National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for rgcm program subsurface

  1. Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... Current descriptions of the RGCM and other Climate and Earth System Modeling projects, ... Metrics to evaluate components of the Earth system, such as the carbon cycle, ocean ...

  2. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface

  3. Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program

  4. Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program

  5. Technical support to the ER program subsurface technologies team leader. Final report, March 15, 1993--March 15, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    This research included development of a new geologic sample management facility and associated quality assurance systems for the LANL Environmental Restoration Program. Additional work with the LANL Environmental Restoration Program included the development of Sampling and Analysis Plans (SAP) for various Operable Units for the Laboratory. The PI (Davidson) served as the sample curation/sample management specialist on the ER program Subsurface Studies Technical Team. Specialization in Field Unit Data Base systems was the focus of the work towards the end of the contract. A document is included which provides the Statement of Policy for the management of borehole samples collected during environmental restoration activities at LANL.

  6. Terrestrial Ecosystem Science | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface

  7. Analysis of tank 51H (HTF-51-15-77) subsurface supernatant sample in support of enrichment and corrosion control programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L. N.

    2015-08-18

    This report provides the results of analyses on Tank 51H subsurface supernatant liquid sample in support of the Enrichment Control Program (ECP) and the Corrosion Control Program (CCP).The purpose of the ECP sample taken from Tank 51H in early June was to determine if the later decants would be acceptable feed to the 2H and 3H evaporator systems.

  8. Analysis of tank 51H (HTF-51-15-77) subsurface supernatant sample in support of enrichment and corrosion control programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L. N.

    2015-08-18

    This report provides the results of analyses on Tank 51H subsurface supernatant liquid sample in support of the Enrichment Control Program (ECP) and the Corrosion Control Program (CCP). The purpose of the ECP sample taken from Tank 51H in early June was to determine if the later decants would be acceptable feed to the 2H and 3H evaporator systems.

  9. Subsurface Challenges

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Challenges Mastering the subsurface for energy production and storage and for the management of energy waste streams constitutes a substantial energy challenge. The Department of ...

  10. Analysis of tank 4 (FTF-4-15-22, 23) surface and subsurface supernatant samples in support of enrichment control, corrosion control and evaporator feed qualification programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L. N.

    2015-09-09

    This report provides the results of analyses on Savannah River Site Tank 4 surface and subsurface supernatant liquid samples in support of the Enrichment Control Program (ECP), the Corrosion Control Program (CCP) and the Evaporator Feed Qualification (EFQ) Program. The purpose of the ECP sample taken from Tank 4 in August 2015 was to determine if the supernatant liquid would be acceptable feed to the 2H and 3H evaporator systems.

  11. Energy and Subsurface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy and Subsurface Energy and Subsurface Los Alamos is using its world-class scientific capabilities to enhance national energy security by developing energy sources with limited environmental impact and by improving the efficiency and reliability of the energy infrastructure. Contact thumbnail of Business Development Executive Laura Barber Business Development Executive Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation (505) 667-9266 Email Energy The Applied Energy Programs encompass the broad set of

  12. Analysis of tank 39H (HTF-39-15-61, 62) surface and subsurface supernatant samples in support of corrosion control program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L. N.

    2015-08-19

    This report provides the results of analyses on Tanks 39H surface and subsurface supernatant liquid samples in support of the Corrosion Control Program. Analyses included warm acid strike preparation followed by analysis for silicon, aluminum, and sodium and water dilution preparation followed by analysis for anions. Other reported analytical results include analyses results for uranium, Pu-241 and Pu-239.

  13. Analysis of tank 39H (HTF-39-15-61, 62) surface and subsurface supernatant samples in support of corrosion control program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L. N.

    2015-08-01

    This report provides the results of analyses on Tanks 39H surface and subsurface supernatant liquid samples in support of the Corrosion Control Program. Analyses included warm acid strike preparation followed by analysis for silicon, aluminum, and sodium and water dilution preparation followed by analysis for anions. Other reported analytical results include analyses results for uranium, Pu-241 and Pu-239. The measured sodium concentration averaged, respectively, 4.28E+00 9.30E-02 M and 4.32E+00 1.076E-01 M in the Tank 39H surface sample and Tank 39H subsurface sample. In general, the nitrate, nitrite, free-OH and specific gravity of the Tank 39H surface and subsurface samples were all about the same in magnitude, respectively, averaging 1.98 M, 0.314 M, 1.26 M and 1.24. The measured silicon concentration for the Tank 39H surface and subsurface samples were, respectively, 3.84E+01 5.51E+00 and 4.14E+01 1.17E+00 mg/L. Based on the uranium, Pu-241 and Pu-239 concentrations, the calculated U-235 equivalent is 21.41 wt% for the surface sample and 21.32 wt% for the subsurface sample.

  14. Analysis of Tank 38H (HTF-38-15-47, 49) and Tank 43H (HTF-43-15-51, 53) surface and subsurface supernatant samples in support of enrichment and corrosion control programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L. N.

    2015-06-30

    This report provides the results of analyses on Tanks 38H and 43H surface and subsurface supernatant liquid samples in support of the Enrichment Control Program (ECP) and the Corrosion Control Program (CCP).

  15. Site Recommendation Subsurface Layout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.L. Linden

    2000-06-28

    The purpose of this analysis is to develop a Subsurface Facility layout that is capable of accommodating the statutory capacity of 70,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU), as well as an option to expand the inventory capacity, if authorized, to 97,000 MTU. The layout configuration also requires a degree of flexibility to accommodate potential changes in site conditions or program requirements. The objective of this analysis is to provide a conceptual design of the Subsurface Facility sufficient to support the development of the Subsurface Facility System Description Document (CRWMS M&O 2000e) and the ''Emplacement Drift System Description Document'' (CRWMS M&O 2000i). As well, this analysis provides input to the Site Recommendation Consideration Report. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Evaluation of the existing facilities and their integration into the Subsurface Facility design. (2) Identification and incorporation of factors influencing Subsurface Facility design, such as geological constraints, thermal loading, constructibility, subsurface ventilation, drainage control, radiological considerations, and the Test and Evaluation Facilities. (3) Development of a layout showing an available area in the primary area sufficient to support both the waste inventories and individual layouts showing the emplacement area required for 70,000 MTU and, if authorized, 97,000 MTU.

  16. Addressing Common Subsurface Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    geophysical and geochemical technologies quantitatively inferring subsurface evolution under current and future engineered conditions finding viable, low-risk resources...

  17. U.S. Department of Energy Subsurface Technology and Engineering...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... all DOE programs focused on subsurface extraction of resources, energy storage, ... Ultrasonic imaging logs are a well-established means of characterizing the quality of a ...

  18. Multiscale Subsurface Biogeochemical Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biogeochemical Modeling Multiscale Subsurface Biogeochemical Modeling ScheibeSmaller.jpg Simulation of flow inside an experimental packed bed, performed on Franklin Key...

  19. Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The below listing provides additional references related to Subsurface & Groundwater Remediation.  The references are categorized by documents types (e.g., Strategic Plans, Groundwater Plume...

  20. Subsurface Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Yuan

    2001-12-12

    There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

  1. Best Practice -- Subsurface Investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark Scott

    2010-03-01

    These best practices for Subsurface Survey processes were developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and later shared and formalized by a sub-committee, under the Electrical Safety Committee of EFCOG. The developed best practice is best characterized as a Tier II (enhanced) survey process for subsurface investigations. A result of this process has been an increase in the safety and lowering of overall cost, when utility hits and their related costs are factored in. The process involves improving the methodology and thoroughness of the survey and reporting processes; or improvement in tool use rather than in the tools themselves. It is hoped that the process described here can be implemented at other sites seeking to improve their Subsurface Investigation results with little upheaval to their existing system.

  2. Subsurface connection methods for subsurface heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Bass, Ronald Marshall (Houston, TX); Kim, Dong Sub (Sugar Land, TX); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX); Keltner, Thomas Joseph (Spring, TX); Carl, Jr., Frederick Gordon (Houston, TX)

    2010-12-28

    A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a first elongated heater in a first opening in the formation. The first elongated heater includes an exposed metal section in a portion of the first opening. The portion is below a layer of the formation to be heated. The exposed metal section is exposed to the formation. A second elongated heater is in a second opening in the formation. The second opening connects to the first opening at or near the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated. At least a portion of an exposed metal section of the second elongated heater is electrically coupled to at least a portion of the exposed metal section of the first elongated heater in the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated.

  3. Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Rigby; M. Mrugala; G. Shideler; T. Davidsavor; J. Leem; D. Buesch; Y. Sun; D. Potyondy; M. Christianson

    2003-12-17

    The Yucca Mountain Project is entering a the license application (LA) stage in its mission to develop the nation's first underground nuclear waste repository. After a number of years of gathering data related to site characterization, including activities ranging from laboratory and site investigations, to numerical modeling of processes associated with conditions to be encountered in the future repository, the Project is realigning its activities towards the License Application preparation. At the current stage, the major efforts are directed at translating the results of scientific investigations into sets of data needed to support the design, and to fulfill the licensing requirements and the repository design activities. This document addresses the program need to address specific technical questions so that an assessment can be made about the suitability and adequacy of data to license and construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. In July 2002, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an Integrated Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2002). Included in this report were the Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) Key Technical Issues (KTI). Geotechnical agreements were formulated to resolve a number of KTI subissues, in particular, RDTME KTIs 3.04, 3.05, 3.07, and 3.19 relate to the physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the host rock (NRC 2002, pp. 2.1.1-28, 2.1.7-10 to 2.1.7-21, A-17, A-18, and A-20). The purpose of the Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report is to present an accounting of current geotechnical information that will help resolve KTI subissues and some other project needs. The report analyzes and summarizes available qualified geotechnical data. It evaluates the sufficiency and quality of existing data to support engineering design and performance assessment. In addition, the corroborative data obtained from tests performed by a number of research organizations is presented to reinforce conclusions derived from the pool of data gathered within a full QA-controlled domain. An evaluation of the completeness of the current data is provided with respect to the requirements for geotechnical data to support design and performance assessment.

  4. Sustainable Subsurface Energy Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sustainable Subsurface Energy Development - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management

  5. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  6. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.

    1994-09-06

    A barrier is disclosed for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates. 5 figs.

  7. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, John C. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    A barrier for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates.

  8. Subsurface Tech Team | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Subsurface Tech Team Subsurface Tech Team Subsurface Tech Team Energy sources originating from beneath the Earth's surface satisfy over 80% of total U.S. energy needs. Finding and...

  9. proposed surface and subsurface marker designs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Images of proposed markers for the surface and subsurface Large Surface Marker - Proposed Design with Plaques of Text and Images Small Subsurface Marker - Proposed Design

  10. Poster on Subsurface Technology & Engineering Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Poster on Subsurface Technology & Engineering Research, Development, and Demonstration Crosscut (SubTER) Poster on Subsurface Technology & Engineering Research, Development, and...

  11. Subsurface Facility System Description Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-31

    The Subsurface Facility System encompasses the location, arrangement, size, and spacing of the underground openings. This subsurface system includes accesses, alcoves, and drifts. This system provides access to the underground, provides for the emplacement of waste packages, provides openings to allow safe and secure work conditions, and interfaces with the natural barrier. This system includes what is now the Exploratory Studies Facility. The Subsurface Facility System physical location and general arrangement help support the long-term waste isolation objectives of the repository. The Subsurface Facility System locates the repository openings away from main traces of major faults, away from exposure to erosion, above the probable maximum flood elevation, and above the water table. The general arrangement, size, and spacing of the emplacement drifts support disposal of the entire inventory of waste packages based on the emplacement strategy. The Subsurface Facility System provides access ramps to safely facilitate development and emplacement operations. The Subsurface Facility System supports the development and emplacement operations by providing subsurface space for such systems as ventilation, utilities, safety, monitoring, and transportation.

  12. Crosscutting Subsurface Initiative: Adaptive Control of Subsurface Fractures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The subsurface provides most of the world’s energy and offers great potential for CO2, nuclear waste, and energy storage.  Despite decades of research and recent successes in new extraction methods...

  13. Lower-Temperature Subsurface Layout and Ventilation Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christine L. Linden; Edward G. Thomas

    2001-06-20

    This analysis combines work scope identified as subsurface facility (SSF) low temperature (LT) Facilities System and SSF LT Ventilation System in the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001b, pp. 6 and 7, and pp. 13 and 14). In accordance with this technical work plan (TWP), this analysis is performed using AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models. It also incorporates the procedure AP-SI.1Q, Software Management. The purpose of this analysis is to develop an overall subsurface layout system and the overall ventilation system concepts that address a lower-temperature operating mode for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). The objective of this analysis is to provide a technical design product that supports the lower-temperature operating mode concept for the revision of the system description documents and to provide a basis for the system description document design descriptions. The overall subsurface layout analysis develops and describes the overall subsurface layout, including performance confirmation facilities (also referred to as Test and Evaluation Facilities) for the Site Recommendation design. This analysis also incorporates current program directives for thermal management.

  14. Method of installing subsurface barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A. (Shelley, ID); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sloan, Paul A. (Rigby, ID)

    2007-10-09

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  15. INL Subsurface Wireless Sensor Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis C. Kunerth; John M. Svoboda; James T. Johnson

    2005-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory is developing a versatile micro-power sensor interface platform for periodic subsurface sensing of environmental variables important to waste disposal sites such as volumetric moisture, water potential, and temperature. The key characteristics of the platform architecture are that the platform is passive until externally energized --no internal power source is required -- and that it communicates with a "reader" via short-range telemetry - no wires penetrate the subsurface. Other significant attributes include the potential for a long service life and a compact size that makes it well suited for retrofitting existing landfill structures. Functionally, the sensor package is "read" by a short-range induction coil that activates and powers the sensor platform as well as detects the sensor output via a radio frequency signal generated by the onboard programmable interface controller microchip. As a result, the platform has a functional subsurface communication range of approximately 10 to 12 ft. and can only accept sensors that require low power to operate.

  16. Calculation notes that support accident scenario and consequence development for the subsurface leak remaining subsurface accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-12

    This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: Subsurface Leak Remaining Subsurface. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

  17. Calculation notes that support accident scenario and consequence development for the subsurface leak remaining subsurface accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-19

    This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: Subsurface Leak Remaining Subsurface. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

  18. Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-09-19

    FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code for simulating isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably and/or fully saturated subsurface porous media. Both single and dual-domain transport formulations are available. Transport mechanisms considered include advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, linear adsorption, mobile/immobile mass transfer and first-order degradation. A wide range of acquifier conditions and remediation systems commonly encountered in the field can be simulated. Notable boundary condition (BC) options include, a combined rechargemore » and drain BC for simulating recirculation wells, and a head dependent well BC that computes flow based on specified drawdown. The code is designed to handle highly heterogenous, multi-layer, acquifer systems in a numerically efficient manner. Subsurface structure is represented with vertically distorted rectangular brick elements in a Cartesian system. The groundwater flow equation is approximated using the Bubnov-Galerkin finite element method in conjunction with an efficient symmetric Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) ICCG matrix solver. The solute transport equation is approximated using an upstream weighted residual finite element method designed to alleviate numerical oscillation. An efficient asymmetric PCG (ORTHOMIN) matrix solver is employed for transport. For both the flow and transport equations, element matrices are computed from either influence coefficient formulas for speed, or two point Gauss-Legendre quadrature for accuracy. Non-linear flow problems can be solved using either Newton-Ralphson linearization or Picard iteration, with under-relaxation formulas to further enhance convergence. Dynamic memory allocation is implemented using Fortran 90 constructs. FACT coding is clean and modular.« less

  19. Subsurface Temperature Data in Jemez Mountains, New Mexico |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Subsurface Temperature Data in Jemez Mountains, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Subsurface Temperature Data in Jemez...

  20. Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

    2014-07-29

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

  1. Controlling Subsurface Fractures and Fluid Flow: A Basic Research Agenda |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Controlling Subsurface Fractures and Fluid Flow: A Basic Research Agenda Controlling Subsurface Fractures and Fluid Flow: A Basic Research Agenda PDF icon BES Report Controlling Subsurface Fractures and Fluid Flow.pdf More Documents & Publications AGU SubTER Town Hall Presentation 2015 SubTER Grand Challenge Roundtable: Imaging Geophysical and Geochemical Signals in the Subsurface

  2. Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area annual report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    In support of its vision for technological excellence, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) has identified three strategic goals. The three goals of the SCFA are: Contain and/or stabilize contamination sources that pose an imminent threat to surface and ground waters; Delineate DNAPL contamination in the subsurface and remediate DNAPL-contaminated soils and ground water; and Remove a full range of metal and radionuclide contamination in soils and ground water. To meet the challenges of remediating subsurface contaminants in soils and ground water, SCFA funded more than 40 technologies in fiscal year 1997. These technologies are grouped according to the following product lines: Dense Nonaqueous-Phase Liquids; Metals and Radionuclides; Source Term Containment; and Source Term Remediation. This report briefly describes the SCFA 1997 technologies and showcases a few key technologies in each product line.

  3. Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Bass, Ronald M. (Houston, TX)

    2012-04-24

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

  4. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pemberton, B.E.; May, C.P.; Rossabi, J.

    1997-06-24

    An apparatus is provided which passively removes contaminated gases from a subsurface. The apparatus includes a riser pipe extending into a subsurface which has an exterior end in fluid communication with a valve. When well pressure is greater than atmospheric pressure, the valve opens to release contaminants into the atmosphere, and when well pressure is less than atmospheric pressure, the valve closes to prevent flow of air into the well. The valve assembly of the invention comprises a lightweight ball which is lifted from its valve seat with a slight pressure drop between the well and the atmosphere. 7 figs.

  5. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pemberton, Bradley E. (Aiken, SC); May, Christopher P. (Fairfax, VA); Rossabi, Joseph (Aiken, SC)

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus is provided which passively removes contaminated gases from a subsurface. The apparatus includes a riser pipe extending into a subsurface which has an exterior end in fluid communication with a valve. When well pressure is greater than atmospheric pressure, the valve opens to release contaminants into the atmosphere, and when well pressure is less than atmospheric pressure, the valve closes to prevent flow of air into the well. The valve assembly of the invention comprises a lightweight ball which is lifted from its valve seat with a slight pressure drop between the well and the atmosphere.

  6. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2011-04-26

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  7. Grid Generator for Two, Three-dimensional Finite Element Subsurface Flow Models

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-04-28

    GRIDMAKER serves as a preprocessor for finite element models in solving two- and three-dimensional subsurface flow and pollutant transport problems. It is designed to generate three-point triangular or four-point quadrilateral elements for two-dimensional domains and eight-point hexahedron elements for three-dimensional domains. A two-dimensional domain of an aquifer with a variable depth layer is treated as a special case for depth-integrated two-dimensional, finite element subsurface flow models. The program accommodates the need for aquifers with heterogeneousmore » systems by identifying the type of material in each element.« less

  8. Methods for forming long subsurface heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Dong Sub

    2013-09-17

    A method for forming a longitudinal subsurface heater includes longitudinally welding an electrically conductive sheath of an insulated conductor heater along at least one longitudinal strip of metal. The longitudinal strip is formed into a tubular around the insulated conductor heater with the insulated conductor heater welded along the inside surface of the tubular.

  9. About the Subsurface Tech Team | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    About the Subsurface Tech Team The Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Subsurface Technology and Engineering Research, Development, and Demonstration (SubTER) Tech Team as an integrated platform across DOE subsurface interests to address crosscutting grand challenges associated with the use of the subsurface for energy extraction and storage purposes. This Tech Team includes representatives of all of DOE's applied technology offices as well as several other offices focused on policy,

  10. Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Initiative (ABRS AFRI) | Department of Energy Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) Located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, the Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) was established to

  11. Subsurface Tech Team (SubTER) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Subsurface Tech Team (SubTER) Subsurface Tech Team (SubTER) Subsurface Tech Team (SubTER) Energy sources originating from beneath the Earth's surface satisfy over 80% of total U.S. energy needs. Finding and effectively exploiting these resources while mitigating impacts of their use constitute major technical and socio-political challenges and opportunities. Next generation advances in subsurface technologies will enable increases in domestic natural gas supplies, as well as more than 100

  12. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programming Programming Compiling and linking programs on Euclid. Compiling Codes How to compile and link MPI codes on Euclid. Read More » Using the ACML Math Library How to compile and link a code with the ACML library and include the $ACML environment variable. Read More » Process Limits The hard and soft process limits are listed. Read More » Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:07:27

  13. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This page provides examples of compilation and running scripts when mixing CC++ with Fortran codes. Read More Programming Tuning Options Tips for tuning performance on the...

  14. Subsurface materials management and containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2006-10-17

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  15. Subsurface materials management and containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kosteinik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2004-07-06

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  16. Resonant seismic emission of subsurface objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    2009-04-15

    Numerical modeling results and field data indicate that some contrasting subsurface objects (such as tunnels, caves, pipes, filled pits, and fluid-filled fractures) are capable of generating durable resonant oscillations after trapping seismic energy. These oscillations consist of surface types of circumferential waves that repeatedly propagate around the object. The resonant emission of such trapped energy occurs primarily in the form of shear body waves that can be detected by remotely placed receivers. Resonant emission reveals itself in the form of sharp resonant peaks for the late parts of the records, when all strong direct and primary reflected waves are gone. These peaks were observed in field data for a buried barrel filled with water, in 2D finite-difference modeling results, and in the exact canonical solution for a fluid-filled sphere. A computed animation for the diffraction of a plane wave upon a low-velocity elastic sphere confirms the generation of resonances by durable surface waves. Resonant emission has characteristic quasi-hyperbolic traveltime patterns on shot gathers. The inversion of these patterns can be performed in the frequency domain after muting the strong direct and primary scattered waves. Subsurface objects can be detected and imaged at a single resonance frequency without an accurate knowledge of source trigger time. The imaging of subsurface objects requires information about the shear velocity distribution in an embedding medium, which can be done interactively during inversion.

  17. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    using MPI and OpenMP on NERSC systems, the same does not always exist for other supported parallel programming models such as UPC or Chapel. At the same time, we know that these...

  18. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    provided on the Cray systems at NERSC. The Programming Environment is managed by a meta-module named similar to "PrgEnv-gnu4.6". The "gnu" indicates that it is providing the...

  19. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programming Programming Compiling Codes There are three compiler suites available on Carver: Portland Group (PGI), Intel, and GCC. The PGI compilers are the default, to provide compatibility with other NERSC platforms. Read More » Using MKL Intel's Math Kernel Library (MKL) is a library of highly optimized, extensively threaded math routines optimized for Intel processors. Core math functions include BLAS, LAPACK, ScaLAPACK, Sparse Solvers, Fast Fourier Transforms, Vector Math, and more. It is

  20. STOMP Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases: User`s guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, M.D.; Oostrom, M.

    1997-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, through the Office of Technology Development, has requested the demonstration of remediation technologies for the cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated radionuclides within the soil and groundwater at arid sites. This demonstration program, called the VOC-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration Program (Arid-ID), has been initially directed at a volume of unsaturated and saturated soil contaminated with carbon tetrachloride, on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. A principal subtask of the Arid-ID program involves the development of an integrated engineering simulator for evaluating the effectiveness and efficiency of various remediation technologies. The engineering simulator`s intended users include scientists and engineers who are investigating soil physics phenomena associated with remediation technologies. Principal design goals for the engineer simulator include broad applicability, verified algorithms, quality assurance controls, and validated simulations against laboratory and field-scale experiments. An important goal for the simulator development subtask involves the ability to scale laboratory and field-scale experiments to full-scale remediation technologies, and to transfer acquired technology to other arid sites. The STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator has been developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for modeling remediation technologies. Information on the use, application, and theoretical basis of the STOMP simulator theory and discussions on the governing equations, constitutive relations, and numerical solution algorithms for the STOMP simulator.

  1. Parallel heater system for subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Christopher Kelvin (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

    2011-10-25

    A heating system for a subsurface formation is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of substantially horizontally oriented or inclined heater sections located in a hydrocarbon containing layer in the formation. At least a portion of two of the heater sections are substantially parallel to each other. The ends of at least two of the heater sections in the layer are electrically coupled to a substantially horizontal, or inclined, electrical conductor oriented substantially perpendicular to the ends of the at least two heater sections.

  2. Low temperature monitoring system for subsurface barriers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); McKinzie, II. Billy John (Houston, TX)

    2009-08-18

    A system for monitoring temperature of a subsurface low temperature zone is described. The system includes a plurality of freeze wells configured to form the low temperature zone, one or more lasers, and a fiber optic cable coupled to at least one laser. A portion of the fiber optic cable is positioned in at least one freeze well. At least one laser is configured to transmit light pulses into a first end of the fiber optic cable. An analyzer is coupled to the fiber optic cable. The analyzer is configured to receive return signals from the light pulses.

  3. Subsurface Technology and Engineering RD&D Crosscut | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Subsurface Technology and Engineering RD&D Crosscut Subsurface Technology and Engineering RD&D Crosscut Subsurface Technology and Engineering RD&D Crosscut The Subsurface Technology and Engineering Research, Development, and Demonstration (SubTER) Crosscut encompasses DOE offices involved in subsurface activities that are aligned with energy production/extraction, subsurface storage of energy and CO2, and subsurface waste disposal and environmental remediation. Energy sources

  4. LANL researchers develop platform to study subsurface reservoir conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subsurface reservoir conditions LANL researchers develop platform to study subsurface reservoir conditions This increasing demand for energy around the globe requires a better understanding of subsurface energy resources and their associated environmental issues. March 7, 2016 Shown are time lapse images of supercritical CO2 displacing water in a fracture etched into a shale micromodel. The white, blue and gray colors represent supercritical CO2, water and shale, respectively. Shown are time

  5. Grand Challenges: Request for Information on the Subsurface | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Grand Challenges: Request for Information on the Subsurface Grand Challenges: Request for Information on the Subsurface May 14, 2014 - 4:10pm Addthis Subsurface reservoirs account for more than 80% of U.S. primary energy, and they offer vast potential for the storage of energy, CO2, and nuclear waste. Finding and effectively exploiting these resources while mitigating impacts of their use constitute major technical and socio-political challenges and opportunities. Next generation

  6. Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) sites. The ABRS AFRI site provides a unique setting for researchers in both applied and basic science fields. A wealth of subsurface data is ...

  7. Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security (CFSES) |...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security (CFSES) Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers EFRC External Websites Research Science Highlights News & Events ...

  8. Program

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles SEPTEMBER 19 -23, 2004 CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles © 2004, American Society for Microbiology 1752 N Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20036-2904 Phone: 202-737-3600 World Wide Web: www.asm.org All Rights Reserved Printed in the United States of America ISBN: 1-55581 324-0 TABLE OF CONTENTS General Information Scientific Program Abstracts for Oral Sessions Abstracts for Poster

  9. Complex Systems Science for Subsurface Fate and Transport Report from the August 2009 Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-03-01

    The subsurface environment, which encompasses the vadose and saturated zones, is a heterogeneous, geologically complex domain. Believed to contain a large percentage of Earth's biomass in the form of microorganisms, the subsurface is a dynamic zone where important biogeochemical cycles work to sustain life. Actively linked to the atmosphere and biosphere through the hydrologic and carbon cycles, the subsurface serves as a storage location for much of Earth's fresh water. Coupled hydrological, microbiological, and geochemical processes occurring within the subsurface environment cause the local and regional natural chemical fluxes that govern water quality. These processes play a vital role in the formation of soil, economically important fossil fuels, mineral deposits, and other natural resources. Cleaning up Department of Energy (DOE) lands impacted by legacy wastes and using the subsurface for carbon sequestration or nuclear waste isolation require a firm understanding of these processes and the documented means to characterize the vertical and spatial distribution of subsurface properties directing water, nutrient, and contaminant flows. This information, along with credible, predictive models that integrate hydrological, microbiological, and geochemical knowledge over a range of scales, is needed to forecast the sustainability of subsurface water systems and to devise ways to manage and manipulate dynamic in situ processes for beneficial outcomes. Predictive models provide the context for knowledge integration. They are the primary tools for forecasting the evolving geochemistry or microbial ecology of groundwater under various scenarios and for assessing and optimizing the potential effectiveness of proposed approaches to carbon sequestration, waste isolation, or environmental remediation. An iterative approach of modeling and experimentation can reveal powerful insights into the behavior of subsurface systems. State-of-science understanding codified in models can provide a basis for testing hypotheses, guiding experiment design, integrating scientific knowledge on multiple environmental systems into a common framework, and translating this information to support informed decision making and policies. Subsurface behavior typically has been investigated using reductionist, or bottom-up approaches. In these approaches, mechanisms of small-scale processes are quantified, and key aspects of their behaviors are moved up to the prediction scale using scaling laws and models. Reductionism has and will continue to yield essential and comprehensive understanding of the molecular and microscopic underpinnings of component processes. However, system-scale predictions cannot always be made with bottom-up approaches because the behaviors of subsurface environments often simply do not result from the sum of smaller-scale process interactions. Systems exhibiting such behavior are termed complex and can range from the molecular to field scale in size. Complex systems contain many interactive parts and display collective behavior including emergence, feedback, and adaptive mechanisms. Microorganisms - key moderators of subsurface chemical processes - further challenge system understanding and prediction because they are adaptive life forms existing in an environment difficult to observe and measure. A new scientific approach termed complex systems science has evolved from the critical need to understand and model these systems, whose distinguishing features increasingly are found to be common in the natural world. In contrast to reductionist approaches, complexity methods often use a top-down approach to identify key interactions controlling diagnostic variables at the prediction scale; general macroscopic laws controlling system-scale behavior; and essential, simplified models of subsystem interactions that enable prediction. This approach is analogous to systems biology, which emphasizes the tight coupling between experimentation and modeling and is defined, in the context of Biological Systems Science research programs under DOE'

  10. Optimal joule heating of the subsurface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

  11. Optimal joule heating of the subsurface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berryman, J.G.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-07-05

    A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating is disclosed. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

  12. Method and Compositions for Treatment of Subsurface Contaminants - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Find More Like This Return to Search Method and Compositions for Treatment of Subsurface Contaminants Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryThis invention describes compositions and methods for oxidizing subsurface contaminants. Compositions include compatible combinations of surfactants, cosolvents and chemical oxidants. DescriptionCompositions have been identified that

  13. Accelerating Subsurface Transport Simulation on Heterogeneous Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villa, Oreste; Gawande, Nitin A.; Tumeo, Antonino

    2013-09-23

    Reactive transport numerical models simulate chemical and microbiological reactions that occur along a flowpath. These models have to compute reactions for a large number of locations. They solve the set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that describes the reaction for each location through the Newton-Raphson technique. This technique involves computing a Jacobian matrix and a residual vector for each set of equation, and then solving iteratively the linearized system by performing Gaussian Elimination and LU decomposition until convergence. STOMP, a well known subsurface flow simulation tool, employs matrices with sizes in the order of 100x100 elements and, for numerical accuracy, LU factorization with full pivoting instead of the faster partial pivoting. Modern high performance computing systems are heterogeneous machines whose nodes integrate both CPUs and GPUs, exposing unprecedented amounts of parallelism. To exploit all their computational power, applications must use both the types of processing elements. For the case of subsurface flow simulation, this mainly requires implementing efficient batched LU-based solvers and identifying efficient solutions for enabling load balancing among the different processors of the system. In this paper we discuss two approaches that allows scaling STOMP's performance on heterogeneous clusters. We initially identify the challenges in implementing batched LU-based solvers for small matrices on GPUs, and propose an implementation that fulfills STOMP's requirements. We compare this implementation to other existing solutions. Then, we combine the batched GPU solver with an OpenMP-based CPU solver, and present an adaptive load balancer that dynamically distributes the linear systems to solve between the two components inside a node. We show how these approaches, integrated into the full application, provide speed ups from 6 to 7 times on large problems, executed on up to 16 nodes of a cluster with two AMD Opteron 6272 and a Tesla M2090 per node.

