Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Subsurface Biogeochemical Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

2

Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

opportunity announcements are posted on the DOE Office of Science Grants and Contracts Web Site and at grants.gov External link . Information about preparing and submitting...

3

Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

» Atmospheric System Research (ASR) » Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

4

Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Earth System Modeling (ESM) Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

5

subsurface science | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

science subsurface science Leads No leads are available at this time. Oxidative Remobilization of Technetium Sequestered by Sulfide-Transformed Nano Zerovalent Iron. Abstract: The...

6

Subsurface Contamination Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

Y. Yuan

2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

7

Subsurface connection methods for subsurface heaters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a first elongated heater in a first opening in the formation. The first elongated heater includes an exposed metal section in a portion of the first opening. The portion is below a layer of the formation to be heated. The exposed metal section is exposed to the formation. A second elongated heater is in a second opening in the formation. The second opening connects to the first opening at or near the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated. At least a portion of an exposed metal section of the second elongated heater is electrically coupled to at least a portion of the exposed metal section of the first elongated heater in the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Bass, Ronald Marshall (Houston, TX); Kim, Dong Sub (Sugar Land, TX); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX); Keltner, Thomas Joseph (Spring, TX); Carl, Jr., Frederick Gordon (Houston, TX)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

8

Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Project is entering a the license application (LA) stage in its mission to develop the nation's first underground nuclear waste repository. After a number of years of gathering data related to site characterization, including activities ranging from laboratory and site investigations, to numerical modeling of processes associated with conditions to be encountered in the future repository, the Project is realigning its activities towards the License Application preparation. At the current stage, the major efforts are directed at translating the results of scientific investigations into sets of data needed to support the design, and to fulfill the licensing requirements and the repository design activities. This document addresses the program need to address specific technical questions so that an assessment can be made about the suitability and adequacy of data to license and construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. In July 2002, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an Integrated Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2002). Included in this report were the Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) Key Technical Issues (KTI). Geotechnical agreements were formulated to resolve a number of KTI subissues, in particular, RDTME KTIs 3.04, 3.05, 3.07, and 3.19 relate to the physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the host rock (NRC 2002, pp. 2.1.1-28, 2.1.7-10 to 2.1.7-21, A-17, A-18, and A-20). The purpose of the Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report is to present an accounting of current geotechnical information that will help resolve KTI subissues and some other project needs. The report analyzes and summarizes available qualified geotechnical data. It evaluates the sufficiency and quality of existing data to support engineering design and performance assessment. In addition, the corroborative data obtained from tests performed by a number of research organizations is presented to reinforce conclusions derived from the pool of data gathered within a full QA-controlled domain. An evaluation of the completeness of the current data is provided with respect to the requirements for geotechnical data to support design and performance assessment.

D. Rigby; M. Mrugala; G. Shideler; T. Davidsavor; J. Leem; D. Buesch; Y. Sun; D. Potyondy; M. Christianson

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

9

Dr J Michael Kuperberg | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Climate and Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) » Dr J Michael Kuperberg Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities

10

ARM Climate Research Facility | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research » Climate and Research » Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) » ARM Climate Research Facility Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER

11

William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) | U.S.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

William R. Wiley Environmental William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

12

Data Management | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Management Data Management Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

13

Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Assessment of Global Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

14

Subsurface contaminants focus area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Radionuclide Sensors for Subsurface Water Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contamination of the subsurface by radionuclides is a persistent and vexing problem for the Department of Energy. These radionuclides must be measured in field studies and monitoed in the long term when they cannot be removed. However, no radionuclide sensors existed for groundwater monitoring prior to this team's research under the EMSP program Detection of a and b decays from radionuclides in water is difficult due to their short ranges in condensed media.

Timothy DeVol

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

Surfactants and subsurface remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of the limitations of pump-and-treat technology, attention is now focused on the feasibility of surfactant use to increase its efficiency. Surfactants have been studied for use in soil washing and enhanced oil recovery. Although similarities exist between the applications, there are significant differences in the objectives of the technologies and the limitations placed on surfactant use. In this article we review environmental studies concerned with the fate and transport of surface-active compounds in the subsurface environment and discuss key issues related to their successful use for in situ aquifer remediation, particularly with respect to nonaqueous-phase liquids.

West, C.C.; Harwell, J.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

EMSL - Subsurface Flow and Transport  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

carbonate (CaCO3) geochemical reactions exert a fundamental control on the evolution of porosity and permeability in shallow-to-deep subsurface siliciclastic and limestone rock...

18

Subsurface Flow and Transport | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

subsurface related to contaminant transport, carbon cycling, enhanced oil recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration. Resources and Techniques Users have access to all the...

19

Subsurface Flow and Transport | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and compare experimental and numerical results to address the nation's most challenging problems in the subsurface related to contaminant transport, carbon cycling, enhanced oil...

20

Crosscutting Subsurface Initiative: Adaptive Control of Subsurface Fractures  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The subsurface provides most of the worlds energy and offers great potential for CO2, nuclear waste, and energy storage. Despite decades of research and recent successes in new extraction methods...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Maintaining Subsurface Drip Irrigation Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A subsurface drip irrigation system should last more than 20 years if properly maintained. Important maintenance procedures include cleaning the filters, flushing the lines, adding chlorine and injecting acids. Details of these procedures...

Enciso, Juan; Porter, Dana; Bordovsky, Jim; Fipps, Guy

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

22

Subsurface Fire Hazards Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results from this report are preliminary and cannot be used as input into documents supporting procurement, fabrication, or construction. This technical report identifies fire hazards and proposes their mitigation for the subsurface repository fire protection system. The proposed mitigation establishes the minimum level of fire protection to meet NRC regulations, DOE fire protection orders, that ensure fire containment, adequate life safety provisions, and minimize property loss. Equipment requiring automatic fire suppression systems is identified. The subsurface fire hazards that are identified can be adequately mitigated.

Logan, R.C.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

23

SUBSURFACE VISUAL ALARM SYSTEM ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ''Subsurface Fire Hazard Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 1998, page 61), and the document, ''Title III Evaluation Report for the Surface and Subsurface Communication System'', (CRWMS M&O 1999a, pages 21 and 23), both indicate the installed communication system is adequate to support Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) activities with the exception of the mine phone system for emergency notification purposes. They recommend the installation of a visual alarm system to supplement the page/party phone system The purpose of this analysis is to identify data communication highway design approaches, and provide justification for the selected or recommended alternatives for the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system. This analysis is being prepared to document a basis for the design selection of the data communication method. This analysis will briefly describe existing data or voice communication or monitoring systems within the ESF, and look at how these may be revised or adapted to support the needed data highway of the subsurface visual alarm. system. The existing PLC communication system installed in subsurface is providing data communication for alcove No.5 ventilation fans, south portal ventilation fans, bulkhead doors and generator monitoring system. It is given that the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system will be a digital based system. It is also given that it is most feasible to take advantage of existing systems and equipment and not consider an entirely new data communication system design and installation. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Briefly review and describe existing available data communication highways or systems within the ESF. (2) Examine technical characteristics of an existing system to disqualify a design alternative is paramount in minimizing the number of and depth of a system review. (3) Apply general engineering design practices or criteria such as relative cost, and degree of difficulty and complexity in determining requirements in adapting existing data communication highways to support the subsurface visual alarm system. These requirements would include such things as added or new communication cables, added Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), Inputs and Outputs (I/O), and communication hardware components, and human machine interfaces and their software operating system. (4) Select the best data communication highway system based on this review of adapting or integrating with existing data communication systems.

D.W. Markman

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

24

EMSL: Science: Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems logo Visualization of CFD-simulated fluid velocities within a single pore space between randomly packed spherical grains Visualization of CFD-simulated fluid velocities within a single pore space between randomly packed spherical grains. The Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems Science Theme focuses on the dynamics of nutrients, metabolites, and contaminants at biogeochemical interfaces in heterogeneous environments across multiple scales. By providing a mechanistic understanding of biogeochemical and microbial processes in soils and the subsurface, and linking those processes via pore-scale hydrological models, EMSL can improve strategies for sustainable solutions to contaminant attenuation, remediation and biogeochemical

25

Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page The below listing provides additional references related to Subsurface & Groundwater Remediation. The references are categorized by documents types (e.g., Strategic Plans, Groundwater Plume Map Booklets, etc.) and under each "document type", there is a list of documents and/or hyperlinks to a reference. The Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page will continue to reflect additional information as it is identified. Strategic Plans Scientific Opportunities to Reduce Risk in Groundwater and Soil Remediation Scientific Opportunities for Monitoring at Environmental Remediation Sites (SOMERS) Groundwater Plume Map Booklets Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites -

26

Method of installing subsurface barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

Nickelson, Reva A. (Shelley, ID); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sloan, Paul A. (Rigby, ID)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

27

U.S. Department of Energy Subsurface Biogeochemical Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research. Click to return to home page. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research. Click to return to home page. Department of Energy Office of Science. Click to visit main DOE SC site. About the Program Research User Facilities PI Meeting Site Map Contact Us About SBR Overview Impact of SBR Research Bibliography Research Abstracts Reports and Documents Document Archive Timeline Related DOE Programs Related Meetings Calendar Contact Information David Lesmes Paul Bayer All SBR Contacts Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Simulation of Pore-Scale Fluid Flow Research Snapshot Approach Bibliography Research Abstracts Research Highlights Performance Measures and Milestones Archive Calls for Proposals Announcements Major Programmatic Components National Laboratory SFAs University-Led Projects

28

Subsurface Synthesis and Characterization of Ag Nanoparticles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Synthesis and Characterization of Ag Nanoparticles Embedded in MgO. Subsurface Synthesis and Characterization of Ag Nanoparticles Embedded in MgO. Abstract: Metal nanoparticles...

29

Effect of Extent of Natural Subsurface Bioreduction on Fe-mineralogy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Extent of Natural Subsurface Bioreduction on Fe-mineralogy of Subsurface Sediments. Effect of Extent of Natural Subsurface Bioreduction on Fe-mineralogy of Subsurface Sediments....

30

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Contractor-Grantee Workshop--Abstracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abiotic Reactions in Hanford 300 Area Subsurface Sedimentsin the subsurface at Hanfords 300 Area. To initially studycore samples from the Hanford 300 Area IFRC site. Uranium

Hazen, Terry C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

JSR-14-Task-013 Subsurface Characterization Letter Report_09192014...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of the state of stress of engineered subsurface systems in order to address major energy and security challenges of the nation. In addition to the engineered subsurface being...

32

Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

33

Wave-Based Subsurface Guide Star  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Astronomical or optical guide stars are either natural or artificial point sources located above the Earth's atmosphere. When imaged from ground-based telescopes, they are distorted by atmospheric effects. Knowing the guide star is a point source, the atmospheric distortions may be estimated and, deconvolved or mitigated in subsequent imagery. Extending the guide star concept to wave-based measurement systems to include acoustic, seismo-acoustic, ultrasonic, and radar, a strong artificial scatterer (either acoustic or electromagnetic) may be buried or inserted, or a pre-existing or natural sub-surface point scatterer may be identified, imaged, and used as a guide star to determine properties of the sub-surface volume. That is, a data collection is performed on the guide star and the sub-surface environment reconstructed or imaged using an optimizer assuming the guide star is a point scatterer. The optimization parameters are the transceiver height and bulk sub-surface background refractive index. Once identified, the refractive index may be used in subsequent reconstructions of sub-surface measurements. The wave-base guide star description presented in this document is for a multimonostatic ground penetrating radar (GPR) but is applicable to acoustic, seismo-acoustic, and ultrasonic measurement systems operating in multimonostatic, multistatic, multibistatic, etc., modes.

Lehman, S K

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

34

Subsurface Science (The Molecular Environmental Science Group) |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Subsurface Science Subsurface Science BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne arrow Subsurface Science The Molecular Environmental Science Group (MESG) The MESG is part of the Biosciences Division at Argonne National Laboratory. One of the main foci during the creation and growth of the MESG has been the development of an internationally recognized integrated multidisciplinary scientific team focused on the investigation of fundamental biogeochemical questions. Presently, expertise that is represented by members of the MES Group includes x-ray Physics, Environmental Chemistry, Environmental Microbiology, (Bio)geochemistry, and radiolimnology. Additional expertise in electron microscopy, x-ray microscopy, Microbial Ecology, and Bioinformatics often is provided by collaborations with scientists outside of our group.

35

Autonomous microexplosives subsurface tracing system final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the autonomous micro-explosive subsurface tracing system is to image the location and geometry of hydraulically induced fractures in subsurface petroleum reservoirs. This system is based on the insertion of a swarm of autonomous micro-explosive packages during the fracturing process, with subsequent triggering of the energetic material to create an array of micro-seismic sources that can be detected and analyzed using existing seismic receiver arrays and analysis software. The project included investigations of energetic mixtures, triggering systems, package size and shape, and seismic output. Given the current absence of any technology capable of such high resolution mapping of subsurface structures, this technology has the potential for major impact on petroleum industry, which spends approximately $1 billion dollar per year on hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States alone.

Engler, Bruce Phillip; Nogan, John; Melof, Brian Matthew; Uhl, James Eugene; Dulleck, George R., Jr.; Ingram, Brian V.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Rivas, Raul R.; Cooper, Paul W.; Warpinski, Norman Raymond; Kravitz, Stanley H.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Bass, Ronald M. (Houston, TX)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

37

Heating systems for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

38

Methods for forming long subsurface heaters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming a longitudinal subsurface heater includes longitudinally welding an electrically conductive sheath of an insulated conductor heater along at least one longitudinal strip of metal. The longitudinal strip is formed into a tubular around the insulated conductor heater with the insulated conductor heater welded along the inside surface of the tubular.

Kim, Dong Sub

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

39

Carbon Tetrachloride Flow and Transport in the Subsurface of...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Tetrachloride Flow and Transport in the Subsurface of the 216-Z-9 Trench at the Hanford Site. Carbon Tetrachloride Flow and Transport in the Subsurface of the 216-Z-9 Trench...

40

Wind Power Today, 2010, Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP) ...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

& Publications Wind Program Accomplishments Final Report DE-EE0005380 - Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems A...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Probable hydrologic effects of subsurface mining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This case history provides information on the ground-water system and presents the results of an analysis of present and future hydrologic effects of coal mining in the Appalachian coal basin. Although emphasis is on the probable hydrologic effects due to subsurface mining, examples and discussions are equally applicable to surface mine problems. The case history is based on an ongoing study in Greene County which will be completed in 1983. Cooperators in this project were the Pennsylvania Geologic and Topographic Survey and the Greene County Commissioners. The study stemmed from local interest in the rural water supply of the county which is predominantly groundwater.

Stoner, J.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Parallel heater system for subsurface formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heating system for a subsurface formation is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of substantially horizontally oriented or inclined heater sections located in a hydrocarbon containing layer in the formation. At least a portion of two of the heater sections are substantially parallel to each other. The ends of at least two of the heater sections in the layer are electrically coupled to a substantially horizontal, or inclined, electrical conductor oriented substantially perpendicular to the ends of the at least two heater sections.

Harris, Christopher Kelvin (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

43

Low temperature monitoring system for subsurface barriers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for monitoring temperature of a subsurface low temperature zone is described. The system includes a plurality of freeze wells configured to form the low temperature zone, one or more lasers, and a fiber optic cable coupled to at least one laser. A portion of the fiber optic cable is positioned in at least one freeze well. At least one laser is configured to transmit light pulses into a first end of the fiber optic cable. An analyzer is coupled to the fiber optic cable. The analyzer is configured to receive return signals from the light pulses.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); McKinzie, II. Billy John (Houston, TX)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

44

Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Lead Laboratory Providing Technical Assistance to the DOE Weapons Complex in Subsurface Contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA), a DOE-HQ EM-50 organization, is hosted and managed at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. SCFA is an integrated program chartered to find technology and scientific solutions to address DOE subsurface environmental restoration problems throughout the DOE Weapons Complex. Since its inception in 1989, the SCFA program has resulted in a total of 269 deployments of 83 innovative technologies. Until recently, the primary thrust of the program has been to develop, demonstrate, and deploy those remediation technology alternatives that are solutions to technology needs identified by the DOE Sites. Over the last several years, the DOE Sites began to express a need not only for innovative technologies, but also for technical assistance. In response to this need, DOE-HQ EM-50, in collaboration with and in support of a Strategic Lab Council recommendation directed each of its Focus Areas to implement a Lead Laboratory Concept to enhance their technical capabilities. Because each Focus Area is unique as defined by the contrast in either the type of contaminants involved or the environments in which they are found, the Focus Areas were given latitude in how they set up and implemented the Lead Lab Concept. The configuration of choice for the SCFA was a Lead-Partner Lab arrangement. Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) teamed with the SCFA as the Focus Area's Lead Laboratory. SRTC then partnered with the DOE National Laboratories to create a virtual consulting function within DOE. The National Laboratories were established to help solve the Nation's most difficult problems, drawing from a resource pool of the most talented and gifted scientists and engineers. Following that logic, SRTC, through the Lead-Partner Lab arrangement, has that same resource base to draw from to provide assistance to any SCFA DOE customer throughout the Complex. This paper briefly describes how this particular arrangement is organized and provides case histories that illustrate its strengths in solving problems and offering solutions. The program is designed to minimize red tape, maximize value, and to rapidly and cost effectively disseminate solutions to common problems facing the DOE.

Wright, J. A. Jr.; Corey, J. C.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

45

Grand Challenges: Request for Information on the Subsurface ...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

resources while mitigating impacts of their use constitute major technical and socio-political challenges and opportunities. Next generation advances in subsurface technologies...

46

Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso geothermal reservoir by analyzing shear-wave splitting of...

47

Evaluation of subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to solid earth tidal strain Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Evaluation of...

48

Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

setting for researchers in both applied and basic science fields. A wealth of subsurface data is available to support research activities and remedial decision making. Led by the...

49

Historical Perspective on Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Success: Counting the Things That Really Count  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area, (SCFA) is committed to, and has been accountable for, identifying and providing solutions for the most pressing subsurface contamination problems in the DOE Complex. The SCFA program is a DOE end user focused and problem driven organization that provides the best technical solutions for the highest priority problems. This paper will discuss in some detail specific examples of the most successful, innovative technical solutions and the DOE sites where they were deployed or demonstrated. These solutions exhibited outstanding performance in FY 2000/2001 and appear poised to achieve significant success in saving end users money and time. They also provide a reduction in risk to the environment, workers, and the public while expediting environmental clean up of the sites.

Wright, J. A. Jr.; Middleman, L. I.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

50

Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone Contamination at Hanford Site Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone Contamination at Hanford Site May 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Shown here are high-resolution, three-dimensional ERT images of contaminant distribution Shown here are high-resolution, three-dimensional ERT images of contaminant distribution RICHLAND, Wash. - Cold War waste disposal practices resulted in both planned and unplanned releases of large amounts of radionuclide and heavy metal contamination into the subsurface throughout the DOE complex. Characterizing the distribution of the resulting environmental contamination remains one of the single most significant challenges limiting subsurface remediation and closure, particularly for the

51

Optimal joule heating of the subsurface  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating is disclosed. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

Berryman, J.G.; Daily, W.D.

1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

52

Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

Richard C. Logan

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

53

Programming  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

provided on the Cray systems at NERSC. The Programming Environment is managed by a meta-module named similar to "PrgEnv-gnu4.6". The "gnu" indicates that it is providing the GNU...

54

Poster on Subsurface Technology & Engineering Research, Development, and Demonstration Crosscut (SubTER)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A new DOE Subsurface Crosscut, known as SubTER, coalesces energy technologies that use the subsurface for energy production, storage, and waste management.

55

Development of Enabling Scientific Tools to Characterize the Geologic Subsurface at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report to the Department of Energy provides a summary of activities conducted under our exploratory grant, funded through U.S. DOE Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program in the category of enabling scientific tools, which covers the period from July 15, 2010 to July 14, 2013. The main goal of this exploratory project is to determine the parameters necessary to translate existing borehole log data into reservoir properties following scientifically sound petrophysical relationships. For this study, we focused on samples and Ge-based spectral gamma logging system (SGLS) data collected from wells located in the Hanford 300 Area. The main activities consisted of 1) the analysis of available core samples for a variety of mineralogical, chemical and physical; 2) evaluation of selected spectral gamma logs, environmental corrections, and calibration; 3) development of algorithms and a proposed workflow that permits translation of log responses into useful reservoir properties such as lithology, matrix density, porosity, and permeability. These techniques have been successfully employed in the petroleum industry; however, the approach is relatively new when applied to subsurface remediation. This exploratory project has been successful in meeting its stated objectives. We have demonstrated that our approach can lead to an improved interpretation of existing well log data. The algorithms we developed can utilize available log data, in particular gamma, and spectral gamma logs, and continued optimization will improve their application to ERSP goals of understanding subsurface properties.

Kenna, Timothy C.; Herron, Michael M.

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

56

EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at 331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal for the Rock Springs In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Test Site remediation that would be performed at the Rock Springs site in Sweetwater County, Wyoming. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Finding of No Significant Impact Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Final Environmental Assessment

57

PNNL: Biological Sciences - A Subsurface Science Scientific Focus Area -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Role of Microenvironments and Transition Zones in Subsurface Reactive Role of Microenvironments and Transition Zones in Subsurface Reactive Contaminant Transport Subsurface Science Scientific Focus Area (SFA) The Subsurface Science Scientific Focus Area (SFA) is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The SFA team is performing integrated, multidisciplinary, science-theme-focused research on the role of microenvironments and transition zones in the reactive transport of technetium (Tc), uranium (U), and plutonium (Pu). The primary environmental system being studied is the groundwater-river interaction zone in the 300 area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Ringold Sediments Redox boundary in Ringold sediments about 2.5 m below the Hanford-Ringold contact. The boundary is the point where oxygen and other terminal electron

58

Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Single-Well and Surface-to-Well Induction Logging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Single-Well and Surface-to-Well Induction Logging Abstract Extended logging and surface-to-borehole electromagnetic induction measurements were performed at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field as part of an ongoing effort to employ electromagnetic induction logging to geothermal reservoir characterization. The principal goal of this effort is to discern subsurface features useful in geothermal production, such as larger scale mapping of geothermal reservoirs and smaller scale mapping of producing

59

High-resolution subsurface water-ice distributions on Mars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Theoretical models indicate that water ice is stable in the shallow subsurface (depths of water-ice table that steadily increases in depth with decreasing latitude. More detailed modelling has ...

Joshua L. Bandfield

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

60

2014 JASON Report: State of Stress in Engineered Subsurface Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A new report by an independent panel recommends that the Energy Department take a leading role in understanding subsurface systems to better address the nations energy and security issues. JASON ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DOE Solicits Feedback on Subsurface Characterization to Commercialize Viable EGS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To better engineer commercially viable EGS technologies, the Energy Department is soliciting information to more accurately measure and quantify vital subsurface parameters in EGS settings and how they change throughout EGS development phases.

62

Neutron and Gamma Ray Scattering Measurements for Subsurface Geochemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...subsurface porous rocks that covers...definition ofa reservoir is made more...extent, porosity, hydrocarbon...possibility for the reservoir to be profitable...assessment of rock formation...reservoir quality. The selection...ofporosity, permeability, and hydrocarbon...

Darwin V. Ellis

1990-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

63

On the use of drogues for measuring subsurface ocean currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Drogues are frequently used to measure ocean currents. Wind drag and subsurface drag on the ... , as well as non-linear effects of current velocity gradients, can cause slippage past the ... must be considered wh...

Dr. David A. Booth

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Installing a Subsurface Drip Irrigation System for Row Crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication describes the components of a subsurface drip irrigation system and the procedure for installing such a system. Each step is outlined and illustrated. Steps include tape injection, trenching, connecting drip lines, back-filling...

Enciso, Juan

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

65

Channel erosion due to subsurface flow Braunen Smith,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Channel erosion due to subsurface flow Braunen Smith,1 Arshad Kudrolli,1 Alexander E. Lobkovsky,2, and D. H. Rothman, J. Fluid Mech. 503, 357 2004 . 2 A. E. Lobkovsky, B. Smith, A. Kudrolli, D. C. Mohrig

Kudrolli, Arshad

66

BOD5 removal in subsurface flow constructed wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The frequency of on-site systems for treatment of domestic wastewater is increasing with new residential development in both rural and low-density suburban areas. Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCW) have emerged as a viable option to achieve...

Melton, Rebecca Hobbs

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

67

Laboratory simulation of subsurface airflow beneath a building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vapor intrusion is the vapor-phase migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings due to subsurface soil or groundwater contamination. Oxygen replenishment rates beneath a building are significant for ...

Corsello, Joseph William

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Long-term hydraulic properties of subsurface flow constructed wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LONG-TERM HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES OF SUBSURFACE FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS A Thesis by GLENN ALLEN TURNER Submitted to the Office of Graduate studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1994 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering LONG-TERM HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES OF SUBSURFACE FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS by GLENN ALLEN TURNER Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfdlment of the requirements for the degree...

Turner, Glenn Allen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

69

Subsurface distributions of petroleum from an offshore well blowout. The Ixtoc I blowout, Bay of Campeche  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Subsurface distributions of petroleum from an offshore well blowout. ... Photochemistry of Deepwater Horizon Oil ...

Paul D. Boehm; David L. Fiest

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Enhancing technology acceptance: The role of the subsurface contaminants focus area external integration team  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE is developing and deploying innovative technologies for cleaning up its contaminated facilities using a market-oriented approach. This report describes the activities of the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area`s (SCFA) External Integration Team (EIT) in supporting DOE`s technology development program. The SCFA program for technology development is market-oriented, driven by the needs of end users. The purpose of EIT is to understand the technology needs of the DOE sites and identify technology acceptance criteria from users and other stakeholders to enhance deployment of innovative technologies. Stakeholders include regulators, technology users, Native Americans, and environmental and other interest groups. The success of this national program requires close coordination and communication among technology developers and stakeholders to work through all of the various phases of planning and implementation. Staff involved must be willing to commit significant amounts of time to extended discussions with the various stakeholders.

Kirwan-Taylor, H.; McCabe, G.H. [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States); Lesperance, A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kauffman, J.; Serie, P.; Dressen, L. [EnvironIssues (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Intercellular Genomics of Subsurface Microbial Colonies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes progress in the second year of this project. The objective is to develop methods and software to predict the spatial configuration, properties and temporal evolution of microbial colonies in the subsurface. To accomplish this, we integrate models of intracellular processes, cell-host medium exchange and reaction-transport dynamics on the colony scale. At the conclusion of the project, we aim to have the foundations of a predictive mathematical model and software that captures the three scales of these systems the intracellular, pore, and colony wide spatial scales. In the second year of the project, we refined our transcriptional regulatory network discovery (TRND) approach that utilizes gene expression data along with phylogenic similarity and gene ontology analyses and applied it successfully to E.coli, human B cells, and Geobacter sulfurreducens. We have developed a new Web interface, GeoGen, which is tailored to the reconstruction of microbial TRNs and solely focuses on Geobacter as one of DOEs high priority microbes. Our developments are designed such that the frameworks for the TRND and GeoGen can readily be used for other microbes of interest to the DOE. In the context of modeling a single bacterium, we are actively pursuing both steady-state and kinetic approaches. The steady-state approach is based on a flux balance that uses maximizing biomass growth rate as its objective, subjected to various biochemical constraints, for the optimal values of reaction rates and uptake/release of metabolites. For the kinetic approach, we use Karyote, a rigorous cell model developed by us for an earlier DOE grant and the DARPA BioSPICE Project. We are also investigating the interplay between bacterial colonies and environment at both pore and macroscopic scales. The pore scale models use detailed representations for realistic porous media accounting for the distribution of grain size whereas the macroscopic models employ the Darcy-type flow equations and up-scaled advective-diffusive transport equations for chemical species. We are rigorously testing the relationship between these two scales by evaluating macroscopic parameters using the volume averaging methodology applied to pore scale model results.

Ortoleva, Peter; Tuncay, Kagan; Gannon, Dennis; Meile, Christof

2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

72

Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Extremophiles 2004 Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles SEPTEMBER 19 -23, 2004 CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles © 2004, American Society for Microbiology 1752 N Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20036-2904 Phone: 202-737-3600 World Wide Web: www.asm.org All Rights Reserved Printed in the United States of America ISBN: 1-55581 324-0 TABLE OF CONTENTS General Information Scientific Program Abstracts for Oral Sessions Abstracts for Poster Sessions Index 4 10 18 42 144 4 ASM Conferences EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Frank Robb, Chair University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute Michael W. Adams University of Georgia Koki Horikoshi Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology Robert M. Kelly North Carolina State University Jennifer Littlechild

73

Evaluation of subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to solid earth tidal strain Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Evaluation of subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to solid earth tidal strain Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The nature of solid earth tidal strain and surface load deformation due to the influence of gravitational forces and barometric pressure loading are discussed. The pore pressure response to these types of deformation is investigated in detail, including the cases of a confined aquifer intersected by a well and a discrete fracture intersected by a well. The integration of the tidal response method with conventional pump tests in order to independently calculate the hydraulic parameters of the

74

Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso geothermal subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso geothermal reservoir by analyzing shear-wave splitting of microearthquake seismorgrams Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso geothermal reservoir by analyzing shear-wave splitting of microearthquake seismorgrams Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A large number of microearthquake seismograms have been recorded by a downhole, three-component seismic network deployed around the Coso, California geothermal reservoir. Shear-wave splitting induced by the alignment of cracks in the reservoir has been widely observed in the recordings. Over 100 events with body wave magnitude greater than 1.0 from

75

Subsurface Stratigraphy, Structure, and Alteration in the Senator Thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Subsurface Stratigraphy, Structure, and Alteration in the Senator Thermal Subsurface Stratigraphy, Structure, and Alteration in the Senator Thermal Area, Northern Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada-Initial Results from Injection Well 38-32, and a New Structural Scenario for the Stillwater Escarpment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Subsurface Stratigraphy, Structure, and Alteration in the Senator Thermal Area, Northern Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada-Initial Results from Injection Well 38-32, and a New Structural Scenario for the Stillwater Escarpment Abstract Two injection wells (DV 38-32 and DV 27-32) in the Senator thermal area of the northern Dixie Valley geothermal field supply all the injectate reaching the field's northernmost group of production wells. These injectors are also the only wells in the field drilled between the surface

76

Neutron and Gamma Ray Scattering Measurements for Subsurface Geochemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...subsurface porous rocks that covers a large...academic definition ofa reservoir is made more precise...areal extent, porosity, hydrocarbon content...possibility for the reservoir to be profitable...the assessment of rock formation properties...analyses ofporosity, permeability, and hydrocarbon...

Darwin V. Ellis

1990-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

77

The use of seismic anisotropy for characterizing subsurface fracture ori-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of seismic anisotropy for characterizing subsurface fracture ori- entations and intensity anisotropy as a routine technique for fracture characterization is partly because of its inability to pro- vide information about sizes and vol- ume of fractures. Although both grain-scale micro

Edinburgh, University of

78

Heating subsurface formations by oxidizing fuel on a fuel carrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of heating a portion of a subsurface formation includes drawing fuel on a fuel carrier through an opening formed in the formation. Oxidant is supplied to the fuel at one or more locations in the opening. The fuel is combusted with the oxidant to provide heat to the formation.

Costello, Michael; Vinegar, Harold J.

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

79

Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE's Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In 1998 a 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to determine if modern seismic techniques could be successfully applied in geothermal environments. Furthermore, it was intended to map the structural features which may control geothermal production in the reservoir. The results

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Using electrical impedance tomography to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The use of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity. EIT can be used to map hydraulic conductivity in the subsurface where measurements of both amplitude and phase are made. Hydraulic conductivity depends on at least two parameters: porosity and a length scale parameter. Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) measures and maps electrical conductivity (which can be related to porosity) in three dimensions. By introducing phase measurements along with amplitude, the desired additional measurement of a pertinent length scale can be achieved. Hydraulic conductivity controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the surface. Thus inexpensive maps of hydraulic conductivity would improve planning strategies for subsequent remediation efforts. Fluid permeability is also of importance for oil field exploitation and thus detailed knowledge of fluid permeability distribution in three-dimension (3-D) would be a great boon to petroleum reservoir analysts.

Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Roberts, Jeffery J. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media. The code is designed specifically to handle complex multi-layer and/or heterogeneous aquifer systems in an efficient manner and accommodates a wide range of boundary conditions. Additionally, 1-D and 2-D (in Cartesian coordinates) problems are handled in FACT by simply limiting the number of elements in a particular direction(s) to one. The governing equations in FACT are formulated only in Cartesian coordinates.

Aleman, S.E.

