Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of...

2

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subsurface Biogeochemical Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

3

Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» Atmospheric System Research (ASR) » Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

4

Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth System Modeling (ESM) Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

5

A BASIC program for calculating subsurface water temperatures using chemical geothermometersimplication to geothermal reservoir estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: BASIC, Na-K-Ca geothermometer, Na/K ratio, geothermometer, silica geothermometer, subsurface temperature

Ali El-Naqa; Nasser Abu Zeid

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Why sequence archaea in a terrestrial subsurface aquifer?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

genome sequencing. Principal Investigators: Wen-Tso Liu, University of Illinois Program: CSP 2011 Home > Sequencing > Why sequence archaea in a terrestrial subsurface aquifer...

7

Electrical Subsurface Grounding Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and objective of this analysis is to determine the present grounding requirements of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) subsurface electrical system and to verify that the actual grounding system and devices satisfy the requirements.

J.M. Calle

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Subsurface Contamination Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

Y. Yuan

2001-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

9

Subsurface Contamination Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

Y. Yuan

2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

10

Subsurface connection methods for subsurface heaters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a first elongated heater in a first opening in the formation. The first elongated heater includes an exposed metal section in a portion of the first opening. The portion is below a layer of the formation to be heated. The exposed metal section is exposed to the formation. A second elongated heater is in a second opening in the formation. The second opening connects to the first opening at or near the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated. At least a portion of an exposed metal section of the second elongated heater is electrically coupled to at least a portion of the exposed metal section of the first elongated heater in the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Bass, Ronald Marshall (Houston, TX); Kim, Dong Sub (Sugar Land, TX); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX); Keltner, Thomas Joseph (Spring, TX); Carl, Jr., Frederick Gordon (Houston, TX)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

11

SUBSURFACE EMPLACEMENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this analysis is to identify issues and criteria that apply to the design of the Subsurface Emplacement Transportation System (SET). The SET consists of the track used by the waste package handling equipment, the conductors and related equipment used to supply electrical power to that equipment, and the instrumentation and controls used to monitor and operate those track and power supply systems. Major considerations of this analysis include: (1) Operational life of the SET; (2) Geometric constraints on the track layout; (3) Operating loads on the track; (4) Environmentally induced loads on the track; (5) Power supply (electrification) requirements; and (6) Instrumentation and control requirements. This analysis will provide the basis for development of the system description document (SDD) for the SET. This analysis also defines the interfaces that need to be considered in the design of the SET. These interfaces include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Waste handling building; (2) Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface site layout; (3) Waste Emplacement System (WES); (4) Waste Retrieval System (WRS); (5) Ground Control System (GCS); (6) Ex-Container System (XCS); (7) Subsurface Electrical Distribution System (SED); (8) MGR Operations Monitoring and Control System (OMC); (9) Subsurface Facility System (SFS); (10) Subsurface Fire Protection System (SFR); (11) Performance Confirmation Emplacement Drift Monitoring System (PCM); and (12) Backfill Emplacement System (BES).

T. Wilson; R. Novotny

1999-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

12

Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Project is entering a the license application (LA) stage in its mission to develop the nation's first underground nuclear waste repository. After a number of years of gathering data related to site characterization, including activities ranging from laboratory and site investigations, to numerical modeling of processes associated with conditions to be encountered in the future repository, the Project is realigning its activities towards the License Application preparation. At the current stage, the major efforts are directed at translating the results of scientific investigations into sets of data needed to support the design, and to fulfill the licensing requirements and the repository design activities. This document addresses the program need to address specific technical questions so that an assessment can be made about the suitability and adequacy of data to license and construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. In July 2002, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an Integrated Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2002). Included in this report were the Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) Key Technical Issues (KTI). Geotechnical agreements were formulated to resolve a number of KTI subissues, in particular, RDTME KTIs 3.04, 3.05, 3.07, and 3.19 relate to the physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the host rock (NRC 2002, pp. 2.1.1-28, 2.1.7-10 to 2.1.7-21, A-17, A-18, and A-20). The purpose of the Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report is to present an accounting of current geotechnical information that will help resolve KTI subissues and some other project needs. The report analyzes and summarizes available qualified geotechnical data. It evaluates the sufficiency and quality of existing data to support engineering design and performance assessment. In addition, the corroborative data obtained from tests performed by a number of research organizations is presented to reinforce conclusions derived from the pool of data gathered within a full QA-controlled domain. An evaluation of the completeness of the current data is provided with respect to the requirements for geotechnical data to support design and performance assessment.

D. Rigby; M. Mrugala; G. Shideler; T. Davidsavor; J. Leem; D. Buesch; Y. Sun; D. Potyondy; M. Christianson

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

13

Dr J Michael Kuperberg | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Climate and Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) » Dr J Michael Kuperberg Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities

14

ARM Climate Research Facility | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research » Climate and Research » Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) » ARM Climate Research Facility Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER

15

William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) | U.S.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

William R. Wiley Environmental William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

16

Data Management | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Management Data Management Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

17

Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Assessment of Global Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

18

Radionuclide Sensors for Subsurface Water Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of the subsurface by radionuclides is a persistent and vexing problem for the Department of Energy. These radionuclides must be measured in field studies and monitoed in the long term when they cannot be removed. However, no radionuclide sensors existed for groundwater monitoring prior to this team's research under the EMSP program Detection of a and b decays from radionuclides in water is difficult due to their short ranges in condensed media.

Timothy DeVol

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

Eric Loros

2001-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

20

Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

NONE

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Six Science Secrets of the Subsurface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article highlights recent fundamental scientific research on subsurface radionuclide migration.

Manke, Kristin L.; Wiley, Julie G.

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

22

ESF Subsurface Standby Generator Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to outline and recommend two standby generator systems. These systems shall provide power during a utility outage to critical Alcove No.5's thermal test loads and to subsurface flow through ventilation loads. Critical loads that will be supported by these generator systems will be identified and evaluated. Additionally, other requirements from the Exploratory Studies Facilities Design Requirements (ESFDR) document will be evaluated. Finally, the standby generator systems will be integrated into the existing ESF subsurface distribution system. The objective of this analysis is to provide design inputs for an efficient and reliable standby generator systems which will provide power for critical loads during a power outage; specifically, Alcove No.5's thermal test loads and the subsurface flow through ventilation loads. Additionally, preliminary one-line diagrams will be developed using this analysis as a primary input.

L. Fernandez

1998-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

23

REPOSITORY SUBSURFACE LAYOUT OPTIONS AND ESF INTERFACE  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work completed by the repository subsurface design group during the 1993 fiscal year (FY93), and represents a portion of the ongoing, repository Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) effort. The ACD work is being performed in accordance with guidance and controls established for the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). This document draws information from other ACD reports prepared and submitted during the year, and from other program studies, including the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Title II design. Site specific data gathered by the Surface Based Testing (SBT) program has been included to the extent that it became available early enough for use in the designs presented herein.

Dana J. Rogers

1993-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

24

Lower-Temperature Subsurface Layout and Ventilation Concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis combines work scope identified as subsurface facility (SSF) low temperature (LT) Facilities System and SSF LT Ventilation System in the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001b, pp. 6 and 7, and pp. 13 and 14). In accordance with this technical work plan (TWP), this analysis is performed using AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models. It also incorporates the procedure AP-SI.1Q, Software Management. The purpose of this analysis is to develop an overall subsurface layout system and the overall ventilation system concepts that address a lower-temperature operating mode for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). The objective of this analysis is to provide a technical design product that supports the lower-temperature operating mode concept for the revision of the system description documents and to provide a basis for the system description document design descriptions. The overall subsurface layout analysis develops and describes the overall subsurface layout, including performance confirmation facilities (also referred to as Test and Evaluation Facilities) for the Site Recommendation design. This analysis also incorporates current program directives for thermal management.

Christine L. Linden; Edward G. Thomas

2001-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

25

SUBSURFACE VISUAL ALARM SYSTEM ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The ''Subsurface Fire Hazard Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 1998, page 61), and the document, ''Title III Evaluation Report for the Surface and Subsurface Communication System'', (CRWMS M&O 1999a, pages 21 and 23), both indicate the installed communication system is adequate to support Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) activities with the exception of the mine phone system for emergency notification purposes. They recommend the installation of a visual alarm system to supplement the page/party phone system The purpose of this analysis is to identify data communication highway design approaches, and provide justification for the selected or recommended alternatives for the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system. This analysis is being prepared to document a basis for the design selection of the data communication method. This analysis will briefly describe existing data or voice communication or monitoring systems within the ESF, and look at how these may be revised or adapted to support the needed data highway of the subsurface visual alarm. system. The existing PLC communication system installed in subsurface is providing data communication for alcove No.5 ventilation fans, south portal ventilation fans, bulkhead doors and generator monitoring system. It is given that the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system will be a digital based system. It is also given that it is most feasible to take advantage of existing systems and equipment and not consider an entirely new data communication system design and installation. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Briefly review and describe existing available data communication highways or systems within the ESF. (2) Examine technical characteristics of an existing system to disqualify a design alternative is paramount in minimizing the number of and depth of a system review. (3) Apply general engineering design practices or criteria such as relative cost, and degree of difficulty and complexity in determining requirements in adapting existing data communication highways to support the subsurface visual alarm system. These requirements would include such things as added or new communication cables, added Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), Inputs and Outputs (I/O), and communication hardware components, and human machine interfaces and their software operating system. (4) Select the best data communication highway system based on this review of adapting or integrating with existing data communication systems.

D.W. Markman

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

26

EMSL: Science: Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems logo Visualization of CFD-simulated fluid velocities within a single pore space between randomly packed spherical grains Visualization of CFD-simulated fluid velocities within a single pore space between randomly packed spherical grains. The Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems Science Theme focuses on the dynamics of nutrients, metabolites, and contaminants at biogeochemical interfaces in heterogeneous environments across multiple scales. By providing a mechanistic understanding of biogeochemical and microbial processes in soils and the subsurface, and linking those processes via pore-scale hydrological models, EMSL can improve strategies for sustainable solutions to contaminant attenuation, remediation and biogeochemical

27

Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page The below listing provides additional references related to Subsurface & Groundwater Remediation. The references are categorized by documents types (e.g., Strategic Plans, Groundwater Plume Map Booklets, etc.) and under each "document type", there is a list of documents and/or hyperlinks to a reference. The Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page will continue to reflect additional information as it is identified. Strategic Plans Scientific Opportunities to Reduce Risk in Groundwater and Soil Remediation Scientific Opportunities for Monitoring at Environmental Remediation Sites (SOMERS) Groundwater Plume Map Booklets Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites -

28

Method of installing subsurface barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

Nickelson, Reva A. (Shelley, ID); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sloan, Paul A. (Rigby, ID)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

29

Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers  

SciTech Connect

An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier.

Borns, D.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

U.S. Department of Energy Subsurface Biogeochemical Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research. Click to return to home page. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research. Click to return to home page. Department of Energy Office of Science. Click to visit main DOE SC site. About the Program Research User Facilities PI Meeting Site Map Contact Us About SBR Overview Impact of SBR Research Bibliography Research Abstracts Reports and Documents Document Archive Timeline Related DOE Programs Related Meetings Calendar Contact Information David Lesmes Paul Bayer All SBR Contacts Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Simulation of Pore-Scale Fluid Flow Research Snapshot Approach Bibliography Research Abstracts Research Highlights Performance Measures and Milestones Archive Calls for Proposals Announcements Major Programmatic Components National Laboratory SFAs University-Led Projects

31

ASSESSMENT OF THE SUBSURFACE FATE OF MONOETHANOLAMINE  

SciTech Connect

Burial of amine reclaimer unit sludges and system filters has resulted in contamination of soil at the CanOxy Okotoks decommissioned sour gas-processing plant with amines, amine byproducts, and salts. A three-phase research program was devised to investigate the natural attenuation process that controls the subsurface transport and fate of these contaminants and to apply the results toward the development of a strategy for the remediation of this type of contamination in soils. Phase I experimental activities examined interactions between monoethanolamine (MEA) and sediment, the biodegradability of MEA in soils at various concentrations and temperatures, and the biodegradability of MEA sludge contamination in a soil slurry bioreactor. The transport and fate of MEA in the subsurface was found to be highly dependant on the nature of the release, particularly MEA concentration and conditions of the subsurface environment, i.e., pH, temperature, and oxygen availability. Pure compound biodegradation experiments in soil demonstrated rapid biodegradation of MEA under aerobic conditions and moderate temperatures (>6 C). Phase II landfarming activities confirmed that these contaminants are readily biodegradable in soil under ideal laboratory conditions, yet considerable toxicity was observed in the remaining material. Examination of water extracts from the treated soil suggested that the toxicity is water-soluble. Phase II activities led to the conclusion that landfarming is not the most desirable bioremediation technique; however, an engineered biopile with a leachate collection system could remove the remaining toxic fraction from the soil. Phase III was initiated to conduct field-based experimental activities to examine the optimized remediation technology. A pilot-scale engineered biopile was constructed at a decommissioned gas-sweetening facility in Okotoks, Alberta, Canada. On the basis of a review of the analytical and performance data generated from soil and leachate samples, the biopile operation has successfully removed all identified amines and removed significant amounts of organic nitrogen and organic carbon. Salts initially present in the soil and salts generated during the biodegradation of contaminants remain to be flushed from the soil. Laboratory data show that these salts are readily removable with a simple soil leach.

James A. Sorensen; John R. Gallagher; Lori G. Kays

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Subsurface Excavations (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

legislation addresses subsurface excavations conducted for all purposes other than the exploration or production of gas and oil resources that may adversely affect water...

33

capabilitiesFlier_subsurfaceFlow_WEB  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

use is applied to EMSL's sci- ence themes of Biological Interactions and Dynamics, GeochemistryBiogeochemistry and Subsurface Science, as well as Science of Interfacial...

34

EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and...

35

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Contractor-Grantee Workshop--Abstracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abiotic Reactions in Hanford 300 Area Subsurface Sedimentsin the subsurface at Hanfords 300 Area. To initially studycore samples from the Hanford 300 Area IFRC site. Uranium

Hazen, Terry C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) Located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, the Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied...

37

On the Dynamics of Equatorial Subsurface Countercurrents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equatorial subsurface countercurrents (SSCC are strong, steady, geostrophically balanced eastward flows situated below the high speed core of the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) at 35N and S. The dynamics of these currents are explored using ...

Michael J. McPhaden

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to develop preliminary high-level functional and physical control system architectures for the proposed subsurface repository at Yucca Mountain. This document outlines overall control system concepts that encompass and integrate the many diverse systems being considered for use within the subsurface repository. This document presents integrated design concepts for monitoring and controlling the diverse set of subsurface operations. The subsurface repository design will be composed of a series of diverse systems that will be integrated to accomplish a set of overall functions and objectives. The subsurface repository contains several Instrumentation and Control (I&C) related systems including: waste emplacement systems, ventilation systems, communication systems, radiation monitoring systems, rail transportation systems, ground control monitoring systems, utility monitoring systems (electrical, lighting, water, compressed air, etc.), fire detection and protection systems, retrieval systems, and performance confirmation systems. Each of these systems involve some level of I&C and will typically be integrated over a data communication network. The subsurface I&C systems will also integrate with multiple surface-based site-wide systems such as emergency response, health physics, security and safeguards, communications, utilities and others. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Identify preliminary system level functions and interface needs (Presented in the functional diagrams in Section 7.2). (2) Examine the overall system complexity and determine how and on what levels these control systems will be controlled and integrated (Presented in Section 7.2). (3) Develop a preliminary subsurface facility-wide design for an overall control system architecture, and depict this design by a series of control system functional block diagrams (Presented in Section 7.2). (4) Develop a series of physical architectures that present preliminary concepts for integrating the diverse set of control systems to be used within the subsurface repository facility (Presented in Section 7.3). (5) Develop initial concepts for an overall subsurface data communication system that can be used to integrate critical and data-intensive control systems (Presented in Section 7.4). (6) Discuss technology trends and control system design issues (Presented in Section 7.5).

C.J. Fernado

1998-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

39

Subsurface Science (The Molecular Environmental Science Group) |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subsurface Science Subsurface Science BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne arrow Subsurface Science The Molecular Environmental Science Group (MESG) The MESG is part of the Biosciences Division at Argonne National Laboratory. One of the main foci during the creation and growth of the MESG has been the development of an internationally recognized integrated multidisciplinary scientific team focused on the investigation of fundamental biogeochemical questions. Presently, expertise that is represented by members of the MES Group includes x-ray Physics, Environmental Chemistry, Environmental Microbiology, (Bio)geochemistry, and radiolimnology. Additional expertise in electron microscopy, x-ray microscopy, Microbial Ecology, and Bioinformatics often is provided by collaborations with scientists outside of our group.

40

Autonomous microexplosives subsurface tracing system final report.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the autonomous micro-explosive subsurface tracing system is to image the location and geometry of hydraulically induced fractures in subsurface petroleum reservoirs. This system is based on the insertion of a swarm of autonomous micro-explosive packages during the fracturing process, with subsequent triggering of the energetic material to create an array of micro-seismic sources that can be detected and analyzed using existing seismic receiver arrays and analysis software. The project included investigations of energetic mixtures, triggering systems, package size and shape, and seismic output. Given the current absence of any technology capable of such high resolution mapping of subsurface structures, this technology has the potential for major impact on petroleum industry, which spends approximately $1 billion dollar per year on hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States alone.

Engler, Bruce Phillip; Nogan, John; Melof, Brian Matthew; Uhl, James Eugene; Dulleck, George R., Jr.; Ingram, Brian V.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Rivas, Raul R.; Cooper, Paul W.; Warpinski, Norman Raymond; Kravitz, Stanley H.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

MSTS - Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator theory manual  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy, through the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office, has designated the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada for detailed study as the candidate US geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Site characterization will determine the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for the potential waste repository. If the site is determined suitable, subsequent studies and characterization will be conducted to obtain authorization from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to construct the potential waste repository. A principal component of the characterization and licensing processes involves numerically predicting the thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment of the Yucca Mountain site to the potential repository over a 10,000-year period. The thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment to the repository is anticipated to include complex processes of countercurrent vapor and liquid migration, multiple-phase heat transfer, multiple-phase transport, and geochemical reactions. Numerical simulators based on mathematical descriptions of these subsurface phenomena are required to make numerical predictions of the thermal and hydrologic response of the Yucca Mountain subsurface environment The engineering simulator called the Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator (MSTS) was developed at the request of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office to produce numerical predictions of subsurface flow and transport phenomena at the potential Yucca Mountain site. This document delineates the design architecture and describes the specific computational algorithms that compose MSTS. Details for using MSTS and sample problems are given in the {open_quotes}User`s Guide and Reference{close_quotes} companion document.

White, M.D.; Nichols, W.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Heating systems for heating subsurface formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

43

Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Bass, Ronald M. (Houston, TX)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

44

Interim report: Manipulation of natural subsurface processes: Field research and validation.  

SciTech Connect

Often the only alternative for treating deep subsurface contamination is in situ manipulation of natural processes to change the mobility or form of contaminants. However, the complex interactions of natural subsurface physical, chemical, and microbial processes limit the predictability of the system-wide impact of manipulation based on current knowledge. This report is a summary of research conducted to examine the feasibility of controlling the oxidation-reduction (redox) potential of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State by introducing chemical reagents and microbial nutrients. The experiment would allow the testing of concepts and hypotheses developed from fundamental research in the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Subsurface Science Program. Furthermore, the achievement of such control is expected to have implications for in situ remediation of dispersed aqueous contaminants in the subsurface environment at DOE sites nationwide, and particularly at the Hanford Site. This interim report summarizes initial research that was conducted between July 1990 and October 1991.

Fruchter, J.S.; Spane, F.A.; Amonette, J.E. [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Parallel heater system for subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of substantially horizontally oriented or inclined heater sections located in a hydrocarbon containing layer in the formation. At least a portion of two of the heater sections are substantially parallel to each other. The ends of at least two of the heater sections in the layer are electrically coupled to a substantially horizontal, or inclined, electrical conductor oriented substantially perpendicular to the ends of the at least two heater sections.

Harris, Christopher Kelvin (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

46

Low temperature monitoring system for subsurface barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for monitoring temperature of a subsurface low temperature zone is described. The system includes a plurality of freeze wells configured to form the low temperature zone, one or more lasers, and a fiber optic cable coupled to at least one laser. A portion of the fiber optic cable is positioned in at least one freeze well. At least one laser is configured to transmit light pulses into a first end of the fiber optic cable. An analyzer is coupled to the fiber optic cable. The analyzer is configured to receive return signals from the light pulses.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); McKinzie, II. Billy John (Houston, TX)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

47

Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Lead Laboratory Providing Technical Assistance to the DOE Weapons Complex in Subsurface Contamination  

SciTech Connect

The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA), a DOE-HQ EM-50 organization, is hosted and managed at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. SCFA is an integrated program chartered to find technology and scientific solutions to address DOE subsurface environmental restoration problems throughout the DOE Weapons Complex. Since its inception in 1989, the SCFA program has resulted in a total of 269 deployments of 83 innovative technologies. Until recently, the primary thrust of the program has been to develop, demonstrate, and deploy those remediation technology alternatives that are solutions to technology needs identified by the DOE Sites. Over the last several years, the DOE Sites began to express a need not only for innovative technologies, but also for technical assistance. In response to this need, DOE-HQ EM-50, in collaboration with and in support of a Strategic Lab Council recommendation directed each of its Focus Areas to implement a Lead Laboratory Concept to enhance their technical capabilities. Because each Focus Area is unique as defined by the contrast in either the type of contaminants involved or the environments in which they are found, the Focus Areas were given latitude in how they set up and implemented the Lead Lab Concept. The configuration of choice for the SCFA was a Lead-Partner Lab arrangement. Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) teamed with the SCFA as the Focus Area's Lead Laboratory. SRTC then partnered with the DOE National Laboratories to create a virtual consulting function within DOE. The National Laboratories were established to help solve the Nation's most difficult problems, drawing from a resource pool of the most talented and gifted scientists and engineers. Following that logic, SRTC, through the Lead-Partner Lab arrangement, has that same resource base to draw from to provide assistance to any SCFA DOE customer throughout the Complex. This paper briefly describes how this particular arrangement is organized and provides case histories that illustrate its strengths in solving problems and offering solutions. The program is designed to minimize red tape, maximize value, and to rapidly and cost effectively disseminate solutions to common problems facing the DOE.

Wright, J. A. Jr.; Corey, J. C.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

48

Historical Ocean Subsurface Temperature Analysis with Error Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective analysis of monthly ocean subsurface temperatures from 1950 to 1998 is carried out. The analysis scheme and the results with estimated analysis errors are presented.

Masayoshi Ishii; Masahide Kimoto; Misako Kachi

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

EMSL: Science: Geochemistry/Biogeochemistry and Subsurface Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GeochemistryBiogeochemistry and Subsurface Science pyramid-like surface structure of the mineral, hematite Pyramid-like surface structure of the mineral, hematite Research in this...

50

Chombo-Crunch: Advanced Simulation of Subsurface Flow and Reactive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chombo-Crunch: Advanced Simulation of Subsurface Flow and Reactive Transport Processes Associated with Carbon Sequestration PI Name: David Trebotich Institution: Lawrence Berkeley...

51

Instruments for subsurface monitoring of geothermal subsidence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The requirements for a subsurface geothermal subsidence instrument were reviewed. Available instruments for monitoring subsurface displacements, both vertical and horizontal, were studied and the most capable instruments identified. Techniques and materials for improving existing or developing new instruments were evaluated. Elements of sensor and signal technology with potential for high temperature monitoring of subsidence were identified. Drawing from these studies, methods to adapt production wells for monitoring were proposed and several new instrumentation systems were conceptually designed. Finally, four instrumentation systems were selected for future development. These systems are: triple sensor induction sensor probe (with casing collar markers); triple sensor gamma ray detector probe (with radioactive markers); triple sensor reed switch probe (with magnet markers); and triple sensor oscillator-type magnet detector probe (with magnet markers). All are designed for use in well casing incorporating slip couplings or bellows sections, although the gamma ray detector probe may also be used in unlined holes. These systems all measure vertical moement. Instruments to measure horizontal displacement due to geothermal subsidence were studied and the required instrument performance was judged to be beyond the state-of-the-art. Thus, no conceptual designs for instruments to monitor horizontal movement are included.

O'Rourke, J.E.; Ranson, B.B.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Programming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programming for Exascale Computers William Gropp and Marc Snir April 15, 2013 Abstract Exascale systems will present programmers with many challenges. We review the...

53

Characterization of Microbial Communities in Subsurface Nuclear Blast Cavities of the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this programs Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

Duane P. Moser, Jim Bruckner, Jen Fisher, Ken Czerwinski, Charles E. Russell, and Mavrik Zavarin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Armored Enzyme Nanoparticles for Remediation of Subsurface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The remediation of subsurface contaminants is a critical problem for the Department of Energy, other government agencies, and our nation. Severe contamination of soil and groundwater exists at several DOE sites due to various methods of intentional and unintentional release. Given the difficulties involved in conventional removal or separation processes, it is vital to develop methods to transform contaminants and contaminated earth/water to reduce risks to human health and the environment. Transformation of the contaminants themselves may involve conversion to other immobile species that do not migrate into well water or surface waters, as is proposed for metals and radionuclides; or degradation to harmless molecules, as is desired for organic contaminants. Transformation of contaminated earth (as opposed to the contaminants themselves) may entail reductions in volume or release of bound contaminants for remediation.

Grate, Jay W.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Optimal joule heating of the subsurface  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

Richard C. Logan

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

57

Optimal joule heating of the subsurface  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating is disclosed. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

Berryman, J.G.; Daily, W.D.

1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

58

Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone Contamination at Hanford Site Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone Contamination at Hanford Site May 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Shown here are high-resolution, three-dimensional ERT images of contaminant distribution Shown here are high-resolution, three-dimensional ERT images of contaminant distribution RICHLAND, Wash. - Cold War waste disposal practices resulted in both planned and unplanned releases of large amounts of radionuclide and heavy metal contamination into the subsurface throughout the DOE complex. Characterizing the distribution of the resulting environmental contamination remains one of the single most significant challenges limiting subsurface remediation and closure, particularly for the

59

Historical Perspective on Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Success: Counting the Things That Really Count  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area, (SCFA) is committed to, and has been accountable for, identifying and providing solutions for the most pressing subsurface contamination problems in the DOE Complex. The SCFA program is a DOE end user focused and problem driven organization that provides the best technical solutions for the highest priority problems. This paper will discuss in some detail specific examples of the most successful, innovative technical solutions and the DOE sites where they were deployed or demonstrated. These solutions exhibited outstanding performance in FY 2000/2001 and appear poised to achieve significant success in saving end users money and time. They also provide a reduction in risk to the environment, workers, and the public while expediting environmental clean up of the sites.

Wright, J. A. Jr.; Middleman, L. I.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

60

EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at 331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal for the Rock Springs In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Test Site remediation that would be performed at the Rock Springs site in Sweetwater County, Wyoming. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Finding of No Significant Impact Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Final Environmental Assessment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

PNNL: Biological Sciences - A Subsurface Science Scientific Focus Area -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of Microenvironments and Transition Zones in Subsurface Reactive Role of Microenvironments and Transition Zones in Subsurface Reactive Contaminant Transport Subsurface Science Scientific Focus Area (SFA) The Subsurface Science Scientific Focus Area (SFA) is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The SFA team is performing integrated, multidisciplinary, science-theme-focused research on the role of microenvironments and transition zones in the reactive transport of technetium (Tc), uranium (U), and plutonium (Pu). The primary environmental system being studied is the groundwater-river interaction zone in the 300 area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Ringold Sediments Redox boundary in Ringold sediments about 2.5 m below the Hanford-Ringold contact. The boundary is the point where oxygen and other terminal electron

62

Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Single-Well and Surface-to-Well Induction Logging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Single-Well and Surface-to-Well Induction Logging Abstract Extended logging and surface-to-borehole electromagnetic induction measurements were performed at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field as part of an ongoing effort to employ electromagnetic induction logging to geothermal reservoir characterization. The principal goal of this effort is to discern subsurface features useful in geothermal production, such as larger scale mapping of geothermal reservoirs and smaller scale mapping of producing

63

Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the waves generated by all surface sources. The subject of this report is use this data set to determine the subsurface structure as a function of azimuth. A total or 2005 first...

64

Manual on Subsurface Investigations National Highway Institute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AT THE SCHWARZE PUMPE POWER STATION IN GERMANY ..................................................... 56 FIGURE 7-5. THE DOE CARBON SEQUESTRATION PROGRAM ROADMAP FROM 2012 TO 2022 ...................... 68 FIGURE 8-6. DOE result in cost increases rather than decreases). A number of R&D programs emphasize the need for lower

Mayne, Paul W.

65

Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Extremophiles 2004 Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles SEPTEMBER 19 -23, 2004 CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles © 2004, American Society for Microbiology 1752 N Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20036-2904 Phone: 202-737-3600 World Wide Web: www.asm.org All Rights Reserved Printed in the United States of America ISBN: 1-55581 324-0 TABLE OF CONTENTS General Information Scientific Program Abstracts for Oral Sessions Abstracts for Poster Sessions Index 4 10 18 42 144 4 ASM Conferences EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Frank Robb, Chair University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute Michael W. Adams University of Georgia Koki Horikoshi Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology Robert M. Kelly North Carolina State University Jennifer Littlechild

66

Overview of research and development in subsurface fate and transport modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is responsible for the remediation of over 450 different subsurface-contaminated sites. Contaminant plumes at these sites range in volume from several to millions of cubic yards. The concentration of contaminants also ranges over several orders of magnitude. Contaminants include hazardous wastes such as heavy metals and organic chemicals, radioactive waste including tritium, uranium, and thorium, and mixed waste, which is a combination of hazardous and radioactive wastes. The physical form of the contaminants includes solutes, nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), and vapor phase contaminants such as volatilized organic chemicals and radon. The subject of contaminant fate and transport modeling is multi-disciplinary, involving hydrology, geology, microbiology, chemistry, applied mathematics, computer science, and other areas of expertise. It is an issue of great significance in the United States and around the world. As such, many organizations have substantial programs in this area. In gathering data to prepare this report, a survey was performed of research and development work that is funded by US government agencies to improve the understanding and mechanistic modeling of processes that control contaminant movement through subsurface systems. Government agencies which fund programs that contain fate and transport modeling components include the Environmental Protection Agency, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Department of Agriculture, Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Department of Defense, United States Geological Survey, and National Institutes of Health.

Sullivan, T.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chehata, M. [Science Applications Internationa Corp. (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Evaluation of subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to solid earth tidal strain Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Evaluation of subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to solid earth tidal strain Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The nature of solid earth tidal strain and surface load deformation due to the influence of gravitational forces and barometric pressure loading are discussed. The pore pressure response to these types of deformation is investigated in detail, including the cases of a confined aquifer intersected by a well and a discrete fracture intersected by a well. The integration of the tidal response method with conventional pump tests in order to independently calculate the hydraulic parameters of the

68

Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso geothermal subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso geothermal reservoir by analyzing shear-wave splitting of microearthquake seismorgrams Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso geothermal reservoir by analyzing shear-wave splitting of microearthquake seismorgrams Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A large number of microearthquake seismograms have been recorded by a downhole, three-component seismic network deployed around the Coso, California geothermal reservoir. Shear-wave splitting induced by the alignment of cracks in the reservoir has been widely observed in the recordings. Over 100 events with body wave magnitude greater than 1.0 from

69

Subsurface Stratigraphy, Structure, and Alteration in the Senator Thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Subsurface Stratigraphy, Structure, and Alteration in the Senator Thermal Subsurface Stratigraphy, Structure, and Alteration in the Senator Thermal Area, Northern Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada-Initial Results from Injection Well 38-32, and a New Structural Scenario for the Stillwater Escarpment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Subsurface Stratigraphy, Structure, and Alteration in the Senator Thermal Area, Northern Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada-Initial Results from Injection Well 38-32, and a New Structural Scenario for the Stillwater Escarpment Abstract Two injection wells (DV 38-32 and DV 27-32) in the Senator thermal area of the northern Dixie Valley geothermal field supply all the injectate reaching the field's northernmost group of production wells. These injectors are also the only wells in the field drilled between the surface

70

DETERMINATION OF IMPORTANCE EVALUATION FOR THE SUBSURFACE EXPORATORY STUDIES FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) East-West Cross Drift Starter Tunnel (to approximate ECRB Station 0+26 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas in the TS Loop. This evaluation applies to the construction, operation, and maintenance of these excavations. A more detailed description of these items is provided in Section 6.0. Testing activities are not evaluated in this DIE. Certain construction activities with respect to testing activities are evaluated; but the testing activities themselves are not evaluated. The DIE for ESF Subsurface Testing Activities (BAJ3000000-01717-2200-00011 Rev 01) (CRWMS M&O 1998a) evaluates Subsurface ESF Testing activities. The construction, operation, and maintenance of the TS Loop niches and alcove slot cuts is evaluated herein and is also discussed in CRWMS M&O 1998a. The construction, operation, and maintenance of the Busted Butte subsurface test area in support of the Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test is evaluated in CRWMS M&O 1998a. Potential test-to-test interference and the waste isolation impacts of testing activities are evaluated in the ESF Subsurface Testing Activities DIE and other applicable evaluation(s) for the Job Package (JP), Test Planning Package (TPP), and/or Field Work Package (FWP). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether the Subsurface ESF TS Loop and associated excavations, including activities associated with their construction and operation, potentially impact site characterization testing or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified. The validity and veracity of the individual tests, including data collection, are the responsibility of the assigned Principal Investigator(s) (PIs) and are not evaluated in this DIE.