  14. Characterization of Microbial Communities in Subsurface Nuclear Blast Cavities of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, Duane P.; Bruckner, Jim; Fisher, Jen; Czerwinski, Ken; Russell, Charles E.; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2010-09-01

    This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this programs Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

  15. RADIOIODINE GEOCHEMISTRY IN THE SRS SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.; Emerson, H.; Powell, B.; Roberts, K.; Zhang, S.; Xu, C.; Schwer, K.; Li, H.; Ho, Y.; Denham, M.; Yeager, C.; Santschi, P.

    2013-05-16

    Iodine-129 is one of the key risk drivers for several Savannah River Site (SRS) performance assessments (PA), including that for the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility in E-Area. In an effort to reduce the uncertainty associated with the conceptual model and the input values used in PA, several studies have recently been conducted dealing with radioiodine geochemistry at the SRS. The objective of this report was to review these recent studies and evaluate their implications on SRS PA calculations. For the first time, these studies measured iodine speciation in SRS groundwater and provided technical justification for assuming the presence of more strongly sorbing species (iodate and organo-iodine), and measured greater iodine sediment sorption when experiments included these newly identified species; specifically they measured greater sorption coefficients (K{sub d} values: the concentration ratio of iodine on the solid phase divided by the concentration in the aqueous phase). Based on these recent studies, new best estimates were proposed for future PA calculations. The new K{sub d} values are greater than previous recommended values. These proposed K{sub d} values reflect a better understanding of iodine geochemistry in the SRS subsurface environment, which permits reducing the associated conservatism included in the original estimates to account for uncertainty. Among the key contributing discoveries supporting the contention that the K{sub d} values should be increased are that: 1) not only iodide (I{sup -}), but also the more strongly sorbing iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup -}) species exists in SRS groundwater (average total iodine = 15% iodide, 42% iodate, and 43% organoiodine), 2) when iodine was added as iodate, the measured K{sub d} values were 2 to 6 times greater than when the iodine was added as iodide, and perhaps most importantly, 3) higher desorption (10 to 20 mL/g) than (ad)sorption (all previous studies) K{sub d} values were measured. The implications of this latter point is that the iodine desorption process would be appreciably slower than the (ad)sorption process, and as such would control the rate (and the PA K{sub d} value) that iodine sorbed to and therefore migrated through the subsurface sediment. High desorption K{sub d} values would result in the effective K{sub d} for a reactive transport model being closer to the desorption K{sub d} value (the rate limiting value) than the (ad)sorption K{sub d} value. In summary, our understanding of {sup 129}I geochemistry has greatly improved, reducing the uncertainty associated with the PAs conceptual model, thereby permitting us to reduce the conservatism presently incorporated in PA input values to describe {sup 129}I fate and transport in the SRS subsurface environment.

  16. Poster on Subsurface Technology & Engineering Research, Development, and Demonstration Crosscut (SubTER)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A new DOE Subsurface Crosscut, known as SubTER, coalesces energy technologies that use the subsurface for energy production, storage, and waste management.

  17. Enhanced bioremediation of subsurface contamination: Enzyme recruitment and redesign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockman, F.J.; Ornstein, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    Subsurface systems containing radionuclide, heavy metal, and organic wastes must be carefully attended to avoid further impacts to the environment or exposures to human populations. It is appropriate, therefore, to invest in basic research to develop the requisite tools and methods for addressing complex cleanup problems. The rational modification of subsurface microoganisms by enzyme recruitment and enzyme design, in concert with engineered systems for delivery of microorganisms and nutrients to the contaminated zone, are potentially useful tools in the spectrum of approaches that will be required for successful remediation of deep subsurface contamination.

  18. Development of Enabling Scientific Tools to Characterize the Geologic Subsurface at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenna, Timothy C.; Herron, Michael M.

    2014-07-08

    This final report to the Department of Energy provides a summary of activities conducted under our exploratory grant, funded through U.S. DOE Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program in the category of enabling scientific tools, which covers the period from July 15, 2010 to July 14, 2013. The main goal of this exploratory project is to determine the parameters necessary to translate existing borehole log data into reservoir properties following scientifically sound petrophysical relationships. For this study, we focused on samples and Ge-based spectral gamma logging system (SGLS) data collected from wells located in the Hanford 300 Area. The main activities consisted of 1) the analysis of available core samples for a variety of mineralogical, chemical and physical; 2) evaluation of selected spectral gamma logs, environmental corrections, and calibration; 3) development of algorithms and a proposed workflow that permits translation of log responses into useful reservoir properties such as lithology, matrix density, porosity, and permeability. These techniques have been successfully employed in the petroleum industry; however, the approach is relatively new when applied to subsurface remediation. This exploratory project has been successful in meeting its stated objectives. We have demonstrated that our approach can lead to an improved interpretation of existing well log data. The algorithms we developed can utilize available log data, in particular gamma, and spectral gamma logs, and continued optimization will improve their application to ERSP goals of understanding subsurface properties.

  19. DOE Solicits Feedback on Subsurface Characterization to Commercialize Viable EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To better engineer commercially viable EGS technologies, the Energy Department is soliciting information to more accurately measure and quantify vital subsurface parameters in EGS settings and how they change throughout EGS development phases.

  20. Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Subsurface geology of the Raft River...

  1. proposed designs for surface and subsurface information rooms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Buried Room and Information Center located in middle of the berm Isometric view of the a subsurface room magnets could be used to alert would be intruders Information Center...

  2. Monitoring the subsurface with quasi-static deformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sneider, Roel; Spetzler, Hartmut

    2013-09-06

    This project consisted of three sub-projects that are all aimed at monitoring the subsurface with geophysical methods. The objectives of these sub-projects are: to investigate the use of seismic waves for remote monitoring of temperature changes in the Yucca Mountain nuclear repository; to investigate the use of measured changes in the tidal tilt as a diagnostic for the infiltration of fluids in the subsurface; and to extract the electrostatic response from dynamic field fluctuations.

  3. 2014 JASON Report: State of Stress in Engineered Subsurface Systems |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 14 JASON Report: State of Stress in Engineered Subsurface Systems 2014 JASON Report: State of Stress in Engineered Subsurface Systems September 26, 2014 - 12:04pm Addthis JASON study members stand on a basaltic dike exposure below the La Jolla cliffs while professor Yuri Fialko of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (back left) describes how its orientation is controlled by the stress field at the time of emplacement. Credit: Benjamin Phillips JASON study members

  4. Subsurface void detection using seismic tomographic imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritto, Roland

    2003-06-26

    Tomographic imaging has been widely used in scientific and medical fields to remotely image media in a nondestructive way. This paper introduces a spectrum of seismic imaging applications to detect and characterize voids in coal mines. The application of seismic waves to detect changes in coal relies on two types of waves: body waves refracted along the interface between coal and bedrock (i.e., refracted P-waves) and channel waves that propagate directly through the coal (dispersive wave trains of the Rayleigh or Love type). For example, a P-wave tomography study to find underlying old mine workings in a coal mine in England, produced velocity patterns that revealed increases in velocity where high stress concentrations occur in the rock, which are most likely connected to old pillars left in support of the old working areas. At the same time, low velocities were found in areas of low stress concentrations, which are related to roof collapses indicating the locations of mined areas below. The application of channel wave tomography to directly image the presence of gaseous CO{sub 2} in a low velocity oil reservoir showed that the injected CO{sub 2} followed an ancient flow channel in the reservoir migrating from the injector to the producer well. The study showed how channel waves are preferable over refracted P-waves, as the latter were only marginally affected by the presence of the gas in the low-velocity channel. Similar approaches show great promise for the detection of voids in coal mines. Finally, a newly developed technique, based on scattering theory, revealed that the location and the size of a subsurface cavity could be accurately determined even in the presence of strong correlated and uncorrelated noise.

  5. Geophysical subsurface imaging and interface identification.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendley, Kevin; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Day, David Minot; Robinson, Allen Conrad; Weiss, Chester Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Electromagnetic induction is a classic geophysical exploration method designed for subsurface characterization--in particular, sensing the presence of geologic heterogeneities and fluids such as groundwater and hydrocarbons. Several approaches to the computational problems associated with predicting and interpreting electromagnetic phenomena in and around the earth are addressed herein. Publications resulting from the project include [31]. To obtain accurate and physically meaningful numerical simulations of natural phenomena, computational algorithms should operate in discrete settings that reflect the structure of governing mathematical models. In section 2, the extension of algebraic multigrid methods for the time domain eddy current equations to the frequency domain problem is discussed. Software was developed and is available in Trilinos ML package. In section 3 we consider finite element approximations of De Rham's complex. We describe how to develop a family of finite element spaces that forms an exact sequence on hexahedral grids. The ensuing family of non-affine finite elements is called a van Welij complex, after the work [37] of van Welij who first proposed a general method for developing tangentially and normally continuous vector fields on hexahedral elements. The use of this complex is illustrated for the eddy current equations and a conservation law problem. Software was developed and is available in the Ptenos finite element package. The more popular methods of geophysical inversion seek solutions to an unconstrained optimization problem by imposing stabilizing constraints in the form of smoothing operators on some enormous set of model parameters (i.e. ''over-parametrize and regularize''). In contrast we investigate an alternative approach whereby sharp jumps in material properties are preserved in the solution by choosing as model parameters a modest set of variables which describe an interface between adjacent regions in physical space. While still over-parametrized, this choice of model space contains far fewer parameters than before, thus easing the computational burden, in some cases, of the optimization problem. And most importantly, the associated finite element discretization is aligned with the abrupt changes in material properties associated with lithologic boundaries as well as the interface between buried cultural artifacts and the surrounding Earth. In section 4, algorithms and tools are described that associate a smooth interface surface to a given triangulation. In particular, the tools support surface refinement and coarsening. Section 5 describes some preliminary results on the application of interface identification methods to some model problems in geophysical inversion. Due to time constraints, the results described here use the GNU Triangulated Surface Library for the manipulation of surface meshes and the TetGen software library for the generation of tetrahedral meshes.

  6. The Stimulation of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs with Subsurface Nuclear Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LORENZ,JOHN C.

    2000-12-08

    Between 1965 and 1979 there were five documented and one or more inferred attempts to stimulate the production from hydrocarbon reservoirs by detonating nuclear devices in reservoir strata. Of the five documented tests, three were carried out by the US in low-permeability, natural-gas bearing, sandstone-shale formations, and two were done in the USSR within oil-bearing carbonates. The objectives of the US stimulation efforts were to increase porosity and permeability in a reservoir around a specific well by creating a chimney of rock rubble with fractures extending beyond it, and to connect superimposed reservoir layers. In the USSR, the intent was to extensively fracture an existing reservoir in the more general vicinity of producing wells, again increasing overall permeability and porosity. In both countries, the ultimate goals were to increase production rates and ultimate recovery from the reservoirs. Subsurface explosive devices ranging from 2.3 to about 100 kilotons were used at depths ranging from 1208 m (3963 ft) to 2568 m (8427 ft). Post-shot problems were encountered, including smaller-than-calculated fracture zones, formation damage, radioactivity of the product, and dilution of the BTU value of tie natural gas with inflammable gases created by the explosion. Reports also suggest that production-enhancement factors from these tests fell short of expectations. Ultimately, the enhanced-production benefits of the tests were insufficient to support continuation of the pro-grams within increasingly adversarial political, economic, and social climates, and attempts to stimulate hydrocarbon reservoirs with nuclear devices have been terminated in both countries.

  7. Enhancing technology acceptance: The role of the subsurface contaminants focus area external integration team

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirwan-Taylor, H.; McCabe, G.H.; Lesperance, A.; Kauffman, J.; Serie, P.; Dressen, L.

    1996-09-01

    The US DOE is developing and deploying innovative technologies for cleaning up its contaminated facilities using a market-oriented approach. This report describes the activities of the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area`s (SCFA) External Integration Team (EIT) in supporting DOE`s technology development program. The SCFA program for technology development is market-oriented, driven by the needs of end users. The purpose of EIT is to understand the technology needs of the DOE sites and identify technology acceptance criteria from users and other stakeholders to enhance deployment of innovative technologies. Stakeholders include regulators, technology users, Native Americans, and environmental and other interest groups. The success of this national program requires close coordination and communication among technology developers and stakeholders to work through all of the various phases of planning and implementation. Staff involved must be willing to commit significant amounts of time to extended discussions with the various stakeholders.

  8. The microbial methane cycle in subsurface sediments. Final project report, July 1, 1993--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossman, E.L.; Ammerman, J.W.; Suflita, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    The objectives of this study were to determine the factors controlling microbial activity and survival in the subsurface and, specifically, to determine whether microbial communities in aquitards and in aquifer microenvironments provide electron donors and/or acceptors that enhance microbial survival in aquifers. Although the original objectives were to focus on methane cycling, the authors pursued an opportunity to study sulfur cycling in aquifer systems, a process of much greater importance in microbial activity and survival, and in the mobility of metals in the subsurface. Furthermore, sulfur cycling is pertinent to the Subsurface Science Program`s study at Cerro Negro, New Mexico. The study combined field and laboratory approaches and microbiological, molecular, geochemical, and hydrogeological techniques. During drilling operations, sediments were collected aseptically and assayed for a variety of microorganisms and metabolic capabilities including total counts, viable aerobic heterotrophs, total anaerobic heterotrophs, sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfate reduction activity (in situ and in slurries), methanogens, methanotrophs, and Fe- and S-oxidizers, among others. Geochemical analyses of sediments included organic carbon content and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio, sulfur chemistry (reduced sulfur, sulfate), {sup 34}S/{sup 32}S, {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C, {sup 14}C, tritium, etc. The authors drilled eight boreholes in the Eocene Yegua formation at four localities on the Texas A&M University campus using a hollow-stem auger drilling rig. The drilling pattern forms a T, with three well clusters along the dip direction and two along strike. Four boreholes were sampled for sediments and screened at the deepest sand interval encountered, and four boreholes were drilled to install wells in shallower sands. Boreholes range in depth from 8 to 31 m, with screened intervals ranging from 6 to 31 m. Below are the results of these field studies.

  9. Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard C. Logan

    2002-03-28

    The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment; Vital U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

  10. Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Kubicek

    2001-09-07

    The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire or related event. (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment. (3) Vital US. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards. (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE. (5) Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

  11. Method for formation of subsurface barriers using viscous colloids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.; Persoff, P.; Moridis, G.; Pruess, K.

    1998-11-17

    A method is described for formation of subsurface barriers using viscous liquids where a viscous liquid solidifies at a controlled rate after injection into soil and forms impermeable isolation of the material enclosed within the subsurface barriers. The viscous liquid is selected from the group consisting of polybutenes, polysiloxanes, colloidal silica and modified colloidal silica of which solidification is controlled by gelling, cooling or cross-linking. Solidification timing is controlled by dilution, addition of brines, coating with alumina, stabilization with various agents and by temperature. 17 figs.

  12. Method for formation of subsurface barriers using viscous colloids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apps, John A. (Lafayette, CA); Persoff, Peter (Piedmont, CA); Moridis, George (Oakland, CA); Pruess, Karsten (Berkeley, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A method for formation of subsurface barriers using viscous liquids where a viscous liquid solidifies at a controlled rate after injection into soil and forms impermeable isolation of the material enclosed within the subsurface barriers. The viscous liquid is selected from the group consisting of polybutenes, polysilotanes, colloidal silica and modified colloidal silica of which solidification is controlled by gelling, cooling or cross-linking. Solidification timing is controlled by dilution, addition of brines, coating with alumina, stabilization with various agents and by temperature.

  13. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2015-04-06

    In this project, inter-disciplinary research activities were conducted in collaboration among investigators at The University of Alabama (UA), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light source (SSRL) to: (i) confirm that phosphatase activities of subsurface bacteria in Area 2 and 3 from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center result in solid U-phosphate precipitation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions; (ii) investigate the eventual competition between uranium biomineralization via U-phosphate precipitation and uranium bioreduction; (iii) determine subsurface microbial community structure changes of Area 2 soils following organophosphate amendments; (iv) obtain the complete genome sequences of the Rahnella sp. Y9-602 and the type-strain Rahnella aquatilis ATCC 33071 isolated from these soils; (v) determine if polyphosphate accumulation and phytate hydrolysis can be used to promote U(VI) biomineralization in subsurface sediments; (vi) characterize the effect of uranium on phytate hydrolysis by a new microorganism isolated from uranium-contaminated sediments; (vii) utilize positron-emission tomography to label and track metabolically-active bacteria in soil columns, and (viii) study the stability of the uranium phosphate mineral product. Microarray analyses and mineral precipitation characterizations were conducted in collaboration with DOE SBR-funded investigators at LBNL. Thus, microbial phosphorus metabolism has been shown to have a contributing role to uranium immobilization in the subsurface.

  14. Heating subsurface formations by oxidizing fuel on a fuel carrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Costello, Michael; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2012-10-02

    A method of heating a portion of a subsurface formation includes drawing fuel on a fuel carrier through an opening formed in the formation. Oxidant is supplied to the fuel at one or more locations in the opening. The fuel is combusted with the oxidant to provide heat to the formation.

  15. Bioventing approach to remediate a gasoline contaminated subsurface. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kampbell, D.H.; Wilson, J.T.; Griffin, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    Bioventing is a subsurface process using an air stream to enhance biodegradation of oily contaminants. Two pilot-scale bioventing systems were installed at a field site. Process operations began in October 1990. The field site is located at an air station. A spill in 1969 of about 100,000 kilograms aviation gasoline was caused by a broken underground transfer line. A major portion of the spilled product still persists as an oily-phase residue in a 80x360 meter plume. The subsurface is a uniform beach sand with the ground water level near five meters. Prior to startup of the venting systems, a grass cover was established and a nutrient solution was dispersed throughout the unsaturated subsurface. Subsurface air flow patterns are being determined with a tracer gas of sulfur hexafloride. Soil gas, core material, and underground water are being monitored to determine the extent of remediation. Objectives of the study are to demonstrate that surface emissions of gasoline are minimal, oily residue will be reduced to <100 mg fuel carbon/Kg core material, and the process will be applicable to full-scale remediation. Flow rate is based on a calculated residence time of 24 hours. Surface emission of fuel hydrocarbons have not exceeded 1 micrograms/liter soil gas.

  16. Cone Penetrometer for Subsurface Heavy Metals Detection. Semiannual report, November 1, 1996--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grisanti, Ames A.; Timpe, Ronald C.; Foster, H.J.; Eylands, Kurt E.; Crocker, Charlene R.

    1997-12-31

    Surface and subsurface contamination of soils by heavy metals, including Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Cd, has become an area of concern for many industrial and government organizations (1). Conventional sampling and analysis techniques for soil provide a high degree of sensitivity and selectivity for individual analytes. However, obtaining a representative sampling and analysis from a particular site using conventional techniques is time consuming and costly (2). Additionally, conventional methods are difficult to implement in the field for in situ and/or real-time applications. Therefore, there is a need for characterization and monitoring techniques for heavy metals in soils which allow cost-effective, rapid, in situ measurements. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to successfully measure metals content in a variety of matrices (3-15) including soil (16,17). Under the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) Industry Program, Science {ampersand} Engineering Associates (SEA) is developing a subsurface cone penetrometer (CPT) probe for heavy metals detection that employs LIBS (18). The LIES-CPT unit is to be applied to in situ, real-time sampling and analysis of heavy metals in soil. As part of its contract with DOE FETC, SEA is scheduled to field test its LIBS-CPT system in September 1997.

  17. Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. )

    1992-04-01

    This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE's Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

  18. LM Program Update Newsletter

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 Pinellas Site Uses Horizontal Wells for Enhanced Bioremediation Operations to develop and manufacture components at the former Pinellas Plant in Florida during the nation's Cold War-era nuclear weapons program, released solvents to subsurface soils beneath the plant's 11-acre Building 100. Release areas became sources of dissolved contamination, creating groundwater plumes that extended south and east from the source areas beneath Building 100 and onto private property. After the Cold War

  19. Using electrical impedance tomography to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G.; Daily, William D.; Ramirez, Abelardo L.; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2000-01-01

    The use of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity. EIT can be used to map hydraulic conductivity in the subsurface where measurements of both amplitude and phase are made. Hydraulic conductivity depends on at least two parameters: porosity and a length scale parameter. Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) measures and maps electrical conductivity (which can be related to porosity) in three dimensions. By introducing phase measurements along with amplitude, the desired additional measurement of a pertinent length scale can be achieved. Hydraulic conductivity controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the surface. Thus inexpensive maps of hydraulic conductivity would improve planning strategies for subsequent remediation efforts. Fluid permeability is also of importance for oil field exploitation and thus detailed knowledge of fluid permeability distribution in three-dimension (3-D) would be a great boon to petroleum reservoir analysts.

  20. Subsurface Technology & Engineering Research (SubTER) Internship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Opportunities Subsurface Technology & Engineering Research (SubTER) Internship Opportunities - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization

  1. Downhole burner systems and methods for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmayan, Walter Farman (Houston, TX); Giles, Steven Paul (Damon, TX); Brignac, Jr., Joseph Phillip (Katy, TX); Munshi, Abdul Wahid (Houston, TX); Abbasi, Faraz (Sugarland, TX); Clomburg, Lloyd Anthony (Houston, TX); Anderson, Karl Gregory (Missouri City, TX); Tsai, Kuochen (Katy, TX); Siddoway, Mark Alan (Katy, TX)

    2011-05-31

    A gas burner assembly for heating a subsurface formation includes an oxidant conduit, a fuel conduit, and a plurality of oxidizers coupled to the oxidant conduit. At least one of the oxidizers includes a mix chamber for mixing fuel from the fuel conduit with oxidant from the oxidant conduit, an igniter, and a shield. The shield includes a plurality of openings in communication with the oxidant conduit. At least one flame stabilizer is coupled to the shield.

  2. Method of sealing casings of subsurface materials management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2007-02-06

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  3. Multi-step heater deployment in a subsurface formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX)

    2012-04-03

    A method for installing a horizontal or inclined subsurface heater includes placing a heating section of a heater in a horizontal or inclined section of a wellbore with an installation tool. The tool is uncoupled from the heating section. A lead in section is mechanically and electrically coupled to the heating section of the heater. The lead-in section is located in an angled or vertical section of the wellbore.

  4. Subsurface Site Characterization Work Plan for the Rulison Site, Colorado

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Subsurface Site Characterization Work Plan for the Rulison Site, Colorado Controlled Copy No.: Revision No.: 0 October 2004 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1009 Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at

  5. Methods and system for subsurface stabilization using jet grouting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loomis, Guy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Weidner, Jerry R. (Iona, ID); Farnsworth, Richard K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jessmore, James J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and systems are provided for stabilizing a subsurface area such as a buried waste pit for either long term storage, or interim storage and retrieval. A plurality of holes are drilled into the subsurface area with a high pressure drilling system provided with a drill stem having jet grouting nozzles. A grouting material is injected at high pressure through the jet grouting nozzles into a formed hole while the drill stem is withdrawn from the hole at a predetermined rate of rotation and translation. A grout-filled column is thereby formed with minimal grout returns, which when overlapped with other adjacent grout-filled columns encapsulates and binds the entire waste pit area to form a subsurface agglomeration or monolith of grout, soil, and waste. The formed monolith stabilizes the buried waste site against subsidence while simultaneously providing a barrier against contaminate migration. The stabilized monolith can be left permanently in place or can be retrieved if desired by using appropriate excavation equipment. The jet grouting technique can also be utilized in a pretreatment approach prior to in situ vitrification of a buried waste site. The waste encapsulation methods and systems are applicable to buried waste materials such as mixed waste, hazardous waste, or radioactive waste.

  6. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research FY11 Second Quarter Performance Measure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2011-03-31

    The Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Long Term Measure for 2011 under the Performance Assessment Rating Tool (PART) measure is to "Refine subsurface transport models by developing computational methods to link important processes impacting contaminant transport at smaller scales to the field scale." The second quarter performance measure is to "Provide a report on computational methods linking genome-enabled understanding of microbial metabolism with reactive transport models to describe processes impacting contaminant transport in the subsurface." Microorganisms such as bacteria are by definition small (typically on the order of a micron in size), and their behavior is controlled by their local biogeochemical environment (typically within a single pore or a biofilm on a grain surface, on the order of tens of microns in size). However, their metabolic activity exerts strong influence on the transport and fate of groundwater contaminants of significant concern at DOE sites, in contaminant plumes with spatial extents of meters to kilometers. This report describes progress and key findings from research aimed at integrating models of microbial metabolism based on genomic information (small scale) with models of contaminant fate and transport in aquifers (field scale).

  7. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Funding Opportunity Announced for Regional and Global Climate Modeling and ASR Bookmark and Share The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science is now accepting applications for Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) grants on topics related to the "Reduction of Tropical Cloud and Precipitation Biases in Global High Resolution Models" under the Regional and Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) programs. Priority will be given to

  8. Novel Tube-in-Tube System Simplifies Subsurface Fluid Sampling

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2011-01-21

    Barry Freifeld of Berkeley Lab has developed a device that simplifies subsurface fluid sampling. The technology’s tube-within-a-tube construction is a substantial improvement to the U-tube sampling system widely used for borehole sampling today. Using only one line, instead of two, the tube-in-tube system enables the sampling device to get lowered easily through a pressure control device (such as a grease head or pack-off) for discrete level sampling of live oil and gas wells...

  9. Linking deposit morphology and clogging in subsurface remediation: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, David C.

    2013-12-11

    Groundwater is a crucial resource for water supply, especially in arid and semiarid areas of the United States west of the 100th meridian. Accordingly, remediation of contaminated groundwater is an important application of science and technology, particularly for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which oversees a number of groundwater remediation sites from Cold War era mining. Groundwater remediation is complex, because it depends on identifying, locating, and treating contaminants in the subsurface, where remediation reactions depend on interacting geological, hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological factors. Within this context, permeability is a fundamental concept, because it controls the rates and pathways of groundwater flow. Colloid science is intimately related to permeability, because when colloids are present (particles with equivalent diameters between 1 nanometer and 10 micrometers), changes in hydrological or geochemical conditions can trigger a detrimental reduction in permeability called clogging. Accordingly, clogging is a major concern in groundwater remediation. Several lines of evidence suggest that clogging by colloids depends on (1) colloid deposition, and (2) deposit morphology, that is, the structure of colloid deposits, which can be quantified as a fractal dimension. This report describes research, performed under a 2-year, exploratory grant from the DOEs Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) program. This research employed a novel laboratory technique to simultaneously measure flow, colloid deposition, deposit morphology, and permeability in a flow cell, and also collected field samples from wells at the DOEs Old Rifle remediation site. Field results indicate that suspended solids at the Old Rifle site have fractal structures. Laboratory results indicate that clogging is associated with colloid deposits with smaller fractal dimensions, in accordance with previous studies on initially clean granular media. Preliminary modeling has identified the deposit radius of gyration as a candidate variable to account for clogging as a function of (1) colloid accumulation and (2) deposit morphology.

  10. U.S. Department of Energy Subsurface Technology and Engineering RD&D Crosscutting Team

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control for a Safe and Effective Energy Future U.S. Department of Energy Subsurface Technology and Engineering RD&D Crosscutting Team Introduction While subsurface sources constitute the Nation's primary source of energy (providing more than 80 percent of total U.S. energy needs today), they are also critical to the Nation's low-carbon and secure energy future. Next generation advances in subsurface technologies will enable access to more than 100 gigawatt-electric (GWe) of clean, renewable

  11. Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramirez, A.L.; Chesnut, D.A.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-09-13

    A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations. 1 fig.

  12. Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Chesnut, Dwayne A. (San Francisco, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations.

  13. Method for Implementing Subsurface Solid Derived Concentration Guideline Levels (DCGL) - 12331

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lively, J.W.