1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

83

A VSP transformation technique for the determination of subsurface structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the dominant wavelength. With the surface reflection profiling technique, resolution typically ranges from tens to hundreds of meters. With this degree of resolution, a detailed understanding of the subsurface is hard to achieve, In a vertical seismic... Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Terry W. Spencer An algorithm was developed which transforms a vertical seismic profile (VSP) from the time-depth domain into the offset-time domain. The procedure operates by calculating the dips of the reflectors...

Malloy, Jeffrey Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

84

Chitinozoans in the subsurface Lower Paleozoic of West Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS October 22, 1971 Paper 54 CHITINOZOANS IN THE SUBSURFACE LOWER PALEOZOIC OF WEST TEXAS A. E. KAUFFMAN Humble Oil & Refining Company, Midland, Texas ABSTRACT Studies based on both comprehensive... with known lithologie in- tervals and electric logs. These fossils were re- covered from most lithologies. Chert, including novaculite and tripolitic types, and dark micritic 4 The University of Kansas Paleontological ContributionsPaper 54 limestone yield...

Kauffman, A. E.

1971-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

85

Interdependency of Subsurface Carbon Distribution and Graphene-Catalyst Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interdependency of Subsurface Carbon Distribution and Graphene? Catalyst Interaction Robert S. Weatherup,*, Hakim Amara, Raoul Blume, Bruno Dlubak,?,? Bernhard C. Bayer, Mamadou Diarra,?,# Mounib Bahri, Andrea Cabrero-Vilatela, Sabina Caneva... , France * S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The dynamics of the graphene?catalyst interaction during chemical vapor deposition are investigated using in situ, time- and depth- resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and complementary grand canonical...

Weatherup, Robert S.; Amara, Hakim; Blume, Raoul; Dlubak, Bruno; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Diarra, Mamadou; Bahri, Mounib; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Caneva, Sabina; Kidambi, Piran R.; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Deranlot, Cyrile; Seneor, Pierre; Schloegl, Robert; Ducastelle, Franois; Bichara, Christophe; Hofmann, Stephan

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

86

Chapter 28 - Nanotechnology for Contaminated Subsurface Remediation: Possibilities and Challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Groundwater represents a significant source of potable and industrial process water throughout the world. With population growth the availability of this precise resource is becoming increasingly scarce. Historically, the subsurface was thought to act as a natural filter of wastes injected into the ground. The potential for these wastes to persist in the subsurface for decades, potentially contaminating drinking water sources was ignored. Not only do toxic compounds have significant detrimental impacts on the environment and human health, there are also economic and social costs associated with contaminated groundwater. Due to increased demands on groundwater resources and historical contamination there is a need to remediate contaminated groundwater to meet current and future demands. At many hazardous sites, however, current remediation technologies routinely defy attempts at satisfactory restoration. As a result new, innovative remediation technologies are required. Nanomaterials are receiving widespread interest in a variety of fields due to their unique, beneficial chemical, physical, and mechanical properties. They have recently been proposed to address a number of environmental problems including the remediation of the contaminated subsurface. A wide variety of nanoparticles, such as metallic (e.g., zero valent iron or bimetallic nanoparticles) and carbon based nanoparticles (e.g., C60 nanoparticles) have been investigated to assess their potential for contaminated site remediation. Studies suggest that nanoparticles have the ability to convert or sequester a wide variety of subsurface contaminants (e.g., chlorinated solvents and heavy metals). In addition they are more reactive than similar, larger sized, reactive materials. The majority of these studies have, however, been conducted at the batch scale. Considerable work is necessary prior to the application of nanotechnology for contaminated site remediation. One problem, for example, is the delivery of reactive nanometals to the contaminated source zone where they will react. This chapter will summarize the use of nanoparticles for contaminated site remediation and highlight some of the challenges that remain unresolved.

Denis M. OCarroll

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Evaluation of the application uniformity of subsurface drip distribution systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. .......................................................................................13 Table 3. Recommended acid concentration to treat water (Netafim, 2000a)................15 Table 4. Methods of comparison of statistical uniformity (ASAE, 1999). ...................19 Table 5. Evaluation of type Y emitter flow rates... is This thesis is written to conform to the style of Transactions of the ASAE. 2 essential for proper treatment of wastewater. Subsurface drip distribution systems can be used in these areas, but the effects of different site conditions and drip emitter...

Weynand, Vance Leo

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

Downhole burner systems and methods for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas burner assembly for heating a subsurface formation includes an oxidant conduit, a fuel conduit, and a plurality of oxidizers coupled to the oxidant conduit. At least one of the oxidizers includes a mix chamber for mixing fuel from the fuel conduit with oxidant from the oxidant conduit, an igniter, and a shield. The shield includes a plurality of openings in communication with the oxidant conduit. At least one flame stabilizer is coupled to the shield.

Farmayan, Walter Farman (Houston, TX); Giles, Steven Paul (Damon, TX); Brignac, Jr., Joseph Phillip (Katy, TX); Munshi, Abdul Wahid (Houston, TX); Abbasi, Faraz (Sugarland, TX); Clomburg, Lloyd Anthony (Houston, TX); Anderson, Karl Gregory (Missouri City, TX); Tsai, Kuochen (Katy, TX); Siddoway, Mark Alan (Katy, TX)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

Multi-step heater deployment in a subsurface formation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for installing a horizontal or inclined subsurface heater includes placing a heating section of a heater in a horizontal or inclined section of a wellbore with an installation tool. The tool is uncoupled from the heating section. A lead in section is mechanically and electrically coupled to the heating section of the heater. The lead-in section is located in an angled or vertical section of the wellbore.

Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

90

CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR SUBSURFACE DEVELOPMENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface development transportation structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P7 ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

R. Garrett

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research FY11 Second Quarter Performance Measure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Long Term Measure for 2011 under the Performance Assessment Rating Tool (PART) measure is to "Refine subsurface transport models by developing computational methods to link important processes impacting contaminant transport at smaller scales to the field scale." The second quarter performance measure is to "Provide a report on computational methods linking genome-enabled understanding of microbial metabolism with reactive transport models to describe processes impacting contaminant transport in the subsurface." Microorganisms such as bacteria are by definition small (typically on the order of a micron in size), and their behavior is controlled by their local biogeochemical environment (typically within a single pore or a biofilm on a grain surface, on the order of tens of microns in size). However, their metabolic activity exerts strong influence on the transport and fate of groundwater contaminants of significant concern at DOE sites, in contaminant plumes with spatial extents of meters to kilometers. This report describes progress and key findings from research aimed at integrating models of microbial metabolism based on genomic information (small scale) with models of contaminant fate and transport in aquifers (field scale).

Scheibe, Timothy D.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

Methods and system for subsurface stabilization using jet grouting  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and systems are provided for stabilizing a subsurface area such as a buried waste pit for either long term storage, or interim storage and retrieval. A plurality of holes are drilled into the subsurface area with a high pressure drilling system provided with a drill stem having jet grouting nozzles. A grouting material is injected at high pressure through the jet grouting nozzles into a formed hole while the drill stem is withdrawn from the hole at a predetermined rate of rotation and translation. A grout-filled column is thereby formed with minimal grout returns, which when overlapped with other adjacent grout-filled columns encapsulates and binds the entire waste pit area to form a subsurface agglomeration or monolith of grout, soil, and waste. The formed monolith stabilizes the buried waste site against subsidence while simultaneously providing a barrier against contaminate migration. The stabilized monolith can be left permanently in place or can be retrieved if desired by using appropriate excavation equipment. The jet grouting technique can also be utilized in a pretreatment approach prior to in situ vitrification of a buried waste site. The waste encapsulation methods and systems are applicable to buried waste materials such as mixed waste, hazardous waste, or radioactive waste.

Loomis, Guy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Weidner, Jerry R. (Iona, ID); Farnsworth, Richard K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jessmore, James J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Linking deposit morphology and clogging in subsurface remediation: Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater is a crucial resource for water supply, especially in arid and semiarid areas of the United States west of the 100th meridian. Accordingly, remediation of contaminated groundwater is an important application of science and technology, particularly for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which oversees a number of groundwater remediation sites from Cold War era mining. Groundwater remediation is complex, because it depends on identifying, locating, and treating contaminants in the subsurface, where remediation reactions depend on interacting geological, hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological factors. Within this context, permeability is a fundamental concept, because it controls the rates and pathways of groundwater flow. Colloid science is intimately related to permeability, because when colloids are present (particles with equivalent diameters between 1 nanometer and 10 micrometers), changes in hydrological or geochemical conditions can trigger a detrimental reduction in permeability called clogging. Accordingly, clogging is a major concern in groundwater remediation. Several lines of evidence suggest that clogging by colloids depends on (1) colloid deposition, and (2) deposit morphology, that is, the structure of colloid deposits, which can be quantified as a fractal dimension. This report describes research, performed under a 2-year, exploratory grant from the DOEs Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) program. This research employed a novel laboratory technique to simultaneously measure flow, colloid deposition, deposit morphology, and permeability in a flow cell, and also collected field samples from wells at the DOEs Old Rifle remediation site. Field results indicate that suspended solids at the Old Rifle site have fractal structures. Laboratory results indicate that clogging is associated with colloid deposits with smaller fractal dimensions, in accordance with previous studies on initially clean granular media. Preliminary modeling has identified the deposit radius of gyration as a candidate variable to account for clogging as a function of (1) colloid accumulation and (2) deposit morphology.

Mays, David C. [University of Colorado Denver

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

94

Subsurface barrier design alternatives for confinement and controlled advection flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various technologies and designs are being considered to serve as subsurface barriers to confine or control contaminant migration from underground waste storage or disposal structures containing radioactive and hazardous wastes. Alternatives including direct-coupled flood and controlled advection designs are described as preconceptual examples. Prototype geotechnical equipment for testing and demonstration of these alternative designs tested at the Hanford Geotechnical Development and Test Facility and the Hanford Small-Tube Lysimeter Facility include mobile high-pressure injectors and pumps, mobile transport and pumping units, vibratory and impact pile drivers, and mobile batching systems. Preliminary laboratory testing of barrier materials and additive sequestering agents have been completed and are described.

Phillips, S.J.; Stewart, W.E.; Alexander, R.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, K.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); McLaughlin, T.J. [Bovay Northwest Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Subsurface Facies Analysis of the Devonian Berea Sandstone in Southeastern Ohio.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??James Evans, AdvisorThe Devonian Berea Sandstone is an internally complex, heterogeneous unit that appears prominently both in outcrop and subsurface in Ohio. While the unit (more)

Garnes, William Thomas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Dissemination and visualisation of earth system models for the Dutch subsurface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For more than a century, geological surveys have gathered a great amount of subsurface data. Within the last decade, major technological advancements have revolutionised geoscience interpretations. Multidiscip...

Jan-Diederik van Wees; Rob Versseput

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Influence of Mg2+ on CaCO3 precipitation during subsurface reactive...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

under flow and mixing conditions similar to those in subsurface aquifers. Citation: Boyd V, H Yoon, C Zhang, M Oostrom, NJ Hess, BW Fouke, AJ Valocchi, and CJ...

98

Modeling subsurface contaminant reactions and transport at the watershed scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this research are: (1) to numerically examine the multiscale effects of physical and chemical mass transfer processes on watershed scale, variably saturated subsurface contaminant transport, and (2) to conduct numerical simulations on watershed scale reactive solute transport and evaluate their implications to uncertainty characterization and cost benefit analysis. Concurrent physical and chemical nonequilibrium caused by inter aggregate gradients of pressure head and solute concentration and intra-aggregate geochemical and microbiological processes, respectively, may arise at various scales and flowpaths. To this date, experimental investigations of these complex processes at watershed scale remain a challenge and numerical studies are often needed for guidance of water resources management and decision making. This research integrates the knowledge bases developed during previous experimental and numerical investigations at a proposed waste disposal site at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the concurrent effects of physical and chemical nonequilibrium. Comparison of numerical results with field data indicates that: (1) multiregion, preferential flow and solute transport exist under partially saturated condition and can be confirmed theoretically, and that (2) mass transfer between pore regions is an important process influencing contaminant movement in the subsurface. Simulations of watershed scale, multi species reactive solute transport suggest that dominance of geochemistry and hydrodynamics may occur simultaneously at different locales and influence the movement of one species relative to another. Execution times on the simulations of the reactive solute transport model also indicate that the model is ready to assist the selection of important parameters for site characterization.

Gwo, J.P.; Jardine, P.M.; D`Azevedo, E.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilson, G.V. [Desert Research Inst., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Advanced Polymer Technology for Containing and Immobilizing Strontium-90 in the Subsurface - 8361  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many Department of Energy (DOE) sites, including Idaho and Hanford, have heavy metals and/or radionuclides (e.g. strontium-90) present that are strongly adsorbed in the vadose zone, but which nevertheless are propagating toward the water table. A key challenge for immobilization of these contaminants is bringing the chosen amendment or remediation technology into contact with the contaminated porous medium, while ensuring that contaminated water and colloids do not escape. This is particularly challenging when the subsurface geology is complex and highly heterogeneous, as is the case at many DOE sites. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in collaboration with the University of Texas at Austin (UT) has conducted research sponsored through the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) Advanced Remediation Technologies Phase I program that successfully demonstrated application of a novel, pH-triggered advanced polymer for creating a physical barrier that prevents heavy metals and radionuclides in vadose zone soil and soil-pore water from migrating to the groundwater. The focus of this paper is on the column and sandbox experiments conducted by researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory in support of the Phase I program objectives. Proof of these concepts provides a technology basis for confining or isolating a volume of contaminated groundwater, to be implemented in future investigations at the Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP) at INL.

K. Baker; G. Heath; C. Scott; A. Schafer; S. Bryant; M. Sharma; C. Huh; S. K. Choi

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Quantification of subsurface heat storage in a GCM simulation Andrew H. MacDougall,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the subsurface of the GCM ECHO-G. With a 600-m BBC and driven by ECHO-G future temperatures, the FDLSM subsurface absorbs 6.2 (7.5) times more heat than the ECHO-G soil model (10 m deep) under the Intergovernmental Panel

Beltrami, Hugo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Protozoa in Subsurface Sediments from Sites Contaminated with Aviation Gasoline or Jet Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with Aviation Gasoline or Jet Fuel James L. Sinclair 1 * Don H...of aviation gasoline and jet fuel spill areas at a Coast Guard...aerobic bacteria, protozoa, algae, and fungae in deep subsurface...aviation gasoline and JP-4 jet fuel in subsurface core samples...

James L. Sinclair; Don H. Kampbell; Mike L. Cook; John T. Wilson

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

FACT (Version 2.0) - Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media.

Aleman, S.E.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

103

To appear in the SIGGRAPH conference proceedings A Practical Model for Subsurface Light Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be simulated accurately but slowly by solving the full radiative transfer equation [1]. Only a few papersTo appear in the SIGGRAPH conference proceedings A Practical Model for Subsurface Light Transport introduces a simple model for subsurface light transport in translucent materials. The model enables

Stanford University

104

Surface and Subsurface Geochemical Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface and Subsurface Geochemical Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil C. Magnier1, V Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil -- This paper presents a surface and subsurface geochemical survey of the Buracica EOR-CO2 field onshore Brazil. We adopted a methodology coupling the stable

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

105

Experiences and Challenges Scaling PFLOTRAN, a PETSc-based Code for Subsurface Reactive Flow Simulations,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, groundwater, solvers 1 Introduction Over the past several decades, subsurface (ground- water) flow these simplified ground- water models are still in wide use, advances in subsurface science have enabled and the efficacy of proposed remediation strategies for legacy waste sites. For years, traditional models

Mills, Richard

106

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Jerry P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

107

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Jerry P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

108

Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 4 Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study Schematic of soil-gas and contaminant transport into a slab-on-grade building at a former service station site. Three effects are illustrated that can contribute to reducing the amount of contaminant available for entry into the building: biodegradation by soil microorganisms; a layer of soil that limits diffusive movement of the contaminant; and wind-driven ventilation of the soil below the building. Not illustrated are the effects of ventilation on contaminant concentrations inside the building. The transport of soil-gas-borne contaminants into buildings has been documented as a significant source of human exposure to some pollutants indoors; one example is radon, which has received widespread public

109

Ranging methods for developing wellbores in subsurface formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming two or more wellbores in a subsurface formation includes forming a first wellbore in the formation. A second wellbore is directionally drilled in a selected relationship relative to the first wellbore. At least one magnetic field is provided in the second wellbore using one or more magnets in the second wellbore located on a drilling string used to drill the second wellbore. At least one magnetic field is sensed in the first wellbore using at least two sensors in the first wellbore as the magnetic field passes by the at least two sensors while the second wellbore is being drilled. A position of the second wellbore is continuously assessed relative to the first wellbore using the sensed magnetic field. The direction of drilling of the second wellbore is adjusted so that the second wellbore remains in the selected relationship relative to the first wellbore.

MacDonald, Duncan (Houston, TX)

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

110

Development of microwave and millimeter-wave integrated-circuit stepped-frequency radar sensors for surface and subsurface profiling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) for various surface and subsurface applications, such as profiling the surface and subsurface of pavements, detecting and localizing small buried Anti-Personnel (AP) mines and measuring the liquid level in a tank. These sensors meet the critical requirements...

Park, Joongsuk

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

111

EMSL: Science: Research and Capability Development Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Intramural Research & Capability Development Program Intramural Research & Capability Development Program The EMSL Intramural Research and Capability Development Program facilitates development of new research tools and enables EMSL staff members to advance the important skills and expertise necessary to enhance the EMSL user program. These intramural projects are intended to increase the scientific visibility of EMSL staff in areas that promote the objectives of EMSL's three science themes- Biological Interactions and Dynamics, Geochemistry/Biogeochemistry and Subsurface Science, and Science of Interfacial Phenomena. Technical outcomes of this program include journal publications, scientific presentations, new capabilities or capability enhancements, and expertise to augment EMSL user activities and foster development of innovative

112

Molten salt as a heat transfer fluid for heating a subsurface formation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in an opening in the subsurface formation. An insulated conductor is located in the conduit. A material is in the conduit between a portion of the insulated conductor and a portion of the conduit. The material may be a salt. The material is a fluid at operating temperature of the heating system. Heat transfers from the insulated conductor to the fluid, from the fluid to the conduit, and from the conduit to the subsurface formation.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

113

A high-performance workflow system for subsurface simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subsurface modeling applications typically neglect uncertainty in the conceptual models, past or future scenarios, and attribute most or all uncertainty to errors in model parameters. In this contribution, uncertainty in technetium-99 transport in a heterogeneous, deep vadose zone is explored with respect to the conceptual model using a next generation user environment called Akuna. Akuna provides a range of tools to manage environmental modeling projects, from managing simulation data to visualizing results from high-performance computational simulators. Core toolsets accessible through the user interface include model setup, grid generation, parameter estimation, and uncertainty quantification. The BC Cribs site at Hanford in southeastern Washington State is used to demonstrate Akuna capabilities. At the BC Cribs site, conceptualization of the system is highly uncertain because only sparse information is available for the geologic conceptual model, the physical and chemical properties of the sediments, and the history of waste disposal operations. Using the Akuna toolset to perform an analysis of conservative solute transport, significant prediction uncertainty in simulated concentrations is demonstrated by conceptual model variation. This demonstrates that conceptual model uncertainty is an important consideration in sparse data environments such as BC Cribs. It is also demonstrated that Akuna and the underlying toolset provides an integrated modeling environment that streamlines model setup, parameter optimization, and uncertainty analyses for high-performance computing applications.

Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Xingyuan; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Freshley, Mark D.; Gorton, Ian; Gosink, Luke J.; Keating, Elizabeth; Lansing, Carina; Moeglein, William AM; Murray, Christopher J.; Pau, George Shu Heng; Porter, Ellen A.; Purohit, Sumit; Rockhold, Mark L.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Vesselinov, Velimir V.; Waichler, Scott R.

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

114

Stability of natural gas in the deep subsurface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas is becoming increasingly important as a fuel because of its widespread occurrence and because it has a less significant environmental impact than oil. Many of the known gas accumulations were discovered by accident during exploration for oil, but with increasing demand for gas, successful exploration will require a clearer understanding of the factors that control gas distribution and gas composition. Natural gas is generated by three main processes. In oxygen-deficient, sulfate-free, shallow (few thousand feet) environments bacteria generate biogenic gas that is essentially pure methane with no higher hydrocarbons ({open_quotes}dry gas{close_quotes}). Gas is also formed from organic matter ({open_quotes}kerogen{close_quotes}), either as the initial product from the thermal breakdown of Type III, woody kerogens, or as the final hydrocarbon product from all kerogen types. In addition, gas can be formed by the thermal cracking of crude oil in the deep subsurface. The generation of gas from kerogen requires higher temperatures than the generation of oil. Also, the cracking of oil to gas requires high temperatures, so that there is a general trend from oil to gas with increasing depth. This produces a well-defined {open_quotes}floor for oil{close_quotes}, below which crude oil is not thermally stable. The possibility of a {open_quotes}floor for gas{close_quotes} is less well documented and understanding the limits on natural gas occurrence was one of the main objectives of this research.

Barker, C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Strontium isotopic study of subsurface brines from Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The abundance of the radiogenic isotope /sup 87/Sr in a subsurface brine can be used as a tracer of brine origin, evolution, and diagenetic effects. The authors have determined the /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios of over 60 oil-field waters from the Illinois basin, where brine origin is perplexing because of the absence of any significant evaporite strata. Initially, they analyzed brines from 15 petroleum-producing sandstone and carbonate units; waters from Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian, and Mississippian strata have /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios in the range 0.7079-0.7108. All but those from the Ste. Genevieve Limestone (middle Mississippian) are more radiogenic in /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr than seawater values for this interval of geologic time. The detrital source of the more radiogenic /sup 87/Sr may be the New Albany Shale group, considered to be a major petroleum source rock in the basin. The /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios of Ste. Genevieve brines apparently evolved without a contribution from fluid-shale interaction.

hetherington, E.A.; Stueber, A.M.; Pushkar, P.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Limiting factors and microbial organometallic transformations in anaerobic subsurface environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial communities from subsurface materials were analyzed for microbial community-particle size relationships, effects of arsenic and mercury compounds on microbial community structure, and limiting factors influencing mercury volatilization under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The microbial communities showed strong relationships to particle size and size distribution. Major differences were found in relation to aerobic and anaerobic populations and for aerobic populations between the largest and smallest fractions. Under aerobic conditions, a significant increase in low nutrient responsive microbes occurred. After exposure to four metal compounds (phenylmercuric acetate (PMA), mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}), phenylarsonic acid (PAA), and sodium arsenate (Na{sub 2}AsO{sub 4})) major changes in populations occurred. Previous exposure to these metals increased the aerobic and anaerobic populations of GS-9, indicating an adaptive response. In GS-20, previous exposure to all four compounds caused a decrease in both the aerobic and anaerobic populations. The effect was most pronounced in sediments treated with PMA or HgCl{sub 2}. Limiting nutritional factors for the volatilization of mercury under aerobic and anaerobic conditions were identified in control and PMA impacted samples from GS-9 and GS-20.

Klein, D.A.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We relocate 14 years of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for seismic velocities to improve our knowledge of the subsurface geologic and hydrologic structure. We utilize over 60,000 micro-seismic events using waveform crosscorrelation to augment the expansive catalog of Pand S-wave

118

Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » January 2013 Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration New computational technique creates high resolution maps of subsurface CO2 after geologic sequestration. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of Sanjay Srinivasan, UT-Austin High resolution inverted seismic images of CO2 migration at the Cranfield,

119

Calculation Notes for Subsurface Leak Resulting in Pool, TWRS FSAR Accident Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document includes the calculations performed to quantify the risk associated with the unmitigated and mitigated accident scenarios described in the TWRS FSAR for the accident analysis titled: Subsurface Leaks Resulting in Pool.

Hall, B.W.

1996-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

120

Gas Chromatographic Determination of Aviation Gasoline and JP-4 Jet Fuel in Subsurface Core Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......capillary column gas chromatography...subsurface material. Water samples from...have a higher water solubility than the other...aroma- tics in water and solid wastes...jars inside a nitrogen atmosphere glovebox...subsequent analysis. Gas chromatography......

Steve A. Vandegrift; Don H. Kampbell

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A problem solving environment for subsurface flow and transport phenomena Matthew Farthinga  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hold vast fresh water reserves of vital importance to our lives above ground, but are susceptible to depletion and contamination. Hence questions about the man- agement and remediation of subsurface systems

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

122

Wastewater treatment and flow patterns in an onsite subsurface flow constructed wetland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common as a secondary treatment of onsite domestic wastewater. Even though SFCWs are being used widely, sufficient data has not been collected to determine how parameters...

Stecher, Matthew C

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Effects of droplet size on intrusion of sub-surface oil spills  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the effects of droplet size on droplet intrusion in sub-surface oil spills. Laboratory experiments were performed where glass beads of various sizes, which serve to simulate oil droplets in deepsea oil ...

Chan, Godine Kok Yan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Phosphorus sorption in subsurface constructed wetlands: investigations focused on calcareous materials and their  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phosphorus sorption in subsurface constructed wetlands: investigations focused on calcareous attractive sorption capacities using batch experiments, however experiments carried out in open reactors. NOMENCLATURE b: Langmuir adjustable parameter representing the maximum sorption capacity c: P concentration (mg

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

125

A model of the subsurface structure at the Rye Patch geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the subsurface structure at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir based on surface-to-borehole seismic data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

126

Nonlinear Acoustic Phenomena in Subsurface Bubble Layers and its Usage for Bubble Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper contains a brief review of our recent theoretical and experimental investigations of nonlinear acoustic phenomena in sub-surface bubble layers produced by breaking waves and results concerning linear a...

A. M. Sutin

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Salinity Constraints on Subsurface Archaeal Diversity and Methanogenesis in Sedimentary Rock Rich in Organic Matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...These substrates yield more energy (78.7 to 191.1 kJ per mol substrate...concentrations by offsetting the energy cost of the increased osmoregulatory...2005. Microbial community in a geothermal aquifer associated with the subsurface...

Patricia J. Waldron; Steven T. Petsch; Anna M. Martini; Klaus Nsslein

2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

128

Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, the Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) was established to develop the tools,...

129

Subsurface characterization of groundwater contaminated by landfill leachate using microbial community profile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subsurface characterization of groundwater contaminated by landfill leachate using microbial from groundwater monitoring wells located within and around an aquifer contaminated with landfill. In this landfill leachate application, the weighted SOM assembles the microbial community data from monitoring

Vermont, University of

130

Thickness estimation of subsurface layers in asphalt pavement using monstatic ground penetrating radar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THICKNESS ESTIMATION OF SUBSURFACE LAYERS IN ASPHALT PAVEMENT USING MONSTATIC GROUND PENETRATING RADAR A Thesis CHUN LOK LAU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THICKNESS ESTIMATION OF SUBSURFACE LAYERS IN ASPHALT PAVEMENT USING MONSTATIC GROUND PENETRATING RADAR A Thesis CHUN LOK LAU Approved as to style and content by...

Lau, Chun Lok

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

131

Optical method and apparatus for detection of surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser is used in a non-destructive manner to detect surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics and particularly in ceramic bodies with complex shapes such as ceramic bearings, turbine blades, races, and the like. The laser`s wavelength is selected based upon the composition of the ceramic sample and the laser can be directed on the sample while the sample is static or in dynamic rotate or translate motion. Light is scattered off surface and subsurface defects using a preselected polarization. The change in polarization angle is used to select the depth and characteristics of surface/subsurface defects. The scattered light is detected by an optical train consisting of a charge coupled device (CCD), or vidicon, television camera which, in turn, is coupled to a video monitor and a computer for digitizing the image. An analyzing polarizer in the optical train allows scattered light at a given polarization angle to be observed for enhancing sensitivity to either surface or near-subsurface defects. Application of digital image processing allows subtraction of digitized images in near real-time providing enhanced sensitivity to subsurface defects. Storing known ``feature masks`` of identified defects in the computer and comparing the detected scatter pattern (Fourier images) with the stored feature masks allows for automatic classification of detected defects. 29 figs.

Ellingson, W.A.; Brada, M.P.

1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

132

Optical method and apparatus for detection of surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser is used in a non-destructive manner to detect surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics and particularly in ceramic bodies with complex shapes such as ceramic bearings, turbine blades, races, and the like. The laser's wavelength is selected based upon the composition of the ceramic sample and the laser can be directed on the sample while the sample is static or in dynamic rotate or translate motion. Light is scattered off surface and subsurface defects using a preselected polarization. The change in polarization angle is used to select the depth and characteristics of surface/subsurface defects. The scattered light is detected by an optical train consisting of a charge coupled device (CCD), or vidicon, television camera which, in turn, is coupled to a video monitor and a computer for digitizing the image. An analyzing polarizer in the optical train allows scattered light at a given polarization angle to be observed for enhancing sensitivity to either surface or near-subsurface defects. Application of digital image processing allows subtraction of digitized images in near real-time providing enhanced sensitivity to subsurface defects. Storing known "feature masks" of identified defects in the computer and comparing the detected scatter pattern (Fourier images) with the stored feature masks allows for automatic classification of detected defects.

Ellingson, William A. (Naperville, IL); Brada, Mark P. (Goleta, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Reactive Membrane Barriers for Containment of Subsurface Contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project was to develop reactive membrane barriers--a new and flexible technique to contain and stabilize subsurface contaminants. Polymer membranes will leak once a contaminant is able to diffuse through the membrane. By incorporating a reactive material in the polymer, however, the contaminant is degraded or immobilized within the membrane. These processes increase the time for contaminants to breakthrough the barrier (i.e. the lag time) and can dramatically extend barrier lifetimes. In this work, reactive barrier membranes containing zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) or crystalline silicotitanate (CST) were developed to prevent the migration of chlorinated solvents and cesium-137, respectively. These studies were complemented by the development of models quantifying the leakage/kill time of reactive membranes and describing the behavior of products produced via the reactions within the membranes. First, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes containing Fe{sup 0} and CST were prepared and tested. Although PVA is not useful in practical applications, it allows experiments to be performed rapidly and the results to be compared to theory. For copper ions (Cu{sup 2+}) and carbon tetrachloride, the barrier was effective, increasing the time to breakthrough over 300 times. Even better performance was expected, and the percentage of the iron used in the reaction with the contaminants was determined. For cesium, the CST laden membranes increased lag times more than 30 times, and performed better than theoretical predictions. A modified theory was developed for ion exchangers in reactive membranes to explain this result. With the PVA membranes, the effect of a groundwater matrix on barrier performance was tested. Using Hanford groundwater, the performance of Fe{sup 0} barriers decreased compared to solutions containing a pH buffer and high levels of chloride (both of which promote iron reactivity). For the CST bearing membrane, performance improved by a factor of three when groundwater was used in place of deionized water. The performance of high density polyethylene (HDPE) membranes containing Fe{sup 0} was then evaluating using carbon tetrachloride as the target contaminant. Only with a hydrophilic additive (glycerol), was the iron able to extend lag times. Lag times were increased by a factor of 15, but only 2-3% of the iron was used, likely due to formation of oxide precipitates on the iron surface, which slowed the reaction. With thicker membranes and lower carbon tetrachloride concentrations, it is expected that performance will improve. Previous models for reactive membranes were also extended. The lag time is a measurement of when the barrier is breached, but contaminants do slowly leak through prior to the lag time. Thus, two parameters, the leakage and the kill time, were developed to determine when a certain amount of pollutant has escaped (the kill time) or when a given exposure (concentration x time) occurs (the leakage). Finally, a model was developed to explain the behavior of mobile reaction products in reactive barrier membranes. Although the goal of the technology is to avoid such products, it is important to be able to predict how these products will behave. Interestingly, calculations show that for any mobile reaction products, one half of the mass will diffuse into the containment area and one half will escape, assuming that the volumes of the containment area and the surrounding environment are much larger than the barrier membrane. These parameters/models will aid in the effective design of barrier membranes.

William A. Arnold; Edward L. Cussler

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

134

Understanding How Uranium Changes in Subsurface Environments | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Understanding How Uranium Changes in Subsurface Environments Understanding How Uranium Changes in Subsurface Environments Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » March 2013 Understanding How Uranium Changes in Subsurface Environments Bacterial biomass found to have an impact. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo

135

Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination.

Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination. 1 fig.

Ramirez, A.L.; Cooper, J.F.; Daily, W.D.