W.J. Clark

1999-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

71

Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment; Vital U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

Richard C. Logan

2002-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

72

Subsurface Pathway Flow and Transport Modeling for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

Migration of contaminants through the complex subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area was simulated for an ongoing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability (CERCLA) assessment. A previously existing model for simulating flow and transport through the vadose zone for this site was updated to incorporate information obtained from recent characterization activities. Given the complexity of the subsurface at this site, the simulation results were acknowledged to be uncertain. Rather than attempt parametric approaches to quantify uncertainty, it was recognized that conceptual uncertainty involving the controlling processes was likely dominant. So, the effort focused on modeling different scenarios to evaluate the impact of the conceptual uncertainty.

Magnuson, S.O.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

73

Heating subsurface formations by oxidizing fuel on a fuel carrier  

SciTech Connect

A method of heating a portion of a subsurface formation includes drawing fuel on a fuel carrier through an opening formed in the formation. Oxidant is supplied to the fuel at one or more locations in the opening. The fuel is combusted with the oxidant to provide heat to the formation.

Costello, Michael; Vinegar, Harold J.

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

74

Review of potential subsurface permeable barrier emplacement and monitoring technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report focuses on subsurface permeable barrier technologies potentially applicable to existing waste disposal sites. This report describes candidate subsurface permeable barriers, methods for emplacing these barriers, and methods used to monitor the barrier performance. Two types of subsurface barrier systems are described: those that apply to contamination.in the unsaturated zone, and those that apply to groundwater and to mobile contamination near the groundwater table. These barriers may be emplaced either horizontally or vertically depending on waste and site characteristics. Materials for creating permeable subsurface barriers are emplaced using one of three basic methods: injection, in situ mechanical mixing, or excavation-insertion. Injection is the emplacement of dissolved reagents or colloidal suspensions into the soil at elevated pressures. In situ mechanical mixing is the physical blending of the soil and the barrier material underground. Excavation-insertion is the removal of a soil volume and adding barrier materials to the space created. Major vertical barrier emplacement technologies include trenching-backfilling; slurry trenching; and vertical drilling and injection, including boring (earth augering), cable tool drilling, rotary drilling, sonic drilling, jetting methods, injection-mixing in drilled holes, and deep soil mixing. Major horizontal barrier emplacement technologies include horizontal drilling, microtunneling, compaction boring, horizontal emplacement, longwall mining, hydraulic fracturing, and jetting methods.

Riggsbee, W.H.; Treat, R.L.; Stansfield, H.J.; Schwarz, R.M. [Ebasco Environmental, Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, K.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Phillips, S.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Subsurface Jets in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface jets, defined as having velocity maxima >40 cm s?1 at depths between 100 and 350 m, and being surrounded by much weaker near-surface currents, have been observed over the northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The observations ...

Peter Hamilton; Antoine Badan

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Feasibility study of tank leakage mitigation using subsurface barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to satisfy manage and dispose of the waste currently stored in the underground storage tanks. The retrieval element of TWRS includes a work scope to develop subsurface impermeable barriers beneath SSTs. The barriers could serve as a means to contain leakage that may result from waste retrieval operations and could also support site closure activities by facilitating cleanup. Three types of subsurface barrier systems have emerged for further consideration: (1) chemical grout, (2) freeze walls, and (3) desiccant, represented in this feasibility study as a circulating air barrier. This report contains analyses of the costs and relative risks associated with combinations retrieval technologies and barrier technologies that from 14 alternatives. Eight of the alternatives include the use of subsurface barriers; the remaining six nonbarrier alternative are included in order to compare the costs, relative risks and other values of retrieval with subsurface barriers. Each alternative includes various combinations of technologies that can impact the risks associated with future contamination of the groundwater beneath the Hanford Site to varying degrees. Other potential risks associated with these alternatives, such as those related to accidents and airborne contamination resulting from retrieval and barrier emplacement operations, are not quantitatively evaluated in this report.

Treat, R.L.; Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J.; McCormak, W.D.; Trenkler, T.; Walters, M.F. [Ensearch Environmental, Inc. (United States); Rouse, J.K.; McLaughlin, T.J. [Bovay Northwest, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Cruse, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

77

Subsurface steam sampling in Geysers wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new downhole sampling tool has been built for use in steam wells at The Geysers geothermal reservoir. The tool condenses specimens into an initially evacuated vessel that is opened down hole at the direction of an on-board computer. The tool makes a temperature log of the well as it is deployed, and the pressure and temperature of collected specimens are monitored for diagnostic purposes. Initial tests were encouraging, and the Department of Energy has funded an expanded effort that includes data gathering needed to develop a three-dimensional model of The Geysers geochemical environment. Collected data will be useful for understanding the origins of hydrogen chloride and non-condensable gases in the steam, as well as tracking the effect of injection on the composition of produced steam. Interested parties are invited to observe the work and to join the program.

Lysne, P. [Lysne (Peter), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, B. [Unocal Geothermal and Power Operations Group, Santa Rose, CA (United States); Hirtz, P. [Thermochem, Inc., Santa Rosa, CA (United States); Normann, R.; Henfling, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Impact of Subsurface Temperature Variability on Surface Air Temperature Variability: An AGCM Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anomalous atmospheric conditions can lead to surface temperature anomalies, which in turn can lead to temperature anomalies in the subsurface soil. The subsurface soil temperature (and the associated ground heat content) has significant memory...

Sarith P. P. Mahanama; Randal D. Koster; Rolf H. Reichle; Max J. Suarez

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Cone Penetrometer for Subsurface Heavy Metals Detection. Semiannual report, November 1, 1996--March 31, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface and subsurface contamination of soils by heavy metals, including Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Cd, has become an area of concern for many industrial and government organizations (1). Conventional sampling and analysis techniques for soil provide a high degree of sensitivity and selectivity for individual analytes. However, obtaining a representative sampling and analysis from a particular site using conventional techniques is time consuming and costly (2). Additionally, conventional methods are difficult to implement in the field for in situ and/or real-time applications. Therefore, there is a need for characterization and monitoring techniques for heavy metals in soils which allow cost-effective, rapid, in situ measurements. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to successfully measure metals content in a variety of matrices (3-15) including soil (16,17). Under the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) Industry Program, Science {ampersand} Engineering Associates (SEA) is developing a subsurface cone penetrometer (CPT) probe for heavy metals detection that employs LIBS (18). The LIES-CPT unit is to be applied to in situ, real-time sampling and analysis of heavy metals in soil. As part of its contract with DOE FETC, SEA is scheduled to field test its LIBS-CPT system in September 1997.

Grisanti, Ames A.; Timpe, Ronald C.; Foster, H.J.; Eylands, Kurt E.; Crocker, Charlene R.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE's Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In 1998 a 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to determine if modern seismic techniques could be successfully applied in geothermal environments. Furthermore, it was intended to map the structural features which may control geothermal production in the reservoir. The results

82

Using electrical impedance tomography to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The use of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity. EIT can be used to map hydraulic conductivity in the subsurface where measurements of both amplitude and phase are made. Hydraulic conductivity depends on at least two parameters: porosity and a length scale parameter. Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) measures and maps electrical conductivity (which can be related to porosity) in three dimensions. By introducing phase measurements along with amplitude, the desired additional measurement of a pertinent length scale can be achieved. Hydraulic conductivity controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the surface. Thus inexpensive maps of hydraulic conductivity would improve planning strategies for subsequent remediation efforts. Fluid permeability is also of importance for oil field exploitation and thus detailed knowledge of fluid permeability distribution in three-dimension (3-D) would be a great boon to petroleum reservoir analysts.

Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Roberts, Jeffery J. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Multi-step heater deployment in a subsurface formation  

SciTech Connect

A method for installing a horizontal or inclined subsurface heater includes placing a heating section of a heater in a horizontal or inclined section of a wellbore with an installation tool. The tool is uncoupled from the heating section. A lead in section is mechanically and electrically coupled to the heating section of the heater. The lead-in section is located in an angled or vertical section of the wellbore.

Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

84

CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR SUBSURFACE ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface electrical distribution system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333PY ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

R.J. Garrett

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Downhole burner systems and methods for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas burner assembly for heating a subsurface formation includes an oxidant conduit, a fuel conduit, and a plurality of oxidizers coupled to the oxidant conduit. At least one of the oxidizers includes a mix chamber for mixing fuel from the fuel conduit with oxidant from the oxidant conduit, an igniter, and a shield. The shield includes a plurality of openings in communication with the oxidant conduit. At least one flame stabilizer is coupled to the shield.

Farmayan, Walter Farman (Houston, TX); Giles, Steven Paul (Damon, TX); Brignac, Jr., Joseph Phillip (Katy, TX); Munshi, Abdul Wahid (Houston, TX); Abbasi, Faraz (Sugarland, TX); Clomburg, Lloyd Anthony (Houston, TX); Anderson, Karl Gregory (Missouri City, TX); Tsai, Kuochen (Katy, TX); Siddoway, Mark Alan (Katy, TX)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Nevada Subsurface Site  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) describes the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) continued environmental investigation of the subsurface Project Shoal Area (PSA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447. The PSA is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, about 48 kilometers (km) (30 miles [mi]) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. Project Shoal was part of the Vela Uniform Program which was conducted to improve the US' ability to detect, identify, and locate underground nuclear detonations. The test consisted of detonating a 12-kiloton nuclear device deep underground in granitic rock to determine whether seismic waves produced by an underground nuclear test could be differentiated from seismic waves produced by a naturally occurring earthquake. The test was a joint effort conducted by the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the US Department of Defense (DoD) in October 1963 (AEC, 1964).

DOE /NV

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Methods and system for subsurface stabilization using jet grouting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems are provided for stabilizing a subsurface area such as a buried waste pit for either long term storage, or interim storage and retrieval. A plurality of holes are drilled into the subsurface area with a high pressure drilling system provided with a drill stem having jet grouting nozzles. A grouting material is injected at high pressure through the jet grouting nozzles into a formed hole while the drill stem is withdrawn from the hole at a predetermined rate of rotation and translation. A grout-filled column is thereby formed with minimal grout returns, which when overlapped with other adjacent grout-filled columns encapsulates and binds the entire waste pit area to form a subsurface agglomeration or monolith of grout, soil, and waste. The formed monolith stabilizes the buried waste site against subsidence while simultaneously providing a barrier against contaminate migration. The stabilized monolith can be left permanently in place or can be retrieved if desired by using appropriate excavation equipment. The jet grouting technique can also be utilized in a pretreatment approach prior to in situ vitrification of a buried waste site. The waste encapsulation methods and systems are applicable to buried waste materials such as mixed waste, hazardous waste, or radioactive waste.

Loomis, Guy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Weidner, Jerry R. (Iona, ID); Farnsworth, Richard K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jessmore, James J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

STOMP, Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases, theory guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide describes the simulator`s governing equations, constitutive functions and numerical solution algorithms of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator, a scientific tool for analyzing multiple phase subsurface flow and transport. The STOMP simulator`s fundamental purpose is to produce numerical predictions of thermal and hydrologic flow and transport phenomena in variably saturated subsurface environments, which are contaminated with volatile or nonvolatile organic compounds. Auxiliary applications include numerical predictions of solute transport processes including radioactive chain decay processes. In writing these guides for the STOMP simulator, the authors have assumed that the reader comprehends concepts and theories associated with multiple-phase hydrology, heat transfer, thermodynamics, radioactive chain decay, and nonhysteretic relative permeability, saturation-capillary pressure constitutive functions. The authors further assume that the reader is familiar with the computing environment on which they plan to compile and execute the STOMP simulator. The STOMP simulator requires an ANSI FORTRAN 77 compiler to generate an executable code. The memory requirements for executing the simulator are dependent on the complexity of physical system to be modeled and the size and dimensionality of the computational domain. Likewise execution speed depends on the problem complexity, size and dimensionality of the computational domain, and computer performance. One-dimensional problems of moderate complexity can be solved on conventional desktop computers, but multidimensional problems involving complex flow and transport phenomena typically require the power and memory capabilities of workstation or mainframe type computer systems.

White, M.D.; Oostrom, M.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Subsurface barrier design alternatives for confinement and controlled advection flow  

SciTech Connect

Various technologies and designs are being considered to serve as subsurface barriers to confine or control contaminant migration from underground waste storage or disposal structures containing radioactive and hazardous wastes. Alternatives including direct-coupled flood and controlled advection designs are described as preconceptual examples. Prototype geotechnical equipment for testing and demonstration of these alternative designs tested at the Hanford Geotechnical Development and Test Facility and the Hanford Small-Tube Lysimeter Facility include mobile high-pressure injectors and pumps, mobile transport and pumping units, vibratory and impact pile drivers, and mobile batching systems. Preliminary laboratory testing of barrier materials and additive sequestering agents have been completed and are described.

Phillips, S.J.; Stewart, W.E.; Alexander, R.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, K.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); McLaughlin, T.J. [Bovay Northwest Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides in contaminated subsurface environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex face a daunting challenge of remediating huge below inventories of legacy radioactive and toxic metal waste. More often than not, the scope of the problem is massive, particularly in the high recharge, humid regions east of the Mississippi river, where the off-site migration of contaminants continues to plague soil water, groundwater, and surface water sources. As of 2002, contaminated sites are closing rapidly and many remediation strategies have chosen to leave contaminants in-place. In situ barriers, surface caps, and bioremediation are often the remedial strategies of chose. By choosing to leave contaminants in-place, we must accept the fact that the contaminants will continue to interact with subsurface and surface media. Contaminant interactions with the geosphere are complex and investigating long term changes and interactive processes is imperative to verifying risks. We must be able to understand the consequences of our action or inaction. The focus of this manuscript is to describe recent technical developments for assessing the performance of in situ bioremediation and immobilization of subsurface metals and radionuclides. Research within DOE's NABIR and EMSP programs has been investigating the possibility of using subsurface microorganisms to convert redox sensitive toxic metals and radionuclides (e.g. Cr, U, Tc, Co) into a less soluble, less mobile forms. Much of the research is motivated by the likelihood that subsurface metal-reducing bacteria can be stimulated to effectively alter the redox state of metals and radionuclides so that they are immobilized in situ for long time periods. The approach is difficult, however, since subsurface media and waste constituents are complex with competing electron acceptors and hydrogeological conditions making biostimulation a challenge. Performance assessment of in situ biostimulation strategies is also difficult and typically requires detailed monitoring of coupled hydrological, geochemical/geophysical, and microbial processes. In the following manuscript we will (1) discuss contaminant fate and transport problems in humid regimes, (2) efforts to immobilize metals and radionuclides in situ via bioremediation, and (3) state-of-the-art techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides. These included (a) in situ solution and solid phase monitoring, (b) in situ and laboratory microbial community analysis, (c) noninvasive geophysical methods, and (d) solid phase speciation via high resolution spectroscopy.

Jardine, P.M.; Watson, D.B.; Blake, D.A.; Beard, L.P.; Brooks, S.C.; Carley, J.M.; Criddle, C.S.; Doll, W.E.; Fields, M.W.; Fendorf, S.E.; Geesey, G.G.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Hubbard, S.S.; Istok, J.D.; Kelly, S.; Kemner, K.M.; Peacock, A.D.; Spalding, B.P.; White, D.C.; Wolf, A.; Wu, W.; Zhou, J.

2004-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

91

Sequestration of ethane in the cryovolcanic subsurface of Titan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saturn's largest satellite, Titan, has a thick atmosphere dominated by nitrogen and methane. The dense orange-brown smog hiding the satellite's surface is produced by photochemical reactions of methane, nitrogen and their dissociation products with solar ultraviolet, which lead primarily to the formation of ethane and heavier hydrocarbons. In the years prior to the exploration of Titan's surface by the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft, the production and condensation of ethane was expected to have formed a satellite-wide ocean one kilometer in depth, assuming that it was generated over the Solar system's lifetime. However, Cassini-Huygens observations failed to find any evidence of such an ocean. Here we describe the main cause of the ethane deficiency on Titan: cryovolcanic lavas regularly cover its surface, leading to the percolation of the liquid hydrocarbons through this porous material and its accumulation in subsurface layers built up during successive methane outgassing events. The liquid stored in the pores may, combined with the ice layers, form a stable ethane-rich clathrate reservoir, potentially isolated from the surface. Even with a low open porosity of 10% for the subsurface layers, a cryovolcanic icy crust less than 2300 m thick is required to bury all the liquid hydrocarbons generated over the Solar system's lifetime.

Olivier Mousis; Bernard Schmitt

2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

92

Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations.

Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Chesnut, Dwayne A. (San Francisco, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations. 1 fig.

Ramirez, A.L.; Chesnut, D.A.; Daily, W.D.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

94

Subsurface Ocean Signals from an Orbiting Polarization Lidar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Detection of subsurface returns from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite were demonstrated. Despite the coarse range resolution of this aerosol lidar, evidence of subsurface scattering was observed as a delay and broadening of the cross-polarized signal relative to the co-polarized signal in the three near-surface range bins. These two effects contributed to an increased depolarization at the nominal depth of 25 m. These features were all correlated with near-surface chlorophyll concentrations. An increase in the depolarization was also seen at a depth of 50 m under certain conditions, suggesting that chlorophyll concentration at that depth could be estimated if an appropriate retrieval technique can be developed. At greater depths, the signal is dominated by the temporal response of the detectors, which was approximated by an analytical expression. The depolarization caused by aerosols in the atmosphere was calculated and eliminated as a possible artifact.

James H. Churnside; I J. Mccarty; Xiaomei Lu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Annual Cycle of Subsurface Thermal Structure in the Tropical Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subsurface thermal structure in the tropical Atlantic Ocean (30N20S, East of 80W) is studied on the basis of an extensive data bank of subsurface soundings. Calendar monthly maps are presented showing mixed layer depth, base of ...

Stefan Hastenrath; Jacques Merle

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

An iterative stochastic ensemble method for parameter estimation of subsurface flow models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parameter estimation for subsurface flow models is an essential step for maximizing the value of numerical simulations for future prediction and the development of effective control strategies. We propose the iterative stochastic ensemble method (ISEM) ... Keywords: Iterative stochastic ensemble method, Parameter estimation, Regularization, Subsurface flow models

Ahmed H. Elsheikh, Mary F. Wheeler, Ibrahim Hoteit

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

FACT (Version 2.0) - Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media.

Aleman, S.E.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

98

FITOVERT: A dynamic numerical model of subsurface vertical flow constructed wetlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a mathematical model (FITOVERT) specifically developed to simulate the behaviour of vertical subsurface flow constructed wetlands (VSSF-CWs). One of the main goals of the development of FITOVERT was to keep the complexity of the ... Keywords: Constructed wetlands, Hydrodynamics, Modelling, Reactive transport, Unsaturated flow, Vertical subsurface flow

D. Giraldi; M. de Michieli Vitturi; R. Iannelli

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Jerry P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

100

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Jerry P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study Schematic of soil-gas and contaminant transport into a slab-on-grade building at a former service station site. Three effects are illustrated that can contribute to reducing the amount of contaminant available for entry into the building: biodegradation by soil microorganisms; a layer of soil that limits diffusive movement of the contaminant; and wind-driven ventilation of the soil below the building. Not illustrated are the effects of ventilation on contaminant concentrations inside the building. The transport of soil-gas-borne contaminants into buildings has been documented as a significant source of human exposure to some pollutants indoors; one example is radon, which has received widespread public

102

Subsurface safety valves: safety asset or safety liability  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the methods used to compare the risk of a blowout for a well completed with a subsurface safety valve (SSSV) vs. a completion without an SSSV. These methods, which could be applied to any field, include a combination of SSSV reliability and conventional risk analyses. The Kuparuk River Unit Working Interest Owners recently formed a group to examine the risks associated with installing and maintaining SSSV's in the Kuparuk field. The group was charged with answering the question: ''Assuming Kuparuk field operating conditions, are SSSV's a safety asset, or do numerous operating and maintenance procedures make them a safety liability.'' The results indicate that for the Kuparuk River Unit, an SSSV becomes a safety liability when the mean time between SSSV failures is less than one year. Since current SSSV mean time to failure (MTTF) at Kuparuk is approximately 1000 days, they are considered a safety asset.

Busch, J.M.; Llewelyn, D.C.G.; Policky, B.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Titan's Obliquity as evidence for a subsurface ocean?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the basis of gravity and radar observations with the Cassini spacecraft, the moment of inertia of Titan and the orientation of Titan's rotation axis have been estimated in recent studies. According to the observed orientation, Titan is close to the Cassini state. However, the observed obliquity is inconsistent with the estimate of the moment of inertia for an entirely solid Titan occupying the Cassini state. We propose a new Cassini state model for Titan in which we assume the presence of a liquid water ocean beneath an ice shell and consider the gravitational and pressure torques arising between the different layers of the satellite. With the new model, we find a closer agreement between the moment of inertia and the rotation state than for the solid case, strengthening the possibility that Titan has a subsurface ocean.

Baland, Rose-Marie; Yseboodt, Marie; Karatekin, Ozgur

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Ultrasonic Imaging of Subsurface Objects Using Photorefractive Dynamic Holography  

SciTech Connect

The INEEL has developed a photorefractive ultrasonic imaging technology that records both phase and amplitude of ultrasonic waves on the surface of solids. Phase locked dynamic holography provides full field images of these waves scattered from subsurface defects in solids, and these data are compared with theoretical predictions. Laser light reflected by a vibrating surface is imaged into a photorefractive material where it is mixed in a heterodyne technique with a reference wave. This demodulates the data and provides an image of the ultrasonic waves in either 2 wave or 4 wave mixing mode. These data images are recorded at video frame rates and show phase locked traveling or resonant acoustic waves. This technique can be used over a broad range of ultrasonic frequencies. Acoustic frequencies from 2 kHz to 10 MHz have been imaged, and a point measuring (non-imaging) version of the system has measured picometer amplitudes at 1 GHz.

Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

TITLE III EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE SUBSURFACE LIGHTING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this evaluation is to provide recommendations to ensure consistency between the technical baseline requirements, baseline design, and the as-constructed Subsurface Lighting System. Recommendations for resolving discrepancies between the as-constructed system, and the technical baseline requirements are included in this report. Cost and Schedule estimates are provided for all recommended modifications. This report does not address items which do not meet current safety or code requirements. These items are identified to the CMO and immediate action is taken to correct the situation. The report does identify safety and code items for which the A/E is recommending improvements. The recommended improvements will exceed the minimum requirements of applicable code and safety guide lines. These recommendations are intended to improve and enhance the operation and maintenance of the facility.

L.J. Fernandez

1998-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

106

Ranging methods for developing wellbores in subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming two or more wellbores in a subsurface formation includes forming a first wellbore in the formation. A second wellbore is directionally drilled in a selected relationship relative to the first wellbore. At least one magnetic field is provided in the second wellbore using one or more magnets in the second wellbore located on a drilling string used to drill the second wellbore. At least one magnetic field is sensed in the first wellbore using at least two sensors in the first wellbore as the magnetic field passes by the at least two sensors while the second wellbore is being drilled. A position of the second wellbore is continuously assessed relative to the first wellbore using the sensed magnetic field. The direction of drilling of the second wellbore is adjusted so that the second wellbore remains in the selected relationship relative to the first wellbore.

MacDonald, Duncan (Houston, TX)

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

107

Molten salt as a heat transfer fluid for heating a subsurface formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in an opening in the subsurface formation. An insulated conductor is located in the conduit. A material is in the conduit between a portion of the insulated conductor and a portion of the conduit. The material may be a salt. The material is a fluid at operating temperature of the heating system. Heat transfers from the insulated conductor to the fluid, from the fluid to the conduit, and from the conduit to the subsurface formation.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

108

EMSL: Science: Research and Capability Development Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intramural Research & Capability Development Program Intramural Research & Capability Development Program The EMSL Intramural Research and Capability Development Program facilitates development of new research tools and enables EMSL staff members to advance the important skills and expertise necessary to enhance the EMSL user program. These intramural projects are intended to increase the scientific visibility of EMSL staff in areas that promote the objectives of EMSL's three science themes- Biological Interactions and Dynamics, Geochemistry/Biogeochemistry and Subsurface Science, and Science of Interfacial Phenomena. Technical outcomes of this program include journal publications, scientific presentations, new capabilities or capability enhancements, and expertise to augment EMSL user activities and foster development of innovative

109

Stability of natural gas in the deep subsurface  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas is becoming increasingly important as a fuel because of its widespread occurrence and because it has a less significant environmental impact than oil. Many of the known gas accumulations were discovered by accident during exploration for oil, but with increasing demand for gas, successful exploration will require a clearer understanding of the factors that control gas distribution and gas composition. Natural gas is generated by three main processes. In oxygen-deficient, sulfate-free, shallow (few thousand feet) environments bacteria generate biogenic gas that is essentially pure methane with no higher hydrocarbons ({open_quotes}dry gas{close_quotes}). Gas is also formed from organic matter ({open_quotes}kerogen{close_quotes}), either as the initial product from the thermal breakdown of Type III, woody kerogens, or as the final hydrocarbon product from all kerogen types. In addition, gas can be formed by the thermal cracking of crude oil in the deep subsurface. The generation of gas from kerogen requires higher temperatures than the generation of oil. Also, the cracking of oil to gas requires high temperatures, so that there is a general trend from oil to gas with increasing depth. This produces a well-defined {open_quotes}floor for oil{close_quotes}, below which crude oil is not thermally stable. The possibility of a {open_quotes}floor for gas{close_quotes} is less well documented and understanding the limits on natural gas occurrence was one of the main objectives of this research.

Barker, C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Subsurface contamination focus area technical requirements. Volume II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is our vision, a vision that replaces the ad hoc or {open_quotes}delphi{close_quotes} method which is to get a group of {open_quotes}experts{close_quotes} together and make decisions based upon opinion. To fulfill our vision for the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA), it is necessary to generate technical requirements or performance measures which are quantitative or measurable. Decisions can be supported if they are based upon requirements or performance measures which can be traced to the origin (documented) and are verifiable, i.e., prove that requirements are satisfied by inspection (show me), demonstration, analysis, monitoring, or test. The data from which these requirements are derived must also reflect the characteristics of individual landfills or plumes so that technologies that meet these requirements will necessarily work at specific sites. Other subjective factors, such as stakeholder concerns, do influence decisions. Using the requirements as a basic approach, the SCFA can depend upon objective criteria to help influence the areas of subjectivity, like the stakeholders. In the past, traceable requirements were not generated, probably because it seemed too difficult to do so. There are risks that the requirements approach will not be accepted because it is new and represents a departure from the historical paradigm.

Nickelson, D.; Nonte, J.; Richardson, J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Cascades geothermal program  

SciTech Connect

The Cascades region is an area with high geothermal potential but few surface manifestations and limited subsurface data. To stimulate further development of hydrothermal resources, DOE-Idaho Operations Office issued Solicitation Number DE-SC07-85IDI2580. The reason for this solicitation was to secure cost sharing agreements with industry to drill gradient holes that would penetrate the rain curtain and obtain deep thermal, lithologic, and structural data. The data obtained and studies conducted under this program are to be released to the public for the benefit of the geothermal industry and the scientific community. The first thermal gradient hole to be drilled under this program was finished November 1985 by GEO-Newberry Crater, Inc. on the south flank of Newberry volcano. Data for additional wells drilled under the Cascades Geothermal Drilling Program will be released as they become available.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We relocate 14 years of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for seismic velocities to improve our knowledge of the subsurface geologic and hydrologic structure. We utilize over 60,000 micro-seismic events using waveform crosscorrelation to augment the expansive catalog of Pand S-wave

113

Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » January 2013 Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration New computational technique creates high resolution maps of subsurface CO2 after geologic sequestration. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of Sanjay Srinivasan, UT-Austin High resolution inverted seismic images of CO2 migration at the Cranfield,

114

Characterizing LandAtmosphere Coupling and the Implications for Subsurface Thermodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to develop a Simple Land-Interface Model (SLIM) that captures the seasonal and interannual behavior of landatmosphere coupling, as well as the subsequent subsurface temperature evolution. The model employs the one-...

Marc Stieglitz; Jason E. Smerdon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Seasonal Variations of the Subsurface Thermal Structure in the Gulf of Guinea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subsurface thermal structure in the Gulf of Guinea is analyzed using the historical hydrographic data file. Of particular interest is the rapid vertical displacement of the thermal structure from the warm (MarchMay) season to the cold (July...

Robert W. Houghton

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Rossby Wave Analysis of Subsurface Temperature Fluctuations along the Honolulu-San Francisco Great Circle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seven years of XBT observations collected between Honolulu and San Francisco reveal subsurface temperature fluctuations with strong, in-phase vertical coherence and fair horizontal coherence over 1000 km distance. Their annual and semi-annual ...

James Michael Price; Lorenz Magaard

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Synthetic Subsurface Pressure Derived from Bottom Pressure and Tide Gauge Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthetic subsurface pressure (SSP) can be formed from tide gauge records and from bottom pressure measurements to provide a consistent and convenient basis for comparison of these two different types of observations. Common methods for this ...

Sabine Harms; Clinton D. Winant

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, the Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) was established to develop the tools,...

119

Fiber optic/cone penetrometer system for subsurface heavy metals detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes a project designed to develop an intergrated fiber optic sensor/cone penetrometer system to analyze the heavy metals content of the subsurface as a site characterization tool.

Saggese, S.; Greenwell, R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Effects of droplet size on intrusion of sub-surface oil spills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the effects of droplet size on droplet intrusion in sub-surface oil spills. Laboratory experiments were performed where glass beads of various sizes, which serve to simulate oil droplets in deepsea oil ...

Chan, Godine Kok Yan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Characteristics of Subsurface Ocean Response to ENSO Assessed from Simulations with the NCEP Climate Forecast System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subsurface ocean temperature response to El NioSouthern Oscillation (ENSO) is examined based on 31-yr (19812011) simulations with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System (CFS) coupled model. The ...

Hui Wang; Arun Kumar; Wanqiu Wang

122

Annual Heat Gain of the Tropical Atlantic Computed from Subsurface Ocean Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Charts are presented which show the seasonal and annual rates of heat gain of the tropical North Atlantic Ocean. These rates have been computed using subsurface oceanographic data and wind-stress data. In these computations the interseasonal ...

David W. Behringer; Henry Stommel

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Freshening of Subsurface Waters in the Northwest Pacific Subtropical Gyre: Observations and Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface salinity anomalies propagating between mid- and low latitudes along isopycnal surfaces have been shown to play an important role in modulating ocean and climate variability. In this study, a sustained freshening and southwestward ...

Youfang Yan; Eric P. Chassignet; Yiquan Qi; William K. Dewar

124

Wastewater Subsurface Drip Distribution: Peer-Reviewed Guidelines for Design, Operation, and Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface drip distribution is the most efficient method currently available for application and subsurface dispersal of wastewater to soil. Because it is so effective, drip distribution represents a viable option for wastewater disposal and reuse for all soil types. The technology is commonly used at sites where point source discharges and National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits are not appropriate due to environmental sensitivity of receiving streams. It is also commonly used a...

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Final Report: A Model Management System for Numerical Simulations of Subsurface Processes  

SciTech Connect

The DOE and several other Federal agencies have committed significant resources to support the development of a large number of mathematical models for studying subsurface science problems such as groundwater flow, fate of contaminants and carbon sequestration, to mention only a few. This project provides new tools to help decision makers and stakeholders in subsurface science related problems to select an appropriate set of simulation models for a given field application.

Zachmann, David

2013-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

126

Reference Handbook for Site-Specific Assessment of Subsurface Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface vapor intrusion is only one of several possible sources for volatile and semi-volatile chemicals in indoor air. This report provides guidance on the site-specific assessment of the significance of subsurface vapor intrusion into indoor air. Topics covered include theoretical considerations, sampling and analysis considerations, recommended strategies and procedures, interpretive tools, mitigation measures, and suggestions for future research. This document reflects a comprehensive understandin...