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other federal agencies currently approve the Multi-Agency Radiation Site Survey and Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) as guidance for licensees who are conducting final radiological status surveys in support of decommissioning. MARSSIM provides a method to demonstrate compliance with the applicable regulation by comparing residual radioactivity in surface soils with derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs), but specifically discounts its applicability to subsurface soils. Many sites and facilities undergoing decommissioning contain subsurface soils that are potentially impacted by radiological constituents. In the absence of specific guidance designed to address the derivation of subsurface soil DCGLs and compliance demonstration, decommissioning facilities have attempted to apply DCGLs and final status survey techniques designed specifically for surface soils to subsurface soils. The decision to apply surface soil limits and surface soil compliance metrics to subsurface soils typically results in significant over-excavation with associated cost escalation. MACTEC, Inc. has developed the overarching concepts and principles found in recent NRC decommissioning guidance in NUREG 1757 to establish a functional method to derive dose-based subsurface soil DCGLs. The subsurface soil method developed by MACTEC also establishes a rigorous set of criterion-based data evaluation metrics (with analogs to the MARSSIM methodology) that can be used to demonstrate compliance with the developed subsurface soil DCGLs. The method establishes a continuum of volume factors that relate the size and depth of a volume of subsurface soil having elevated concentrations of residual radioactivity with its ability to produce dose. The method integrates the subsurface soil sampling regime with the derivation of the subsurface soil DCGL such that a self-regulating optimization is naturally sought by both the responsible party and regulator. This paper describes the concepts and basis used by MACTEC to develop the dose-based subsurface soil DCGL method. The paper will show how MACTEC's method can be used to demonstrate that higher concentrations of residual radioactivity in subsurface soils (as compared with surface soils) can meet the NRC's dose-based regulations. MACTEC's method has been used successfully to obtain the NRC's radiological release at a site with known radiological impacts to subsurface soils exceeding the surface soil DCGL, saving both time and cost. Having considered the current NRC guidance for consideration of residual radioactivity in subsurface soils during decommissioning, MACTEC has developed a technically based approach to the derivation of and demonstration of compliance with subsurface soil DCGLs for radionuclides. In fact, the process uses the already accepted concepts and metrics approved for surface soils as the foundation for deriving scaling factors used to calculate subsurface soil DCGLs that are at least equally protective of the decommissioning annual dose standard. Each of the elements identified for consideration in the current NRC guidance is addressed in this proposed method. Additionally, there is considerable conservatism built into the assumptions and techniques used to arrive at subsurface soil scaling factors and DCGLs. The degree of conservatism embodied in the approach used is such that risk managers and decision makers approving and using subsurface soil DCGLs derived in accordance with this method can be confident that the future exposures will be well below permissible and safe levels. The technical basis for the method can be applied to a broad variety of sites with residual radioactivity in subsurface soils. Given the costly nature of soil surveys, excavation, and disposal of soils as low-level radioactive waste, MACTEC's method for deriving and demonstrating compliance with subsurface soil DCGLs offers the possibility of significant cost savings over the traditional approach of applying surface soil DCGLs to subsurface soils. Furthermore, while yet untested, MACTEC believes that the concepts and methods embodied in this approach could readily be applied to other types of contamination found in subsurface soils. (author)

  14. Ranging methods for developing wellbores in subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Duncan (Houston, TX)

    2011-09-06

    A method for forming two or more wellbores in a subsurface formation includes forming a first wellbore in the formation. A second wellbore is directionally drilled in a selected relationship relative to the first wellbore. At least one magnetic field is provided in the second wellbore using one or more magnets in the second wellbore located on a drilling string used to drill the second wellbore. At least one magnetic field is sensed in the first wellbore using at least two sensors in the first wellbore as the magnetic field passes by the at least two sensors while the second wellbore is being drilled. A position of the second wellbore is continuously assessed relative to the first wellbore using the sensed magnetic field. The direction of drilling of the second wellbore is adjusted so that the second wellbore remains in the selected relationship relative to the first wellbore.

  15. A Reactive Transport Simulator for Biogeochemical Processes in Subsurface System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-04-01

    BIOGEOCHEM is a Fortran code that mumerically simulates the coupled processes of solute transport, microbial population dynamics, microbial metabolism, and geochemical reactions. The potential applications of the code include, but not limited to, (a) sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for assessing the impact of microbial activity on subsurface geochemical systems; (b) extraction of biogeochemical parameter values from field observations or laboratory measurements, (c) helping to design and optimize laboratory biogeochemical experiments, and (d) data integration. Methodmore » of Solution: A finite difference method and a Newton-Raphson technique are used to solve a set of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations and algebraic equations. Practical Application: Environmental analysis, bioremediation performance assessments of radioactive or non-radioactive wase disposal, and academic research.« less

  16. TITLE III EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE SUBSURFACE LIGHTING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.J. Fernandez

    1998-09-09

    The objective of this evaluation is to provide recommendations to ensure consistency between the technical baseline requirements, baseline design, and the as-constructed Subsurface Lighting System. Recommendations for resolving discrepancies between the as-constructed system, and the technical baseline requirements are included in this report. Cost and Schedule estimates are provided for all recommended modifications. This report does not address items which do not meet current safety or code requirements. These items are identified to the CMO and immediate action is taken to correct the situation. The report does identify safety and code items for which the A/E is recommending improvements. The recommended improvements will exceed the minimum requirements of applicable code and safety guide lines. These recommendations are intended to improve and enhance the operation and maintenance of the facility.

  17. FACT (Version 2.0) - Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleman, S.E.

    2000-05-05

    This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media.

  18. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B.; Novascone, Stephen R.; Wright, Jerry P.

    2012-05-29

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  19. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B.; Novascone, Stephen R.; Wright, Jerry P.

    2011-09-27

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  20. Controlling Subsurface Fractures and Fluid Flow: A Basic Research Agenda, Report of a Roundtable Convened to Consider Foundational Research Relevant to Subsurface Technology and Engineering RD&D

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Controlling Subsurface Fractures and Fluid Flow: A Basic Research Agenda DOE Roundtable Report May 22, 2015 Germantown, MD 1 Controlling Subsurface Fractures and Fluid Flow: A Basic Research Agenda Controlling Subsurface Fractures and Fluid Flow: A Basic Research Agenda Report of a Roundtable Convened to Consider Foundational Research Relevant to Subsurface Technology and Engineering RD&D May 22, 2015 Germantown, MD Organizing Committee Laura J. Pyrak-Nolte (Chair), Purdue University Donald

  1. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - Outreach Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program

  2. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - Outreach Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program

  3. Molten salt as a heat transfer fluid for heating a subsurface formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2010-11-16

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in an opening in the subsurface formation. An insulated conductor is located in the conduit. A material is in the conduit between a portion of the insulated conductor and a portion of the conduit. The material may be a salt. The material is a fluid at operating temperature of the heating system. Heat transfers from the insulated conductor to the fluid, from the fluid to the conduit, and from the conduit to the subsurface formation.

  4. Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone Contamination at Hanford Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – Cold War waste disposal practices resulted in both planned and unplanned releases of large amounts of radionuclide and heavy metal contamination into the subsurface throughout the DOE complex.

  5. Calculation Notes for Subsurface Leak Resulting in Pool, TWRS FSAR Accident Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, B.W.

    1996-09-25

    This document includes the calculations performed to quantify the risk associated with the unmitigated and mitigated accident scenarios described in the TWRS FSAR for the accident analysis titled: Subsurface Leaks Resulting in Pool.

  6. Final Report: A Model Management System for Numerical Simulations of Subsurface Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachmann, David

    2013-10-07

    The DOE and several other Federal agencies have committed significant resources to support the development of a large number of mathematical models for studying subsurface science problems such as groundwater flow, fate of contaminants and carbon sequestration, to mention only a few. This project provides new tools to help decision makers and stakeholders in subsurface science related problems to select an appropriate set of simulation models for a given field application.

  7. Novel Tube-in-Tube System Simplifies Subsurface Fluid Sampling - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Geothermal Geothermal Find More Like This Return to Search Novel Tube-in-Tube System Simplifies Subsurface Fluid Sampling Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryBarry Freifeld of Berkeley Lab has developed a device that simplifies subsurface fluid sampling. The technology's tube-within-a-tube construction is a substantial improvement to the U-tube sampling system

  8. U.S. Department of Energy Announces Funding Opportunities for Subsurface

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technology and Engineering Crosscut Initiative | Department of Energy Department of Energy Announces Funding Opportunities for Subsurface Technology and Engineering Crosscut Initiative U.S. Department of Energy Announces Funding Opportunities for Subsurface Technology and Engineering Crosscut Initiative March 10, 2016 - 1:54pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory has announced a collaborative funding opportunity sponsored through the Energy

  9. Heat flow and subsurface temperature distributions in central and western New York. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, D.S.; Fromm, K.

    1984-01-01

    Initiation of a geothermal energy program in western and central New York requires knowledge of subsurface temperatures for targeting areas of potential resources. The temperature distribution in possible geothermal reservoirs, calculated from heat flow measurements and modeling techniques, shows that a large area of New York can be considered for exploitation of geothermal resources. Though the temperatures at currently accessible depths show the availability of only a low-temperature (less than 100/sup 0/C), direct-use resource, this can be considered as an alternative for the future energy needs of New York State. From analysis of bottom-hole-temperature data and direct heat flow measurements, estimates of temperatures in the Cambrian Sandstones provide the basis of the economic evaluation of the reservoir. This reservoir contains the extractable fluids needed for targeting a potential geothermal well site in the low-temperature geothermal target zone. In the northern section of the Appalachian basin, reservoir temperatures in the Cambrian are below 50/sup 0/C but may be over 80/sup 0/C in the deeper parts of the basin in southern New York State. Using a minimum of 50/sup 0/C as a useful reservoir temperature, temperatures in excess of this value are encountered in the Theresa Formation at depths in excess of 1300 meters. Considering a maximum depth for economical drilling to be 2500 meters with present technology, the 2500 meters to the Theresa (sea level datum) forms the lower limit of the geothermal resource. Temperatures in the range of 70/sup 0/C to 80/sup 0/C are predicted for the southern portion of New York State.

  10. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Wastewater Discharge Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ansley, Shannon L.

    2002-02-20

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist.

  11. Optical method and apparatus for detection of surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellingson, William A.; Brada, Mark P.

    1995-01-01

    A laser is used in a non-destructive manner to detect surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics and particularly in ceramic bodies with complex shapes such as ceramic bearings, turbine blades, races, and the like. The laser's wavelength is selected based upon the composition of the ceramic sample and the laser can be directed on the sample while the sample is static or in dynamic rotate or translate motion. Light is scattered off surface and subsurface defects using a preselected polarization. The change in polarization angle is used to select the depth and characteristics of surface/subsurface defects. The scattered light is detected by an optical train consisting of a charge coupled device (CCD), or vidicon, television camera which, in turn, is coupled to a video monitor and a computer for digitizing the image. An analyzing polarizer in the optical train allows scattered light at a given polarization angle to be observed for enhancing sensitivity to either surface or near-subsurface defects. Application of digital image processing allows subtraction of digitized images in near real-time providing enhanced sensitivity to subsurface defects. Storing known "feature masks" of identified defects in the computer and comparing the detected scatter pattern (Fourier images) with the stored feature masks allows for automatic classification of detected defects.

  12. Optical method and apparatus for detection of surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellingson, W.A.; Brada, M.P.

    1995-06-20

    A laser is used in a non-destructive manner to detect surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics and particularly in ceramic bodies with complex shapes such as ceramic bearings, turbine blades, races, and the like. The laser`s wavelength is selected based upon the composition of the ceramic sample and the laser can be directed on the sample while the sample is static or in dynamic rotate or translate motion. Light is scattered off surface and subsurface defects using a preselected polarization. The change in polarization angle is used to select the depth and characteristics of surface/subsurface defects. The scattered light is detected by an optical train consisting of a charge coupled device (CCD), or vidicon, television camera which, in turn, is coupled to a video monitor and a computer for digitizing the image. An analyzing polarizer in the optical train allows scattered light at a given polarization angle to be observed for enhancing sensitivity to either surface or near-subsurface defects. Application of digital image processing allows subtraction of digitized images in near real-time providing enhanced sensitivity to subsurface defects. Storing known ``feature masks`` of identified defects in the computer and comparing the detected scatter pattern (Fourier images) with the stored feature masks allows for automatic classification of detected defects. 29 figs.

  13. 3D Seismic Experimentation and Advanced Processing/Inversion Development for Investigations of the Shallow Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levander, Alan Richard; Zelt, Colin A.

    2015-03-17

    The work plan for this project was to develop and apply advanced seismic reflection and wide-angle processing and inversion techniques to high resolution seismic data for the shallow subsurface to seismically characterize the shallow subsurface at hazardous waste sites as an aid to containment and cleanup activities. We proposed to continue work on seismic data that we had already acquired under a previous DoE grant, as well as to acquire additional new datasets for analysis. The project successfully developed and/or implemented the use of 3D reflection seismology algorithms, waveform tomography and finite-frequency tomography using compressional and shear waves for high resolution characterization of the shallow subsurface at two waste sites. These two sites have markedly different near-surface structures, groundwater flow patterns, and hazardous waste problems. This is documented in the list of refereed documents, conference proceedings, and Rice graduate theses, listed below.

  14. Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination.

  15. Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramirez, A.L.; Cooper, J.F.; Daily, W.D.

    1996-02-27

    This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination. 1 fig.

  16. Program Evaluation: Program Logic

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Logic modeling is a thought process program evaluators have found to be useful for at least forty years and has become increasingly popular with program managers during the last decade. A logic model presents a plausible and sensible model of how the program will work under certain environmental conditions to solve identified problems. The logic model can be the basis for a convincing story of the program's expected performance – telling stakeholders and others the problem the program focuses on and how it is uniquely qualified to address it. The elements of the logic model are resources, activities, outputs, short, intermediate and longer-term outcomes. Some add the customers reached, as well as the relevant external contextual influences, present before a program begins or appearing as the program is implemented.

  17. Wind Power Today, 2010, Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Wind Power Today, 2010, Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP) Wind Power Today, 2010, Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP) Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program. PDF icon 47531.pdf More Documents & Publications Wind Program Accomplishments Final Report DE-EE0005380 - Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne

  18. Device and nondestructive method to determine subsurface micro-structure in dense materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sun, Jiangang (Westmont, IL)

    2006-05-09

    A method and a device to detect subsurface three-dimensional micro-structure in a sample by illuminating the sample with light of a given polarization and detecting light emanating from the sample that has a different direction of polarization by means of a confocal optical system.

  19. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES AFFECTING RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AND BIOIMMOBILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel E. Kostka; Lee Kerkhof; Kuk-Jeong Chin; Martin Keller; Joseph W. Stucki

    2011-06-15

    The objectives of this project were to: (1) isolate and characterize novel anaerobic prokaryotes from subsurface environments exposed to high levels of mixed contaminants (U(VI), nitrate, sulfate), (2) elucidate the diversity and distribution of metabolically active metal- and nitrate-reducing prokaryotes in subsurface sediments, and (3) determine the biotic and abiotic mechanisms linking electron transport processes (nitrate, Fe(III), and sulfate reduction) to radionuclide reduction and immobilization. Mechanisms of electron transport and U(VI) transformation were examined under near in situ conditions in sediment microcosms and in field investigations at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination predominated by uranium and nitrate. A total of 20 publications (16 published or 'in press' and 4 in review), 10 invited talks, and 43 contributed seminars/ meeting presentations were completed during the past four years of the project. PI Kostka served on one proposal review panel each year for the U.S. DOE Office of Science during the four year project period. The PI leveraged funds from the state of Florida to purchase new instrumentation that aided the project. Support was also leveraged by the PI from the Joint Genome Institute in the form of two successful proposals for genome sequencing. Draft genomes are now available for two novel species isolated during our studies and 5 more genomes are in the pipeline. We effectively addressed each of the three project objectives and research highlights are provided. Task I - Isolation and characterization of novel anaerobes: (1) A wide range of pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and denitrifying bacteria (32 strains) were isolated from subsurface sediments of the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination of uranium and nitrate. These isolates which are new to science all show high sequence identity to sequences retrieved from ORFRC subsurface. (2) Based on physiological and phylogenetic characterization, two new species of subsurface bacteria were described: the metal-reducer Geobacter daltonii, and the denitrifier Rhodanobacter denitrificans. (3) Strains isolated from the ORFRC show that Rhodanobacter species are well adapted to the contaminated subsurface. Strains 2APBS1 and 116-2 grow at high salt (3% NaCl), low pH (3.5) and tolerate high concentrations of nitrate (400mM) and nitrite (100mM). Strain 2APBS1 was demonstrated to grow at in situ acidic pHs down to 2.5. (4) R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 is the first described Rhodanobacter species shown to denitrify. Nitrate is almost entirely converted to N2O, which may account for the large accumulation of N2O in the ORFRC subsurface. (5) G. daltonii, isolated from uranium- and hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface sediments of the ORFRC, is the first organism from the subsurface clade of the genus Geobacter that is capable of growth on aromatic hydrocarbons. (6) High quality draft genome sequences and a complete eco-physiological description are completed for R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and G. daltonii strain FRC-32. (7) Given their demonstrated relevance to DOE remediation efforts and the availability of detailed genotypic/phenotypic characterization, Rhodanobacter denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and Geobacter daltonii strain FRC-32 represent ideal model organisms to provide a predictive understanding of subsurface microbial activity through metabolic modeling. Tasks II and III-Diversity and distribution of active anaerobes and Mechanisms linking electron transport and the fate of radionuclides: (1) Our study showed that members of genus Rhodanobacter and Geobacter are abundant and active in the uranium and nitrate contaminated subsurface. In the contaminant source zone of the Oak Ridge site, Rhodanobacter spp. are the predominant, active organisms detected (comprising 50% to 100% of rRNA detected). (2) We demonstrated for the first time that the function of microbial communities can be quantified in subsurface sediments using messenger RNA assays (molecular proxies) under in situ conditions. (3) Active Geobacteraceae were identified and phylogenetically characterized from the cDNA of messenger RNA extracted from ORFRC subsurface sediment cores. Multiple clone sequences were retrieved from G. uraniireducens, G. daltonii, and G. metallireducens. (4) Results show that Geobacter strain FRC-32 is capable of growth on benzoate, toluene and benzene as the electron donor, thereby providing evidence that this strain is physiologically distinct from other described members of the subsurface Geobacter clade. (5) Fe(III)-reducing bacteria transform structural Fe in clay minerals from their layer edges rather than from their basal surfaces.

  20. An evaluation of large diameter coiled tubing for subsurface production tubulars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, L.S.; Smith, L.W.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides an economic and technological perspective for use of large diameter coiled tubing relative to threaded tubulars for subsurface production tubing. This new advancement in coiled tubing technology can significantly reduce the expense for purchasing and installing production tubing while increasing hydrocarbon reserve recovery and providing a safer, more desirable ecosystem interrelation.

  1. Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

    1984-06-27

    The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

  2. Atomic-Scale Chemical, Physical and Electronic Properties of the Subsurface Hydride of Palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, Paul

    2014-01-20

    We employed low-temperature, extreme-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to investigate the roles of subsurface hydride (H) and deuteride (D) in the surface reconstruction and surface reactivity of Pd{110}. Specifically, we gained the ability to tailor the surface structure of Pd{110} both by preparation method and by deposition of deuterium from the gas phase. We observed thiophene at low coverage on Pd{110} to determine its adsorption orientation and electronic structure through scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) namely, conductance spectroscopy and differential conductance imaging. We developed the methods necessary to coadsorb D adatoms with thiophene molecules, and to induce the reaction of individual molecules with predefined subsurface H or D features. In the case of Pd{110}, we found a much more pronounced effect from subsurface D, as it is influenced by the surface directionality. These experiments facilitate an understanding of the role of surface and subsurface H and D in heterogeneous catalytic processes, specifically in the hydrodesulfuization (HDS) of thiophene, an important and ubiquitous component found to be detrimental to petroleum refining.

  3. Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Grover S.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin

    2012-11-21

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOEs Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation & decommissioning (D&D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites.

  4. Complete genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, an Anaerobic, Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from a Contaminated Subsurface Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, C.; Copeland, A.; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Barry, Kerrie W.; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, S.; Sims, David R.; Brettin, T.; Bruce, David; Detter, J. C.; Han, Cliff F.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Larimer, F.; Land, M.; Hauser, L.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Richardson, P. M.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Sanford, Robert A.; Loeffler, Frank E.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2015-01-22

    We report the genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, isolated from nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site, Oak Ridge Reservation, TN. The bacteriums genome sequence will elucidate its physiological potential in subsurface sediments undergoing in situ uranium bioremediation and natural attenuation.

  5. Complete genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, an anaerobic, metal-reducing bacterium isolated from a contaminated subsurface environment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hwang, C.; Copeland, A.; Lucas, S.; Lapidus, A.; Barry, K.; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, E.; Tice, H.; Pitluck, S.; Sims, D.; et al

    2015-01-22

    We report the genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, isolated from nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site, Oak Ridge Reservation, TN. The bacteriums genome sequence will elucidate its physiological potential in subsurface sediments undergoing in situ uranium bioremediation and natural attenuation.

  6. Complete genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, an Anaerobic, Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from a Contaminated Subsurface Environment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hwang, C.; Copeland, A.; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Barry, Kerrie W.; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, S.; Sims, David R.; et al

    2015-01-22

    We report the genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, isolated from nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site, Oak Ridge Reservation, TN. The bacterium’s genome sequence will elucidate its physiological potential in subsurface sediments undergoing in situ uranium bioremediation and natural attenuation.

  7. SAGE Past Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Interpreting the Environmental Restoration Site in Los Alamos, New Mexico Scharf, Stephen Georgia Institute of Technology Subsurface characterization and ground water...

  8. Conceptual Model of Iodine Behavior in the Subsurface at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Lee, Brady D.; Johnson, Christian D.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Last, George V.; Lee, Michelle H.; Kaplan, Daniel I.

    2015-09-01

    The fate and transport of 129I in the environment and potential remediation technologies are currently being studied as part of environmental remediation activities at the Hanford Site. A conceptual model describing the nature and extent of subsurface contamination, factors that control plume behavior, and factors relevant to potential remediation processes is needed to support environmental remedy decisions. Because 129I is an uncommon contaminant, relevant remediation experience and scientific literature are limited. Thus, the conceptual model also needs to both describe known contaminant and biogeochemical process information and to identify aspects about which additional information needed to effectively support remedy decisions. this document summarizes the conceptual model of iodine behavior relevant to iodine in the subsurface environment at the Hanford site.

  9. Further RAGE modeling of asteroid mitigation: surface and subsurface explosions in porous objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Robert P; Plesko, Catherine S; Dearholt, William R

    2011-01-03

    Disruption or mitigation of a potentially hazardous object (PHO) by a high-energy subsurface burst is considered. This is just one possible method of impact-hazard mitigation. We present RAGE hydrocode models of the shock-generated disruption of PHOs by subsurface nuclear bursts using scenario-specific models from realistic RADAR shape models. We will show 2D and 3D models for the disruption by a large energy source at the center of such PHO models ({approx}100 kt-10 Mt) specifically for the shape of the asteroid 25143 Itokawa. We study the effects of non-uniform composition (rubble pile), shallow buried bursts for the optimal depth of burial and porosity.

  10. Insulated conductor temperature limited heater for subsurface heating coupled in a three-phase WYE configuration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Sandberg, Chester Ledlie (Palo Alto, CA)

    2010-11-09

    A heating system for a subsurface formation is described. The heating system includes a first heater, a second heater, and a third heater placed in an opening in the subsurface formation. Each heater includes: an electrical conductor; an insulation layer at least partially surrounding the electrical conductor; and an electrically conductive sheath at least partially surrounding the insulation layer. The electrical conductor is electrically coupled to the sheath at a lower end portion of the heater. The lower end portion is the portion of the heater distal from a surface of the opening. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are electrically coupled at the lower end portions of the heaters. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are configured to be electrically coupled in a three-phase wye configuration.

  11. 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) Field Site Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freshley, Mark D.

    2008-12-31

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has established the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (300 Area IFRC) on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State for the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Office of Science. The project is funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). The purpose of the project is to conduct research at the 300 IFRC to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The management approach for the 300 Area IFRC requires that a Field Site Management Plan be developed. This is an update of the plan to reflect the installation of the well network and other changes.

  12. Subsurface basin analysis of fault-controlled turbidite system in Bradano trough, southern Adriatic foredeep, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casnedi, R.

    1988-11-01

    Subsurface data (seismic lines, wireline logs, cores, and drill cuttings) from intensive hydrocarbon exploration in the Pliocene-Pleistocene Bradano Trough were used in performing a three-dimensional basin analysis and in reconstructing the time-space evolution of the basin. A middle Pliocene sedimentary system characterizes the hydrocarbon-bearing sands of the major gas field of the Bradano Trough, the Candela field. This system includes two phases of deposition in a migrating basin. 9 figures.

  13. Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slate, L.J.; Taylor, J.T.

    2000-08-31

    A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

  14. Subsurface materials management and containment system, components thereof and methods relating thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2006-04-18

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  15. Subsurface geological and geophysical study of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, D.J.; van de Kamp, P.C.

    1980-01-01

    The subsurface investigation of the Cerro Prieto field and surrounding area is described including the stratigraphy, structure, hydrothermal alteration, and reservoir properties for use in designing reservoir simulation models and planning development of the field. Insights into the depositional, tectonic, and thermal history of the area are presented. The following types of data were used: well sample descriptions and analyses, well logs, geophysical surveys; physiography, and regional geology. (MHR)

  16. Thermal wave image processing for characterization of subsurface of flaws in materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopalan, K.; Gopalsami, N.

    1993-08-01

    Infrared images resulting from back-scattered thermal waves in composite materials are corrupted by instrument noise and sample heat-spread function. This paper demonstrates that homomorphic deconvolution and {open_quotes}demultiplication{close_quotes} result in enhanced image quality for characterization of subsurface flaws in Kevlar and graphics composites. The choice of processing depends on the material characteristics and the extent of noise in the original image.

  17. Uranium Contamination in the Subsurface Beneath the 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Mark D.

    2008-02-29

    This report provides a description of uranium contamination in the subsurface at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The principal focus is a persistence plume in groundwater, which has not attenuated as predicted by earlier remedial investigations. Included in the report are chapters on current conditions, hydrogeologic framework, groundwater flow modeling, and geochemical considerations. The report is intended to describe what is known or inferred about the uranium contamination for the purpose of making remedial action decisions.

  18. Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slate, Lawrence J; Taylor, Joseph Todd

    2000-08-01

    A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

  19. Addendum to the CAIP for CAU 447: Project Shoal Area, Nevada Subsurface Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    513-ADD ADDENDUM TO THE CORRECTIVE ACTION INVESTIGATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 447: PROJECT SHOAL AREA, NEVADA SUBSURFACE SITE DOE Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada Controlled Copy No.: Revision No.: 1 March 1999 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Available to the public from - U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 (703) 487-4650 Available electronically at

  20. Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

    2012-11-23

    Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

  1. Stability of Surface and Subsurface Hydrogen on and in Au/Ni Near-Surface Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celik, Fuat E.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2015-10-01

    Periodic, self-consistent DFT-GGA (PW91) calculations were used to study the interaction of hydrogen atoms with the (111) surfaces of substitutional near-surface alloys (NSAs) of Au and Ni with different surface layer compositions and different arrangements of Au atoms in the surface layer. The effect of hydrogen adsorption on the surface and in the first and second subsurface layers of the NSAs was studied. Increasing the Au content in the surface layer weakens hydrogen binding on the surface, but strengthens subsurface binding, suggesting that the distribution of surface and subsurface hydrogen will be different than that on pure Ni(111). While the metal composition of the surface layer has an effect on the binding energy of hydrogen on NSA surfaces, the local composition of the binding site has a stronger effect. For example, fcc hollow sites consisting of three Ni atoms bind H nearly as strongly as on Ni(111), and fcc sites consisting of three Au atoms bind H nearly as weakly as on Au(111). Sites with one or two Au atoms show intermediate binding energies. The preference of hydrogen for three-fold Ni hollow sites alters the relative stabilities of different surface metal atom arrangements, and may provide a driving force for adsorbate-induced surface rearrangement.

  2. Characterization of microbial communities in subsurface nuclear blast cavities of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane P. Moser; Ken Czerwinski; Charles E. Russell; Mavrik Zavarin

    2010-07-13

    This US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this program??s Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

  3. Performance Indicators for Uranium Bioremediation in the Subsurface: Basis and Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2006-12-29

    The purpose of this letter report is to identify performance indicators for in situ engineered bioremediation of subsurface uranium (U) contamination. This report focuses on in situ treatment of groundwater by biostimulation of extant in situ microbial populations (see http://128.3.7.51/NABIR/generalinfo/primers_guides/03_NABIR_primer.pdf for background information on bioremediation of metals and radionuclides). The treatment process involves amendment of the subsurface with an electron donor such as acetate, lactate, ethanol or other organic compound such that in situ microorganisms mediate the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). U(VI) precipitates as uraninite or other insoluble U phase. Uranium is thus immobilized in place by such processes and is subject to reoxidation that may remobilize the reduced uranium. Related processes include augmenting the extant subsurface microbial populations, addition of electron acceptors, and introduction of chemically reducing materials such as zero-valent Fe. While metrics for such processes may be similar to those for in situ biostimulation, these related processes are not directly in the scope of this letter report.

  4. Subsurface water flow simulated for hill slopes with spatially dependent soil hydraulic characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, M.L.; Luxmoore, R.J.; DeAngelis, R.; Ward, R.C.; Yeh, G.T.

    1987-08-01

    Water flow through hill slopes consisting of five soil layers, with varying spatial dependence in hydraulic characteristics in the lateral plane was simulated by solving Richards' equation in three dimensions under varying rainfall intensities and for two complexities of terrain. By concepts of similar media the variability in soil hydraulic characteristics was expressed by a single dimensionless parameter, the scaling factor ..cap alpha... The moments of log normally distributed ..cap alpha.. were set as: Mean = 1.0 and standard deviation = 1.0. Four cases of spatial dependence of ..cap alpha.. in the lateral plane were selected for simulation, using exponential variogram functions ranging in spatial structure from random (no spatial dependence) to large dependence (large correlation lengths). The simulations showed that the rates of subsurface flow from the 30/sup 0/ hillslope, during and following rainfall, were significantly enhanced with an increase in spatial dependence. Subsurface drainage was also increased with increases in rainfall intensity and slop complexity. For hill slopes the relative effects of spatial dependence in soil hydraulic characteristics was smaller with 30/sup 0/ horizontal pitching than without pitching. Hill slopes with a random distribution of hydraulic characteristics provided greater opportunity for soil units with differing water capacities to interact than in cases with spatially correlated distributions. This greater interaction is associated with a greater lag in subsurface flow generation. These studies illustrate some of the expected effects of spatial dependence of soil hydraulic characteristics of the integrated hydrologic response of land areas.