1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

Microbial transformations of natural organic compounds and radionuclides in subsurface environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major national concern in the subsurface disposal of energy wastes is the contamination of ground and surface waters by waste leachates containing radionuclides, toxic metals, and organic compounds. Microorganisms play an important role in the transformation of organic compounds, radionuclides, and toxic metals present in the waste and affect their mobility in subsurface environments. Microbial processes involved in dissolution, mobilization, and immobilization of toxic metals under aerobic and anaerobic conditions are briefly reviewed. Metal complexing agents and several organic acids produced by microbial action affect mobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in subsurface environments. Information on the persistence of and biodegradation rates of synthetic as well as microbiologically produced complexing agents is scarce but important in determining the mobility of metal organic complexes in subsoils. Several gaps in knowledge in the area of microbial transformation of naturally occurring organics, radionuclides, and toxic metals have been identified, and further basic research has been suggested. 31 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Francis, A.J.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Preliminary development of a comprehensive calibrated subsurface pathway simulator for the subsurface disposal area at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first detailed comprehensive simulation study to evaluate fate and transport of low-level, mixed, and transuranic wastes buried in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has recently been conducted. The study took advantage of pertinent information relating to describing aqueous- and vapor-phase movement of contaminants in the primarily fractured basalt subsurface. The study included spatially and temporally variable infiltration, barometric pressure changes, positive down-hole air pressure during well drilling, vapor-vacuum extraction, and regional hydraulic gradients. Use of the TETRAD simulation code allowed all the pertinent information to be included into a single comprehensive model of the SDA subsurface. An overview of the model implementation and comparisons of calibrated model results to the observed vadose zone water distribution, volatile organic vapor concentrations, and aqueous concentrations of volatile organics and nitrate are presented. Additionally, comparisons between simulated and observed concentrations for other contaminants which were not used for model calibration are made. As part of this modeling exercise, inadequacies in the available data relating to characterization of non-sorbing aqueous-phase transport have been identified. Even with the identified data inadequacies, the comparisons between simulated and observed contaminants along with the calibration results give confidence that the model is a conservative representation of flow and transport in the subsurface at the SDA. The results from this modeling study are being used to guide additional data collection activities at the SDA for purposes of increasing confidence in the appropriateness of model predictions.

Magnuson, S.; Sondrup, J.; Becker, B.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A mathematical model for simulation of a water table profile between two parallel subsurface drains using fractional derivatives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By considering the initial and boundary conditions corresponding to parallel subsurface drains, the linear form of a one-dimensional fractional Boussinesq equation was solved and an analytical mathematical model was developed to predict the water table ... Keywords: Bess algorithm, Fractional Boussinesq equation, Glover-Dumm's model, Heterogeneity, Subsurface drainage

Behrouz Mehdinejadiani; Abd Ali Naseri; Hossein Jafari; Afshin Ghanbarzadeh; Dumitru Baleanu

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Sorghum Program BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorghum Program BIOENERGY PROGRAM Sorghums are important nongrain lignocellulosic feedstocks Biomass Switch Grass Forage Sorghum Bioenergy Sorghum Biomass per acre per year that can be converted (DT

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Dynamics of Subsurface and Surface Chemisorption for B, C, and N on Gaas and Inp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Hellmann-Feynman molecular-dynamics simulations, we have investigated interactions of first-row elements with the (110) surfaces of GaAs and InP. We find that these atoms prefer to occupy subsurface sites. The open structure...

MENON, M.; Allen, Roland E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Mechanical models of sandfish locomotion reveal principles of high performance subsurface sand-swimming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...when the lycra sleeve is loose. The outer layer reduces the wear on the thin inner layer, allowing greater than 100 subsurface...Dorgan, K. , S. Arwade, and P. Jumars 2007 Burrowing in marine muds by crack propagation: kinematics and forces. J. Exp...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Ice-shelf collapse from subsurface warming as a trigger for Heinrich events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Antarctica, the resulting ice-shelf loss and attendant HSIS acceleration would produce a Heinrich eventIce-shelf collapse from subsurface warming as a trigger for Heinrich events Shaun A. Marcotta,1-discharge events from the Hudson Strait Ice Stream (HSIS) of the Laurentide Ice Sheet, referred to as Heinrich

Schmittner, Andreas

144

Subsurface and Atmospheric Influences on Solar Activity ASP Conference Series, Vol. 383, c 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hemisphere with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope on 26 August 2003. The upper panel shows the filament spineSubsurface and Atmospheric Influences on Solar Activity ASP Conference Series, Vol. 383, c 2008 R and their Interrelation Y. Lin,1 S. F. Martin,2 and O. Engvold1 Abstract. The main structural components of solar

Lin, Yong

145

Feasibility study of tank leakage mitigation using subsurface barriers. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reflects the evaluations and analyses performed in response to Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07A - {open_quotes}Complete Evaluation of Subsurface Barrier Feasibility{close_quotes} (September 1994). In addition, this feasibility study was revised reflecting ongoing work supporting a pending decision by the DOE Richland Operations Office, the Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency regarding further development of subsurface barrier options for SSTs and whether to proceed with demonstration plans at the Hanford Site (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07B). Analyses of 14 integrated SST tank farm remediation alternatives were conducted in response to the three stated objectives of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07A. The alternatives include eight with subsurface barriers and six without. Technologies used in the alternatives include three types of tank waste retrieval, seven types of subsurface barriers, a method of stabilizing the void space of emptied tanks, two types of in situ soil flushing, one type of surface barrier, and a clean-closure method. A no-action alternative and a surface-barrier-only alternative were included as nonviable alternatives for comparison. All other alternatives were designed to result in closure of SST tank farms as landfills or in clean-closure. Revision 1 incorporates additional analyses of worker safety, large leak scenarios, and sensitivity to the leach rates of risk controlling constituents. The additional analyses were conducted to support TPA Milestone M-45-07B.

Treat, R.L.; Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J. [Enserch Environmental, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Device and nondestructive method to determine subsurface micro-structure in dense materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and a device to detect subsurface three-dimensional micro-structure in a sample by illuminating the sample with light of a given polarization and detecting light emanating from the sample that has a different direction of polarization by means of a confocal optical system.

Sun, Jiangang (Westmont, IL)

2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

147

Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

1984-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

148

NEPTUNIUM IV AND V SORPTIN TO END-MEMBER SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS TO THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Migration of Np through the subsurface is expected to be primarily controlled by sorption to sediments. Therefore, understanding and quantifying Np sorption to sediments and sediments from the Savannah River Site (SRS) is vital to ensure safe disposal of Np bearing wastes. In this work, Np sorption to two sediments representing the geological extremes with respect to sorption properties expected in the SRS subsurface environment (named 'subsurface sandy sediment' and 'subsurface clayey sediment') was examined under a variety of conditions. First a series of baseline sorption tests at pH 5.5 under an oxic atmosphere was performed to understand Np sorption under typical subsurface conditions. These experiments indicated that the baseline K{sub d} values for the subsurface sandy and subsurface clayey sediments are 4.26 {+-} 0.24 L kg{sup -1} and 9.05 {+-} 0.61 L kg{sup -1}, respectively. These Np K{sub d} values of SRS sediments are the first to be reported since Sheppard et al. (1979). The previous values were 0.25 and 0.16 L kg{sup -1} for a low pH sandy sediment. To examine a possible range of K{sub d} values under various environmental scenarios, the effects of natural organic matter (NOM, also a surrogate for cellulose degradation products), the presence of various chemical reductants, and an anaerobic atmosphere on Np sorption were examined. The presence of NOM resulted in an increase in the Np K{sub d} values for both sediments. This behavior is hypothesized to be the result of formation of a ternary Np-NOM-sediment complex. Slight increases in the Np sorption (K{sub d} 13-24 L kg{sup -1}) were observed when performing experiments in the presence of chemical reductants (dithionite, ascorbic acid, zero-valent iron) or under anaerobic conditions. Presumably, the increased sorption can be attributed to a slight reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV), the stronger sorbing form of Np. The most significant result of this study is the finding that Np weakly sorbs to both end member sediments and that Np only has a slight tendency to reduce to its stronger sorbing form, even under the most strongly reducing conditions expected under natural SRS conditions. Also, it appears that pH has a profound effect on Np sorption. Based on the these new measurements and the revelations about Np redox chemistry, the following changes to 'Best K{sub d}' values, as defined in Kaplan (2006), for SRS performance assessment calculations are recommended.

Kaplan, D.

2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

149

Laboratory evaluation of performance and durability of polymer grouts for subsurface hydraulic/diffusion barriers. Informal report, October 1993--May 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contaminated soils, buried waste and leaking underground storage tanks pose a threat to the environment through contaminant transport. One of the options for control of contaminant migration from buried waste sites is the construction of a subsurface barrier. Subsurface barriers increase the performance of waste disposal sites by providing a low permeability layer that can reduce percolation water migration into the waste site, minimize surface transport of contaminants, and reduce migration of volatile species. Also, a barrier can be constructed to envelop the site or plume completely, there by containing the contaminants and the potential leakage. Portland cement grout curtains have been used for barriers around waste sites. However, large castings of hydraulic cements result invariably in cracking due to shrinkage, thermal stresses induced by the hydration reactions, and wet-dry cycling prevalent at and sites. Therefore, improved, low permeability, high integrity materials are under investigation by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Technology Development, Integrated Demonstrations and Programs. The binders chosen for characterization include: an acrylic, a vinylester styrene, bitumen, a polyester styrene, furfuryl alcohol, and sulfur polymer cement. These materials cover broad ranges of chemical and physical durability, performance, viscosity, and cost. This report details the results of laboratory formulation, testing, and characterization of several innovative polymer grouts. An appendix containing a database of the barrier materials is at the end of this report.

Heiser, J.H.; Milian, L.W.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES AFFECTING RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AND BIOIMMOBILIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project were to: (1) isolate and characterize novel anaerobic prokaryotes from subsurface environments exposed to high levels of mixed contaminants (U(VI), nitrate, sulfate), (2) elucidate the diversity and distribution of metabolically active metal- and nitrate-reducing prokaryotes in subsurface sediments, and (3) determine the biotic and abiotic mechanisms linking electron transport processes (nitrate, Fe(III), and sulfate reduction) to radionuclide reduction and immobilization. Mechanisms of electron transport and U(VI) transformation were examined under near in situ conditions in sediment microcosms and in field investigations at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination predominated by uranium and nitrate. A total of 20 publications (16 published or 'in press' and 4 in review), 10 invited talks, and 43 contributed seminars/ meeting presentations were completed during the past four years of the project. PI Kostka served on one proposal review panel each year for the U.S. DOE Office of Science during the four year project period. The PI leveraged funds from the state of Florida to purchase new instrumentation that aided the project. Support was also leveraged by the PI from the Joint Genome Institute in the form of two successful proposals for genome sequencing. Draft genomes are now available for two novel species isolated during our studies and 5 more genomes are in the pipeline. We effectively addressed each of the three project objectives and research highlights are provided. Task I - Isolation and characterization of novel anaerobes: (1) A wide range of pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and denitrifying bacteria (32 strains) were isolated from subsurface sediments of the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination of uranium and nitrate. These isolates which are new to science all show high sequence identity to sequences retrieved from ORFRC subsurface. (2) Based on physiological and phylogenetic characterization, two new species of subsurface bacteria were described: the metal-reducer Geobacter daltonii, and the denitrifier Rhodanobacter denitrificans. (3) Strains isolated from the ORFRC show that Rhodanobacter species are well adapted to the contaminated subsurface. Strains 2APBS1 and 116-2 grow at high salt (3% NaCl), low pH (3.5) and tolerate high concentrations of nitrate (400mM) and nitrite (100mM). Strain 2APBS1 was demonstrated to grow at in situ acidic pHs down to 2.5. (4) R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 is the first described Rhodanobacter species shown to denitrify. Nitrate is almost entirely converted to N2O, which may account for the large accumulation of N2O in the ORFRC subsurface. (5) G. daltonii, isolated from uranium- and hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface sediments of the ORFRC, is the first organism from the subsurface clade of the genus Geobacter that is capable of growth on aromatic hydrocarbons. (6) High quality draft genome sequences and a complete eco-physiological description are completed for R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and G. daltonii strain FRC-32. (7) Given their demonstrated relevance to DOE remediation efforts and the availability of detailed genotypic/phenotypic characterization, Rhodanobacter denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and Geobacter daltonii strain FRC-32 represent ideal model organisms to provide a predictive understanding of subsurface microbial activity through metabolic modeling. Tasks II and III-Diversity and distribution of active anaerobes and Mechanisms linking electron transport and the fate of radionuclides: (1) Our study showed that members of genus Rhodanobacter and Geobacter are abundant and active in the uranium and nitrate contaminated subsurface. In the contaminant source zone of the Oak Ridge site, Rhodanobacter spp. are the predominant, active organisms detected (comprising 50% to 100% of rRNA detected). (2) We demonstrated for the first time that the function of micro

Joel E. Kostka; Lee Kerkhof; Kuk-Jeong Chin; Martin Keller; Joseph W. Stucki

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) Field Site Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has established the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (300 Area IFRC) on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State for the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Office of Science. The project is funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). The purpose of the project is to conduct research at the 300 IFRC to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The management approach for the 300 Area IFRC requires that a Field Site Management Plan be developed. This is an update of the plan to reflect the installation of the well network and other changes.

Freshley, Mark D.

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Insulated conductor temperature limited heater for subsurface heating coupled in a three-phase WYE configuration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heating system for a subsurface formation is described. The heating system includes a first heater, a second heater, and a third heater placed in an opening in the subsurface formation. Each heater includes: an electrical conductor; an insulation layer at least partially surrounding the electrical conductor; and an electrically conductive sheath at least partially surrounding the insulation layer. The electrical conductor is electrically coupled to the sheath at a lower end portion of the heater. The lower end portion is the portion of the heater distal from a surface of the opening. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are electrically coupled at the lower end portions of the heaters. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are configured to be electrically coupled in a three-phase wye configuration.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Sandberg, Chester Ledlie (Palo Alto, CA)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

153

Long-Term Evolution of Anthropogenic Heat Fluxes into a Subsurface Urban Heat Island  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we develop an analytical heat flux model to investigate possible drivers such as increased ground surface temperatures (GSTs) at artificial surfaces and heat losses from basements of buildings, sewage systems, subsurface district heating networks, and reinjection of thermal wastewater. ... Although only 41 of the original wells in 1977 could be used for measurements in 2011, both measurement campaigns yield representative regional GWT distributions because of the homogeneous distribution of the wells within the study area (Figure 1). ...

Kathrin Menberg; Philipp Blum; Axel Schaffitel; Peter Bayer

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

154

Subsurface Conditions Description of the B and BX and BY Waste Management Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a discussion of the subsurface conditions relevant to the occurrence and migration of contaminants in the vadose zone and groundwater underlying the 241-B, -BX, and -BY tank farms. This document provides a concise summary of existing information in support of characterization planning. This document includes a description of the available environmental contamination data and a limited, qualitative interpretation of these data.

WOOD, M.I.

2000-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

155

Uranium Contamination in the Subsurface Beneath the 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a description of uranium contamination in the subsurface at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The principal focus is a persistence plume in groundwater, which has not attenuated as predicted by earlier remedial investigations. Included in the report are chapters on current conditions, hydrogeologic framework, groundwater flow modeling, and geochemical considerations. The report is intended to describe what is known or inferred about the uranium contamination for the purpose of making remedial action decisions.

Peterson, Robert E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Mark D.

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

156

Identification of subsurface fractures in the Austin Chalk using vertical seismic profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDENTIFICATION OF SUSSURFACE FRACTURES IN THE AUSTIN CHALK USING VERTICAL SEISMIC PROFILES A Thesis by KYLE THOMAS LEWALLEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major Subject: Geophysics IDENTIFICATION OF SUBSURFACE FRACTURES IN THE AUSTIN CHALK USING VERTICAL SEISMIC PROFILES A Thesis by KYLE THOMAS LEWALLEN Approved as to style and content by: T. W. Spencer...

Lewallen, Kyle Thomas

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Geochemistry of silicate-rich rocks can curtail spreading of carbon dioxide in subsurface aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of carbon sequestration and dissolution rates in the subsurface, suggesting that pooled carbon dioxide may remain in the shallower regions of the formation for hundreds to thousands of years. The deeper regions of the reservoir can remain virtually carbon... interests. References 1. Marini, L. Geochemical Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. (Elsevier 2007). 2. IPCC Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage, edited by Metz B. et al. (Cambridge University Press, UK and New York, USA, 2005). 3. Falkowski...

Cardoso, S. S. S.; Andres, J. T. H.

2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

158

Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

Slate, Lawrence J; Taylor, Joseph Todd

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

Slate, L.J.; Taylor, J.T.

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Geothermal exploration program, Hill Air Force Base, Davis and Weber Counties, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results obtained from a program designed to locate a low- or moderate-temperature geothermal resource that might exist beneath Hill Air Force Base (AFB), Ogden, Utah are discussed. A phased exploration program was conducted at Hill AFB. Published geological, geochemical, and geophysical reports on the area were examined, regional exploration was conducted, and two thermal gradient holes were drilled. This program demonstrated that thermal waters are not present in the shallow subsurface at this site. (MHR)

Glenn, W.E.; Chapman, D.S.; Foley, D.; Capuano, R.M.; Cole, D.; Sibbett, B.; Ward, S.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Facilitated Strontium Transport by Remobilization of Strontium-Containing Secondary Precipitates in Hanford Site Subsurface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significantly enhanced immobilization of radionuclides (such as 90Sr and 137Cs) due to adsorption and coprecipitation with neo-formed colloid-sized secondary precipitates has been reported at the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site. However, the stability of these secondary precipitates containing radionuclides in the subsurface under changeable field conditions is not clear. Here, the authors tested the remobilization possibility of Sr containing secondary precipitates (nitrate-cancrinite) in the subsurface using saturated column experiments under different geochemical and flow conditions. The columns were packed with quartz sand that contained secondary precipitates (nitrate-cancrinite containing Sr), and leached using colloid-free solutions under different flow rates, varying pH, and ionic strength conditions. The results indicate remobilization of the neo-formed secondary precipitates could be possible given a change of background conditions. The remobility of the neo formed precipitates increased with the rise in the leaching solution flow rate and pH (in a range of pH 4 to 11), as well as with decreasing solution ionic strength. The increased mobility of Sr-containing secondary precipitates with changing background conditions can be a potential source for additional radionuclide transport in Hanford Site subsurface environments.

Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Subsurface and Plant Contamination During Natural Attenuation and Phytoremediation of Silt Loam Contaminated with Chlorinated Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Root establishment of perennial ryegrass (L. Perenne) in diesel contaminated subsurface soil layers. Environ. Pollut. 145...15226510903353120 USEPA. 1996a. Clean up the nations waste sites: Markets and technology trends. Office of Solid Waste and Emergency...

Changhwan Cho; Soyoung Park; Kijune Sung

163

Evaluation of a Conjunctive SurfaceSubsurface Process Model (CSSP) over the Contiguous United States at RegionalLocal Scales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents a comprehensive evaluation on a Conjunctive SurfaceSubsurface Process Model (CSSP) in predicting soil temperaturemoisture distributions, terrestrial hydrology variations, and landatmosphere exchanges against various in situ ...

Xing Yuan; Xin-Zhong Liang

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Community Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Programs Friends of Berkeley Lab Navigate Section Community Richmond Bay Campus Planning Tours Community Programs Friends of Berkeley Lab Community Education Programs...

165

Testing efficiency of storage in the subsurface: frio brine pilot experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Can we demonstrate that subsurface storage is an effective method of reducing emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere? The Frio Brine Pilot Experiment is designed to test storage performance of a typical subsurface environment in an area where large-volume sources and sinks are abundant, near Houston, Texas, USA. We employed extensive pre-experiment characterization and modeling to identify significant factors that increase or decrease risk of leakage from the injection zone. We then designed the experiment to focus on those factors, as well as to test for presence or absence of events that are not expected. A fully developed reservoir model of heterogeneous reworked fluvial sandstones of the Frio Formation documents three-dimensional compartmentalization of the injection horizon by faulting associated with salt-dome intrusion and growth. Modeling using the TOUGH2 simulator showed that a significant source of uncertainty for subsurface performance of injected CO2 is residual CO2 saturation during storage. If initial displacement of water during injection is efficient and capillary effects create the expected residual saturation of 30 percent CO2, the volume occupied by the plume will be limited, and long-term storage can be expected even in an open system. If, however, during injection, CO2 moves out from the injection well along high-permeability pathways, it may not contact most pores, and residual saturation will have a smaller effect on storage. Our experiment is therefore designed to monitor plume geometry and CO2 saturation near the injection well and closely spaced observation well. Leakage out of the injection zone as a result of well engineering or other flaws in the seal is also monitored in the sandstone immediately overlying the injection zone and at the surface using multiple techniques. Permitting strategies include cooperation among two State agencies, as well as Federal NEPA assessment, because of the innovative aspects of the experiment.

Hovorka, Susan D.; Doughty, Christine; Holtz, Mark

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

Seismic Survey Report for Central Nevada Test Area, Subsurface, Correction Action Unit 443, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The seismic survey was successful in imaging the water table and underlying structures at the site. The configuration of the water table reflector confirms the general southeast horizontal flow direction in the alluvial aquifer. Offsets in the water table reflector, both at known faults that reach the surface and at subsurface faults not previously recognized, indicate that both extension and blast-related faults are barriers to lateral groundwater flow. The results from this study have been used to optimally locate two new wells designed to monitor head levels and possible contaminant migration in the alluvial aquifer at CTNA.

None

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

167

Subsurface Temperature, Moisture, Thermal Conductivity and Heat Flux, Barrow, Area A, B, C, D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subsurface temperature data are being collected along a transect from the center of the polygon through the trough (and to the center of the adjacent polygon for Area D). Each transect has five 1.5m vertical array thermistor probes with 16 thermistors each. This dataset also includes soil pits that have been instrumented for temperature, water content, thermal conductivity, and heat flux at the permafrost table. Area C has a shallow borehole of 2.5 meters depth is instrumented in the center of the polygon.

Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

Subsurface Temperature, Moisture, Thermal Conductivity and Heat Flux, Barrow, Area A, B, C, D  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Subsurface temperature data are being collected along a transect from the center of the polygon through the trough (and to the center of the adjacent polygon for Area D). Each transect has five 1.5m vertical array thermistor probes with 16 thermistors each. This dataset also includes soil pits that have been instrumented for temperature, water content, thermal conductivity, and heat flux at the permafrost table. Area C has a shallow borehole of 2.5 meters depth is instrumented in the center of the polygon.

Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

169

Three-phase heaters with common overburden sections for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heating system for a subsurface formation is described. The heating system includes three substantially u-shaped heaters with first end portions of the heaters being electrically coupled to a single, three-phase wye transformer and second end portions of the heaters being electrically coupled to each other and/or to ground. The three heaters may enter the formation through a first common wellbore and exit the formation through a second common wellbore so that the magnetic fields of the three heaters at least partially cancel out in the common wellbores.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

170

Student Internship Programs Program Description  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Student Internship Programs Program Description The objective of the Laboratory's student internship programs is to provide students with opportunities for meaningful hands- on...

171

Enhancements to and Characterization of the Very Early Time Electromagnetic (VETEM) Prototype Instrument and Applications to Shallow Subsurface Imaging at Sites in the DOE Complex - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field tests and deployments of VETEM is a flexible and highly effective new system for electromagnetic imaging that offers significant new 3D electromagnetic imaging capabilities in the shallow subsurface. Important new numerical modeling techniques have been produced, which are applicable to electromagnetic subsurface imaging, and suggest further research and development. In addition, this research has also produced a flexible, fast, and fully functional prototype VETEM system that has produced some remarkable subsurface images, has bridged the gap between pure research and applications, and is now available for use at DOE sites that have shallow subsurface imaging needs.

Wright, D.L.; Chew, W.C.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Understanding the Long Term Ecosystem Stability of a Fen Mire by Analyzing Subsurface Geology, Eco-Hydrology and Nutrient Stoichiometry Case Study of the Rospuda Valley (NE Poland)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the Rospuda valley, two mire parts differ considerably with respect to subsurface geological settings and longterm vegetation stability. By jointly analysing sub...

Ewa Jab?o?ska; Tomasz Falkowski; Jaros?aw Chorma?ski; Filip Jarzombkowski

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Phytosiderophore Effects on Subsurface Actinide Contaminants: Potential for Phytostabilization and Phytoextraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project seeks to understand the influence of phytosiderophore-producing plants (grasses, including crops such as wheat and barley) on the biogeochemistry of actinide and other metal contaminants in the subsurface environment, and to determine the potential of phytosiderophore-producing plants for phytostabilization and phytoextraction of actinides and some metal soil contaminants. Phytosiderophores are secreted by graminaceous plants such as barley and wheat for the solubilization, mobilization and uptake of Fe and other essential nutrients from soils. The ability for these phytosiderophores to chelate and absorb actinides using the same uptake system as for Fe is being investigated though characterization of actinide-phytosiderophore complexes (independently of plants), and characterization of plant uptake of such complexes. We may also show possible harm caused by these plants through increased chelation of actinides that increase in actinide mobilization & migration in the subsurface environment. This information can then be directly applied by either removal of harmful plants, or can be used to develop plant-based soil stabilization/remediation technologies. Such technologies could be the low-cost, low risk solution to many DOE actinide contamination problems.

Ruggiero, Christy

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Fate of Brine Applied to Unpaved Roads at a Radioactive Waste Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between 1984 and 1993, MgCl2 brine was used to suppress dust on unpaved roads at a radioactive waste subsurface disposal area. Because Cl might enhance corrosion of buried metals in the waste, we investigated the distribution and fate of Cl in the vadose zone using pore water samples collected from suction lysimeters and soluble salt concentrations extracted from sediment samples. The Cl/Br mass ratio and the total dissolved Cl concentration of pore water show that brine contamination occurs primarily within 13 m of treated roads, but can extend as much as 30 m laterally in near-surface sedimentary deposits. Within the deep vadose zone, which consists of interlayered basalt lava flows and sedimentary interbeds, brine has moved up to 110 m laterally. This lateral migration suggests formation of perched water and horizontal transport during periods of high recharge. In a few locations, brine migrated to depths of 67 m within 3 to 5 yr. Elevated Cl concentrations were found to depths of 2 m in roadbed material. In drainage ditches along roads, where runoff accumulates and recharge of surface water is high, Cl was flushed from the sediments in 3 to 4 yr. In areas of lower recharge, Cl remained in the sediments after 5 yr. Vertical brine movement is directly related to surface recharge through sediments. The distribution of Cl in pore water and sediments is consistent with estimates of vadose zone residence times and spatial distribution of surface water recharge from other investigations at the subsurface disposal area.

Larry C. Hull; Carolyn W. Bishop

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Staining of in vivo subsurface degradation in dental composites with silver nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A previously reported technique for staining areas of degradation in dental composite restorations was evaluated in 51 removed restorations. The staining reagent was silver nitrate, which penetrated the degraded subsurface as ionic silver and was subsequently developed into colored deposits of metallic silver. Several artefacts were recognized that resulted in an apparent image of subsurface stain. Most importantly, the presence of a layer of adsorbed silver on the edge of the specimen exaggerated the extent of staining. In order for the true depth of stain to be determined, thin sections of the materials should first be examined with a stereomicroscope to distinguish any contribution from adsorbed silver on the specimen edge. With this regimen, no stain was present in 41% of the restorations, and in a further 30%, the depth of stain was less than 50 microns. In two composites, the depth of stain was greater than 900 microns, and in a number of specimens, localized stain was found in association with attrition scars. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis indicated that the amount of silver present in the degraded layers was very small. Overall, the results indicated that the staining technique is useful in the study of composite degradation.

Mair, L.H. (Univ. of Liverpool (England))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Electron probe micro-analysis for subsurface demineralization and remineralization of dental enamel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A quantitative study of fluoride distribution profile changes in dental enamel was conducted by means of electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA). Fluoride-deposited hydroxyapatite powders were chosen as fluoride standards, and analytical conditions were optimized. The lower limit of detection for fluoride was estimated to be 270 ppm, with an accelerating voltage of 5 kV, a specimen current of 40 nA, and a counting time of 40 seconds. Fluoride profiles in fluoride-treated dental enamel, which exhibited intact surface layers and subsurface demineralization, were determined. The results were also compared with those of an acid-abrasion method, and reasonable consistency was found between these two methods, although the acid-abrasion procedure yielded a slightly lower fluoride content in the initial layers, followed by a higher content of fluoride in the deeper layers. The precision of fluoride profile data obtained from EPMA permits further studies to be conducted on the kinetics of subsurface demineralization and intact surface layer formation (white spot formation) which is observed during the acid challenge of dental enamel.

Chu, J.S.; Fox, J.L.; Higuchi, W.I.; Nash, W.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Intermediate-Scale Laboratory Experiments of Subsurface Flow and Transport Resulting from Tank Leaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Washington River Protection Solutions contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct laboratory experiments and supporting numerical simulations to improve the understanding of water flow and contaminant transport in the subsurface between waste tanks and ancillary facilities at Waste Management Area C. The work scope included two separate sets of experiments: Small flow cell experiments to investigate the occurrence of potential unstable fingering resulting from leaks and the limitations of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator to predict flow patterns and solute transport behavior under these conditions. Unstable infiltration may, under certain conditions, create vertically elongated fingers potentially transporting contaminants rapidly through the unsaturated zone to groundwater. The types of leak that may create deeply penetrating fingers include slow release, long duration leaks in relatively permeable porous media. Such leaks may have occurred below waste tanks at the Hanford Site. Large flow experiments to investigate the behavior of two types of tank leaks in a simple layered system mimicking the Waste Management Area C. The investigated leaks include a relatively large leak with a short duration from a tank and a long duration leak with a relatively small leakage rate from a cascade line.

Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Evaluation of a subsurface oxygenation technique using colloidal gas aphron injections into packed column reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bioremediation may be a remedial technology capable of decontaminating subsurface environments. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of colloidal gas aphron (CGA) injection, which is the injection of micrometer-size air bubbles in an aqueous surfactant solution, as a subsurface oxygenation technique to create optimal growth conditions for aerobic bacteria. Along with this, the capability of CGAs to act as a soil-washing agent and free organic components from a coal tar-contaminated matrix was examined. Injection of CGAs may be useful for remediation of underground coal gasification (UCG) sites. Because of this, bacteria and solid material from a UCG site located in northeastern Wyoming were used in this research. Colloidal gas aphrons were generated and pumped through packed column reactors (PCRS) containing post-burn core materials. For comparison, PCRs containing sand were also studied. Bacteria from this site were tested for their capability to degrade phenol, a major contaminant at the UCG site, and were also used to bioaugment the PCR systems. In this study we examined: (1) the effect of CGA injection on dissolved oxygen concentrations in the PCR effluents, (2) the effect of CGA, H[sub 2]O[sub 2], and phenol injections on bacterial populations, (3) the stability and transport of CGAs over distance, and (4) CGA injection versus H[sub 2]O[sub 2] injection as an oxygenation technique.

Wills, R.A.; Coles, P.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Evaluation of a subsurface oxygenation technique using colloidal gas aphron injections into packed column reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bioremediation may be a remedial technology capable of decontaminating subsurface environments. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of colloidal gas aphron (CGA) injection, which is the injection of micrometer-size air bubbles in an aqueous surfactant solution, as a subsurface oxygenation technique to create optimal growth conditions for aerobic bacteria. Along with this, the capability of CGAs to act as a soil-washing agent and free organic components from a coal tar-contaminated matrix was examined. Injection of CGAs may be useful for remediation of underground coal gasification (UCG) sites. Because of this, bacteria and solid material from a UCG site located in northeastern Wyoming were used in this research. Colloidal gas aphrons were generated and pumped through packed column reactors (PCRS) containing post-burn core materials. For comparison, PCRs containing sand were also studied. Bacteria from this site were tested for their capability to degrade phenol, a major contaminant at the UCG site, and were also used to bioaugment the PCR systems. In this study we examined: (1) the effect of CGA injection on dissolved oxygen concentrations in the PCR effluents, (2) the effect of CGA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and phenol injections on bacterial populations, (3) the stability and transport of CGAs over distance, and (4) CGA injection versus H{sub 2}O{sub 2} injection as an oxygenation technique.

Wills, R.A.; Coles, P.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Mapping subsurface radionuclide migration and groundwater flow with organic tracers. [Shallow-land burial  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At Pacific Northwest Laboratory we have had the opportunity to study the subsurface migration of radionuclides at the Maxey Flats burial site. We constructed an experimental study area adjacent to one of the waste-filled trenches at the site. In this report we describe some preliminary results of organic research currently underway at Maxey Flats. This research is aimed at: (1) elucidating the role of organic species in the subsurface migration of radionuclides; and (2) testing the usefulness of artificial and in situ organic groundwater tracers for mapping radionuclide migration and groundwater flow. We also describe two analytical procedures developed for this research. First, as part of a survey study of organics in Maxey Flats groundwater we have developed a procedure for the isolation and characterization of trace levels of organics in radioactive groundwaters. Second, for a detailed chemical speciation study we developed a procedure based on steric exclusion chromatography for testing whether or not organics are chelated to radionuclides. 1 figure, 1 table.