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

127

Armored Enzyme Nanoparticles for Remediation of Subsurface Contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The remediation of subsurface contaminants is a critical problem for the Department of Energy, other government agencies, and our nation. Severe contamination of soil and groundwater exists at several DOE sites due to various methods of intentional and unintentional release. Given the difficulties involved in conventional removal or separation processes, it is vital to develop methods to transform contaminants and contaminated earth/water to reduce risks to human health and the environment. Transformation of the contaminants themselves may involve conversion to other immobile species that do not migrate into well water or surface waters, as is proposed for metals and radionuclides; or degradation to harmless molecules, as is desired for organic contaminants. Transformation of contaminated earth (as opposed to the contaminants themselves) may entail reductions in volume or release of bound contaminants for remediation. Research at Rensselaer focused on the development of haloalkane dehalogenase as a critical enzyme in the dehalogenation of contaminated materials (ultimately trichloroethylene and related pollutants). A combination of bioinformatic investigation and experimental work was performed. The bioinformatics was focused on identifying a range of dehalogenase enzymes that could be obtained from the known proteomes of major microorganisms. This work identified several candidate enzymes that could be obtained through relatively straightforward gene cloning and expression approaches. The experimental work focused on the isolation of haloalkane dehalogenase from a Xanthobacter species followed by incorporating the enzyme into silicates to form biocatalytic silicates. These are the precursors of SENs. At the conclusion of the study, dehalogenase was incorporated into SENs, although the loading was low. This work supported a single Ph.D. student (Ms. Philippa Reeder) for two years. The project ended prior to her being able to perform substantive bioinformatics efforts that would identify more promising dehalogenase enzymes. The SEN synthesis, however, was demonstrated to be partially successful with dehalogenases. Further work would provide optimized dehalogenases in SENs for use in pollution remission.

Jonathan S. Dordick; Jay Grate; Jungbae Kim

2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

128

ACID GASES IN CO2-RICH SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC ENVIRONMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of species behavior involving dilute fluid environments has been crucial for the advance of modern solvation thermodynamics through molecular-based formalisms to guide the development of macroscopic regression tools in the description of fluid behavior and correlation of experimental data (Chialvo 2013). Dilute fluid environments involving geologic formations are of great theoretical and practical relevance regardless of the thermodynamic state conditions. The most challenging systems are those involving highly compressible and reactive confined environments, i.e., where small perturbations of pressure and/or temperature can trigger considerable density changes. This in turn can alter significantly the species solvation, their preferential solvation, and consequently, their reactivity with one another and with the surrounding mineral surfaces whose outcome is the modification of the substrate porosity and permeability, and ultimately, the integrity of the mineral substrates. Considering that changes in porosity and permeability resulting from dissolution and precipitation phenomena in confined environments are at the core of the aqueous CO2-mineral interactions, and that caprock integrity (e.g., sealing capacity) depends on these key parameters, it is imperative to gain fundamental understanding of the mineral-fluid interfacial phenomena and fluid-fluid equilibria under mineral confinement at subsurface conditions. In order to undertand the potential effects of acid gases as contaminants of supercritical CO2 streams, in the next section we will discuss the thermodynamic behavior of CO2 fluid systems by addressing two crucial issues in the context of carbon capture, utilization and sequestration (CCUS) technologies: (i) Why should we consider (acid gas) CO2 impurities? and (ii) Why are CO2 fluid - mineral interactions of paramount relevance?

Chialvo, Ariel A [ORNL] [ORNL; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL] [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University] [Ohio State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Scientific Posters from the DOE Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program's Annual PI Meeting, 2012  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

\tIdentification and Characterization of Microbial Proteins Important for Extracellular Electron Transfer Reactions

130

Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Wastewater Discharge Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist.

Ansley, Shannon L.

2002-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

131

ANALYSIS ON CORRELATIONS BETWEEN SUBSURFACE KINETIC HELICITY AND PHOTOSPHERIC CURRENT HELICITY IN ACTIVE REGIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation on correlations between photospheric current helicity and subsurface kinetic helicity is carried out by analyzing vector magnetograms and subsurface velocities for two rapidly developing active regions. The vector magnetograms are from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (SDO/HMI) observed Stokes parameters, and the subsurface velocity is from time-distance data-analysis pipeline using HMI Dopplergrams. Over a span of several days, the evolution of the weighted current helicity shows a tendency similar to that of the weighted subsurface kinetic helicity, attaining a correlation coefficient above 0.60 for both active regions. Additionally, there seems to be a phase lag between the evolutions of the unweighted current and subsurface kinetic helicities for one of the active regions. The good correlation between these two helicities indicates that there is some intrinsic connection between the interior dynamics and photospheric magnetic twistedness inside active regions, which may help to interpret the well-known hemispheric preponderance of current-helicity distribution.

Gao Yu; Zhang Hongqi [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Zhao Junwei [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

132

Optical method and apparatus for detection of surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser is used in a non-destructive manner to detect surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics and particularly in ceramic bodies with complex shapes such as ceramic bearings, turbine blades, races, and the like. The laser`s wavelength is selected based upon the composition of the ceramic sample and the laser can be directed on the sample while the sample is static or in dynamic rotate or translate motion. Light is scattered off surface and subsurface defects using a preselected polarization. The change in polarization angle is used to select the depth and characteristics of surface/subsurface defects. The scattered light is detected by an optical train consisting of a charge coupled device (CCD), or vidicon, television camera which, in turn, is coupled to a video monitor and a computer for digitizing the image. An analyzing polarizer in the optical train allows scattered light at a given polarization angle to be observed for enhancing sensitivity to either surface or near-subsurface defects. Application of digital image processing allows subtraction of digitized images in near real-time providing enhanced sensitivity to subsurface defects. Storing known ``feature masks`` of identified defects in the computer and comparing the detected scatter pattern (Fourier images) with the stored feature masks allows for automatic classification of detected defects. 29 figs.

Ellingson, W.A.; Brada, M.P.

1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

133

Optical method and apparatus for detection of surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser is used in a non-destructive manner to detect surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics and particularly in ceramic bodies with complex shapes such as ceramic bearings, turbine blades, races, and the like. The laser's wavelength is selected based upon the composition of the ceramic sample and the laser can be directed on the sample while the sample is static or in dynamic rotate or translate motion. Light is scattered off surface and subsurface defects using a preselected polarization. The change in polarization angle is used to select the depth and characteristics of surface/subsurface defects. The scattered light is detected by an optical train consisting of a charge coupled device (CCD), or vidicon, television camera which, in turn, is coupled to a video monitor and a computer for digitizing the image. An analyzing polarizer in the optical train allows scattered light at a given polarization angle to be observed for enhancing sensitivity to either surface or near-subsurface defects. Application of digital image processing allows subtraction of digitized images in near real-time providing enhanced sensitivity to subsurface defects. Storing known "feature masks" of identified defects in the computer and comparing the detected scatter pattern (Fourier images) with the stored feature masks allows for automatic classification of detected defects.

Ellingson, William A. (Naperville, IL); Brada, Mark P. (Goleta, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Geochemistry, Fate, and Three-Dimensional Transport Modeling of Subsurface Cyanide Contamination at a Manufactured Gas Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the geochemistry, fate, and three-dimensional transport modeling of subsurface cyanide contamination at a manufactured gas plant.

2001-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

135

Silica-Coated Titania and Zirconia Colloids for Subsurface Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Environmental Engineering Program, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8286, and Department of Civil transport experiments. Electrophoretic mobility measurements showed that coating with silica imparted electrophoretic mobility and size (by dynamic light scattering) over a 90-day period showed that the silica

Elimelech, Menachem

136

Uniformity of wastewater dispersal using subsurface drip emitters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An on-site wastewater treatment project site with two separate drip fields produced data on emitter flow rates and uniformity after 6 years of operation. The site served a two-bedroom residence in Weslaco, Texas, with treatment through a septic tank and subsurface flow constructed wetland. Filtration was accomplished with a small sand filter and screen filter. Results represent a worst-case scenario because the air relief valves were improperly installed and maintenance on the system was lacking. A pressure compensating (PC) emitter (Netafim Bioline 2.30 L/hr) and a pressure dependent (PD) emitter (Aqua-Drip 3.79 L/hr) were evaluated. When new, the PC emitters produced a mean discharge of 2.33 L/hr with a manufacturing coefficient of 0.043. The PD emitters, when new, produced a mean discharge of 4.30 L/hr and a manufacturing coefficient of variation of 0.016. The testing protocol was verified with the collection of data on new emitters. Two individual drip fields contained PC emitters (Netafim Bioline 3.50 L/hr) and PD emitters (Aqua-Drip 2.35 L/hr). The PC emitters were installed in a 200 m continuous length of tubing and the PD emitters were installed with ten individual lines of 15.24 m connected with a supply and return header. Wastewater with an average BOD? of 23 mg/L was applied to two drip fields for 6 years. Emitter flow rates for 313 PC emitters were reduced to a mean discharge of 0.95 L/hr with a coefficient of variation of 0.74 and the 251 PD emitters were reduced to a mean discharge of 1.52 L/hr with a coefficient of variation of 0.35. Two shock chlorination treatments with chlorine concentrations of 500 mg/L and 1000 mg/L were used to increase the emitter's flow rate. Sixty PC and 61 PD emitters were evaluated. The initial average flow rate of the PC emitters was 0.818 L/hr. Average flow rates for the PC emitters increased significantly to 0.859 L/hr and 0.954 L/hr following the 500 mg/L and 1000 mg/L shock chlorination treatments, respectively. The initial flow rate of the PD emitters was 1.54 L/hr. The field flushing cycle represented an increase in flow rate to 1.60 L/hr. The shock chlorination treatments increased the average flow rate to 1.71 L/hr and 1.77 L/hr following the 500 mg/L and 1000 mg/L treatments respectively. All increases in mean discharge were statistically significant. Uniformity and over-application of wastewater were evaluated by analyzing the soil profile on a 1.22 m grid over the entire drain field. Statistical uniformity was 48.1 percent and 71.4 percent for the PC and PD emitters, respectively. The uniformity coefficient resulted in similar results with 70.1 percent for the PC emitters and 85.6 percent for the PD emitters. PC and PD fields caused an over-application of 55.3 percent and 58.5 percent of the field area, respectively.

Persyn, Russell Alan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Understanding How Uranium Changes in Subsurface Environments | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Understanding How Uranium Changes in Subsurface Environments Understanding How Uranium Changes in Subsurface Environments Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » March 2013 Understanding How Uranium Changes in Subsurface Environments Bacterial biomass found to have an impact. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo

138

CSAMT method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object  

SciTech Connect

The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a CSAMT signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak.

Lee, David O. (Albuquerque, NM); Montoya, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Wayland, Jr., J. Robert (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

1984-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

140

Sensitivity of a World Ocean GCM to Changes in Subsurface Mixing Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of a coarse-resolution model of the World Ocean to parameterization of subgrid-scale mixing is examined. The model is based on the GFDL code. Results are presented from a series of model runs where the subsurface mixing ...

Anthony C. Hirst; Wenju Cai

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Subsurface structure of the southern portion of the Salton Sea geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subsurface correlation of sedimentary strata was attempted among ten geothermal wells in the southern portion of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. The spontaneous potential (SP) log was the principal tool used for correlation purposes. The structure that emerges from the correlation diagrams is a shallow plunging syncline with an east-west axis perpendicular to the axis of the Salton Trough.

Chan, M.A.; Tewhey, J.D.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Multi-scale finite-volume method for elliptic problems in subsurface flow simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a multi-scale finite-volume (MSFV) method to solve elliptic problems with many spatial scales arising from flow in porous media. The method efficiently captures the effects of small scales on a coarse grid, is conservative, and ... Keywords: finite-volume, multi-scale physics, subsurface flow, upscaling

P. Jenny; S. H. Lee; H. A. Tchelepi

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Evaluation of positron emission tomography as a method to visualize subsurface microbial processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Positron emission tomography (PET) provides spatiotemporal monitoring in a nondestructive manner and has higher sensitivity and resolution relative to other tomographic methods. Therefore, this technology was evaluated for its application to monitor in situ subsurface bacterial activity. To date, however, it has not been used to monitor or image soil microbial processes. In this study, PET imaging was applied as a 'proof-of-principle' method to assess the feasibility of visualizing a radiotracer labeled subsurface bacterial strain (Rahnella sp. Y9602), previously isolated from uranium contaminated soils and shown to promote uranium phosphate precipitation. Soil columns packed with acid-purified simulated mineral soils were seeded with 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-d-glucose ({sup 18}FDG) labeled Rahnella sp. Y9602. The applicability of [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion as a tracer for measuring hydraulic conductivity and {sup 18}FDG as a tracer to identify subsurface metabolically active bacteria was successful in our soil column studies. Our findings indicate that positron-emitting isotopes can be utilized for studies aimed at elucidating subsurface microbiology and geochemical processes important in contaminant remediation.

Kinsella K.; Schlyer D.; Kinsella, K.; Schlyer, D.J.; Fowler, J.S.; Martinez, R.J.; Sobecky, P.A.

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

144

Device and nondestructive method to determine subsurface micro-structure in dense materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and a device to detect subsurface three-dimensional micro-structure in a sample by illuminating the sample with light of a given polarization and detecting light emanating from the sample that has a different direction of polarization by means of a confocal optical system.

Sun, Jiangang (Westmont, IL)

2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

145

Feasibility study of tank leakage mitigation using subsurface barriers. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document reflects the evaluations and analyses performed in response to Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07A - {open_quotes}Complete Evaluation of Subsurface Barrier Feasibility{close_quotes} (September 1994). In addition, this feasibility study was revised reflecting ongoing work supporting a pending decision by the DOE Richland Operations Office, the Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency regarding further development of subsurface barrier options for SSTs and whether to proceed with demonstration plans at the Hanford Site (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07B). Analyses of 14 integrated SST tank farm remediation alternatives were conducted in response to the three stated objectives of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07A. The alternatives include eight with subsurface barriers and six without. Technologies used in the alternatives include three types of tank waste retrieval, seven types of subsurface barriers, a method of stabilizing the void space of emptied tanks, two types of in situ soil flushing, one type of surface barrier, and a clean-closure method. A no-action alternative and a surface-barrier-only alternative were included as nonviable alternatives for comparison. All other alternatives were designed to result in closure of SST tank farms as landfills or in clean-closure. Revision 1 incorporates additional analyses of worker safety, large leak scenarios, and sensitivity to the leach rates of risk controlling constituents. The additional analyses were conducted to support TPA Milestone M-45-07B.

Treat, R.L.; Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J. [Enserch Environmental, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Multicomponent seismic data registration for subsurface characterization in the shallow Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gulf of Mexico Sergey Fomel, Milo M. Backus, Michael V. DeAngelo, Paul E. Murray, Bob A. Hardage with application to subsurface characterization in the shallow Gulf of Mexico. In this study, we extend-S images. Application of this technique to data from the Gulf of Mexico reveals the structure of sediments

Texas at Austin, University of

147

Adaptive and Efficient Computing for Subsurface Simulation within ParFlow  

SciTech Connect

This project is concerned with the PF.WRF model as a means to enable more accurate predictions of wind fluctuations and subsurface storage. As developed at LLNL, PF.WRF couples a groundwater (subsurface) and surface water flow model (ParFlow) to a mesoscale atmospheric model (WRF, Weather Research and Forecasting Model). It was developed as a unique tool to address coupled water balance and wind energy questions that occur across traditionally separated research regimes of the atmosphere, land surface, and subsurface. PF.WRF is capable of simulating fluid, mass, and energy transport processes in groundwater, vadose zone, root zone, and land surface systems, including overland flow, and allows for the WRF model to both directly drive and respond to surface and subsurface hydrologic processes and conditions. The current PF.WRF model is constrained to have uniform spatial gridding below the land surface and matching areal grids with the WRF model at the land surface. There are often cases where it is advantageous for land surface, overland flow and subsurface models to have finer gridding than their atmospheric counterparts. Finer vertical discretization is also advantageous near the land surface (to properly capture feedbacks) yet many applications have a large vertical extent. However, the surface flow is strongly dependent on topography leading to a need for greater lateral resolution in some regions and the subsurface flow is tightly coupled to the atmospheric model near the surface leading to a need for finer vertical resolution. In addition, the interactions (e.g. rain) will be highly variable in space and time across the problem domain so an adaptive scheme is preferred to a static strategy to efficiently use computing and memory resources. As a result, this project focussed on algorithmic research required for development of an adaptive simulation capability in the PF.WRF system and its subsequent use in an application problem in the Central Valley of California. This report documents schemes of use for a future implementation of an adaptive grid capability within the ParFlow subsurface flow simulator in PF.WRF. The methods describe specific handling of the coarse/fine boundaries within a cell-centered discretization of the nonlinear parabolic Richards equation model for variable saturated flow. In addition, we describe development of a spline fit and table lookup method implemented within ParFlow to enhance computational efficiency of variably saturated flow calculations.

Tiedeman, H; Woodward, C S

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

148

NEPTUNIUM IV AND V SORPTIN TO END-MEMBER SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS TO THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Migration of Np through the subsurface is expected to be primarily controlled by sorption to sediments. Therefore, understanding and quantifying Np sorption to sediments and sediments from the Savannah River Site (SRS) is vital to ensure safe disposal of Np bearing wastes. In this work, Np sorption to two sediments representing the geological extremes with respect to sorption properties expected in the SRS subsurface environment (named 'subsurface sandy sediment' and 'subsurface clayey sediment') was examined under a variety of conditions. First a series of baseline sorption tests at pH 5.5 under an oxic atmosphere was performed to understand Np sorption under typical subsurface conditions. These experiments indicated that the baseline K{sub d} values for the subsurface sandy and subsurface clayey sediments are 4.26 {+-} 0.24 L kg{sup -1} and 9.05 {+-} 0.61 L kg{sup -1}, respectively. These Np K{sub d} values of SRS sediments are the first to be reported since Sheppard et al. (1979). The previous values were 0.25 and 0.16 L kg{sup -1} for a low pH sandy sediment. To examine a possible range of K{sub d} values under various environmental scenarios, the effects of natural organic matter (NOM, also a surrogate for cellulose degradation products), the presence of various chemical reductants, and an anaerobic atmosphere on Np sorption were examined. The presence of NOM resulted in an increase in the Np K{sub d} values for both sediments. This behavior is hypothesized to be the result of formation of a ternary Np-NOM-sediment complex. Slight increases in the Np sorption (K{sub d} 13-24 L kg{sup -1}) were observed when performing experiments in the presence of chemical reductants (dithionite, ascorbic acid, zero-valent iron) or under anaerobic conditions. Presumably, the increased sorption can be attributed to a slight reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV), the stronger sorbing form of Np. The most significant result of this study is the finding that Np weakly sorbs to both end member sediments and that Np only has a slight tendency to reduce to its stronger sorbing form, even under the most strongly reducing conditions expected under natural SRS conditions. Also, it appears that pH has a profound effect on Np sorption. Based on the these new measurements and the revelations about Np redox chemistry, the following changes to 'Best K{sub d}' values, as defined in Kaplan (2006), for SRS performance assessment calculations are recommended.

Kaplan, D.

2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

149

Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOEs Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation & decommissioning (D&D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites.

Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Grover S.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

150

Monitor for detecting nuclear waste leakage in a subsurface repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The remote fiber fluorimetric portion of the program is slightly ahead of schedule and proceeding well technically. Proof of principle has been demonstrated over a 0.2 km path length using an organic tracer material. Performance and design calculations have been made for the fiber optic components of the system. Optimized fibers have been ordered and special jigs and optical couplings are presently being fabricated. Progress on the high-sensitivity analyzer using coprecipitation techniques has proceeded well ahead of schedule with technical results far above expectations. Preliminary measurements in the UO/sub 2//sup 2 +//CaF/sub 2/ detection system has proved sensitivities well beyond the natural background limit. While further improvement of sensitivity (to 10/sup -15/ g) already is planned, emphasis will now be placed on locating and dealing with possible interferences and on determining how to improve and optimize quantitative accuracy. In addition, simplication of the sample preparation procedure and downscaling to use very small (< 1 ml) groundwater samples is planned. In the longer time frame, work on maximum chemical speciation and the possibility of isotopic speciation will be undertaken. Once the coprecipitation procedures, instrumentation, and spectroscopy have been fully refined for uranium, then the process will be repeated for plutonium and perhaps americium and thorium.

Klainer, S.; Hirschfeld, T.; Bowman, H.; Milanovich, F.; Perry, D.; Johnson, D.

1980-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

151

Subsurface microbial community structure correlates with uranium redox phases during in situ field manipulation in a contaminated aquifer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term field manipulation experiments investigating the effects of subsurface redox conditions on the fate and transport of soluble uranium(VI) were conducted over a 3 year period at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Center (OR-IFRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. In the highly contaminated source zone, introduction of ethanol to the subsurface stimulated native denitrifying, sulfate-reducing, iron-reducing and fermentative microorganisms and reduced U to below 0.03 mg/L. Subsequently, oxygen and nitrate were experimentally re-introduced into the subsurface to examine the potential for re-oxidation and re-mobilization of U(IV). Introduction of oxygen or nitrate caused changes in subsurface geochemistry and re-oxidation of U. After reoxidation, the subsurface experienced several months of starvation conditions before ethanol injection was restored to reduce the treatment zone. Subsurface microorganisms were characterized by community fingerprinting, targeted population analyses, and quantitative PCR of key functional groups in 50 samples taken during multiple phases of field manipulation. Statistical analysis confirmed the hypothesis that the microbial community would co-vary with the shifts in the subsurface geochemistry. The level of hydraulic connectivity of sampling wells to the injection well was readily tracked by microbial community analysis. We demonstrate quantitatively that specific populations, especially Desulfosporosinus, are heavily influenced by geochemical conditions and positively correlate with the immobilization of uranium. Following nitrate reoxidation, populations of Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate reducing organisms (Thiobacillus) showed an increase in relative abundance.

Kostka, Joel [Florida State University; Green, Stefan [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Criddle, Craig [Stanford University; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A Research on Production Optimization of Coupled Surface and Subsurface Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the main objectives in the Oil & Gas Industry is to constantly improve the reservoir management capabilities by using production optimization strategies that can positively impact the so-called net-present value (NPV) of a given project. In order to achieve this goal the industry is faced with the difficult task of maximizing hydrocarbon production and minimizing unwanted fluids, such as water, while sustaining or even enhancing the reservoir recovery factor by handling properly the fluids at surface facilities. A key element in this process is the understanding of the interactions between subsurface and subsurface dynamics in order to provide insightful production strategies which honor reservoir management surface facility constraints. The implementation of the ideal situation of fully coupling surface/subsurface has been hindered by the required computational efforts involved in the process. Consequently, various types of partially coupling that require less computational efforts are practically implemented. Due to importance of coupling surface and subsurface model on production optimization and taking the advantage of advancing computational performance, this research explores the concept of surface and subsurface model couplings and production optimization. The research aims at demonstrating the role of coupling of surface and subsurface model on production optimization under simple production constraint (i.e. production and injection pressure limit). The normal production prediction runs with various reservoir description (homogeneous-low permeability, homogeneous-high permeability, and heterogeneous permeability) and different fluid properties (dead-oil PVT and lived-oil PVT) were performed in order to understand the effect of coupling level, and coupling scheme with different reservoir descriptions and fluid properties on production and injection rate prediction. The result shows that for dead-oil PVT, the production rate from different coupling schemes in homogeneous and heterogeneous reservoir is less sensitive than lived-oil PVT cases. For lived-oil PVT, the production rate from different coupling schemes in homogeneous high permeability and heterogeneous permeability are more sensitive than homogeneous low permeability. The production optimization on water flooding under production and injection constraint cases is considered here also.

Iemcholvilert, Sevaphol

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Source Release Modeling for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

A source release model was developed to determine the release of contaminants into the shallow subsurface, as part of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) evaluation at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The output of the source release model is used as input to the subsurface transport and biotic uptake models. The model allowed separating the waste into areas that match the actual disposal units. This allows quantitative evaluation of the relative contribution to the total risk and allows evaluation of selective remediation of the disposal units within the SDA.

Becker, Bruce Harley

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES AFFECTING RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AND BIOIMMOBILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project were to: (1) isolate and characterize novel anaerobic prokaryotes from subsurface environments exposed to high levels of mixed contaminants (U(VI), nitrate, sulfate), (2) elucidate the diversity and distribution of metabolically active metal- and nitrate-reducing prokaryotes in subsurface sediments, and (3) determine the biotic and abiotic mechanisms linking electron transport processes (nitrate, Fe(III), and sulfate reduction) to radionuclide reduction and immobilization. Mechanisms of electron transport and U(VI) transformation were examined under near in situ conditions in sediment microcosms and in field investigations at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination predominated by uranium and nitrate. A total of 20 publications (16 published or 'in press' and 4 in review), 10 invited talks, and 43 contributed seminars/ meeting presentations were completed during the past four years of the project. PI Kostka served on one proposal review panel each year for the U.S. DOE Office of Science during the four year project period. The PI leveraged funds from the state of Florida to purchase new instrumentation that aided the project. Support was also leveraged by the PI from the Joint Genome Institute in the form of two successful proposals for genome sequencing. Draft genomes are now available for two novel species isolated during our studies and 5 more genomes are in the pipeline. We effectively addressed each of the three project objectives and research highlights are provided. Task I - Isolation and characterization of novel anaerobes: (1) A wide range of pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and denitrifying bacteria (32 strains) were isolated from subsurface sediments of the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination of uranium and nitrate. These isolates which are new to science all show high sequence identity to sequences retrieved from ORFRC subsurface. (2) Based on physiological and phylogenetic characterization, two new species of subsurface bacteria were described: the metal-reducer Geobacter daltonii, and the denitrifier Rhodanobacter denitrificans. (3) Strains isolated from the ORFRC show that Rhodanobacter species are well adapted to the contaminated subsurface. Strains 2APBS1 and 116-2 grow at high salt (3% NaCl), low pH (3.5) and tolerate high concentrations of nitrate (400mM) and nitrite (100mM). Strain 2APBS1 was demonstrated to grow at in situ acidic pHs down to 2.5. (4) R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 is the first described Rhodanobacter species shown to denitrify. Nitrate is almost entirely converted to N2O, which may account for the large accumulation of N2O in the ORFRC subsurface. (5) G. daltonii, isolated from uranium- and hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface sediments of the ORFRC, is the first organism from the subsurface clade of the genus Geobacter that is capable of growth on aromatic hydrocarbons. (6) High quality draft genome sequences and a complete eco-physiological description are completed for R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and G. daltonii strain FRC-32. (7) Given their demonstrated relevance to DOE remediation efforts and the availability of detailed genotypic/phenotypic characterization, Rhodanobacter denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and Geobacter daltonii strain FRC-32 represent ideal model organisms to provide a predictive understanding of subsurface microbial activity through metabolic modeling. Tasks II and III-Diversity and distribution of active anaerobes and Mechanisms linking electron transport and the fate of radionuclides: (1) Our study showed that members of genus Rhodanobacter and Geobacter are abundant and active in the uranium and nitrate contaminated subsurface. In the contaminant source zone of the Oak Ridge site, Rhodanobacter spp. are the predominant, active organisms detected (comprising 50% to 100% of rRNA detected). (2) We demonstrated for the first time that the function of micro

Joel E. Kostka; Lee Kerkhof; Kuk-Jeong Chin; Martin Keller; Joseph W. Stucki

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Exact method for determining subsurface radioactivity depth profiles from gamma spectroscopy measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subsurface radioactivity may be due to transport of radionuclides from a contaminated surface into the solid volume, as occurs for radioactive fallout deposited on soil, or from fast neutron activation of a solid volume, as occurs in concrete blocks used for radiation shielding. For purposes including fate and transport studies of radionuclides in the environment, decommissioning and decontamination of radiation facilities, and nuclear forensics, an in situ, nondestructive method for ascertaining the subsurface distribution of radioactivity is desired. The method developed here obtains a polynomial expression for the radioactivity depth profile, using a small set of gamma-ray count rates measured by a collimated detector directed towards the surface at a variety of angles with respect to the surface normal. To demonstrate its capabilities, this polynomial method is applied to the simple case where the radioactivity is maximal at the surface and decreases exponentially with depth below the surface, and to the ...

Van Siclen, Clinton DeW

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Computational methods for improving the resolution of subsurface seismic images. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The original goal is to devise computational methods for improving the resolution of subsurface seismic images. Initially the research emphasis was primarily on developing methods for efficient ray- theoretic modeling of acoustic waves in triangulated representations of media and on efficient means of modeling waves that travel sub- horizontally in horizontally layered media. Subsequent directions included new efficient methods for imaging the Earth`s subsurface (specifically, 3-D migration via the McClellan transformation, and squeezing dip movement (DMO) for depth-variable velocity), demonstrations of the importance of taking P-wave anisotrophy into account in migration and DMO, the development of algorithms for doing migration and DMO in heterogeneous, anisotropic media, and the development of a methodology for the all-important step of deriving the anisotrophy parameters necessary for imaging of P-wave data.

Larner, K.L.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Changes in the subsurface stratification of the Sun with the 11-year activity cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the changes of the Sun's subsurface stratification inferred from helioseismology data. Using SOHO/MDI (SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager) data for the last 9 years and, more precisely, the temporal variation of f-mode frequencies, we have computed the variation of the radius of subsurface layers of the Sun by applying helioseismic inversions. We have found a variability of the ``helioseismic'' radius in antiphase with the solar activity, with the strongest variations of the stratification being just below the surface around 0.995$R_{\\odot}$. Besides, the radius of the deeper layers of the Sun, between 0.975$R_{\\odot}$ and 0.99$R_{\\odot}$ changes in phase with the 11-year cycle.

Sandrine Lefebvre; Alexander Kosovichev

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

158

Insulated conductor temperature limited heater for subsurface heating coupled in a three-phase WYE configuration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation is described. The heating system includes a first heater, a second heater, and a third heater placed in an opening in the subsurface formation. Each heater includes: an electrical conductor; an insulation layer at least partially surrounding the electrical conductor; and an electrically conductive sheath at least partially surrounding the insulation layer. The electrical conductor is electrically coupled to the sheath at a lower end portion of the heater. The lower end portion is the portion of the heater distal from a surface of the opening. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are electrically coupled at the lower end portions of the heaters. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are configured to be electrically coupled in a three-phase wye configuration.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Sandberg, Chester Ledlie (Palo Alto, CA)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

159

300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) Field Site Management Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has established the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (300 Area IFRC) on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State for the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Office of Science. The project is funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). The purpose of the project is to conduct research at the 300 IFRC to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The management approach for the 300 Area IFRC requires that a Field Site Management Plan be developed. This is an update of the plan to reflect the installation of the well network and other changes.

Freshley, Mark D.

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

Slate, Lawrence J; Taylor, Joseph Todd

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

Slate, L.J.; Taylor, J.T.

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Uranium Contamination in the Subsurface Beneath the 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a description of uranium contamination in the subsurface at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The principal focus is a persistence plume in groundwater, which has not attenuated as predicted by earlier remedial investigations. Included in the report are chapters on current conditions, hydrogeologic framework, groundwater flow modeling, and geochemical considerations. The report is intended to describe what is known or inferred about the uranium contamination for the purpose of making remedial action decisions.

Peterson, Robert E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Mark D.

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

163

Characterization and monitoring of subsurface processes using parallel computing and electrical resistivity imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This newsletter discusses recent advancement in subsurface resistivity characterization and monitoring capabilities. The BC Cribs field desiccation treatability test resistivity monitoring data is use an example to demonstrate near-real time 3D subsurface imaging capabilities. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a method of imaging the electrical resistivity distribution of the subsurface. An ERT data collection system consists of an array of electrodes, deployed on the ground surface or within boreholes, that are connected to a control unit which can access each electrode independently (Figure 1). A single measurement is collected by injecting current across a pair of current injection electrodes (source and sink), and measuring the resulting potential generated across a pair of potential measurement electrodes (positive and negative). An ERT data set is generated by collecting many such measurements using strategically selected current and potential electrode pairs. This data set is then processed using an inversion algorithm, which reconstructs an estimate (or image) of the electrical conductivity (i.e. the inverse of resistivity) distribution that gave rise to the measured data.