  5. Weatherization Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residences participating in the Home Energy Rebate or New Home Rebate Program may not also participate in the Weatherization Program.

  6. Program Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Vehicle Technologies Plenary

  7. On using rational enzyme redesign to improve enzyme-mediated microbial dehalogenation of recalcitrant substances in deep-subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ornstein, R.L.

    1993-06-01

    Heavily halogenated hydrocarbons are one of the most prevalent classes of man-made recalcitrant environmental contaminants and often make their way into subsurface environments. Biodegradation of heavily chlorinated compounds in the deep subsurface often occurs at extremely slow rates because native enzymes of indigenous microbes are unable to efficiently metabolize such synthetic substances. Cost-effective engineering solutions do not exist for dealing with disperse and recalcitrant pollutants in the deep subsurface (i.e., ground water, soils, and sediments). Timely biodegradation of heavily chlorinated compounds in the deep subsurface may be best accomplished by rational redesign of appropriate enzymes that enhance the ability of indigenous microbes to metabolize these substances. The isozyme family cytochromes P450 are catalytically very robust and are found in all aerobic life forms and may be active in may anaerobes as well. The author is attempting to demonstrate proof-of-principle rational enzyme redesign of cytochromes P450 to enhance biodehalogenation.

  8. Geothermal exploration program, Hill Air Force Base, Davis and Weber Counties, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn, W.E.; Chapman, D.S.; Foley, D.; Capuano, R.M.; Cole, D.; Sibbett, B.; Ward, S.H.

    1980-03-01

    Results obtained from a program designed to locate a low- or moderate-temperature geothermal resource that might exist beneath Hill Air Force Base (AFB), Ogden, Utah are discussed. A phased exploration program was conducted at Hill AFB. Published geological, geochemical, and geophysical reports on the area were examined, regional exploration was conducted, and two thermal gradient holes were drilled. This program demonstrated that thermal waters are not present in the shallow subsurface at this site. (MHR)

  9. Program Evaluation: Program Life Cycle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In general, different types of evaluation are carried out over different parts of a program's life cycle (e.g., Creating a program, Program is underway, or Closing out or end of program)....

  10. Enhanced Geothermal Systems Research and Development: Models of Subsurface Chemical Processes Affecting Fluid Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moller, Nancy; Weare J. H.

    2008-05-29

    Successful exploitation of the vast amount of heat stored beneath the earths surface in hydrothermal and fluid-limited, low permeability geothermal resources would greatly expand the Nations domestic energy inventory and thereby promote a more secure energy supply, a stronger economy and a cleaner environment. However, a major factor limiting the expanded development of current hydrothermal resources as well as the production of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is insufficient knowledge about the chemical processes controlling subsurface fluid flow. With funding from past grants from the DOE geothermal program and other agencies, we successfully developed advanced equation of state (EOS) and simulation technologies that accurately describe the chemistry of geothermal reservoirs and energy production processes via their free energies for wide XTP ranges. Using the specific interaction equations of Pitzer, we showed that our TEQUIL chemical models can correctly simulate behavior (e.g., mineral scaling and saturation ratios, gas break out, brine mixing effects, down hole temperatures and fluid chemical composition, spent brine incompatibilities) within the compositional range (Na-K-Ca-Cl-SO4-CO3-H2O-SiO2-CO2(g)) and temperature range (T < 350C) associated with many current geothermal energy production sites that produce brines with temperatures below the critical point of water. The goal of research carried out under DOE grant DE-FG36-04GO14300 (10/1/2004-12/31/2007) was to expand the compositional range of our Pitzer-based TEQUIL fluid/rock interaction models to include the important aluminum and silica interactions (T < 350C). Aluminum is the third most abundant element in the earths crust; and, as a constituent of aluminosilicate minerals, it is found in two thirds of the minerals in the earths crust. The ability to accurately characterize effects of temperature, fluid mixing and interactions between major rock-forming minerals and hydrothermal and/or injected fluids is critical to predict important chemical behaviors affecting fluid flow, such as mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions. We successfully achieved the project goal and objectives by demonstrating the ability of our modeling technology to correctly predict the complex pH dependent solution chemistry of the Al3+ cation and its hydrolysis species: Al(OH)2+, Al(OH)2+, Al(OH)30, and Al(OH)4- as well as the solubility of common aluminum hydroxide and aluminosilicate minerals in aqueous brines containing components (Na, K, Cl) commonly dominating hydrothermal fluids. In the sodium chloride system, where experimental data for model parameterization are most plentiful, the model extends to 300C. Determining the stability fields of aluminum species that control the solubility of aluminum-containing minerals as a function of temperature and composition has been a major objective of research in hydrothermal chemistry.

  11. Final Technical Report: Viral Infection of Subsurface Microorganisms and Metal/Radionuclide Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Karrie A.; Bender, Kelly S.; Li, Yusong

    2013-09-28

    Microbially mediated metabolisms have been identified as a significant factor either directly or indirectly impacting the fate and transport of heavy metal/radionuclide contaminants. To date microorganisms have been isolated from contaminated environments. Examination of annotated finished genome sequences of many of these subsurface isolates from DOE sites, revealed evidence of prior viral infection. To date the role that viruses play influencing microbial mortality and the resulting community structure which directly influences biogeochemical cycling in soils and sedimentary environments remains poorly understood. The objective of this exploratory study was to investigate the role of viral infection of subsurface bacteria and the formation of contaminant-bearing viral particles. This objective was approached by examining the following working hypotheses: (i) subsurface microorganisms are susceptible to viral infections by the indigenous subsurface viral community, and (ii) viral surfaces will adsorb heavy metals and radionuclides. Our results have addressed basic research needed to accomplish the BER Long Term Measure to provide sufficient scientific understanding such that DOE sites would be able to incorporate coupled physical, chemical and biological processes into decision making for environmental remediation or natural attenuation and long-term stewardship by establishing viral-microbial relationships on the subsequent fate and transport of heavy metals and radionuclides. Here we demonstrated that viruses play a significant role in microbial mortality and community structure in terrestrial subsurface sedimentary systems. The production of viral-like particles within subsurface sediments in response to biostimulation with dissolved organic carbon and a terminal electron acceptor resulted in the production of viral-like particles. Organic carbon alone did not result in significant viral production and required the addition of a terminal electron acceptor (nitrate), indicating that nutrients are not limiting viral production, but rather substrates that can be converted into energy for host metabolism. Our results also revealed that cell abundance was not correlated to the mineralization of organic carbon, but rather viruses were positively correlated with carbon mineralization. This is a result of viral-mediated cell lysis and demonstrates that viruses are sensitive indicators of microbial activity. Viruses as an indicator of microbial activity was not unique to batch culture studies as results obtained from an in situ field experiment conducted at the DOE Old Rifle Field site. This study revealed that viral abundance increased in response to the injection of oxygenated groundwater and influx of dissolved organic carbon whereas cell abundance changes were minimal. However, the extent to which viral-mediated cell lysis alters organic matter pools subsequently influencing microbial community structure and biogeochemical function remains a critical question in subsurface biogeochemical cycling. The production of significant numbers of viruses in groundwater has implications for nanoparticulate metal as well as carbon transport in groundwater. We have demonstrated that the virus surface is reactive and will adsorb heavy metals. Thus viruses can promote colloidal contaminant mobility. Interestingly, the presence of heavy metals has a positive effect on infectivity of the phage, increasing phage infection which could lead to further production of viruses. Together, the results indicate that the sorption of metals to the surface of viruses could not only contribute to nanoparticulate metal as well as carbon transport but could also enhance infectivity further contributing to cell lysis which could subsequently influence biogeochemical cycling. As more viruses infect host microbial populations the high concentration of metals would enhance infection, resulting in cell lysis, and decreasing the metabolically active host population while yielding greater numbers of viruses capable of transporting contaminats. Additional studie

  12. Science Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programs /science-innovation/_assets/images/icon-science.jpg Science Programs The focal point for basic and applied R&D programs with a primary focus on energy but also encompassing medical, biotechnology, high-energy physics, and advanced scientific computing programs. Applied Energy Programs» Civilian Nuclear Programs» Laboratory Directed Research & Development» Office of Science»

  13. Spatial resolution and the geologic interpretation of Martian morphology - implications for subsurface volatiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimbelman, J.R.

    1987-08-01

    Viking Orbiter images of the Acheron Fossae on Mars are presented and analyzed, with an emphasis on the impact of image resolution on the interpretation. High-resolution (less than 10 m/pixel) images reveal small mounds which can be interpreted as aeolian dunes, but these features are not evident on images with resolution of 50 m/pixel or greater. Also reported are the results of a visual inspection of 527 usable high-resolution images: it is found that all of the morphological features identified can arise in the absence of subsurface volatiles. 21 references.

  14. Subsurface Temperature, Moisture, Thermal Conductivity and Heat Flux, Barrow, Area A, B, C, D

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    2014-03-31

    Subsurface temperature data are being collected along a transect from the center of the polygon through the trough (and to the center of the adjacent polygon for Area D). Each transect has five 1.5m vertical array thermistor probes with 16 thermistors each. This dataset also includes soil pits that have been instrumented for temperature, water content, thermal conductivity, and heat flux at the permafrost table. Area C has a shallow borehole of 2.5 meters depth is instrumented in the center of the polygon.

  15. Three-phase heaters with common overburden sections for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2012-02-14

    A heating system for a subsurface formation is described. The heating system includes three substantially u-shaped heaters with first end portions of the heaters being electrically coupled to a single, three-phase wye transformer and second end portions of the heaters being electrically coupled to each other and/or to ground. The three heaters may enter the formation through a first common wellbore and exit the formation through a second common wellbore so that the magnetic fields of the three heaters at least partially cancel out in the common wellbores.

  16. Subsurface Temperature, Moisture, Thermal Conductivity and Heat Flux, Barrow, Area A, B, C, D

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    Subsurface temperature data are being collected along a transect from the center of the polygon through the trough (and to the center of the adjacent polygon for Area D). Each transect has five 1.5m vertical array thermistor probes with 16 thermistors each. This dataset also includes soil pits that have been instrumented for temperature, water content, thermal conductivity, and heat flux at the permafrost table. Area C has a shallow borehole of 2.5 meters depth is instrumented in the center of the polygon.

  17. SCIENCE Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program early science program Early at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility CONTACT Argonne Leadership Computing Facility | www.alcf.anl.gov | (877) 737-8615...

  18. Program Administration

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume describes program administration that establishes and maintains effective organizational management and control of the emergency management program. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

  19. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters Final Report to the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-03-10

    . In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signaturea hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivityover a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Our study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOEs Hanford 300 Area.

  20. DOE Subsurface Technology and Engineering RD&D (SubTER) Overview Mark Ackiewicz FE, EERE, NE, EM, SC, ARPA-E, OE, EPSA, CI, EIA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CFO Welcome! DOE Crosscutting Subsurface Initiative: Adaptive Control of Subsurface Fractures and Flow AGU Town Hall Meeting TH15E 6:15-7:15 SubTER CFO For More Information Website: http://energy.gov/subsurface-tech-team AGU booths: In Exhibit Hall:  Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (#2309)  Oak Ridge National Laboratory (#2813)  Sandia National Laboratories (#2819) Student/Career Center Lounge, Moscone South:  Los Alamos National Laboratory (Room 101) Register at both locations

  1. Visiting Faculty Program Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visiting Faculty Program Program Description The Visiting Faculty Program seeks to increase the research competitiveness of faculty members and their students at institutions historically underrepresented in the research community in order to expand the workforce vital to Department of Energy mission areas. As part of the program, selected university/college faculty members collaborate with DOE laboratory research staff on a research project of mutual interest. Program Objective The program is

  2. Visiting Faculty Program Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    covers stipend and travel reimbursement for the 10-week program. Teacherfaculty participants: 1 Program Coordinator: Scott Robbins Email: srobbins@lanl.gov Phone number: 663-5621...

  3. Subsurface failure in spherical bodies. A formation scenario for linear troughs on Vestas surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stickle, Angela M.; Schultz, P. H.; Crawford, D. A.

    2014-10-13

    Many asteroids in the Solar System exhibit unusual, linear features on their surface. The Dawn mission recently observed two sets of linear features on the surface of the asteroid 4 Vesta. Geologic observations indicate that these features are related to the two large impact basins at the south pole of Vesta, though no specific mechanism of origin has been determined. Furthermore, the orientation of the features is offset from the center of the basins. Experimental and numerical results reveal that the offset angle is a natural consequence of oblique impacts into a spherical target. We demonstrate that a set of shear planes develops in the subsurface of the body opposite to the point of first contact. Moreover, these subsurface failure zones then propagate to the surface under combined tensile-shear stress fields after the impact to create sets of approximately linear faults on the surface. Comparison between the orientation of damage structures in the laboratory and failure regions within Vesta can be used to constrain impact parameters (e.g., the approximate impact point and likely impact trajectory).

  4. Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides, Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA project processing site. Final [report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Surface and subsurface soil cleanup protocols for the Gunnison, Colorado, processing sits are summarized as follows: In accordance with EPA-promulgated land cleanup standards (40 CFR 192), in situ Ra-226 is to be cleaned up based on bulk concentrations not exceeding 5 and 15 pCi/g in 15-cm surface and subsurface depth increments, averaged over 100-m{sup 2} grid blocks, where the parent Ra-226 concentrations are greater than, or in secular equilibrium with, the Th-230 parent. A bulk interpretation of these EPA standards has been accepted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and while the concentration of the finer-sized soil fraction less than a No. 4 mesh sieve contains the higher concentration of radioactivity, the bulk approach in effect integrates the total sample radioactivity over the entire sample mass. In locations where Th-230 has differentially migrated in subsoil relative to Ra-226, a Th-230 cleanup protocol has been developed in accordance with Supplemental Standard provisions of 40 CFR 192 for NRC/Colorado Department of Health (CDH) approval for timely implementation. Detailed elements of the protocol are contained in Appendix A, Generic Protocol from Thorium-230 Cleanup/Verification at UMTRA Project Processing Sites. The cleanup of other radionuclides or nonradiological hazards that pose a significant threat to the public and the environment will be determined and implemented in accordance with pathway analysis to assess impacts and the implications of ALARA specified in 40 CFR 192 relative to supplemental standards.

  5. Subsurface failure in spherical bodies. A formation scenario for linear troughs on Vesta’s surface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stickle, Angela M.; Schultz, P. H.; Crawford, D. A.

    2014-10-13

    Many asteroids in the Solar System exhibit unusual, linear features on their surface. The Dawn mission recently observed two sets of linear features on the surface of the asteroid 4 Vesta. Geologic observations indicate that these features are related to the two large impact basins at the south pole of Vesta, though no specific mechanism of origin has been determined. Furthermore, the orientation of the features is offset from the center of the basins. Experimental and numerical results reveal that the offset angle is a natural consequence of oblique impacts into a spherical target. We demonstrate that a set ofmore » shear planes develops in the subsurface of the body opposite to the point of first contact. Moreover, these subsurface failure zones then propagate to the surface under combined tensile-shear stress fields after the impact to create sets of approximately linear faults on the surface. Comparison between the orientation of damage structures in the laboratory and failure regions within Vesta can be used to constrain impact parameters (e.g., the approximate impact point and likely impact trajectory).« less

  6. An Electrode-based approach for monitoring in situ microbial activity during subsurface bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.H.; Nevin, K.P.; Franks, A.; Englert, A.; Long, P.E.; Lovley, D.R.

    2009-11-15

    Current production by microorganisms colonizing subsurface electrodes and its relationship to substrate availability and microbial activity was evaluated in an aquifer undergoing bioremediation. Borehole graphite anodes were installed downgradient from a region of acetate injection designed to stimulate bioreduction of U(VI); cathodes consisted of graphite electrodes embedded at the ground surface. Significant increases in current density ({<=}50 mA/m{sup 2}) tracked delivery of acetate to the electrodes, dropping rapidly when acetate inputs were discontinued. An upgradient control electrode not exposed to acetate produced low, steady currents ({<=}0.2 mA/m{sup 2}). Elevated current was strongly correlated with uranium removal but minimal correlation existed with elevated Fe(II). Confocal laser scanning microscopy of electrodes revealed firmly attached biofilms, and analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated the electrode surfaces were dominated (67-80%) by Geobacter species. This is the first demonstration that electrodes can produce readily detectable currents despite long-range (6 m) separation of anode and cathode, and these results suggest that oxidation of acetate coupled to electron transfer to electrodes by Geobacter species was the primary source of current. Thus it is expected that current production may serve as an effective proxy for monitoring in situ microbial activity in a variety of subsurface anoxic environments.

  7. Intermediate-Scale Laboratory Experiments of Subsurface Flow and Transport Resulting from Tank Leaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.

    2014-09-30

    Washington River Protection Solutions contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct laboratory experiments and supporting numerical simulations to improve the understanding of water flow and contaminant transport in the subsurface between waste tanks and ancillary facilities at Waste Management Area C. The work scope included two separate sets of experiments: •Small flow cell experiments to investigate the occurrence of potential unstable fingering resulting from leaks and the limitations of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator to predict flow patterns and solute transport behavior under these conditions. Unstable infiltration may, under certain conditions, create vertically elongated fingers potentially transporting contaminants rapidly through the unsaturated zone to groundwater. The types of leak that may create deeply penetrating fingers include slow release, long duration leaks in relatively permeable porous media. Such leaks may have occurred below waste tanks at the Hanford Site. •Large flow experiments to investigate the behavior of two types of tank leaks in a simple layered system mimicking the Waste Management Area C. The investigated leaks include a relatively large leak with a short duration from a tank and a long duration leak with a relatively small leakage rate from a cascade line.

  8. Subsurface Multiphase Flow and Multicomponent Reactive Transport Modeling using High-Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Lu, Chuan

    2007-07-16

    Numerical modeling has become a critical tool to the U.S. Department of Energy for evaluating the environmental impact of alternative energy sources and remediation strategies for legacy waste sites. Unfortunately, the physical and chemical complexity of many sites overwhelms the capabilities of even most state of the art groundwater models. Of particular concern are the representation of highly-heterogeneous stratified rock/soil layers in the subsurface and the biological and geochemical interactions of chemical species within multiple fluid phases. Clearly, there is a need for higher-resolution modeling (i.e. more spatial, temporal, and chemical degrees of freedom) and increasingly mechanistic descriptions of subsurface physicochemical processes. We present SciDAC-funded research being performed in the development of PFLOTRAN, a parallel multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model. Written in Fortran90, PFLOTRAN is founded upon PETSc data structures and solvers. We are employing PFLOTRAN in the simulation of uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area, a contaminated site of major concern to the Department of Energy, the State of Washington, and other government agencies. By leveraging the billions of degrees of freedom available through high-performance computation using tens of thousands of processors, we can better characterize the release of uranium into groundwater and its subsequent transport to the Columbia River, and thereby better understand and evaluate the effectiveness of various proposed remediation strategies.

  9. Community Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Programs Community Berkeley Global Campus Environmental Documents Tours Community Programs Friends of Berkeley Lab ⇒ Navigate Section Community Berkeley Global Campus Environmental Documents Tours Community Programs Friends of Berkeley Lab Community Education Programs Workforce Development & Education As part of the Lab's education mission to inspire and prepare the next generation of scientists and engineers, the Workforce Development & Education runs numerous education

  10. Final Report: DoE SBIR Phase 2 Low-Cost Small Diameter NMR Technologies for In-Situ Subsurface Characterization and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, David Oliver

    2010-09-03

    In this Phase 2 SBIR program, Vista Clara successfully developed and field-tested small diameter NNR logging tools for subsurface characterization and monitoring. This effort involved the design and development surface electronics, a winch with 470ft cable, and three interchangeable downhole probes: a 3.5? diameter borehole NMR probe, a 1.67? diameter borehole NMR probe, and a 2.5? diameter NMR probe that can be deployed using a Geoprobe direct push machine. The 3.5? probe was tested extensively over a 6 week period including 4? to 8? boreholes in Washington, Idaho, Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, Connecticut and Massachusetts. The field test campaign was highly successful. The 1.67? probe was assembled, tested and calibrated in the laboratory. The 2.5? Geoprobe probe is in final assembly and testing at the time of this report. The completed Phase 2 R&D program has resulted in the first NMR logging tool that can be deployed in boreholes of 4? diameter, the first NMR logging tool that can be deployed in boreholes on 2? diameter, and the first NMR logging tool that can be deployed by a direct push machine. These small diameter tools make NMR logging technically and economically feasible, for the first time. Previously available NMR logging tools were developed for oilfield applications and are prohibitively large and expensive for the majority of near surface groundwater characterization problems.

  11. Manipulation of subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi?Sr?CaCu?O8+? using a scanning tunneling microscope

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stollenwerk, A. J.; Gu, G.; Hurley, N.; Beck, B.; Spurgeon, K.; Kidd, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    We present evidence that subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi?Sr?CaCu?O8+? can be manipulated with nanometer precision using a scanning tunneling microscope. High resolution images indicate that most of the carbon particles remain subsurface after transport observable as a local increase in height as the particle pushes up on the surface. Tunneling spectra in the vicinity of these protrusions exhibit semiconducting characteristics with a band gap of approximately 1.8 eV, indicating that the incorporation of carbon locally alters the electronic properties near the surface.

  12. Program Automation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call Series: Program Automation, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, November 21, 2013. This data and evaluation peer exchange call discussed program automation.

  13. Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area: Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA)--Programmatic, Technical, and Regulatory Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, Wayne J.

    2001-07-23

    Natural attenuation processes are commonly used for remediation of contaminated sites. A variety of natural processes occur without human intervention at all sites to varying rates and degrees of effectiveness to attenuate (decrease) the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume, or concentration of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface water systems. The objective of this review is to identify potential technical investments to be incorporated in the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area Strategic Plan for monitored natural attenuation. When implemented, the technical investments will help evaluate and implement monitored natural attenuation as a remediation option at DOE sites. The outcome of this review is a set of conclusions and general recommendations regarding research needs, programmatic guidance, and stakeholder issues pertaining to monitored natural attenuation for the DOE complex.

  14. Innovative technology for expedited site remediation of extensive surface and subsurface contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Audibert, J.M.E.; Lew, L.R.

    1994-12-31

    Large scale surface and subsurface contamination resulted from numerous releases of feed stock, process streams, waste streams, and final product at a major chemical plant. Soil and groundwater was contaminated by numerous compounds including lead, tetraethyl lead, ethylene dibromide, ethylene dichloride, and toluene. The state administrative order dictated that the site be investigated fully, that remedial alternative be evaluated, and that the site be remediated within a year period. Because of the acute toxicity and extreme volatility of tetraethyl lead and other organic compounds present at the site and the short time frame ordered by the regulators, innovative approaches were needed to carry out the remediation while protecting plant workers, remediation workers, and the public.

  15. Visual probes and methods for placing visual probes into subsurface areas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clark, Don T.; Erickson, Eugene E.; Casper, William L.; Everett, David M.

    2004-11-23

    Visual probes and methods for placing visual probes into subsurface areas in either contaminated or non-contaminated sites are described. In one implementation, the method includes driving at least a portion of a visual probe into the ground using direct push, sonic drilling, or a combination of direct push and sonic drilling. Such is accomplished without providing an open pathway for contaminants or fugitive gases to reach the surface. According to one implementation, the invention includes an entry segment configured for insertion into the ground or through difficult materials (e.g., concrete, steel, asphalt, metals, or items associated with waste), at least one extension segment configured to selectively couple with the entry segment, at least one push rod, and a pressure cap. Additional implementations are contemplated.

  16. Correlation and deposystem interpretation for Lower Mississippian sequence in subsurface of West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, R.M.; Jewell, G.A. )

    1988-08-01

    Correlation and depositional environments of the Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Price-Rockwell delta complex are well understood for units along the outcrop belt in eastern West Virginia. However, the correlation of these units with the sequence of subsurface driller's sandstones is poorly known. Furthermore, little is known concerning the relationships of the well-developed Lower Mississippian hydrocarbon-bearing strata of southern West Virginia with equivalent units to the north. Regional analysis of over 700 gamma-ray well logs, combined with study of outcrops at Rowlesburg and Caldwell, West Virginia, provides insight into the nature of the Cloyd conglomerate, and the Berea, Weir, Squaw, and Big Injun sandstones and allows the refinement of the stratigraphic succession of the Price Formation in southern West Virginia. New members listed herein are as of yet information, pending publication of description of type sections from the Caldwell outcrop.

  17. Barrier-free subsurface incorporation of 3d metal atoms into Bi(111) films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Klein, C.; Vollmers, N. J.; Gerstmann, U.; Zahl, P.; Lukermann, D.; Jnawali, G.; Pfnur, H.; Sutter, P.; Tegenkamp, C.; Schmidt, W. G.; et al

    2015-05-27

    By combining scanning tunneling microscopy with density functional theory it is shown that the Bi(111) surface provides a well-defined incorporation site in the first bilayer that traps highly coordinating atoms such as transition metals (TMs) or noble metals. All deposited atoms assume exactly the same specific sevenfold coordinated subsurface interstitial site while the surface topography remains nearly unchanged. Notably, 3d TMs show a barrier-free incorporation. The observed surface modification by barrier-free subsorption helps to suppress aggregation in clusters. Thus, it allows a tuning of the electronic properties not only for the pure Bi(111) surface, but may also be observed formore » topological insulators formed by substrate-stabilized Bi bilayers.« less

  18. DEMONSTRATiON OF A SUBSURFACE CONTAINMENT SYSTEM FOR INSTALLATION AT DOE WASTE SITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas J. Crocker; Verna M. Carpenter

    2003-05-21

    Between 1952 and 1970, DOE buried mixed waste in pits and trenches that now have special cleanup needs. The disposal practices used decades ago left these landfills and other trenches, pits, and disposal sites filled with three million cubic meters of buried waste. This waste is becoming harmful to human safety and health. Today's cleanup and waste removal is time-consuming and expensive with some sites scheduled to complete cleanup by 2006 or later. An interim solution to the DOE buried waste problem is to encapsulate and hydraulically isolate the waste with a geomembrane barrier and monitor the performance of the barrier over its 50-yr lifetime. The installed containment barriers would isolate the buried waste and protect groundwater from pollutants until final remediations are completed. The DOE has awarded a contract to RAHCO International, Inc.; of Spokane, Washington; to design, develop, and test a novel subsurface barrier installation system, referred to as a Subsurface Containment System (SCS). The installed containment barrier consists of commercially available geomembrane materials that isolates the underground waste, similar to the way a swimming pools hold water, without disrupting hazardous material that was buried decades ago. The barrier protects soil and groundwater from contamination and effectively meets environmental cleanup standards while reducing risks, schedules, and costs. Constructing the subsurface containment barrier uses a combination of conventional and specialized equipment and a unique continuous construction process. This innovative equipment and construction method can construct a 1000-ft-long X 34-ft-wide X 30-ft-deep barrier at construction rates to 12 Wday (8 hr/day operation). Life cycle costs including RCRA cover and long-term monitoring range from approximately $380 to $590/cu yd of waste contained or $100 to $160/sq ft of placed barrier based upon the subsurface geology surrounding the waste. Project objectives for Phase I were to validate the SCS construction equipment and process, evaluate the system performance, validate the barrier constructability, and assess the barrier effectiveness. The objectives for Phase 11, which is a full-scale demonstration at a DOE site, are to perform an extensive characterization of the test site, to demonstrate the equipment and the installation process under site-specific performance and regulatory requirements, to validate the operational performance of the equipment, and to perform long-term verification of the barrier using monitoring wells. To date, significant progress has been made to establish the technical and economical feasibility of the SCS. This report describes the SCS conventional and specialized equipment, barrier materials, and construction process. It presents results of the specialized equipment Factory Test, the SCS Control Test and the SCS Advance Control Test at the RAHCO facility. Provided herein are the system performance capabilities and an estimated construction cost and schedule for a 1000-ft-long X 34-ft-wide X 29-ft-deep containment barrier at the DOE Oak Ridge Bear Creek Burial Grounds are also provided.

  19. Application of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) for controlling subsurface fire area: Indian context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohalik, N.K.; Singh, V.K.; Singh, R.V.K.

    2009-07-15

    In bord and pillar method of mining, the panels are sealed off after depillaring. Depending upon the site specific condition, 40 to 45 % coal are left in depillared panel as stook, loose coal left in goaf, hard coal on floor and roof of the panel. The left out coals in goaf area start oxidation, and this leads to spontaneous heating in side sealed off area. For assessment of fire in underground coal mines, thermo-compositional monitoring plays an important role. This paper presents scientific relevance and selective criteria for use of inert gas for control of subsurface fire. Finally the paper discusses spontaneous heating problem in sealed off area and application of inertisation technology by using CO, to prevent and control sealed off fire at Haripur Colliery, Kenda Area, ECL, India.

  20. Retiree Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Library Services » Retiree Program Retiree Program The Research Library offers a 1 year library card to retired LANL employees that allows usage of Library materials. This service is only available to retired LANL employees. Who is eligible? Any Laboratory retiree, not participating in any other program (ie, Guest Scientist, Affiliate). Upon completion of your application, you will be notified of your acceptance into the program. This does not include past students. What is the term of the

  1. HVAC Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Commercial Program Development Commercial Current Promotions Industrial Federal Agriculture Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning Energy efficient Heating Ventilation and...

  2. Simulation of subsurface thermal regimes of polygonal tundra at Barrow Environmental Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Richard T. Mills; Jitendra Kumar; Vladimir Romanovsky; Peter E. Thornton; Gautam Bisht; Colleen M. Iversen; Nathan Collier

    2016-01-27

    Vast carbon stocks stored in permafrost soils of Arctic tundra are under risk of release to atmosphere under warming climate. Ice--wedge polygons in the low-gradient polygonal tundra create a complex mosaic of microtopographic features. The microtopography plays a critical role in regulating the fine scale variability in thermal and hydrological regimes in the polygonal tundra landscape underlain by continuous permafrost. Modeling of thermal regimes of this sensitive ecosystem is essential for understanding the landscape behaviour under current as well as changing climate. We present here an end-to-end effort for high resolution numerical modeling of thermal hydrology at real-world field sites, utilizing the best available data to characterize and parameterize the models. We develop approaches to model the thermal hydrology of polygonal tundra and apply them at four study sites at Barrow, Alaska spanning across low to transitional to high-centered polygon and representative of broad polygonal tundra landscape. A multi--phase subsurface thermal hydrology model (PFLOTRAN) was developed and applied to study the thermal regimes at four sites. Using high resolution LiDAR DEM, microtopographic features of the landscape were characterized and represented in the high resolution model mesh. Best available soil data from field observations and literature was utilized to represent the complex hetogeneous subsurface in the numerical model. This data collection provides the complete set of input files, forcing data sets and computational meshes for simulations using PFLOTRAN for four sites at Barrow Environmental Observatory. It also document the complete computational workflow for this modeling study to allow verification, reproducibility and follow up studies.