Toste, A.P.; Kirby, L.J.; Pahl, T.R.; Myers, R.B.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Automated laser scatter detection of surface and subsurface defects in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon Nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramics are currently a primary material of choice to replace conventional materials in many structural applications because of their oxidation resistance and desirable mechanical and thermal properties at elevated temperatures. However, surface or near-subsurface defects, such as cracks, voids, or inclusions, significantly affect component lifetimes. These defects are currently difficult to detect, so a technique is desired for the rapid automated detection and quantification of both surface and subsurface defects. To address this issue, the authors have developed an automated system based on the detection of scattered laser light which provides a 2-D map of surface or subsurface defects. This system has been used for the analysis of flexure bars and button-head tensile rods of several Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials. Mechanical properties of these bars have also been determined and compared with the laser scatter results.

Steckenrider, J.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Final report - Reduction of mercury in saturated subsurface sediments and its potential to mobilize mercury in its elemental form  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of our project was to investigate Hg(II) reduction in the deep subsurface. We focused on microbial and abiotic pathways of reduction and explored how it affected the toxicity and mobility of Hg in this unique environment. The projects tasks included: 1. Examining the role of mer activities in the reduction of Hg(II) in denitrifying enrichment cultures; 2. Investigating the biotic/abiotic reduction of Hg(II) under iron reducing conditions; 3. Examining Hg(II) redox transformations under anaerobic conditions in subsurface sediments from DOE sites.

Bakray, Tamar [Rutgers University

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

183

Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters Final Report to the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signaturea hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivityover a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Our study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOEs Hanford 300 Area.

Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

184

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the CNTA Subsurface Sites (CAU Number 443), Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) planned environmental investigation of the subsurface Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 443. The CNTA is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, adjacent to U.S. Highway 6, about 48 kilometers (km) (30 miles [mi]) north of Warm Springs, Nevada. The CNTA was the site of Project Faultless, a nuclear device detonated in the subsurface by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in January 1968. The purposes of this test were to gauge the seismic effects of a relatively large, high-yield detonation completed in Hot Creek Valley (outside the Nevada Test Site) and to determine the suitability of the site for future large detonations. The yield of the Faultless test was between 200 kilotons and 1 megaton. Two similar tests were planned for the CNTA, but neither of them was completed. Based on the general definition of a corrective action investigation (CAI) from Section IV.14 of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO), the purpose of the CAI is ''to gather data sufficient to characterize the nature, extent, and rate of migration or potential rate of migration from releases or discharges of pollutants or contaminants and/or potential releases or discharges from corrective action units identified at the facilities''. For CNTA CAU 443 the concepts developed for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) CAUs will be applied on a limited scale. For the UGTA CAUs, ''the objective of the CAI process is to define boundaries around each UGTA CAU that establish areas that contain water that may be unsafe for domestic and municipal use,'' as stated in Appendix VI of the FFACO (1996). Based on this strategy the CAI for CAU 443 will start with modeling using existing data. New data collection activities are generally contingent upon the results of the modeling and may or may not be part of the CAI. Specific objectives of the CAI ar e as follows: (1) determine the characteristics of the groundwater flow system, the sources of contamination, and the transport processes to acceptable levels of uncertainty; (2) develop a credible numerical model of groundwater flow and contaminant transport for the UC-1 Subsurface Corrective Action Site (CAS) and downgradient areas; and, (3) develop stochastic predictions of the contaminant boundary at an acceptable level of uncertainty.

USDOE/NV

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Addendum to the CAIP for CAU 447: Project Shoal Area, Nevada Subsurface Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

513-ADD 513-ADD ADDENDUM TO THE CORRECTIVE ACTION INVESTIGATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 447: PROJECT SHOAL AREA, NEVADA SUBSURFACE SITE DOE Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada Controlled Copy No.: Revision No.: 1 March 1999 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Available to the public from - U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 (703) 487-4650 Available electronically at http://www.doe.gov/bridge. Available to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors in paper from - U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 (423) 576-8401 ADDENDUM TO THE CORRECTIVE ACTION INVESTIGATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 447:

186

Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River Valley occupies an upper Cenozoic structural basin filled with nearly 1600 m of fluvial silt, sand, and gravel. Rapid facies and thickness changes, steep initial dips (30 0C), and alteration make correlation of basin-fill depositional units very difficult. Hydrothermal alteration products in the form of clays and zeolites, and deposition of secondary calcite and silica increase with depth. The abundance of near-vertical open fractures also increases with depth, allowing greater movement of hydrothermal fluids near the base of the Cenozoic basin fill.

187

Evaluation of a low-cost and accurate ocean temperature logger on subsurface mooring systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring seawater temperature is important to understanding evolving ocean processes. To monitor internal waves or ocean mixing, a large number of temperature loggers are typically mounted on subsurface mooring systems to obtain high-resolution temperature data at different water depths. In this study, we redesigned and evaluated a compact, low-cost, self-contained, high-resolution and high-accuracy ocean temperature logger, TC-1121. The newly designed TC-1121 loggers are smaller, more robust, and their sampling intervals can be automatically changed by indicated events. They have been widely used in many mooring systems to study internal wave and ocean mixing. The loggers fundamental design, noise analysis, calibration, drift test, and a long-term sea trial are discussed in this paper.

Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Jun; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Ming

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

188

Innovative technology for expedited site remediation of extensive surface and subsurface contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large scale surface and subsurface contamination resulted from numerous releases of feed stock, process streams, waste streams, and final product at a major chemical plant. Soil and groundwater was contaminated by numerous compounds including lead, tetraethyl lead, ethylene dibromide, ethylene dichloride, and toluene. The state administrative order dictated that the site be investigated fully, that remedial alternative be evaluated, and that the site be remediated within a year period. Because of the acute toxicity and extreme volatility of tetraethyl lead and other organic compounds present at the site and the short time frame ordered by the regulators, innovative approaches were needed to carry out the remediation while protecting plant workers, remediation workers, and the public.

Audibert, J.M.E.; Lew, L.R.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site's 300 Area in southeastern Washington State was investigated by analyzing 21 samples recovered from depths that ranged from 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 non-chimeric Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that contain a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units, defined at the 97% identity level). Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (based upon Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic transition zone, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The Bacterial community in the oxic Hanford and Ringold Formations contained members of 9 major well-recognized phyla as well 30 as unusually high proportions of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by low OTU richness and a very high preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The study has greatly expanded the intralineage phylogenetic diversity within some major divisions. These subsurface sediments have been shown to contain a large number of phylogenetically novel microbes, with substantial heterogeneities between sediment samples from the same geological formation.

Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Program Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will participate in a wide spectrum of program and project management activities involving systems engineering and integration support for Defense Programs...

191

Program Managers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Managers Program Managers Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy...

192

Retiree Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Library Services Retiree Program Retiree Program The Research Library offers a 1 year library card to retired LANL employees that allows usage of Library materials. This service...

193

Educational Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Educational Programs Educational Programs A collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering...

194

A Practical Model for Subsurface Light Transport Henrik Wann Jensen Stephen R. Marschner Marc Levoy Pat Hanrahan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by solving the full radiative transfer equation [1]. Only a few papers in graphics have taken this approachA Practical Model for Subsurface Light Transport Henrik Wann Jensen Stephen R. Marschner Marc Levoy transport in translucent materials. The model enables efficient simulation of effects that BRDF models

O'Brien, James F.

195

Subsurface Imaging using Ground-Penetrating Radar Measurements Nathan Goodman, Carl Leuschen, Richard Plumb and Chris Allen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of transmitters and receivers in several common configurations, such as the offset VRP, cross-borehole of the subsurface layers. Further- more, the advantages of ground-penetrating radar over drill- ing and digging FACILITY Work has just been completed on a fully automated test facility. A large concrete box

Kansas, University of

196

Enumeration and Characterization of Iron(III)-Reducing Microbial Communities from Acidic Subsurface Sediments Contaminated with Uranium(VI)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bioremediation potential in uranium-contaminated subsurface...reduced. Once nitrate is depleted, U(VI) and Fe(III...bacteria, a study in a uranium-contaminated mill tailing...sludge. American Public Health Association, Washington...detection of trace levels of uranium by laser-induced kinetic...

Lainie Petrie; Nadia N. North; Sherry L. Dollhopf; David L. Balkwill; Joel E. Kostka

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Environmental Programs Environmental Programs Committee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Architecture) The Environmental Programs Committee coordinates courses and curricula on environmental topics. Wiesner (Civil and Environmental Engineering) Gordon G. Wittenberg (Architecture) #12;162 Environmental Programs Environmental Programs Committee Walter Whitfield Isle, Chair (English

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

198

SRS - Programs - Nonproliferation Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3/2012 3/2012 SEARCH GO spacer SRS Home Nonproliferation Programs In the crucial field of nuclear nonproliferation, SRS employee contributions helped to advance all three of the planned plutonium disposition facilities at the Savannah River Site: the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF); Waste Solidification Building (WSB); and the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility. A $345 million project, the WSB will process liquid waste from the MOX facility. After material is processed at the WSB, transuranic waste will be packaged and sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico, and low-level waste will be packaged and sent to onsite or commercial off-site low-level waste disposal facilities. The mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility will be a major component in the United States' program to dispose of excess weapons grade plutonium.

199

A Strategy to Conduct an Analysis of the Long-Term Performance of Low-Activity Waste Glass in a Shallow Subsurface Disposal System at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The federal facilities located on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State have been used extensively by the U.S. government to produce nuclear materials for the U.S. strategic defense arsenal. Currently, the Hanford Site is under the stewardship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste resulting from the production of nuclear materials has accumulated, mainly in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks located in the central plateau of the Hanford Site (Mann et al., 2001). The DOE-EM Office of River Protection (ORP) is proceeding with plans to immobilize and permanently dispose of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction onsite in a shallow subsurface disposal facility (the Integrated Disposal Facility [IDF]). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was contracted to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the IDF (the source term) as part of an immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass testing program to support future IDF performance assessments (PAs).

Neeway, James J.; Pierce, Eric M.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Qafoku, Nikolla

2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Research Program | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Research Program The Research Program What is the chemical and physical form of uranium in reduced aquifers? Uranium behavior in the Rifle, CO, aquifer. In order to directly interrogate the chemical and physical form of reduced uranium (U(IV)) in bioremediated sediments within the contaminated aquifer at the Rifle site, a novel technique was developed based on reactors installed in wells (center right). U(IV) was found to be bound to biomass (structural model shown in upper left-hand) within thin (microns) sulfide-rich coatings on mineral grains (bottom left). Uranium in its oxidized (U(VI)) form, is one of the most common, abundant, and problematic subsurface contaminants at legacy nuclear sites. In contrast, the tetravalent form of uranium (U(IV) ) is relatively insoluble

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Wheat Improvement Programs WHEAT PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Royalty revenues, which assist funding of programs and attracting/retaining top scientists, have increased

202

Educational Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Programs Programs Argonne National Laboratory Educational Programs Search Argonne ... Search Argonne Home > Educational Programs > Welcome Type of Appointments Postdoctoral Newsletters Postdoctoral Office Activities Postdoctoral Programs Alumni Postdoctoral Society of Argonne Newcomers Assistance Office Postdoctoral Resources Postdoctoral Mentoring Program Contact Us Schedule of Career Development Seminars Organized by the Postdoctoral Office for 2011 Here is a schedule of all of our Career Development Seminars and Workshops! Normally, the events happen at lunchtime and food is provided. The topics of these events include: Journal Clubs Career Development Networking We welcome all of our Postdocs and colleagues to and join us! Wednesday January 19 Postdoc Journal Club and pizza lunch. Magnetic Domain-Wall Racetrack Memory

203

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 3 with Errata Sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447, Project Shoal Area (PSA)-Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 447 is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, approximately 48 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for CAU 447, as provided in the FFACO. Corrective Action Unit 447 consists of two corrective action sites (CASs): CAS 57-49-01, Emplacement Shaft, and CAS 57-57-001, Cavity. The emplacement shaft (CAS-57-49-01) was backfilled and plugged in 1996 and will not be evaluated further. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. The original Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for the PSA was approved in September 1996 and described a plan to drill and test four characterization wells, followed by flow and transport modeling (DOE/NV, 1996). The resultant drilling is described in a data report (DOE/NV, 1998e) and the data analysis and modeling in an interim modeling report (Pohll et al., 1998). After considering the results of the modeling effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the degree of uncertainty in transport predictions for PSA remained unacceptably large. As a result, a second CAIP was developed by DOE and approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in December 1998 (DOE/NV, 1998a). This plan prescribed a rigorous analysis of uncertainty in the Shoal model and quantification of methods of reducing uncertainty through data collection. This analysis is termed a Data Decision Analysis (Pohll et al., 1999a) and formed the basis for a second major characterization effort at PSA (Pohll et al., 1999b). The details for this second field effort are presented in an Addendum to the CAIP, which was approved by NDEP in April 1999 (DOE/NV, 1999a). Four additional characterization wells were drilled at PSA during summer and fall of 1999; details of the drilling and well installation are in IT Corporation (2000), with testing reported in Mihevc et al. (2000). A key component of the second field program was a tracer test between two of the new wells (Carroll et al., 2000; Reimus et al., 2003). Based on the potential exposure pathways, two corrective action objectives were identified for CAU 447: Prevent or mitigate exposure to groundwater contaminants of concern at concentrations exceeding regulatory maximum contaminant levels or risk-based levels; and Reduce the risk to human health and the environment to the extent practicable. Based on the review of existing data, the results of the modeling, future use, and current operations at PSA, the following alternatives have been developed for consideration at CAU 447: Alternative 1--No Further Action; Alternative 2--Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls; and Alternative 3--Contaminant Control. The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on the approach outlined in the ''Focused Evaluation of Selected Remedial Alternatives for the Underground Test Area'' (DOE/NV, 1998b). Each alternative was assessed against nine evaluation criteria. These criteria include overall protection of human health and the environment;

Tim Echelard

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Rheological Behavior of Xanthan Gum Solution Related to Shear Thinning Fluid Delivery for Subsurface Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Xanthan gum, a biopolymer, forms shear thinning fluids which can be used as delivery media to improve the distribution of remedial amendments injected into heterogeneous subsurface environments. The rheological behavior of the shear thinning solution needs to be known to develop an appropriate design for field injection. In this study, the rheological properties of xanthan gum solutions were obtained under various chemical and environmental conditions relevant to delivery of remedial amendments to groundwater. Higher xanthan concentration raised the absolute solution viscosity and increased the degree of shear thinning. Addition of remedial amendments (e.g., phosphate, sodium lactate, ethyl lactate) caused the dynamic viscosity of xanthan gum to decrease, but the solutions maintained shear-thinning properties. Use of simple salt (e.g. Na+, Ca2+) to increase the solution ionic strength also decreased the dynamic viscosity of xanthan and the degree of shear thinning, although the effect is a function of xanthan gum concentration and diminished as the xanthan gum concentration was increased. At high xanthan concentration, addition of salt to the solution increased dynamic viscosity. In the absence of sediments, xanthan gum solutions maintain their viscosity properties for months. However, xanthan gum solutions were shown to lose dynamic viscosity over a period of days to weeks when contacted with saturated site sediment. Loss of viscosity is attributed to physical and biodegradation processes.

Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Szecsody, James E.

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Elevation of surficial sediment/basalt contact in the Subsurface Disposal Area, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The elevation of the surficial sediment/basalt contact at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA), within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) is presented to provide a data base for future remedial actions at this site. About 1,300 elevation data from published and unpublished reports, maps, and surveyors notes were compiled to generate maps and cross-sections of the surficial sediment/basalt contact. In general, an east to west trending depression exists in the south central portion of the SDA with basalt closer to land surface on the northern and southern boundaries of the SDA. The lowest elevation of the surficial sediment/basalt contact is 4,979 ft and the greatest is land surface at 5,012 ft. The median elevation of the sediment/basalt interface is 4,994 ft. The median depth to basalt in the SDA is 16 ft if land surface elevation is assumed to be 5,010 ft. The depth from land surface to the sediment/basalt interface ranges from 24 ft in the southeast corner of the SDA to less than 3 ft at the north-central boundary of the SDA.

Hubbell, J.M.

1993-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

206

Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site 300 Area near Richland, Washington State (USA) was investigated by analyzing samples recovered from depths of 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that include a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units at the 97% identity level), respectively. Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic interface, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by a preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The Bacterial community in the oxic sediments contained not only members of 9 well-recognized phyla but also an unusually high proportion of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). Additionally, novel phylogenetic orders were identified within the Delta-proteobacteria, a clade rich in microbes that carry out redox transformations of metals that are important contaminants on the Hanford Site.

Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

207

On the Role of Subsurface Oxygen and Ethylenedioxy in Ethylene Epoxidation on Silver.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The thermochemical stability of various three-component phases containing oxygen, ethylene, and Ag(111) was determined as a function of oxygen and ethylene chemical potential using periodic, self-consistent density functional theory calculations. Ethylenedioxy is stable over a wide range of conditions, although its formation may be kinetically hindered in some cases. Ethylene and ethylene-containing oxametallacycles are also found to be stable over a reasonably large range of chemical potentials, particularly if ethylenedioxy formation is neglected. Furthermore, subsurface oxygen (Osb) is seen to be present in the three-component systems at a variety of conditions; minimum energy path calculations performed at a coverage of 1/2 ML Osb suggest that this species may actually increase the reaction barrier for ring closure leading to ethylene oxide elimination from Ag(111).

Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Mavrikakis, Manos

2007-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

208

MICROSCALE METABOLIC, REDOX AND ABIOTIC REACTIONS IN HANFORD 300 AREA SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford 300 Area is a unique site due to periodic hydrologic influence of river water resulting in changes in groundwater elevation and flow direction. This area is also highly subject to uranium remobilization, the source of which is currently believed to be the region at the base of the vadose zone that is subject to period saturation due to the changes in the water levels in the Columbia River. We found that microbial processes and redox and abiotic reactions which operate at the microscale were critical to understanding factors controlling the macroscopic fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface. The combined laboratory and field research showed how microscale conditions control uranium mobility and how biotic, abiotic and redox reactions relate to each other. Our findings extended the current knowledge to examine U(VI) reduction and immobilization using natural 300 Area communities as well as selected model organisms on redox-sensitive and redox-insensitive minerals. Using innovative techniques developed specifically to probe biogeochemical processes at the microscale, our research expanded our current understanding of the roles played by mineral surfaces, bacterial competition, and local biotic, abiotic and redox reaction rates on the reduction and immobilization of uranium.

Beyenal, Haluk [WSU] [WSU; McLEan, Jeff [JCVI] [JCVI; Majors, Paul [PNNL] [PNNL; Fredrickson, Jim [PNNL] [PNNL

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

209

Relative contributions of natural and waste-derived organics to the subsurface transport of radionuclides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our laboratory is studying the role of organic compounds in the subsurface transport of radionuclides at shallow-land burial sites of low-level nuclear waste, including a commercial site at Maxey Flats, Kentucky, and an aqueous waste disposal site. At the Maxey Flats site, several radionuclides, notably Pu and /sup 60/Co, appear to exist as anionic, organic complexes. Waste-derived organics, particularly chelating agents such as EDTA, HEDTA and associated degradation products (e.g., ED3A), are abundant in aqueous waste leachates and appear to account for the complexation. EDTA, and probably other waste-derived chelating agents as well, are chelated to the Pu and /sup 60/Co in the leachates, potentially mobilizing these radionuclides. In contrast, at the low-level aqueous waste disposal site, naturally-occurring organics, ranging from low molecular weight (MW) acids to high MW humic acids, account for the bulk of the groundwater's organic content. Certain radionuclides, notably /sup 60/Co, /sup 103/Ru and /sup 125/Sb, are mobile as anionic complexes. These radionuclides are clearly associated with higher MW organics, presumably humic and fulvic acids with nominal MW's > 1000. It is clear, therefore, that naturally-occurring organics may play an important role in radionuclide transport, particularly at nuclear waste burial sites containing little in the way of waste-derived organics.

Toste, A.P.; Myers, R.B.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

A Method Of Evaluating A Subsurface Region Using Gather Sensitive Data Discrimination  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of evaluating a subsurface region by separating/enhancing a certain type of seismic event data of interest from an overall set of seismic event data which includes other, different types of seismic event data is disclosed herein. In accordance with one feature, a particular type of gather is generated from the seismic event data such that the gather includes at least a portion of the data which is of interest and at least a portion of the other data. A series of data discrimination lines are incorporated into the gather at positions and directions which are established in the gather in a predetermined way. Using the data discrimination lines, the data of interest which is present in the gather is separated/enhanced with respect to the other data within the gather. The separated data may be used for example in producing a map of the particular subterranean region. In accordance with another feature, the gather is selected such that the incorporated discrimination lines approach a near parallel relationship with one another. Thereby, the data is transformed in a way which causes the discrimination lines to be parallel with one another, resulting in reduced frequency distortion accompanied by improved accuracy in the separation/enhancement of data. In accordance with still another feature, the disclosed data separation/enhancement method is compatible with an iterative approach.

Lazaratos, Spyridon K. (Houston, TX)

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

211

E-Print Network 3.0 - area-subsurface central nevada Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

California. Unpublished final... report to Sierra Nevada Global Change Program. Sequoia, Kings Canyon, and Yosemite National Parks. Labo... , USA. Journal of Biogeography...

212

international programs  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

9%2A en International Programs http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsemergencyoperationscounterterrorisminternationalprograms

213

The role of nanopores on U(VI) sorption and redox behavior in U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most reactive surfaces in clay-dominated sediments are present within nanopores (pores of nm dimension). The behavior of geological fluids and minerals in nanopores is significantly different from those in normal non-nanoporous environments. The effect of nanopore surfaces on U(VI) sorption/desorption and reduction is likely to be significant in clay-rich subsurface environments. Our research results from both model nanopore system and natural sediments from both model system (synthetic nanopore alumina) and sediments from the ORNL Field Research Center prove that U(VI) sorption on nanopore surfaces can be greatly enhanced by nanopore confinement environments. The results from the project provide advanced mechanistic, quantitative information on the physiochemical controls on uranium sorption and redox behavior in subsurface sediments. The influence of nanopore surfaces on coupled uranium sorption/desorption and reduction processes is significant in virtually all subsurface environments, because most reactive surfaces are in fact nanopore surfaces. The results will enhance transfer of our laboratory-based research to a major field research initiative where reductive uranium immobilization is being investigated. Our results will also provide the basic science for developing in-situ colloidal barrier of nanoporous alumina in support of environmental remediation and long term stewardship of DOE sites.

Xu, Huifang; Roden, Eric E.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Jung, Hun-Bok; Konishi, Hiromi; Boyanov, Maxim; Sun, Yubing; Mishra, Bhoopesh

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

214

Watershed scale fungal community characterization along a pH gradient in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to characterize fungal communities in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate at the watershed scale, and to determine the potential contribution of fungi to contaminant transformation (nitrate attenuation). The abundance, distribution and diversity of fungi in subsurface groundwater samples were determined using quantitative and semi-quantitative molecular techniques, including quantitative PCR of eukaryotic SSU rRNA genes and pyrosequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Potential bacterial and fungal denitrification was assessed in sediment-groundwater slurries amended with antimicrobial compounds and in fungal pure cultures isolated from subsurface. Our results demonstrate that subsurface fungal communities are dominated by members of the phylum Ascomycota, and a pronounced shift in fungal community composition occurs across the groundwater pH gradient at the field site, with lower diversity observed under acidic (pH < 4.5) conditions. Fungal isolates recovered from subsurface sediments were shown to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide, including cultures of the genus Coniochaeta that were detected in abundance in pyrosequence libraries of site groundwater samples. Denitrifying fungal isolates recovered from the site were classified, and found to be distributed broadly within the phylum Ascomycota, and within a single genus within the Basidiomycota. Potential denitrification rate assays with sediment-groundwater slurries showed the potential for subsurface fungi to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide under in situ acidic pH conditions.

Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Green, Stefan [University of Illinois, Chicago] [University of Illinois, Chicago; Canion, Andy [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Overholt, Will [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Prakash, Om [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Wafula, Dennis [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Hubbard, Daniela [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Watson, David B [ORNL] [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL] [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL] [ORNL; Kostka, [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About About Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on AddThis.com... Our History Related Federal Programs Why Energy Efficiency Upgrades Contacts Related Federal Programs Related Links

216

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Guidance Program Guidance Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Facebook Tweet about Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Twitter Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Google Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Delicious Rank Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Digg Find More places to share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on AddThis.com... Closeout Guidance Recovery Act Monitoring & Reporting National Environmental Policy Act

217

An Analysis of Surface and Subsurface Lineaments and Fractures for Oil and Gas Exploration in the Mid-Continent Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive literature search was conducted and geological and mathematical analyses were performed to investigate the significance of using surface lineaments and fractures for delineating oil and gas reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region. Tremendous amount of data were acquired including surface lineaments, surface major fracture zones, surface fracture traces, gravity and magnetic lineaments, and Precambrian basement fault systems. An orientation analysis of these surface and subsurface linear features was performed to detect the basic structural grains of the region. The correlation between surface linear features and subsurface oil and gas traps was assessed, and the implication of using surface lineament and fracture analysis for delineating hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region discussed. It was observed that the surface linear features were extremely consistent in orientation with the gravity and magnetic lineaments and the basement faults in the Mid-Continent region. They all consist of two major sets bending northeast and northwest, representing, therefore, the basic structural grains of the region. This consistency in orientation between the surface and subsurface linear features suggests that the systematic fault systems at the basement in the Mid-Continent region have probably been reactivated many times and have propagated upward all the way to the surface. They may have acted as the loci for the development of other geological structures, including oil and gas traps. Also observed was a strong association both in orientation and position between the surface linear features and the subsurface reservoirs in various parts of the region. As a result, surface lineament and fracture analysis can be used for delineating additional oil and gas reserves in the Mid-Continent region. The results presented in this paper prove the validity and indicate the significance of using surface linear features for inferring subsurface oil and gas reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region. Any new potential oil and gas reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region, if they exist, will be likely associated with the northeast- and northwest-trending surface lineaments and fracture traces in the region.

Guo, Genliang; and George, S.A.

1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

218

STOMP Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases, Version 4.0, Users Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide describes the general use, input file formatting, compilation and execution of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator, a scientific tool for analyzing single and multiple phase subsurface flow and transport. A description of the simulators governing equations, constitutive functions and numerical solution algorithms are provided in a companion theory guide. In writing these guides for the STOMP simulator, the authors have assumed that the reader comprehends concepts and theories associated with multiple-phase hydrology, heat transfer, thermodynamics, radioactive chain decay, and relative permeability-saturation-capillary pressure constitutive relations. The authors further assume that the reader is familiar with the computing environment on which they plan to compile and execute the STOMP simulator. Source codes for the sequential versions of the simulator are available in pure FORTRAN 77 or mixed FORTRAN 77/90 forms. The pure FORTRAN 77 source code form requires a parameters file to define the memory requirements for the array elements. The mixed FORTRAN 77/90 form of the source code uses dynamic memory allocation to define memory requirements, based on a FORTRAN 90 preprocessor STEP, that reads the input files. The simulator utilizes a variable source code configuration, which allows the execution memory and speed to be tailored to the problem specifics, and essentially requires that the source code be assembled and compiled through a software maintenance utility. The memory requirements for executing the simulator are dependent on the complexity of physical system to be modeled and the size and dimensionality of the computational domain. Likewise execution speed depends on the problem complexity, size and dimensionality of the computational domain, and computer performance. Selected operational modes of the STOMP simulator are available for scalable execution on multiple processor (i.e., parallel) computers. These versions of the simulator are written in pure FORTRAN 90 with imbedded directives that are interpreted by a FORTRAN preprocessor. Without the preprocessor, the scalable version of the simulator can be executed sequentially on a single processor computer. The scalable versions of the STOMP modes carry the -Sc designator on the operational mode name. For example, STOMP-WCS-Sc is the scalable version of the STOMP-WCS (Water-CO2-Salt) mode. A separate mode containing an evaporation model as a boundary condition on the upper surface of the computation domain has also been included. This mode, STOMP-WAE-B (Water-Air-Energy-Barriers) can be viewed as an extension of the STOMP-WAE (Water-Air-Energy) mode. Details of this particular mode are outlined by Ward et al. (2005)(a). STOMP V4.0 includes the reactive transport module ECKEChem (Equilibrium-Conservation-Kinetic Equation Chemistry) for the STOMP-W (Water) and STOMP-WCS (Water-CO2-Salt) modes. For this particular module, the -R designator is included in the operational mode name (e.g., STOMP-W-R, STOMP-WCS-R-Sc). This mode is described in detail by White and McGrail (2005)(b). For all operational modes and processor implementations, the memory requirements for executing the simulator are dependent on the complexity of physical system to be modeled and the size and dimensionality of the computational domain. Likewise execution speed depends on the problem complexity, size and dimensionality of the computational domain, and computer performance. Additional information about the simulator can be found on the STOMP webpage: http://stomp.pnl.gov. The website includes an introductory short course with problems ranging from simple one-dimensional saturated flow to complex multiphase system computations.

White, Mark D.; Oostrom, Martinus

2006-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

219

Neogene stratigraphy and sedimentology in eastern Azerbaijan: Outcrop observations and subsurface implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The largely Pliocene Productive Series of eastern Azerbaijan contains about 26 billion barrels oil equivalent. It is well exposed in outcrops on the Apsheron Peninsula which a joint team from the GIA and the BP and Statoil Alliance have described. Detailed biostratigraphic and petrographic studies have subsequently been carried out. Productive Series deposition was initiated by a dramatic relative sea-level fall which left the South Caspian an isolated basin fed by deeply incised precursors to the modern Volga, Amu Darya, and Kura rivers. Five facies associations have been recognised within the Productive Series at outcrop, encompassing a range of palaeoenvironments from alluvial braided river sandstones and conglomerates to delta-front siltstones and mudstones. The facies associations suggest a river-dominated, braid delta. Four idealised reservoir models can be recognised: fluvial, delta-plain, proximal delta-front and distal delta-front. Each has distinct grain-size and shale distributions. Studies of nearby oilfields suggest that these models form useful subsurface analogues. Flow simulation models suggest that each reservoir type has dramatically different performance. Productive Series sediments are typically loosely cemented and smectite rich, which may result in clay swelling and sand control problems. Localised reduction in reservoir quality is caused by fault-associated calcite cements. Proximal facies of the upper Productive Series contain porosity occluding gypsum cements. Palynology and nannopalaeontology have been applied to the Neogene sediments of Azerbaijan for almost the first time, and have given encouraging results, at least in terms of a broad biozonation. Micropaleontological analyses have also provided useful palaeoenvironmental data.

Ali-zade, A.A.; Guliyev, I.S.; Ateava, E.Z. [GIA, Baku (Azerbaijan)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Revised fusulinid biostratigraphic zonation and depositional sequence correlation, subsurface Permian basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current revisions in fusulinid zonation enable them to subdivide the fossiliferous Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian section in the Permian basin into more biostratigraphic zones than the older scheme of R.V. Hollingsworth, each zone of shorter temporal duration than has previously been recognized. The identification of distinct fusulinid assemblage subzones within the absolute chronology of radiometric dating provides the basis for these stratigraphic subdivisions. The Atoka is divided into five assemblage subzones, each with an approximate duration of 1.0 m.y. In the Strawn, five subzones each of about 0.8 m.y. duration are recognized within the Cherokee; the three subzones in the Marmaton are each of 0.67 m.y. duration. Within Canyon and Cisco shelf carbonate sections are presently recognized seven and six subzones, respectively; the approximate duration of each is 0.33 and 1.03 m.y. The shelf Wolfcamp section is divisible into seven subzones, each of about 2.36 m.y. span. The entire Leonard shelf section comprises six subzones, each of about 1.83 m.y. duration; three subzones are presently recognized in the lower Leonard and three cumulatively in the middle and upper Leonard sections. These biostratigraphic subzones correspond to single or composite sediment packages (parasequences) that can be correlated regionally from shelf into basinal strata, using wireline log and conventional and processed seismic sections. Such packages comprise parts of individual depositional sequences as recognized by seismic-stratigraphic interpretations. Carbonate (various shelf and foreshelf detrital facies) and sandstone reservoirs occur within individual subzones within these sequences and can be readily defined and mapped by subsurface facies studies.