Johnson, Timothy C.; Truex, Michael J.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Marble, Justin

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Qualitative risk assessment of subsurface barriers in applications supporting retrieval of SST waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a brief, qualitative assessment of risks associated with the potential use of impermeable surface barriers installed around and beneath Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs) to support the retrieval of wastes from those tanks. These risks are compared to qualitative assessment of costs and risks associated with a case in which barriers are not used. A quantitative assessment of costs and risks associated with these two cases will be prepared and documented in a companion report. The companion report will compare quantitatively the costs and risks of several retrieval options with varying parameters, such as effectiveness of retrieval, effectiveness of subsurface barriers, and the use of surface barriers. For ease of comparison of qualitative risks, a case in which impermeable subsurface barriers are used in conjunction with another technology to remove tank waste is referred, to in this report as the Barrier Case. A case in which waste removal technologies are used without employing a subsurface barrier is referred to as the No Barrier Case. The technologies associated with each case are described in the following sections.

Treat, R.L. [ENSERCH Environmental Corp. (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Characterization of microbial communities in subsurface nuclear blast cavities of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this program??s Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

Duane P. Moser; Ken Czerwinski; Charles E. Russell; Mavrik Zavarin

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

166

Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity  

SciTech Connect

Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

167

Use of Underwater Gliders for Acoustic Data Retrieval from Subsurface Oceanographic Instrumentation and Bidirectional Communication in the Deep Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many fixed oceanographic instruments and observing systems are deployed in the water column or on the seafloor for extended periods of time without any expression at the sea surface. To routinely communicate with such subsurface instruments in the ...

Uwe Send; Lloyd Regier; Brent Jones

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Evaluation of a Conjunctive SurfaceSubsurface Process Model (CSSP) over the Contiguous United States at RegionalLocal Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a comprehensive evaluation on a Conjunctive SurfaceSubsurface Process Model (CSSP) in predicting soil temperaturemoisture distributions, terrestrial hydrology variations, and landatmosphere exchanges against various in situ ...

Xing Yuan; Xin-Zhong Liang

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Estimation of Subsurface Temperature Anomaly in the North Atlantic Using a Self-Organizing Map Neural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A self-organizing map (SOM) neural network was developed from Argo gridded datasets in order to estimate a subsurface temperature anomaly (STA) from remote sensing data. The SOM maps were trained using anomalies of sea surface temperature (SST), ...

Xiangbai Wu; Xiao-Hai Yan; Young-Heon Jo; W. Timothy Liu

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Geothermal exploration program, Hill Air Force Base, Davis and Weber Counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results obtained from a program designed to locate a low- or moderate-temperature geothermal resource that might exist beneath Hill Air Force Base (AFB), Ogden, Utah are discussed. A phased exploration program was conducted at Hill AFB. Published geological, geochemical, and geophysical reports on the area were examined, regional exploration was conducted, and two thermal gradient holes were drilled. This program demonstrated that thermal waters are not present in the shallow subsurface at this site. (MHR)

Glenn, W.E.; Chapman, D.S.; Foley, D.; Capuano, R.M.; Cole, D.; Sibbett, B.; Ward, S.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Management Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3MS Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs AN L-934 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M...

172

Management Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs AN L-9213 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M Report...

173

Management Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

r Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs ANL-949 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M Report...

174

Three-phase heaters with common overburden sections for heating subsurface formations  

SciTech Connect

A heating system for a subsurface formation is described. The heating system includes three substantially u-shaped heaters with first end portions of the heaters being electrically coupled to a single, three-phase wye transformer and second end portions of the heaters being electrically coupled to each other and/or to ground. The three heaters may enter the formation through a first common wellbore and exit the formation through a second common wellbore so that the magnetic fields of the three heaters at least partially cancel out in the common wellbores.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

175

Subsurface evaluation of the geopressured-geothermal Chloe Prospect, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 123 square mile area approximately 10 miles east of Lake Charles, Louisiana, has been studied to assess its potential geopressured-geothermal resources. Subsurface information was used to study the structure and stratigraphy of the area as they related to the development of geopressured aquifers. The Middle Frio Hackberry wedge was found to contain the geopressured-geothermal reservoir sand, as well as the shales responsible for the origin and sealing of the geopressured strata. The major reservoir within the wedge is the Hackberry massive A sand.

Kurth, R.J.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainability Workshops Highlights of our Programs Named Postdoctoral Fellowship Program Spring Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Faculty opportunities Learning Lab...

177

Hydrogen on and in Selected Overlayer Near-Surface Alloys and the Effect of Subsurface Hydrogen on the Reactivity of Alloy Surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interaction of hydrogen with the closepacked facets of seventeen transition metals overlaid with 1 ML of five transition metals (Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, and Pd) has been studied using periodic self-consistent (GGA-PW91) density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For noble metal overlayers (Au, Ag, and Cu), hydrogen at the hostmetal/ overlayer interface (subsurface hydrogen) is more stable than subsurface hydrogen in the pure host. For certain Au and Ag overlayers, subsurface hydrogen is more stable than surface hydrogen in the same system. The presence of subsurface hydrogen was found to have a significant effect on the electronic structure of the overlayer, resulting in its modified surface reactivity.

Kandoi, Shampa; Ferrin, Peter A.; Mavrikakis, Manos

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides, Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA project processing site. Final [report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface and subsurface soil cleanup protocols for the Gunnison, Colorado, processing sits are summarized as follows: In accordance with EPA-promulgated land cleanup standards (40 CFR 192), in situ Ra-226 is to be cleaned up based on bulk concentrations not exceeding 5 and 15 pCi/g in 15-cm surface and subsurface depth increments, averaged over 100-m{sup 2} grid blocks, where the parent Ra-226 concentrations are greater than, or in secular equilibrium with, the Th-230 parent. A bulk interpretation of these EPA standards has been accepted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and while the concentration of the finer-sized soil fraction less than a No. 4 mesh sieve contains the higher concentration of radioactivity, the bulk approach in effect integrates the total sample radioactivity over the entire sample mass. In locations where Th-230 has differentially migrated in subsoil relative to Ra-226, a Th-230 cleanup protocol has been developed in accordance with Supplemental Standard provisions of 40 CFR 192 for NRC/Colorado Department of Health (CDH) approval for timely implementation. Detailed elements of the protocol are contained in Appendix A, Generic Protocol from Thorium-230 Cleanup/Verification at UMTRA Project Processing Sites. The cleanup of other radionuclides or nonradiological hazards that pose a significant threat to the public and the environment will be determined and implemented in accordance with pathway analysis to assess impacts and the implications of ALARA specified in 40 CFR 192 relative to supplemental standards.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

COUPLING STATE-OF-THE-SCIENCE SUBSURFACE SIMULATION WITH ADVANCED USER INTERFACE AND PARALLEL VISUALIZATION: SBIR Phase I Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a Phase I report on a project to significantly enhance existing subsurface simulation software using leadership-class computing resources, allowing researchers to solve problems with greater speed and accuracy. Subsurface computer simulation is used for monitoring the behavior of contaminants around nuclear waste disposal and storage areas, groundwater flow, environmental remediation, carbon sequestration, methane hydrate production, and geothermal energy reservoir analysis. The Phase I project was a collaborative effort between Thunderhead Engineering (project lead and developers of a commercial pre- and post-processor for the TOUGH2 simulator) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (developers of the TOUGH2 simulator for subsurface flow). The Phase I project successfully identified the technical approaches to be implemented in Phase II.

Hardeman, B.; Swenson, D.; Finsterle, S.; Zhou, Q.

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

180

Automated laser scatter detection of surface and subsurface defects in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silicon Nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramics are currently a primary material of choice to replace conventional materials in many structural applications because of their oxidation resistance and desirable mechanical and thermal properties at elevated temperatures. However, surface or near-subsurface defects, such as cracks, voids, or inclusions, significantly affect component lifetimes. These defects are currently difficult to detect, so a technique is desired for the rapid automated detection and quantification of both surface and subsurface defects. To address this issue, the authors have developed an automated system based on the detection of scattered laser light which provides a 2-D map of surface or subsurface defects. This system has been used for the analysis of flexure bars and button-head tensile rods of several Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials. Mechanical properties of these bars have also been determined and compared with the laser scatter results.

Steckenrider, J.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Electrical resistivity for detecting subsurface non-aqueous phase liquids: A progress report  

SciTech Connect

Soils and groundwater have been contaminated by hazardous substances at many places in the United States and many other countries. The contaminants are commonly either petroleum products or industrial solvents with very low solubility in water. These contaminants are usually called non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The cost of cleaning up the affected sites in the United States is estimated to be of the order of 100 billion dollars. In spite of the expenditure of several billion dollars during the last 15 years, to date, very few, if any major contaminated site has been restored. The presence of NAPL pools in the subsurface is believed to be the main cause for the failure of previous cleanup activities. Due to their relatively low water solubility, and depending on their volume, it takes tens or even hundreds of years to deplete the NAPL sources if they are not removed from the subsurface. The intrinsic electrical resistivity of most NAPLs is typically in the range of 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 12}{Omega}-m, which is several orders of magnitude higher than that of groundwater containing dissolved solids (usually in the range of a few {Omega}-m to a few thousand {Omega}-m). Although a dry soil is very resistive, the electrical resistivity of a wet soil is on the order of 100 {Omega}-m and is dependent on the extent of water saturation. For a given soil, the electrical resistivity increases with decrease of water saturation. Therefore, if part of the pore water is replaced by a NAPL, the electrical resistivity will increase. At many NAPL sites, both the vadose and phreatic zones can be partially occupied by NAPL pools. It is the great contrast in electrical resistivity between the NAPLs and groundwater that may render the method to be effective in detecting subsurface NAPLs at contaminated sites. The following experiments were conducted to investigate the change of the electrical resistivity of porous media when diesel fuel (NAPL) replaces part of the water.

Lee, K.H.; Shan, C.; Javandel, I.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

AN EVALUATION OF HANFORD SITE TANK FARM SUBSURFACE CONTAMINATION FY2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tank Farm Vadose Zone (TFVZ) Project conducts activities to characterize and analyze the long-term environmental and human health impacts from tank waste releases to the vadose zone. The project also implements interim measures to mitigate impacts, and plans the remediation of waste releases from tank farms and associated facilities. The scope of this document is to report data needs that are important to estimating long-term human health and environmental risks. The scope does not include technologies needed to remediate contaminated soils and facilities, technologies needed to close tank farms, or management and regulatory decisions that will impact remediation and closure. This document is an update of ''A Summary and Evaluation of Hanford Site Tank Farm Subsurface Contamination''. That 1998 document summarized knowledge of subsurface contamination beneath the tank farms at the time. It included a preliminary conceptual model for migration of tank wastes through the vadose zone and an assessment of data and analysis gaps needed to update the conceptual model. This document provides a status of the data and analysis gaps previously defined and discussion of the gaps and needs that currently exist to support the stated mission of the TFVZ Project. The first data-gaps document provided the basis for TFVZ Project activities over the previous eight years. Fourteen of the nineteen knowledge gaps identified in the previous document have been investigated to the point that the project defines the current status as acceptable. In the process of filling these gaps, significant accomplishments were made in field work and characterization, laboratory investigations, modeling, and implementation of interim measures. The current data gaps are organized in groups that reflect Components of the tank farm vadose zone conceptual model: inventory, release, recharge, geohydrology, geochemistry, and modeling. The inventory and release components address residual wastes that will remain in the tanks and tank-farm infrastructure after closure and potential losses from leaks during waste retrieval. Recharge addresses the impacts of current conditions in the tank farms (i.e. gravel covers that affect infiltration and recharge) as well as the impacts of surface barriers. The geohydrology and geochemistry components address the extent of the existing subsurface contaminant inventory and drivers and pathways for contaminants to be transported through the vadose zone and groundwater. Geochemistry addresses the mobility of key reactive contaminants such as uranium. Modeling addresses conceptual models and how they are simulated in computers. The data gaps will be used to provide input to planning (including the upcoming C Farm Data Quality Objective meetings scheduled this year).

MANN, F.M.

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

183

FREE TRANSLATIONAL OSCILLATIONS OF ICY BODIES WITH A SUBSURFACE OCEAN USING A VARIATIONAL APPROACH  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the influence of the interior structure of an icy body with an internal ocean on the relative translational motions of its solid constituents. We consider an isolated body differentiated into three homogeneous layers with spherical symmetry: an external ice-I layer, a subsurface ammonia-water ocean, and a rocky inner core. This composition represents icy bodies such as Europa, Titania, Oberon, and Triton, as well as Pluto, Eris, Sedna, and 2004 DW. We construct the equations of motion by assuming that the solid constituents are rigid and that the ocean is an ideal fluid, the internal motion being characterized by the relative translations of the solids and the induced flow in the fluid. Then we determine the dynamics of the icy body using the methods of analytical mechanics, that is, we compute the kinetic energy and the gravitational potential energy, and obtain the Lagrangian function. The resulting solution of the Lagrange equations shows that the solid layers perform translational oscillations of different amplitudes with respect to the barycenter of the body. We derive the dependence of the frequency of the free oscillations of the system on the characteristics of each layer, expressing the period of the oscillations as a function of the densities and masses of the ocean and the rocky inner core, and the mass of the icy body. We apply these results to previously developed subsurface models and obtain numerical values for the period and the ratio between the amplitudes of the translational oscillations of the solid components. The features obtained are quite different from the cases of Earth and Mercury. Our analytical formulas satisfactorily explain the source of these differences. When models of the same icy body, compatible with the existence of an internal ocean, differ in the thickness of the ice-I layer, their associated periods experience a relative variation of at least 10%. In particular, the different models for Titania and Oberon exhibit a larger variation of about 37% and 30%. This indicates an absolute difference of the order of three and two hours, respectively. This suggests that the free period of the internal oscillations might provide a new procedure to constrain the internal structure of icy bodies with a subsurface ocean.

Escapa, A.; Fukushima, T. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Ohsawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

ReproducedfromVadoseZoneJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Colloid Transport in the Subsurface: Past, Present, and Future Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VadoseZoneJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Colloid Transport in the Subsurface: Past, Present, and Future Challenges John F. McCarthy* and Larry D between wells and septic fieldssection on colloid transport within a more general perspective) for individual homes, subsurface systems. The focus will be on the transport of colloidal were based on empirical

McCarthy, John F.

185

Addendum to the CAIP for CAU 447: Project Shoal Area, Nevada Subsurface Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

513-ADD 513-ADD ADDENDUM TO THE CORRECTIVE ACTION INVESTIGATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 447: PROJECT SHOAL AREA, NEVADA SUBSURFACE SITE DOE Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada Controlled Copy No.: Revision No.: 1 March 1999 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Available to the public from - U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 (703) 487-4650 Available electronically at http://www.doe.gov/bridge. Available to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors in paper from - U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 (423) 576-8401 ADDENDUM TO THE CORRECTIVE ACTION INVESTIGATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 447:

186

Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River Valley occupies an upper Cenozoic structural basin filled with nearly 1600 m of fluvial silt, sand, and gravel. Rapid facies and thickness changes, steep initial dips (30 0C), and alteration make correlation of basin-fill depositional units very difficult. Hydrothermal alteration products in the form of clays and zeolites, and deposition of secondary calcite and silica increase with depth. The abundance of near-vertical open fractures also increases with depth, allowing greater movement of hydrothermal fluids near the base of the Cenozoic basin fill.

187

DEMONSTRATiON OF A SUBSURFACE CONTAINMENT SYSTEM FOR INSTALLATION AT DOE WASTE SITES  

SciTech Connect

Between 1952 and 1970, DOE buried mixed waste in pits and trenches that now have special cleanup needs. The disposal practices used decades ago left these landfills and other trenches, pits, and disposal sites filled with three million cubic meters of buried waste. This waste is becoming harmful to human safety and health. Today's cleanup and waste removal is time-consuming and expensive with some sites scheduled to complete cleanup by 2006 or later. An interim solution to the DOE buried waste problem is to encapsulate and hydraulically isolate the waste with a geomembrane barrier and monitor the performance of the barrier over its 50-yr lifetime. The installed containment barriers would isolate the buried waste and protect groundwater from pollutants until final remediations are completed. The DOE has awarded a contract to RAHCO International, Inc.; of Spokane, Washington; to design, develop, and test a novel subsurface barrier installation system, referred to as a Subsurface Containment System (SCS). The installed containment barrier consists of commercially available geomembrane materials that isolates the underground waste, similar to the way a swimming pools hold water, without disrupting hazardous material that was buried decades ago. The barrier protects soil and groundwater from contamination and effectively meets environmental cleanup standards while reducing risks, schedules, and costs. Constructing the subsurface containment barrier uses a combination of conventional and specialized equipment and a unique continuous construction process. This innovative equipment and construction method can construct a 1000-ft-long X 34-ft-wide X 30-ft-deep barrier at construction rates to 12 Wday (8 hr/day operation). Life cycle costs including RCRA cover and long-term monitoring range from approximately $380 to $590/cu yd of waste contained or $100 to $160/sq ft of placed barrier based upon the subsurface geology surrounding the waste. Project objectives for Phase I were to validate the SCS construction equipment and process, evaluate the system performance, validate the barrier constructability, and assess the barrier effectiveness. The objectives for Phase 11, which is a full-scale demonstration at a DOE site, are to perform an extensive characterization of the test site, to demonstrate the equipment and the installation process under site-specific performance and regulatory requirements, to validate the operational performance of the equipment, and to perform long-term verification of the barrier using monitoring wells. To date, significant progress has been made to establish the technical and economical feasibility of the SCS. This report describes the SCS conventional and specialized equipment, barrier materials, and construction process. It presents results of the specialized equipment Factory Test, the SCS Control Test and the SCS Advance Control Test at the RAHCO facility. Provided herein are the system performance capabilities and an estimated construction cost and schedule for a 1000-ft-long X 34-ft-wide X 29-ft-deep containment barrier at the DOE Oak Ridge Bear Creek Burial Grounds are also provided.

Thomas J. Crocker; Verna M. Carpenter

2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

188

Application of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) for controlling subsurface fire area: Indian context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In bord and pillar method of mining, the panels are sealed off after depillaring. Depending upon the site specific condition, 40 to 45 % coal are left in depillared panel as stook, loose coal left in goaf, hard coal on floor and roof of the panel. The left out coals in goaf area start oxidation, and this leads to spontaneous heating in side sealed off area. For assessment of fire in underground coal mines, thermo-compositional monitoring plays an important role. This paper presents scientific relevance and selective criteria for use of inert gas for control of subsurface fire. Finally the paper discusses spontaneous heating problem in sealed off area and application of inertisation technology by using CO, to prevent and control sealed off fire at Haripur Colliery, Kenda Area, ECL, India.

Mohalik, N.K.; Singh, V.K.; Singh, R.V.K. [Central Institute of Mining & Fuel Research, Dhanbad (India)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Subsurface Bio-Immobilization of Plutonium: Experiment and Model Validation Study  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to conduct a concurrent experimental and modeling study centered on the interactions of Shewanella algae BrY with plutonium and uranium species and phases. The most important objective of this research is to investigate the long-term stability of bioprecipitated immobilized actinide phases under changing redox conditions in biologically active systems. The long-term stability of bio-immobilized actinides (e.g. by bio-reduction) is a key criteria that defines the utility and effectiveness of a remediation/containment strategy for subsurface actinide contaminants. Plutonium, which is the focus of this project, is the key contaminant of concern at several DOE sites.

Reed, Donald; Rittmann, Bruce

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Subsurface and seismic investigation of the geopressured-geothermal potential of south Louisiana. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Specific sites (areas) for geopressured-geothermal energy potential have been evaluated: (1) Abbeville Area, (2) Chloe Area, (3) Turtle Bayou Field-Kent Bayou Field Area and (4) Lirette-Chauvin-Lake Boudreaux Area. To arrive at geologic conclusions concerning the geopressured-geothermal energy potential of each area, the following factors have been considered in this study: (1) depth of geopressured sands, (2) geopressured sand volumes, (3) porosities, (4) permeabilities, (5) temperatures, (6) salinities, (7) dissolved gas content, (8) structure - especially as it relates to continuity of reservoirs, and (9) petroleum prodution - espeially if the geopressured fluids are driving mechanisms for current petroleum prodution. To evaluate these parameters the most useful source of information has been petroleum well logs which most commonly are a continuous depth survey of the spontaneous potential (SP) and the electrical resistivity of the subsurface formations. A separate thesis for each of the above four areas was processed separately.

Kinsland, G.L.; Paine, W.R.; Duhon, M.P.; Dungan, J.R.; Kurth, R.J.; Moore, D.R.; Lyons, W.S.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Technical issues associated with in situ vitrification of the INEL Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

In situ vitrification (ISV) has been identified as an alternative technology for remediation of the Acid Pit and Transuranic Pits and Trenches (TRU-PTs) that are present at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). However, a number of technical issues exist that must be resolved before ISV can be considered applicable to these waste sites. To assist in the ISV technology evaluation, an ISV Steering Committee was formed to identify, prioritize, and develop closure roadmaps for technical issues associated with ISV application at the INEL SDA. The activities of the ISV Steering Committee are summarized in three volumes of this report. This document, Volume 1, identifies the systematic approach used to identify and prioritize the ISV technical issues, and briefly discusses the methodology that will be employed to resolve these issues.

Stoots, C.M.; Bates, S.O.; Callow, R.A.; Campbell, K.A.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Gratson, G.K.; McKellar, M.G.; Nickelson, D.F.; Slater, C.E.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area: Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA)--Programmatic, Technical, and Regulatory Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural attenuation processes are commonly used for remediation of contaminated sites. A variety of natural processes occur without human intervention at all sites to varying rates and degrees of effectiveness to attenuate (decrease) the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume, or concentration of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface water systems. The objective of this review is to identify potential technical investments to be incorporated in the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area Strategic Plan for monitored natural attenuation. When implemented, the technical investments will help evaluate and implement monitored natural attenuation as a remediation option at DOE sites. The outcome of this review is a set of conclusions and general recommendations regarding research needs, programmatic guidance, and stakeholder issues pertaining to monitored natural attenuation for the DOE complex.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, Wayne J.

2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

193

Molecular analysis of the metabolic rates of discrete subsurface populations of sulfate reducers  

SciTech Connect

Elucidating the in situ metabolic activity of phylogenetically diverse populations of sulfate-reducing microorganisms that populate anoxic sedimentary environments is key to understanding subsurface ecology. Previous pure culture studies have demonstrated that transcript abundance of dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase genes is correlated with the sulfate reducing activity of individual cells. To evaluate whether expression of these genes was diagnostic for subsurface communities, dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase gene transcript abundance in phylogenetically distinct sulfate-reducing populations was quantified during a field experiment in which acetate was added to uranium-contaminated groundwater. Analysis of dsrAB sequences prior to the addition of acetate indicated that Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, and Syntrophaceae-related sulfate reducers were the most abundant. Quantifying dsrB transcripts of the individual populations suggested that Desulfobacteraceae initially had higher dsrB transcripts per cell than Desulfobulbaceae or Syntrophaceae populations, and that the activity of Desulfobacteraceae increased further when the metabolism of dissimilatory metal reducers competing for the added acetate declined. In contrast, dsrB transcript abundance in Desulfobulbaceae and Syntrophaceae remained relatively constant, suggesting a lack of stimulation by added acetate. The indication of higher sulfate-reducing activity in the Desulfobacteraceae was consistent with the finding that Desulfobacteraceae became the predominant component of the sulfate-reducing community. Discontinuing acetate additions resulted in a decline in dsrB transcript abundance in the Desulfobacteraceae. These results suggest that monitoring transcripts of dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase genes in distinct populations of sulfate reducers can provide insight into the relative rates of metabolism of different components of the sulfate-reducing community and their ability to respond to environmental perturbations.

Miletto, M.; Williams, K.H.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Lovley, D.R.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site's 300 Area in southeastern Washington State was investigated by analyzing 21 samples recovered from depths that ranged from 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 non-chimeric Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that contain a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units, defined at the 97% identity level). Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (based upon Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic transition zone, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The Bacterial community in the oxic Hanford and Ringold Formations contained members of 9 major well-recognized phyla as well 30 as unusually high proportions of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by low OTU richness and a very high preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The study has greatly expanded the intralineage phylogenetic diversity within some major divisions. These subsurface sediments have been shown to contain a large number of phylogenetically novel microbes, with substantial heterogeneities between sediment samples from the same geological formation.

Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Banquet Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Annual Banquet Program 5:30 pm Social Hour (Cash Bar) 6:30 pm Dinner 7:15 pm Program Remarks & Introduction of Current Officers John ...

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Program Accomplishments  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Progress and accomplishments in hydrogen and fuel cells. A Fuel Cell Technologies Program fact sheet that outlines current progress in key program goals.

197

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

program . If you need assistance with the DOE application, please e-mail SC.WDTS@science.doe.gov. For the Argonne Student Research Participation Program, apply only...

198

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

program. If you need assistance with the DOE application, please e-mail SC.WDTS@science.doe.gov. For the Argonne Student Research Participation Program, apply only...

199

SRS - Programs - Nonproliferation Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3/2012 3/2012 SEARCH GO spacer SRS Home Nonproliferation Programs In the crucial field of nuclear nonproliferation, SRS employee contributions helped to advance all three of the planned plutonium disposition facilities at the Savannah River Site: the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF); Waste Solidification Building (WSB); and the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility. A $345 million project, the WSB will process liquid waste from the MOX facility. After material is processed at the WSB, transuranic waste will be packaged and sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico, and low-level waste will be packaged and sent to onsite or commercial off-site low-level waste disposal facilities. The mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility will be a major component in the United States' program to dispose of excess weapons grade plutonium.

200

Environmental Systems Research Candidates Program--FY2000 Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Systems Research Candidates (ESRC) Program, which is scheduled to end September 2001, was established in April 2000 as part of the Environmental Systems Research and Analysis Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to provide key science and technology to meet the clean-up mission of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, and perform research and development that will help solve current legacy problems and enhance the INEELs scientific and technical capability for solving longer-term challenges. This report documents the progress and accomplishments of the ESRC Program from April through September 2000. The ESRC Program consists of 24 tasks subdivided within four research areas: A. Environmental Characterization Science and Technology. This research explores new data acquisition, processing, and interpretation methods that support cleanup and long-term stewardship decisions. B. Subsurface Understanding. This research expands understanding of the biology, chemistry, physics, hydrology, and geology needed to improve models of contamination problems in the earths subsurface. C. Environmental Computational Modeling. This research develops INEEL computing capability for modeling subsurface contaminants and contaminated facilities. D. Environmental Systems Science and Technology. This research explores novel processes to treat waste and decontaminate facilities. Our accomplishments during FY 2000 include the following: We determined, through analysis of samples taken in and around the INEEL site, that mercury emissions from the INEEL calciner have not raised regional off-INEEL mercury contamination levels above normal background. We have initially demonstrated the use of x-ray fluorescence to image uranium and heavy metal concentrations in soil samples. We increased our understanding of the subsurface environment; applying mathematical complexity theory to the problem of transport of subsurface contaminants. We upgraded the INEELs high-speed computer link to offsite supercomputers from T1 (1.5 MB/s) to DS3 (45 MB/s). Procurements have initiated a further upgrade to OC3 (155 MB/s) with additional onsite computational power that should put the INEEL on the Top 500 Supercomputing Sites list. We developed advanced decontamination, decommissioning, and dismantlement techniques, including the Decontamination, Decommissioning, and Remediation Optimal Planning System.

Piet, Steven James

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Quantifying and relating land-surface and subsurface variability in permafrost environments using lidar and surface geophsical datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complexity of permafrost dynamics and its critical impact on climate feedbacks warrant continued development of advanced high-latitude terrestrial ecosystem characterization and monitoring approaches. In this study, we explore the value of remote sensing and surface geophysical data for characterizing land surface and subsurface properties and their linkages in an Alaskan Coastal Plain ecosystem. We base our study on data collected at the end of the 2011 growing season in the Barrow Environmental Observatory, where a nested suite of measurements were collected within a polygon-dominated region including: surface ground penetrating radar, electromagnetic, and electrical resistance tomography data; thaw depth, soil temperature and moisture content, soil texture, soil carbon and nitrogen content, and major and trace cations. Previously-collected lidar data were also available for the study. Analysis of the datasets, individually and in combination, revealed the utility of the methods for characterizing critical land-surface and subsurface properties and associated spatial zonation. Lidar analysis was performed to extract geomorphic metrics (such as slope, curvature, and directed distance of polygons), which potentially indicate drainage potential and permafrost deformation state. Cluster analysis of these lidar-obtained attributes suggested that the land surface can be grouped into three spatially coherent zones, each having a dominant geomorphic expression including: a high centered polygon zone, a low centered polygon zone and a transitional zone. Comparison of the geophysical attributes from radar, electrical resistance tomography, and electromagnetic data with point measurements suggests that the surface geophysical data can provide very high-resolution information about subsurface properties that affect ecosystem feedbacks to climate, such as thaw depth and moisture content. Cluster analysis suggested that the geophysical attributes also varied spatially in a systematic way, suggesting the presence of three laterally distinct subsurface zones. Analysis of zone-based subsurface point measurements suggests that the geophysically-defined zones have unique distributions of hydrological, thermal, and geochemical properties and that the subsurface (geophysically-based) and land-surface (lidar-based) zonation is consistent. Although the close linkage between land surface (polygonal geomorphology) and subsurface (active layer) variability revealed through our study is not surprising, to our knowledge this is the first study to document such relationships using high resolution and non-invasive approaches. This study suggests the potential of using coincident lidar and surface geophysical measurements to quantify land surface and subsurface properties (respectively) and their linkages, which are likely to play a role in terrestrial ecosystem evolution and feedbacks to climate. These findings open the way for future research focused on using combined geophysical and remote sensing datasets to estimate subsurface and land-surface properties in high resolution and over large regions as is needed for process understanding and numerical model initialization in high latitude terrestrial ecosystems.

Hubbard, Susan S [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gangodagmage, C [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Dafflon, B [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Wainwright, H [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Peterson, J [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gusmeroli, A [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Ulrich, Craig [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Wu, Yuxin [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rowland, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tweedie, Craig [University of Texas, El Paso; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Recovery Act: Web-based CO{sub 2} Subsurface Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Web-based CO{sub 2} Subsurface Modeling project focused primarily on extending an existing text-only, command-line driven, isothermal and isobaric, geochemical reaction-transport simulation code, developed and donated by Sienna Geodynamics, into an easier-to-use Web-based application for simulating long-term storage of CO{sub 2} in geologic reservoirs. The Web-based interface developed through this project, publically accessible via URL http://symc.sdsu.edu/, enables rapid prototyping of CO{sub 2} injection scenarios and allows students without advanced knowledge of geochemistry to setup a typical sequestration scenario, invoke a simulation, analyze results, and then vary one or more problem parameters and quickly re-run a simulation to answer what-if questions. symc.sdsu.edu has 2x12 core AMD Opteron 6174 2.20GHz processors and 16GB RAM. The Web-based application was used to develop a new computational science course at San Diego State University, COMP 670: Numerical Simulation of CO{sub 2} Sequestration, which was taught during the fall semester of 2012. The purpose of the class was to introduce graduate students to Carbon Capture, Use and Storage (CCUS) through numerical modeling and simulation, and to teach students how to interpret simulation results to make predictions about long-term CO{sub 2} storage capacity in deep brine reservoirs. In addition to the training and education component of the project, significant software development efforts took place. Two computational science doctoral and one geological science masters student, under the direction of the PIs, extended the original code developed by Sienna Geodynamics, named Sym.8. New capabilities were added to Sym.8 to simulate non-isothermal and non-isobaric flows of charged aqueous solutes in porous media, in addition to incorporating HPC support into the code for execution on many-core XSEDE clusters. A successful outcome of this project was the funding and training of three new computational science students and one geological science student in technologies relevant to carbon sequestration and problems involving flow in subsurface media. The three computational science students are currently finishing their doctorial studies on different aspects of modeling CO{sub 2} sequestration, while the geological science student completed his masters thesis in modeling the thermal response of CO{sub 2} injection in brine and, as a direct result of participation in this project, is now employed at ExxonMobil as a full-time staff geologist.