  3. A Many-Task Parallel Approach for Multiscale Simulations of Subsurface Flow and Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Yang, Xiaofan; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Agarwal, Khushbu; Chase, Jared M.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2014-12-16

    Continuum-scale models have long been used to study subsurface flow, transport, and reactions but lack the ability to resolve processes that are governed by pore-scale mixing. Recently, pore-scale models, which explicitly resolve individual pores and soil grains, have been developed to more accurately model pore-scale phenomena, particularly reaction processes that are controlled by local mixing. However, pore-scale models are prohibitively expensive for modeling application-scale domains. This motivates the use of a hybrid multiscale approach in which continuum- and pore-scale codes are coupled either hierarchically or concurrently within an overall simulation domain (time and space). This approach is naturally suited to an adaptive, loosely-coupled many-task methodology with three potential levels of concurrency. Each individual code (pore- and continuum-scale) can be implemented in parallel; multiple semi-independent instances of the pore-scale code are required at each time step providing a second level of concurrency; and Monte Carlo simulations of the overall system to represent uncertainty in material property distributions provide a third level of concurrency. We have developed a hybrid multiscale model of a mixing-controlled reaction in a porous medium wherein the reaction occurs only over a limited portion of the domain. Loose, minimally-invasive coupling of pre-existing parallel continuum- and pore-scale codes has been accomplished by an adaptive script-based workflow implemented in the Swift workflow system. We describe here the methods used to create the model system, adaptively control multiple coupled instances of pore- and continuum-scale simulations, and maximize the scalability of the overall system. We present results of numerical experiments conducted on NERSC supercomputing systems; our results demonstrate that loose many-task coupling provides a scalable solution for multiscale subsurface simulations with minimal overhead.

  4. 2012 Groundwater Monitoring Report Central Nevada Test Area, Subsurface Corrective Action Unit 443

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    The Central Nevada Test Area was the site of a 0.2- to 1-megaton underground nuclear test in 1968. The surface of the site has been closed, but the subsurface is still in the corrective action process. The corrective action alternative selected for the site was monitoring with institutional controls. Annual sampling and hydraulic head monitoring are conducted as part of the subsurface corrective action strategy. The site is currently in the fourth year of the 5-year proof-of-concept period that is intended to validate the compliance boundary. Analytical results from the 2012 monitoring are consistent with those of previous years. Tritium remains at levels below the laboratory minimum detectable concentration in all wells in the monitoring network. Samples collected from reentry well UC-1-P-2SR, which is not in the monitoring network but was sampled as part of supplemental activities conducted during the 2012 monitoring, indicate concentrations of tritium that are consistent with previous sampling results. This well was drilled into the chimney shortly after the detonation, and water levels continue to rise, demonstrating the very low permeability of the volcanic rocks. Water level data from new wells MV-4 and MV-5 and recompleted well HTH-1RC indicate that hydraulic heads are still recovering from installation and testing. Data from wells MV-4 and MV-5 also indicate that head levels have not yet recovered from the 2011 sampling event during which several thousand gallons of water were purged. It has been recommended that a low-flow sampling method be adopted for these wells to allow head levels to recover to steady-state conditions. Despite the lack of steady-state groundwater conditions, hydraulic head data collected from alluvial wells installed in 2009 continue to support the conceptual model that the southeast-bounding graben fault acts as a barrier to groundwater flow at the site.

  5. Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

    2012-02-01

    The microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site's 300 Area in southeastern Washington State was investigated by analyzing 21 samples recovered from depths that ranged from 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 non-chimeric Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that contain a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units, defined at the 97% identity level). Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (based upon Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic transition zone, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The Bacterial community in the oxic Hanford and Ringold Formations contained members of 9 major well-recognized phyla as well 30 as unusually high proportions of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by low OTU richness and a very high preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The study has greatly expanded the intralineage phylogenetic diversity within some major divisions. These subsurface sediments have been shown to contain a large number of phylogenetically novel microbes, with substantial heterogeneities between sediment samples from the same geological formation.

  6. Does aspartic acid racemization constrain the depth limit of the subsurface biosphere?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onstott, T. C.; Aubrey, A.D.; Kieft, T L; Silver, B J; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Van Heerden, E.; Opperman, D. J.; Bada, J L.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies of the subsurface biosphere have deduced average cellular doubling times of hundreds to thousands of years based upon geochemical models. We have directly constrained the in situ average cellular protein turnover or doubling times for metabolically active micro-organisms based on cellular amino acid abundances, D/L values of cellular aspartic acid, and the in vivo aspartic acid racemization rate. Application of this method to planktonic microbial communities collected from deep fractures in South Africa yielded maximum cellular amino acid turnover times of ~89 years for 1 km depth and 27 C and 1 2 years for 3 km depth and 54 C. The latter turnover times are much shorter than previously estimated cellular turnover times based upon geochemical arguments. The aspartic acid racemization rate at higher temperatures yields cellular protein doubling times that are consistent with the survival times of hyperthermophilic strains and predicts that at temperatures of 85 C, cells must replace proteins every couple of days to maintain enzymatic activity. Such a high maintenance requirement may be the principal limit on the abundance of living micro-organisms in the deep, hot subsurface biosphere, as well as a potential limit on their activity. The measurement of the D/L of aspartic acid in biological samples is a potentially powerful tool for deep, fractured continental and oceanic crustal settings where geochemical models of carbon turnover times are poorly constrained. Experimental observations on the racemization rates of aspartic acid in living thermophiles and hyperthermophiles could test this hypothesis. The development of corrections for cell wall peptides and spores will be required, however, to improve the accuracy of these estimates for environmental samples.

  7. Subsurface Multiphase Flow and Multicomponent Reactive Transport Modeling using High-Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Lu, Chuan

    2007-08-01

    Numerical modeling has become a critical tool to the Department of Energy for evaluating the environmental impact of alternative energy sources and remediation strategies for legacy waste sites. Unfortunately, the physical and chemical complexity of many sites overwhelms the capabilities of even most state of the art groundwater models. Of particular concern are the representation of highly-heterogeneous stratified rock/soil layers in the subsurface and the biological and geochemical interactions of chemical species within multiple fluid phases. Clearly, there is a need for higher-resolution modeling (i.e. more spatial, temporal, and chemical degrees of freedom) and increasingly mechanistic descriptions of subsurface physicochemical processes. We present research being performed in the development of PFLOTRAN, a parallel multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive transport model. Written in Fortran90, PFLOTRAN is founded upon PETSc data structures and solvers and has exhibited impressive strong scalability on up to 4000 processors on the ORNL Cray XT3. We are employing PFLOTRAN in the simulation of uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area, a contaminated site of major concern to the Department of Energy, the State of Washington, and other government agencies where overly-simplistic historical modeling erroneously predicted decade removal times for uranium by ambient groundwater flow. By leveraging the billions of degrees of freedom available through high-performance computation using tens of thousands of processors, we can better characterize the release of uranium into groundwater and its subsequent transport to the Columbia River, and thereby better understand and evaluate the effectiveness of various proposed remediation strategies.

  8. Environmental Systems Research Candidates Program--FY2000 Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piet, Steven James

    2001-01-01

    The Environmental Systems Research Candidates (ESRC) Program, which is scheduled to end September 2001, was established in April 2000 as part of the Environmental Systems Research and Analysis Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to provide key science and technology to meet the clean-up mission of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, and perform research and development that will help solve current legacy problems and enhance the INEEL’s scientific and technical capability for solving longer-term challenges. This report documents the progress and accomplishments of the ESRC Program from April through September 2000. The ESRC Program consists of 24 tasks subdivided within four research areas: A. Environmental Characterization Science and Technology. This research explores new data acquisition, processing, and interpretation methods that support cleanup and long-term stewardship decisions. B. Subsurface Understanding. This research expands understanding of the biology, chemistry, physics, hydrology, and geology needed to improve models of contamination problems in the earth’s subsurface. C. Environmental Computational Modeling. This research develops INEEL computing capability for modeling subsurface contaminants and contaminated facilities. D. Environmental Systems Science and Technology. This research explores novel processes to treat waste and decontaminate facilities. Our accomplishments during FY 2000 include the following: • We determined, through analysis of samples taken in and around the INEEL site, that mercury emissions from the INEEL calciner have not raised regional off-INEEL mercury contamination levels above normal background. • We have initially demonstrated the use of x-ray fluorescence to image uranium and heavy metal concentrations in soil samples. • We increased our understanding of the subsurface environment; applying mathematical complexity theory to the problem of transport of subsurface contaminants. • We upgraded the INEEL’s high-speed computer link to offsite supercomputers from T1 (1.5 MB/s) to DS3 (45 MB/s). Procurements have initiated a further upgrade to OC3 (155 MB/s) with additional onsite computational power that should put the INEEL on the Top 500 Supercomputing Sites list. • We developed advanced decontamination, decommissioning, and dismantlement techniques, including the Decontamination, Decommissioning, and Remediation Optimal Planning System.

  9. Multiply Methyl-Branched Fatty Acids and Diacids in the Polar Lipids of a Microaerophilic Subsurface Microbial Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedrick, David B.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Long, Philip E.; White, David C.

    2008-09-01

    A previously unreported series of di- and trimethylated fatty acids, as well as saturated and monounsaturated diacids were identified in polar lipids isolated from environmental subsurface sediment samples. Mechanisms are proposed for their formation, but their origin and role in cell membranes remains unknown.

  10. Hanford tanks initiative work plan -- subsurface characterization to support the closure-readiness demonstration for tank 241-AX-104

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D.B.

    1996-09-27

    This document presents a plan for subsurface investigation near 241-AX-104 Single-Shell tank. Objectives of the investigation are soil sampling and analyses (physical and chemical), local stratigraphic correlation, groundwater background characterization, and geophysical surveys. The primary purpose of the investigation is to supply physical and hydraulic properties for numerical modeling of vadose zone flow and transport.

  11. Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Description Inspiring girls to recognize their potential and pursue opportunities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Through Expanding Your Horizon (EYH) Network programs, we provide STEM role models and hands-on activities for middle and high school girls. Our ultimate goal is to motivate girls to become innovative and creative thinkers ready to meet 21st century challenges. The EYH Network's programs are based on the following assumptions: 1. In order to increase the

  12. Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Description SAGE, the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience, is a unique educational program designed to introduce students in geophysics and related fields to "hands on" geophysical exploration and research. The program emphasizes both teaching of field methods and research related to basic science and a variety of applied problems. SAGE is hosted by the National Security Education Center and the Earth and Environmental Sciences Division of the Los Alamos National

  13. exercise program

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and dispose of many different hazardous substances, including radioactive materials, toxic chemicals, and biological agents and toxins.

    There are a few programs NNSA uses...

  14. Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applied Geophysical Experience, is a unique educational program designed to introduce students in geophysics and related fields to "hands on" geophysical exploration and research....

  15. Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    their potential and pursue opportunities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Through Expanding Your Horizon (EYH) Network programs, we provide STEM role models...

  16. Counterintelligence Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-09-04

    To establish the policies, procedures, and specific responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Counterintelligence (CI) Program. This directive does not cancel any other directive.

  17. Programming Stage

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-05-21

    This chapter addresses plans for the acquisition and installation of operating environment hardware and software and design of a training program.

  18. Special Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Headquarters Human Resources Operations promotes a variety of hiring flexibilities for managers to attract a diverse workforce, from Student Internship Program opportunities (Pathways), Veteran...

  19. Volunteer Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National VolunteerMatch Retired and Senior Volunteer Program United Way of Northern New Mexico United Way of Santa Fe County Giving Employee Giving Campaign Holiday Food Drive...

  20. Program Summaries

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Program Summaries Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee ...

  1. Counterintelligence Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-12-10

    The Order establishes Counterintelligence Program requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy, including the National Nuclear Security Administration. Supersedes DOE 5670.3.

  2. IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program Results for CY2009 IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program Results for CY2009 PDF icon ...

  3. A Strategy to Conduct an Analysis of the Long-Term Performance of Low-Activity Waste Glass in a Shallow Subsurface Disposal System at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeway, James J.; Pierce, Eric M.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-08-04

    The federal facilities located on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State have been used extensively by the U.S. government to produce nuclear materials for the U.S. strategic defense arsenal. Currently, the Hanford Site is under the stewardship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste resulting from the production of nuclear materials has accumulated, mainly in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks located in the central plateau of the Hanford Site (Mann et al., 2001). The DOE-EM Office of River Protection (ORP) is proceeding with plans to immobilize and permanently dispose of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction onsite in a shallow subsurface disposal facility (the Integrated Disposal Facility [IDF]). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was contracted to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the IDF (the source term) as part of an immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass testing program to support future IDF performance assessments (PAs).

  4. Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs to an Unconfined Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Guohui; Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Harvey, Omar; Sullivan, E. C.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2015-07-15

    A series of batch and column experiments combined with solid phase characterization studies (i.e., quantitative x-ray diffraction and wet chemical extractions) were conducted to address a variety of scientific issues and evaluate the impacts of the potential leakage of carbon dioxide (CO2) from deep subsurface storage reservoirs. The main objective was to gain an understanding of how CO2 gas influences: 1) the aqueous phase pH; and 2) mobilization of major, minor, and trace elements from minerals present in an aquifer overlying potential CO2 sequestration subsurface repositories. Rocks and slightly weathered rocks representative of an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer within the continental US, i.e., the Edwards aquifer in Texas, were used in these studies. These materials were exposed to a CO2 gas stream or were leached with a CO2-saturated influent solution to simulate different CO2 gas leakage scenarios, and changes in aqueous phase pH and chemical composition were measured in the liquid samples collected at pre-determined experimental times (batch experiments) or continuously (column experiments). The results from the strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the Edward aquifer samples contain As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which may potentially be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. The results from the batch and column experiments confirmed the release of major chemical elements into the contacting aqueous phase (such as Ca, Mg, Ba, Sr, Si, Na, and K); the mobilization and possible rapid immobilization of minor elements (such as Fe, Al, and Mn), which are able to form highly reactive secondary phases; and sporadic mobilization of only low concentrations of trace elements (such as As, Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, Mo, etc.). The results from this experimental research effort will help in developing a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage is likely to influence pertinent geochemical processes (e.g., dissolution/precipitation, sorption/desorption) in the aquifer sediments and will support site selection, risk assessment, policy-making, and public education efforts associated with geologic carbon sequestration.

  5. Testing Novel CR-39 Detector Deployment System For Identification of Subsurface Fractures, Soda Springs, ID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLing, Travis; Carpenter, Michael; Brandon, William; Zavala, Bernie

    2015-06-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has teamed with Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to facilitate further testing of geologic-fracture-identification methodology at a field site near the Monsanto Superfund Site located in Soda Springs, Idaho. INL has the necessary testing and technological expertise to perform this work. Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) has engaged INL to perform this work through a Work for Others (WFO) Agreement. This study continues a multi-year collaborative effort between INL and EPA to test the efficacy of using field deployed Cr-39 radon in soil portals. This research enables identification of active fractures capable of transporting contaminants at sites where fractures are suspected pathways into the subsurface. Current state of the art methods for mapping fracture networks are exceedingly expensive and notoriously inaccurate. The proposed WFO will evaluate the applicability of using cheap, readily available, passive radon detectors to identify conductive geologic structures (i.e. fractures, and fracture networks) in the subsurface that control the transport of contaminants at fracture-dominated sites. The proposed WFO utilizes proven off-the-shelf technology in the form of CR-39 radon detectors, which have been widely deployed to detect radon levels in homes and businesses. In an existing collaborative EPA/INL study outside of this workscope,. CR-39 detectors are being utilized to determine the location of active transport fractures in a fractured granitic upland adjacent to a landfill site at the Fort Devens, MA that EPA-designated as National Priorities List (NPL) site. The innovative concept of using an easily deployed port that allows the CR-39 to measure the Rn-222 in the soil or alluvium above the fractured rock, while restricting atmospheric Rn-222 and soil sourced Ra from contaminating the detector is unique to INL and EPA approach previously developed. By deploying a series of these inexpensive detector-casing combinations statistical samples of the Rn-222 flux can be measured, elucidating the most communicative fractures (i.e. fractures that are actively transporting water and gasses). The Rn-222 measurements can then be used as an input to create a more accurate conceptual model to be used for transport modeling and related cleanup activities. If the teams approach is demonstrated to be applicable to a wide variety of rock types and soil conditions it might potentially offer significant cost saving without a reduction in data quality at Monsanto Superfund and other sites underlain by fracture-dominated bedrock.

  6. Recovery Act: Web-based CO{sub 2} Subsurface Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paolini, Christopher; Castillo, Jose

    2012-11-30

    The Web-based CO{sub 2} Subsurface Modeling project focused primarily on extending an existing text-only, command-line driven, isothermal and isobaric, geochemical reaction-transport simulation code, developed and donated by Sienna Geodynamics, into an easier-to-use Web-based application for simulating long-term storage of CO{sub 2} in geologic reservoirs. The Web-based interface developed through this project, publically accessible via URL http://symc.sdsu.edu/, enables rapid prototyping of CO{sub 2} injection scenarios and allows students without advanced knowledge of geochemistry to setup a typical sequestration scenario, invoke a simulation, analyze results, and then vary one or more problem parameters and quickly re-run a simulation to answer what-if questions. symc.sdsu.edu has 2x12 core AMD Opteron 6174 2.20GHz processors and 16GB RAM. The Web-based application was used to develop a new computational science course at San Diego State University, COMP 670: Numerical Simulation of CO{sub 2} Sequestration, which was taught during the fall semester of 2012. The purpose of the class was to introduce graduate students to Carbon Capture, Use and Storage (CCUS) through numerical modeling and simulation, and to teach students how to interpret simulation results to make predictions about long-term CO{sub 2} storage capacity in deep brine reservoirs. In addition to the training and education component of the project, significant software development efforts took place. Two computational science doctoral and one geological science masters student, under the direction of the PIs, extended the original code developed by Sienna Geodynamics, named Sym.8. New capabilities were added to Sym.8 to simulate non-isothermal and non-isobaric flows of charged aqueous solutes in porous media, in addition to incorporating HPC support into the code for execution on many-core XSEDE clusters. A successful outcome of this project was the funding and training of three new computational science students and one geological science student in technologies relevant to carbon sequestration and problems involving flow in subsurface media. The three computational science students are currently finishing their doctorial studies on different aspects of modeling CO{sub 2} sequestration, while the geological science student completed his masters thesis in modeling the thermal response of CO{sub 2} injection in brine and, as a direct result of participation in this project, is now employed at ExxonMobil as a full-time staff geologist.

  7. Student Internship Programs Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Student Internship Programs Program Description The objective of the Laboratory's student internship programs is to provide students with opportunities for meaningful hands- on experience supporting educational progress in their selected scientific or professional fields. The most significant impact of these internship experiences is observed in the intellectual growth experienced by the participants. Student interns are able to appreciate the practical value of their education efforts in their

  8. Closure Report Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Corrective Action Unit 443 January 2016

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Findlay, Rick

    2015-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) prepared this Closure Report for the subsurface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443 at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Nevada, Site. CNTA was the site of a 0.2- to 1-megaton underground nuclear test in 1968. Responsibility for the site’s environmental restoration was transferred from the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Field Office to LM on October 1, 2006. The environmental restoration process and corrective action strategy for CAU 443 are conducted in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO 1996, as amended 2011) and all applicable Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) policies and regulations. This Closure Report provides justification for closure of CAU 443 and provides a summary of completed closure activities; describes the selected corrective action alternative; provides an implementation plan for long-term monitoring with well network maintenance and approaches/policies for institutional controls (ICs); and presents the contaminant, compliance, and use-restriction boundaries for the site.

  9. Disturbed subsurface microbial communities follow equivalent trajectories despite different structural starting points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handley, Kim M.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Miller, Christopher S.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Kantor, Rose S.; Thomas, Brian C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Long, Philip E.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-03-01

    We explored the impact of the starting community composition and structure on ecosystem response to perturbations using organic carbon amendment experiments. Subsurface sediment was partitioned into flow-through columns, and the microbial communities were initially stimulated in situ by addition of acetate as a carbon and electron donor source. This drove community richness and evenness down, and pushed the system into a new biogeochemical state characterized by iron reduction. Reconstructed near-full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated a concomitant enrichment of Desulfuromonadales, Comamonadaceae and Bacteroidetes lineages. After 10 to 12 days, acetate was exchange for lactate in a subset of columns. Following the clear onset of sulfate reduction (35 days after acetate-amendment), acetate was substituted for lactate in additional columns. Acetatestimulated communities differed markedly during each biogeochemical regime and at each lactate-switch. Regardless, however, of when communities were switched to lactate, they followed comparable trajectories with respect to composition and structure, with convergence evident one week after each switch, and marked after one month of lactate amendment. During sulfate reduction all treatments were enriched in Firmicutes and a number of species likely involved in sulfate reduction (notably Desulfobulbus, Desulfosporosinus, Desulfitobacterium and Desulfotomaculum). Lactate treatments were distinguished by substantially lower relative abundances of Desulfotomaculum and Bacteroidetes, and enrichments of Psychrosinus and Clostridiales species. Results imply that the structure of the starting community was not significant in controlling organism selection in community succession.

  10. Re-evaluation of a subsurface injection experiment for testing flow and transport models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fayer, M.J.; Lewis, R.E.; Engelman, R.E.; Pearson, A.L.; Murray, C.J.; Smoot, J.L. Lu, A.H.; Randall, P.R.; Wegener, W.H.

    1995-12-01

    The current preferred method for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Hanford Site is to vitrify the wastes so they can be stored in a near-surface, shallow-land burial facility (Shord 1995). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) managed the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to assist Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in designing and assessing the performance of a disposal facility for the vitrified LLW. Vadose zone flow and transport models are recognized as necessary tools for baseline risk assessments of stored waste forms. The objective of the Controlled Field Testing task of the PVTD Project is to perform and analyze field experiments to demonstrate the appropriateness of conceptual models for the performance assessment. The most convincing way to demonstrate appropriateness is to show that the model can reproduce the movement of water and contaminants in the field. Before expensive new experiments are initiated, an injection experiment conducted at the Hanford Site in 1980 (designated the ``Sisson and the Lu experiment``) should be completely analyzed and understood. Briefly, in that test, a solution containing multiple tracers was injected at a single point into the subsurface sediments. The resulting spread of the water and tracers was monitored in wells surrounding the injection point. Given the advances in knowledge, computational capabilities, and models over the last 15 years, it is important to re-analyze the data before proceeding to other experiments and history-matching exercises.

  11. Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

    2011-11-29

    Microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site 300 Area near Richland, Washington State (USA) was investigated by analyzing samples recovered from depths of 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that include a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units at the 97% identity level), respectively. Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic interface, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by a preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The Bacterial community in the oxic sediments contained not only members of 9 well-recognized phyla but also an unusually high proportion of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). Additionally, novel phylogenetic orders were identified within the Delta-proteobacteria, a clade rich in microbes that carry out redox transformations of metals that are important contaminants on the Hanford Site.

  12. A Method Of Evaluating A Subsurface Region Using Gather Sensitive Data Discrimination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lazaratos, Spyridon K. (Houston, TX)

    2000-01-11

    A method of evaluating a subsurface region by separating/enhancing a certain type of seismic event data of interest from an overall set of seismic event data which includes other, different types of seismic event data is disclosed herein. In accordance with one feature, a particular type of gather is generated from the seismic event data such that the gather includes at least a portion of the data which is of interest and at least a portion of the other data. A series of data discrimination lines are incorporated into the gather at positions and directions which are established in the gather in a predetermined way. Using the data discrimination lines, the data of interest which is present in the gather is separated/enhanced with respect to the other data within the gather. The separated data may be used for example in producing a map of the particular subterranean region. In accordance with another feature, the gather is selected such that the incorporated discrimination lines approach a near parallel relationship with one another. Thereby, the data is transformed in a way which causes the discrimination lines to be parallel with one another, resulting in reduced frequency distortion accompanied by improved accuracy in the separation/enhancement of data. In accordance with still another feature, the disclosed data separation/enhancement method is compatible with an iterative approach.

  13. DFNWorks. A discrete fracture network framework for modeling subsurface flow and transport

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; Gable, Carl W.; Painter, Scott L.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2015-08-10

    DFNWorks is a parallalized computational suite to generate three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN) and simulate flow and transport. Developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory over the past five years, it has been used to study flow and transport in fractured media at scales ranging from millimeters to kilometers. The networks are created and meshed using dfnGen, which combines fram (the feature rejection algorithm for meshing) methodology to stochastically generate three-dimensional DFNs on the basis of site specific data with the LaGriT meshing toolbox to create a high-quality computational mesh representation, specifically a conforming Delaunay triangulation suitable for high performance computingmore » finite volume solvers, of the DFN in an intrinsically parallel fashion. Flow through the network is simulated in dfnFlow, which utilizes the massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport finite volume code pflotran. A Lagrangian approach to simulating transport through the DFN is adopted within dfnTrans, which is an extension of the walkabout particle tracking method to determine pathlines through the DFN. Example applications of this suite in the areas of nuclear waste repository science, hydraulic fracturing and CO2 sequestration are also included.« less

  14. DFNWorks. A discrete fracture network framework for modeling subsurface flow and transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyman, Jeffrey D.; Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; Gable, Carl W.; Painter, Scott L.; Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2015-08-10

    DFNWorks is a parallalized computational suite to generate three-dimensional discrete fracture networks (DFN) and simulate flow and transport. Developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory over the past five years, it has been used to study flow and transport in fractured media at scales ranging from millimeters to kilometers. The networks are created and meshed using dfnGen, which combines fram (the feature rejection algorithm for meshing) methodology to stochastically generate three-dimensional DFNs on the basis of site specific data with the LaGriT meshing toolbox to create a high-quality computational mesh representation, specifically a conforming Delaunay triangulation suitable for high performance computing finite volume solvers, of the DFN in an intrinsically parallel fashion. Flow through the network is simulated in dfnFlow, which utilizes the massively parallel subsurface flow and reactive transport finite volume code pflotran. A Lagrangian approach to simulating transport through the DFN is adopted within dfnTrans, which is an extension of the walkabout particle tracking method to determine pathlines through the DFN. Example applications of this suite in the areas of nuclear waste repository science, hydraulic fracturing and CO2 sequestration are also included.

  15. Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan; Moore, Dean A.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2012-04-14

    The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) were investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface Pleistocene flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and 57Fe Mssbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in incubated Hanford sediments with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

  16. Electrode Induced Removal and Recovery of Uranium (VI) from Acidic Subsurfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, Kelvin

    2013-08-12

    The overarching objective of this research is to provide an improved understanding of how aqueous geochemical conditions impact the removal of U and Tc from groundwater and how engineering design may be utilized to optimize removal of these radionuclides. Experiments were designed to address the unique conditions in Area 3 of ORNL while also providing broader insight into the geochemical effectors of the removal rates and extent for U and Tc. The specific tasks of this work were to: 1) quantify the impact of common aqueous geochemical and operational conditions on the rate and extent of U removal and recovery from water, 2) investigate the removal of Tc with polarized graphite electrode, and determine the influence of geochemical and operational conditions on Tc removal and recovery, 3) determine whether U and Tc may be treated simultaneous from Area 3 groundwater, and examine the bench-scale performance of electrode-based treatment, and 4) determine the capacity of graphite electrodes for U(VI) removal and develop a mathematical, kinetic model for the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution. Overall the body of work suggests that an electrode-based approach for the remediation of acidic subsurface environments, such as those observed in Area 3 of ORNL may be successful for the removal for both U(VI) and Tc. Carbonaceous (graphite) electrode materials are likely to be the least costly means to maximize removal rates and efficiency by maximizing the electrode surface area.

  17. MICROSCALE METABOLIC, REDOX AND ABIOTIC REACTIONS IN HANFORD 300 AREA SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beyenal, Haluk; McLEan, Jeff; Majors, Paul; Fredrickson, Jim

    2013-11-14

    The Hanford 300 Area is a unique site due to periodic hydrologic influence of river water resulting in changes in groundwater elevation and flow direction. This area is also highly subject to uranium remobilization, the source of which is currently believed to be the region at the base of the vadose zone that is subject to period saturation due to the changes in the water levels in the Columbia River. We found that microbial processes and redox and abiotic reactions which operate at the microscale were critical to understanding factors controlling the macroscopic fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface. The combined laboratory and field research showed how microscale conditions control uranium mobility and how biotic, abiotic and redox reactions relate to each other. Our findings extended the current knowledge to examine U(VI) reduction and immobilization using natural 300 Area communities as well as selected model organisms on redox-sensitive and redox-insensitive minerals. Using innovative techniques developed specifically to probe biogeochemical processes at the microscale, our research expanded our current understanding of the roles played by mineral surfaces, bacterial competition, and local biotic, abiotic and redox reaction rates on the reduction and immobilization of uranium.