Reid, A.M.; Reid, S.T.; Mazzullo, S.J.; Robbins, S.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geochemical and Mineralogical Investigation of Uranium in Multielement Contaminated, Organicrich Subsurface Sediment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alluvial sediments characterized by an abundance of refractory or lignitic organic carbon compounds and reduced Fe and S bearing mineral phases have been identified through drilling activities at the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site at Rifle, CO. Regions of the subsurface from which such sediments are derived are referred to as Naturally Reduced Zones (NRZ). We conducted a study with NRZ sediments with the objective to: i.) Characterize solid phase contamination of U and other co-contaminants; ii.) Document the occurrence of potential U host minerals; iii.) Determine U valence state and micron scale spatial association with co-contaminants. Macroscopic (wet chemical batch extractions and a column experiment), microscopic (SEM-EDS), and spectroscopic (Mssbauer, -XRF and XANES) techniques were employed. Results showed that sediments solid phase had significant concentrations of U, S, As, Zn, V, Cr, Cu and Se, and a remarkable assortment of potential U hosts (sorbents and/or electron donors), such as Fe oxides (hematite, magnetite, Al-substituted goethite), siderite, reduced Fe(II) bearing clays, sulfides of different types, Zn sulfide framboids and multi element sulfides. Multi-contaminants, micron size (ca. 5 to 30 m) areas of mainly U(IV) and some U(VI), and/or other electron scavengers or donors such as Se, As, Cr, and V were discovered in the sediments, suggesting complex micron-scale system responses to transient redox conditions, and different extent and rates of competing U redox reactions than those of single contaminant systems. Collectively, the results improve our understanding and ability to predict U and NRZs complex behavior and will delineate future research directions to further study both the natural attenuation and persistence of contaminant plumes and their contribution to groundwater contamination.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Gartman, Brandy N.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Mouser, Paula J.; Heald, Steve M.; Bargar, John R.; Janot, Noemie; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Long, Philip E.

2014-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

222

Assessment of subsurface VOCs using a chemical microsensor array. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of laboratory investigations of several performance parameters relevant to surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) chemical sensor arrays for the measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in contaminated soil and groundwater. The small size, low cost, sensitivity and selectivity of such instruments promise improvements in the quality and quantity of data used to guide site assessment and restoration efforts. In this investigation, calibrations were performed for 15 different coated SAW sensors. Each sensor was exposed to six VOCs selected to represent three chemical classes of contaminants that are commonly found at waste sites (i.e., aliphatic, aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons). A new pattern recognition method was developed for determining which coated sensors would maximize the selectivity and accuracy of quantitation for a given set of vapor contaminants. Using this method, an optimal subwet of four coated sensors was selected for testing in a prototype microsensor instrument. Additional laboratory experiments were performed with this optimized array to assess the limits of detection and linear response ranges for the representative vapors, as well as the additivity of responses to vapors in binary mixtures, temperature and humidity effects, aging effects, and other performance parameters related to the application of this technology to soil and groundwater VOC monitoring. Results demonstrate that SAW microsensor arrays can identify and quantify specific VOCs at concentrations in the {mu}g/L to mg/L range when present alone or in simple (e.g., binary) mixtures. SAW sensor technology offers a potentially effective alternative to existing field instrumentation for headspace analysis, soil vapor monitoring, and vacuum extraction process monitoring of VOCs in subsurface media.

Batterman, S.A.; Zellers, E.T. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). School of Public Health

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Subsurface models of coal occurrence, Oak Grove field, Black Warrior basin, Alabama  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subsurface investigation of coal occurrence in the Black Creek-Cobb interval of Oak Grove field is based on cross sections and isopach maps made from more than 500 density logs. This study was designed to identify styles of coal occurrence in the Black Warrior basin to aid in coalbed-methane exploration and production. Coal occurrence in parts of the Black Warrior basin may be characterized in terms of end-member fluvial and structural control. Fluvial processes apparently were the major controls on coal occurrence in the Black Creek cycle, where sandstone and coal thickness are inversely related. Additionally, occurrence of thick sandstone sequences above the thickest coal beds suggests that peat compaction provided sites for channel avulsion. In the Mary Lee and Cobb cycles, more coal beds occur in a downthrown fault block than in an upthrown block, and in the Pratt and Cobb cycles, the thickest coal beds occur on the downthrown side of a fault. Only in the Mary Lee cycle, where thick peat accumulated in an abandoned tributary system, is coal thickest on the upthrown block. Most coal beds in Oak Grove field are thickest on the downthrown block because differential subsidence apparently promoted peat accumulation. Clastic influx favors beds splits in the downthrown block, but joining of beds in the Pratt cycle may reflect sheltering by the fault. In the Mary Lee cycle, in contrast, channel incision evidently provided local relief sufficient for thick peat to accumulate in lows on the upthrown block. Although fluvial and structural processes result in varied styles of coal occurrence, models of coal occurrence have resulted in a predictive framework that may aid in strategic well siting and completion.

Pashin, J.C. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Geological characterization and statistical comparison of outcrop and subsurface facies: Shannon shelf sand ridges: Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research is to develop a methodology for constructing accurate quantitative models of reservoir heterogeneities. The resulting models are expected to improve predictions of flow patterns, spatial distribution of residual oil after secondary and tertiary recovery operations, and ultimate oil recovery. The purpose of this study is to provide preliminary evaluation of the usefulness of outcrop information in characterizing analogous reservoirs and to develop research techniques necessary for model development. The Shannon Sandstone, a shelf sand ridge deposit in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, was studied. Sedimentologic and petrophysical features of an outcrop exposure of the High-Energy Ridge-Margin facies (HERM) within the Shannon were compared with those from a Shannon sandstone reservoir in Teapot Dome field. Comparisons of outcrop and subsurface permeability and porosity histograms, cumulative distribution functions, correlation lengths and natural logarithm of permeability versus porosity plots indicate a strong similarity between Shannon outcrop and Teapot Dome HERM facies petrophysical properties. Permeability classes found in outcrop samples can be related to crossbedded zones and shaley, rippled, and bioturbated zones. Similar permeability classes related to similar sedimentologic features were found in Teapot Dome field. The similarities of outcrop and Teapot Dome petrophysical properties, which are from the same geologic facies but from different depositional episodes, suggest that rocks deposited under similar depositional processes within a given deposystem have similar reservoir properties. The results of the study indicate that the use of quantitative outcrop information in characterizing reservoirs may provide a significant improvement in reservoir characterization. 17 refs., 5 tabs.

Jackson, S.; Szpakiewicz, M.; Tomutsa, L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About About Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Facebook Tweet about Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Twitter Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Google Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Delicious Rank Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Digg Find More places to share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on AddThis.com... Plans, Implementation, & Results Weatherization Assistance Program

226

SECO Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

maximum of $50,000 per grant ? Funded on a reimbursement basis Renewable Energy Technology Grants ? Fort Worth ISD ? South Sills High School ? 5KW Wind Turbine Alternative Fuel Grants ? Grant program to convert city/county and ISD vehicle... fleets to alternative fuels and hybrid- electric vehicles ? Competitive equipment grant program ? Maximum grant per vehicle - $5,000 ? Maximum total grant per applicant - $50,000 ? Funded on a reimbursement basis The LoanSTAR Revolving Loan Program...

Trevino, E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Program Evaluation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation: Background and Methods Evaluation: Background and Methods Definition of evaluation: the process of determining the worth or merit of something; if "something" is a program, then it's "program evaluation." Other types of evaluation include: product evaluation (most widely practiced, e.g., Consumer Reports); personnel evaluation; research evaluation; policy studies; art, movie, play, and book reviews. Program evaluation is NOT the same as research although they share many characteristics--Both: Start with questions Use similar methods Provide similar information Program evaluation focuses on decisions. Research focuses on answering questions about phenomena to discover new knowledge and test theories/hypotheses. Research is aimed at truth. Evaluation is aimed at

228

Program Description  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Description Program Description SAGE, the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience, is a unique educational program designed to introduce students in geophysics and related fields to "hands on" geophysical exploration and research. The program emphasizes both teaching of field methods and research related to basic science and a variety of applied problems. SAGE is hosted by the National Security Education Center and the Earth and Environmental Sciences Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. * teaches modern geophysical exploration techniques: seismic reflection and refraction, gravity and magnetics, electromagnetics (including magnetotellurics), and electrical resistivity * involves extensive hands-on field experience * integrates geophysical methods to solve real

229

Counterintelligence Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes Counterintelligence Program requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy, including the National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels: DOE 5670.3.

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

230

Program Planning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In practice, organization is fluid, highly matrixed; scientists work in multiple areas - Ad hoc Task Forces form to address specific problems or issues * Experimental Program...

231

Counterintelligence Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish the policies, procedures, and specific responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Counterintelligence (CI) Program. This directive does not cancel any other directive.

1992-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

232

Programming Stage  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter addresses plans for the acquisition and installation of operating environment hardware and software and design of a training program.

1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

233

tentative program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sep 28, 2014 ... with Jon Brown, Gabriel Nagy, Aidan Sims, and Dana Williams. David Fisher Groups acting on Manifolds: Around the Zimmer Program.

2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

234

LWRS Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What's New Archive Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Accomplishments Report: 2013 An accomplishments report highlighting progress in the development of the scientific...

235

2012 Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area Subsurface Corrective Action Unit 447  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Project Shoal Area (PSA) in Nevada was the site of a 12-kiloton underground nuclear test in 1963. Although the surface of the site has been remediated, investigation of groundwater contamination resulting from the test is still in the corrective action process. Annual sampling and hydraulic head monitoring are conducted at the site as part of the subsurface corrective action strategy. Analytical results from the 2012 monitoring are consistent with those of the previous years, with tritium detected only in well HC-4. The tritium concentration in groundwater from well HC-4 remains far below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-established maximum contaminant level of 20,000 picocuries per liter. Concentrations of total uranium and gross alpha were also detected during this monitoring period, with uranium accounting for nearly all the gross alpha activity. The total uranium concentrations obtained from this monitoring period were consistent with previous results and reflect a slightly elevated natural uranium concentration, consistent with the mineralized geologic terrain. Isotopic ratios of uranium also indicate a natural source of uranium in groundwater, as opposed to a nuclear-test-related source. Water level trends obtained from the 2012 water level data were consistent with those of previous years. The corrective action strategy for the PSA is currently focused on revising the site conceptual model (SCM) and evaluating the adequacy of the current monitoring well network. Some aspects of the SCM are known; however, two major concerns are the uncertainty in the groundwater flow direction and the cause of rising water levels in site wells west of the shear zone. Water levels have been rising in the site wells west of the shear zone since the first hydrologic characterization wells were installed in 1996. While water levels in wells west of the shear zone continue to rise, the rate of increase is less than in previous years. The SCM will be revised, and an evaluation of the groundwater monitoring network will be conducted when water levels at the site have stabilized.

None

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Run a Program Run a Program Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Workforce Development Run a Program Energy efficiency upgrade programs provide communities with many benefits. In addition to helping homeowners, businesses, and institutions save money

237

Recovery Act: Understanding the Impact of CO{sub 2} Injection on the Subsurface Microbial Community in an Illinois Basin CCS Reservoir: Integrated Student Training in Geoscience and Geomicrobiology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated research and teaching program was developed to provide cross-?disciplinary training opportunities in the emerging field of carbon capture and storage (CCS) for geobiology students attending the University of Illinois Urbana-?Champaign (UIUC). Students from across the UIUC campus participated, including those from the departments of Geology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Animal Sciences and the Institute for Genomic Biology. The project took advantage of the unique opportunity provided by the drilling and sampling of the large-?scale Phase III CCS demonstration Illinois Basin -? Decatur Project (IBDP) in the central Illinois Basin at nearby Decatur, Illinois. The IBPD is under the direction of the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS, located on the UIUC campus) and the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC). The research component of this project focused on the subsurface sampling and identification of microbes inhabiting the subsurface Cambrian-?age Mt. Simon Sandstone. In addition to formation water collected from the injection and monitoring wells, sidewall rock cores were collected and analyzed to characterize the cements and diagenetic features of the host Mt. Simon Sandstone. This established a dynamic geobiological framework, as well as a comparative baseline, for future studies of how CO2 injection might affect the deep microbial biosphere at other CCS sites. Three manuscripts have been prepared as a result of these activities, which are now being finalized for submission to top-?tier international peer-?reviewed research journals. The training component of this project was structured to ensure that a broad group of UIUC students, faculty and staff gained insight into CCS issues. An essential part of this training was that the UIUC faculty mentored and involved undergraduate and graduate students, as well as postdocs and research scientists, at all stages of the project in order to develop CCS-?focused classroom and field courses, as well as seminars. This program provided an excellent opportunity for participants to develop the background necessary to establish longer-?term research in CCS-?related geology and microbial ecology. Further, the program provided an ongoing dynamic platform to foster long-?term collaboration with the regional ISGS and MGSC sequestration partnership, while offering hands-?on, applied learning experiences.

Fouke, Bruce

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

Dispersion Stability and Electrokinetic Properties of Intrinsic Plutonium Colloids: Implications for Subsurface Transport  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The testing well is located near Nye County, Nevada, along a key groundwater pathway between Yucca Mountain and the Amargosa desert. ... Funding for this work was provided by the Institute for Multiscale Materials Studies, the DOE Underground Test Area (UGTA) program, and the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under Cooperative Agreement Number DBI-0830117. ...

Amr I. Abdel-Fattah; Dongxu Zhou; Hakim Boukhalfa; Sowmitri Tarimala; S. Doug Ware; Arturo A. Keller

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

239

CHRG Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Programs Programs Work Force Information Systems (WFIS): Acquisition Letter 2009-10, Displaced Worker Medical Benefit Program - Friday, July 10, 2009 Acquisition Letter 2009-10, which provides informaiton and guidance to Department of Energy (DOE) Contracting Officers pertaining to the DOE's Displaced Worker Medical Benefit Program (DWMBP) and similar benefits provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. read more ... Computer Account Registration Form - Tuesday, July 28, 2009 All computer users must complete this form whenever a change in multi-user system access is necessary. read more ... Computer Security Awareness Acknowledgement Form - Tuesday, July 28, 2009 Computer Security Rules of Behavior Office of Legacy Management read more ... Remote Access Procedures for Systems at Grand Junction - Monday, January 23, 2006

240

PROGRAM ABSTRACTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& DEVELOPMENT: & DEVELOPMENT: PROGRAM ABSTRACTS Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Catalyst Layer Bipolar Plate Electrode Backing Layers INTEGRATED SYSTEMS Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells Fuel Cell Stack

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Program Summaries  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Program Summaries Program Summaries Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Program Summaries Brochures Reports Accomplishments Presentations BES and Congress Science for Energy Flow Seeing Matter Scale of Things Chart Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » News & Resources Program Summaries Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Bes Summaries 2012 thumbnail JPG .jpg file (469KB) Basic Energy Sciences FY 2012 Research Summaries This report provides a collection of research abstracts and highlights for

242

Program Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The culture of the DOE community will be based on standards. Technical standards will formally integrate part of all DOE facility, program and project activities. The DOE will be recognized as a...

243

RERTR program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program was established in 1978 at the Argonne National Laboratory by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which continues to fund the program and to manage it in coordination with the U.S. Department of State, the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The primary objective of the program is to develop the technology needed to use low-enrichment uranium (LEU) instead of high-enrichment uranium (HEU) in research and test reactors, without significant penalties in experiment performance, economics, or safety. Eliminating the continuing need of HEU supplies for research and test reactors has long been an integral part of U.S. nonproliferation policy. This paper reviews the main accomplishments of the program through the years.

Travelli, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Fate of Magnesium Chloride Brine Applied to Suppress Dust from Unpaved Roads at the INEEL Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between 1984 and 1993, MgCl2 brine was used to suppress dust on unpaved roads at a radioactive waste subsurface disposal area. Because Cl might enhance corrosion of buried metals in the waste, we investigated the distribution and fate of Cl in the vadose zone using pore water samples collected from suction lysimeters and soluble salt concentrations extracted from sediment samples. The Cl/Br mass ratio and the total dissolved Cl concentration of pore water show that brine contamination occurs primarily within 13 m of treated roads, but can extend as much as 30 m laterally in near-surface sedimentary deposits. Within the deep vadose zone, which consists of interlayered basalt lava flows and sedimentary interbeds, brine has moved up to 110 m laterally. This lateral migration suggests formation of perched water and horizontal transport during periods of high recharge. In a few locations, brine migrated to depths of 67 m within 3 to 5 yr. Elevated Cl concentrations were found to depths of 2 m in roadbed material. In drainage ditches along roads, where runoff accumulates and recharge of surface water is high, Cl was flushed from the sediments in 3 to 4 yr. In areas of lower recharge, Cl remained in the sediments after 5 yr. Vertical brine movement is directly related to surface recharge through sediments. The distribution of Cl in pore water and sediments is consistent with estimates of vadose zone residence times and spatial distribution of surface water recharge from other investigations at the subsurface

Larry Hull; Carolyn Bishop

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Nontoxic chemical process for in situ permeability enhancement and accelerated decontamination of fine-grain subsurface sediments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The remediation of heterogeneous subsurfaces is extremely time consuming and expensive with current and developing technologies. Although such technologies can adequately remove contaminants in the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, they cannot access the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The slow bleed of contaminants from the fine-grained sediments is the primary reason why subsurface remediation is so time-consuming and expensive. This invention addresses the problem of remediating contaminated fine-grained sediments. It is intended that, in the future, a heterogeneous site be treated by a hybrid process that first remediates the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, to be followed by the process, described in this invention, to treat the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The invention uses cationic flocculents and organic solvents to collapse the swelling negative double layer surrounding water saturated clay particles, causing a flocculated, cracked clay structure. The modification of the clay fabric in fine-grained sediments dramatically increases the hydraulic conductivity of previously very tight clays many orders of magnitude.

Kansa, Edward J. (Livermore, CA); Wijesinghe, Ananda M. (Tracy, CA); Viani, Brian E. (Oakland, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Machinist Pipeline/Apprentice Program Program Description  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Machinist PipelineApprentice Program Program Description The Machinist Pipeline Program was created by the Prototype Fabrication Division to fill a critical need for skilled...

247

Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than Fe into the structure of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) has been shown to greatly enhance the magnetic properties of the particles, tailoring them to different commercial uses. However, synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is often carried out at high temperatures with toxic solvents resulting in high environmental and energy costs. Additionally, these ferrite nanoparticles are not intrinsically biocompatible, and to make them suitable for insertion into the human body is a rather intricate task. A relatively unexplored resource for magnetic nanomaterial production is subsurface Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, as these microorganisms are capable of producing large quantities of nanoscale magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) at ambient temperatures. Metal-reducing bacteria live in environments deficient in oxygen and conserve energy for growth through the oxidation of hydrogen or organic electron donors, coupled to the reduction of oxidized metals such as Fe(III)-bearing minerals. This can result in the formation of magnetite via the extracellular reduction of amorphous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides causing the release of soluble Fe(II) and resulting in complete recrystallization of the amorphous mineral into a new phase. Some previous studies have reported altering the composition of biogenic magnetite produced by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria for industrial and environmental applications. However, research into the commercial exploitation of bacteria to form magnetic minerals has focused primarily on magnetotactic bacteria which form magnetosomal magnetite internally using very different pathways to those bacteria forming magnetite outside the cell. Magnetotactic bacteria live at the sediment-water interface and use internal nanomagnets to guide them to their preferred environmental niche using the Earth's magnetic field. Since magnetotactic bacteria generally grow optimally under carefully controlled microaerobic conditions, the culturing processes for these organisms are challenging and result in low yields of nanomagnetite. Despite these limitations, magnetotactic bacteria have bee

Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

248

DOE/EA-1331: Environmental Assessment for Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs In Situ Oil Shale Retort Site (07/31/00)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

31 31 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT REMEDIATION OF SUBSURFACE AND GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION AT THE ROCK SPRINGS IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT SITE SWEETWATER COUNTY, WYOMING July 2000 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT REMEDIATION OF SUBSURFACE AND GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION AT THE ROCK SPRINGS IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT SITE SWEETWATER COUNTY, WYOMING July 2000 Prepared by: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory NEPA COMPLIANCE SUMMARY SHEET LEAD AGENCY U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE Environmental Assessment for Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs In Situ Oil Shale Retort Test Site; Sweetwater County Wyoming. CONTACT Additional copies or information concerning the Environmental Assessment (EA) can

249

Characteristics of Strong Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Existing financing programs offer a number of important lessons on effective program design. Some characteristics of strong financing programs drawn from past program experience are described below.

250

NREL: Education Programs - Teacher Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Teacher Programs Teacher Programs Photo of a man and woman working together in a laboratory. They are both wearing safety glasses as they look at a small white box the man is holding. NREL promotes excellence in teaching and learning and contributes to improving critical elements of the science, mathematics, and technology education system. Teachers are offered research and development opportunities to enhance their content knowledge, instructional strategies, and leadership abilities. Visiting Faculty Program (VFP) Visiting Faculty Program (VFP), formerly called Faculty and Student Teams (FaST), seeks to increase the research competitiveness of faculty members and their students at institutions historically underrepresented in the research community in order to expand the workforce vital to the Department

251

Influence of Mg2+ on CaCO3 precipitation during subsurface reactive transport in a homogeneous silicon-etched pore network  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) geochemical reactions exert a fundamental control on the evolution of porosity and permeability in shallow-to-deep subsurface siliciclastic and limestone rock reservoirs. As a result, these carbonate water-rock interactions play a critically important role in research on groundwater remediation, geological carbon sequestration, and hydrocarbon exploration. A study was undertaken to determine the effects of Mg2+ concentration on CaCO3 crystal morphology, precipitation rate, and porosity occlusion under flow and mixing conditions similar to those in subsurface aquifers.

Boyd, Victoria; Yoon, Hongkyu; Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus; Hess, Nancy J.; Fouke, Bruce W.; Valocchi, Albert J.; Werth, Charles J.

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

252

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Incentive Energy Incentive Programs to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on AddThis.com... Energy Savings Performance Contracts ENABLE Utility Energy Service Contracts On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements Energy Incentive Programs Recovery Act Energy Incentive Programs Most states offer energy incentive programs to help offset energy costs.

253

ARRA Program Summary: Energy Smart Jobs Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARRA Program Summary: Energy Smart Jobs Program Statewide Program (Initially targeting urban Description: The Program focuses on both job creation and energy efficiency. Just over one third, utilities and customers to ensure both job creation and energy efficiency opportunities continue

254

CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT CANCER PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT CANCER PROGRAM 2010 ANNUAL REPORT WITH STATISTICAL DATA FROM 2009 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS MEDICAL CENTER #12;2 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2 #12;3 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 3 UIMC CANCER PROGRAM CHANGING MULTIDISCIPLINARY CARE. FOR GOOD. #12;4 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT

Illinois at Chicago, University of

255

SCIENCE Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SCIENCE Program SCIENCE Program early science program Early at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility CONTACT  Argonne Leadership Computing Facility | www.alcf.anl.gov | (877) 737-8615 Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model PI: Venkatramani Balaji Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Award: 150 Million Hours Materials Design and Discovery: Catalysis and Energy Storage PI: Larry Curtiss Argonne National Laboratory Award: 50 Million Hours Direct Numerical Simulation of Autoignition in a Jet in a Cross-Flow PI: Christos Frouzakis Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Award: 150 Million Hours High-Accuracy Predictions of the Bulk Properties of Water PI: Mark Gordon Iowa State University Award: 150 Million Hours Cosmic Structure Probes

256

Educational Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Program The program of the school focuses on the following areas: The fundamentals of the interaction of X-rays and neutrons with matter X-ray and neutron production and experimental instrumentation Theory and practical application of various X-ray and neutron experimental techniques Hands on experience gained through experiments at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Lectures are given by prominent scientists drawn from universities, several national laboratories, and industry. Subjects for lectures include: Interactions of X-rays and Neutrons with Matter Neutron Generation and Detection Neutron Instrumentation X-ray Generation and Detection X-ray Instrumentation Single-Crystal and Surface Diffraction

257

Program Description  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Description Program Description Discover E (Engineering) is an evening of interesting, interactive and fun engineering, science, math, and technology demonstrations for K-12 students and their parents or guardians. It is held in conjunction with National Engineers Week which is celebrated at the time of George Washington's birthday, our nation's first President, who was a military engineer and land surveyor. Activities include 30-50 interactive demonstrations of basic engineering, science, technology and math principles that may include robots, reverse engineering, casting, crystal structures, forensic science, the effects of liquid nitrogen, slide rule, sound waves, electrostatics, mechanics, materials properties and materials

258

Sequestration Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NETL's NETL's Carbon Capture and Sequestration Program Advances of Multi-pollutant and CO 2 Control Technologies Chicago, IL April 30, 2007 Timothy Fout Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory T. Fout, Apr. 2007 Outline for Presentation * NETL Overview * The Issue * The Solutions * What is Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) * DOE's Sequestration Program Structure * CO 2 Capture Research Projects T. Fout, Apr. 2007 National Energy Technology Laboratory * Only DOE national lab dedicated to fossil energy - Fossil fuels provide 85% of U.S. energy supply * One lab, five locations, one management structure * 1,100 Federal and support-contractor employees * Research spans fundamental science to technology demonstrations West Virginia

259

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Residential Buildings Integration Program Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

260

Maryland Efficiency Program Options  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Maryland Efficiency Program Options, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

RESEARCHCONTRIBUTIONS Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCHCONTRIBUTIONS Programming Techniques and Data Structures Min-Max Heaps and Ian Munro Editor Generalized Priority Queues M. D. ATKINSON,J.-R. SACK,N. SANTORO,and T. STROTHOTTE ABSTRACT: ,4 simple implementation of double- endedpriority queues is presented. The proposed structure, called a min-max heap, can

Atkinson, Mike

262

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada Controlled Copy No.: Revision No.: 3 March 2006 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1025--Rev. 3 Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062

263

Final Report Coupling in silico microbial models with reactive transport models to predict the fate of contaminants in the subsurface.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project successfully accomplished its goal of coupling genome-scale metabolic models with hydrological and geochemical models to predict the activity of subsurface microorganisms during uranium bioremediation. Furthermore, it was demonstrated how this modeling approach can be used to develop new strategies to optimize bioremediation. The approach of coupling genome-scale metabolic models with reactive transport modeling is now well enough established that it has been adopted by other DOE investigators studying uranium bioremediation. Furthermore, the basic principles developed during our studies will be applicable to much broader investigations of microbial activities, not only for other types of bioremediation, but microbial metabolism in diversity of environments. This approach has the potential to make an important contribution to predicting the impact of environmental perturbations on the cycling of carbon and other biogeochemical cycles.

Lovley, Derek R.

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

PROBABILISTIC SIMULATION OF SUBSURFACE FLUID FLOW: A STUDY USING A NUMERICAL SCHEME  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been an increasing interest in probabilistic modeling of hydrogeologic systems. The classical approach to groundwater modeling has been deterministic in nature, where individual layers and formations are assumed to be uniformly homogeneous. Even in the case of complex heterogeneous systems, the heterogeneities describe the differences in parameter values between various layers, but not within any individual layer. In a deterministic model a single-number is assigned to each hydrogeologic parameter, given a particular scale of interest. However, physically there is no such entity as a truly uniform and homogeneous unit. Single-number representations or deterministic predictions are subject to uncertainties. The approach used in this work models such uncertainties with probabilistic parameters. The resulting statistical distributions of output variables are analyzed. A numerical algorithm, based on axiomatic principles of probability theory, performs arithmetic operations between probability distributions. Two subroutines are developed from the algorithm and incorporated into the computer program TERZAGI, which solves groundwater flow problems in saturated, multi-dimensional systems. The probabilistic computer program is given the name, PROGRES. The algorithm has been applied to study the following problems: one-dimensional flow through homogeneous media, steady-state and transient flow conditions, one-dimensional flow through heterogeneous media, steady-state and transient flow conditions, and two-dimensional steady-stte flow through heterogeneous media. The results are compared with those available in the literature.

Buscheck, Timothy Eric

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 15, PAGES 2245-2248, AUGUST 1, 2000 Sub-surface nuclear tests monitoring through the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) which should detect nuclear tests down to 1 kiloton (kt) TNT equivalent anywhere on the planet. The IMS), hydroacoustic and infrasound waves will help check for underground, under-water and atmospheric nuclear testsGEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 15, PAGES 2245-2248, AUGUST 1, 2000 Sub-surface nuclear

Hourdin, Chez Frédéric

266

Program Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation covers how to go about developing a human reliability program. In particular, it touches on conceptual thinking, raising awareness in an organization, the actions that go into developing a plan. It emphasizes evaluating all positions, eliminating positions from the pool due to mitigating factors, and keeping the process transparent. It lists components of the process and objectives in process development. It also touches on the role of leadership and the necessity for audit.

Atencio, Julian J.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Bridge MBA ProgrAM Program Format  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bridge MBA ProgrAM Program Format Program Duration 12 months Program Format Cohort (lockstep) Class Requirements · Application Form and $55 fee. · Resume · Essay outlining why you wish to join the Bridge MBA program, and how you expect the Bridge to aid your future job search (500 words or less) · Official

Carter, John

268

Crosscutting Subsurface Initiative: Adaptive Control of Subsurface...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in the ability to access, characterize, predict, and adaptively manipulate fracture and flow processes over scales from nanometers to kilometers. This town hall...

269

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cushion Gas for Compressed Air Energy Storage in SubsurfaceCushion Gas for Compressed Air Energy Storage, 10th AnnualCushion Gas for Compressed Air Energy Storage in Subsurface

ed, Todd Hansen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Perennial Grass Breeding Program BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perennial Grass Breeding Program BIOENERGY PROGRAM One Texas AgriLife Research initiative for bioenergy is the perennial grass breeding program. Results are outlined here. Pearl Millet-Napiergrass P

271

DOE Technical Assistance Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

government needs 17 | TAP Webinar eere.energy.gov Market-Focused Programs * Partner with utilities to: - Help promote and supplement EECBG programs - Directly administer programs...

272

Seafood Extension Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seafood Extension Program Pamela Tom, Program Manager,of California Sea Grants Seafood Extension Program and thetechnical information to seafood processors, distributors,

Tom, Pamela

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Subsurface Completion Report for Amchitka Underground Nuclear Test Sites: Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin, Rev. No.: 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island, Alaska, in 1965, 1969, and 1971. The effects of the Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin tests on the environment were extensively investigated during and following the detonations, and the area continues to be monitored today. This report is intended to document the basis for the Amchitka Underground Nuclear Test Sites: Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin (hereafter referred to as ''Amchitka Site'') subsurface completion recommendation of No Further Remedial Action Planned with Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance, and define the long-term surveillance and maintenance strategy for the subsurface. A number of factors were considered in evaluating and selecting this recommendation for the Amchitka Site. Historical studies and monitoring data, ongoing monitoring data, the results of groundwater modeling, and the results of an independent stakeholder-guided scientific investigation were also considered in deciding the completion action. Water sampling during and following the testing showed no indication that radionuclides were released to the near surface, or marine environment with the exception of tritium, krypton-85, and iodine-131 found in the immediate vicinity of Long Shot surface ground zero. One year after Long Shot, only tritium was detectable (Merritt and Fuller, 1977). These tritium levels, which were routinely monitored and have continued to decline since the test, are above background levels but well below the current safe drinking water standard. There are currently no feasible means to contain or remove radionuclides in or around the test cavities beneath the sites. Surface remediation was conducted in 2001. Eleven drilling mud pits associated with the Long Shot, Milrow and Cannikin sites were remediated. Ten pits were remediated by stabilizing the contaminants and constructing an impermeable cap over each pit. One pit was remediated by removing all of the contaminated mud for consolidation in another pit. In addition to the mud pits, the hot mix plant was also remediated. Ongoing monitoring data does not indicate that radionuclides are currently seeping into the marine environment. Additionally, the groundwater modeling results indicate no seepage is expected for tens to thousands of years. If seepage does occur in the future, however, the rich, diverse ecosystems around the island could be at risk, as well as people eating foods from the area. An independent science study was conducted by the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) in accordance with the Amchitka Independent Science Plan (2003). The study report was published on August 1, 2005. The CRESP study states ''our geophysical and biological analyses did not find evidence of risk from radionuclides from the consumption of marine foods, nor indication of any current radionuclide contaminated migration into the marine environment from the Amchitka test shots''. The study also found evidence supporting the groundwater modeling conclusions of very slow contaminant transport (CRESP, 2005). While no further action is recommended for the subsurface of the Amchitka Site, long-term stewardship of Amchitka Island will be instituted and will continue into the future. This will include institutional controls management and enforcement, post-completion monitoring, performance of five-year reviews, public participation, and records management. Long-term stewardship will be the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. The Department of Energy is recommending completion of the investigation phase of the Amchitka Sites. The recommended remedy for the Amchitka Site is No Further Action with Long-Term Monitoring and Surveillance. The future long-term stewardship actions will be governed by a Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan. This Plan is currently being developed with input from the State, landowner, and other interested or affected stakeholders.