Paolini, Christopher; Castillo, Jose

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

The Research Program | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Research Program The Research Program What is the chemical and physical form of uranium in reduced aquifers? Uranium behavior in the Rifle, CO, aquifer. In order to directly interrogate the chemical and physical form of reduced uranium (U(IV)) in bioremediated sediments within the contaminated aquifer at the Rifle site, a novel technique was developed based on reactors installed in wells (center right). U(IV) was found to be bound to biomass (structural model shown in upper left-hand) within thin (microns) sulfide-rich coatings on mineral grains (bottom left). Uranium in its oxidized (U(VI)) form, is one of the most common, abundant, and problematic subsurface contaminants at legacy nuclear sites. In contrast, the tetravalent form of uranium (U(IV) ) is relatively insoluble

204

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs Programs Argonne National Laboratory Educational Programs Search Argonne ... Search Argonne Home > Educational Programs > Welcome Type of Appointments Postdoctoral Newsletters Postdoctoral Office Activities Postdoctoral Programs Alumni Postdoctoral Society of Argonne Newcomers Assistance Office Postdoctoral Resources Postdoctoral Mentoring Program Contact Us Schedule of Career Development Seminars Organized by the Postdoctoral Office for 2011 Here is a schedule of all of our Career Development Seminars and Workshops! Normally, the events happen at lunchtime and food is provided. The topics of these events include: Journal Clubs Career Development Networking We welcome all of our Postdocs and colleagues to and join us! Wednesday January 19 Postdoc Journal Club and pizza lunch. Magnetic Domain-Wall Racetrack Memory

205

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 3 with Errata Sheet  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447, Project Shoal Area (PSA)-Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 447 is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, approximately 48 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for CAU 447, as provided in the FFACO. Corrective Action Unit 447 consists of two corrective action sites (CASs): CAS 57-49-01, Emplacement Shaft, and CAS 57-57-001, Cavity. The emplacement shaft (CAS-57-49-01) was backfilled and plugged in 1996 and will not be evaluated further. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. The original Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for the PSA was approved in September 1996 and described a plan to drill and test four characterization wells, followed by flow and transport modeling (DOE/NV, 1996). The resultant drilling is described in a data report (DOE/NV, 1998e) and the data analysis and modeling in an interim modeling report (Pohll et al., 1998). After considering the results of the modeling effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the degree of uncertainty in transport predictions for PSA remained unacceptably large. As a result, a second CAIP was developed by DOE and approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in December 1998 (DOE/NV, 1998a). This plan prescribed a rigorous analysis of uncertainty in the Shoal model and quantification of methods of reducing uncertainty through data collection. This analysis is termed a Data Decision Analysis (Pohll et al., 1999a) and formed the basis for a second major characterization effort at PSA (Pohll et al., 1999b). The details for this second field effort are presented in an Addendum to the CAIP, which was approved by NDEP in April 1999 (DOE/NV, 1999a). Four additional characterization wells were drilled at PSA during summer and fall of 1999; details of the drilling and well installation are in IT Corporation (2000), with testing reported in Mihevc et al. (2000). A key component of the second field program was a tracer test between two of the new wells (Carroll et al., 2000; Reimus et al., 2003). Based on the potential exposure pathways, two corrective action objectives were identified for CAU 447: Prevent or mitigate exposure to groundwater contaminants of concern at concentrations exceeding regulatory maximum contaminant levels or risk-based levels; and Reduce the risk to human health and the environment to the extent practicable. Based on the review of existing data, the results of the modeling, future use, and current operations at PSA, the following alternatives have been developed for consideration at CAU 447: Alternative 1--No Further Action; Alternative 2--Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls; and Alternative 3--Contaminant Control. The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on the approach outlined in the ''Focused Evaluation of Selected Remedial Alternatives for the Underground Test Area'' (DOE/NV, 1998b). Each alternative was assessed against nine evaluation criteria. These criteria include overall protection of human health and the environment;

Tim Echelard

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 3 with Errata Sheet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447, Project Shoal Area (PSA)-Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 447 is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, approximately 48 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for CAU 447, as provided in the FFACO. Corrective Action Unit 447 consists of two corrective action sites (CASs): CAS 57-49-01, Emplacement Shaft, and CAS 57-57-001, Cavity. The emplacement shaft (CAS-57-49-01) was backfilled and plugged in 1996 and will not be evaluated further. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. The original Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for the PSA was approved in September 1996 and described a plan to drill and test four characterization wells, followed by flow and transport modeling (DOE/NV, 1996). The resultant drilling is described in a data report (DOE/NV, 1998e) and the data analysis and modeling in an interim modeling report (Pohll et al., 1998). After considering the results of the modeling effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the degree of uncertainty in transport predictions for PSA remained unacceptably large. As a result, a second CAIP was developed by DOE and approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in December 1998 (DOE/NV, 1998a). This plan prescribed a rigorous analysis of uncertainty in the Shoal model and quantification of methods of reducing uncertainty through data collection. This analysis is termed a Data Decision Analysis (Pohll et al., 1999a) and formed the basis for a second major characterization effort at PSA (Pohll et al., 1999b). The details for this second field effort are presented in an Addendum to the CAIP, which was approved by NDEP in April 1999 (DOE/NV, 1999a). Four additional characterization wells were drilled at PSA during summer and fall of 1999; details of the drilling and well installation are in IT Corporation (2000), with testing reported in Mihevc et al. (2000). A key component of the second field program was a tracer test between two of the new wells (Carroll et al., 2000; Reimus et al., 2003). Based on the potential exposure pathways, two corrective action objectives were identified for CAU 447: Prevent or mitigate exposure to groundwater contaminants of concern at concentrations exceeding regulatory maximum contaminant levels or risk-based levels; and Reduce the risk to human health and the environment to the extent practicable. Based on the review of existing data, the results of the modeling, future use, and current operations at PSA, the following alternatives have been developed for consideration at CAU 447: Alternative 1--No Further Action; Alternative 2--Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls; and Alternative 3--Contaminant Control. The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on the approach outlined in the ''Focused Evaluation of Selected Remedial Alternatives for the Underground Test Area'' (DOE/NV, 1998b). Each alternative was assessed against nine evaluation criteria. These criteria include overall protection of human health and the environment;

Tim Echelard

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A Method Of Evaluating A Subsurface Region Using Gather Sensitive Data Discrimination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of evaluating a subsurface region by separating/enhancing a certain type of seismic event data of interest from an overall set of seismic event data which includes other, different types of seismic event data is disclosed herein. In accordance with one feature, a particular type of gather is generated from the seismic event data such that the gather includes at least a portion of the data which is of interest and at least a portion of the other data. A series of data discrimination lines are incorporated into the gather at positions and directions which are established in the gather in a predetermined way. Using the data discrimination lines, the data of interest which is present in the gather is separated/enhanced with respect to the other data within the gather. The separated data may be used for example in producing a map of the particular subterranean region. In accordance with another feature, the gather is selected such that the incorporated discrimination lines approach a near parallel relationship with one another. Thereby, the data is transformed in a way which causes the discrimination lines to be parallel with one another, resulting in reduced frequency distortion accompanied by improved accuracy in the separation/enhancement of data. In accordance with still another feature, the disclosed data separation/enhancement method is compatible with an iterative approach.

Lazaratos, Spyridon K. (Houston, TX)

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

208

USE OF PERFLUOROCARBON TRACER (PFT) TECHNOLOGY FOR SUBSURFACE BARRIER INTEGRITY VERIFICATION AT THE WALDO TEST SITE.  

SciTech Connect

Testing of perfluorocarbon gas tracers (PFT) on a subsurface barrier with known flaws was conducted at the Waldo Test Site operated by Science and Engineering Associates, Inc (SEA). The tests involved the use of five unique PFTs with a different tracer injected along the interior of each wall of the barrier. A fifth tracer was injected exterior to the barrier to examine the validity of diffusion controlled transport of the PFTs. The PFTs were injected for three days at a nominal flow rate of 15 cm{sup 3}/min and concentrations in the range of a few hundred ppm. Approximately 65 liters of air laced with tracer was injected for each tracer. The tracers were able to accurately detect the presence of the engineered flaws. Two flaws were detected on the north and east walls, and one flaw was detected on the south and west walls. In addition, one non-engineered flaw at the seam between the north and east walls was also detected. The use of multiple tracers provided independent confirmation of the flaws and permitted a distinction between tracers arriving at a monitoring port after being released from a nearby flaw and non-engineered flaws. The PFTs detected the smallest flaw, 0.5 inches in diameter. Visual inspection of the data showed excellent agreement with the known flaw locations and the relative size of the flaws was accurately estimated. Simultaneous with the PFT tests, SEA conducted tests with another gas tracer sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}).

SULLIVAN,T.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Electrode Induced Removal and Recovery of Uranium (VI) from Acidic Subsurfaces  

SciTech Connect

The overarching objective of this research is to provide an improved understanding of how aqueous geochemical conditions impact the removal of U and Tc from groundwater and how engineering design may be utilized to optimize removal of these radionuclides. Experiments were designed to address the unique conditions in Area 3 of ORNL while also providing broader insight into the geochemical effectors of the removal rates and extent for U and Tc. The specific tasks of this work were to: 1) quantify the impact of common aqueous geochemical and operational conditions on the rate and extent of U removal and recovery from water, 2) investigate the removal of Tc with polarized graphite electrode, and determine the influence of geochemical and operational conditions on Tc removal and recovery, 3) determine whether U and Tc may be treated simultaneous from Area 3 groundwater, and examine the bench-scale performance of electrode-based treatment, and 4) determine the capacity of graphite electrodes for U(VI) removal and develop a mathematical, kinetic model for the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution. Overall the body of work suggests that an electrode-based approach for the remediation of acidic subsurface environments, such as those observed in Area 3 of ORNL may be successful for the removal for both U(VI) and Tc. Carbonaceous (graphite) electrode materials are likely to be the least costly means to maximize removal rates and efficiency by maximizing the electrode surface area.

Gregory, Kelvin [Carnegie Mellon University] [Carnegie Mellon University

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

210

The in-situ vitrification of subsurface containment barriers: An overview  

SciTech Connect

In situ vitrification (ISV) is an environmental engineering process in which soil or soil/waste mixtures are melted through the direct application of electrical current and subsequently cooled to a glassy solid. The technology was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in the 1980s and has been tested on transuranic, mixed-hazardous, and PCB/organic waste similar to that found at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other facilities nationwide. PNL is conducting a wide range of field tests, expanding the scientific basis of ISV, and assessing its extension into new applications. One such project is ISV--Selective Barriers, an investigation into the construction and performance of ISV--generated, vertical and/or horizontal subsurface barriers to ground-water flow and biogenic intrusion. In some situations, it may be impractical or unnecessary to either excavate or vitrify an entire waste site. Vitrified barriers could minimize the diffusive or fluid transport of hazardous components with either a ground-water diversion wall or an in situ, box-like'' structure. During the first year of this project, engineering-scale tests are being conducted between graphite electrodes within a 1.8-m-diameter, 2.4-m-high test cell. Several methods are being tested, including passive metal electrodes, electrode feeding systems, fluxed soil, and fluxed boreholes. In addition, basic data have been collected on the thermal and material properties of ISV melt and solidified glass. 7 refs., 6 figs.

Murphy, M.; Stottlemyre, J.A.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site 300 Area near Richland, Washington State (USA) was investigated by analyzing samples recovered from depths of 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that include a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units at the 97% identity level), respectively. Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic interface, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by a preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The Bacterial community in the oxic sediments contained not only members of 9 well-recognized phyla but also an unusually high proportion of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). Additionally, novel phylogenetic orders were identified within the Delta-proteobacteria, a clade rich in microbes that carry out redox transformations of metals that are important contaminants on the Hanford Site.

Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

212

Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments  

SciTech Connect

The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) were investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface Pleistocene flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and 57Fe Mssbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in incubated Hanford sediments with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan; Moore, Dean A.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

2012-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

213

EMSL Geochemistry, Biogeochemistry and Subsurface Science-Science Theme Advisory Panel Meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the topics of discussion and the recommendations of the panel members. On December 8 and 9, 2010, the Geochemistry, Biogeochemistry, and Subsurface Science (GBSS) Science Theme Advisory Panel (STAP) convened for a more in-depth exploration of the five Science Theme focus areas developed at a similar meeting held in 2009. The goal for the fiscal year (FY) 2011 meeting was to identify potential topical areas for science campaigns, necessary experimental development needs, and scientific members for potential research teams. After a review of the current science in each of the five focus areas, the 2010 STAP discussions successfully led to the identification of one well focused campaign idea in pore-scale modeling and five longer-term potential research campaign ideas that would likely require additional workshops to identify specific research thrusts. These five campaign areas can be grouped into two categories: (1) the application of advanced high-resolution, high mass accuracy experimental techniques to elucidate the interplay between geochemistry and microbial communities in terrestrial ecosystems and (2) coupled computation/experimental investigations of the electron transfer reactions either between mineral surfaces and outer membranes of microbial cells or between the outer and inner membranes of microbial cells.

Brown, Gordon E.; Chaka, Anne; Shuh, David K.; Roden, Eric E.; Werth, Charles J.; Hess, Nancy J.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Baer, Donald R.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Bowden, Mark E.; Grate, Jay W.; Hoyt, David W.; Kuprat, Laura R.; Lea, Alan S.; Mueller, Karl T.; Oostrom, Martinus; Orr, Galya; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Plata, Charity; Robinson, E. W.; Teller, Raymond G.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Wang, Hongfei; Wiley, H. S.; Wilkins, Michael J.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

MICROSCALE METABOLIC, REDOX AND ABIOTIC REACTIONS IN HANFORD 300 AREA SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford 300 Area is a unique site due to periodic hydrologic influence of river water resulting in changes in groundwater elevation and flow direction. This area is also highly subject to uranium remobilization, the source of which is currently believed to be the region at the base of the vadose zone that is subject to period saturation due to the changes in the water levels in the Columbia River. We found that microbial processes and redox and abiotic reactions which operate at the microscale were critical to understanding factors controlling the macroscopic fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface. The combined laboratory and field research showed how microscale conditions control uranium mobility and how biotic, abiotic and redox reactions relate to each other. Our findings extended the current knowledge to examine U(VI) reduction and immobilization using natural 300 Area communities as well as selected model organisms on redox-sensitive and redox-insensitive minerals. Using innovative techniques developed specifically to probe biogeochemical processes at the microscale, our research expanded our current understanding of the roles played by mineral surfaces, bacterial competition, and local biotic, abiotic and redox reaction rates on the reduction and immobilization of uranium.

Beyenal, Haluk [WSU] [WSU; McLEan, Jeff [JCVI] [JCVI; Majors, Paul [PNNL] [PNNL; Fredrickson, Jim [PNNL] [PNNL

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

215

DISTRIBUTION AND RANGE OF RADIONUCLIDE SORPTION COEFFICIENTS IN A SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SUBSURFACE: STOCHASTIC MODELING CONSIDERATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The uncertainty associated with the sorption coefficient, or K{sub d} value, is one of the key uncertainties in estimating risk associated with burying low-level nuclear waste in the subsurface. The objective of this study was to measure >648 K{sub d} values and provide a measure of the range and distribution (normal or log-normal) of radionuclide K{sub d} values appropriate for the E-Area disposal site, within the Savannah River Site, near Aiken South Carolina. The 95% confidence level for the mean K{sub d} was twice the mean in the Aquifer Zone (18-30.5 m depth), equal to the mean for the Upper Vadose Zone (3.3-10 m depth), and half the mean for the Lower Vadose Zone (3.10-18 m depth). The distribution of K{sub d} values was log normal in the Upper Vadose Zone and Aquifer Zone, and normal in the Lower Vadose Zone. To our knowledge, this is the first report of natural radionuclide Kd variability in the literature. Using ranges and distribution coefficients that are specific to the hydrostratigraphic unit improved model accuracy and reduced model uncertainty. Unfortunately, extension of these conclusions to other sites is likely not appropriate given that each site has its own sources of hydrogeological variability. However, this study provides one of the first examples of the development stochastic ranges and distributions of K{sub d} values for a hydrological unit for stochastic modeling.

Kaplan, D.; et. al

2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

216

Subsurface Ice and Brine Sampling Using an Ultrasonic/Sonic Gopher for Life Detection and Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is growing evidence for ice and fluids near the surface of Mars with potential discharge of brines, which may preserve a record of past life on the planet. Proven techniques to sample Mars subsurface will be critical for future NASA astrobiology missions that will search for such records. The required technology studies are underway in the McMurdo Dry valleys, Antarctica, which is serving as a Mars analog. The ice layer on Lake Vida in the dry valleys is estimated to be 20-meter thick where below 16-m depth there is a mix of ice and brine, which has never been sampled directly due to logistical constraints. A novel light weight, low power ultrasonic/sonic driller/corer (USDC) mechanism was developed that overcomes the need for high axial loads required by drilling via conventional techniques. The USDC was modified to produce an Ultrasonic/Sonic Gopher that is being developed to core down to the 20-m depth for in situ analysis and sample collection. Coring ice at-20 o C as in Lake Vida suggests that it is a greater challenge and current efforts are focused on the problems of ice core cutting, ice chip handling and potential ice melt (and refreezing) during drilling. An analytical model and a prototype are being developed with an effort to

Y. Bar-cohen; S. Sherrit; Z. Chang; L. Wessel; X. Bao; P. T. Doran; C. H. Fritsen; F. Kenig; C. P. Mckay; A. Murray; T. Peterson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Enhanced Remedial Amendment Delivery to Subsurface Using Shear Thinning Fluid and Aqueous Foam  

SciTech Connect

A major issue with in situ subsurface remediation is the ability to achieve an even spatial distribution of remedial amendments to the contamination zones in an aquifer or vadose zone. Delivery of amendment to the aquifer using shear thinning fluid and to the vadose zone using aqueous foam has the potential to enhance the amendment distribution into desired locations and improve the remediation. 2-D saturated flow cell experiments were conducted to evaluate the enhanced sweeping, contaminant removal, and amendment persistence achieved by shear thinning fluid delivery. Bio-polymer xanthan gum solution was used as the shear thinning fluid. Unsaturated 1-D column and 2-D flow cell experiments were conducted to evaluate the mitigation of contaminant mobilization, amendment uniform distribution enhancement, and lateral delivery improvement by foam delivery. Surfactant sodium lauryl ether sulfate was used as the foaming agent. It was demonstrated that the shear thinning fluid injection enhanced the fluid sweeping over a heterogeneous system and increased the delivery of remedial amendment into low-permeability zones. The persistence of the amendment distributed into the low-perm zones by the shear thinning fluid was prolonged compared to that of amendment distributed by water injection. Foam delivery of amendment was shown to mitigate the mobilization of highly mobile contaminant from sediments under vadose zone conditions. Foam delivery also achieved more uniform amendment distribution in a heterogeneous unsaturated system, and demonstrated remarkable increasing in lateral distribution of the injected liquid compared to direct liquid injection.

Zhong, Lirong; Szecsody, James E.; Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Shen, Xin; Li, Xiqing

2011-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

218

Importance of Mobile Genetic Elements and Conjugal Gene Transfer for Subsurface Microbial Community Adaptation to Biotransformation of Metals  

SciTech Connect

Soils used in the present DOE project were obtained from the Field Research Center (FRC) through correspondence with FRC Manager David Watson. We obtained a total of six soils sampled at different distances from the surface: (A) Non-contaminated surface soil from Hinds Creek Floodplain (0 mbs (meter below surface)). (B) Mercury-contaminated surface soil from Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Floodplain (0 mbs). (C) Mercury-contaminated subsurface soil from Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Floodplain (0.5 mbs). (D) Mercury-contaminated subsurface soil from Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Floodplain (1.0 mbs). (E) Non-contaminated surface soil from Ish Creek Floodplain (0 mbs). (F) Non-contaminated surface soil from Ish Creek Floodplain (0.5 mbs).

Sorensen, Soren J.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pre-College Research Participation Program Summer 2013 Program Dates June 10, 2013 to August 2, 2013 precollege research student Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S....

220

Special Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... enrolled in our Kindergarten program, as well as students enrolled at Diamond Elementary School. Montgomery County Public Schools provide pick ...

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Training Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training Program EHS 0243 Soldering Awareness Training Course Syllabus Subject Category: General Course Prerequisite: None Course Length: 30 Minutes Medical...

222

Technical Protocols for Assessing Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Mobility in the Subsurface at Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) research that has been conducted on dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) mobility at manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites and presents technical protocols for conducting DNAPL mobility assessments at MGP sites using currently available methodologies and/or technologies. The technical protocols address each of the primary zones of the subsurface environment: vadose zone, saturated zone, and bedrock (both competent and fractured). The report a...

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

223

Biolog(TM) ID as compared to 16S ribosomal RNA ID for environmental isolates from the deep subsurface  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Dept of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Microbial Culture Collection (SMCC) contains nearly 10,000 strains of microorganisms isolated from terrestrial subsurface environments. Many of the aerobic, gram-negative, chemoheterotrophs isolated from the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) have previously been identified by phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene nucleotide sequences. These SMCC isolates are currently being examined using Biolog GN Microplates and the Biolog Microstation System in order to gain knowledge of their metabolic capabilities and to compare Biolog IDs with 16S IDs. To accommodate the particular needs of these subsurface isolates, which are often incapable of growing under high-nutrient conditions, Biolog's recommendations for inoculating isolates into Biolog GN Microplates have been altered. The isolates are grown on low nutrient media, sodium thioglycolate (3mM) is added to the culture media to inhibit capsule formation, and a low density of bacteria is inoculated into the microplate. Using these altered inoculation criteria, 60 percent of these SMCC isolates have a Biolog genus ID that matches the 16S rRNA ID. These results indicate that the Biolog System can be a good means of identifying unusual environmental isolates, even when recommended inoculation procedures are altered to accommodate particular isolate needs.

McKinsey, P.C.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

224

Distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters in fissured volcanogenic bed rocks of the Lake Karachai Area, Chelyabinsk, Southern Urals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present investigation is devoted to the study of the distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters, beneath the site of temporary storage of liquid radioactive waste known as Lake Karachai. For this purpose a method of hydrogeochemical logging (HGCL) together with standard hydrogeochemical and geophysical methods of uncased hole logging were used. The distribution of sodium nitrate brine plumes in the subsurface was determined by the physical and physico-chemical properties of these brines and by the petrochemical composition of enclosing rocks and the structural setting of the flow paths. The latter is represented by fractures and large faults in the bedrock of volcanogenic and volcanogenic-sedimentary rocks of intermediate-to-basic composition. The volcanogenic rocks are overlain in some places by a thin cover of unconsolidated sediments, i.e., by loams and relatively impermeable silts. Contaminated waters flow-in accordance with the eluvium bottom relief towards local areas of natural (Mishelyak and Techa rivers) and artificial (Novogomenskii water intake) discharge of subsurface waters. The large Mishelyak fault, southwest of Lake Karachai and under fluvial sediments of the Mishelyak, is assumed to significantly influence the flow pattern of contaminated waters, diverting them from an intake of drinking water.

Solodov, I.N.; Belichkin, V.I.; Zotov, A.V.; Kochkin, B.T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Drozhko, E.G. [Atomic Energy of Russia (Russian Federation); Glagolev, A.V.; Skokov, A.N. [Russian Federation Committee on Geological and Subsurface Usage (Russian Federation)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Phased Array Approach To Retrieve Gases, Liquids, Or Solids From Subsurface And Subaqueous Geologic Or Man-Made Formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of enhancing the remediation of contaminated soils and ground water, production of oil and gas, and production of any solid, gas, and/or liquid from subsurface geologic and man-made formations including the steps of estimating the geometric boundaries of the region containing the material to be recovered, drilling a recovery well(s) into subsurface in a strategic location to recover the material of interest, establishing multiple sources of acoustical power in an array about and spaced-apart from the surface or at various depths below the surface in a borehole(s) and/or well(s), directing a volume of acoustical excitation from the sources into the region containing the material to be recovered, the excitation in the form of either controllable sinusoidal, square, pulsed, or various combinations of these three waveforms, and controlling the phasing, frequency, power, duration, and direction of these waveforms from the sources to increase and control the intensity of acoustical excitation in the region of the material to be recovered to enhance. the recovery of said material from the recovery well(s). The invention will augment any technology affecting the removal of materials from the subsurface.

Rynne, Timothy M. (Long Beach, CA); Spadaro, John F. (Huntington Beach, CA); Iovenitti, Joe L. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Dering, John P. (Lakewood, CA); Hill, Donald G. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

226

A multi-model study of sea surface temperature and sub-surface density fingerprints of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) is an important component of the North Atlantic climate system. Here, we use simulations from ten coupled climate models to calculate patterns of sea surface temperature (SST) and sub-surface ...

Christopher D. Roberts; Freya K. Garry; Laura C. Jackson

227

On the Joint Role of Subtropical Atmospheric Variability and Equatorial Subsurface Heat Content Anomalies in Initiating the Onset of ENSO Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous research has shown that seasonal mean variations in both the subtropical/extratropical sea level pressures over the central North Pacific and the subsurface heat content anomalies in the western equatorial Pacific are significantly ...

Bruce T. Anderson

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Estimation of subsurface temperatures in the Tattapani geothermal field, central India from limited volume of magnetotelluric data and borehole thermograms using a constructive back-propagation neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A constructive back-propagation code which was designed to run as a single hidden layer, feed-forward neural network (SLFFNN) has been adapted and used to estimate subsurface temperature from a small volume of magnetotelluric (MT) derived ...

Anthony E. Akpan; Mahesh Narayanan; T. Harinarayana

229

Networked Acoustic Modems for Real-Time Data Delivery from Distributed Subsurface Instruments in the Coastal Ocean: Initial System Development and Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are reported from field tests of networked acoustic modems used for wireless real-time delivery of oceanographic measurements from a distributed array of subsurface instruments in coastal waters. The network demonstrated consists of ...

Daniel L. Codiga; Joseph A. Rice; Paul A. Baxley

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Program structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A program is usually represented as a word chain. It is exactly a word chain that appears as the lexical analyzer output and is parsed. The work shows that a program can be syntactically represented as an oriented word tree, that is a syntactic program tree, program words being located both in tree nodes and on tree arrows. The basic property of a tree is that arrows starting from each node are marked by different words (including an empty word). Semantics can then be directly specified on such tree using either requirements or additional links, and adding instructions to some tree nodes enables program execution specification.

Shkotin, Alex

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Subsurface Hybrid Power Options for Oil & Gas Production at Deep Ocean Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investment in deep-sea (deep-ocean) hybrid power systems may enable certain off-shore oil and gas exploration and production. Advanced deep-ocean drilling and production operations, locally powered, may provide commercial access to oil and gas reserves otherwise inaccessible. Further, subsea generation of electrical power has the potential of featuring a low carbon output resulting in improved environmental conditions. Such technology therefore, enhances the energy security of the United States in a green and environmentally friendly manner. The objective of this study is to evaluate alternatives and recommend equipment to develop into hybrid energy conversion and storage systems for deep ocean operations. Such power systems will be located on the ocean floor and will be used to power offshore oil and gas exploration and production operations. Such power systems will be located on the oceans floor, and will be used to supply oil and gas exploration activities, as well as drilling operations required to harvest petroleum reserves. The following conceptual hybrid systems have been identified as candidates for powering sub-surface oil and gas production operations: (1) PWR = Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactor + Lead-Acid Battery; (2) FC1 = Line for Surface O{sub 2} + Well Head Gas + Reformer + PEMFC + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (3) FC2 = Stored O2 + Well Head Gas + Reformer + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (4) SV1 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (5) SV2 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Engine or Turbine + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (6) SV3 = Submersible Vehicle + Charge at Docking Station + ZEBRA & Li-Ion Batteries; (7) PWR TEG = PWR + Thermoelectric Generator + Lead-Acid Battery; (8) WELL TEG = Thermoelectric Generator + Well Head Waste Heat + Lead-Acid Battery; (9) GRID = Ocean Floor Electrical Grid + Lead-Acid Battery; and (10) DOC = Deep Ocean Current + Lead-Acid Battery.

Farmer, J C; Haut, R; Jahn, G; Goldman, J; Colvin, J; Karpinski, A; Dobley, A; Halfinger, J; Nagley, S; Wolf, K; Shapiro, A; Doucette, P; Hansen, P; Oke, A; Compton, D; Cobb, M; Kopps, R; Chitwood, J; Spence, W; Remacle, P; Noel, C; Vicic, J; Dee, R

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

232

Assessment of subsurface VOCs using a chemical microsensor array. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of laboratory investigations of several performance parameters relevant to surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) chemical sensor arrays for the measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in contaminated soil and groundwater. The small size, low cost, sensitivity and selectivity of such instruments promise improvements in the quality and quantity of data used to guide site assessment and restoration efforts. In this investigation, calibrations were performed for 15 different coated SAW sensors. Each sensor was exposed to six VOCs selected to represent three chemical classes of contaminants that are commonly found at waste sites (i.e., aliphatic, aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons). A new pattern recognition method was developed for determining which coated sensors would maximize the selectivity and accuracy of quantitation for a given set of vapor contaminants. Using this method, an optimal subwet of four coated sensors was selected for testing in a prototype microsensor instrument. Additional laboratory experiments were performed with this optimized array to assess the limits of detection and linear response ranges for the representative vapors, as well as the additivity of responses to vapors in binary mixtures, temperature and humidity effects, aging effects, and other performance parameters related to the application of this technology to soil and groundwater VOC monitoring. Results demonstrate that SAW microsensor arrays can identify and quantify specific VOCs at concentrations in the {mu}g/L to mg/L range when present alone or in simple (e.g., binary) mixtures. SAW sensor technology offers a potentially effective alternative to existing field instrumentation for headspace analysis, soil vapor monitoring, and vacuum extraction process monitoring of VOCs in subsurface media.

Batterman, S.A.; Zellers, E.T. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). School of Public Health

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Sorption of organic carbon compounds to the fine fraction of surface and Subsurface Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transported from the soil surface is stabilized in deeper soil profiles by physicochemical sorption processes. However, it is unclear how different forms of organic carbon (OC) compounds common in soil organic matter interact with soil minerals in the surface (A) and subsurface (B) horizons. We added four compounds (glucose, starch, cinnamic acid and stearic acid) to the silt- and clay-sized fraction (fine fraction) of A and B horizons of eight soils from varying climates (3 temperate, 3 tropical, 1 arctic and 1 sub-arctic). Equilibriumbatch experiments were conducted using 0 to 100 mg C L 1 of 14C-labeled compounds for 8 h. Sorption parameters (maximum sorption capacity, Qmax and binding coefficient, k) calculated by fitting sorption data to the Langmuir equation showed that Qmax of A and B horizons was very similar for all compounds. Both Qmax and k values were related to sorbate properties, with Qmax being lowest for glucose (20 500 mg kg 1), highest for stearic acid (20,000 200,000 mg kg 1), and intermediate for both cinnamic acid (200 4000 mg kg 1) and starch (400 6000 mg kg 1). Simple linear regression analysis revealed that physicochemical properties of the sorbents influenced the Qmax of cinnamic acid and stearic acid, but not glucose and starch. The sorbent properties did not show predictive ability for binding coefficient k. By using the fine fraction as sorbent, we found that the mineral fractions of A horizons are equally reactive as the B horizons irrespective of soil organic carbon content.

Jagadamma, Sindhu [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Zinn, Yuri [Federal University of Lavras, Brazil; Gisladottir, Gudrun [University of Iceland; Ann, Russell [Iowa State University

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Facility Representative Program: Program Mission Statement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Program Information Program Mission Statement Program Directives and Guidance Facility Representative of the Year Award Program Facility Representative of the Year Award FR...

235

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and...

236

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on AddThis.com... Our History Related Federal Programs Why Energy Efficiency Upgrades Contacts Related Federal Programs Related Links

237

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Guidance Program Guidance Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Facebook Tweet about Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Twitter Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Google Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Delicious Rank Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Digg Find More places to share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on AddThis.com... Closeout Guidance Recovery Act Monitoring & Reporting National Environmental Policy Act

238

Program Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation: Background and Methods Evaluation: Background and Methods Definition of evaluation: the process of determining the worth or merit of something; if "something" is a program, then it's "program evaluation." Other types of evaluation include: product evaluation (most widely practiced, e.g., Consumer Reports); personnel evaluation; research evaluation; policy studies; art, movie, play, and book reviews. Program evaluation is NOT the same as research although they share many characteristics--Both: Start with questions Use similar methods Provide similar information Program evaluation focuses on decisions. Research focuses on answering questions about phenomena to discover new knowledge and test theories/hypotheses. Research is aimed at truth. Evaluation is aimed at

239

Program Description  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Description Program Description SAGE, the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience, is a unique educational program designed to introduce students in geophysics and related fields to "hands on" geophysical exploration and research. The program emphasizes both teaching of field methods and research related to basic science and a variety of applied problems. SAGE is hosted by the National Security Education Center and the Earth and Environmental Sciences Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. * teaches modern geophysical exploration techniques: seismic reflection and refraction, gravity and magnetics, electromagnetics (including magnetotellurics), and electrical resistivity * involves extensive hands-on field experience * integrates geophysical methods to solve real

240

Metric Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The NIST metric program encourages the use of the SI in all facets of education, including honing of worker skills. All Levels of Government. ...

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Sequestration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxycombustion Technology Research And The National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Sequestration Program Prof. Jost O.L. Wendt Honorary Session - Oxycombustion Of Coal III Salt...

242

Program Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Amounts reported to nearest $0.1M. 2. FEMA planned NEHRP budget includes program activities, excluding employee salaries & expenses (S&E). ...