  18. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 3 with Errata Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Echelard

    2006-03-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447, Project Shoal Area (PSA)-Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 447 is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, approximately 48 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for CAU 447, as provided in the FFACO. Corrective Action Unit 447 consists of two corrective action sites (CASs): CAS 57-49-01, Emplacement Shaft, and CAS 57-57-001, Cavity. The emplacement shaft (CAS-57-49-01) was backfilled and plugged in 1996 and will not be evaluated further. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. The original Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for the PSA was approved in September 1996 and described a plan to drill and test four characterization wells, followed by flow and transport modeling (DOE/NV, 1996). The resultant drilling is described in a data report (DOE/NV, 1998e) and the data analysis and modeling in an interim modeling report (Pohll et al., 1998). After considering the results of the modeling effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the degree of uncertainty in transport predictions for PSA remained unacceptably large. As a result, a second CAIP was developed by DOE and approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in December 1998 (DOE/NV, 1998a). This plan prescribed a rigorous analysis of uncertainty in the Shoal model and quantification of methods of reducing uncertainty through data collection. This analysis is termed a Data Decision Analysis (Pohll et al., 1999a) and formed the basis for a second major characterization effort at PSA (Pohll et al., 1999b). The details for this second field effort are presented in an Addendum to the CAIP, which was approved by NDEP in April 1999 (DOE/NV, 1999a). Four additional characterization wells were drilled at PSA during summer and fall of 1999; details of the drilling and well installation are in IT Corporation (2000), with testing reported in Mihevc et al. (2000). A key component of the second field program was a tracer test between two of the new wells (Carroll et al., 2000; Reimus et al., 2003). Based on the potential exposure pathways, two corrective action objectives were identified for CAU 447: Prevent or mitigate exposure to groundwater contaminants of concern at concentrations exceeding regulatory maximum contaminant levels or risk-based levels; and Reduce the risk to human health and the environment to the extent practicable. Based on the review of existing data, the results of the modeling, future use, and current operations at PSA, the following alternatives have been developed for consideration at CAU 447: Alternative 1--No Further Action; Alternative 2--Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls; and Alternative 3--Contaminant Control. The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on the approach outlined in the ''Focused Evaluation of Selected Remedial Alternatives for the Underground Test Area'' (DOE/NV, 1998b). Each alternative was assessed against nine evaluation criteria. These criteria include overall protection of human health and the environment;

  19. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for CAU 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface CNTA, NV

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Document/ Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada Controlled Copy No.: Revision No.: 0 November 2004 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--977 Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering:

  20. Ombuds Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ombuds Program Ombuds Program Committed to fair and equitable treatment of all employees, contractors, and persons doing business with the Laboratory. Contact Ombuds Office Appointments (505) 665-2837 Email Helpline (505) 667-9370 Fax (505) 667-3119 Map & Hours Hours: 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. The Ombuds Office is a safe haven. We provide a resource for people to call first when faced with conflict or disputes. Ombuds program is an independent, neutral, impartial, confidential, and informal

  1. Phased Array Approach To Retrieve Gases, Liquids, Or Solids From Subsurface And Subaqueous Geologic Or Man-Made Formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rynne, Timothy M.; Spadaro, John F.; Iovenitti, Joe L.; Dering, John P.; Hill, Donald G.

    1998-10-27

    A method of enhancing the remediation of contaminated soils and ground water, production of oil and gas, and production of any solid, gas, and/or liquid from subsurface geologic and man-made formations including the steps of estimating the geometric boundaries of the region containing the material to be recovered, drilling a recovery well(s) into subsurface in a strategic location to recover the material of interest, establishing multiple sources of acoustical power in an array about and spaced-apart from the surface or at various depths below the surface in a borehole(s) and/or well(s), directing a volume of acoustical excitation from the sources into the region containing the material to be recovered, the excitation in the form of either controllable sinusoidal, square, pulsed, or various combinations of these three waveforms, and controlling the phasing, frequency, power, duration, and direction of these waveforms from the sources to increase and control the intensity of acoustical excitation in the region of the material to be recovered to enhance. the recovery of said material from the recovery well(s). The invention will augment any technology affecting the removal of materials from the subsurface.

  2. Distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters in fissured volcanogenic bed rocks of the Lake Karachai Area, Chelyabinsk, Southern Urals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solodov, I.N.; Belichkin, V.I.; Zotov, A.V.; Kochkin, B.T.; Drozhko, E.G.; Glagolev, A.V.; Skokov, A.N.

    1994-06-01

    The present investigation is devoted to the study of the distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters, beneath the site of temporary storage of liquid radioactive waste known as Lake Karachai. For this purpose a method of hydrogeochemical logging (HGCL) together with standard hydrogeochemical and geophysical methods of uncased hole logging were used. The distribution of sodium nitrate brine plumes in the subsurface was determined by the physical and physico-chemical properties of these brines and by the petrochemical composition of enclosing rocks and the structural setting of the flow paths. The latter is represented by fractures and large faults in the bedrock of volcanogenic and volcanogenic-sedimentary rocks of intermediate-to-basic composition. The volcanogenic rocks are overlain in some places by a thin cover of unconsolidated sediments, i.e., by loams and relatively impermeable silts. Contaminated waters flow-in accordance with the eluvium bottom relief towards local areas of natural (Mishelyak and Techa rivers) and artificial (Novogomenskii water intake) discharge of subsurface waters. The large Mishelyak fault, southwest of Lake Karachai and under fluvial sediments of the Mishelyak, is assumed to significantly influence the flow pattern of contaminated waters, diverting them from an intake of drinking water.

  3. Integrated Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Review (IPR) Quarterly Business Review (QBR) Access to Capital Debt Management July 2013 Aug. 2013 Sept. 2013 Oct. 2013 Nov. 2013 Dec. 2013 Jan. 2014 Feb. 2014 March...

  4. Deconvolution Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-02-18

    The program is suitable for a lot of applications in applied mathematics, experimental physics, signal analytical system and some engineering applications range i.e. deconvolution spectrum, signal analysis and system property analysis etc.

  5. Program Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The culture of the DOE community will be based on standards. Technical standards will formally integrate part of all DOE facility, program and project activities. The DOE will be recognized as a...

  6. Educational Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Educational Programs Educational Programs A collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff Assistant Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505) 665-8899 Email There are two educational components to the Engineering Institute. The Los Alamos Dynamic

  7. Assessment Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  8. Program Leadership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Leadership - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  9. Volunteer Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community » Volunteer Program Volunteer Program Our good neighbor pledge includes active employee engagement in our communities through volunteering. More than 3,000 current and retired Lab employees have logged more than 1.8 million volunteer hours since 2007. August 19, 2015 LANL employee volunteers with Mountain Canine Corps Lab employee Debbi Miller volunteers for the Mountain Canine Corps with her search and rescue dogs. She also volunteers with another search and rescue organization: the

  10. Influence of Acidic and Alkaline Waste Solution Properties on Uranium Migration in Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Wellman, Dawn M.; Resch, Charles T.; Zhong, Lirong

    2013-08-01

    This study shows that acidic and alkaline wastes co-disposed with uranium into subsurface sediments has significant impact on changes in uranium retardation, concentration, and mass during downward migration. For uranium co-disposal with acidic wastes, significant rapid (i.e., hours) carbonate and slow (i.e., 100s of hours) clay dissolution resulted, releasing significant sediment-associated uranium, but the extent of uranium release and mobility change was controlled by the acid mass added relative to the sediment proton adsorption capacity. Mineral dissolution in acidic solutions (pH 2) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in aqueous carbonate (with Ca2+, Mg2+) and phosphate and a slow (100s of hours) increase in silica, Al3+, and K+, likely from 2:1 clay dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong acid resulted in significant shallow uranium mineral dissolution and deeper uranium precipitation (likely as phosphates and carbonates) with downward uranium migration of three times greater mass at a faster velocity relative to uranium infiltration in pH neutral groundwater. In contrast, mineral dissolution in an alkaline environment (pH 13) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in carbonate, followed by a slow (10s to 100s of hours) increase in silica concentration, likely from montmorillonite, muscovite, and kaolinite dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong base resulted in uranium-silicate precipitation (presumed Na-boltwoodite) but also desorption of natural uranium on the sediment due to the high ionic strength solution, or 60% greater mass with greater retardation compared with groundwater. Overall, these results show that acidic or alkaline co-contaminant disposal with uranium can result in complex depth- and time-dependent changes in uranium dissolution/precipitation reactions and uranium sorption, which alter the uranium migration mass, concentration, and velocity.

  11. Geochemical and Mineralogical Investigation of Uranium in Multielement Contaminated, Organicrich Subsurface Sediment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Gartman, Brandy N.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Mouser, Paula J.; Heald, Steve M.; Bargar, John R.; Janot, Noemie; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Long, Philip E.

    2014-03-02

    Alluvial sediments characterized by an abundance of refractory or lignitic organic carbon compounds and reduced Fe and S bearing mineral phases have been identified through drilling activities at the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site at Rifle, CO. Regions of the subsurface from which such sediments are derived are referred to as Naturally Reduced Zones (NRZ). We conducted a study with NRZ sediments with the objective to: i.) Characterize solid phase contamination of U and other co-contaminants; ii.) Document the occurrence of potential U host minerals; iii.) Determine U valence state and micron scale spatial association with co-contaminants. Macroscopic (wet chemical batch extractions and a column experiment), microscopic (SEM-EDS), and spectroscopic (Mssbauer, -XRF and XANES) techniques were employed. Results showed that sediments solid phase had significant concentrations of U, S, As, Zn, V, Cr, Cu and Se, and a remarkable assortment of potential U hosts (sorbents and/or electron donors), such as Fe oxides (hematite, magnetite, Al-substituted goethite), siderite, reduced Fe(II) bearing clays, sulfides of different types, Zn sulfide framboids and multi element sulfides. Multi-contaminants, micron size (ca. 5 to 30 m) areas of mainly U(IV) and some U(VI), and/or other electron scavengers or donors such as Se, As, Cr, and V were discovered in the sediments, suggesting complex micron-scale system responses to transient redox conditions, and different extent and rates of competing U redox reactions than those of single contaminant systems. Collectively, the results improve our understanding and ability to predict U and NRZs complex behavior and will delineate future research directions to further study both the natural attenuation and persistence of contaminant plumes and their contribution to groundwater contamination.

  12. Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs to Unconfined and Confined Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Brown, Christopher F.; Wang, Guohui; Sullivan, E. C.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Harvey, Omar R.; Bowden, Mark

    2013-04-15

    Experimental research work has been conducted and is undergoing at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to address a variety of scientific issues related with the potential leaks of the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas from deep storage reservoirs. The main objectives of this work are as follows: • Develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage is likely to influence pertinent geochemical processes (e.g., dissolution/precipitation, sorption/desorption and redox reactions) in the aquifer sediments. • Identify prevailing environmental conditions that would dictate one geochemical outcome over another. • Gather useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, policy-making, and public education efforts associated with geological carbon sequestration. In this report, we present results from experiments conducted at PNNL to address research issues related to the main objectives of this effort. A series of batch and column experiments and solid phase characterization studies (quantitative x-ray diffraction and wet chemical extractions with a concentrated acid) were conducted with representative rocks and sediments from an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer, i.e., Edwards aquifer in Texas, and a confined aquifer, i.e., the High Plains aquifer in Kansas. These materials were exposed to a CO2 gas stream simulating CO2 gas leaking scenarios, and changes in aqueous phase pH and chemical composition were measured in liquid and effluent samples collected at pre-determined experimental times. Additional research to be conducted during the current fiscal year will further validate these results and will address other important remaining issues. Results from these experimental efforts will provide valuable insights for the development of site-specific, generation III reduced order models. In addition, results will initially serve as input parameters during model calibration runs and, ultimately, will be used to test model predictive capability and competency. The results from these investigations will provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological, deep subsurface CO2 storage and sequestration.

  13. Deep subsurface drip irrigation using coal-bed sodic water: Part I. Water and solute movement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bern, Carleton R.; Breit, George N.; Healy, Richard W.; Zupancic, John W.; Hammack, Richard

    2013-02-01

    Water co-produced with coal-bed methane (CBM) in the semi-arid Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana commonly has relatively low salinity and high sodium adsorption ratios that can degrade soil permeability where used for irrigation. Nevertheless, a desire to derive beneficial use from the water and a need to dispose of large volumes of it have motivated the design of a deep subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) system capable of utilizing that water. Drip tubing is buried 92 cm deep and irrigates at a relatively constant rate year-round, while evapotranspiration by the alfalfa and grass crops grown is seasonal. We use field data from two sites and computer simulations of unsaturated flow to understand water and solute movements in the SDI fields. Combined irrigation and precipitation exceed potential evapotranspiration by 300480 mm annually. Initially, excess water contributes to increased storage in the unsaturated zone, and then drainage causes cyclical rises in the water table beneath the fields. Native chloride and nitrate below 200 cm depth are leached by the drainage. Some CBM water moves upward from the drip tubing, drawn by drier conditions above. Chloride from CBM water accumulates there as root uptake removes the water. Year over year accumulations indicated by computer simulations illustrate that infiltration of precipitation water from the surface only partially leaches such accumulations away. Field data show that 7% and 27% of added chloride has accumulated above the drip tubing in an alfalfa and grass field, respectively, following 6 years of irrigation. Maximum chloride concentrations in the alfalfa field are around 45 cm depth but reach the surface in parts of the grass field, illustrating differences driven by crop physiology. Deep SDI offers a means of utilizing marginal quality irrigation waters and managing the accumulation of their associated solutes in the crop rooting zone.

  14. Subsurface Hybrid Power Options for Oil & Gas Production at Deep Ocean Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C; Haut, R; Jahn, G; Goldman, J; Colvin, J; Karpinski, A; Dobley, A; Halfinger, J; Nagley, S; Wolf, K; Shapiro, A; Doucette, P; Hansen, P; Oke, A; Compton, D; Cobb, M; Kopps, R; Chitwood, J; Spence, W; Remacle, P; Noel, C; Vicic, J; Dee, R

    2010-02-19

    An investment in deep-sea (deep-ocean) hybrid power systems may enable certain off-shore oil and gas exploration and production. Advanced deep-ocean drilling and production operations, locally powered, may provide commercial access to oil and gas reserves otherwise inaccessible. Further, subsea generation of electrical power has the potential of featuring a low carbon output resulting in improved environmental conditions. Such technology therefore, enhances the energy security of the United States in a green and environmentally friendly manner. The objective of this study is to evaluate alternatives and recommend equipment to develop into hybrid energy conversion and storage systems for deep ocean operations. Such power systems will be located on the ocean floor and will be used to power offshore oil and gas exploration and production operations. Such power systems will be located on the oceans floor, and will be used to supply oil and gas exploration activities, as well as drilling operations required to harvest petroleum reserves. The following conceptual hybrid systems have been identified as candidates for powering sub-surface oil and gas production operations: (1) PWR = Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactor + Lead-Acid Battery; (2) FC1 = Line for Surface O{sub 2} + Well Head Gas + Reformer + PEMFC + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (3) FC2 = Stored O2 + Well Head Gas + Reformer + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (4) SV1 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (5) SV2 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Engine or Turbine + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (6) SV3 = Submersible Vehicle + Charge at Docking Station + ZEBRA & Li-Ion Batteries; (7) PWR TEG = PWR + Thermoelectric Generator + Lead-Acid Battery; (8) WELL TEG = Thermoelectric Generator + Well Head Waste Heat + Lead-Acid Battery; (9) GRID = Ocean Floor Electrical Grid + Lead-Acid Battery; and (10) DOC = Deep Ocean Current + Lead-Acid Battery.

  15. Student Internship Programs Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for a summer high school student to 75,000 for a Ph.D. student working full-time for a year. Program Coordinator: Scott Robbins Email: srobbins@lanl.gov Phone number: 663-5621...

  16. Postdoctoral Program Program Description The Postdoctoral (Postdoc...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Postdoctoral Program Program Description The Postdoctoral (Postdoc) Research program offers the opportunity for appointees to perform research in a robust scientific R&D...

  17. Interlanguage Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interlanguage Programming Interlanguage Programming This page provides examples of compilation and running scripts when mixing C/C++ with Fortran codes. C/MPI Main Calling Fortran Subroutine Here is a full example of a parallel C code using MPI which calls a Fortran subroutine. The Fortran subroutine sets a number of data values based on the MPI task ID. The code is compiled and run using the batch system. C Source Code % cat cmainmpi.c #include "mpi.h" int main(int argc, char* argv[])

  18. Program Year 2008 State Energy Program Formula

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) State Energy Program (SEP), SEP Program Guidance Fiscal Year 2008, Program Year 2008, energy efficiency and renewable energy programs in the states, DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  19. 2012 Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area Subsurface Corrective Action Unit 447

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    The Project Shoal Area (PSA) in Nevada was the site of a 12-kiloton underground nuclear test in 1963. Although the surface of the site has been remediated, investigation of groundwater contamination resulting from the test is still in the corrective action process. Annual sampling and hydraulic head monitoring are conducted at the site as part of the subsurface corrective action strategy. Analytical results from the 2012 monitoring are consistent with those of the previous years, with tritium detected only in well HC-4. The tritium concentration in groundwater from well HC-4 remains far below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-established maximum contaminant level of 20,000 picocuries per liter. Concentrations of total uranium and gross alpha were also detected during this monitoring period, with uranium accounting for nearly all the gross alpha activity. The total uranium concentrations obtained from this monitoring period were consistent with previous results and reflect a slightly elevated natural uranium concentration, consistent with the mineralized geologic terrain. Isotopic ratios of uranium also indicate a natural source of uranium in groundwater, as opposed to a nuclear-test-related source. Water level trends obtained from the 2012 water level data were consistent with those of previous years. The corrective action strategy for the PSA is currently focused on revising the site conceptual model (SCM) and evaluating the adequacy of the current monitoring well network. Some aspects of the SCM are known; however, two major concerns are the uncertainty in the groundwater flow direction and the cause of rising water levels in site wells west of the shear zone. Water levels have been rising in the site wells west of the shear zone since the first hydrologic characterization wells were installed in 1996. While water levels in wells west of the shear zone continue to rise, the rate of increase is less than in previous years. The SCM will be revised, and an evaluation of the groundwater monitoring network will be conducted when water levels at the site have stabilized.

  20. IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    77 DOE Industrial Technologies Program Appendix 4: Method of Calculating Results for the IAC Program u IAC Table......

  1. Disposal phase experimental program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility comprises surface and subsurface facilities, including a repository mined in a bedded salt formation at a depth of 2,150 feet. It has been developed to safely and permanently isolate transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes in a deep geological disposal site. On April 12, 1996, the DOE submitted a revised Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The DOE anticipates receiving an operating permit from the NMED; this permit is required prior to the start of disposal operations. On October 29, 1996, the DOE submitted a Compliance Certification Application (CCA) to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in accordance with the WIPP land Withdrawal Act (LWA) of 1992 (Public Law 102-579) as amended, and the requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR) Parts 191 and 194. The DOE plans to begin disposal operations at the WIPP in November 1997 following receipt of certification by the EPA. The disposal phase is expected to last for 35 years, and will include recertification activities no less than once every five years. This Disposal Phase Experimental Program (DPEP) Plan outlines the experimental program to be conducted during the first 5-year recertification period. It also forms the basis for longer-term activities to be carried out throughout the 35-year disposal phase. Once the WIPP has been shown to be in compliance with regulatory requirements, the disposal phase gives an opportunity to affirm the compliance status of the WIPP, enhance the operations of the WIPP and the national TRU system, and contribute to the resolution of national and international nuclear waste management technical needs. The WIPP is the first facility of its kind in the world. As such, it provides a unique opportunity to advance the technical state of the art for permanent disposal of long-lived radioactive wastes.

  2. Final Report DE-EE0005380 Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN Final Report DE-EE0005380 Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by: Hao Ling (UT) Mark F. Hamilton (ARL:UT) Rajan Bhalla (SAIC) Walter E. Brown (ARL:UT) Todd A. Hay (ARL:UT) Nicholas J. Whitelonis (UT) Shang-Te Yang (UT) Aale R. Naqvi (UT) 9/30/2013 DE-EE0005380 The University of Texas at Austin ii Notice and Disclaimer This report is being disseminated by

  3. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada Controlled Copy No.: Revision No.: 3 March 2006 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1025--Rev. 3 Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm

  4. Program Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-01

    This presentation covers how to go about developing a human reliability program. In particular, it touches on conceptual thinking, raising awareness in an organization, the actions that go into developing a plan. It emphasizes evaluating all positions, eliminating positions from the pool due to mitigating factors, and keeping the process transparent. It lists components of the process and objectives in process development. It also touches on the role of leadership and the necessity for audit.

  5. Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Description Discover E (Engineering) is an evening of interesting, interactive and fun engineering, science, math, and technology demonstrations for K-12 students and their parents or guardians. It is held in conjunction with National Engineers Week which is celebrated at the time of George Washington's birthday, our nation's first President, who was a military engineer and land surveyor. Activities include 30-50 interactive demonstrations of basic engineering, science, technology and

  6. Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MATHCOUNTS is a national enrichment, coaching and competition program that promotes middle school mathematic achievement. The mission of MATHCOUNTS is to increase enthusiasm for and enhance achievement in middle school mathematics throughout the United States. MATHCOUNTS is supported by the National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE), The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, to name a few. . With the generous support of all

  7. Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bowl Program Description The Science Bowl® is a nationwide academic competition that tests students' knowledge in all areas of science and mathematics. Middle and high school student teams from diverse backgrounds are comprised of four students, one alternate, and a teacher who serves as an advisor and coach. These teams face-off in a fast-paced question-and-answer format, being tested on a range of science disciplines including biology, chemistry, Earth science, physics, energy, and math. The

  8. Quality Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    QP001 Revision 0 Effective October 15, 2001 QUALITY PROGRAM Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: _______________________________ Date:__________ Jude M. Clark Approved by: _______________________________________________ Date: ______________ Donald B. Karner Procedure ETA-QP001 Revision 0 2 2001 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Objectives 3 2.0 Scope 3 3.0 Documentation 3 4.0 Prerequisites 4 5.0 Exclusions 5 6.0 Quality

  9. Environmental Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory | Environmental Programs Material Disposal Areas and the Threat of Wildfire Fact Sheet Established in 1943, Los Alamos National Laboratory now consists of 1,280 buildings in 47 technical areas spread out over 37 square miles. The complex includes 11 nuclear facilities and more than 10,000 workers. Los Alamos and Wildfires In the past, large wildfires in the area, including the La Mesa Fire (1977), the Dome Fire (1996), the Oso Fire (1998), the Cerro Grande Fire

  10. Environmental Programs

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Alamos National Laboratory | Environmental Programs Material Disposal Areas and the Threat of Wildfire Fact Sheet Established in 1943, Los Alamos National Laboratory now consists of 1,280 buildings in 47 technical areas spread out over 37 square miles. The complex includes 11 nuclear facilities and more than 10,000 workers. Los Alamos and Wildfires In the past, large wildfires in the area, including the La Mesa Fire (1977), the Dome Fire (1996), the Oso Fire (1998), the Cerro Grande Fire (2000)

  11. STEP Program Benchmark Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Program Benchmark Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  12. Residential Buildings Integration Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential Buildings Integration Program Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  13. Maryland Efficiency Program Options

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maryland Efficiency Program Options, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  14. Manipulating subsurface colloids to enhance cleanups of DOE waste sites. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gschwend, P.M.

    1997-01-01

    'This research is aimed at (a) developing improved understandings of the processes involved in holding colloids immobile in subsurface media, and (b) exploring the prospects for mobilizing such colloids to enhance cleanups. These colloids are important because they are the many contaminants of concern. chief sorbent media for The following briefly describes the efforts manuscript (currently submitted to Environmental also appended. in the last year. A draft Science and Technology) is Mechanisms Controlling Colloid Releases (Swartz) Using aquifer materials from a Southeastern Coastal Plain site, the authors have explored the mechanisms which control the releases of attached colloids into the groundwater flow. First, the authors have completed electron microscopy observations regarding the intimate particle:particle juxtapositions in the solids (Swartz et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 61, 707, 1997.) Next, by flushing these aquifer sands with various aqueous solutions, the authors have found that the bulk of the attached colloids appear to be (a) bound to one another via intermediary amorphous iron oxyhydroxides, and (b) attracted to the other colloids by juxtapositions of oppositely charged phases (manuscript submitted to Environ. Sci. Technol. and attached.) The authors suspect that this combination of inter-colloid interactions may be especially important in geologically young deposits where diagenetic processes have not produced highly crystalline solids yet. As a result of these observations and laboratory manipulations, the authors believe the authors understand the steps necessary to initiate colloid mobilization at such a groundwater site. First, one must apply solution constituents which are suited to dissolving a limited portion of the amorphous iron oxyhydroxides. The authors have accomplished this using 0.5 mM ascorbic acid (i.e., vitamin C.) Next, one must reverse the surface charges of either the negatively charged alumino-silicate clays or the adjacent positively charged iron oxyhydroxides. The authors have used 0.5 \\265m phosphate solutions (pH 5.2) to drive the iron oxyhydroxides to a net negative surface charge. By working at only millimolar levels, the resulting total solution ionic strength is still low enough to permit the corresponding expanded double layers to push the now like-charge colloids apart. In the laboratory, this results in a sustained presence of about 2 mg colloids per liter of flushing solution for at least many tens of pore volumes. In the author''s continuing efforts, he has returned to the field site, where the aquifer solids were initially collected, and tested the possibility of using such ascorbic acid-phosphate solutions to mobilize colloids in the ground. Efforts have proven successful as measured by the presence of turbidity in suitably altered flushing solutions (and the absence of turbidity in control tests). The author is now completing measurements of the ancillary parameters necessary to interpret the field tests.'

  15. Nontoxic chemical process for in situ permeability enhancement and accelerated decontamination of fine-grain subsurface sediments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kansa, Edward J. (Livermore, CA); Wijesinghe, Ananda M. (Tracy, CA); Viani, Brian E. (Oakland, CA)

    1997-01-01

    The remediation of heterogeneous subsurfaces is extremely time consuming and expensive with current and developing technologies. Although such technologies can adequately remove contaminants in the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, they cannot access the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The slow bleed of contaminants from the fine-grained sediments is the primary reason why subsurface remediation is so time-consuming and expensive. This invention addresses the problem of remediating contaminated fine-grained sediments. It is intended that, in the future, a heterogeneous site be treated by a hybrid process that first remediates the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, to be followed by the process, described in this invention, to treat the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The invention uses cationic flocculents and organic solvents to collapse the swelling negative double layer surrounding water saturated clay particles, causing a flocculated, cracked clay structure. The modification of the clay fabric in fine-grained sediments dramatically increases the hydraulic conductivity of previously very tight clays many orders of magnitude.

  16. Nontoxic chemical process for in situ permeability enhancement and accelerated decontamination of fine-grain subsurface sediments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kansa, E.J.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

    1997-01-14

    The remediation of heterogeneous subsurfaces is extremely time consuming and expensive with current and developing technologies. Although such technologies can adequately remove contaminants in the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, they cannot access the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The slow bleed of contaminants from the fine-grained sediments is the primary reason why subsurface remediation is so time-consuming and expensive. This invention addresses the problem of remediating contaminated fine-grained sediments. It is intended that, in the future, a heterogeneous site be treated by a hybrid process that first remediates the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, to be followed by the process, described in this invention, to treat the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The invention uses cationic flocculants and organic solvents to collapse the swelling negative double layer surrounding water saturated clay particles, causing a flocculated, cracked clay structure. The modification of the clay fabric in fine-grained sediments dramatically increases the hydraulic conductivity of previously very tight clays many orders of magnitude. 8 figs.

  17. Intergovernmental Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs The Office of Environmental Management supports, by means of grants and cooperative agreements, a number of

  18. Programming Libraries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Math Libraries Programming Tools List Performance and Debugging Tools Grid Software and Services NERSC Software Downloads Policies User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements Help Staff Blogs Request Repository Mailing List Operations for: Passwords & Off-Hours Status 1-800-66-NERSC, option 1 or 510-486-6821 Account Support https://nim.nersc.gov accounts@nersc.gov 1-800-66-NERSC, option 2 or 510-486-8612 Consulting http://help.nersc.gov consult@nersc.gov 1-800-66-NERSC, option 3 or

  19. Program Update

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    April-June 2014 issue of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offce of Legacy Management (LM) Program Update. This publication is designed to provide a status of activities within LM. Please direct all comments and inquiries to lm@hq.doe.gov. April-June 2014 Visit us at http://energy.gov/lm/ Goal 4 Optimizing the Use of Federal Lands Through Disposition The foundation of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offce of Legacy Manage- ment's (LM) Goal 4, "Optimize the use of land and

  20. Fiscal Year 2007 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RSI

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR) is to present the fiscal year (FY) 2007 results of characterization activities and recommended remedial actions (RAs) for 11 exposure units (EUs) in Zone 2 (Z2-01, Z2-03, Z2-08, Z2-23, Z2-24, Z2-28, Z2-34, Z2-37, Z2-41, Z2-43, and Z2-44) at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), which is located in the northwest corner of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Fig. 1). ETTP encompasses a total land area of approximately 5000 acres that has been subdivided into three zones--Zone 1 ({approx}1400 acres), Zone 2 ({approx}800 acres), and the Boundary Area ({approx}2800 acres). Zone 2, which encompasses the highly industrialized portion of ETTP shown in Fig. 1, consists of all formerly secured areas of the facility, including the large processing buildings and direct support facilities; experimental laboratories and chemical and materials handling facilities; materials storage and waste disposal facilities; secure document records libraries; and shipping and receiving warehouses. The Zone 2 Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2005) (Zone 2 ROD) specifies the future end use for Zone 2 acreage as uncontrolled industrial for the upper 10 ft of soils. Characterization activities in these areas were conducted in compliance with the Zone 2 ROD and the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS) and data quality objectives (DQOs) presented in the Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2007) (Zone 2 RDR/RAWP). The purpose of this PCCR is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for the accessible EUs in FY 2007; (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation for each EU, and determine if the EU met the Zone 2 ROD requirements for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs; (3) Identify additional areas not defined in the Zone 2 ROD that require remediation based on the DVS evaluation results; and (4) Describe the RAs performed in Zone 2. The Zone 2 ROD divided the Zone 2 area into 7 geographic areas and 44 EUs. To facilitate the DQOs of the DVS process, the Zone 2 RDR/RAWP regrouped the 44 EUs into 12 DQO scoping EU groups. These groups facilitated the DQO process by placing similar facilities and their support facilities together and allowed identification of data gaps. The EU groups were no longer pertinent after DQO planning was completed, and characterization was conducted as areas became accessible. As the opportunity to complete characterization became available, the planned DVS program was executed and completed in FY 2007 for the 11 EUs addressed in this document. The main body of this report describes both the DVS process and scope of work performed and the RAs completed. The scope and approach for performing DVS activities performed in FY 2007 that lead to action/no further action decisions are presented in Sects. 2 through 4. RAs performed in FY 2007 are presented in Sects. 5 through 10. Future land use is described in Sect. 11, and the status of all Zone 2 EUs as of this PCCR is presented in Sect. 12.