Echelard, Tim

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Combining VisNIR hyperspectral imagery and legacy measured soil profiles to map subsurface soil properties in a Mediterranean area (Cap-Bon, Tunisia)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Previous studies have demonstrated that Visible Near InfraRed (VisNIR) hyperspectral imagery is a cost-efficient way to map soil properties at fine resolutions (~5m) over large areas. However, such mapping is only feasible for the soil surface because the effective penetration depths of optical sensors do not exceed several millimeters. This study aims to determine how VisNIR hyperspectral imagery can serve to map the subsurface properties at four depth intervals (1530cm, 3060cm, 60100cm and 30100cm) when used with legacy soil profiles and images of parameters derived from digital elevation model (DEM). Two types of surfacesubsurface functions, namely linear models and random forests, that estimate subsurface property values from surface values and landscape covariates were first calibrated over the set of legacy measured profiles. These functions were then applied to map the soil properties using the hyperspectral-derived digital surface soil property maps and the images of landscape covariates as input. Error propagation was addressed using a Monte Carlo approach to estimate the mapping uncertainties. The study was conducted in a pedologically contrasted 300km2-cultivated area located in the Cap Bon region (Northern Tunisia) and tested on three soil surface properties (clay and sand contents and cation exchange capacity). The main results were as follows: i) fairly satisfactory (cross-validation R2 between 0.55 and 0.81) surfacesubsurface functions were obtained for predicting the soil properties at 1530cm and 3060cm, whereas predictions at 60100cm were less accurate (R2 between 0.38 and 0.43); ii) linear models outperformed random-forest models in developing surfacesubsurface functions; iii) due to the error propagations, the final predicted maps of the subsurface soil properties captured from 1/3 to 2/3 of the total variance with a significantly decreasing performance with depth; and iv) these maps brought significant improvements over the existing soil maps of the region and showed soil patterns that largely agreed with the local pedological knowledge. This paper demonstrates the added value of combining modern remote sensing techniques with old legacy soil databases.

Philippe Lagacherie; Anne-Ruth Sneep; Ccile Gomez; Sinan Bacha; Guillaume Coulouma; Mohamed Hdi Hamrouni; Insaf Mekki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Human Reliability Program Overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

Bodin, Michael

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

276

LWR Sustainability Program Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Integrated Program Plan, Revision 2, INL-EXT-11-23452, April 2014. pdf DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program -...

277

DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Administered by the HSS Office of Corporate Safety Programs, the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is responsible for implementing performance standards for DOE contractor external dosimetry and radiobioassay programs through periodic performance testing and on-site program assessments.

278

ARM - Program Fact Sheets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Annual Reports Program Fact Sheets Campaign Backgrounders Education and Outreach Posters Brochures Research Highlights Summaries Program Fact Sheets Please contact...

279

Water Power Program: Publications  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Water Power Program HOME ABOUT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES INFORMATION RESOURCES NEWS EVENTS EERE Water Power Program Information Resources Publications...

280

Actuarial Sciences Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Purdue Actuarial Science Program is an interdisciplinary program offered jointly by the Department of Mathematics and Department of Statistics.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan A Vision for Building Comprehensive Wetland Information for the State of Colorado Planning Years 2011­2015 #12;Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan A Vision for Building Comprehensive Wetland Information for the State of Colorado Planning

282

Integrated Program Review Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Program Review (IPR) Fish and Wildlife Program Costs May 20, 2010 Presented to Northwest-2013 data is based on the proposed IPR spending levels as of May 13, 2010. Total $ 155 4 20 34 4 445 116 778 Program Proposed Expense Budget F&W Program Expense Budget IPR FY 2012 FY 2013 Base * 239,634,000 243

283

Fire Protection Systems Program Program Manual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fire Protection Systems Program Program Manual Approved by: (name) Last revised by: (name) Revision/FPS_Program_Manual_Template.docx 1. Introduction The Fire Protection Systems Program is designed to make sure the annual compliance ................................................................................................................. 3 7.1.1 Job Plan: Fire Pump Testing

Pawlowski, Wojtek

284

Program 050  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental and Water Environmental and Water Resources MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH PROGRAM Background Mercury exists in trace amounts in fossil fuels (e.g., natural gas, coal), vegetation, crustal material, and waste products. Through combustion or natural processes, mercury vapor can be released to the atmosphere, where it can drift for a year or more, spreading with air currents over vast regions of the globe. Current estimates approximate that 5000 tons of mercury is released annually into the atmosphere from anthropogenic (man-made) and natural sources combined. Anthropogenic sources in the United States account for about 3 percent of the total annual global mercury releases, with U.S. power plants contributing about 1 percent of the world total. Mercury emissions have fallen in

285

Estimated duration of the subsurface reduction environment produced by the salt-stone disposal facility on the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formula for Savannah River Site (SRS) salt-stone includes {approx}25 wt% slag to create a reducing environment for mitigating the subsurface transport of several radionuclides, including Tc-99. Based on laboratory measurements and two-dimensional reactive transport calculations, it was estimated that the SRS salt-stone waste form will maintain a reducing environment, and therefore its ability to sequester Tc-99, for well over 10,000 years. For example, it was calculated that {approx}16% of the salt-stone reduction capacity would be consumed after 213,000 years. For purposes of comparison, a second calculation was presented that was based on entirely different assumptions (direct spectroscopic measurements and diffusion calculations). The results from this latter calculation were near identical to those from this study. Obtaining similar conclusions by two extremely different calculations and sets of assumptions provides additional credence to the conclusion that the salt-stone will likely maintain a reducing environment in excess of 10,000 years. (authors)

Kaplan, D.I.; Hang, T. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Carolina (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Computational methods for improving the resolution of subsurface seismic images. Progress report, September 15, 1991--September 14, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our interactive modeling for Gaussian beam modeling in two-dimensional, triangulated complex geologic structure, has been generalized to include transmission losses at interfaces, and density and Q-characterization of attenuation in layers. Also, multiple reflections and the option to model data from VSP acquisition geometry have been included. Shortcomings when the structure contains first-order discontinuities, however, limit the full geologic complexity that presently can be modeled by the Gaussian beam method. Other studies of wave filtering that arises for waves propagating nearly parallel to bedding reveal the importance of tunneling evanescent filtering on the propagating wavelet. Likewise, for reflections from steep interfaces, we have developed a dip-divergence correction to compensate for shortcomings in the conventional divergence correction for energy spreading. A new direction this past year, which we will be pursuing in the year ahead is analysis of errors in migration and dip-moveout (DMO) that arise when conventional imaging processing, which ignores anisotropy, is applied to data acquired where the subsurface is transversely isotropic. We are also developing approaches for taking anisotropy into account in these important imaging processes. Similarly, we have developed an efficient approach to performing DMO on P-SV-mode-converted data. Our interests in taking anisotropy into account have led us to study the importance of anisotropy in the overburden on reflection amplitude variations with offset (AVO).

Larner, K.; Hale, D.; Bleistein, N.; Cohen, J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Approaches to identifying reservoir heterogeneity and reserve growth opportunities from subsurface data: The Oficina Formation, Budare field, Venezuela  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We applied an integrated geologic, geophysical, and engineering approach devised to identify heterogeneities in the subsurface that might lead to reserve growth opportunities in our analysis of the Oficina Formation at Budare field, Venezuela. The approach involves 4 key steps: (1) Determine geologic reservoir architecture; (2) Investigate trends in reservoir fluid flow; (3) Integrate fluid flow trends with reservoir architecture; and (4) Estimate original oil-in-place, residual oil saturation, and remaining mobile oil, to identify opportunities for reserve growth. There are three main oil-producing reservoirs in the Oficina Formation that were deposited in a bed-load fluvial system, an incised valley-fill, and a barrier-strandplain system. Reservoir continuity is complex because, in addition to lateral facies variability, the major Oficina depositional systems were internally subdivided by high-frequency stratigraphic surfaces. These surfaces define times of intermittent lacustrine and marine flooding events that punctuated the fluvial and marginal marine sedimentation, respectively. Syn and post depositional faulting further disrupted reservoir continuity. Trends in fluid flow established from initial fluid levels, response to recompletion workovers, and pressure depletion data demonstrated barriers to lateral and vertical fluid flow caused by a combination of reservoir facies pinchout, flooding shale markers, and the faults. Considerable reserve growth potential exists at Budare field because the reservoir units are highly compartment by the depositional heterogeneity and structural complexity. Numerous reserve growth opportunities were identified in attics updip of existing production, in untapped or incompletely drained compartments, and in field extensions.

Hamilton, D.S.; Raeuchle, S.K.; Holtz, M.H. [Bureau of Economic Geology, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Syntrophic Effects in a Subsurface Clostridial Consortium on Fe(III)-(Oxyhydr)oxide Reduction and Secondary Mineralization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we cultivated from subsurface sediments an anaerobic Clostridia 25 consortium that was composed of a fermentative Fe-reducer Clostridium species (designated as 26 strain FGH) and a novel sulfate-reducing bacterium belonging to the Clostridia family 27 Vellionellaceae (designated as strain RU4). In pure culture, Clostridium sp. strain FGH mediated 28 the reductive dissolution/transformation of iron oxides during growth on peptone. When 29 Clostridium sp. FGH was grown with strain RU4 on peptone, the rates of iron oxide reduction 30 were significantly higher. Iron reduction by the consortium was mediated by multiple 31 mechanisms, including biotic reduction by Clostridium sp. FGH and biotic/abiotic reactions 32 involving biogenic sulfide by strain RU4. The Clostridium sp. FGH produced hydrogen during 33 fermentation, and the presence of hydrogen inhibited growth and iron reduction activity. The 34 sulfate-reducing partner strain RU4 was stimulated by the presence of H2 gas and generated 35 reactive sulfide which promoted the chemical reduction of the iron oxides. Characterization of 36 Fe(II) mineral products showed the formation of magnetite during ferrihydrite reduction, and 37 the precipitation of iron sulfides during goethite and hematite reduction. The results suggest an 38 important pathway for iron reduction and secondary mineralization by fermentative sulfate-39 reducing microbial consortia is through syntrophy-driven biotic/abiotic reactions with biogenic 40 sulfide.

Shah, Madhavi; Lin, Chu-Ching; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhao, Xiuhong; Wang, Yangping; Barkay, Tamar; Yee, Nathan

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

289

Pilot demonstration of concentrated solar-powered desalination of subsurface agricultural drainage water and other brackish groundwater sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The energywater nexus is addressed with the experimental demonstration of a solar-powered desalination process system. This system was designed for high-recovery treatment of subsurface agricultural drainage water as a reuse strategy as well as other brackish groundwater sources. These water sources may exhibit wide fluctuations in salinity and makeup and pose a high risk for operational troubles due to high scaling potential. A first-of-its-kind open-cycle vapor-absorption heat pump is coupled with a multiple-effect distillation train and a large parabolic trough solar thermal concentrator. Without the heat pump, the distillation operation showed a minimum thermal energy consumption of 261.87kWhth/m3. With the heat pump, the thermal energy consumption was reduced by more than 49% to 133.2kWhth/m3. This reduction in thermal energy requirement directly translates into a 49% reduction in solar array area required to power a process with the same freshwater production rate as a system without an integrated heat pump. An optimized design was modeled and the thermal energy performance of a commercial system is projected at 34.9kWhth/m3 using a 10-effect MED operating at 85% recovery.

Matthew D. Stuber; Christopher Sullivan; Spencer A. Kirk; Jennifer A. Farrand; Philip V. Schillaci; Brian D. Fojtasek; Aaron H. Mandell

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

Ling, Hao [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Hamilton, Mark F. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Bhalla, Rajan [Science Applications International Corporation] [Science Applications International Corporation; Brown, Walter E. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Hay, Todd A. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Whitelonis, Nicholas J. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Yang, Shang-Te [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Naqvi, Aale R. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

291

Subsurface flow and transport of organic chemicals: an assessment of current modeling capability and priority directions for future research (1987-1995)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Theoretical and computer modeling capability for assessing the subsurface movement and fate of organic contaminants in groundwater was examined. Hence, this study is particularly concerned with energy-related, organic compounds that could enter a subsurface environment and move as components of a liquid phase separate from groundwater. The migration of organic chemicals that exist in an aqueous dissolved state is certainly a part of this more general scenario. However, modeling of the transport of chemicals in aqueous solution has already been the subject of several reviews. Hence, this study emphasizes the multiphase scenario. This study was initiated to focus on the important physicochemical processes that control the behavior of organic substances in groundwater systems, to evaluate the theory describing these processes, and to search for and evaluate computer codes that implement models that correctly conceptualize the problem situation. This study is not a code inventory, and no effort was made to identify every available code capable of representing a particular process.

Streile, G.P.; Simmons, C.S.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Intergovernmental Programs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Intergovernmental Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs The Office of Environmental Management supports, by means of grants and cooperative agreements, a number of institutionalized activities and relationships with various national intergovernmental organizations. These organizations include the Energy Communities Alliance, the Environmental Council of States, the National Association of Attorneys General, the National Governors Association, and the National Conference of

293

Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. Strain 300A, Isolated from Hanford 300A Subsurface Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facultative iron-reducing (Fe(III)-reducing) Paenibacillus sp. strain was isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms that was capable of reducing soluble Fe(III) complexes (Fe(III)-NTA and Fe(III)-citrate) but unable to reduce poorly crystalline ferrihydrite (Fh). However, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of reducing Fh in the presence of low concentrations (2 M) of either of electron transfer mediators (ETMs) flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Maximum initial Fh reduction rates were observed at catalytic concentrations (<10 M) of either FMN or AQDS. Higher FMN concentrations inhibited Fh reduction, while increased AQDS concentrations did not. We found that Paenibacillus sp. 300A also could reduce Fh in the presence of natural ETMs from Hanford 300A subsurface sediments. In the absence of ETMs, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of immobilizing U(VI) through both reduction and adsorption. The relative contributions of adsorption and microbial reduction to U(VI) removal from the aqueous phase were ~7:3 in PIPES and ~1:4 in bicarbonate buffer. Our study demonstrated that Paenibacillus sp. 300A catalyzes Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization and that these reactions benefit from externally added or naturally existing ETMs in 300A subsurface sediments.

Ahmed, B.; Cao, B.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Ica, Tuba; Dohnalkova, Alice; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Paksoy, Akin; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

294

Technology needs for remediation: Hanford and other DOE sites. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technologies are being developed under the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program to facilitate remediation of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) buried and stored low-level radioactive, transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive and hazardous buried wastes. The BWID program is being coordinated by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho, a DOE site that has large volumes of buried radioactive wastes. The program is currently focusing its efforts on the problems at INEL`s Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). As specific technologies are successfully demonstrated, they will be available for transfer to applications at other DOE buried waste sites. The purpose of this study is to present buried waste technology needs that have been identified for DOE sites other than INEL.

Stapp, D.C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Summer Internship Programs | Office of Educational Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BNL Summer Internship Programs BNL Summer Internship Programs Please note: All DOE programs have strict deadlines. Please contact the Office of Educational Programs for this information. Mentor Orientation Please review the following documents that are part of the Mentor Orientation: Mentor Manual New Appointment Checklist SULI Syllabus CCI Syllabus VFP Syllabus DOE Internship Programs DOE Program Forms & Information DOE summer programs include Community College Institute (CCI), Science Undergraduate Summer Internship (SULI) and Visiting Faculty Program (VFP). DOE Summer Internship Programs Important Dates January 31st - 1st round of student applications available for viewing February 23rd - 2nd round of student applications available for viewing March 12th - Last day for accepting DOE student request

296

Corrective Action Decision Document/ Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the subsurface at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443, CNTA - Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). CAU 443 is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, north of U.S. Highway 6, about 48 kilometers north of Warm Springs, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the corrective action plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for the UC-1 Cavity (Corrective Action Site 58-57-001) at CAU 443, as provided in the FFACO. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. A Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) was performed in several stages from 1999 to 2003, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites (Corrective Action Unit No. 443)'' (DOE/NV, 1999). Groundwater modeling was the primary activity of the CAI. Three phases of modeling were conducted for the Faultless underground nuclear test. The first involved the gathering and interpretation of geologic and hydrogeologic data into a three-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow, and use of the output of the flow model for a transport model of radionuclide release and migration behavior (Pohlmann et al., 2000). The second modeling phase (known as a Data Decision Analysis [DDA]) occurred after the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection reviewed the first model and was designed to respond to concerns regarding model uncertainty (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). The third modeling phase updated the original flow and transport model to incorporate the uncertainty identified in the DDA, and focused the model domain on the region of interest to the transport predictions. This third phase culminated in the calculation of contaminant boundaries for the site (Pohll et al., 2003).

Susan Evans

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Office of Educational Programs | Teacher Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Specifically Geared for Teachers Specifically Geared for Teachers Displaying all programs and contests suitable for teachers and faculty. [ Update Search Criteria ] (OEP) InSynC (OEP) Professional Development Workshops for Teachers (OEP) The G.R.E.En. Institute (OSSP) GREEN Institute's Open Space Stewardship Program Other Educational Programs Displaying all programs and contests. [ Narrow Search ] (INCREASE) Historically Black Colleges and Universities / National Synchrotron Light Source Consortium (Internship - CCI) Community College Internship (Internship - SULI) Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (Internship - VFP) Visiting Faculty Program (NCSS) Nuclear Chemistry Summer School (NNSS) Nuclear Nonproliferation Safeguards and Security Summer Course (OEP) College Mini-Semester Program

298

Office of Educational Programs | Student Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Contests for Students and Contests for Students Displaying all programs and contests. [ Narrow Search ] (INCREASE) Historically Black Colleges and Universities / National Synchrotron Light Source Consortium (Internship - CCI) Community College Internship (Internship - SULI) Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (Internship - VFP) Visiting Faculty Program (NCSS) Nuclear Chemistry Summer School (NNSS) Nuclear Nonproliferation Safeguards and Security Summer Course (OEP) College Mini-Semester Program (OEP) InSynC (OEP) New York State Collegiate Science & Technology Entry Program Mini-Course (CSTEP) (OEP) Professional Development Workshops for Teachers (OEP) The G.R.E.En. Institute (OSSP) GREEN Institute's Open Space Stewardship Program (Postdoc) AGEP-T FRAME (Research - HSRP) High School Research Program

299

Undergraduate Student Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Undergraduate Program Undergraduate Program Undergraduate Student Program The Undergraduate Student (UGS) program is a year-round educational program that provides students with relevant research experience while they are pursuing an undergraduate degree. Contact Program Manager Scott Robbins Student Programs (505) 663-5621 Email Program Coordinator Brenda Montoya Student Programs (505) 663-5116 Email Deadline for continuing and returning students: you are required to submit updated transcripts to the program office by 2/28 each year. Get relevant experience while pursuing undergraduate degree The Undergraduate Student (UGS) Program offers summer, part-time, and full-time appointments for undergraduate students. The program is a year-round educational program that provides students with

300

Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Processing Site. Revision 3, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The supplemental standards provisions of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 192 (40 CFR Part 192) require the cleanup of radionuclides other than radium-226 (Ra-226) to levels ``as low as reasonably achievable`` (ALARA), taking into account site-specific conditions, if sufficient quantities and concentrations are present to constitute a significant radiation hazard. In this context, thorium-230 (Th-230) at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site will require remediation. However, a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table at the site significantly complicates conventional remedial action with respect to cleanup. Characterization data indicate that in the offpile areas, the removal of residual in situ bulk Ra-226 and Th-230 such that the 1000-year projected Ra-226 concentration (Ra-226 concentration in 1000 years due to the decay of in situ Ra-226 and the in-growth of Ra-226 from in situ Th-230) complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cleanup standard for in situ Ra-226 and the cleanup protocol for in situ Th-230 can be readily achieved using conventional excavation techniques for bulk contamination without encountering significant impacts due to groundwater. The EPA cleanup standard and criterion for Ra-226 and the 1000-year projected Ra-226 are 5 and 15 picocuries per gram (pCi/g) above background, respectively, averaged over 15-centimeter (cm) deep surface and subsurface intervals and 100-square-meter (m{sup 2}) grid areas. Significant differential migration of Th-230 relative to Ra-226 has occurred over 40 percent of the subpile area. To effectively remediate the site with respect to Ra-226 and Th-230, supplemental standard is proposed and discussed in this report.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Subsurface temperature anomalies as a key to petroleum-producing areas in the Cherokee and Forest City Basins, eastern Kansas?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relation of subsurface temperature to `plain-type fold` structure in the Midcontinent (USA) as an exploration tool has been speculated on for a long time. Structural highs, termed `plains-type folds,` are partly the result of differential compaction of sediments over rigid crystalline fault blocks in the Precambrian basement. In the Midcontinent, bottom-hole temperature (BHT) data, temperatures measured in drillstem tests (DSTs), and structural data are abundant. In the Cherokee and Forest City Basins, we analyzed BHT data by depth and stratigraphic unit (Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle carbonates; Mississippian carbonates; and Perm-Pennsylvanian clastics). By relating the BHTs to DSTs, it was noted that the thermal disturbance inherent in BHT by drilling is minor and comparable within a formation. Also, the signal-noise ratio of BHTs could be improved utilizing the large data set. Although the resulting BHT formation gradients show unexpected values from the thermal conductivity in the carbonates and from the evaluated temperature disturbance by the drilling process, analysis of the BHT spatial pattern shows a coincidence of structural highs and temperature anomalies both in the clastics and in the carbonates. These BHT anomalies are outlined by values higher than the regional temperature trend. We attribute the anomalies partly to the insulation effect of petroleum (which may include the self-generation of heat) and partly to the movement of fluids vertically through the fracture and fault system created in the sedimentary veneer. Numerous examples from the oil- and gas-producing areas in eastern Kansas show that the nature of origin of fluids contained in a porous medium can alter local geothermal conditions.

Merriam, D.F. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Foerster, A. [GeoForschungsZentrum Posdam (Germany)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Notices Heritage Program Volunteer Program; (b)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

67 Federal Register 67 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 60 / Thursday, March 28, 2013 / Notices Heritage Program Volunteer Program; (b) the USAF Heritage Program the means with which to select respondents pursuant to the USAF Heritage Program Volunteer Program. The primary use of the information collection includes the evaluation and placement of respondents within the USAF Heritage Program Volunteer Program. Affected Public: Business or other for profit; Not-for-profit Institutions. Annual Burden Hours: 49.5. Number of Respondents: 198. Responses per Respondent: 1. Average Burden per Response: 15 minutes. Frequency: On occasion. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Summary of Information Collection Respondents are individuals expressing an interest in participating in the USAF Heritage Program Volunteer

303

Program Management for Large Scale Engineering Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this whitepaper is to summarize the LAI research that applies to program management. The context of most of the research discussed in this whitepaper are large-scale engineering programs, particularly in the ...

Oehmen, Josef

304

State Energy Program Competitive Financial Assistance Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

State Energy Program (SEP) dedicates a portion of its funding each year to provide competitively awarded financial assistance to U.S. states and territories to advance policies, programs, and market strategies.

305

Contract Management Certificate Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contract Management Certificate Program Accelerate Your Career BusinessandManagement extension bearing the UC seal signifies a well- known, uncompromising standard of academic excellence. #12;Contract Management Certificate Program UC Irvine Extension's Contract Management Certificate Program focuses on core

Rose, Michael R.

306

Assistance Program, State Energy Program, Energy Efficiency and...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Assistance Program, State Energy Program, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants Assistance Program, State Energy Program, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants...

307

State Energy Program Formula Grant Guidance Program Year 2007...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Formula Grant Guidance Program Year 2007 State Energy Program Formula Grant Guidance Program Year 2007 This document provides instructions to the states for program year 2007 about...

308

Hydropower Program Technology Overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New fact sheets for the DOE Office of Power Technologies (OPT) that provide technology overviews, description of DOE programs, and market potential for each OPT program area.

Not Available

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs SHARE Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs image Oak Ridge National Laboratory covers the entire spectrum of nuclear nonproliferation work, from...

310

ORISE: Science Education Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

undergraduate students for paid internships at ORNL for the 2015 spring term of the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Program. The program at ORNL is administered by...

311

Energy Smart Grocer Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Commercial Commercial Industrial Lighting Energy Smart Grocer Program HVAC Program Shell Measures Commercial Kitchen & Food Service Equipment Plug Load New...

312

Fungal Genomics Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strains Comparative genomics and transcriptomics of xyloseFungal Genomics Program Igor Grigoriev 1 * (complex communities Fungal Genomics Program Igor Grigoriev

Grigoriev, Igor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

program | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Carbon Storage Program Carbon Capture Program Crosscutting Research Program Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) Lake Nyos and Mammoth Mountain: What Do They Tell Us about...

314

Program Analysis | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Program Analysis Program Analysis 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Vehicle Technologies Plenary...

315

Subsurface Site Characterization  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

and limestone. The Green River Formation is the primary formation of interest for oil shale development in the region. Quaternary-age deposits of alluvium, mudflows, talus...

316

Addressing Common Subsurface Challenges  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of the President's Climate Action Plan, necessary to meet the 2050 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction target. Increasing domestic energy supply from greater hydrocarbon...

317

EMSL - subsurface science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

science en Oxidative Remobilization of Technetium Sequestered by Sulfide-Transformed Nano Zerovalent Iron. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsoxidative-remobilization-tec...

318

Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cycle and ecosystem biogeochemistry and inform biogeochemistry components of Earth System Models. Theme Leads Instruments Science Highlights Publications Leads Nancy J. Hess...

319

EMSL - Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cycle and ecosystem biogeochemistry and inform biogeochemistry components of Earth System Models. en Influence of Adsorption Site and Wavelength on the Photodesorption of NO...

320

subsurface geological field | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

transport of U(VI) at the field-scale. The results indicate that multi-rate U(VI) sorptiondesorption, U(VI) surface complexation reactions, and initial U(VI) concentrations...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EMSL - subsurface geological field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

transport of U(VI) at the field-scale. The results indicate that multi-rate U(VI) sorptiondesorption, U(VI) surface complexation reactions, and initial U(VI) concentrations...

322

In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Effect of rogue particles on the sub-surface damage of fused silica during grinding/polishing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The distribution and characteristics of surface cracks (i.e., sub-surface damage or scratching) on fused silica formed during grinding/polishing resulting from the addition of rogue particles in the base slurry has been investigated. Fused silica samples (10 cm diameter x 1 cm thick) were: (1) ground by loose abrasive grinding (alumina particles 9-30 {micro}m) on a glass lap with the addition of larger alumina particles at various concentrations with mean sizes ranging from 15-30 {micro}m, or (2) polished (using 0.5 {micro}m cerium oxide slurry) on various laps (polyurethanes pads or pitch) with the addition of larger rogue particles (diamond (4-45 {micro}m), pitch, dust, or dried Ceria slurry agglomerates) at various concentrations. For the resulting ground samples, the crack distributions of the as-prepared surfaces were determined using a polished taper technique. The crack depth was observed to: (1) increase at small concentrations (>10{sup -4} fraction) of rogue particles; and (2) increase with rogue particle concentration to crack depths consistent with that observed when grinding with particles the size of the rogue particles alone. For the polished samples, which were subsequently etched in HF:NH{sub 4}F to expose the surface damage, the resulting scratch properties (type, number density, width, and length) were characterized. The number density of scratches increased exponentially with the size of the rogue diamond at a fixed rogue diamond concentration suggesting that larger particles are more likely to lead to scratching. The length of the scratch was found to increase with rogue particle size, increase with lap viscosity, and decrease with applied load. At high diamond concentrations, the type of scratch transitioned from brittle to ductile and the length of the scratches dramatically increased and extended to the edge of the optic. The observed trends can explained semi-quantitatively in terms of the time needed for a rogue particle to penetrate into a viscoelastic lap. The results of this study provide useful insights and 'rules-of-thumb' relating scratch characteristics observed on surfaces during optical glass fabrication to the characteristics rogue particles causing them and their possible source.

Suratwala, T I; Steele, R; Feit, M D; Wong, L; Miller, P E; Menapace, J A; Davis, P J

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

324

Tank waste remediation system vadose zone program plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the vadose zone characterization under this program is to develop a better conceptual geohydrologic model of identified tank farms which will be characterized so that threats to human health and the environment from past leaks and spills, intentional liquid discharges, potential future leaks during retrieval, and from residual contaminants that may remain in tank farms at closure can be explicitly addressed in decision processes. This model will include geologic, hydrologic, and hydrochemical parameters as defined by the requirements of each of the TWRS programs identified here. The intent of this TWRS Vadose Zone Program Plan is to provide justification and an implementation plan for the following activities: Develop a sufficient understanding of subsurface conditions and transport processes to support decisions on management, cleanup, and containment of past leaks, spills, and intentional liquid discharges; Develop a sufficient understanding of transport processes to support decisions on controlling potential retrieval leaks; Develop a sufficient understanding of transport processes to support decisions on tank farm closure, including allowable residual waste that may remain at closure; and Provide new information on geotechnical properties in the 200 Area to supplement data used for design and performance assessment for immobilized low-activity waste disposal facilities.

Fredenburg, E.A.

1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

325

A brief analysis and description of transuranic wastes in the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at INEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a brief summary of the wastes and waste types disposed of in the transuranic contaminated portions of the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory from 1954 through 1970. Wastes included in this summary are organics, inorganics, metals, radionuclides, and atypical wastes. In addition to summarizing amounts of wastes disposed and describing the wastes, the document also provides information on disposal pit and trench dimensions and contaminated soil volumes. The report also points out discrepancies that exist in available documentation regarding waste and soil volumes and make recommendations for future efforts at waste characterization. 19 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs.

Arrenholz, D.A.; Knight, J.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Models Guide, October 27, 2011.

327

study programs in mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

study programs in m mathematics #12;#12;3 CONTENTS 5 Introduction 7 Mathematics at the University of Ljubljana 9 Department of Mathematics information page Academic study program in Mathematics Academic study program in Financial Mathematics Single cycle master's study program in Mathematics education

?umer, Slobodan

328

HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to serve as "go-to" organization to catalyze PA Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Economy development #12;FundingHYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA Melissa Klingenberg, PhDMelissa Klingenberg, PhD #12;Hydrogen ProgramHydrogen Program Air Products

329

SHIPBOARD LABORATORY SAFETY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................................10 Lockout/Tag-Out Program: IODP-USIO Policy Modification

330

Wind Program: Program Plans, Implementation, and Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wind Program Wind Program HOME ABOUT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT DEPLOYMENT FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES INFORMATION RESOURCES NEWS EVENTS EERE » Wind Program » About Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Budget Contacts Plans, Implementation, and Results Here you'll find an overview of the Wind Program and links to its program planning, implementation, and results documents. This list summarizes the program's wind power research, development, and demonstration activities. Read more about: Overview Learn more about this EERE Office. Plans Discover the plans, budgets, and analyses that set the direction of office priorities and activities. Implementation Find out how the office controls, implements, and adjusts its plans and manages its activities. Results Learn about the technological, commercial, and other outputs and outcomes

331

Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

514 514 Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2007 Includes Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) Projects As of September 2007 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 2008 T E C H N O L O G Y DOE/FE-0514 Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2007 Includes Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) Projects As of September 2007 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 2008 T E C H N O L O G Y This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Offi

332

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Offers Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network

333

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

: Design : Design the Financing Program to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Assess the Market Define Finance Program Objectives Identify & Engage Financial Partners

334

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2: Define 2: Define Finance Program Objectives to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Assess the Market Define Finance Program Objectives

335

Technology Commercialization Program 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This reference compilation describes the Technology Commercialization Program of the Department of Energy, Defense Programs. The compilation consists of two sections. Section 1, Plans and Procedures, describes the plans and procedures of the Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Program. The second section, Legislation and Policy, identifies legislation and policy related to the Program. The procedures for implementing statutory and regulatory requirements are evolving with time. This document will be periodically updated to reflect changes and new material.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Wind Program: Program Plans, Implementation, and Results  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Hydropower Technologies Program Technology Review (Deep Dive) for Under Secretaries Johnson and Koonin September 4, 2009 presentation highlighting the Wind and Hydropower...