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

243

Training Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training Program EHS 680 Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures Training & Underground Storage Tank (UST) Facility Employee Training Course Syllabus Subject Category:...

244

Postdoc Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for growth. Contact Postdoc Program Office Email New Initiative Los Alamos National Laboratory is pleased to announce our recent partnership with the University of California (UC)...

245

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Facebook Tweet about Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Twitter Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Google Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Delicious Rank Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Digg Find More places to share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on AddThis.com... Plans, Implementation, & Results Weatherization Assistance Program

246

2012 Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area Subsurface Corrective Action Unit 447  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Project Shoal Area (PSA) in Nevada was the site of a 12-kiloton underground nuclear test in 1963. Although the surface of the site has been remediated, investigation of groundwater contamination resulting from the test is still in the corrective action process. Annual sampling and hydraulic head monitoring are conducted at the site as part of the subsurface corrective action strategy. Analytical results from the 2012 monitoring are consistent with those of the previous years, with tritium detected only in well HC-4. The tritium concentration in groundwater from well HC-4 remains far below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-established maximum contaminant level of 20,000 picocuries per liter. Concentrations of total uranium and gross alpha were also detected during this monitoring period, with uranium accounting for nearly all the gross alpha activity. The total uranium concentrations obtained from this monitoring period were consistent with previous results and reflect a slightly elevated natural uranium concentration, consistent with the mineralized geologic terrain. Isotopic ratios of uranium also indicate a natural source of uranium in groundwater, as opposed to a nuclear-test-related source. Water level trends obtained from the 2012 water level data were consistent with those of previous years. The corrective action strategy for the PSA is currently focused on revising the site conceptual model (SCM) and evaluating the adequacy of the current monitoring well network. Some aspects of the SCM are known; however, two major concerns are the uncertainty in the groundwater flow direction and the cause of rising water levels in site wells west of the shear zone. Water levels have been rising in the site wells west of the shear zone since the first hydrologic characterization wells were installed in 1996. While water levels in wells west of the shear zone continue to rise, the rate of increase is less than in previous years. The SCM will be revised, and an evaluation of the groundwater monitoring network will be conducted when water levels at the site have stabilized.

None

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The effects of cultural noise on controlled source electromagnetic resonses of subsurface fractures in resistive terrain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) geophysics has been used with a fair amount of success in near surface hydrogeological studies. Recently, these investigations have been conducted frequently in human impacted field sites containing cultural conductors such as metal fences and buried pipes. Cultural noise adds an element of complexity to the geological interpretation of this type of data. This research investigates the influence of mutual induction between two buried targets in a CSEM experiment. In particular, it looks at the mutual coupling between a buried cultural conductor and a geological heterogeneity. We attempt to isolate the Hz field induced by tertiary currents in targets caused by mutual coupling. This is achieved with a Texas A&M 3D CSEM finite element code, which calculates the secondary Hz fields emanating from a target buried in a halfspace. Buried geological targets and cultural conductors are modeled as volumetric slabs embedded in a halfspace. A series of models have been simulated to study the effect of varying parameters such as target conductivity, transmitter location and shape of a target on the mutual inductance. In each case, the secondary Hz field is calculated for a model with two slabs, and two models with individual slabs. The mutual coupling is calculated by removing the secondary fields from the individual slab models from the response of a two slab model. The calculations of mutual inductance from a variety of such models suggests a complicated interaction of EM fields between the two targets. However, we can explain most of these complexities by adapting a simple approach to Maxwells equations. Although the tertiary Hz field is complicated, it may be useful in the characterization and delineation of electrical heterogeneities in the subsurface, which can then be related to geological features such as fractures or joints. It is seen that the most important factor affecting the mutual coupling is the host conductivity. The results have also shown that mutual coupling is very sensitive to transmitter (TX) location, especially when the TX is positioned near one of the targets.

Fernandes, Roland Anthony Savio

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Geothermal Environmental Impact Assessment: Subsurface Environmental Assessment for Four Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal systems are described for Imperial Valley and The Geysers, California; Klamath Falls, Oregon; and the Rio Grande Rift Zone, New Mexico; including information on location, area, depth, temperature, fluid phase and composition, resource base and status of development. The subsurface environmental assessment evaluates potential groundwater degradation, seismicity and subsidence. A general discussion on geothermal systems, pollution potential, chemical characteristics of geothermal fluids and environmental effects of geothermal water pollutants is presented as background material. For the Imperial Valley, all publicly available water quality and location data for geothermal and nongeothermal wells in and near the East Mesa, Salton Sea, Heber, Brawley, Dunes and Glamis KGRAs have been compiled and plotted. The geothermal fluids which will be reinjected range in salinity from a few thousand to more than a quarter million ppm. Although Imperial Valley is a major agricultural center, groundwater use in and near most of these KGRAs is minimal. Extensive seismicity and subsidence monitoring networks have been established in this area of high natural seismicity and subsidence. The vapor-dominated Geysers geothermal field is the largest electricity producer in the world. Groundwater in this mountainous region flows with poor hydraulic continuity in fractured rock. Ground and surface water quality is generally good, but high boron concentrations in hot springs and geothermal effluents is of significant concern; however, spent condensate is reinjected. High microearthquake activity is noted around the geothermal reservoir and potential subsidence effects are considered minimal. In Klamath Falls, geothermal fluids up to 113 C (235 F) are used for space heating, mostly through downhole heat exchangers with only minor, relatively benign, geothermal fluid being produced at the surface. Seismicity is low and is not expected to increase. Subsidence is not recognized. Of all geothermal occurrences in the Rio Grande Rift, the Valles Caldera is currently of primary interest. injection of geothermal effluent from hydrothermal production wells should remove any hydrologic hazard due to some potentially noxious constituents. Waters circulating in the LASL Hot Dry Rock experiment are potable. Seismic effects are expected to be minimal. Subsidence effects could develop.

Sanyal, Subir; Weiss, Richard

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Conservation Program Update New conservation program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation Program Update New conservation program > Conservation Stewardship Program (CSTP) The new Conservation Stewardship Program is available for all landowners. CSTP rules are still being developed. However, the program could pay farmers who are improving conservation treatment on their working

Netoff, Theoden

250

Genome sequences for six Rhodanobacter strains isolated from soils and the terrestrial subsurface with variable denitrification capabilities  

SciTech Connect

We report the first genome sequences for six strains of Rhodanobacter species isolated from a variety of soil and subsurface environments. Three of these strains are capable of complete denitrification and three others are not. However, all six strains contain most of the genes required for the respiration of nitrate to gaseous nitrogen. The nondenitrifying members of the genus lack only the gene for nitrate reduction, the first step in the full denitrification pathway. The data suggest that the environmental role of bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter should be reevaluated.

Kostka, Joel [Florida State University; Green, Stefan [Florida State University; Rishishwar, Lavanya [Georgia Institute of Technology; Prakash, Om [National Centre for Cell Science, Pune, India; Katz, Lee [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; Marino-Ramirez, Leonardo [National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Institutes of Health; Jordan, King [Georgia Institute of Technology; Munk, Christine [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, Natalia [United States Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Watson, David B [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Diversity of Life at the Geothermal Subsurface--Surface Interface: The Yellowstone Example  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Northwest) and in agricultural policies (e.g., loss of the wool incentive program), have had economic (e.g., loss of the National Wool incentive payment clearly hurt the sheep industry in the West; see history and relative sophistication of urban and suburban land use change modeling (see Klosterman, 1994

252

CHRG Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs Programs Work Force Information Systems (WFIS): Acquisition Letter 2009-10, Displaced Worker Medical Benefit Program - Friday, July 10, 2009 Acquisition Letter 2009-10, which provides informaiton and guidance to Department of Energy (DOE) Contracting Officers pertaining to the DOE's Displaced Worker Medical Benefit Program (DWMBP) and similar benefits provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. read more ... Computer Account Registration Form - Tuesday, July 28, 2009 All computer users must complete this form whenever a change in multi-user system access is necessary. read more ... Computer Security Awareness Acknowledgement Form - Tuesday, July 28, 2009 Computer Security Rules of Behavior Office of Legacy Management read more ... Remote Access Procedures for Systems at Grand Junction - Monday, January 23, 2006

253

Program Summaries  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Program Summaries Program Summaries Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Program Summaries Brochures Reports Accomplishments Presentations BES and Congress Science for Energy Flow Seeing Matter Scale of Things Chart Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » News & Resources Program Summaries Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Bes Summaries 2012 thumbnail JPG .jpg file (469KB) Basic Energy Sciences FY 2012 Research Summaries This report provides a collection of research abstracts and highlights for

254

Program Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The culture of the DOE community will be based on standards. Technical standards will formally integrate part of all DOE facility, program and project activities. The DOE will be recognized as a...

255

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sponsor of terrorism' (as defined by the U.S. Department of State). These are currently Iran, Syria, Sudan, & Cuba. What is the acceptance rate for applicants? The program is...

256

SR Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Operations Office Art Programs banner SRS Strategic Plan 2011 - 2015 2010 Draft enterprise SRS Vision DOE-SR Workforce Restructuring Plan Fiscal Year 2013 DOE-SR...

257

Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 11, 2008 ... program (High Amperage and Low Energy) was a successful assets ...... structures, fusion reactors, and heat management systems due to their ...... intensity, which have migrated from process innovation research to enterprise.

258

PROGRAM ABSTRACTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& DEVELOPMENT: & DEVELOPMENT: PROGRAM ABSTRACTS Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Catalyst Layer Bipolar Plate Electrode Backing Layers INTEGRATED SYSTEMS Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells Fuel Cell Stack

259

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Run a Program Run a Program Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Workforce Development Run a Program Energy efficiency upgrade programs provide communities with many benefits. In addition to helping homeowners, businesses, and institutions save money

260

EM Task 13 -- Cone penetrometer for subsurface heavy metals detection. Semi-annual report, April 1--September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Surface and subsurface contamination of soils by heavy metals, including Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Cd has become an area of concern for many industrial and government organizations. Conventional sampling and analysis techniques for soil provide a high degree of sensitivity and selectivity for individual analytes. However, obtaining a representative sampling and analysis from a particular site using conventional techniques is time-consuming and costly. Additionally, conventional methods are difficult to implement in the field for in situ and/or real-time applications. Therefore, there is a need for characterization and monitoring techniques for heavy metals in soils which allow cost-effective, rapid, in situ measurements. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to successfully measure metals content in a variety of matrices including soil. Science and Engineering Associates (SEA) is developing a subsurface cone penetrometer (CPT) probe for heavy metal detection that employs LIBS. The LIBS/CPT unit is to be applied to in situ, real-time sampling and analysis of heavy metals in soil. The overall objectives of this project are to evaluate potential calibration techniques for the LIBS/CPT instrument and to provide a preliminary evaluation of the LIBS instrument calibration using samples obtained from the field.

Grisanti, A.A.; Timpe, R.C.; Foster, H.J.; Eylands, K.E.; Crocker, C.R.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Nontoxic chemical process for in situ permeability enhancement and accelerated decontamination of fine-grain subsurface sediments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The remediation of heterogeneous subsurfaces is extremely time consuming and expensive with current and developing technologies. Although such technologies can adequately remove contaminants in the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, they cannot access the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The slow bleed of contaminants from the fine-grained sediments is the primary reason why subsurface remediation is so time-consuming and expensive. This invention addresses the problem of remediating contaminated fine-grained sediments. It is intended that, in the future, a heterogeneous site be treated by a hybrid process that first remediates the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, to be followed by the process, described in this invention, to treat the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The invention uses cationic flocculants and organic solvents to collapse the swelling negative double layer surrounding water saturated clay particles, causing a flocculated, cracked clay structure. The modification of the clay fabric in fine-grained sediments dramatically increases the hydraulic conductivity of previously very tight clays many orders of magnitude. 8 figs.

Kansa, E.J.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

262

Nontoxic chemical process for in situ permeability enhancement and accelerated decontamination of fine-grain subsurface sediments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The remediation of heterogeneous subsurfaces is extremely time consuming and expensive with current and developing technologies. Although such technologies can adequately remove contaminants in the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, they cannot access the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The slow bleed of contaminants from the fine-grained sediments is the primary reason why subsurface remediation is so time-consuming and expensive. This invention addresses the problem of remediating contaminated fine-grained sediments. It is intended that, in the future, a heterogeneous site be treated by a hybrid process that first remediates the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, to be followed by the process, described in this invention, to treat the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The invention uses cationic flocculents and organic solvents to collapse the swelling negative double layer surrounding water saturated clay particles, causing a flocculated, cracked clay structure. The modification of the clay fabric in fine-grained sediments dramatically increases the hydraulic conductivity of previously very tight clays many orders of magnitude.

Kansa, Edward J. (Livermore, CA); Wijesinghe, Ananda M. (Tracy, CA); Viani, Brian E. (Oakland, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than Fe into the structure of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) has been shown to greatly enhance the magnetic properties of the particles, tailoring them to different commercial uses. However, synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is often carried out at high temperatures with toxic solvents resulting in high environmental and energy costs. Additionally, these ferrite nanoparticles are not intrinsically biocompatible, and to make them suitable for insertion into the human body is a rather intricate task. A relatively unexplored resource for magnetic nanomaterial production is subsurface Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, as these microorganisms are capable of producing large quantities of nanoscale magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) at ambient temperatures. Metal-reducing bacteria live in environments deficient in oxygen and conserve energy for growth through the oxidation of hydrogen or organic electron donors, coupled to the reduction of oxidized metals such as Fe(III)-bearing minerals. This can result in the formation of magnetite via the extracellular reduction of amorphous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides causing the release of soluble Fe(II) and resulting in complete recrystallization of the amorphous mineral into a new phase. Some previous studies have reported altering the composition of biogenic magnetite produced by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria for industrial and environmental applications. However, research into the commercial exploitation of bacteria to form magnetic minerals has focused primarily on magnetotactic bacteria which form magnetosomal magnetite internally using very different pathways to those bacteria forming magnetite outside the cell. Magnetotactic bacteria live at the sediment-water interface and use internal nanomagnets to guide them to their preferred environmental niche using the Earth's magnetic field. Since magnetotactic bacteria generally grow optimally under carefully controlled microaerobic conditions, the culturing processes for these organisms are challenging and result in low yields of nanomagnetite. Despite these limitations, magnetotactic bacteria have bee

Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

264

DOE/EA-1331: Environmental Assessment for Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs In Situ Oil Shale Retort Site (07/31/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 31 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT REMEDIATION OF SUBSURFACE AND GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION AT THE ROCK SPRINGS IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT SITE SWEETWATER COUNTY, WYOMING July 2000 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT REMEDIATION OF SUBSURFACE AND GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION AT THE ROCK SPRINGS IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT SITE SWEETWATER COUNTY, WYOMING July 2000 Prepared by: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory NEPA COMPLIANCE SUMMARY SHEET LEAD AGENCY U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE Environmental Assessment for Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs In Situ Oil Shale Retort Test Site; Sweetwater County Wyoming. CONTACT Additional copies or information concerning the Environmental Assessment (EA) can

265

Machinist Pipeline/Apprentice Program Program Description  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Machinist PipelineApprentice Program Program Description The Machinist Pipeline Program was created by the Prototype Fabrication Division to fill a critical need for skilled...

266

NREL: Education Programs - Teacher Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Teacher Programs Teacher Programs Photo of a man and woman working together in a laboratory. They are both wearing safety glasses as they look at a small white box the man is holding. NREL promotes excellence in teaching and learning and contributes to improving critical elements of the science, mathematics, and technology education system. Teachers are offered research and development opportunities to enhance their content knowledge, instructional strategies, and leadership abilities. Visiting Faculty Program (VFP) Visiting Faculty Program (VFP), formerly called Faculty and Student Teams (FaST), seeks to increase the research competitiveness of faculty members and their students at institutions historically underrepresented in the research community in order to expand the workforce vital to the Department

267

SCIENCE Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCIENCE Program SCIENCE Program early science program Early at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility CONTACT  Argonne Leadership Computing Facility | www.alcf.anl.gov | (877) 737-8615 Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model PI: Venkatramani Balaji Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Award: 150 Million Hours Materials Design and Discovery: Catalysis and Energy Storage PI: Larry Curtiss Argonne National Laboratory Award: 50 Million Hours Direct Numerical Simulation of Autoignition in a Jet in a Cross-Flow PI: Christos Frouzakis Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Award: 150 Million Hours High-Accuracy Predictions of the Bulk Properties of Water PI: Mark Gordon Iowa State University Award: 150 Million Hours Cosmic Structure Probes

268

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program The program of the school focuses on the following areas: The fundamentals of the interaction of X-rays and neutrons with matter X-ray and neutron production and experimental instrumentation Theory and practical application of various X-ray and neutron experimental techniques Hands on experience gained through experiments at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Lectures are given by prominent scientists drawn from universities, several national laboratories, and industry. Subjects for lectures include: Interactions of X-rays and Neutrons with Matter Neutron Generation and Detection Neutron Instrumentation X-ray Generation and Detection X-ray Instrumentation Single-Crystal and Surface Diffraction

269

Federal Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Local government agencies are often the first places where homeowners seek financial assistance for mortgage relief. These requests come at a time when municipalities are facing increasing budgetary demands and diminishing revenues. With unemployment at an all time high and worsening economic conditions, the foreclosure crisis is not likely to abate in the near future. Due to the deep and spreading nationwide foreclosure crisis, Congress has enacted legislation that authorizes agencies in the federal government and national organizations to develop or expand programs to intervene and to assist borrowers by revising and guaranteeing loan agreements. Additionally, large financial institutions and banks are absorbing assets of failed entities and creating programs for homeowners to work out new loan terms. This document provides summaries of the major program offerings to borrowers by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development ( HUD), Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, NeighborWorks, large banks, and financial institutions that have clients nation-wide.

Hope For Homeowners Program

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Incentive Energy Incentive Programs to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on AddThis.com... Energy Savings Performance Contracts ENABLE Utility Energy Service Contracts On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements Energy Incentive Programs Recovery Act Energy Incentive Programs Most states offer energy incentive programs to help offset energy costs.

271

Program Description  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Description Program Description Discover E (Engineering) is an evening of interesting, interactive and fun engineering, science, math, and technology demonstrations for K-12 students and their parents or guardians. It is held in conjunction with National Engineers Week which is celebrated at the time of George Washington's birthday, our nation's first President, who was a military engineer and land surveyor. Activities include 30-50 interactive demonstrations of basic engineering, science, technology and math principles that may include robots, reverse engineering, casting, crystal structures, forensic science, the effects of liquid nitrogen, slide rule, sound waves, electrostatics, mechanics, materials properties and materials

272

Sequestration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL's NETL's Carbon Capture and Sequestration Program Advances of Multi-pollutant and CO 2 Control Technologies Chicago, IL April 30, 2007 Timothy Fout Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory T. Fout, Apr. 2007 Outline for Presentation * NETL Overview * The Issue * The Solutions * What is Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) * DOE's Sequestration Program Structure * CO 2 Capture Research Projects T. Fout, Apr. 2007 National Energy Technology Laboratory * Only DOE national lab dedicated to fossil energy - Fossil fuels provide 85% of U.S. energy supply * One lab, five locations, one management structure * 1,100 Federal and support-contractor employees * Research spans fundamental science to technology demonstrations West Virginia

273

RANGE AND DISTRIBUTION OF TECHNETIUM KD VALUES IN THE SRS SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT  

SciTech Connect

Performance assessments (PAs) are risk calculations used to estimate the amount of low-level radioactive waste that can be disposed at DOE sites. Distribution coefficients (K{sub d} values) are input parameters used in PA calculations to provide a measure of radionuclide sorption to sediment; the greater the K{sub d} value, the greater the sorption and the slower the estimated movement of the radionuclide through sediment. Understanding and quantifying K{sub d} value variability is important for estimating the uncertainty of PA calculations. Without this information, it is necessary to make overly conservative estimates about the possible limits of K{sub d} values, which in turn may increase disposal costs. Finally, technetium is commonly found to be amongst the radionuclides posing potential risk at waste disposal locations because it is believed to be highly mobile in its anionic form (pertechnetate, TcO{sub 4}{sup -}), it exists in relatively high concentrations in SRS waste, and it has a long half-life (213,000 years). The objectives of this laboratory study were to determine under SRS environmental conditions: (1) whether and to what extent TcO{sub 4}{sup -} sorbs to sediments, (2) the range of Tc K{sub d} values, (3) the distribution (normal or log-normal) of Tc K{sub d} values, and (4) how strongly Tc sorbs to SRS sediments through desorption experiments. Objective 3, to identify the Tc K{sub d} distribution is important because it provides a statistical description that influences stochastic modeling of estimated risk. The approach taken was to collect 26 sediments from a non-radioactive containing sediment core collected from E-Area, measure Tc K{sub d} values and then perform statistical analysis to describe the measured Tc K{sub d} values. The mean K{sub d} value was 3.4 {+-} 0.5 mL/g and ranged from -2.9 to 11.2 mL/g. The data did not have a Normal distribution (as defined by the Shapiro-Wilk's Statistic) and had a 95-percentile range of 2.4 to 4.4 mL/g. The E-Area subsurface is subdivided into three hydrostratigraphic layers: Upper Vadose Zone (11 to 30 ft depth), Lower Vadose Zone (30 to 51 ft depth), and aquifer (51 to 95 ft depth). The Upper Vadose Zone generally contains more clay than the Lower Vadose Zone, and the Aquifer tends to be made up of mostly sand layers with clay strata. The mean K{sub d} values of each of these zones did not differ significantly and the K{sub d} values from each zone were not from the Normal distribution. The ranges of values were greatest in the Upper Vadose Zone and least in the Lower Vadose Zone. Previous Best Estimate Tc K{sub d} values for Sandy Sediment and Clayey Sediment were 0.1 and 0.2 mL/g, respectively (Kaplan 2007a). A more thorough review indicates that the Best Estimates for Sandy Sediment is 0.1 mL/g and for Clayey Sediment is 0.8 mL/g (Kaplan 2007b). This current dataset greatly increases the number of Tc K{sub d} values measured with SRS sediments, but perhaps more importantly, provides a better estimate for E-Area sediments, and provides a measure of Tc K{sub d} distributions. Based on this dataset, the best overall Tc K{sub d} value for E-Area is the mean, 3.4 mL/g, with a log-normal distribution between the 95 percentile values of 2.4 to 4.4 mL/g. This document version differs from the earlier version, SRNS-STI-2008-00286, in that it includes some editorial corrections. This version does not contain any technical changes or changes to the conclusions presented in the earlier version.

Kaplan, D

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

274

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada Controlled Copy No.: Revision No.: 3 March 2006 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1025--Rev. 3 Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062

275

Subsurface and seismic investigation of the geopressured-geothermal potential of the Abbeville area of south Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The structure investigated is a basin roughly bounded by the Abbeville Dome on the west, the Erath Dome on the southeast and the Grosse Isle Dome on the northeast and whose center is located at approximately Section 31 T14S R4E. The geopressured sands investigated are below approximately 12,800 feet (3901 M) in the center of the basin and consist of two groups of rather thin, discontinuous, marly sands. These two groups, rather arbitrarily defined, are termed the upper and lower geopressured sands and the following map types and analyses have been derived from subsurface data of each: structure, temperature, pressure, salinity and net sand maps; and porosity, permeability and methane content analyses.

Duhon, M.P.; Dungan, J.R.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Final Report Coupling in silico microbial models with reactive transport models to predict the fate of contaminants in the subsurface.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project successfully accomplished its goal of coupling genome-scale metabolic models with hydrological and geochemical models to predict the activity of subsurface microorganisms during uranium bioremediation. Furthermore, it was demonstrated how this modeling approach can be used to develop new strategies to optimize bioremediation. The approach of coupling genome-scale metabolic models with reactive transport modeling is now well enough established that it has been adopted by other DOE investigators studying uranium bioremediation. Furthermore, the basic principles developed during our studies will be applicable to much broader investigations of microbial activities, not only for other types of bioremediation, but microbial metabolism in diversity of environments. This approach has the potential to make an important contribution to predicting the impact of environmental perturbations on the cycling of carbon and other biogeochemical cycles.

Lovley, Derek R.

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

NIST Performance Management Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Performance Management Program. Performance ... appraisal. APMS and FWS Performance Management Programs: ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

278

Presidential Management Fellows Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presidential Management Fellows Program. Summary: About the Program: The Presidential Management Fellows (PMF ...

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 15, PAGES 2245-2248, AUGUST 1, 2000 Sub-surface nuclear tests monitoring through the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) which should detect nuclear tests down to 1 kiloton (kt) TNT equivalent anywhere on the planet. The IMS), hydroacoustic and infrasound waves will help check for underground, under-water and atmospheric nuclear testsGEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 15, PAGES 2245-2248, AUGUST 1, 2000 Sub-surface nuclear

Hourdin, Chez Frédéric

280

Academic Program: Undergraduate Studies General Education Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the skills necessary to do work at the university level. General #12;Academic Program: Undergraduate StudiesAcademic Program: Undergraduate Studies General Education Program Page 1 of 12 Governance & Policies Effective: June 2008 Academic Program: Undergraduate Studies GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM Approved

Hardy, Christopher R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Federal Energy Management Program: About the Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Program Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Federal Energy Management Program: About the Program to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy...

282

Facility Representative Program: Program Directives and Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative of the Year Award FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) Program Directives and Guidance FR Program Standard, DOE STD 1063-2011,...

283

Education Programs | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graduate Opportunities Education and Outreach Programs For Academia Home | Connect with ORNL | For Academia | Education and Outreach Programs SHARE Education Programs Visiting...

284

STEM Education Program Inventory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Issue for STEM Education Program Inventory Title of Program* Requestor Contact Information First Name* Last Name* Phone Number* E-mail* Fax Number Institution Name Program...

285

Fermilab Education - Graduate Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PhD Program Doctoral Fellowships The DOE Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (DOE CSGF) program FermilabURA Thesis Awards Program The National GEM Consortium Fermilab...

286

Subsurface Completion Report for Amchitka Underground Nuclear Test Sites: Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin, Rev. No.: 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island, Alaska, in 1965, 1969, and 1971. The effects of the Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin tests on the environment were extensively investigated during and following the detonations, and the area continues to be monitored today. This report is intended to document the basis for the Amchitka Underground Nuclear Test Sites: Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin (hereafter referred to as ''Amchitka Site'') subsurface completion recommendation of No Further Remedial Action Planned with Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance, and define the long-term surveillance and maintenance strategy for the subsurface. A number of factors were considered in evaluating and selecting this recommendation for the Amchitka Site. Historical studies and monitoring data, ongoing monitoring data, the results of groundwater modeling, and the results of an independent stakeholder-guided scientific investigation were also considered in deciding the completion action. Water sampling during and following the testing showed no indication that radionuclides were released to the near surface, or marine environment with the exception of tritium, krypton-85, and iodine-131 found in the immediate vicinity of Long Shot surface ground zero. One year after Long Shot, only tritium was detectable (Merritt and Fuller, 1977). These tritium levels, which were routinely monitored and have continued to decline since the test, are above background levels but well below the current safe drinking water standard. There are currently no feasible means to contain or remove radionuclides in or around the test cavities beneath the sites. Surface remediation was conducted in 2001. Eleven drilling mud pits associated with the Long Shot, Milrow and Cannikin sites were remediated. Ten pits were remediated by stabilizing the contaminants and constructing an impermeable cap over each pit. One pit was remediated by removing all of the contaminated mud for consolidation in another pit. In addition to the mud pits, the hot mix plant was also remediated. Ongoing monitoring data does not indicate that radionuclides are currently seeping into the marine environment. Additionally, the groundwater modeling results indicate no seepage is expected for tens to thousands of years. If seepage does occur in the future, however, the rich, diverse ecosystems around the island could be at risk, as well as people eating foods from the area. An independent science study was conducted by the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) in accordance with the Amchitka Independent Science Plan (2003). The study report was published on August 1, 2005. The CRESP study states ''our geophysical and biological analyses did not find evidence of risk from radionuclides from the consumption of marine foods, nor indication of any current radionuclide contaminated migration into the marine environment from the Amchitka test shots''. The study also found evidence supporting the groundwater modeling conclusions of very slow contaminant transport (CRESP, 2005). While no further action is recommended for the subsurface of the Amchitka Site, long-term stewardship of Amchitka Island will be instituted and will continue into the future. This will include institutional controls management and enforcement, post-completion monitoring, performance of five-year reviews, public participation, and records management. Long-term stewardship will be the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. The Department of Energy is recommending completion of the investigation phase of the Amchitka Sites. The recommended remedy for the Amchitka Site is No Further Action with Long-Term Monitoring and Surveillance. The future long-term stewardship actions will be governed by a Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan. This Plan is currently being developed with input from the State, landowner, and other interested or affected stakeholders.

Echelard, Tim

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

In Situ Remediation Integrated Program, Evaluation and assessment of containment technology  

SciTech Connect

The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISRIP) was established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to advance the state-of-the art of innovative in situ remediation technologies to the point of demonstration and to broaden the applicability of these technologies to the widely varying site remediation requirements throughout the DOE complex. This program complements similar ongoing integrated demonstration programs being conducted at several DOE sites. The ISRIP has been conducting baseline assessments on in situ technologies to support program planning. Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted an assessment and evaluation of subsurface containment barrier technology in support of ISRIP`s Containment Technology Subprogram. This report summarizes the results of that activity and provides a recommendation for priortizing areas in which additional research and development is needed to advance the technology to the point of demonstration in support of DOE`s site restoration activities.

Gerber, M.A.; Fayer, M.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Federal Energy Management Program: Program Areas  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

program areas of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) focus on specific energy management actions to help Federal agencies deploy the available technologies appropriate...

289

Federal Energy Management Program: About the Program  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Skip to Content U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Federal Energy Management Program Search...

290

The DOE Vadose Zone Science and Technology Roadmap: A National Program to Address Characeterization, Monitoring and Simulation of Subsurface Contaminant Fate and Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vadose zone comprises the region lying between the earths surface and the top of the regional seasonal aquifer. Until recently contamination in the vadose zone was believed to remain relatively immobile. Thus, little attention was paid to understanding the nature of the vadose zone or the potential pathways for contaminants to migrate through it to the water table or other accessible environments. However, recent discoveries of contaminants migrating considerable distances through the vadose zone at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites have changed many assumptions both about the nature and function of the vadose zone and the importance we place on understanding this region. As a result of several vadose zone surprises, DOE Environmental Management (EM) tasked the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to lead the development of a vadose zone science and technology roadmap. The roadmap is focused on identifying research spanning the next 25 years necessary to be able to better predict the fate and transport of contaminants in the vadose zone. This in turn will provide the basis for reducing scientific uncertainty in environmental remediation and, especially, vadose zone related long-term stewardship decisions across the DOE complex. Vadose zone issues are now recognized as a national problem affecting other federal agencies as well as state and municipal sites with similar problems. Over the next few decades, dramatic and fundamental advances in computing, communication, electronics and micro-engineered systems will transform our understanding of many aspects of the scientific and technical challenges we face today. The roadmap will serve to develop a common perspective on possible future science and technology needs in an effort to help make better R&D investment decisions.

Kowall, Stephen Jacob

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Enhanced Geothermal Systems Research and Development: Models of Subsurface Chemical Processes Affecting Fluid Flow  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With funding from past grants from the DOE geothermal program and other agencies, we successfully developed advanced equation of state (EOS) and simulation technologies that accurately describe the chemistry of geothermal reservoirs and energy production processes via their free energies for wide XTP ranges. Using the specific interaction equations of Pitzer, we showed that our TEQUIL chemical models can correctly simulate behavior (e.g., mineral scaling and saturation ratios, gas break out, brine mixing effects, down hole temperatures and fluid chemical composition, spent brine incompatibilities) within the compositional range (Na-K-Ca-Cl-SO4-CO3-H2O-SiO2-CO2(g)) and temperature range (T < 350C) associated with many current geothermal energy production sites that produce brines with temperatures below the critical point of water. The goal of research carried out under DOE grant DE-FG36-04GO14300 (10/1/2004-12/31/2007) was to expand the compositional range of our Pitzer-based TEQUIL fluid/rock interaction models to include the important aluminum and silica interactions (T < 350C). Aluminum is the third most abundant element in the earths crust; and, as a constituent of aluminosilicate minerals, it is found in two thirds of the minerals in the earths crust. The ability to accurately characterize effects of temperature, fluid mixing and interactions between major rock-forming minerals and hydrothermal and/or injected fluids is critical to predict important chemical behaviors affecting fluid flow, such as mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions. We successfully achieved the project goal and objectives by demonstrating the ability of our modeling technology to correctly predict the complex pH dependent solution chemistry of the Al3+ cation and its hydrolysis species: Al(OH)2+, Al(OH)2+, Al(OH)30, and Al(OH)4- as well as the solubility of common aluminum hydroxide and aluminosilicate minerals in aqueous brines containing components (Na, K, Cl) commonly dominating hydrothermal fluids. In the sodium chloride system, where experimental data for model parameterization are most plentiful, the model extends to 300C. Determining the stability fields of aluminum species that control the solubility of aluminum-containing minerals as a function of temperature and composition has been a major objective of research in hydrothermal chemistry.