  1. Recovery Act: Understanding the Impact of CO{sub 2} Injection on the Subsurface Microbial Community in an Illinois Basin CCS Reservoir: Integrated Student Training in Geoscience and Geomicrobiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouke, Bruce

    2013-03-31

    An integrated research and teaching program was developed to provide cross-?disciplinary training opportunities in the emerging field of carbon capture and storage (CCS) for geobiology students attending the University of Illinois Urbana-?Champaign (UIUC). Students from across the UIUC campus participated, including those from the departments of Geology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Animal Sciences and the Institute for Genomic Biology. The project took advantage of the unique opportunity provided by the drilling and sampling of the large-?scale Phase III CCS demonstration Illinois Basin -? Decatur Project (IBDP) in the central Illinois Basin at nearby Decatur, Illinois. The IBPD is under the direction of the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS, located on the UIUC campus) and the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC). The research component of this project focused on the subsurface sampling and identification of microbes inhabiting the subsurface Cambrian-?age Mt. Simon Sandstone. In addition to formation water collected from the injection and monitoring wells, sidewall rock cores were collected and analyzed to characterize the cements and diagenetic features of the host Mt. Simon Sandstone. This established a dynamic geobiological framework, as well as a comparative baseline, for future studies of how CO2 injection might affect the deep microbial biosphere at other CCS sites. Three manuscripts have been prepared as a result of these activities, which are now being finalized for submission to top-?tier international peer-?reviewed research journals. The training component of this project was structured to ensure that a broad group of UIUC students, faculty and staff gained insight into CCS issues. An essential part of this training was that the UIUC faculty mentored and involved undergraduate and graduate students, as well as postdocs and research scientists, at all stages of the project in order to develop CCS-?focused classroom and field courses, as well as seminars. This program provided an excellent opportunity for participants to develop the background necessary to establish longer-?term research in CCS-?related geology and microbial ecology. Further, the program provided an ongoing dynamic platform to foster long-?term collaboration with the regional ISGS and MGSC sequestration partnership, while offering hands-?on, applied learning experiences.

  2. Biomass Program 2007 Program Peer Review - Program Summary Section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-10-27

    This document summarizes the comments provided by the peer reviewers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Programs Peer Review meeting, held on November 14-15, 2007 in Baltimore, MD and Platform Reviews conducted over the summer of 2007. The Platform Reviews provide evaluations of the Programs projects in applied research, development, and demonstration.

  3. Geothermal Technologies Program Overview - Peer Review Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milliken, JoAnn

    2011-06-06

    This Geothermal Technologies Program presentation was delivered on June 6, 2011 at a Program Peer Review meeting. It contains annual budget, Recovery Act, funding opportunities, upcoming program activities, and more.

  4. Beryllium Program - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Beryllium Program Beryllium Program Points of Contact Beryllium Facilities & Areas Beryllium Program Information Hanford CBDPP Committee Beryllium FAQs Beryllium Related Links Hanford Beryllium Awareness Group (BAG) Program Performance Assessments Beryllium Program Feedback Beryllium Health Advocates Primary Contractors/Employers Medical Testing and Surveillance Facilities General Resources Contact Us Beryllium

  5. Manipulation of subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ using a scanning tunneling microscope

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stollenwerk, A. J.; Hurley, N.; Beck, B.; Spurgeon, K.; Kidd, T. E.; Gu, G.

    2015-03-19

    In this study, we present evidence that subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi₂Sr₂CaCu₂O8+δ can be manipulated with nanometer precision using a scanning tunneling microscope. High resolution images indicate that most of the carbon particles remain subsurface after transport observable as a local increase in height as the particle pushes up on the surface. Tunneling spectra in the vicinity of these protrusions exhibit semiconducting characteristics with a band gap of approximately 1.8 eV, indicating that the incorporation of carbon locally alters the electronic properties near the surface.

  6. Manipulation of subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+? using a scanning tunneling microscope

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stollenwerk, A. J.; Hurley, N.; Beck, B.; Spurgeon, K.; Kidd, T. E.; Gu, G.

    2015-03-19

    In this study, we present evidence that subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi?Sr?CaCu?O8+? can be manipulated with nanometer precision using a scanning tunneling microscope. High resolution images indicate that most of the carbon particles remain subsurface after transport observable as a local increase in height as the particle pushes up on the surface. Tunneling spectra in the vicinity of these protrusions exhibit semiconducting characteristics with a band gap of approximately 1.8 eV, indicating that the incorporation of carbon locally alters the electronic properties near the surface.

  7. Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2007

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FE-0514 Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2007 Includes Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) Projects As of September 2007 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 2008 T E C H N O L O G Y DOE/FE-0514 Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2007 Includes Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant

  8. Machinist Pipeline/Apprentice Program Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cost effective than previous time-based programs Moves apprentices to journeyworker status more quickly Program Coordinator: Heidi Hahn Email: hahn@lanl.gov Phone number:...

  9. Existing Facilities Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The NYSERDA Existing Facilities program merges the former Peak Load Reduction and Enhanced Commercial and Industrial Performance programs. The new program offers a broad array of different...

  10. Graduate Research Assistant Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Program Manager Scott Robbins Student Programs (505) 667-3639 Email Program Coordinator Emily Robinson Student...

  11. Undergraduate Student Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    while they are pursuing an undergraduate degree. Contact Program Manager Scott Robbins Student Programs (505) 667-3639 Email Program Coordinator Emily Robinson Student...

  12. Understanding the Subsurface Reactive Transport of Transuranic Contaminants at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, Mark O.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.; Saiers, James E.; Shuh, David K.

    2013-12-20

    Our primary hypothesis is that actinides can interact with surfaces in fundamentally different ways than other metals, metalloids, and oxyanions and that this fundamental difference requires new approaches to studying and modeling transuranic sorption to minerals and geomedia. This project supports a key mission of the SBR program to develop sufficient scientific understanding such that DOE sites will be able to incorporate coupled physical, chemical, and biological processes into decision making for environmental management and long-term stewardship, while also supporting DOEs commitment to education, training, and collaboration with DOE user facilities.

  13. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Program Administrator Description

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Program Administrator Business Models, Program Administrator Description.

  14. PROBABILISTIC SIMULATION OF SUBSURFACE FLUID FLOW: A STUDY USING A NUMERICAL SCHEME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buscheck, Timothy Eric

    1980-03-01

    There has been an increasing interest in probabilistic modeling of hydrogeologic systems. The classical approach to groundwater modeling has been deterministic in nature, where individual layers and formations are assumed to be uniformly homogeneous. Even in the case of complex heterogeneous systems, the heterogeneities describe the differences in parameter values between various layers, but not within any individual layer. In a deterministic model a single-number is assigned to each hydrogeologic parameter, given a particular scale of interest. However, physically there is no such entity as a truly uniform and homogeneous unit. Single-number representations or deterministic predictions are subject to uncertainties. The approach used in this work models such uncertainties with probabilistic parameters. The resulting statistical distributions of output variables are analyzed. A numerical algorithm, based on axiomatic principles of probability theory, performs arithmetic operations between probability distributions. Two subroutines are developed from the algorithm and incorporated into the computer program TERZAGI, which solves groundwater flow problems in saturated, multi-dimensional systems. The probabilistic computer program is given the name, PROGRES. The algorithm has been applied to study the following problems: one-dimensional flow through homogeneous media, steady-state and transient flow conditions, one-dimensional flow through heterogeneous media, steady-state and transient flow conditions, and two-dimensional steady-stte flow through heterogeneous media. The results are compared with those available in the literature.

  15. EOS7CA Version 1.0: TOUGH2 Module for Gas Migration in Shallow Subsurface Porous Media Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-22

    EOS7CA is a TOUGH2 module for mixtures of a non-condensible gas (NCG) and air (with or without a gas tracer), an aqueous phase, and water vapor. The user can select the NCG as being CO2, N2, or CH4. EOS7CA uses a cubic equation of state with a multiphase version of Darcy?s Law to model flow and transport of gas and aqueous phase mixtures over a range of pressures and temperatures appropriate to shallow subsurface porous media systems. The limitation to shallow systems arises from the use of Henry?s Law for gas solubility which is appropriate for low pressures but begins to over-predict solubility starting at pressures greater than approximately 1 MPa (10 bar). The components modeled in EOS7CA are water, brine, NCG, gas tracer, air, and optional heat.

  16. EOS7CA Version 1.0: TOUGH2 Module for Gas Migration in Shallow Subsurface Porous Media Systems

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-06-22

    EOS7CA is a TOUGH2 module for mixtures of a non-condensible gas (NCG) and air (with or without a gas tracer), an aqueous phase, and water vapor. The user can select the NCG as being CO2, N2, or CH4. EOS7CA uses a cubic equation of state with a multiphase version of Darcy’s Law to model flow and transport of gas and aqueous phase mixtures over a range of pressures and temperatures appropriate to shallow subsurface porousmore » media systems. The limitation to shallow systems arises from the use of Henry’s Law for gas solubility which is appropriate for low pressures but begins to over-predict solubility starting at pressures greater than approximately 1 MPa (10 bar). The components modeled in EOS7CA are water, brine, NCG, gas tracer, air, and optional heat.« less

  17. Barrier-free subsurface incorporation of 3d metal atoms into Bi(111) films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, C.; Vollmers, N. J.; Gerstmann, U.; Zahl, P.; Lukermann, D.; Jnawali, G.; Pfnur, H.; Sutter, P.; Tegenkamp, C.; Schmidt, W. G.; Horn-von Hoegen, M.

    2015-05-27

    By combining scanning tunneling microscopy with density functional theory it is shown that the Bi(111) surface provides a well-defined incorporation site in the first bilayer that traps highly coordinating atoms such as transition metals (TMs) or noble metals. All deposited atoms assume exactly the same specific sevenfold coordinated subsurface interstitial site while the surface topography remains nearly unchanged. Notably, 3d TMs show a barrier-free incorporation. The observed surface modification by barrier-free subsorption helps to suppress aggregation in clusters. Thus, it allows a tuning of the electronic properties not only for the pure Bi(111) surface, but may also be observed for topological insulators formed by substrate-stabilized Bi bilayers.

  18. Vehicle Technologies Program Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-09-05

    Overview of the Vehicle Technologies Program including external assessment and market view; internal assessment, program history and progress; program justification and federal role; program vision, mission, approach, strategic goals, outputs, and outcomes; and performance goals.

  19. Human Reliability Program Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  20. Utility Partnerships Program Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-10-03

    Document describes the Utility Partnerships Program within the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program.

  1. Mentoring Program | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mentoring Program Mentoring Program Mentee Questionnaire Mentor Questionnaire Ideas for Mentoring Program Activities

  2. Machinist Pipeline/Apprentice Program Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Machinist Pipeline/Apprentice Program Program Description The Machinist Pipeline Program was created by the Prototype Fabrication Division to fill a critical need for skilled journeyworker machinists. It is based on a program developed by the National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) in conjunction with metalworking trade associations to develop and maintain a globally competitive U.S. workforce. The goal is to develop and implement apprenticeship programs that are aligned with

  3. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program, Evaluation and assessment of containment technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.A.; Fayer, M.J.

    1994-04-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISRIP) was established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to advance the state-of-the art of innovative in situ remediation technologies to the point of demonstration and to broaden the applicability of these technologies to the widely varying site remediation requirements throughout the DOE complex. This program complements similar ongoing integrated demonstration programs being conducted at several DOE sites. The ISRIP has been conducting baseline assessments on in situ technologies to support program planning. Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted an assessment and evaluation of subsurface containment barrier technology in support of ISRIP`s Containment Technology Subprogram. This report summarizes the results of that activity and provides a recommendation for priortizing areas in which additional research and development is needed to advance the technology to the point of demonstration in support of DOE`s site restoration activities.

  4. Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination - 12543

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerdes, Kurt; Chamberlain, Grover; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin; Wellman, Dawn; Deeb, Rula; Hawley, Elisabeth

    2012-07-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites. (authors)

  5. Invited Article: In situ comparison of passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors at subsurface workplaces in Hungary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kvsi, Norbert; Social Organization for Radioecological Cleanliness, Veszprm ; Vigh, Tams; Manganese Mining Process Ltd., rkt ; Nmeth, Csaba; University of Pannonia, Veszprm ; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Omori, Yasutaka; Janik, Miroslaw; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2014-02-15

    During a one-year long measurement period, radon and thoron data obtained by two different passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors were compared at subsurface workplaces in Hungary, such as mines (bauxite and manganese ore) and caves (medical and touristic). These workplaces have special environmental conditions, such as, stable and high relative humidity (100%), relatively stable temperature (12C21C), low or high wind speed (max. 2.4 ms{sup ?1}) and low or elevated aerosol concentration (13060000 particles m{sup ?3}). The measured radon and thoron concentrations fluctuated in a wide range among the different workplaces. The respective annual average radon concentrations and their standard deviations (in brackets) measured by the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with cellulose filter (CF) and the passive radon-thoron discriminative monitor with sponge filter (SF) were: 350(321) Bqm{sup ?3} and 550(497) Bqm{sup ?3} in the bauxite mine; 887(604) Bqm{sup ?3} and 1258(788) Bqm{sup ?3} in the manganese ore mine; 2510(2341) Bqm{sup ?3} and 3403(3075) Bqm{sup ?3} in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 6239(2057) Bq m{sup ?3} and 8512(1955) Bqm{sup ?3} in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). The respective average thoron concentrations and their standard deviation (in brackets) measured by CF and SF monitors were: 154(210) Bqm{sup ?3} and 161(148) Bqm{sup ?3} in the bauxite mine; 187(191) Bqm{sup ?3} and 117(147) Bqm{sup ?3} in the manganese-ore mine; 360(524) Bqm{sup ?3} and 371(789) Bqm{sup ?3} in the medical cave (Hospital Cave of Tapolca); and 1420(1184) Bq m{sup ?3} and 1462(3655) Bqm{sup ?3} in the touristic cave (Lake Cave of Tapolca). Under these circumstances, comparison of the radon data for the SF and CF monitors showed the former were consistently 51% higher in the bauxite mine, 38% higher in the manganese ore mine, and 34% higher in the caves. Consequently, correction is required on previously obtained radon data acquired by CF monitors at subsurface workplaces to gain comparable data for SF monitors. In the case of thoron, the data were unreliable and no significant tendency was seen during the comparison therefore comparison of previously obtained thoron data acquired by either CF or SF is doubtful. There was probable influence by relative humidity on the detection response; however, the effects of the high wind speed and elevated aerosol concentration could not be excluded. The results of this study call attention to the importance of calibration under extreme environmental conditions and the need for using reliable radon-thoron monitors for subsurface workplaces.

  6. Subsurface Completion Report for Amchitka Underground Nuclear Test Sites: Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin, Rev. No.: 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echelard, Tim

    2006-09-01

    Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island, Alaska, in 1965, 1969, and 1971. The effects of the Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin tests on the environment were extensively investigated during and following the detonations, and the area continues to be monitored today. This report is intended to document the basis for the Amchitka Underground Nuclear Test Sites: Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin (hereafter referred to as ''Amchitka Site'') subsurface completion recommendation of No Further Remedial Action Planned with Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance, and define the long-term surveillance and maintenance strategy for the subsurface. A number of factors were considered in evaluating and selecting this recommendation for the Amchitka Site. Historical studies and monitoring data, ongoing monitoring data, the results of groundwater modeling, and the results of an independent stakeholder-guided scientific investigation were also considered in deciding the completion action. Water sampling during and following the testing showed no indication that radionuclides were released to the near surface, or marine environment with the exception of tritium, krypton-85, and iodine-131 found in the immediate vicinity of Long Shot surface ground zero. One year after Long Shot, only tritium was detectable (Merritt and Fuller, 1977). These tritium levels, which were routinely monitored and have continued to decline since the test, are above background levels but well below the current safe drinking water standard. There are currently no feasible means to contain or remove radionuclides in or around the test cavities beneath the sites. Surface remediation was conducted in 2001. Eleven drilling mud pits associated with the Long Shot, Milrow and Cannikin sites were remediated. Ten pits were remediated by stabilizing the contaminants and constructing an impermeable cap over each pit. One pit was remediated by removing all of the contaminated mud for consolidation in another pit. In addition to the mud pits, the hot mix plant was also remediated. Ongoing monitoring data does not indicate that radionuclides are currently seeping into the marine environment. Additionally, the groundwater modeling results indicate no seepage is expected for tens to thousands of years. If seepage does occur in the future, however, the rich, diverse ecosystems around the island could be at risk, as well as people eating foods from the area. An independent science study was conducted by the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) in accordance with the Amchitka Independent Science Plan (2003). The study report was published on August 1, 2005. The CRESP study states ''our geophysical and biological analyses did not find evidence of risk from radionuclides from the consumption of marine foods, nor indication of any current radionuclide contaminated migration into the marine environment from the Amchitka test shots''. The study also found evidence supporting the groundwater modeling conclusions of very slow contaminant transport (CRESP, 2005). While no further action is recommended for the subsurface of the Amchitka Site, long-term stewardship of Amchitka Island will be instituted and will continue into the future. This will include institutional controls management and enforcement, post-completion monitoring, performance of five-year reviews, public participation, and records management. Long-term stewardship will be the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. The Department of Energy is recommending completion of the investigation phase of the Amchitka Sites. The recommended remedy for the Amchitka Site is No Further Action with Long-Term Monitoring and Surveillance. The future long-term stewardship actions will be governed by a Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan. This Plan is currently being developed with input from the State, landowner, and other interested or affected stakeholders.

  7. Subsurface cross section of lower Paleozoic rocks, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macke, D.L.

    1988-07-01

    The Powder River basin is one of the most actively explored Rocky Mountain basins for hydrocarbons, yet the lower Paleozoic (Cambrian through Mississippian) rocks of this interval remain little studied. As a part of a program studying the evolution of sedimentary basins, approximately 3200 km of cross section, based on more than 50 combined geophysical and lithologic logs, have been constructed covering an area of about 200,000 km/sup 2/. The present-day basin is a Cenozoic structural feature located between the stable interior of the North American craton and the Cordilleran orogenic belt. At various times during the early Paleozoic, the basin area was not distinguishable from either the stable craton, the Williston basin, the Central Montana trough, or the Cordilleran miogeocline. Both deposition and preservation in the basin have been greatly influenced by the relative uplift of the Transcontinental arch. Shows of oil and dead oil in well cuttings confirm that hydrocarbons have migrated through at least parts of the basin's lower Paleozoic carbonate section. These rocks may have been conduits for long-distance migration of hydrocarbons as early as Late Cretaceous, based on (1) the probable timing of thermal maturation of hydrocarbon-source rocks within the basin area and to the west, (2) the timing of Laramide structural events, (3) the discontinuous nature of the reservoirs in the overlying, highly productive Pennsylvanian-Permian Minnelusa Formation, and (4) the under-pressuring observed in some Minnelusa oil fields. Vertical migration into the overlying reservoirs could have been through deep fractures within the basin, represented by major lineament systems. Moreover, the lower Paleozoic rocks themselves may also be hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  8. IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    91 DOE Industrial Technologies Program Appendix 7: Methodology for Technology Tracking and Assessment of Benefits u Technology Tracking......

  9. Y-12 Apprentice Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apprentice Program Over the years Y-12 has produced numerous training programs. Many of them have been developed at Y-12 to meet special needs. The training programs have ranged...

  10. Volunteer Program FAQs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volunteer Program FAQs FAQs About Volunteer Program Your questions about volunteering answered. . . General info about LANL volunteering 2016 FAQs (pdf) Vecinos Volunteer Program What is the LANL Vecinos Volunteer Program? The LANL Vecinos Volunteer Program connects great employee and retiree volunteers with local nonprofit organizations needing assistance. What does the word 'Vecinos' mean? Vecinos, the name of the LANL Volunteer Program, means "neighbors" in Spanish. Our employee and

  11. Sedimentology of the Mesaverde Formation at Rifle Gap, Colorado and implications for gas-bearing intervals in the subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenz, J.C.

    1982-03-01

    The exposures of the Mesaverde Formation at Rifle Gap, Colorado, are of a regressive series of marine to fluvial deposits about 1650 m (5000 ft) thick. Grading up out of the marine Mancos Shale, the blanket shoreline sandstones of the Corcoran, Cozzette, and Rollins Sandstones record substages of the regression as delta lobes were activated and abandoned in northwestern Colorado during Late Cretaceous time. The overlying coals, sandstones, and carbonaceous mudstones were deposited on the paludal lower delta plain behind the shoreline. Meandering fluvial systems prograded over the paludal deposits. These systems deposited point-bar sandstones and overbank mudstones and siltstones in composite meander-belt trends, some of which are now gas-bearing, low-permeability reservoirs. Reorientation of the paleogeography during the Laramide orogeny (contemporaneous with fluvial deposition) probably changed the orientation of the meander belt trends. The uppermost sandstones at Rifle Gap, including the Ohio Creek conglomerate, are interpreted as shoreline deposits of a transgression that has been previously unrecognized in the area. Most of the record of this transgression has been destroyed by pre-Eocene erosion. The outcrops at Rifle Gap provide a basis for interpreting subsurface deposis in the Department of Energy's Western Gas Sands Project Multi-Well Experiment, 12 miles away.

  12. Approaches to identifying reservoir heterogeneity and reserve growth opportunities from subsurface data: The Oficina Formation, Budare field, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, D.S.; Raeuchle, S.K.; Holtz, M.H.

    1997-08-01

    We applied an integrated geologic, geophysical, and engineering approach devised to identify heterogeneities in the subsurface that might lead to reserve growth opportunities in our analysis of the Oficina Formation at Budare field, Venezuela. The approach involves 4 key steps: (1) Determine geologic reservoir architecture; (2) Investigate trends in reservoir fluid flow; (3) Integrate fluid flow trends with reservoir architecture; and (4) Estimate original oil-in-place, residual oil saturation, and remaining mobile oil, to identify opportunities for reserve growth. There are three main oil-producing reservoirs in the Oficina Formation that were deposited in a bed-load fluvial system, an incised valley-fill, and a barrier-strandplain system. Reservoir continuity is complex because, in addition to lateral facies variability, the major Oficina depositional systems were internally subdivided by high-frequency stratigraphic surfaces. These surfaces define times of intermittent lacustrine and marine flooding events that punctuated the fluvial and marginal marine sedimentation, respectively. Syn and post depositional faulting further disrupted reservoir continuity. Trends in fluid flow established from initial fluid levels, response to recompletion workovers, and pressure depletion data demonstrated barriers to lateral and vertical fluid flow caused by a combination of reservoir facies pinchout, flooding shale markers, and the faults. Considerable reserve growth potential exists at Budare field because the reservoir units are highly compartment by the depositional heterogeneity and structural complexity. Numerous reserve growth opportunities were identified in attics updip of existing production, in untapped or incompletely drained compartments, and in field extensions.

  13. X-ray imaging of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials at the Diamond Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eakins, D. E. Chapman, D. J.

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, we describe a new approach enabling study of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials using the unique combination of high-energy synchrotron X-rays, a hybrid bunch structure, and a new dynamic loading platform. We detail the design and operation of the purpose-built, portable small bore gas-gun, which was installed on the I12 high-energy beamline at the Diamond Light Source and used to drive compression waves into solid and porous metal targets. Using a hybrid bunch structure and broadband X-ray pulses of up to 300 keV, radiographic snapshots were captured during various dynamic deformation processes in cm-scale specimens, thereby contributing to a more complete understanding of the evolution of mesoscale damage. Importantly, we highlight strategies for overcoming the challenges associated with using high-energy X-rays, and suggest areas for improvement needed to advance dynamic imaging through large-scale samples of relevance to engineering scenarios. These preliminary measurements demonstrate the feasibility of probing highly transient phenomena using the presented methodology.

  14. Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Hao; Hamilton, Mark F.; Bhalla, Rajan; Brown, Walter E.; Hay, Todd A.; Whitelonis, Nicholas J.; Yang, Shang-Te; Naqvi, Aale R.

    2013-09-30

    Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

  15. Programming on Franklin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programming Programming on Franklin Compiling Codes on Franklin Cray provides a convenient set of wrapper commands which should be used in almost all cases for compiling and...

  16. Weapons Program Associate Directors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    integration we have achieved between the various components of the program," said Bret Knapp, Principal Associate Director for Weapons Programs. "They have both done an...

  17. Voluntary Separation Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... time limits of the program, the ages and job titles of everyone eligible for the ... Separation Program. The separation package has been explained to my satisfaction. ...

  18. TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Combustion Systems program is conducted under the Clean Coal Research Program (CCRP). DOE's overarching mission is to increase the energy ...

  19. Hydropower Program Technology Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2001-10-01

    New fact sheets for the DOE Office of Power Technologies (OPT) that provide technology overviews, description of DOE programs, and market potential for each OPT program area.

  20. Energy Smart Grocer Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Commercial Program Development Commercial Current Promotions Industrial Federal Agriculture EnergySmart Grocer Program Close-out BPA and CLEAResult have concluded negotiations...

  1. STEM Education Program Inventory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    box to the right.)* Workforce Development Student Programs Public Engagement in Life Long Learning TeacherFaculty Prefessional Development Other Type of Program (Other) To select...

  2. ARM - Program Fact Sheets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MaterialsProgram Fact Sheets Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library...

  3. SEP Program Transition Tables

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Program Transition Tables provide information concerning the level of effort required to move from a traditional, industrial incentive program to Strategic Energy Management, ISO 50001, or SEP.

  4. Assistance Program, State Energy Program, Energy Efficiency and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Assistance Program, State Energy Program, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants Assistance Program, State Energy Program, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants ...

  5. State Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program: Volume 1 - Program...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    State Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program: Volume 1 - Program Design Lessons Learned State Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program: Volume 1 - Program Design Lessons...

  6. Evaluation of conceptual, mathematical and physical-and-chemical models for describing subsurface radionuclide transport at the Lake Karachai Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rumynin, V.G.; Mironenko, V.A.; Sindalovsky, L.N.; Boronina, A.V.; Konosavsky, P.K.; Pozdniakov, S.P.

    1998-06-01

    The goal of this work was to develop the methodology and to improve understanding of subsurface radionuclide transport for application to the Lake Karachai Site and to identify the influence of the processes and interactions involved into transport and fate of the radionuclides. The report is focused on two sets of problems, which have to do both with, hydrodynamic and hydrogeochemical aspects of the contaminant transport.

  7. National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Development of an automated ultrasonic inspection cell for detecting subsurface discontinuities in cast gray iron. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burningham, J.S.

    1995-08-01

    This inspection cell consisted of an ultrasonic flaw detector, transducer, robot, immersion tank, computer, and software. Normal beam pulse-echo ultrasonic nondestructive testing, using the developed automated cell, was performed on 17 bosses on each rough casting. Ultrasonic transducer selection, initial inspection criteria, and ultrasonic flow detector (UFD) setup parameters were developed for the gray iron castings used in this study. The software were developed for control of the robot and UFD in real time. The software performed two main tasks: emulating the manual operation of the UFD, and evaluating the ultrasonic signatures for detecting subsurface discontinuities. A random lot of 105 castings were tested; the 100 castings that passed were returned to the manufacturer for machining into finished parts and then inspection. The other 5 castings had one boss each with ultrasonic signatures consistent with subsurface discontinuities. The cell was successful in quantifying the ultrasonic echo signatures for the existence of signature characteristics consistent with Go/NoGo criteria developed from simulated defects. Manual inspection showed that no defects in the areas inspected by the automated cell avoided detection in the 100 castings machined into finished parts. Of the 5 bosses found to have subsurface discontinuities, two were verified by manual inspection. The cell correctly classified 1782 of the 1785 bosses (99.832%) inspected.

  8. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - Outreach Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Coyote's webpage

  9. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - Outreach Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Field Guide PDF

  10. Internship Programs Calendar | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Internship Programs Calendar

  11. Beryllium Program Feedback - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Wide Programs Beryllium Program Beryllium Program Feedback About Us Beryllium Program Beryllium Program Points of Contact Beryllium Facilities & Areas Beryllium Program Information Hanford CBDPP Committee Beryllium FAQs Beryllium Related Links Hanford Beryllium Awareness Group (BAG) Program Performance Assessments Beryllium Program Feedback Beryllium Health Advocates Primary Contractors/Employers Medical Testing and Surveillance Facilities General Resources Beryllium Program

  12. Biomass Program Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-01

    This document provides an overview of the Biomass Program's mission, strategic goals, and research approach.

  13. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Models Guide, October 27, 2011.

  14. Home Energy Score Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  15. Laser Programs Highlights 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowdermilk, H.; Cassady, C.

    1999-12-01

    This report covers the following topics: Commentary; Laser Programs; Inertial Confinement Fusion/National Ignition Facility (ICF/NIF); Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS); Laser Science and Technology (LS&T); Information Science and Technology Program (IS&T); Strategic Materials Applications Program (SMAP); Medical Technology Program (MTP) and Awards.

  16. SEP Program Planning Template ("Program Planning Template") ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    File Program Planning Template More Documents & Publications Commute Mode Switching Impact Tool Energy Intensity Indicators Data Refrigerator-Freezers (multiple defrost waiver)...

  17. State Energy Program & Weatherization Assistance Program: Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Area 2 - Stimulating Energy Efficiency Action * Policy and program frameworks to support investment in cost-effective energy efficiency; establish or increase a statewide energy ...

  18. IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    181 DOE Industrial Technologies Program Appendix 5: Method of Calculating Results for the Save Energy Now Initiative u Large Plant Assessments ......