337

FINDING OF MD SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FORMERLY UTILIZED HED/AEC SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

FINDING OF MD SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINDING OF MD SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FORMERLY UTILIZED HED/AEC SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM: BAY0 CANYONS, NEW MEXICO Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed to carry out rcmedfrl action at a site located in Bayo Canyon, Los Alamos County, New Mexico. Although the site as partially decontaminated and decommissioned in the 196Os, there remain above-background amounts of radionuclides. DOE has determined that strontium-90 in excess of DDE's proposed remedial- action criterir exists in subsurface materials underlying an area of about 0.6 ha (1.5 acres) at the Bayo Canyon site. The proposed action is to demarcate this are8 and restrict its use to activities that will not disturb this sub-

338

WVU cooperative agreement, decontamination systems information and research program, deployment support leading to implementation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program at West Virginia University is a Cooperative Agreement that focuses on R&D associated with hazardous waste remediation problems existing at DOE, Corps of Engineers, and private sector sites. The Agreement builds on a unique combination of resources coupling university researchers with DOE sponsored small businesses, leading toward field tests and large scale technology demonstrations of environmental technologies. Most of the Agreement`s projects are categorized in the Technology Maturity Levels under Gates 3-Advanced Development, Gate 4-Engineering Development, and Gate 5-Demonstration. The program includes a diversity of projects: subsurface contaminants; mixed wastes; mixed wastes/efficient separations; mixed wastes/characterization, monitoring, and sensor technologies; and decontamination and decommissioning/efficient separations.

Cook, E.E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Subsurface characterization of an oxidation-induced phase transformation and twinning in nickel-based superalloy exposed to oxy-combustion environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the integration of oxy-fuel combustion to turbine power generation system, turbine alloys are exposed to high temperature and an atmosphere comprised of steam, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. While surface and internal oxidation of the alloy takes place, the microstructure in the subsurface region also changes due to oxidation. In this study, bare metal coupons of Ni-base superalloys were exposed in oxy-fuel combustion environment for up to 1000 h and the oxidation-related microstructures were examined. Phase transformation occurred in the subsurface region in Ni-based superalloy and led to twinning. The transformation product phases were analyzed through thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and various electron microscopy techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The mechanism by which the phase transformation and the formation of the microstructure occurred was also discussed. The possible effects of the product phases on the performance of the alloy in service were discussed.

Zhu, Jingxi; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Wise, Adam; Li, Jia; Laughlin, David E.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operations and Operations and Maintenance Program Structure to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6: 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Assess the Market

342

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measurement to someone by E-mail Measurement to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management

343

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operations and Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

344

Civilian Nuclear Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Los Alamos is committed to using its advanced nuclear expertise and unique facilities to meet the civilian nuclear national security demands of the future. CONTACT US Program Director Bruce Robinson (505) 667-1910 Email Los Alamos partners extensively with other laboratories, universities, industry, and the international nuclear community to address real-world technical challenges The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office is the focal point for nuclear energy research and development and next-generation repository science at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office manages projects funded by the Department of Energy's offices of Nuclear Energy Environmental Management Nuclear Regulatory Commission

345

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Incentive Programs Incentive Programs Most states offer energy incentive programs to help offset energy costs. FEMP's Energy Incentive Program helps Federal agencies take advantage of these incentives by providing information about the funding-program opportunities available in each state. Find Funding Click on a state or choose a one from the menu to see a summary of available energy incentives. Select a State Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Oklahoma Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming

346

Program Impact Analysis | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Impact Analysis Program Impact Analysis BECP periodically assesses the impacts of its activities by estimating historical and projected energy savings, consumer savings, and avoided emissions. Since the inception of the Program 20 years ago, cumulative full-fuel-cycle (FFC) energy savings from 1992- 2012 are estimated to be approximately 4.8 quads and cost savings to consumers have been more than $44 billion. These savings have resulted primarily from the Program's activities which upgrade the model energy codes, accelerate their adoption by states and localities, and improve code compliance by means of various software tools and other types of training and technical support. The federal budgetary cost of the Program over this same period (1992-2012) was estimated to be around $110 million, resulting in a ratio of more than $400

347

PNNL EERE Program: Building Technologies Program (Overview)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program Laboratory, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program Home Program Areas Contacts Related Sites Energy Directorate PNNL Home Security & Privacy PNNL Buildings Program Overview PNNL Buildings Portfolio Science Foundation EE & Demand Response High-Performance Sustainable Design Codes and Standards Overcoming Market Barriers Analysis and Planning Key Buildings Projects Contacts Publications & Presentations PNNL Buildings Program Buildings account for about 40 percent of our nation's energy use. That's 72 percent of U.S. electricity and 55 percent of natural gas, resulting in 39 percent of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions and a range of other negative environmental impacts. The buildings sciences team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is committed to dramatically improving the

348

Applied Energy Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applied Energy Programs Applied Energy Programs Applied Energy Programs Los Alamos is using its world-class scientific capabilities to enhance national energy security by developing energy sources with limited environmental impact and by improving the efficiency and reliability of the energy infrastructure. CONTACT US Acting Program Director Melissa Fox (505) 663-5538 Email Applied Energy Program Office serves as the hub connecting the Laboratory's scientific and technical resources to DOE sponsors, DoD programs, and to industry. The Applied Energy Program Office manages Los Alamos National Laboratory programs funded by the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Offices of Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy, Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, and Fossil Energy. With energy use increasing across the nation and the

349

Generic programming in Scala  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generic programming is a programming methodology that aims at producing reusable code, defined independently of the data types on which it is operating. To achieve this goal, that particular code must rely on a set of requirements known as concepts...

N'guessan, Olayinka

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

350

NASA Defends University Programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NASA Defends University Programs ... Predoctoral fellowships, research and facilities grants are essential to the space effort, NASA says ... The Senate Appropriations Committee has questioned the propriety and legality of NASA's academic grant program (C&EN, Nov. 11, page 21). ...

1963-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

351

Safeguards and Security Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes responsibilities and program planning and management requirements for the Safeguards and Security Program. Admin Chg 1, dated 2-15-13, cancels DOE O 470.4B.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

352

NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK APRIL 2006 CEC-300 Director Heather Raitt Technical Director Renewable Energy Program Drake Johnson Office Manager Renewable Energy Office Valerie Hall Deputy Director Efficiency, Renewables, and Demand Analysis Division #12;These

353

SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM MATHEMATICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

program, students must: (1) Be entering freshman; (2) Be U.S. citizens, nationals, aliens admitted as refugees, permanent resident aliens; (3) Be enrolled full time in a baccalaureate degree program in one

Croicu, Ana-Maria

354

Programming with human computation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Amazon's Mechanical Turk provides a programmatically accessible micro-task market, allowing a program to hire human workers. This has opened the door to a rich field of research in human computation where programs orchestrate ...

Little, Greg (Danny Greg)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Sandia's Biofuels Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia's biofuels program is focused on developing next-generation, renewable fuel solutions derived from biomass. In this video, various Sandia researchers discuss the program and the tools they employ to tackle the technical challenges they face.

Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema; Lane, Todd; Reichardt, Tom; Davis, Ryan

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

356

Protective Force Program Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 473.2, Protective Force Program, which establishes the requirements and responsibilities for management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Protective Force (PF) Program. Does not cancel other directives.

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

Parallel programming with PCN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PCN is a system for developing and executing parallel programs. It comprises a high-level programming language, tools for developing and debugging programs in this language, and interfaces to Fortran and C that allow the reuse of existing code in multilingual parallel programs. Programs developed using PCN are portable across many different workstations, networks, and parallel computers. This document provides all the information required to develop parallel programs with the PCN programming system. In includes both tutorial and reference material. It also presents the basic concepts that underly PCN, particularly where these are likely to be unfamiliar to the reader, and provides pointers to other documentation on the PCN language, programming techniques, and tools. PCN is in the public domain. The latest version of both the software and this manual can be obtained by anonymous FTP from Argonne National Laboratory in the directory pub/pcn at info.mcs.anl.gov (c.f. Appendix A).

Foster, I.; Tuecke, S.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Scientific programming in Fortran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Fortran programming language was designed by John Backus and his colleagues at IBM to reduce the cost of programming scientific applications. IBM delivered the first compiler for its model 704 in 1957. IBM's competitors soon offered incompatible ...

W. Van Snyder

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Centralized Procurement Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Centralized Procurement Program What's New Who to Contact Current Products BOAs MOC Integrated Team Program Elements Future Products Welcome to the Carlsbad Field Office’s (CBFO) Centralized Procurement Program (CPP) Web Page. The purpose of the Centralized Procurement Program is to provide a standardized, economical system of acquisition and distribution of common or critical transuranic (TRU) waste products. The program is available for use by DOE contractors. The program is designed to allow user sites to procure products manufactured to standardized quality, procurement, and engineering requirements. The WIPP Management & Operation Contractor (MOC), Washington TRU Solutions (WTS), administers the program. WTS is the design authority for all products currently offered in the program.

360

Monotonic Answer Set Programming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Answer set programming (ASP) does not allow for incrementally constructing...calculi and implementations. In. In: Handbook of Automated Reasoning-Robinson J...Abstract Answer set programming (ASP) does not allow for incrementally constructing......

Martin Gebser; Mona Gharib; Robert Mercer; Torsten Schaub

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

State Energy Program Formula Grant Guidance Program Year 2007  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

STATE ENERGY PROGRAM FORMULA GRANT GUIDANCE PROGRAM YEAR 2007 STATE ENERGY PROGRAM NOTICE 07-01 EFFECTIVE DATE: April 3, 2007 PURPOSE To establish grant guidance and management...

362

Geothermal Government Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you'll find links to federal, state, and local government programs promoting geothermal energy development.

363

Independent Oversight Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order prescribes the requirements and responsibilities for the DOE Independent Oversight Program. Cancels DOE O 470.2B.

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Master Wellness Volunteer Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the program is that you learn new things while helping others lead healthier lives." ­ Cherokee County

365

Weatherization Assistance Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energys Weatherization Assistance Program.

366

Sustainable Energy Management Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable Energy Management Programs Steve Hanner Allen ISD/TEMA . ESL-KT-14-11-45 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Starting an Energy Management Program Recognize need, Elicit District Commitment... Appoint Energy Manager Analyze Existing Conditions Develop Plan Implement and Monitor Program ESL-KT-14-11-45 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Sustainable Programs Feature District Commitment...

Hanner, S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Safeguards and Security Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish responsibilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Safeguards and Security (S&S) Program, and to establish program planning and management requirements for the S&S Program. Cancels DOE O 470.4A, DOE M 470.4-1, Chg. 2, and DOE O 142.1.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

368

Wellness Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Program Program Wellness Program Workers spend 200 hours per month at work, and keeping a healthy work-life balance is essential. The Headquarters Wellness Program provides support and assistance to DOE employees through a variety of programs and resources geared toward enhancing their mental and physical well-being. Wellness programs include: Accommodations, the Child Development Centers, the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), the Forrestal (FOHO) and Germantown (GOHO) Fitness Centers, the Occupational Health Clinics and the DOE WorkLife4You Program. Programs Disability Services Child Development Centers Headquarters Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics Headquarters Accommodation Program DOE Worklife4You Program Health Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Tips

369

The Texas Watershed Steward Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for participation TEXAS WATERSHED STEWARD PROGRAM · Introductory training in the fundamentals of watersheds of Watershed Functions Program Introduction #12;TWS CURRICULUM HANDBOOK PROGRAM INTRODUCTION · About

370

Demand Response Programs for Oregon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Programs for Oregon Utilities Public Utility Commission May 2003 Public Utility ....................................................................................................................... 1 Types of Demand Response Programs............................................................................ 3 Demand Response Programs in Oregon

371

Geothermal materials program: strategy. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following topics are discussed: program goal and objectives, program organization, and program status. Current program projects are described. (MHR)

Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Guide: Utility Program Administrator Market Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Utility Program Administrator Market Utility program administrator market...

373

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative Program Sponsors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program Sponsors Facility Representative Program Sponsors There are 29 Facility Representative Program Sponsors Office Name Title E-Mail Phone ASO Larry Pendexter ES&H Div Dir (Argonne) larry.pendexter@ch.doe.gov 630-252-1485 BHSO Bob Desmarais Operations Management Division Director desmarai@bnl.gov 631-344-5434 CBFO Glenn Gamlin Facility Representative Supervisor glenn.gamlin@wipp.ws 575-234-8136 CBFO Casey Gadbury Operations Manager casey.gadbury@wipp.ws 575-234-7372 FSO Mark Bollinger Deputy Manager Mark.Bollinger@ch.doe.gov 630-840-8130 FSO John Scott FR Team Lead john.scott@ch.doe.gov 630-840-2250 HS-30 James O'Brien Director, Office of Nuclear Safety James.O'Brien@hq.doe.gov 301-903-1408 HS-32 Earl Hughes Facility Representative Program Manager Earl.Hughes@hq.doe.gov 202-586-0065

374

Program Optimization for Faster Genetic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are six operations that map an index (i, j, k) to an index: ... These wavelets have arbitrarily high approximation power even though they ... It is possible that an evolving genetic programming system will choose the ..... In CRC Handbook of.

1998-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

375

Russian Health Studies Program- Program Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Russian Health Studies Program assesses worker and public health risks from radiation exposure resulting from nuclear weapons production activities in the former Soviet Union.

376

Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009 is to provide an updated status of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commercial-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies (CCT). These demonstrations have been performed under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Program Update 2009 provides: (1) a discussion of the role of clean coal technology demonstrations in improving the nations energy security and reliability, while protecting the environment using the nations most abundant energy resourcecoal; (2) a summary of the funding and costs of the demonstrations; and (3) an overview of the technologies being demonstrated, along with fact sheets for projects that are active, recently completed, or recently discontinued.

None

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Clean coal technology programs: program update 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2006 is to provide an updated status of the DOE commercial-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies (CCTs). These demonstrations are performed under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) and the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Program Update 2006 provides 1) a discussion of the role of clean coal technology demonstrations in improving the nation's energy security and reliability, while protecting the environment using the nation's most abundant energy resource - coal; 2) a summary of the funding and costs of the demonstrations; and 3) an overview of the technologies being demonstrated, with fact sheets for demonstration projects that are active, recently completed, withdrawn or ended, including status as of June 30 2006. 4 apps.

NONE

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Federal Energy Management Program: About the Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About the Program About the Program The U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) works with key individuals to accomplish energy change within organizations, by bringing expertise from all levels of project and policy implementation, to enable Federal agencies to meet energy-related goals and provide energy leadership to the country. As the nation's largest energy consumer, the Federal Government has a tremendous opportunity and clear responsibility to lead by example. FEMP is central to this responsibility, guiding agencies to use funding more effectively in meeting Federal and agency-specific energy management objectives. Directed by Dr. Timothy Unruh, FEMP helps agencies meet its objectives by providing information through its primary program, technology, and service areas.

379

Master's Fellowship Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Master's Fellowship Program Master's Fellowship Program (MFP): The Master's Fellowship Program (MFP) provides exceptional minority bachelor's-level candidates with the opportunity to pursue a fully funded Masters of Science degree. The MFP is a minority based program for U.S. under-represented groups in an effort to help enhance the diversity of Sandia's technical workforce. Successful applicants will become regular full-time Sandia employees and join multidisciplinary teams that are advancing the frontiers of science and technology to solve the world's greatest challenges. Program Requirements: * Apply to a minimum of 3 nationally accredited universities. * Successfully complete the GRE as required by the universities of interest.

380

Fire Protection Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Program Fire Protection Overview The Department of Energy (DOE) Fire Protection Program is multi-faceted. It includes published fire safety directives (Orders, standards, and guidance documents), a range of oversight activities, an annual fire protection program summary, and a directory of fire safety professionals. DOE also sponsors fire safety conferences, various training initiatives, and a spectrum of technical assistance activities. This Home Page is intended to bring together in one location as much of the Program's resources as possible to facilitate greater understanding, communication, and efficiency of operations. Guidelines -- NFPA Codes and standards, CFRs, and DOE Directives (policy statements, Orders, Standards, and Guidance Documents)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

382

Education Programs | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

For Academia For Academia University Partners Distinguished Fellowships Postdoctoral Program Graduate Opportunities Education and Outreach Programs For Academia Home | Connect with ORNL | For Academia | Education and Outreach Programs SHARE Education Programs Visiting Faculty ORNL offers a number of opportunities to visiting faculty to do hands-on research during the summer months. Faculty may be accompanied by up to two students. ORNL's commitment to diversity in the science workforce encourages faculty from historically black colleges and minority educational institutions to apply. The Higher Education Research Experience (HERE) program allows visiting faculty to participate in research during the summer or on a semester basis. Historical Black Colleges and Universities/ Minority Education Institutions

383

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

384

SES CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) DOE F 360.1 (11-03) Executive Development Plan (EDP) Name: Title: Organization: Office: RATIONALE FOR PLAN: APPROVALS: Candidate Signature: Date: Supervisor: Date: Mentor: Date: SES Candidate Development Program Manager: Date: DOE Executive Resources Board: Date: 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE F 360.1 (11-03) SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) Executive Development Plan (EDP) NAME OF SES CANDIDATE: DATE: EXECUTIVE CORE QUALIFICATION 1: LEADING CHANGE This core qualification encompasses the ability to develop and implement an organizational vision which integrates key national and program

385

Protocol for Program Reviews: Undergraduate Interdisciplinary Teaching Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an IAS program for fall semester review and a UGIS program for spring semester review for each academic to guide preparation of self-study ("UGIS/IAS Program Director Questionnaire"). · The program review

Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

386

Energy Efficiency Program Administration Powerpoint Presentation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Efficiency Program Administration Powerpoint Presentation Energy Efficiency Program Administration Powerpoint Presentation Energy Efficiency Program Administration Powerpoint...

387

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 2, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SMECC (Substation Maximum Earth Current Computation Program). This program analyzes the electric current distribution among grounded structures inside and outside a substation for different fault conditions. The fault conditions are automatically selected by the program, or they may be specified by the user, or both. The fault condition resulting in maximum substation earth current is identified and reported. Data requirements for this program are: ground impedance, transformer data, transmission line data, transmission line grounding impedances, etc. The program provides four types of standard outputs: (1) a report of voltages and current flow in the unfaulted system, (2) a brief report of the maximum ground potential rise (worst fault condition), (3) a summary report of all fault conditions which have been analyzed by the program, and (4) a detailed report of voltages and current flow for a selected set of fault conditions.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 3, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SGSYS (Substation Grounding SYStem Analysis Program). This program analyzes the substation ground field given the total electric current injected into the ground field and the design of the grounding system. Standard outputs of the program are (1) total ground resistance, (2) step voltage, (3) touch voltage, (4) voltages on a grid of points, (5) voltage profile along straight lines, (6) transfer voltages, (7) ground potential rise, (8) body currents, (9) step voltage profile along straight lines, and (10) touch voltage profile along straight lines. This program can be utilized in an interactive or batch mode. In the interactive mode, the user defines the grounding system geometry, soil parameters, and output requests interactively, with the use of a user friendly conversational program. The users manual describes data requirements and data preparation procedures. An appendix provides forms which facilitate data collection procedures. The installation and validation manual describes the computer files which make up the program SGSYS and provides a test case for validation purposes.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Nuclear Energy University Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 Status 1 Status Presentation to Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC) June 15, 2011 Michael Worley, NEUP Program Manager NEUP Funding is Program Driven Program Directed Funding Program Supported Funding Mission Supported Funding Natl. Labs Universities DOE-NE HQ Peer Review DOE NE Program Drivers 2 3 Summary of Improvements and New Programs for FY 2011 * Expand "Blue Sky" Research and Development (R&D) * Initiate Integrated Research Projects (IRP) * Expand and improve peer review data base * Evaluate adoption of NRC and NNSA Metrics as appropriate to NEUP * Conduct peer review at pre-application stage for R&D 2011 Proposed NEUP Budget - $61.8M * Program Directed Integrated Research Projects (IRP) - $12.0M (NEW)

390

Programming | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Programming Programming Programming October 16, 2013 - 5:13pm Addthis Key Actions in Programming Commission a renewable energy screening to assess the options and economics of various technologies. Conduct a planning charrette to bring disciplines together to identify project needs and energy opportunities. Define and prioritize specific energy- related goals and include them in the building program and requirements for the design team. Renewable energy is a key consideration during project programming. As more information about the actual function and needs of the facility becomes available, further decisions can be made about the most appropriate types of renewable energy technologies for the project. The end of this phase results in the creation of the building program,

391

Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

Fix, N. J.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

392

Phanerozoic tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Trans-Pecos and Permian basin regions (Mexico, Texas, New Mexico) using Landsat imagery, subsurface and outcrop data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrating regional Landsat imagery, outcrop field studies, and subsurface data has resulted in a more comprehensive understanding and delineation of the tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Trans-Pecos region. Landsat imagery were acquired and registered to the existing 1:25000 scale maps and mosaiced to create a regional view of the Trans-Pecos and Permian basin region. The imagery were used to extrapolate and map key stratigraphic and tectonic elements after calibration from documented outcrop and subsurface data. The interpretations aided in the extrapolation of scattered control information and were critical in the complete reconstruction of the geologic history of the area. The Trans-Pecos Phanerozoic history comprises five tectono-depositional phases, and these have controlled the shape of the modem landscape: (1) Late Proterozoic rifting (Gondwana from Laurentia), and development of the Early-Middle Paleozoic Tobosa basin; (2) Pennsylvanian collision (South and North Americas), and differentiation of the Tobosa basin into the Midland, Delaware, Orogrande, and Pedregosa basins separated by basement blocks: Central Basin Platform, Diablo Platform, Burro-Florida Platform; (3) Middle Mesozoic transtensional rifting (Mexico from North America), and Late Jurassic failed rifting of the Mexican Chihuahua and Coahuila Troughs west and south of the Diablo Platform; (4) Late Mesozoic Laramide collision (Mexico and Texas), and development of the Chihuahua fold/thrust belt limited by the western margin of the Diablo Platform; (5) Late Cenozoic North American basin and Range rifting, and development of Rio Grande grabens, block-faulted mountains, and volcanics. The Tobosa basin was a passive-margin interior sag; its continental margin was south of the Marathons.

Markello, J.R.; Sarg, J.F. [Mobil Technology Corporation, Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

DOE ER63951-3 Final Report: An Integrated Assessment of Geochemical and Community Structure Determinants of Metal Reduction Rates in Subsurface Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to examine the importance of microbial community structure in influencing uranium reduction rates in subsurface sediments. If the redox state alone is the key to metal reduction, then any organisms that can utilize the oxygen and nitrate in the subsurface can change the geochemical conditions so metal reduction becomes an energetically favored reaction. Thus, community structure would not be critical in determining rates or extent of metal reduction unless community structure influenced the rate of change in redox. Alternatively, some microbes may directly catalyze metal reduction (e.g., specifically reduce U). In this case the composition of the community may be more important and specific types of electron donors may promote the production of communities that are more adept at U reduction. Our results helped determine if the type of electron donor or the preexisting community is important in the bioremediation of metal-contaminated environments subjected to biostimulation. In a series of experiments at the DOE FRC site in Oak Ridge we have consistently shown that all substrates promoted nitrate reduction, while glucose, ethanol, and acetate always promoted U reduction. Methanol only occasionally promoted extensive U reduction which is possibly due to community heterogeneity. There appeared to be limitations imposed on the community related to some substrates (e.g. methanol and pyruvate). Membrane lipid analyses (phospholipids and respiratory quinones) indicated different communities depending on electron donor used. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone libraries indicated distinct differences among communities even in treatments that promoted U reduction. Thus, there was enough metabolic diversity to accommodate many different electron donors resulting in the U bioimmobilization.

Susan Pfiffner

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

394

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2013-2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2013-2014 Program Structure and Responsibilities Dr. Anas Chalah #12;SEAS Safety Program SEAS Safety Program Structure We have developed a great model of collaboration among · EHSEM · SEAS Safety Program · SEAS Facilities which accounts for the regulatory component

395

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2012-2103  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2012-2103 Program Structure and Responsibilities Dr. Anas Chalah #12;SEAS Safety Program SEAS Safety Program Structure We have developed a great model of collaboration among · EHSEM · SEAS Safety Program · SEAS Facilities which accounts for the regulatory component

396

Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information Resources Information Resources Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on AddThis.com... Publications Software FAQs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs

397

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. It can be used to compute transient ground potential rise due to lightning or switching, and the ground impedance (i.e. resistance and reactance) at specified frequencies. This report, Volume 4, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program TGRND (Transient GRouNDing System Analysis Program). This program computes transient ground potential rise resulting from lightning, switching, or other transient electric currents injected to a grounding system. The program also computes the impedance (i.e. resistance and reactance) of a grounding system as a function of frequency. This program can be utilized in an interactive or batch mode. The users manual describes data requirements and data preparation procedures. The installation and validation manual describes the computer files which make up the program TGRND and provides a test case for validation purposes.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Joint Plenary

399

Water-Efficiency Program Prioritization  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation outlines water-efficiency program requirements and priorities as presented to Federal agencies by the Federal Energy Management Program.

400

EcoHouse Program Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Provides an overview of the Indianapolis Better Buildings program, the EcoHouse program, and Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing partnership (INHP).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Program Name or Ancillary Text eere.energy.gov Program Name or Ancillary Text eere.energy.gov BTO Program Peer Review Analysis Leading to Lessons Learned Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Danielle Sass Byrnett, DOE Dave Roberts, NREL david.roberts@nrel.gov 303.384.7496 April 3, 2013 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Analysis Leading to Lessons Learned 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives - Program Problem Statement: Buildings consume 40% of energy in the United States and are responsible for nearly 40% of the country's greenhouse gas emissions. Several well documented barriers have prevented the development of a self-sustaining building energy upgrade market to reduce this energy use.

402

STEM Education Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STEM Education Programs STEM Education Programs STEM Education Programs Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) views its investment in STEM education as strengthening the Lab's strategic direction and developing its current and future workforce. Contacts Education Janelle Vigil-Maestas Community Programs Office (505) 665-4329 Email "We don't have to teach children to ask questions. That comes naturally. We have to not stop them." - LANL Director Charlie McMillan STEM education programs Certificate in Environmental Monitoring (pdf) Community College Institute (CCI) (pdf) Computer Science and Information Technology Pipeline Program (ADIT/HPC Division) (pdf) Computer System, Cluster, and Networking Summer Institute (pdf) Discover E (pdf) Engineering Institute Frontiers in Science

403

EEO and Diversity Program  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

EEO and Diversity Program EEO and Diversity Program EEO and Diversity: Collaborating for Mission Success Solutions to Workplace Conflict: What Mediation Can Do for You! FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT MEDIATION On October 27, 2006, the EEO and Diversity Program sponsored a panel presentation on the mediation program for all Service Center complex employees. Also, a session was held for the Service Center Leadership Team on November 15, 2006. At the end of the panel presentations, audience members were able to ask questions about the mediation program. If you would like to review the DVD of the presentation, contact the EEO and Diversity Program Office at (505) 845-5517 or by email at EEODiversityOffice@doeal.gov * What kinds of issues can be mediated? * How does one prepare for mediation?

404

Acquisition Career Development Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes training and certification requirements and career development programs under the Acquisition Career Development (ACD) Program for DOE and NNSA acquisition workforce. The acquisition workforce includes contracting, purchasing, personal property management, program management, Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives. The ACD Program implements the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) requirements, Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) requirements, Federal Acquisition Reform Act (FARA) requirements, and the objectives of Executive Order (E.O.) 129231, Federal Procurement Reform, dated 10-13-1994. This order cancels DOE O 361.1, Acquisition Career Development Program, dated 11-10-99, AND Acquisition Letter 2003-05, Personal Property Management Career Development, Training, and Certification Program, dated 9-10-03. Cancels DOE O 361.1 Chg 2. Canceled by DOE O 361.1B.

2004-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

405

Site Support Program Plan Infrastructure Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fiscal Year 1996 Infrastructure Program Site Support Program Plan addresses the mission objectives, workscope, work breakdown structures (WBS), management approach, and resource requirements for the Infrastructure Program. Attached to the plan are appendices that provide more detailed information associated with scope definition. The Hanford Site`s infrastructure has served the Site for nearly 50 years during defense materials production. Now with the challenges of the new environmental cleanup mission, Hanford`s infrastructure must meet current and future mission needs in a constrained budget environment, while complying with more stringent environmental, safety, and health regulations. The infrastructure requires upgrading, streamlining, and enhancement in order to successfully support the site mission of cleaning up the Site, research and development, and economic transition.

NONE

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

406

Home Energy Score Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home Energy Score Program Home Energy Score Program Peer Review April 3, 2013 Joan Glickman, US DOE Norm Bourassa, LBNL joan.glickman@ee.doe.gov, 202-586-5607 njbourassa@lbl.gov, 510-495-2677 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Significant underinvestment in energy efficiency in residential sector * High costs of traditional energy audits and ratings * No standard method for understanding and comparing the energy efficiency

407

Home Energy Score Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Home Energy Score Program Home Energy Score Program Peer Review April 3, 2013 Joan Glickman, US DOE Norm Bourassa, LBNL joan.glickman@ee.doe.gov, 202-586-5607 njbourassa@lbl.gov, 510-495-2677 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Significant underinvestment in energy efficiency in residential sector * High costs of traditional energy audits and ratings * No standard method for understanding and comparing the energy efficiency

408

Voluntary Protection Program- Basics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) promotes safety and health excellence through cooperative efforts among labor, management, and government at the Department of Energy (DOE) contractor sites. DOE has also formed partnerships with other Federal agencies and the private sector for both advancing and sharing its Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) experiences and preparing for program challenges in the next century. The safety and health of contractor and federal employees are a high priority for the Department.

409

Program Highlights Index  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Highlights Index Program Highlights Index Disposal of Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Ecological Risk Assessment of Chemically and Radiologically Contaminated Federal Sites Energy Zone Planning Tool for the Eastern United States Environmental Site Characterization and Remediation at Former Grain Storage Sites Evaluation of Risks of Aquatic Nuisance Species Transfer via the Chicago Area Waterway System Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan EIS Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) Generated by the Petroleum Industry Mobile Climate Observatory for Atmospheric Aerosols in India Mobile Climate Observatory on the Pacific

410

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Buildings Buildings Integration Program Arah Schuur Program Manager arah.schuur@ee.doe.gov April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and transacted with energy performance in mind and net zero ready commercial buildings are common and cost-effective. Commercial Buildings Integration Program Mission Accelerate voluntary uptake of significant energy performance improvements in existing and new commercial buildings. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov BTO Goals: BTO supports the development and deployment of technologies and systems to reduce

411

Homeland Security Programs | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Homeland Security Programs Homeland Security Programs SHARE Homeland Security Programs The Homeland Security Programs support the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), other federal and state agencies, and commercial partners. Through the integration of a number of key competencies, ORNL is able to provide critical operational, technical, and scientific support to these sponsors. A key focus of this area is to translate the critical research into operational capability for the security, protection, response, and recovery of the nation against natural and man-made events. Research Areas detecting, preventing, and reversing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction deploying integrated systems for incident awareness, detection, and response providing technology for detecting explosives at the

412

Referral Bonus Award Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REFERRAL BONUS AWARD PROGRAM REFERRAL BONUS AWARD PROGRAM The Referral Bonus Award is used to provide an incentive to employees who bring new talent into a Departmental element by referring persons who are subsequently selected and successfully employed for hard-to-fill positions. This award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of DOE O 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program. Eligibility All employees who meet the definition of "employee" in 5 U.S.C. 2105 are eligible for referral bonus awards, except: Employees whose regular, recurring, jobs include the recruitment of employees. Employees who refer any individual related by blood or affinity whose close

413

Employee Assistance Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources Resources AAP/ EEO Working at LBNL Benefits Lab Information International Researchers & Scholars Office Visitors and Affiliates Contact Us forward Berkeley Lab Staff/ Guests Only forward HR Staff Only forward HR A-Z Benefits at Berkeley Lab Search the HR website: Search UC At Your Service My Accounts image (At Your Service Web Site) UPAY 850 Benefits Change form Benefits Forms and Publications Benefits Orientations Benefit Plan Contacts Calendar of Events: July | August COBRA Information Disability Leave of Absence/FMLA Employee Assistance Programs Employee Self Service Family Member Eligibility Verification UC Retirement Savings Program (Fidelity) Health Care Facilitator Program Employee Discounts and Programs Making Benefit Changes Payroll Information Postdoc Benefits

414

Critical Skills Master's Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Skills Master's Program Skills Master's Program (CSMP): The Critical Skills Master's Program (CSMP) provides exceptional bachelor's-level candidates with the opportunity to pursue a fully funded Master's of Science degree. Successful applicants will become regular full-time Sandia employees and join multidisciplinary teams that are advancing the frontiers of science and technology to solve the world's greatest challenges. Program Requirements: * Apply to a minimum of 3 nationally accredited universities. * Successfully complete the GRE as required by the universities of interest. * Complete a master's degree within:

415

Emerging Technologies Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emerging Technologies Program Emerging Technologies Program Pat Phelan Program Manager patrick.phelan@ee.doe.gov (202)287-1906 April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How ET Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers * Solve technical barriers and test innovations to prove effectiveness * Measure and validate energy savings ET Mission: Accelerate the research, development and commercialization of emerging, high impact building technologies that are five years or less to market ready. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov

416

Brookhaven Teaching Fellows Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Brookhaven Teaching Fellows Program is a six-week special training and research summer experience for in-service science and mathematics teachers at Brookhaven National Laboratory....