Moller, Nancy; Weare J. H.

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

292

Program 050  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental and Water Environmental and Water Resources MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH PROGRAM Background Mercury exists in trace amounts in fossil fuels (e.g., natural gas, coal), vegetation, crustal material, and waste products. Through combustion or natural processes, mercury vapor can be released to the atmosphere, where it can drift for a year or more, spreading with air currents over vast regions of the globe. Current estimates approximate that 5000 tons of mercury is released annually into the atmosphere from anthropogenic (man-made) and natural sources combined. Anthropogenic sources in the United States account for about 3 percent of the total annual global mercury releases, with U.S. power plants contributing about 1 percent of the world total. Mercury emissions have fallen in

293

Recent Graduate Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... have recently graduated from qualifying educational institutions or programs. ... 40 hours of formal, interactive training each year of the program. ...

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

294

Postdoctoral Fellowship Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne National Laboratory Educational Programs Search Argonne ... Search Argonne Home > Educational Programs > Welcome Type of Appointments Postdoctoral Newsletters Postdoctoral...

295

Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems  

SciTech Connect

Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

Ling, Hao [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Hamilton, Mark F. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Bhalla, Rajan [Science Applications International Corporation] [Science Applications International Corporation; Brown, Walter E. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Hay, Todd A. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Whitelonis, Nicholas J. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Yang, Shang-Te [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Naqvi, Aale R. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

High-resolution subsurface imaging and neural network recognition: Non-intrusive buried substance location. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A high-frequency, high-resolution electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) elimination of electric-field interference at high frequencies, (5) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (6) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (7) visualization of complex structures during the survey. Four major experiments were conducted with the system: (1) Data were collected for several targets in our physical modeling facility. (2) The authors tested the system over targets buried in soil. (3) The authors conducted an extensive survey at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cold Test Pit (CTP). The location of the buried waste, category of waste, and thickness of the clay cap were successfully mapped. (4) The authors ran surveys over the acid pit at INEL. This was an operational survey over a hot site. The interpreted low-resistivity region correlated closely with the known extent of the acid pit.

Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

1997-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

297

Distribution of microbial biomass and the potential for anaerobic respiration in Hanford Site 300 Area subsurface sediment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface sediments were recovered from a 52 m deep borehole cored in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State to assess the potential for biogeochemical transformation of radionuclide contaminants. Microbial analyses were made on 17 sediment samples traversing multiple geological units: the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation (9-17.4 m), the oxic fine-grained upper Ringold Formation (17.7-18.1 m), and the reduced Ringold Formation (18.3-52m). Microbial biomass (measured as phospholipid) ranged from 7-974 pmols per g in discrete samples, with the highest numbers found in the Hanford formation. On average, strata below 17.4 m had 13-fold less biomass than those from shallower strata. The nosZ gene encoding nitrous oxide reductase had an abundance of 5-17% relative to total 16S rRNA genes below 18.3 m and Hanford-Ringold formation contact and the Ringold oxic-anoxic interface. Within this zone, copies of the dsrA gene and Geobacteraceae had the highest relative abundance. The majority of dsrA genes detected near the interface were related to Desulfotomaculum sp.. These analyses indicate that the region just below the contact between the Hanford and Ringold formations is a zone of active biogeochemical redox cycling.

Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Peacock, Aaron D.; McKinley, James P.; Resch, Charles T.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

DISTRIBUTION AND RANGE OF RADIONUCLIDE SORPTIOIN COEFFICIENTS IN A SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SUBSURFACE: STOCHASTIC MODELING CONSIDERATIONS - 10259  

SciTech Connect

The uncertainty associated with the sorption coefficient, or K{sub d} value, is one of the key uncertainties in estimating risk associated with burying low-level nuclear waste in the subsurface. The objective of this study was to measure >648 K{sub d} values and provide a measure of the range and distribution (normal or log-normal) of radionuclide K{sub d} values appropriate for the E-Area disposal site, within the Savannah River Site, near Aiken South Carolina. The 95% confidence level for the mean K{sub d} was twice the mean in the Aquifer Zone (18-30.5 m depth), equal to the mean for the Upper Vadose Zone (3.3-10 m depth), and half the mean for the Lower Vadose Zone (3.3-18 m depth). The distribution of K{sub d} values was log normal in the Upper Vadose Zone and Aquifer Zone, and normal in the Lower Vadose Zone. To our knowledge, this is the first report of natural radionuclide K{sub d} variability in the literature. Using ranges and distribution coefficients that are specific to the hydrostratigraphic unit improved model accuracy and reduced model uncertainty. Unfortunately, extension of these conclusions to other sites is likely not appropriate given that each site has its own sources of hydrogeological variability. However, this study provides one of the first examples of the development stochastic ranges and distributions of K{sub d} values for a hydrological unit for stochastic modeling.

Kaplan, D.

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

299

Subsurface flow and transport of organic chemicals: an assessment of current modeling capability and priority directions for future research (1987-1995)  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical and computer modeling capability for assessing the subsurface movement and fate of organic contaminants in groundwater was examined. Hence, this study is particularly concerned with energy-related, organic compounds that could enter a subsurface environment and move as components of a liquid phase separate from groundwater. The migration of organic chemicals that exist in an aqueous dissolved state is certainly a part of this more general scenario. However, modeling of the transport of chemicals in aqueous solution has already been the subject of several reviews. Hence, this study emphasizes the multiphase scenario. This study was initiated to focus on the important physicochemical processes that control the behavior of organic substances in groundwater systems, to evaluate the theory describing these processes, and to search for and evaluate computer codes that implement models that correctly conceptualize the problem situation. This study is not a code inventory, and no effort was made to identify every available code capable of representing a particular process.

Streile, G.P.; Simmons, C.S.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs of Jolliet (GC 184), Genesis (GC 160/161) and Petronius (VK 786) fields is estimated to include 17%-28%, 31%-51%, 31%-49% bacterial methane, respectively. Geochemical assessment of the reservoir gas in the fields show that the gas may be the product of thermal cracking of Upper Jurassic crude oil before final migration to the reservoirs. The gas from three different fields is of similar thermal maturity levels. In contrast to oil in reservoirs in the fields, which shows biodegradation effects, the C1-C5 reservoir gas is unaltered by biodegradation. Late gas migration may have occurred at or near present burial depth and flushed the reservoir system of previously biodegraded hydrocarbon gas to include any previous bacterial methane. Molecular and isotopic properties of reservoir gas and oil suggest that bacterial methane mixed with thermogenic hydrocarbon gas before entering the reservoirs. Thus the source of the bacterial methane is logically deeper than the present depth (>~4 km) and temperatures of the reservoirs. High sedimentation rate and low geothermal gradient may offer conditions favorable for generation and preservation of bacterial methane in deep subsurface petroleum system of the Gulf slope. Bacterial methane dispersed across the large drainage areas of the deep subsurface petroleum system may have been swept by migrating fluids at >4 km, and then charged both vents (GC 185, GC 233 and GC 286) at the seafloor and reservoirs in the deep subsurface. The volume of bacterial methane from geologically significant depth in rapidly subsiding basins may be underestimated.

Ozgul, Ercin

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. Strain 300A, Isolated from Hanford 300A Subsurface Sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A facultative iron-reducing (Fe(III)-reducing) Paenibacillus sp. strain was isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms that was capable of reducing soluble Fe(III) complexes (Fe(III)-NTA and Fe(III)-citrate) but unable to reduce poorly crystalline ferrihydrite (Fh). However, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of reducing Fh in the presence of low concentrations (2 M) of either of electron transfer mediators (ETMs) flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Maximum initial Fh reduction rates were observed at catalytic concentrations (Hanford 300A subsurface sediments. In the absence of ETMs, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of immobilizing U(VI) through both reduction and adsorption. The relative contributions of adsorption and microbial reduction to U(VI) removal from the aqueous phase were ~7:3 in PIPES and ~1:4 in bicarbonate buffer. Our study demonstrated that Paenibacillus sp. 300A catalyzes Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization and that these reactions benefit from externally added or naturally existing ETMs in 300A subsurface sediments.

Ahmed, B.; Cao, B.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Ica, Tuba; Dohnalkova, Alice; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Paksoy, Akin; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

302

Wilcox sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy. Report of Investigations No. 117  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regional studies of the lower Eocene Wilcox Group in Texas were conducted to assess the potential for producing heat energy and solution methane from geopressured fluids in the deep-subsurface growth-faulted zone. However, in addition to assembling the necessary data for the geopressured geothermal project, this study has provided regional information of significance to exploration for other resources such as lignite, uranium, oil, and gas. Because the focus of this study was on the geopressured section, emphasis was placed on correlating and mapping those sandstones and shales occurring deeper than about 10,000 ft. The Wilcox and Midway Groups comprise the oldest thick sandstone/shale sequence of the Tertiary of the Gulf Coast. The Wilcox crops out in a band 10 to 20 mi wide located 100 to 200 mi inland from the present-day coastline. The Wilcox sandstones and shales in the outcrop and updip shallow subsurface were deposited primarily in fluvial environments; downdip in the deep subsurface, on the other hand, the Wilcox sediments were deposited in large deltaic systems, some of which were reworked into barrier-bar and strandplain systems. Growth faults developed within the deltaic systems, where they prograded basinward beyond the older, stable Lower Cretaceous shelf margin onto the less stable basinal muds. Continued displacement along these faults during burial resulted in: (1) entrapment of pore fluids within isolated sandstone and shale sequences, and (2) buildup of pore pressure greater than hydrostatic pressure and development of geopressure.

Debout, D.G.; Weise, B.R.; Gregory, A.R.; Edwards, M.B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Intergovernmental Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intergovernmental Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs The Office of Environmental Management supports, by means of grants and cooperative agreements, a number of institutionalized activities and relationships with various national intergovernmental organizations. These organizations include the Energy Communities Alliance, the Environmental Council of States, the National Association of Attorneys General, the National Governors Association, and the National Conference of

304

Summer Internship Programs | Office of Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BNL Summer Internship Programs BNL Summer Internship Programs Please note: All DOE programs have strict deadlines. Please contact the Office of Educational Programs for this information. Mentor Orientation Please review the following documents that are part of the Mentor Orientation: Mentor Manual New Appointment Checklist SULI Syllabus CCI Syllabus VFP Syllabus DOE Internship Programs DOE Program Forms & Information DOE summer programs include Community College Institute (CCI), Science Undergraduate Summer Internship (SULI) and Visiting Faculty Program (VFP). DOE Summer Internship Programs Important Dates January 31st - 1st round of student applications available for viewing February 23rd - 2nd round of student applications available for viewing March 12th - Last day for accepting DOE student request

305

Corrective Action Decision Document/ Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the subsurface at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443, CNTA - Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). CAU 443 is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, north of U.S. Highway 6, about 48 kilometers north of Warm Springs, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the corrective action plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for the UC-1 Cavity (Corrective Action Site 58-57-001) at CAU 443, as provided in the FFACO. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. A Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) was performed in several stages from 1999 to 2003, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites (Corrective Action Unit No. 443)'' (DOE/NV, 1999). Groundwater modeling was the primary activity of the CAI. Three phases of modeling were conducted for the Faultless underground nuclear test. The first involved the gathering and interpretation of geologic and hydrogeologic data into a three-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow, and use of the output of the flow model for a transport model of radionuclide release and migration behavior (Pohlmann et al., 2000). The second modeling phase (known as a Data Decision Analysis [DDA]) occurred after the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection reviewed the first model and was designed to respond to concerns regarding model uncertainty (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). The third modeling phase updated the original flow and transport model to incorporate the uncertainty identified in the DDA, and focused the model domain on the region of interest to the transport predictions. This third phase culminated in the calculation of contaminant boundaries for the site (Pohll et al., 2003).

Susan Evans

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Office of Educational Programs | Teacher Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specifically Geared for Teachers Specifically Geared for Teachers Displaying all programs and contests suitable for teachers and faculty. [ Update Search Criteria ] (OEP) InSynC (OEP) Professional Development Workshops for Teachers (OEP) The G.R.E.En. Institute (OSSP) GREEN Institute's Open Space Stewardship Program Other Educational Programs Displaying all programs and contests. [ Narrow Search ] (INCREASE) Historically Black Colleges and Universities / National Synchrotron Light Source Consortium (Internship - CCI) Community College Internship (Internship - SULI) Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (Internship - VFP) Visiting Faculty Program (NCSS) Nuclear Chemistry Summer School (NNSS) Nuclear Nonproliferation Safeguards and Security Summer Course (OEP) College Mini-Semester Program

307

Office of Educational Programs | Student Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Contests for Students and Contests for Students Displaying all programs and contests. [ Narrow Search ] (INCREASE) Historically Black Colleges and Universities / National Synchrotron Light Source Consortium (Internship - CCI) Community College Internship (Internship - SULI) Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (Internship - VFP) Visiting Faculty Program (NCSS) Nuclear Chemistry Summer School (NNSS) Nuclear Nonproliferation Safeguards and Security Summer Course (OEP) College Mini-Semester Program (OEP) InSynC (OEP) New York State Collegiate Science & Technology Entry Program Mini-Course (CSTEP) (OEP) Professional Development Workshops for Teachers (OEP) The G.R.E.En. Institute (OSSP) GREEN Institute's Open Space Stewardship Program (Postdoc) AGEP-T FRAME (Research - HSRP) High School Research Program

308

Subsurface monitoring of reservoir pressure, temperature, relative humidity, and water content at the CAES Field Experiment, Pittsfield, Illinois: system design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This subsurface-instrumentation design has been developed for the first Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) field experiment to be performed in porous media. Energy storage will be accomplished by alternating the injection and withdrawal of compressed air in a confined sandstone aquifer near Pittsfield, Illinois. The overall experiment objective is to characterize the reservoir's geochemical and thermohydraulic response to imposed CAES conditions. Specific experiment objectives require monitoring: air-bubble development; thermal development; cyclic pressure response; reservoir dehydration; and water coning. Supporting these objectives, four parameters will be continuously monitored at depth in the reservoir. They are: temperature; pressure; pore-air relative humidity; and pore-water content. Reservoir temperatures and pressures will range to maximum values approaching 200/sup 0/C and 300 psi, respectively. Both pore-air relative humidity and pore-water content will range from approx. 0 to 100%. This report discusses: instrumentation design; sensor and sensor system calibration; field installation and testing; and instrument-system operation. No comprehensive off-the-shelf instrument package exists to adequately monitor CAES reservoir parameters at depth. The best available sensors were selected and adapted for use under expected ranges of reservoir conditions. The instrumentation design criteria required: suitable sensor accuracy; continuous monitoring capability; redundancy; maximum sensor integrity; contingency planning; and minimum cost-information ratio. Three wells will be instrumented: the injection/withdrawal (I/W) well and the two instrument wells. Sensors will be deployed by wireline suspension in both open and backfilled (with sand) wellbores. The sensors deployed in the I/W well will be retrievable; the instrument-well sensors will not.

Hostetler, D.D.; Childs, S.W.; Phillips, S.J.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

GEOLOGY OF THE WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA, MONTANA, AND SOUTH DAKOTA, WITH REFERENCE TO SUBSURFACE DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The southern Williston basin, which underlies about 110,000 square miles in Nonth Dakota, South Dakota, and eastern Montana, is part of a large structural and sedimentary basin. The sedimentary sequence that fills the basin has a maximum thickness of about 16,700 feet and rests on Precambrian metamorphic rocks at depths of 500to 13,900 feet below sea level. It contains rocks of every geologic system from Cambrian to Quaternary. Rocks of the Williston basin are gently folded and regional dips are 1 deg or less from the margins to the basin center. The most important mineral resource of the area is oil, which is produced predominantly from the Paleozoic carbonate sequence and largely on three of the major anticlinal folds, and lignite, which is present near the surface in Paleocene rocks. The subsurface disposal of radioactive wastes at some places in the Williston basis appears to be geographically and geologically feasible. Many sites, at which large quantities of wastes might be injected with minimal danger of contamination of fresh-water aquifers with oil-producing strata, are available. The strata and types of reservoirs that deserve primary consideration for waste disposal are the Winnipeg Formation of Middle Ordovician age as a deep salaquifer, the Permian to Jurassic salt beds as moderately deep units in which solution cavities might be created for storage, the thick Upper Cretaceous shale beds as shallow hydraulically fractured shale reservoirs, and the Newcastie Sandstone of Early Cretaceous age as a shallow shale-enclosed sandstone reservoir. (auth)

Sandberg, C.A.

1962-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Undergraduate Student Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Undergraduate Program Undergraduate Program Undergraduate Student Program The Undergraduate Student (UGS) program is a year-round educational program that provides students with relevant research experience while they are pursuing an undergraduate degree. Contact Program Manager Scott Robbins Student Programs (505) 663-5621 Email Program Coordinator Brenda Montoya Student Programs (505) 663-5116 Email Deadline for continuing and returning students: you are required to submit updated transcripts to the program office by 2/28 each year. Get relevant experience while pursuing undergraduate degree The Undergraduate Student (UGS) Program offers summer, part-time, and full-time appointments for undergraduate students. The program is a year-round educational program that provides students with

311

Notices Heritage Program Volunteer Program; (b)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

67 Federal Register 67 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 60 / Thursday, March 28, 2013 / Notices Heritage Program Volunteer Program; (b) the USAF Heritage Program the means with which to select respondents pursuant to the USAF Heritage Program Volunteer Program. The primary use of the information collection includes the evaluation and placement of respondents within the USAF Heritage Program Volunteer Program. Affected Public: Business or other for profit; Not-for-profit Institutions. Annual Burden Hours: 49.5. Number of Respondents: 198. Responses per Respondent: 1. Average Burden per Response: 15 minutes. Frequency: On occasion. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Summary of Information Collection Respondents are individuals expressing an interest in participating in the USAF Heritage Program Volunteer

312

Program Management for Large Scale Engineering Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this whitepaper is to summarize the LAI research that applies to program management. The context of most of the research discussed in this whitepaper are large-scale engineering programs, particularly in the ...

Oehmen, Josef

313

Energy Technology Programs: program summaries for 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy Technology Programs in the BNL Department of Energy and Environment cover a broad range of activities, namely: electrochemical research, chemical energy storage, chemical heat pumps, solar technology, fossil technology, catalytic systems development, space-conditioning technology, and technical support/program management. Summaries of the individual tasks associated with these activities along with publications, significant accomplishments, and program funding levels are presented.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Invariant based programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Program verification is usually done by adding specifications and invariants to the program and then proving that the verification conditions are all true. This makes program verification an alternative to or a complement to testing. We study here an ...

Ralph-Johan Back

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Y-12 Apprentice Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apprentice Program Over the years Y-12 has produced numerous training programs. Many of them have been developed at Y-12 to meet special needs. The training programs have ranged...

316

Verifying Interactive Web Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web programs are important, increasingly representing the primary public interfaces of commercial organizations. Unfortunately, Web programs also exhibit numerous flaws. In addition to the usual correctness problems faced by software, Web programs must ...

Daniel R. Licata; Shriram Krishnamurthi

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Subsurface Site Characterization  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

and limestone. The Green River Formation is the primary formation of interest for oil shale development in the region. Quaternary-age deposits of alluvium, mudflows, talus...

318

Subsurface drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A drill string comprises a first drill string member having a male end; and a second drill string member having a female end configured to be joined to the male end of the first drill string member, the male end having a threaded portion including generally square threads, the male end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the threaded portion, and the male end further having a bearing surface, the female end having a female threaded portion having corresponding female threads, the female end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the female threaded portion, and the female end having a bearing surface. Installation methods, including methods of installing instrumented probes are also provided.

Casper, William L. (Rigby, ID); Clark, Don T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grover, Blair K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mathewson, Rodney O. (Idaho Falls, ID); Seymour, Craig A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

TOURGHREACT: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal MultiphaseReactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated GeologicMedia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The program was written in Fortran 77 and developed by introducing reactive geochemistry into the multiphase fluid and heat flow simulator TOUGH2. A variety of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes are considered under a wide range of conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, ionic strength, and pH and Eh. Interactions between mineral assemblages and fluids can occur under local equilibrium or kinetic rates. The gas phase can be chemically active. Precipitation and dissolution reactions can change formation porosity and permeability. The program can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. Here we present two examples to illustrate applicability of the program: (1) injectivity effects of mineral scaling in a fractured geothermal reservoir and (2) CO2 disposal in a deep saline aquifer.

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

320

Renewable Energy Loan Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Loan Programs Title Renewable Energy Loan Programs Publication Type Case Study Year of Publication 2002 Authors Bolinger, Mark, and Kevin Porter Secondary Title...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Early Career Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Science Early Career Research Program Early Career Research Program Overview Divisional Points of Contact Office of Science Early Career Website Important Dates Links and...

322

Hydropower Program Technology Overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New fact sheets for the DOE Office of Power Technologies (OPT) that provide technology overviews, description of DOE programs, and market potential for each OPT program area.

Not Available

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

NREL: Education Programs - About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Education Programs Photo graphic representation of NREL Education Programs. NREL believes renewable energy and energy efficiency R&D is only part of the new energy future equation....

324

Hydrogen Program Overview  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to the DOE Hydrogen Program. It describes the program mission and answers the question: Why Hydrogen?

325

Weatherization & Intergovernmental Program: Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program and the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. AS GU MP PR VI State: Select one... Alaska Alabama Arkansas American Samoa Arizona California Colorado...

326

Intern Programs | PARTI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics of Accelerators and Related Technology for International Students (PARTI) About Apply Visa Info For Current Interns Program Description Fermilab's PARTI program offers...

327

Graduate Research Assistant Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Students Graduate Program Graduate Research Assistant Program Point your career towards LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in...

328

NREL: Education Programs - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Education Programs News Below are news stories involving NREL Education Programs. August 26, 2013 Wind for Schools Project Funding Case Studies This case study look at the project...

329

JGI Fungal Genomics Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

View Supports functional genomics, user data deposition andJGI Fungal Genomics Program Igor V. Grigoriev 1 DOE Jointof California. JGI Fungal Genomics Program Contact: Igor

Grigoriev, Igor V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

JGI Fungal Genomics Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JGI Fungal Genomics Program Igor V. Grigoriev 1 Lawrenceof California. JGI Fungal Genomics Program Contact: IgorJGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi,

Grigoriev, Igor V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM - Energy  

75 vehicle technologies program ed wall, program manager ed.wall@ee.doe.gov (202) 586-8055 venture capital technology showcase aug 21 and 22, 2007

332

Program Areas | National Security | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs Initiatives Facilities Events and Conferences Supporting Organizations National Security Home | Science & Discovery | National Security | Program Areas SHARE Program...

333

Office of Corporate Safety Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corporate Safety Program (CSP) CSP Home Consolidated Audit Program (DOECAP) Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) DOE Analytical Services Program (ASP) DOE Laboratory...

334

Quantifying the effects of three-dimensional subsurface heterogeneity on Hortonian runoff processes using a fully-coupled numerical, stochastic approach.  

SciTech Connect

The impact of three-dimensional subsurface heterogeneity on hillslope runoff generated by excess infiltration (so called Hortonian runoff) is examined. A fully-coupled, parallel subsurface overland flow model is used to simulate runoff from an idealized hillslope. Ensembles of correlated, Gaussian random fields of saturated hydraulic conductivity are used to create uncertainty and variability (i.e. structure) due to subsurface heterogeneity. A large number of cases are simulated in a parametric manner with variance of the hydraulic conductivity varied over two orders of magnitude. These cases include rainfall rates above, equal and below the geometric mean of the hydraulic conductivity distribution. These cases are also compared to theoretical considerations of runoff production based on simple assumptions regarding (1) the rainfall rate and the value of hydraulic conductivity in the surface cell using a spatially-indiscriminant approach; and (2) a percolation-theory type approach to incorporate so-called runon. Simulations to test the ergodicity of hydraulic conductivity on hillslope runoff are also performed. Results show three-dimensional features (particularly in the vertical dimension) in the hydraulic conductivity distributions that create shallow perching, which has an important effect on runoff behavior that is fundamentally different in character than previous two dimensional analyses. The simple theories are shown to be very poor predictors of the saturated area that might runoff due to excess infiltration. It is also shown that ergodicity is reached only for a large number of integral scales ({approx}30) and not for cases where the rainfall rate is less than the geometric mean of the saturated hydraulic conductivity.

Maxwell, R M; Kollet, S J

2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

335

The Oak Ridge Field Research Center : Advancing Scientific Understanding of the Transportation, Fate, and Remediation of Subsurface Contamination Sources and Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical research, development, and testing of nuclear materials across this country resulted in subsurface contamination that has been identified at over 7,000 discrete sites across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. With the end of the Cold War threat, DOE has shifted its emphasis to remediation, decommissioning, and decontamination of the immense volumes of contaminated groundwater, sediments, and structures at its sites. DOE currently is responsible for remediating 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to approximately four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of contaminated soil, enough to fill approximately 17 professional sports stadiums.* DOE also sponsors research intended to improve or develop remediation technologies, especially for difficult, currently intractable contaminants or conditions. The Oak Ridge FRC is representative of some difficult sites, contaminants, and conditions. Buried wastes in contact with a shallow water table have created huge reservoirs of contamination. Rainfall patterns affect the water table level seasonally and over time. Further, the hydrogeology of the area, with its fractures and karst geology, affects the movement of contaminant plumes. Plumes have migrated long distances and to surface discharge points through ill-defined preferred flowpaths created by the fractures and karst conditions. From the standpoint of technical effectiveness, remediation options are limited, especially for contaminated groundwater. Moreover, current remediation practices for the source areas, such as capping, can affect coupled processes that, in turn, may affect the movement of subsurface contaminants in unknown ways. Research conducted at the FRC or with FRC samples therefore promotes understanding of the processes that influence the transport and fate of subsurface contaminants, the effectiveness and long-term consequences of extant remediation options, and the development of improved remediation strategies.

David Watson

2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

336

Alternative Loan Program (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Loan Program (Missouri) Alternative Loan Program (Missouri) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Program Information Missouri Program Type Loan Program The Missouri...

337

A brief analysis and description of transuranic wastes in the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at INEL  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a brief summary of the wastes and waste types disposed of in the transuranic contaminated portions of the Subsurface Disposal Area of the radioactive waste management complex at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory from 1954 through 1970. Wastes included in this summary are organics, inorganics, metals, radionuclides, and atypical wastes. In addition to summarizing amounts of wastes disposed and describing the wastes, the document also provides information on disposal pit and trench dimensions and contaminated soil volumes. The report also points out discrepancies that exist in available documentation regarding waste and soil volumes and make recommendations for future efforts at waste characterization. 19 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs.

Arrenholz, D.A.; Knight, J.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Usable live programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Programming today involves code editing mixed with bouts of debugging to get feedback on code execution. For programming to be more fluid, editing and debugging should occur concurrently as live programming. This paper describes how live execution ... Keywords: debugging, live programming

Sean McDirmid

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

FMOC Standards Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spacer Facilities Management and Operations Center (FMOC) Standards Program (removed) Sandia Home...

340

OSHWPP model programs guide  

SciTech Connect

Descriptions of model occupational health and safety programs implemented at DOE facilities are presented.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

4SIGHT Computer Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The 4SIGHT computer program was written to facilitate concrete performance prediction under various exposure conditions. ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

342

Typing constraint logic programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a prescriptive type system with parametric polymorphism and subtyping for constraint logic programs. The aim of this type system is to detect programming errors statically. It introduces a type discipline for constraint logic programs and ... Keywords: Constraint logic programming, Metaprogramming, Prolog, subtyping, type systems

Franois Fages; Emmanuel Coquery

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Wind Program: Program Plans, Implementation, and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Program Wind Program HOME ABOUT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT DEPLOYMENT FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES INFORMATION RESOURCES NEWS EVENTS EERE » Wind Program » About Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Budget Contacts Plans, Implementation, and Results Here you'll find an overview of the Wind Program and links to its program planning, implementation, and results documents. This list summarizes the program's wind power research, development, and demonstration activities. Read more about: Overview Learn more about this EERE Office. Plans Discover the plans, budgets, and analyses that set the direction of office priorities and activities. Implementation Find out how the office controls, implements, and adjusts its plans and manages its activities. Results Learn about the technological, commercial, and other outputs and outcomes

344

Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

514 514 Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2007 Includes Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) Projects As of September 2007 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 2008 T E C H N O L O G Y DOE/FE-0514 Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2007 Includes Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) Projects As of September 2007 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 2008 T E C H N O L O G Y This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Offi

345

Technology Commercialization Program 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This reference compilation describes the Technology Commercialization Program of the Department of Energy, Defense Programs. The compilation consists of two sections. Section 1, Plans and Procedures, describes the plans and procedures of the Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Program. The second section, Legislation and Policy, identifies legislation and policy related to the Program. The procedures for implementing statutory and regulatory requirements are evolving with time. This document will be periodically updated to reflect changes and new material.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Postdoctoral Program Program Description The Postdoctoral (Postdoc...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

program offers the opportunity for appointees to perform research in a robust scientific R&D environment, present and publish research, advance knowledge in basic and applied...

347

Facility Representative Program: Program Performance Indicators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Performance Indicators DOE Corporate Reporting Data (ORPS, CAIRS, Others) Facility Representative Performance Indicator Guidance -- Appendix A in DOE-STD-1063-2011,...

348

External > Programs > Supporting Activities > Diversity Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORO Diversity Programs & Employee Concerns Office Welcome The Oak Ridge Office is a recognized leader in developing and sustaining a high performing, diverse workforce. Reasonable...

349

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of a teepee and a wind turbine. Turbine installed at the Rosebud Sioux Reservation in South Dakota Credit: Intertribal Council on Utility Policy Corporation The program...

350

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Offers Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network

351

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: Design : Design the Financing Program to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Assess the Market Define Finance Program Objectives Identify & Engage Financial Partners

352

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: Define 2: Define Finance Program Objectives to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Assess the Market Define Finance Program Objectives

353

TOUGHREACT Version 2.0: A simulator for subsurface reactive transport under non-isothermal multiphase flow conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media, and was developed by introducing reactive chemistry into the multiphase fluid and heat flow simulator TOUGH2 ... Keywords: CO2 geological storage, Environmental remediation, Multi-phase flow, Nuclear waste geological disposal, Reactive transport, TOUGHREACT

Tianfu Xu; Nicolas Spycher; Eric Sonnenthal; Guoxiang Zhang; Liange Zheng; Karsten Pruess

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Subsurface characterization of an oxidation-induced phase transformation and twinning in nickel-based superalloy exposed to oxy-combustion environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the integration of oxy-fuel combustion to turbine power generation system, turbine alloys are exposed to high temperature and an atmosphere comprised of steam, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. While surface and internal oxidation of the alloy takes place, the microstructure in the subsurface region also changes due to oxidation. In this study, bare metal coupons of Ni-base superalloys were exposed in oxy-fuel combustion environment for up to 1000 h and the oxidation-related microstructures were examined. Phase transformation occurred in the subsurface region in Ni-based superalloy and led to twinning. The transformation product phases were analyzed through thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and various electron microscopy techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The mechanism by which the phase transformation and the formation of the microstructure occurred was also discussed. The possible effects of the product phases on the performance of the alloy in service were discussed.

Zhu, Jingxi; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Wise, Adam; Li, Jia; Laughlin, David E.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Assessment of Vapor Intrusion at MGP Sites: Review of Current Knowledge, Practices, and Proposed Field-Based Research Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vapor intrusion (VI) is the migration of volatile or semi-volatile chemicals from subsurface contaminated soil or groundwater to indoor air in the overlying building. In the past decade, VI has emerged as a major environmental issue. This report presents a review of the current knowledge, practices, and research needs for VI, including the current regulatory status at both the federal and state level. The report also provides a summary of a proposed field-focused research program to be implemented at two...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

TFE Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented herein will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results. The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. The TF Verification Program builds directly on the technology and data base developed in the 1960s and 1970s in an AEC/NASA program, and in the SP-100 program conducted in 1983, 1984 and 1985. In the SP-100 program, the attractive but concern was expressed over the lack of fast reactor irradiation data. The TFE Verification Program addresses this concern. The general logic and strategy of the program to achieve its objectives is shown on Fig. 1-1. Five prior programs form the basis for the TFE Verification Program: (1) AEC/NASA program of the 1960s and early 1970; (2) SP-100 concept development program;(3) SP-100 thermionic technology program; (4) Thermionic irradiations program in TRIGA in FY-86; (5) and Thermionic Technology Program in 1986 and 1987. 18 refs., 64 figs., 43 tabs.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Science Policy Fellowship Program About the Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science Policy Fellowship Program About the Program This two-year fellowship at the IDA Science recipients to gain science and technology policy experience. Policy research will focus on areas research for leaders in the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in the Executive Office

Sibille, Etienne

358

RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK Staff Draft Guidebook Third Edition COMMISSION Kate Zocchetti Project Manager Tony Gonçalves Office Manager Renewable Energy Office Valerie Hall Deputy Director Efficiency and Renewable Energy Division Melissa Jones Executive Director The California

359

RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK Final Committee Draft Guidebook Third Edition COMMISSION RENEWABLES COMMITTEE James D. Boyd Vice Chair Presiding Member Robert B. Weisenmiller, Ph.D. Commissioner Associate Member Kate Zocchetti Project Manager Tony Gonçalves Office Manager Renewable Energy

360

RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK Committee Draft Guidebook Third Edition COMMISSION RENEWABLES COMMITTEE James D. Boyd Vice Chair Presiding Member Robert B. Weisenmiller, Ph.D. Commissioner Associate Member Kate Zocchetti Project Manager Tony Gonçalves Office Manager Renewable Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

FINDING OF MD SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FORMERLY UTILIZED HED/AEC SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

FINDING OF MD SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINDING OF MD SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FORMERLY UTILIZED HED/AEC SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM: BAY0 CANYONS, NEW MEXICO Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed to carry out rcmedfrl action at a site located in Bayo Canyon, Los Alamos County, New Mexico. Although the site as partially decontaminated and decommissioned in the 196Os, there remain above-background amounts of radionuclides. DOE has determined that strontium-90 in excess of DDE's proposed remedial- action criterir exists in subsurface materials underlying an area of about 0.6 ha (1.5 acres) at the Bayo Canyon site. The proposed action is to demarcate this are8 and restrict its use to activities that will not disturb this sub-

362

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incentive Programs Incentive Programs Most states offer energy incentive programs to help offset energy costs. FEMP's Energy Incentive Program helps Federal agencies take advantage of these incentives by providing information about the funding-program opportunities available in each state. Find Funding Click on a state or choose a one from the menu to see a summary of available energy incentives. Select a State Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Oklahoma Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming

363

Program Impact Analysis | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Impact Analysis Program Impact Analysis BECP periodically assesses the impacts of its activities by estimating historical and projected energy savings, consumer savings, and avoided emissions. Since the inception of the Program 20 years ago, cumulative full-fuel-cycle (FFC) energy savings from 1992- 2012 are estimated to be approximately 4.8 quads and cost savings to consumers have been more than $44 billion. These savings have resulted primarily from the Program's activities which upgrade the model energy codes, accelerate their adoption by states and localities, and improve code compliance by means of various software tools and other types of training and technical support. The federal budgetary cost of the Program over this same period (1992-2012) was estimated to be around $110 million, resulting in a ratio of more than $400

364

PNNL EERE Program: Building Technologies Program (Overview)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program Laboratory, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program Home Program Areas Contacts Related Sites Energy Directorate PNNL Home Security & Privacy PNNL Buildings Program Overview PNNL Buildings Portfolio Science Foundation EE & Demand Response High-Performance Sustainable Design Codes and Standards Overcoming Market Barriers Analysis and Planning Key Buildings Projects Contacts Publications & Presentations PNNL Buildings Program Buildings account for about 40 percent of our nation's energy use. That's 72 percent of U.S. electricity and 55 percent of natural gas, resulting in 39 percent of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions and a range of other negative environmental impacts. The buildings sciences team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is committed to dramatically improving the

365

Civilian Nuclear Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Los Alamos is committed to using its advanced nuclear expertise and unique facilities to meet the civilian nuclear national security demands of the future. CONTACT US Program Director Bruce Robinson (505) 667-1910 Email Los Alamos partners extensively with other laboratories, universities, industry, and the international nuclear community to address real-world technical challenges The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office is the focal point for nuclear energy research and development and next-generation repository science at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office manages projects funded by the Department of Energy's offices of Nuclear Energy Environmental Management Nuclear Regulatory Commission

366

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations and Operations and Maintenance Program Structure to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements

367

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Assess the Market

368

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement to someone by E-mail Measurement to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management

369

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations and Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

370

Centralized Procurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centralized Procurement Program What's New Who to Contact Current Products BOAs MOC Integrated Team Program Elements Future Products Welcome to the Carlsbad Field Office’s (CBFO) Centralized Procurement Program (CPP) Web Page. The purpose of the Centralized Procurement Program is to provide a standardized, economical system of acquisition and distribution of common or critical transuranic (TRU) waste products. The program is available for use by DOE contractors. The program is designed to allow user sites to procure products manufactured to standardized quality, procurement, and engineering requirements. The WIPP Management & Operation Contractor (MOC), Washington TRU Solutions (WTS), administers the program. WTS is the design authority for all products currently offered in the program.

371

NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK APRIL 2006 CEC-300 Director Heather Raitt Technical Director Renewable Energy Program Drake Johnson Office Manager Renewable Energy Office Valerie Hall Deputy Director Efficiency, Renewables, and Demand Analysis Division #12;These

372

Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS provides a Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP). Formerly the Smalley Check Sample Program LPP is a collaborative proficiency testing service for oil and fat related commodities, oilseeds, oilseed meals, and edible fats. Laboratory Proficiency Testing

373

Transportation Research Internship Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Research Internship Program Civil & Coastal Engineering Overview The Transportation Research Internship Program (TRIP) is conducted by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) and the Center is to provide undergraduates an exciting opportunity to learn about transportation engineering

Slatton, Clint

374

Automated Program Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Programmer's apprentice (PA) is an automated program development tool. The PA depends upon a library of common algorithms (cliches) as the source of its knowledge about programming. The PA uses these cliches to understand ...

Cyphers, D. Scott

375

Awards Program Rewarding Excellence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS awards recognize achievements and contributions to the profession, industry and society. Awards Program Rewarding Excellence Awards Program achievement aocs application award Awards baldwin distinguished division memorial nomination poster pr

376

ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL LBNL/PUB-5519 (1), Rev. 0and Analysis Program Manual. LBNL/PUB-5519 (1), Rev. 0the Regulations and Procedures Manual (RPM): CATS database o

Gravois, Melanie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

US CMS Program Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USCMS US CMS Home US CMS @ Work US CMS Research Program Management Joel Butler, US CMS Research Program Manager E-mail: butler@fnal.gov Phone: (630) 840-3148, Fax: (630) 840-2194...

378

Keyword programming in Java  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keyword programming is a novel technique for reducing the need to remember details of programming language syntax and APIs, by translating a small number of unordered keywords provided by the user into a valid expression. ...

Little, Danny Greg

379

Biomass Energy Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Biomass Energy Program assists businesses in installing biomass energy systems. Program participants receive up to $75,000 in interest subsidy payments to help defray the interest expense on...

380

Worker Training Program (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Worker Training Program is a business incentive program to support the retraining and upgrading of Nebraskas current workforce. The amount of grant funding available quarterly is distributed...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Parametric program slicing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Program slicing is a technique for isolating computational threads in programs. In this paper, we show how to mechanically extract a family of practical algorithms for computing slices directly from semantic specifications. These algorithms are based ...

John Field; G. Ramalingam; Frank Tip

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

NETL Program Fact Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Aug 2013) Methane Hydrates R&D Program: Today and Tomorrow PDF-1.64MB (Jan 2013) Unconventional Fossil Energy Resource Program PDF-1.70MB (Oct 2012) Technology Solutions...

383

Applied Energy Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Energy Programs Applied Energy Programs Applied Energy Programs Los Alamos is using its world-class scientific capabilities to enhance national energy security by developing energy sources with limited environmental impact and by improving the efficiency and reliability of the energy infrastructure. CONTACT US Acting Program Director Melissa Fox (505) 663-5538 Email Applied Energy Program Office serves as the hub connecting the Laboratory's scientific and technical resources to DOE sponsors, DoD programs, and to industry. The Applied Energy Program Office manages Los Alamos National Laboratory programs funded by the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Offices of Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy, Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, and Fossil Energy. With energy use increasing across the nation and the

384

Research Facilities and Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WEB RESOURCES: Magnesium Research Facilities and Programs ... to universities, corporations, and other facilities involved in magnesium research, 0, 1025...

385

Complex Systems Program Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Systems Program seeks to understand the fundamental science of these ... Complex Systems Fundamentals Roldan Pozo; Measurement Science for ...

2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

386

Random Convex Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This fundamental property of scenario solutions has been seemingly been ...... Stochastic Programming, volume 10 of Handbooks in Operations Research and...

387

Sustainable Manufacturing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Program is to develop and deploy advances in measurement science to enable improvements in resource (energy, material) efficiency and waste ...

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

388

Office of Special Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Office of Special Programs of the National Institute of ... Environment; Energy; Forensic Science; Healthcare; Homeland Security; Information ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

389

Previously Competed FOCUSED PROGRAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The program concentrates on three major commercial markets: engines, power trains, and chassis ... Vapor Compression Refrigeration Technology. ...

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

390

Water Workshop Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... We have also participated in planning for testing new technology for the DARPA's (Defense Advanced Research Programs Agency) Materials with ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

391

Fasteners & Metals Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directory of Accredited Laboratories. Fasteners & Metals Program. The Fastener Quality Act (FQA), Public Law 101-592, was ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

392

Weatherization & Intergovernmental Program: Projects  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Intergovernmental Program Projects Site Map Bookmark and Share Projects From energy efficiency initiatives - such as residential weatherization and state capitol...

393

Baldrige Program Transition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Baldrige Performance Excellence Program is transitioning to a Sustainable, Enterprise Model. ... A Vision to Be Among the Best. ...

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

394

ABET Program Evaluator (PEV)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volunteer Training Module. March 2013. 1. Your Professional Partner for Career Advancement. ABET Program Evaluator. (PEV). Online Training Module.

395

TMS 2012: Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This programming track focuses such energy related issues as developing advanced new systems, improving existing energy systems, sustainable production of...

396

TMS 2011: Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This programming track focuses such energy related isues as developing advanced new systems, improving existing energy systems, sustainable production of...

397

Nanomanufacturing Programs and Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for the nanoscale stress distributions and surface defects that control device more. Next-Generation Robotics and Automation Program Last ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

398

Travel Award Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Travel Award Program. What is the travel award? The CNST has a Cooperative Agreement with the University of Maryland Nanocenter. ...

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

399

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative Program Sponsors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program Sponsors Facility Representative Program Sponsors There are 29 Facility Representative Program Sponsors Office Name Title E-Mail Phone ASO Larry Pendexter ES&H Div Dir (Argonne) larry.pendexter@ch.doe.gov 630-252-1485 BHSO Bob Desmarais Operations Management Division Director desmarai@bnl.gov 631-344-5434 CBFO Glenn Gamlin Facility Representative Supervisor glenn.gamlin@wipp.ws 575-234-8136 CBFO Casey Gadbury Operations Manager casey.gadbury@wipp.ws 575-234-7372 FSO Mark Bollinger Deputy Manager Mark.Bollinger@ch.doe.gov 630-840-8130 FSO John Scott FR Team Lead john.scott@ch.doe.gov 630-840-2250 HS-30 James O'Brien Director, Office of Nuclear Safety James.O'Brien@hq.doe.gov 301-903-1408 HS-32 Earl Hughes Facility Representative Program Manager Earl.Hughes@hq.doe.gov 202-586-0065

400

Equipment qualification research program: program plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed this program plan for research in equipment qualification (EQA). In this report the research program which will be executed in accordance with this plan will be referred to as the Equipment Qualification Research Program (EQRP). Covered are electrical and mechanical equipment under the conditions described in the OBJECTIVE section of this report. The EQRP has two phases; Phase I is primarily to produce early results and to develop information for Phase II. Phase I will last 18 months and consists of six projects. The first project is program management. The second project is responsible for in-depth evaluation and review of EQ issues and EQ processes. The third project is responsible for detailed planning to initiate Phase II. The remaining three projects address specific equipment; i.e., valves, electrical equipment, and a pump.

Dong, R.G.; Smith, P.D.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009 is to provide an updated status of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commercial-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies (CCT). These demonstrations have been performed under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Program Update 2009 provides: (1) a discussion of the role of clean coal technology demonstrations in improving the nations energy security and reliability, while protecting the environment using the nations most abundant energy resourcecoal; (2) a summary of the funding and costs of the demonstrations; and (3) an overview of the technologies being demonstrated, along with fact sheets for projects that are active, recently completed, or recently discontinued.

None

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Federal Energy Management Program: About the Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Program About the Program The U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) works with key individuals to accomplish energy change within organizations, by bringing expertise from all levels of project and policy implementation, to enable Federal agencies to meet energy-related goals and provide energy leadership to the country. As the nation's largest energy consumer, the Federal Government has a tremendous opportunity and clear responsibility to lead by example. FEMP is central to this responsibility, guiding agencies to use funding more effectively in meeting Federal and agency-specific energy management objectives. Directed by Dr. Timothy Unruh, FEMP helps agencies meet its objectives by providing information through its primary program, technology, and service areas.

403

Master's Fellowship Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Master's Fellowship Program Master's Fellowship Program (MFP): The Master's Fellowship Program (MFP) provides exceptional minority bachelor's-level candidates with the opportunity to pursue a fully funded Masters of Science degree. The MFP is a minority based program for U.S. under-represented groups in an effort to help enhance the diversity of Sandia's technical workforce. Successful applicants will become regular full-time Sandia employees and join multidisciplinary teams that are advancing the frontiers of science and technology to solve the world's greatest challenges. Program Requirements: * Apply to a minimum of 3 nationally accredited universities. * Successfully complete the GRE as required by the universities of interest.

404

Education Programs | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Academia For Academia University Partners Distinguished Fellowships Postdoctoral Program Graduate Opportunities Education and Outreach Programs For Academia Home | Connect with ORNL | For Academia | Education and Outreach Programs SHARE Education Programs Visiting Faculty ORNL offers a number of opportunities to visiting faculty to do hands-on research during the summer months. Faculty may be accompanied by up to two students. ORNL's commitment to diversity in the science workforce encourages faculty from historically black colleges and minority educational institutions to apply. The Higher Education Research Experience (HERE) program allows visiting faculty to participate in research during the summer or on a semester basis. Historical Black Colleges and Universities/ Minority Education Institutions

405

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

406

SES CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) DOE F 360.1 (11-03) Executive Development Plan (EDP) Name: Title: Organization: Office: RATIONALE FOR PLAN: APPROVALS: Candidate Signature: Date: Supervisor: Date: Mentor: Date: SES Candidate Development Program Manager: Date: DOE Executive Resources Board: Date: 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE F 360.1 (11-03) SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) Executive Development Plan (EDP) NAME OF SES CANDIDATE: DATE: EXECUTIVE CORE QUALIFICATION 1: LEADING CHANGE This core qualification encompasses the ability to develop and implement an organizational vision which integrates key national and program

407

Fire Protection Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Fire Protection Overview The Department of Energy (DOE) Fire Protection Program is multi-faceted. It includes published fire safety directives (Orders, standards, and guidance documents), a range of oversight activities, an annual fire protection program summary, and a directory of fire safety professionals. DOE also sponsors fire safety conferences, various training initiatives, and a spectrum of technical assistance activities. This Home Page is intended to bring together in one location as much of the Program's resources as possible to facilitate greater understanding, communication, and efficiency of operations. Guidelines -- NFPA Codes and standards, CFRs, and DOE Directives (policy statements, Orders, Standards, and Guidance Documents)

408

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

409

Wellness Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program Wellness Program Workers spend 200 hours per month at work, and keeping a healthy work-life balance is essential. The Headquarters Wellness Program provides support and assistance to DOE employees through a variety of programs and resources geared toward enhancing their mental and physical well-being. Wellness programs include: Accommodations, the Child Development Centers, the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), the Forrestal (FOHO) and Germantown (GOHO) Fitness Centers, the Occupational Health Clinics and the DOE WorkLife4You Program. Programs Disability Services Child Development Centers Headquarters Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics Headquarters Accommodation Program DOE Worklife4You Program Health Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Tips

410

Utility Partnerships Program Overview (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Program overview brochure for the Utility Partnerships Program within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP).

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Principal Associate Director - Weapons Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weapons Programs As Principal Associate Director for the Weapons Program, Knapp leads the programs to assure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the systems in the nation's...

412

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Weatherization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weatherization Assistance Program Quality Work Plan Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Weatherization Assistance Program Quality...

413

Wellness Program | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Wellness Program Workers spend 200 hours per month at work, and keeping a healthy work-life balance is essential. The Headquarters Wellness Program provides support and...

414

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program: Videos on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Videos on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Videos on Delicious Rank Better...

415

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Maine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program: Maine on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Maine on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Maine on Delicious Rank Better...

416

Building Technologies Program: Peer Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program: Peer Review on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Program: Peer Review on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Program: Peer Review on Delicious Rank Building...

417

Womans Programs,Diversity Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and programs that respond to the needs of its' women employees. Rosa Palmore of the Diversity Office serves as Women's Program Coordinator. Women's Program Advisory Committee...

418

Intelligence Programs | National Security | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intelligence Programs SHARE Intelligence Programs image The Intelligence Programs leverage ORNL's considerable science and technology assets to support the Intelligence Community....

419

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 3, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SGSYS (Substation Grounding SYStem Analysis Program). This program analyzes the substation ground field given the total electric current injected into the ground field and the design of the grounding system. Standard outputs of the program are (1) total ground resistance, (2) step voltage, (3) touch voltage, (4) voltages on a grid of points, (5) voltage profile along straight lines, (6) transfer voltages, (7) ground potential rise, (8) body currents, (9) step voltage profile along straight lines, and (10) touch voltage profile along straight lines. This program can be utilized in an interactive or batch mode. In the interactive mode, the user defines the grounding system geometry, soil parameters, and output requests interactively, with the use of a user friendly conversational program. The users manual describes data requirements and data preparation procedures. An appendix provides forms which facilitate data collection procedures. The installation and validation manual describes the computer files which make up the program SGSYS and provides a test case for validation purposes.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 2, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SMECC (Substation Maximum Earth Current Computation Program). This program analyzes the electric current distribution among grounded structures inside and outside a substation for different fault conditions. The fault conditions are automatically selected by the program, or they may be specified by the user, or both. The fault condition resulting in maximum substation earth current is identified and reported. Data requirements for this program are: ground impedance, transformer data, transmission line data, transmission line grounding impedances, etc. The program provides four types of standard outputs: (1) a report of voltages and current flow in the unfaulted system, (2) a brief report of the maximum ground potential rise (worst fault condition), (3) a summary report of all fault conditions which have been analyzed by the program, and (4) a detailed report of voltages and current flow for a selected set of fault conditions.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Nuclear Energy University Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Status 1 Status Presentation to Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC) June 15, 2011 Michael Worley, NEUP Program Manager NEUP Funding is Program Driven Program Directed Funding Program Supported Funding Mission Supported Funding Natl. Labs Universities DOE-NE HQ Peer Review DOE NE Program Drivers 2 3 Summary of Improvements and New Programs for FY 2011 * Expand "Blue Sky" Research and Development (R&D) * Initiate Integrated Research Projects (IRP) * Expand and improve peer review data base * Evaluate adoption of NRC and NNSA Metrics as appropriate to NEUP * Conduct peer review at pre-application stage for R&D 2011 Proposed NEUP Budget - $61.8M * Program Directed Integrated Research Projects (IRP) - $12.0M (NEW)

422

Programming | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Programming Programming Programming October 16, 2013 - 5:13pm Addthis Key Actions in Programming Commission a renewable energy screening to assess the options and economics of various technologies. Conduct a planning charrette to bring disciplines together to identify project needs and energy opportunities. Define and prioritize specific energy- related goals and include them in the building program and requirements for the design team. Renewable energy is a key consideration during project programming. As more information about the actual function and needs of the facility becomes available, further decisions can be made about the most appropriate types of renewable energy technologies for the project. The end of this phase results in the creation of the building program,

423

Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

Fix, N. J.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

424

Goa, India How far does Surface Heave Propagate? A Discussion on Analytical and Numerical Modeling of the Surface Heave Induced by Subsurface Fluid Injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Reservoir dilations occur due to variety of subsurface injection operations including waste disposal, waterflooding, steam injection, CO 2 sequestration and aquifer storage recovery. These reservoir dilations propagate to the surrounding formations and extend up to the ground surface resulting in surface heaves. This paper discusses modelling of the surface heave by applying both analytical and numerical methods. Results of the study demonstrate that the lateral extent of a finite element model has a direct impact on the surface heave profile and if the lateral boundaries are too close to the line of symmetry there will be significant errors in the finite element results. This paper proposes a rapid way of estimating a sufficient lateral extent for the finite element model by using a new chart. The chart contains a family of curves which can be used to estimate the surface heave propagation distance under various injection depths, injection periods and soil properties. 1

Asanga S. Nanayakkara; Ron C. K. Wong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Utility Green Pricing Programs: A Statistical Analysis of Program Effectiveness  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes actual utility green pricing program data to provide further insight into which program features might help maximize both customer participation in green pricing programs and the amount of renewable energy purchased by customers in those programs.

Wiser, R.; Olson, S.; Bird, L.; Swezey, B.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Geothermal materials program: strategy. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are discussed: program goal and objectives, program organization, and program status. Current program projects are described. (MHR)

Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Plutonium Disposition Program | National Nuclear Security Administrati...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plutonium Disposition Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Fissile Materials Disposition > Plutonium Disposition Program Plutonium Disposition Program The...

428

Energy Efficiency Program Administration Powerpoint Presentation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Administration Powerpoint Presentation Energy Efficiency Program Administration Powerpoint Presentation Energy Efficiency Program Administration Powerpoint Presentation...

429

Environmental Assessment for Selection and Operation of the Proposed Field Research Centers for the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), within the Office of Science (SC), proposes to add a Field Research Center (FRC) component to the existing Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program. The NABIR Program is a ten-year fundamental research program designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. An FRC would be integrated with the existing and future laboratory and field research and would provide a means of examining the fundamental biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. The NABIR Program would continue to perform fundamental research that might lead to promising bioremediation technologies that could be demonstrated by other means in the future. For over 50 years, DOE and its predecessor agencies have been responsible for the research, design, and production of nuclear weapons, as well as other energy-related research and development efforts. DOE's weapons production and research activities generated hazardous, mixed, and radioactive waste products. Past disposal practices have led to the contamination of soils, sediments, and groundwater with complex and exotic mixtures of compounds. This contamination and its associated costs and risks represents a major concern to DOE and the public. The high costs, long duration, and technical challenges associated with remediating the subsurface contamination at DOE sites present a significant need for fundamental research in the biological, chemical, and physical sciences that will contribute to new and cost-effective solutions. One possible low-cost approach for remediating the subsurface contamination of DOE sites is through the use of a technology known as bioremediation. Bioremediation has been defined as the use of microorganisms to biodegrade or biotransform hazardous organic contaminants to environmentally safe levels in soils, subsurface materials, water, sludges, and residues.. While bioremediation technology is promising, DOE managers and non-DOE scientists have recognized that the fundamental scientific information needed to develop effective bioremediation technologies for cleanup of the legacy waste sites is lacking in many cases. DOE believes that field-based research is needed to realize the full potential of bioremediation. The Department of Energy faces a unique set of challenges associated with cleaning up waste at its former weapons production and research sites. These sites contain complex mixtures of contaminants in the subsurface, including radioactive compounds. In many cases, the fundamental field-based scientific information needed to develop safe and effective remediation and cleanup technologies is lacking. DOE needs fundamental research on the use of microorganisms and their products to assist DOE in the decontamination and cleanup of its legacy waste sites. The existing NABIR program to-date has focused on fundamental scientific research in the laboratory. Because subsurface hydrologic and geologic conditions at contaminated DOE sites cannot easily be duplicated in a laboratory, however, the DOE needs a field component to permit existing and future laboratory research results to be field-tested on a small scale in a controlled outdoor setting. Such field-testing needs to be conducted under actual legacy waste field conditions representative of those that DOE is most in need of remediating. Ideally, these field conditions should be as representative as practicable of the types of subsurface contamination conditions that resulted from legacy wastes from the nuclear weapons program activities. They should also be representative of the types of hydrologic and geologic conditions that exist across the DOE complex.

N /A

2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

430

Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Resources Information Resources Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on AddThis.com... Publications Software FAQs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs

431

Site Support Program Plan Infrastructure Program  

SciTech Connect

The Fiscal Year 1996 Infrastructure Program Site Support Program Plan addresses the mission objectives, workscope, work breakdown structures (WBS), management approach, and resource requirements for the Infrastructure Program. Attached to the plan are appendices that provide more detailed information associated with scope definition. The Hanford Site`s infrastructure has served the Site for nearly 50 years during defense materials production. Now with the challenges of the new environmental cleanup mission, Hanford`s infrastructure must meet current and future mission needs in a constrained budget environment, while complying with more stringent environmental, safety, and health regulations. The infrastructure requires upgrading, streamlining, and enhancement in order to successfully support the site mission of cleaning up the Site, research and development, and economic transition.

NONE

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

432

Life Sciences Programs and Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Life Sciences Programs & Projects. ... to PMT sensitivity and long-term stability ... Micronutrients Measurement Quality Assurance Program Last Updated ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

433

Programs/Projects in ITL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Programs/Projects in ITL. ... Awareness, Training, Education (ATE) and Professional Development. ... Biometric Standards Program and Resource Center. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

434

Postdoctoral Fellowship Programs Contact Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne National Laboratory Educational Programs Search Argonne ... Search Argonne Home > Educational Programs > Welcome Type of Appointments Postdoctoral Newsletters Postdoctoral...

435

Postdoctoral Fellowship Programs - Near Hit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne National Laboratory Educational Programs Argonne Home > Educational Programs > Welcome Type of Appointments Postdoctoral Newsletters Postdoctoral Office Activities...

436

NETL: Gasification Systems - Program Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Presentations Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Program Presentations Research Efforts at the National Energy Technology Laboratory to Improve Gasifier Performance...

437

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Name or Ancillary Text eere.energy.gov Program Name or Ancillary Text eere.energy.gov BTO Program Peer Review Analysis Leading to Lessons Learned Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Danielle Sass Byrnett, DOE Dave Roberts, NREL david.roberts@nrel.gov 303.384.7496 April 3, 2013 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Analysis Leading to Lessons Learned 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives - Program Problem Statement: Buildings consume 40% of energy in the United States and are responsible for nearly 40% of the country's greenhouse gas emissions. Several well documented barriers have prevented the development of a self-sustaining building energy upgrade market to reduce this energy use.

438

STEM Education Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STEM Education Programs STEM Education Programs STEM Education Programs Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) views its investment in STEM education as strengthening the Lab's strategic direction and developing its current and future workforce. Contacts Education Janelle Vigil-Maestas Community Programs Office (505) 665-4329 Email "We don't have to teach children to ask questions. That comes naturally. We have to not stop them." - LANL Director Charlie McMillan STEM education programs Certificate in Environmental Monitoring (pdf) Community College Institute (CCI) (pdf) Computer Science and Information Technology Pipeline Program (ADIT/HPC Division) (pdf) Computer System, Cluster, and Networking Summer Institute (pdf) Discover E (pdf) Engineering Institute Frontiers in Science

439

EEO and Diversity Program  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

EEO and Diversity Program EEO and Diversity Program EEO and Diversity: Collaborating for Mission Success Solutions to Workplace Conflict: What Mediation Can Do for You! FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT MEDIATION On October 27, 2006, the EEO and Diversity Program sponsored a panel presentation on the mediation program for all Service Center complex employees. Also, a session was held for the Service Center Leadership Team on November 15, 2006. At the end of the panel presentations, audience members were able to ask questions about the mediation program. If you would like to review the DVD of the presentation, contact the EEO and Diversity Program Office at (505) 845-5517 or by email at EEODiversityOffice@doeal.gov * What kinds of issues can be mediated? * How does one prepare for mediation?

440

Home Energy Score Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Energy Score Program Home Energy Score Program Peer Review April 3, 2013 Joan Glickman, US DOE Norm Bourassa, LBNL joan.glickman@ee.doe.gov, 202-586-5607 njbourassa@lbl.gov, 510-495-2677 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Significant underinvestment in energy efficiency in residential sector * High costs of traditional energy audits and ratings * No standard method for understanding and comparing the energy efficiency

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rgcm program subsurface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Home Energy Score Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Energy Score Program Home Energy Score Program Peer Review April 3, 2013 Joan Glickman, US DOE Norm Bourassa, LBNL joan.glickman@ee.doe.gov, 202-586-5607 njbourassa@lbl.gov, 510-495-2677 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Significant underinvestment in energy efficiency in residential sector * High costs of traditional energy audits and ratings * No standard method for understanding and comparing the energy efficiency

442

Heat Rate Program Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plant facilities with performance or heat rate improvement programs perform better than those that do not have those programs. A heat rate improvement program typically provides sufficient information for decision making with respect to timely maintenance actions and/or operational adjustments. Monitoring the performance of any power plant component includes the trending of parameters that also describe the performance of other plant components, providing insight and information on improving ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

443

Meteorological Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this technical report is to provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of the meteorological monitoring program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The principle function of the program is to provide current, accurate meteorological data as input for calculating the transport and diffusion of any unplanned release of an atmospheric pollutant. The report is recommended for meteorologists, technicians, or any personnel who require an in-depth understanding of the meteorological monitoring program.

Hancock, H.A. Jr. [ed.; Parker, M.J.; Addis, R.P.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Program Highlights Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Highlights Index Program Highlights Index Disposal of Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Ecological Risk Assessment of Chemically and Radiologically Contaminated Federal Sites Energy Zone Planning Tool for the Eastern United States Environmental Site Characterization and Remediation at Former Grain Storage Sites Evaluation of Risks of Aquatic Nuisance Species Transfer via the Chicago Area Waterway System Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan EIS Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) Generated by the Petroleum Industry Mobile Climate Observatory for Atmospheric Aerosols in India Mobile Climate Observatory on the Pacific

445

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Integration Program Arah Schuur Program Manager arah.schuur@ee.doe.gov April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and transacted with energy performance in mind and net zero ready commercial buildings are common and cost-effective. Commercial Buildings Integration Program Mission Accelerate voluntary uptake of significant energy performance improvements in existing and new commercial buildings. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov BTO Goals: BTO supports the development and deployment of technologies and systems to reduce

446

Employee Assistance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources Resources AAP/ EEO Working at LBNL Benefits Lab Information International Researchers & Scholars Office Visitors and Affiliates Contact Us forward Berkeley Lab Staff/ Guests Only forward HR Staff Only forward HR A-Z Benefits at Berkeley Lab Search the HR website: Search UC At Your Service My Accounts image (At Your Service Web Site) UPAY 850 Benefits Change form Benefits Forms and Publications Benefits Orientations Benefit Plan Contacts Calendar of Events: July | August COBRA Information Disability Leave of Absence/FMLA Employee Assistance Programs Employee Self Service Family Member Eligibility Verification UC Retirement Savings Program (Fidelity) Health Care Facilitator Program Employee Discounts and Programs Making Benefit Changes Payroll Information Postdoc Benefits

447

Critical Skills Master's Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skills Master's Program Skills Master's Program (CSMP): The Critical Skills Master's Program (CSMP) provides exceptional bachelor's-level candidates with the opportunity to pursue a fully funded Master's of Science degree. Successful applicants will become regular full-time Sandia employees and join multidisciplinary teams that are advancing the frontiers of science and technology to solve the world's greatest challenges. Program Requirements: * Apply to a minimum of 3 nationally accredited universities. * Successfully complete the GRE as required by the universities of interest. * Complete a master's degree within:

448

Emerging Technologies Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies Program Emerging Technologies Program Pat Phelan Program Manager patrick.phelan@ee.doe.gov (202)287-1906 April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How ET Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers * Solve technical barriers and test innovations to prove effectiveness * Measure and validate energy savings ET Mission: Accelerate the research, development and commercialization of emerging, high impact building technologies that are five years or less to market ready. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov

449

NSLS Industrial User Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| Industrial Program Coordinator | Publications Courtesy of The New York Times, Noah Berger The overall goal of the plan to enhance the NSLS facility's Industrial Users'...

450

DOE Carbon Sequestration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Program Charles E. Schmidt Carbon Sequestration Product Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory David J. Beecy Director, Office of Environmental Systems...

451

Pipeline Operations Program (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Pipeline Operations Program regulates the construction, acquisition, abandonment and interconnection of natural gas pipelines, as well as, the transportation and use of natural gas supplies.

452