417

Capital Access Program (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Capital Access Program provides loan guarantees to small businesses seeking access to commercial credit. Premiums paid by the borrower and matched by Vermont Economic Development Authority fund...

418

Agricultural Improvement Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Agricultural Improvement Loan Program is administered by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture through the Minnesota Rural Finance Authority (RFA) and provides loans to farmers for...

419

ATF Program Advisory & Users  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

paths for flexibility & efficiency Old documentation not adequate Old hardware (PLC) no longer programmable ATF Program Advisory & Users Meeting, April 2-3,2009 M.Babzien...

420

Sustainable Agriculture Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Minnesota Sustainable Agriculture Loan program will provide loans to Minnesota residents actively engaged in farming for capital expenditures which enhance the environmental and economic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

CEE Winter Program Meeting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) is hosting their Winter Program Meeting, a two-day conference held in Long Beach, California.

422

EERE Strategic Program Review  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This Strategic Program Review presents the result of recommendations of the National Energy Policy Development Group as stated in the National Energy Policy.

423

Management Control Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy Management Control Program. Cancels DOE O 413.1. Canceled by DOE O 413.1B.

2002-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

424

Programs & User Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facilities Programs & User Facilities Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy...

425

Pipeline Operations Program (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Pipeline Operations Program regulates the construction, acquisition, abandonment and interconnection of natural gas pipelines, as well as, the transportation and use of natural gas supplies.

426

Program Fact Sheets  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page contains links to fact sheets describing solid-state lighting programs, opportunities, and design competitions in place to facilitate the technology's successful introduction into the...

427

California Energy Incentive Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Report from the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) discusses annual update on key energy issues and financial opportunities for federal sites in California.

428

TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

remains available to power a sustainable economy. Program efforts have positioned the United States as the global leader in clean coal technologies. This document serves as a...

429

Nuclear Physics Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Office Data Acquisition Group Detector & Imaging Group Electronics Group User Liaison Nuclear Physics Program HALL A Hall A wide shot of detectors Scientists from across the...

430

EERE Program Management Guide  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Updated in December 2007, this guide is a comprehensive reference manual on EERE program management. The following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

431

New Homes Incentive Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Trust's New Homes Program offers builders cash incentives for energy efficient measures included in new homes, where the measures exceed the building code. Lighting upgrades, whole home...

432

Student Internship Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cutting-edge scientific research to further their educational and research goals. The Student Internship Program can provide undergraduate and graduate students research...

433

Stormwater Management Program (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Stormwater Management program of the Department of Environmental Protection's Bureau of Conservation and Restoration administers the rules and regulations for stormwater management for Pennsylvania...

434

Life Extension Programs  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

B61-12 Life Extension Program Milestone: First Full-System Mechanical Environment Test Completed Successfully http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesb61lep

435

Fossil Energy Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy, the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, the DOE Fossil Energy Clean Coal Technology Program, the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Strategic Petroleum Reserve, and...

436

Contract Financing Program (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Contract Financing Program, administered by the Maryland Small Business Development Authority, provides financial assistance to eligible businesses in the form of a direct loan or the guaranty...

437

Wind Program News  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

eerewindwind-program-news en EERE Leadership Celebrates Offshore Wind in Maine http:energy.goveerearticleseere-leadership-celebrates-offshore-wind-maine

438

Programs of HUD 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This manual briefly explains and updates the status of every program HUD operates, encompassing a host of issues within housing and community development.

439

Parallel programming with PCN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PCN is a system for developing and executing parallel programs. It comprises a high-level programming language, tools for developing and debugging programs in this language, and interfaces to Fortran and Cthat allow the reuse of existing code in multilingual parallel programs. Programs developed using PCN are portable across many different workstations, networks, and parallel computers. This document provides all the information required to develop parallel programs with the PCN programming system. It includes both tutorial and reference material. It also presents the basic concepts that underlie PCN, particularly where these are likely to be unfamiliar to the reader, and provides pointers to other documentation on the PCN language, programming techniques, and tools. PCN is in the public domain. The latest version of both the software and this manual can be obtained by anonymous ftp from Argonne National Laboratory in the directory pub/pcn at info.mcs. ani.gov (cf. Appendix A). This version of this document describes PCN version 2.0, a major revision of the PCN programming system. It supersedes earlier versions of this report.

Foster, I.; Tuecke, S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Records Management Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order sets forth requirements and responsibilities for implementing and maintaining a cost-effective records management program throughout the Department of Energy.

2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Acquisition Career Management Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order defines requirements and responsibilities for training, certification, and career development programs for the DOE acquisition workforce. Cancels DOE O 361.1A.

2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

442

Records Management Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order sets forth requirements and responsibilities for establishing and maintaining a program for the efficient and economical management of records and information assets.

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

443

Weatherization Assistance Program  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Intergovernmental Program n Decreases electricity generation and resulting pollution-This improves local air quality and reduces adverse health effects, particularly...

444

AMO Program Overview  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This Tuesday Webcast for Industry provides information on the Advanced Manufacturing Office's Better Buildings, Better Plants Program and recent Executive Order on Industrial Energy Efficiency

445

Wind Program: WINDExchange  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Version Bookmark and Share WINDExchange logo WINDExchange is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program's platform for disseminating credible information about wind...

446

RCx Program and UESC  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the RCx Program and UESC and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

447

Radiological Assistance Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy, procedures, authorities, and responsibilities for its Radiological Assistance Program. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

1992-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

448

Weatherization & Intergovernmental Program: Projects  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Washington Wisconsin West Virginia Wyoming Program: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants Submit Contacts | Web Site Policies | U.S. Department of Energy | USA.gov...

449

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: About  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About About Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: About to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: About on Facebook Tweet about Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: About on Twitter Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: About on Google Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: About on Delicious Rank Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: About on Digg Find More places to share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: About on AddThis.com... Plans, Implementation, & Results Weatherization Assistance Program WAP - Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Grants WAP - Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program State Energy Program

450

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4b: Choose Your Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

b: b: Choose Your Program Structure-Revolving Loan Funds to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4b: Choose Your Program Structure-Revolving Loan Funds on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4b: Choose Your Program Structure-Revolving Loan Funds on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4b: Choose Your Program Structure-Revolving Loan Funds on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4b: Choose Your Program Structure-Revolving Loan Funds on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4b: Choose Your Program Structure-Revolving Loan Funds on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4b: Choose Your Program Structure-Revolving Loan Funds on

451

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4a: Choose Your Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a: a: Choose Your Program Structure-Credit Enhancements to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4a: Choose Your Program Structure-Credit Enhancements on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4a: Choose Your Program Structure-Credit Enhancements on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4a: Choose Your Program Structure-Credit Enhancements on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4a: Choose Your Program Structure-Credit Enhancements on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4a: Choose Your Program Structure-Credit Enhancements on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4a: Choose Your Program Structure-Credit Enhancements on

452

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 5b: Help Program Contractors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

b: Help b: Help Program Contractors Obtain the Necessary Equipment to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 5b: Help Program Contractors Obtain the Necessary Equipment on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 5b: Help Program Contractors Obtain the Necessary Equipment on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 5b: Help Program Contractors Obtain the Necessary Equipment on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 5b: Help Program Contractors Obtain the Necessary Equipment on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 5b: Help Program Contractors Obtain the Necessary Equipment on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 5b: Help Program Contractors Obtain the Necessary Equipment on

453

Sloppy Programming Greg Little  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Center Introduction When a user enters a query into a web search engine, they do not expect it to return a syntax error. Imagine a user searching for "End User Programing" and getting an error like: Unexpected token "Programing". Not only do users not expect to see such an error, but they expect the search

454

NASA Academy Program Descriptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NASA Academy Program Descriptions October 2010 #12;NASA Academy Program Descriptions 2011 October 11, 2010 1/5 NASA Academy at ARC, GRC, GSFC, and MSFC Websites: Ames: http://academy.arc.nasa.gov Glenn: http://academy.grc.nasa.gov Goddard: http://academy.gsfc.nasa.gov Marshall: http://academy.msfc.nasa

Wang, Z. Jane

455

Certificate Ethics Certificate Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ethics Certificate Program Passion Purpose Rigor #12;#12;Ethics Certificate Program From, the Ethics Certificate provides you with the skills and confidence you need to create and evaluate solutions to ethical dilemmas. Does a government have the right to insist on another government's adherence to human

Zhou, Pei

456

International Programs in Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Programs in Agriculture MessagefromtheDirector­ Staying Ahead of Globalization and more prosperous place for all. Fortunately, Purdue International Programs in Agriculture (IPIA) has natural disasters caution us to remember the power of nature. The United Nations Food and Agriculture

457

study programs in mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

study programs in m mathematics 1_ matematika 2008.qxp 16.7.2008 16:41 Page 1 #12;1_ matematika 2008.qxp 16.7.2008 16:41 Page 2 #12;3 CONTENTS 5 Introduction 7 Mathematics at the University of Ljubljana 9 Department of Mathematics information page Academic study program in Mathematics Academic study

?umer, Slobodan

458

MATHEMATICS Program of Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATHEMATICS Program of Study Degree Requirements The Department offers a program leading to the degree of Master of Arts in Mathematics. There are three "pathways" or tracks for advanced study in mathematics: pure, interdisciplinary, and statistics. All paths provide both thesis and non-thesis options

Thomas, Andrew

459

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT: PROGRAM ABSTRACTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cells for Transportation program will not develop fuel cell cars, but will facilitate the critical-flexible fuel strategy. Other accomplishments under the DOE program include Ford/IFC's 50-kW hydrogen fuel cell Backing Layers INTEGRATED SYSTEMS Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells Fuel Cell Stack PEM STACK

460

Insider Threat Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish responsibilities and requirements for the Department of Energy (DOE) Insider Threat Program (ITP) to deter, detect, and mitigate insider threat actions by Federal and contractor employees in accordance with the requirements of Executive Order 13587, the National Insider Threat Policy and Minimum Standards for Executive Branch Insider Threat Programs and other government-wide and DOE requirements. Does not cancel other directives.

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE PROGRAMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE PROGRAMS The Master of Science in Industrial Engineering (M Systems and Engineering (M.S.M.S.E.), the Doctor of Philosophy in Industrial Engineering, and the Doctor of Philosophy in Systems and Engineering Management programs prepare competent industrial engineers

Gelfond, Michael

462

Personnel Security Program Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

provides detailed requirements and procedures to supplement DOE O 472.1B, PERSONNEL SECURITY ACTIVITIES, which establishes the overall objectives, requirements, and responsibilities for implementation and operation of the Personnel Security Program and the Personnel Security Assurance Program in the Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Cancels DOE M 472.1-1

2000-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

463

Information Security Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes an Information Security Program for the protection and control of classified and sensitive information. Extended until 5-11-06 by DOE N 251.63, dated 5-11-05. DOE O 471.2A, Information Security Program, dated 3/27/1997, extended by DOE N 251.57, dated 4/28/2004. Cancels: DOE O 471.2

1997-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

464

Protective Force Program Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 473.2, PROTECTIVE FORCE PROGRAM, which establishes the requirements and responsibilities for management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Protective Force (PF) Program. Change 1 revised pages in Chapters IV and VI on 12/20/2001.

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

465

The RERTR Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is described. The major events, findings, and activities of 1991 are reviewed after a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program had achieved by the end of 1991 in collaboration with its many international partners.

Travelli, A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Multiprocessor programming environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Programming tools and techniques have been well developed for traditional uniprocessor computer systems. The focus of this research project is on the development of a programming environment for a high speed real time heterogeneous multiprocessor system, with special emphasis on languages and compilers. The new tools and techniques will allow a smooth transition for programmers with experience only on single processor systems.

Smith, M.B.; Fornaro, R.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

New Technology Demonstration Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Technology Demonstration Program Technical Brief FEMPFederal Energy Management Program Tom for saving energy in refrigerated walk-in coolers, and to evaluate the potential for this technology in Federal facilities. The focus of this study was on a single manufacturer of the technology, Nevada Energy

468

Information Security Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish the Department of Energy (DOE) Information Security Program and set forth policies, procedures and responsibilities for the protection and control of classified and sensitive information. The Information Security Program is a system of elements which serve to deter collection activities, This directive does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 471.2 of 9-28-1995.

1992-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

469

Graduate Programs Auburn University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Forest Harvesting Forest Products and Wood Science and Urban Forestry http://www.clemson.edu/for/for_prog.html#grad Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado 805230015 Program: Forestry Wood Engineering Wood 97331 Programs: Forest Engineering, Wood Science and Engineering, Forest Resources, and Forest Science

470

ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office of Information Resources ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office of Information Resources ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office of Information Resources ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office of Information Resources More Documents & Publications iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA, Office of Procurement and Assistance Management MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory

471

TOUGHREACT Version 2.0: A simulator for subsurface reactive transport under non-isothermal multiphase flow conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media, and was developed by introducing reactive chemistry into the multiphase fluid and heat flow simulator TOUGH2 V2. The first version of TOUGHREACT was released to the public through the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC) in August 2004. It is among the most frequently requested of ESTSC's codes. The code has been widely used for studies in CO{sub 2} geological sequestration, nuclear waste isolation, geothermal energy development, environmental remediation, and increasingly for petroleum applications. Over the past several years, many new capabilities have been developed, which were incorporated into Version 2 of TOUGHREACT. Major additions and improvements in Version 2 are discussed here, and two application examples are presented: (1) long-term fate of injected CO{sub 2} in a storage reservoir and (2) biogeochemical cycling of metals in mining-impacted lake sediments.

Xu, T.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.; Zhang, G.; Zheng, L.; Pruess, K.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Probabilistic risk assessment for salt repository conceptual design of subsurface facilities: A techical basis for Q-list determination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subpart G ''Quality Assurance'' of 10 CFR Part 60 requires that the US Department of Energy (DOE) apply a quality assurance program to ''all systems, structures, and components important to safety'' and to ''design and characterization of barriers important to waste isolation.'' In April 1986, DOE's Office of Geologic Repositories (OGR) issued general guidance for formulating a list of such systems, structures, and components---the Q-list. This guidance called for the use of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques to identify Q-list items. In this report, PRA techniques are applied to the underground facilities and systems described in the conceptual design report for the Salt Repository Project (SRP) in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Based on probability and dose consequence calculations, no specific items were identified for the Q-list. However, evaluation of the analyses indicated that two functions are important in precluding off-site releases of radioactivity: disposal container integrity; and isolation of the underground facility by the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Items related to these functions are recommended for further evaluation as the repository design progresses. 13 refs., 20 figs.

Chen, C.P.; Mayberry, J.J.; Shepherd, J.; Koza, H.; Rahmani, H.; Sinsky, J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 1: Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The significant accomplishments of this program included (1) identification of the geopressured-geothermal onshore fairways in Louisiana and Texas, (2) determination that high brine flow rates of 20,000--40,000 barrels a day can be obtained for long periods of time, (3) brine, after gas extraction can be successfully reinjected into shallow aquifers without affecting the surface waters or the fresh water aquifers, (4) no observable subsidence or microseismic activity was induced due to the subsurface injection of brine, and no detrimental environmental effects attributable to geopressured-geothermal well testing were noticed, (5) sanding can be controlled by reducing flow rates, (6) corrosion controlled with inhibitors, (7) scaling controlled by phosphonate scale inhibitors, (8) demonstrated that production of gas from saturated brine under pressure was viable and (9) a hybrid power system can be successfully used for conversion of the thermal and chemical energy contained in the geopressured-geothermal resource for generation of electricity.

John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Science Road Map for Phase 2 of the Tank-Farm Vadose Zone Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase 1 of the Tank-Farm Vadose Zone Program (TFVZP) developed information on the nature and extent of vadose zone contamination in the tank farms through field studies, laboratory analyses and experiments, and historical data searches; assembled data and performed tank-farm risk analysis; and initiated interim corrective actions to lessen the impacts of tank leak contaminants. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists and external collaborators at universities and U.S. Department of Energy user facilities sampled and analyzed contaminant plumes. These types of activities will continue during Phase 2 of the TFVZP to refine and expand scientific understanding of the subsurface beneath tank farms, especially of water movement, residual waste leaching, and contaminant transport.

Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Mann, Frederick M.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

476

Site surveillance and maintenance program for Palos Park: Report for 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of the environmental monitoring program conducted at Site A/Plot M in the Palos Park Forest Preserve area for CY 1986 are presented. The monitoring program reflects remedial action subsequent to the original radiological characterization of the site. The program consists of sample collection and analysis of air, surface and subsurface water, and bottom sediment to determine the migration pathway of water from the burial ground (Plot M) to hand-operated picnic wells, establish if buried radionuclides other than hydrogen-3 have migrated, and generally characterize the radiological environment of the area. New studies include the migration of non-radiological hazardous waste constituents that may have been buried with the radioactive waste, based on an analysis of borehole water samples for selected heavy metals and organic compounds. Hydrogen-3 in the Red Gate Woods picnic well continued to show the same pattern of elevated levels in the winter and low concentrations in the summer, but the magnitude of the winter peak was significantly less than in earlier years. Recent measurements indicate the presence of strontium-90 in borehole water next to Plot M. The program established that the radioactivity remaining at Site A/Plot M does not endanger the health or safety of the public visiting the site of those living in the vicinity. 14 refs., 6 figs., 14 tabs.

Golchert, N.W.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Site surveillance and maintenance program for Palos Park: Report for 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of the environmental monitoring program conducted at Site A/Plot M in the Palos Park Forest Preserve area for CY 1987 are presented. The monitoring program is the ongoing remedial action that resulted from the original radiological characterization of the site. This study had determined that hydrogen-3 (as tritiated water) migrated from the burial ground and was present in two nearby hand-pumped picnic wells. The current program consists of sample collection and analysis of air, surface and subsurface water, and bottom sediment. The results of the analyses are used to (1) determine the migration pathway of water from the burial ground (Plot M) to hand-pumped picnic wells, (2) establish if buried radionuclides other than hydrogen-3 have migrated, and (3) generally characterize the radiological environment of the area. The program was designed to study the migration of non-radiological hazardous waste constituents that may have been buried with the radioactive waste. This was done by analyzing borehole water samples for selected heavy metals and organic compounds and analyzing quarterly water samples from the Red Gate Woods picnic well for inorganic constituents. Hydrogen-3 in the Red Gate Woods picnic well continued to show the same pattern of elevated levels in the winter and low concentrations in the summer, but the magnitude of the current winter peak was significantly less than in earlier years. 16 refs., 6 figs., 15 tabs.

Golchert, N.W.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM (Eligible employees are listed at the end of this narrative) Under the Voluntary Leave Transfer Program you can apply, based on a medical emergency, to receive annual leave donated by other employees. A medical emergency is generally defined as a medical condition of the employee or family member that is likely to keep you (the employee) away from work and cause a loss of pay of at least 24 hours. You are required to submit an Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Form 630, Application to Become A Leave Recipient Under the Voluntary Leave Transfer Program, through your supervisor to be considered for the program. The application must include an explanation of the reason the donation is needed (including a brief description of the

479

Coal Utilization Science Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal Utilization SCienCe Program Coal Utilization SCienCe Program Description The Coal Utilization Science (CUS) Program sponsors research and development (R&D) in fundamental science and technology areas that have the potential to result in major improvements in the efficiency, reliability, and environmental performance of advanced power generation systems using coal, the Nation's most abundant fossil fuel resource. The challenge for these systems is to produce power in an efficient and environmentally benign manner while remaining cost effective for power providers as well as consumers. The CUS Program is carried out by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program supports DOE's Strategic Plan to:

480

JGI - Prokaryote Super Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Prokaryote Super Program Prokaryote Super Program While the sequencing and assembly strategies for the Microbial Genomics and Metagenomics Programs are quite different, the scientific goals of the two programs are very much aligned with an underlying common objective to understand the structure and function of microorganisms and microbial communities with mission relevance to the Department of Energy. To achieve this, scientists in the program are pursuing the sequencing of nucleic acids from both individual microbes and entire communities of organisms. This combined approach offers unique opportunities to the scientific community, but also requires coordinated activities between metagenomic and individual microbial genome sequence generation and data analysis. To capitalize on these emerging opportunities, JGI recently merged the two

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Technology Innovation Program 2010ANNUAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Innovation Program 2010ANNUAL REPORT 2010ANNUAL REPORT Technology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology Innovation ProgramTechnology

482

Winter wheat with subsurface drip irrigation (SDI): Crop coefficients, water-use estimates, and effects of SDI on grain yield and water use efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) production in the North China Plain (NCP) is threatened by insufficient water supply. Interest in microirrigation is increasing in the NCP, while data and guidance for microirrigation scheduling are lacking. An accurate estimation of actual crop evapotranspiration (ETa) is critical for appropriate water management. In this study, therefore, the \\{SIMDualKc\\} model was calibrated with the data from a three-season experiment, and \\{ETa\\} of winter wheat with subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) was estimated with the dual crop coefficient approach and stress adjustments described in the FAO-56 using the data of the other two treatments. The mean value of basal crop coefficient (Kcb) for the winter wheat at the initial-, mid-, and late-season growth stages over the three seasons was 0.25, 1.06, and 0.34, respectively. Over the three growing seasons, the \\{ETa\\} for subsurface drip-irrigated wheat with three irrigation treatments ranged from 393 to 449mm. The Kc-local (ETa/ETo) values for the winter wheat with SDI were 0.340.80, 0.911.11, and 0.410.98, respectively, at the initial-, mid-, and late-season growth stages. Results indicated that the procedure of the dual Kc approach and stress adjustments simulated \\{ETa\\} of the winter wheat reasonably well, with the average absolute error (AAE) of 0.36mmd?1, the root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.43mmd?1,the index of agreement (d) of 0.98, the NashSutcliffe efficiency (NSE) of 0.91, and the RMSE-observations standard deviation ratio (RSR) of 0.31. Discrepancy between the simulated and measured data was mainly attributed to the assumption of a uniform distribution of soil water around an emitter. Irrigation rates have significant effects on ETa, grain yield and WUE. Based on effects of irrigation rates on grain yield and WUE, irrigation schedule for optimum yield and WUE was developed for winter wheat. It was estimated that grain yield and WUE of winter wheat with the optimum irrigation schedule was 7780kgha?1 and 1.83kgm?3, respectively. The simulated results can be used as a reference for irrigation schedule and water management for winter wheat in the NCP.

Yang Gao; Linlin Yang; Xiaojun Shen; Xinqiang Li; Jingsheng Sun; Aiwang Duan; Laosheng Wu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

INTEGRATED OUTCROP AND SUBSURFACE STUDIES OF THE INTERWELL ENVIRONMENT OF CARBONATE RESERVOIRS: CLEAR FORK (LEONARDIAN-AGE) RESERVOIRS, WEST TEXAS AND NEW MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of the project ''Integrated Outcrop and Subsurface Studies of the Interwell Environment of Carbonate Reservoirs: Clear Fork (Leonardian-Age) Reservoirs, West Texas and New Mexico'', Department of Energy contract no. DE-AC26-98BC15105 and is the third in a series of similar projects funded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy and The University of Texas at Austin, Bureau of Economic Geology, Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonates. All three projects focus on the integration of outcrop and subsurface data for the purpose of developing improved methods for modeling petrophysical properties in the interwell environment. The first project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-89BC14470, was a study of San Andres outcrops in the Algerita Escarpment, Guadalupe Mountains, Texas and New Mexico, and the Seminole San Andres reservoir, Permian Basin. This study established the basic concepts for constructing a reservoir model using sequence-stratigraphic principles and rock-fabric, petrophysical relationships. The second project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-93BC14895, was a study of Grayburg outcrops in the Brokeoff Mountains, New Mexico, and the South Cowden Grayburg reservoir, Permian Basin. This study developed a sequence-stratigraphic succession for the Grayburg and improved methods for locating remaining hydrocarbons in carbonate ramp reservoirs. The current study is of the Clear Fork Group in Apache Canyon, Sierra Diablo Mountains, West Texas, and the South Wasson Clear Fork reservoir, Permian Basin. The focus was on scales of heterogeneity, imaging high- and low-permeability layers, and the impact of fractures on reservoir performance. In this study (1) the Clear Fork cycle stratigraphy is defined, (2) important scales of petrophysical variability are confirmed, (3) a unique rock-fabric, petrophysical relationship is defined, (4) a porosity method for correlating high-frequency cycles and defining rock-fabric flow layers is described, (5) Clear Fork fractures are described and geomechanical modeling of fractures is investigated, and (6) most importantly, new statistical methods are developed for scaleup of petrophysical properties from the core to the layer scale and for retaining stratigraphic layering in simulation models.

F. Jerry Lucia

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

484

Performance assurance program plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

B and W Protec, Inc. (BWP) is responsible for implementing the Performance Assurance Program for the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) in accordance with DOE Order 470.1, Safeguards and Security Program (DOE 1995a). The Performance Assurance Program applies to safeguards and security (SAS) systems and their essential components (equipment, hardware, administrative procedures, Protective Force personnel, and other personnel) in direct support of Category I and H special nuclear material (SNM) protection. Performance assurance includes several Hanford Site activities that conduct performance, acceptance, operability, effectiveness, and validation tests. These activities encompass areas of training, exercises, quality assurance, conduct of operations, total quality management, self assessment, classified matter protection and control, emergency preparedness, and corrective actions tracking and trending. The objective of the Performance Assurance Program is to capture the critical data of the tests, training, etc., in a cost-effective, manageable program that reflects the overall effectiveness of the program while minimizing operational impacts. To aid in achieving this objective, BWP will coordinate the Performance Assurance Program for Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) and serve as the central point for data collection.

Rogers, B.H.

1997-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

485

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The five volume report comprises the user manual, installation, and validation manual and an applications guide for the SGA (Substation Grounding Analysis) software package. SGA consists of four computer programs: (1) SOMIP, (2) SMECC, (3) SGSYS, and (4) TGRND. The first three programs provide a comprehensive analysis tool for the design of substation grounding systems to meet safety standards. The fourth program, TGRND, provides a state of the art analysis tool for computing transient ground potential rise and ground system impedance. This part of the report, Volume 1, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SOMIP (SOil Measurement Interpretation Program). This program computes the best estimate of the parameters of a two layer soil model from usual soil resistivity measurements. Four pin or three pin soil measurements can be accommodated. In addition, it provides error bounds on the soil parameters for a given confidence level. The users manual describes data requirements and data preparation procedures. The installation and validation manual describes the computer files which make up the program SOMIP and provides two test cases for validation purposes. 4 refs.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Electrical Engineering)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

OCRWM Program Update -- Lanthrum  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Update Update Presented to: Transportation External Coordination Working Group Presented by: Gary Lanthrum Director, Office of Logistics Management February 6, 2008 San Antonio, TX 2 Introduction * Program key milestones * Status of License Application * FY 2008 Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program budget * Status of transportation projects 3 Program Key Milestones Design for License Application Complete November 2007 License Application Submittal Start Nevada Rail Construction YM Construction Authorization Operating License Submittal Rail Line Operational Begin Receipt Completed Supplemental EIS LSN Certification October 2007 4 Licensing Support Network (LSN) * LSN is a web-based information system established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) that provides public

487

RCx Program and UESC  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Program & UESC Program & UESC FUPWG - Fall 2010 Rapid City, SD Chris Gillis Pacific Gas and Electric Company October 20, 2010 Regional Summits 2 Agenda  What is RCx?  PG&E's RCx Program  RCx and UESC 3 What is RCx? A systematic process for optimizing performance of a facility's existing equipment, lighting controls, processes, and control systems A building tune-up using a facility's existing equipment: * Lighting Controls * HVAC Controls & Processes * Control Systems Regional Summits 4 Common RCx Measures Scheduled Loads * Equipment Scheduling: Time of Day * Equipment Scheduling: Optimum Start-Stop * Equipment Scheduling: Lighting Controls Economizer/Outside Air Loads * Economizer Operation: Inadequate Free

488

California Energy Incentive Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

California Energy California Energy Incentive Programs: An Annual Update on Key Energy Issues and Financial Opportunities for Federal Sites in California Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program December 2011 i Contacts Utility Acquisitions, ESPCs, PPAs Tracy Logan U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program EE-2L 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-0121 Phone: (202) 586-9973 E-mail: tracy.logan@ee.doe.gov Principal Research Associate Elizabeth Stuart Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 Phone: (510)495-2370 E-mail: estuart@lbl.gov ii Contents Overview ...................................................................................................................................................... 1

489

DOE Technical Assistance Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Retrieving Customer Usage Data from Utilities Retrieving Customer Usage Data from Utilities The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii Collection of Customer Data for Better Buildings Guidelines For Retrieving Customer Usage Data from Utility Keith Freischlag and Curtis Framel Southwest Energy Efficiency Project DOE Technical Assistance Program Team 4 - Program & Project Development & Implementation December 16, 2010 Guidelines for Retrieving Customer Usage Data from Utilities Webinar Overview * Technical Assistance Program (TAP) * Discussion of Identifying Utility Stakeholders * Discussion of Procuring Customer Usage Data * Suggestions to Streamline Data Collection Processes * Overview of Data Reporting Requirements * Q&A Guidelines for Retrieving Customer Usage Data from Utilities * Questions and discussion after presentation

490

Financing Program Pitfalls to Avoid  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Clean energy financing programs are not a new concept; however, many programs launched over the years have not had the impact intended. Financing program pitfalls to avoid are listed below.

491

Deere & Company Energy Management Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An overview of the Deere & Company Energy Management Program is discussed. A review is made of seven key elements which have contributed to the success of the program. Installed projects and established programs are identified and discussed...

Darby, D. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Chemical Safety Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Program Home Chemical Safety Topical Committee Library Program Contacts Related Links Site Map Tools 2013 Chemical Safety Workshop Archived Workshops Contact Us Health and Safety HSS Logo Chemical Safety Program logo The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Chemical Safety web pages provide a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of chemical management. This page is supported by the Chemical Safety Topical Committee which was formed to identify chemical safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursue solutions to issues identified. Noteworthy products are the Chemical Management Handbooks and the Chemical Lifecycle Cost Analysis Tool, found under the TOOLS menu. Chemical Management Handbook Vol (1) Chemical Management Handbook Vol (2)

493

Computational Energy Sciences Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computational EnErgy SCiEnCES program Computational EnErgy SCiEnCES program Description Led by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Advanced Research (AR) Computational Energy Sciences (CES) Program provides high-performance computational modeling and simulation resources to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and other programs of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These resources are dedicated to speeding development and reducing costs associated with advanced power system design and performance modeling. CES research is focused on developing a set of complex but flexible computational tools that allow more rapid and efficient scale-up of new subsystems, devices, and components, thereby reducing the need for large and expensive demonstration-scale testing of integrated energy systems,

494

Vecinos Volunteer Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Community Commitment » Community Commitment » Vecinos Volunteer Program Vecinos Volunteer Program Vecinos is Spanish for neighbors. Our good neighbor pledge includes active employee engagement in our communities through volunteering. More than 3,000 current and retired Lab employees have logged more than 1.3 million volunteer hours since 2006. June 28, 2012 LANL employee volunteers at Española Valley Animal Shelter LANL employee P. J. Timmerman volunteers at the Española Valley Animal Shelter. Contact Giving Campaigns & Volunteering Debbi Wersonick Community Programs Office (505) 667-7870 Email Giving the gift of service The LANL Vecinos Volunteer Program encourages LANL employees and retirees to get involved by giving of their time, talent and energy to community efforts. Using VolunteerMatch, a national web-based system, and the Retired

495

VFP: Program Requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Requirements Program Requirements Home Welcome Researcher! Preparing for Your Visit Your Arrival Your First Day Weekly Activities Program Requirements Checkout FAQ The DOE WDTS site has comprehensive information on Participant Obligations. Consult that site for more information on all deliverables except the Fermilab Summer Interns website. Attendance: Complete the full ten-week program and attend all scheduled events including lectures, tours and group activities. Entrance Survey: Complete the entrance survey within your first week at Fermilab. One-page Peer Review Provide a one-page written peer review of another SULI intern' talk or poster. Abstract for General Audience Complete and submit an abstract summarizing your research experience. Oral or Poster Presentation: Deliver an oral or poster presentation to mentors and peers the final week

</