  19. Corrective Action Decision Document/ Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Evans

    2004-11-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the subsurface at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443, CNTA - Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). CAU 443 is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, north of U.S. Highway 6, about 48 kilometers north of Warm Springs, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the corrective action plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for the UC-1 Cavity (Corrective Action Site 58-57-001) at CAU 443, as provided in the FFACO. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. A Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) was performed in several stages from 1999 to 2003, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites (Corrective Action Unit No. 443)'' (DOE/NV, 1999). Groundwater modeling was the primary activity of the CAI. Three phases of modeling were conducted for the Faultless underground nuclear test. The first involved the gathering and interpretation of geologic and hydrogeologic data into a three-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow, and use of the output of the flow model for a transport model of radionuclide release and migration behavior (Pohlmann et al., 2000). The second modeling phase (known as a Data Decision Analysis [DDA]) occurred after the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection reviewed the first model and was designed to respond to concerns regarding model uncertainty (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). The third modeling phase updated the original flow and transport model to incorporate the uncertainty identified in the DDA, and focused the model domain on the region of interest to the transport predictions. This third phase culminated in the calculation of contaminant boundaries for the site (Pohll et al., 2003).

  20. Centralized Procurement Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Centralized Procurement Program What's New Who to Contact Current Products BOAs MOC Integrated Team Program Elements Future Products Welcome to the Carlsbad Field Office’s (CBFO) Centralized Procurement Program (CPP) Web Page. The purpose of the Centralized Procurement Program is to provide a standardized, economical system of acquisition and distribution of containers and equipment used for shipping Transuranic (TRU) Waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The program is available

  1. LANSCE | Users | User Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANSCE User Program LANSCE's User Program ensures the research it oversees represents the cutting edge of nuclear and materials science and technology. The User Program plays a key role in training the next generation of top scientists, attracting the best graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and early-career scientists (defined as those less than 40-years old). The User Program typically begins with the first call for proposals and run until the end of the run-cycle. The User-Program

  2. Applied Energy Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applied Energy Programs Applied Energy Programs Los Alamos is using its world-class scientific capabilities to enhance national energy security by developing energy sources with limited environmental impact and by improving the efficiency and reliability of the energy infrastructure. CONTACT US Program Director Melissa Fox (505) 665-0896 Email Applied Energy Program Office serves as the hub connecting the Laboratory's scientific and technical resources to DOE sponsors, DoD programs, and to

  3. Summary report on close-coupled subsurface barrier technology: Initial field trials to full-scale demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser, J.H.; Dwyer, B.

    1997-09-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate the installation and measure the performance of a close-coupled barrier for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional, low-cost, cement-grout containment barrier followed by a thin lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement-polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. The technology has matured from a regulatory investigation of the issues concerning the use of polymers to laboratory compatibility and performance measurements of various polymer systems to a pilot-scale, single column injection at Sandia to full-scale demonstration. The feasibility of the close-coupled barrier concept was proven in a full-scale cold demonstration at Hanford, Washington and then moved to the final stage with a full-scale demonstration at an actual remediation site at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). At the Hanford demonstration the composite barrier was emplaced around and beneath a 20,000 liter tank. The secondary cement layer was constructed using conventional jet grouting techniques. Drilling was completed at a 45{degree} angle to the ground, forming a cone-shaped barrier. The primary barrier was placed by panel jet-grouting with a dual-wall drill stem using a two part polymer grout. The polymer chosen was a high molecular weight acrylic. At the BNL demonstration a V-trough barrier was installed using a conventional cement grout for the secondary layer and an acrylic-gel polymer for the primary layer. Construction techniques were identical to the Hanford installation. This report summarizes the technology development from pilot- to full-scale demonstrations and presents some of the performance and quality achievements attained.

  4. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed.

  5. The Modular Borehole Monitoring Program. A research program to optimize well-based monitoring for geologic carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freifeld, Barry; Daley, Tom; Cook, Paul; Trautz, Robert; Dodds, Kevin

    2014-12-31

    Understanding the impacts caused by injection of large volumes of CO2 in the deep subsurface necessitates a comprehensive monitoring strategy. While surface-based and other remote geophysical methods can provide information on the general morphology of a CO2 plume, verification of the geochemical conditions and validation of the remote sensing data requires measurements from boreholes that penetrate the storage formation. Unfortunately, the high cost of drilling deep wellbores and deploying instrumentation systems constrains the number of dedicated monitoring borings as well as limits the technologies that can be incorporated in a borehole completion. The objective of the Modular Borehole Monitoring (MBM) Program was to develop a robust suite of well-based tools optimized for subsurface monitoring of CO2 that could meet the needs of a comprehensive well-based monitoring program. It should have enough flexibility to be easily reconfigured for various reservoir geometries and geologies. The MBM Program sought to provide storage operators with a turn-key fully engineered design that incorporated key technologies, function over the decades long time-span necessary for post-closure reservoir monitoring, and meet industry acceptable risk profiles for deep-well installations. While still within the conceptual design phase of the MBM program, the SECARB Anthropogenic Test in Citronelle, Alabama, USA was identified as a deployment site for our engineered monitoring systems. The initial step in designing the Citronelle MBM system was to down-select from the various monitoring tools available to include technologies that we considered essential to any program. Monitoring methods selected included U-tube geochemical sampling, discrete quartz pressure and temperature gauges, an integrated fibre-optic bundle consisting of distributed temperature and heat-pulse sensing, and a sparse string of conventional 3C-geophones. While not originally planned within the initial MBM work scope, the fibre-optic cable was able to also be used for the emergent technology of distributed acoustic sensing. The MBM monitoring string was installed in March, 2012. To date, the Citronelle MBM instruments continue to operate reliably. Results and lessons learned from the Citronelle MBM deployment are addressed along with examples of data being collected.

  6. The Modular Borehole Monitoring Program. A research program to optimize well-based monitoring for geologic carbon sequestration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Freifeld, Barry; Daley, Tom; Cook, Paul; Trautz, Robert; Dodds, Kevin

    2014-12-31

    Understanding the impacts caused by injection of large volumes of CO2 in the deep subsurface necessitates a comprehensive monitoring strategy. While surface-based and other remote geophysical methods can provide information on the general morphology of a CO2 plume, verification of the geochemical conditions and validation of the remote sensing data requires measurements from boreholes that penetrate the storage formation. Unfortunately, the high cost of drilling deep wellbores and deploying instrumentation systems constrains the number of dedicated monitoring borings as well as limits the technologies that can be incorporated in a borehole completion. The objective of the Modular Borehole Monitoring (MBM)more » Program was to develop a robust suite of well-based tools optimized for subsurface monitoring of CO2 that could meet the needs of a comprehensive well-based monitoring program. It should have enough flexibility to be easily reconfigured for various reservoir geometries and geologies. The MBM Program sought to provide storage operators with a turn-key fully engineered design that incorporated key technologies, function over the decades long time-span necessary for post-closure reservoir monitoring, and meet industry acceptable risk profiles for deep-well installations. While still within the conceptual design phase of the MBM program, the SECARB Anthropogenic Test in Citronelle, Alabama, USA was identified as a deployment site for our engineered monitoring systems. The initial step in designing the Citronelle MBM system was to down-select from the various monitoring tools available to include technologies that we considered essential to any program. Monitoring methods selected included U-tube geochemical sampling, discrete quartz pressure and temperature gauges, an integrated fibre-optic bundle consisting of distributed temperature and heat-pulse sensing, and a sparse string of conventional 3C-geophones. While not originally planned within the initial MBM work scope, the fibre-optic cable was able to also be used for the emergent technology of distributed acoustic sensing. The MBM monitoring string was installed in March, 2012. To date, the Citronelle MBM instruments continue to operate reliably. Results and lessons learned from the Citronelle MBM deployment are addressed along with examples of data being collected.« less

  7. Program Launch Letter from Mayor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Program Launch Letter from Mayor, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  8. Subsurface drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Casper, William L. (Rigby, ID); Clark, Don T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grover, Blair K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mathewson, Rodney O. (Idaho Falls, ID); Seymour, Craig A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-10-07

    A drill string comprises a first drill string member having a male end; and a second drill string member having a female end configured to be joined to the male end of the first drill string member, the male end having a threaded portion including generally square threads, the male end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the threaded portion, and the male end further having a bearing surface, the female end having a female threaded portion having corresponding female threads, the female end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the female threaded portion, and the female end having a bearing surface. Installation methods, including methods of installing instrumented probes are also provided.

  9. Farm Opportunities Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Farm Opportunity Loan Program (formerly known as the Sustainable Agriculture Loan Program) is designed to finance the purchase of equipment to add value to crops or livestock, adopt best...

  10. Design Assistance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Efficiency measures that are not eligible under this program may be eligible for other Focus on Energy Business Programs. Eligible buildings include free-standing buildings, adaptive reuse, subst...

  11. Pay for Performance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Hampshire Pay for Performance (P4P) program works with large energy consumers to improve energy efficiency in their facilities. This program is available to commercial, industrial, and...

  12. Standard Offer Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Note: H.B. 40, enacted in June 2015, changes the name of the Sustainably Priced Energy Enterprise Development (SPEED) Program to the Standard Offer Program and replaces the associated state...

  13. New Construction Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: On March 2016, NYSERDA revised the Commercial New Construction program (PON 1601) extending the program through December 29, 2017, or until the funds are fully committed. 

  14. Program Evaluation: Glossary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation and performance measurement professionals use terms that are common to the field of program evaluation. Knowledge of how these terms are used by evaluators will help program managers...

  15. SUNSHOT CATALYST PROGRAM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SUNSHOT CATALYST PROGRAM catalyst.energy.gov May 05, 2015 ● Version 3.2 2 | SunShot Catalyst Official Rules TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................... 3 SUMMARY OF CONTESTS ...................................................................................................... 4 CATALYST PROGRAM EMAIL

  16. Hydrogen Program Overview

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to the DOE Hydrogen Program. It describes the program mission and answers the question: “Why Hydrogen?”

  17. Monte Carlo Example Programs

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-05-09

    The Monte Carlo example programs VARHATOM and DMCATOM are two small, simple FORTRAN programs that illustrate the use of the Monte Carlo Mathematical technique for calculating the ground state energy of the hydrogen atom.

  18. Sandia's Biofuels Program

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema; Lane, Todd; Reichardt, Tom; Davis, Ryan

    2014-07-24

    Sandia's biofuels program is focused on developing next-generation, renewable fuel solutions derived from biomass. In this video, various Sandia researchers discuss the program and the tools they employ to tackle the technical challenges they face.

  19. Protective Force Program Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-30

    Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 473.2, Protective Force Program, which establishes the requirements and responsibilities for management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Protective Force (PF) Program. Does not cancel other directives.

  20. Tribal Energy Program Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2015 Tribal Energy Program Review will include an overview of the Tribal Energy Program and a series of presentations by tribes exploring or deploying weatherization, energy efficiency, and...

  1. Parallel programming with PCN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, I.; Tuecke, S.

    1991-12-01

    PCN is a system for developing and executing parallel programs. It comprises a high-level programming language, tools for developing and debugging programs in this language, and interfaces to Fortran and C that allow the reuse of existing code in multilingual parallel programs. Programs developed using PCN are portable across many different workstations, networks, and parallel computers. This document provides all the information required to develop parallel programs with the PCN programming system. In includes both tutorial and reference material. It also presents the basic concepts that underly PCN, particularly where these are likely to be unfamiliar to the reader, and provides pointers to other documentation on the PCN language, programming techniques, and tools. PCN is in the public domain. The latest version of both the software and this manual can be obtained by anonymous FTP from Argonne National Laboratory in the directory pub/pcn at info.mcs.anl.gov (c.f. Appendix A).

  2. Sandia's Biofuels Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema; Lane, Todd; Reichardt, Tom; Davis, Ryan

    2014-07-22

    Sandia's biofuels program is focused on developing next-generation, renewable fuel solutions derived from biomass. In this video, various Sandia researchers discuss the program and the tools they employ to tackle the technical challenges they face.

  3. Express Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Express Energy Efficiency Program provides free installation of energy-saving products. This program travels around Wisconsin, community-by-community, to see if they are installing in your...

  4. Teacher Development Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Teacher Development Programs LLNL Teacher Development LLNL's Science Education Program provides professional development instruction to in-service and pre-service middle school, high school, and community college science teachers

  5. Natural Phenomena Hazards Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomena Hazards Program develops and maintains state-of-the-art program standards and guidance for DOE facilities exposed to natural phenomena hazards (NPHs).

  6. Environmental Disclosure Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The PSC created New York’s Environmental Disclosure Program via an order issued in December 1998. This program has been modified several times since it was established. A November 2008 PSC order...

  7. Safeguards and Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-21

    The order establishes responsibilities and program planning and management requirements for the Safeguards and Security Program. Admin Chg 1, dated 2-15-13, supersedes DOE O 470.4B.

  8. Weatherization Assistance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energys Weatherization Assistance Program.

  9. TECHNICAL STANDARDS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PurposeThis procedure describes the responsibilities of persons who are charged with implementing the DOE Technical Standards Program.

  10. Departmental Directives Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-08-16

    The Order is the primary directive for administering the Department's directives Program. Cancels: DOE O 251.1A

  11. Geothermal Government Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you'll find links to federal, state, and local government programs promoting geothermal energy development.

  12. Strategic Programs Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategic Programs Overview March 2013 2 EERE Strategic Programs: Mission To increase the effectiveness and impact of all EERE activities by funding cross-cutting (i.e., not technology- or program-specific) activities and initiatives, analysis, and engagement functions with key stakeholders, the media, and the public. Strategic Programs' projects, work products, and activities directly contribute to realizing EERE's mission; facilitate and amplify the successes of EERE technology offices; and

  13. FAQs | Robotics Internship Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FAQs About the Program | Eligibility | Application | Selection Process | Internship Information | General About the EERE ROBOTICS INTERNSHIP PROGRAM 1. What is the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Internship Program? The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Robotics Internship Program is supported through EERE's Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO). AMO partners with industry, small business, universities, and other stakeholders to identify and invest in

  14. Better Buildings Program Sacramento

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents overview and lessons learned by Sacramento's effort to drive program demand through marketing and outreach initiatives.

  15. Commercial Buildings Integration Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings Integration Program Arah Schuur Program Manager arah.schuur@ee.doe.gov April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and transacted with energy performance in mind and net zero ready commercial buildings are common and cost-effective. Commercial Buildings Integration Program Mission Accelerate voluntary uptake of significant energy performance improvements

  16. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BTO Program Peer Review Analysis Leading to Lessons Learned Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Danielle Sass Byrnett, DOE Dave Roberts, NREL david.roberts@nrel.gov 303.384.7496 April 3, 2013 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Analysis Leading to Lessons Learned 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives - Program Problem Statement: Buildings consume 40% of energy in the United States and are responsible for nearly 40% of the country's greenhouse gas

  17. Large Energy Users Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The program is administered by the NJ Board of Public Utilities and is under management by TRC Energy Solutions.

  18. 2010 Program Review Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you'll find presentations from the October 2010 Tribal Energy Program Review in Denver, Colorado.

  19. Clean coal technology programs: program update 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-09-15

    The purpose of the Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2006 is to provide an updated status of the DOE commercial-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies (CCTs). These demonstrations are performed under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) and the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Program Update 2006 provides 1) a discussion of the role of clean coal technology demonstrations in improving the nation's energy security and reliability, while protecting the environment using the nation's most abundant energy resource - coal; 2) a summary of the funding and costs of the demonstrations; and 3) an overview of the technologies being demonstrated, with fact sheets for demonstration projects that are active, recently completed, withdrawn or ended, including status as of June 30 2006. 4 apps.

  20. Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of the Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009 is to provide an updated status of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commercial-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies (CCT). These demonstrations have been performed under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Program Update 2009 provides: (1) a discussion of the role of clean coal technology demonstrations in improving the nation’s energy security and reliability, while protecting the environment using the nation’s most abundant energy resource—coal; (2) a summary of the funding and costs of the demonstrations; and (3) an overview of the technologies being demonstrated, along with fact sheets for projects that are active, recently completed, or recently discontinued.

  1. Wind Energy Program: Top 10 Program Accomplishments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brochure on the top accomplishments of the Wind Energy Program, including the development of large wind machines, small machines for the residential market, wind tunnel testing, computer codes for modeling wind systems, high definition wind maps, and successful collaborations.

  2. Program Executive Officer for Life Extension Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is a semi-autonomous agency of the Department of Energy (DOE) that manges highly visible U. S. National Security Programs, enhances U.S. national...

  3. Russian Health Studies Program- Program Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Russian Health Studies Program assesses worker and public health risks from radiation exposure resulting from nuclear weapons production activities in the former Soviet Union.

  4. Final technical report for project titled Quantitative Characterization of Cell Aggregation/Adhesion as Predictor for Distribution and Transport of Microorganisms in Subsurface Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, April Z; Wan, Kai-tak

    2014-09-02

    This project aims to explore and develop enabling methodology and techniques for nano-scale characterization of microbe cell surface contact mechanics, interactions and adhesion quantities that allow for identification and quantification of indicative properties related to microorganism migration and transport behavior in porous media and in subsurface environments. Microbe transport has wide impact and therefore is of great interest in various environmental applications such as in situ or enhanced subsurface bioremediation,filtration processes for water and wastewater treatments and protection of drinking water supplies. Although great progress has been made towards understanding the identities and activities of these microorganisms in the subsurface, to date, little is known of the mechanisms that govern the mobility and transport of microorganisms in DOEs contaminated sites, making the outcomes of in situ natural attenuation or contaminant stability enhancement unpredictable. Conventionally, movement of microorganisms was believed to follows the rules governing solute (particle) transport. However, recent studies revealed that cell surface properties, especially those pertaining to cell attachment/adhesion and aggregation behavior, can cause the microbe behavior to deviate from non-viable particles and hence greatly influence the mobility and distribution of microorganisms in porous media.This complexity highlights the need to obtain detailed information of cell-cell and cell-surface interactions in order to improve and refine the conceptual and quantitative model development for fate and transport of microorganisms and contaminant in subsurface. Traditional cell surface characterization methods are not sufficient to fully predict the deposition rates and transport behaviors of microorganism observed. A breakthrough of methodology that would allow for quantitative and molecular-level description of intrinsic cell surface properties indicative for cell-surface interactions is essential for the field. To tackle this, we have developed a number of new Bio-nanomechanical techniques, including reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) and bio-AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy), for cell adhesion-detachment measurement of the long-range surface interactions, in combination with mathematical modeling, which would allow us to characterize the mechanical behavior from single cell to multi-cell aggregate, critical thresholds for large scale coaggregation and transportation of cells and aggregates in the presence of long range inter-surface forces etc. Although some technical and mathematical challenges remain, the preliminary results promise great breakthrough potential. In this study, we investigated the cellular surface characteristics of representative bio-remediating microorganisms relevant to DOE IFRC (Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenges) sites and their transport behaviors in porous media, aiming to draw a groundbreaking correlation between the micro-scale genetic and biological origin-based cell surface properties, the consequent mechanical adhesion and aggregation behaviors, and the macro-scale microbial mobility and retention in porous media, which are unavailable in the literature. The long-term goal is to significantly improve the mechanistic and quantitative understanding of microbial mobility, sorption, and transport within reactive transport models as needed to manipulate subsurface contaminant fate and transport predictions.

  5. SRNL LDRD - Program Contacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Contacts Dr. Elizabeth Hoffman LDRD Program Manager Elizabeth.Hoffman@srnl.doe.gov 803.725.5475 Nixon J. Peralta Program Manager, CEM Office of Laboratory Oversight U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office nixon.peralta@srs.gov 803.725.5967

  6. Model Fire Protection Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To facilitate conformance with its fire safety directives and the implementation of a comprehensive fire protection program, DOE has developed a number of "model" program documents. These include a comprehensive model fire protection program, model fire hazards analyses and assessments, fire protection system inspection and testing procedures, and related material.

  7. Office of Strategic Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Strategic Programs STEAB Meeting JoAnn Milliken Washington, DC Acting Director June 27, 2012 Strategic Programs * Advanced Manufacturing * Sustainability Performance * Strategic Programs OFFICE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY ENERGY EFFICIENCY * Advanced Manufacturing * Building Technologies * Federal Energy Management * Weatherization & Intergovernmental RENEWABLE ENERGY * Geothermal Technologies * Solar Energy Technologies * Wind & Water Technologies TRANSPORTATION

  8. Tribal Energy Program Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE's) Tribal Energy Program is hosting its annual Program Review, which will feature project status updates from Tribes across the nation who are leveraging Tribal Energy Program grant funding to explore or deploy weatherization, energy efficiency, and renewable energy technologies.

  9. Safeguards and Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-21

    To establish responsibilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Safeguards and Security (S&S) Program, and to establish program planning and management requirements for the S&S Program. Cancels DOE O 470.4A, DOE M 470.4-1, Chg. 2, and DOE O 142.1.

  10. Priorities and Allocations Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-10-12

    The Order establishes responsibilities for administration of the DOE and NNSA priorities and allocations program for industrial products, materials, and services and requirements for maintaining a system for procurement of industrial products, materials, and services programs that promote the national defense and programs that are determined by DOE to maximize domestic energy supplies. Supersedes DOE O 5560.1A.

  11. Commercialization Programs | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Commercialization Programs Through our commercialization programs, the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Center (IEC) helps accelerate the transfer of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies into the marketplace. Colorado Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development Formerly the Colorado Cleantech Initiative program, the Colorado Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED) is a joint effort between NREL, the State of Colorado, and affiliated stakeholders to provide

  12. DOE's Tribal Energy Program

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop April 29, 2014 Lizana Pierce, Project Manager U.S. DOE, Tribal Energy Program Department of Energy Advancing Energy and National Security through Science, Technology and Environmental Stewardship Managed by Program Offices: * Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy * Loan Programs Office * Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability * Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy * Environmental Management * Fossil Energy * Indian Energy Policy

  13. Weatherization Program Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) is governed by various federal regulations designed to help manage and account for the resources provided by DOE. Each year, Congress passes a Weatherization Assistance Program Appropriation. Find active and archived weatherization program notices and memorandums in the table below, which establish the framework for administering WAP funds.

  14. Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan Program Portfolio Management 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2008-01-01

    Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan 2008 for program portfolio management, including the program portfolio management process, program analysis, performance assessment, stakeholder interactions, and cross-cutting issues.

  15. The Oak Ridge Field Research Center : Advancing Scientific Understanding of the Transportation, Fate, and Remediation of Subsurface Contamination Sources and Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Watson

    2005-04-18

    Historical research, development, and testing of nuclear materials across this country resulted in subsurface contamination that has been identified at over 7,000 discrete sites across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. With the end of the Cold War threat, DOE has shifted its emphasis to remediation, decommissioning, and decontamination of the immense volumes of contaminated groundwater, sediments, and structures at its sites. DOE currently is responsible for remediating 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to approximately four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of contaminated soil, enough to fill approximately 17 professional sports stadiums.* DOE also sponsors research intended to improve or develop remediation technologies, especially for difficult, currently intractable contaminants or conditions. The Oak Ridge FRC is representative of some difficult sites, contaminants, and conditions. Buried wastes in contact with a shallow water table have created huge reservoirs of contamination. Rainfall patterns affect the water table level seasonally and over time. Further, the hydrogeology of the area, with its fractures and karst geology, affects the movement of contaminant plumes. Plumes have migrated long distances and to surface discharge points through ill-defined preferred flowpaths created by the fractures and karst conditions. From the standpoint of technical effectiveness, remediation options are limited, especially for contaminated groundwater. Moreover, current remediation practices for the source areas, such as capping, can affect coupled processes that, in turn, may affect the movement of subsurface contaminants in unknown ways. Research conducted at the FRC or with FRC samples therefore promotes understanding of the processes that influence the transport and fate of subsurface contaminants, the effectiveness and long-term consequences of extant remediation options, and the development of improved remediation strategies.

  16. Geothermal Technologies Program Peer Review Program June 6 -...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Peer Review Program June 6 - 10, 2011 Geothermal Technologies Program Peer Review Program June 6 - 10, 2011 Presentation from GTPs 2011 Annual Peer Review, highlighting...

  17. Beryllium Program Information - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Information About Us Beryllium Program Beryllium Program Points of Contact Beryllium Facilities & Areas Beryllium Program Information Hanford CBDPP Committee Beryllium FAQs Beryllium Related Links Hanford Beryllium Awareness Group (BAG) Program Performance Assessments Beryllium Program Feedback Beryllium Health Advocates Primary Contractors/Employers Medical Testing and Surveillance Facilities General Resources Beryllium Program Information Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text

  18. Principal Associate Director - Weapons Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weapons Programs As Principal Associate Director for the Weapons Program, Robert Webster leads the programs to assure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the systems in the...

  19. Science of Signatures - Past Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Science of Signatures - Past Programs Science of Signatures Program Science of Signatures - Past Programs Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860...

  20. Utility Partnerships Program Overview (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    Program overview brochure for the Utility Partnerships Program within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP).

  1. program | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Research Program Simulation-Based Engineering Summary Crosscutting Technology Research Program Water Management R&D Summary Crosscutting Technology Research Program...

  2. Site Support Program Plan Infrastructure Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-26

    The Fiscal Year 1996 Infrastructure Program Site Support Program Plan addresses the mission objectives, workscope, work breakdown structures (WBS), management approach, and resource requirements for the Infrastructure Program. Attached to the plan are appendices that provide more detailed information associated with scope definition. The Hanford Site`s infrastructure has served the Site for nearly 50 years during defense materials production. Now with the challenges of the new environmental cleanup mission, Hanford`s infrastructure must meet current and future mission needs in a constrained budget environment, while complying with more stringent environmental, safety, and health regulations. The infrastructure requires upgrading, streamlining, and enhancement in order to successfully support the site mission of cleaning up the Site, research and development, and economic transition.

  3. Subsurface characterization of an oxidation-induced phase transformation and twinning in nickel-based superalloy exposed to oxy-combustion environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Jingxi; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Wise, Adam; Li, Jia; Laughlin, David E.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2012-07-30

    In the integration of oxy-fuel combustion to turbine power generation system, turbine alloys are exposed to high temperature and an atmosphere comprised of steam, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. While surface and internal oxidation of the alloy takes place, the microstructure in the subsurface region also changes due to oxidation. In this study, bare metal coupons of Ni-base superalloys were exposed in oxy-fuel combustion environment for up to 1000 h and the oxidation-related microstructures were examined. Phase transformation occurred in the subsurface region in Ni-based superalloy and led to twinning. The transformation product phases were analyzed through thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and various electron microscopy techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The mechanism by which the phase transformation and the formation of the microstructure occurred was also discussed. The possible effects of the product phases on the performance of the alloy in service were discussed.

  4. ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PIA, Office of Information Resources | Department of Energy ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office of Information Resources ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office of Information Resources ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office of Information Resources PDF icon ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office

  5. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Integrated Program Plan |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Program - Integrated Program Plan Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Integrated Program Plan The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), performed in close collaboration and cooperation with related industry R&D programs. The LWRS Program provides technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of

  6. Scientific Exchange Program | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Exchange Program Scientific Exchange Program Applications due February

  7. Acquisition Career Development Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-04-19

    This Order establishes training and certification requirements and career development programs under the Acquisition Career Development (ACD) Program for DOE and NNSA acquisition workforce. The acquisition workforce includes contracting, purchasing, personal property management, program management, Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives. The ACD Program implements the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) requirements, Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) requirements, Federal Acquisition Reform Act (FARA) requirements, and the objectives of Executive Order (E.O.) 129231, Federal Procurement Reform, dated 10-13-1994. This order cancels DOE O 361.1, Acquisition Career Development Program, dated 11-10-99, AND Acquisition Letter 2003-05, Personal Property Management Career Development, Training, and Certification Program, dated 9-10-03. Cancels DOE O 361.1 Chg 2. Canceled by DOE O 361.1B.

  8. Supercomputing Challenge Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputing Challenge Program Description The Challenge is an academic, year-long program that teaches mid school and high school students how to use powerful computers to model real-world problems and to explore computational approaches to their solutions. Teams of up to five students compete for prizes and scholarships, conducting independent research on scientific problems of interest to them. The Supercomputing Challenge is an exciting program that offers a truly unique experience for

  9. SAGE Past Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Past Programs SAGE Past Programs A National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates program Contacts Institute Director Reinhard Friedel-Los Alamos SAGE Co-Director W. Scott Baldridge-Los Alamos SAGE Co-Director Larry Braile-Purdue University Professional Staff Assistant Georgia Sanchez (505) 665-0855 1999 From Portland, Maine, to San Diego, California, a group of 23 undergraduate and graduate students representing 20 institutions from the United States, Mexico, and Ireland

  10. Post Doctoral Fellows Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Post Doctoral Fellows Program The aim of G. T. Seaborg Institute Post Doctoral Fellows Program is to advance nuclear science in a comprehensive project that ties targeted research with Los Alamos mission imperatives. Contacts Director Albert Migliori Deputy Franz Freibert 505 667-6879 Email Professional Staff Assistant Susan Ramsay 505 665 0858 Email The Seaborg Nuclear Science Fellowships for Signatures, Energy, Security, Environment will support research in nuclear science relevant to

  11. National Laboratory's Weapons Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    McMillan to lead Los Alamos National Laboratory's Weapons Program July 28, 2009 Los Alamos, New Mexico, July 28, 2009- Charles McMillan has been appointed the new principal associate director for Weapons Programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory. McMillan succeeds Glenn Mara, who recently retired. McMillan has been the Laboratory's associate director for weapons physics. In his new capacity, he will provide oversight and direction for the nuclear weapons program at Los Alamos to accomplish the

  12. Weatherization Assistance Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weatherization Assistance Program State Energy Advisory Board Meeting Washington, DC Robert C. Adams DOE Weatherization Assistance Program 1 | WAP Training & Technical Assistance Tools and Resources eere.energy.gov Weatherization Assistance Program Background * The WAP leads the nation in advancing technology, research and work practices related to making residential energy upgrades cost effective, safe and comprehensive * Over 7.3 million low-income dwelling units have been weatherized

  13. Graduate Program Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selection Process Graduate Program Selection Process Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-0987 Email The student hiring process Thank you for your interest in Los Alamos National Laboratory's Student Programs. Once an application is submitted online, it is available for all interested Laboratory hiring officials to view.

  14. Voluntary Protection Program- Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) promotes safety and health excellence through cooperative efforts among labor, management, and government at the Department of Energy (DOE) contractor sites. DOE has also formed partnerships with other Federal agencies and the private sector for both advancing and sharing its Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) experiences and preparing for program challenges in the next century. The safety and health of contractor and federal employees are a high priority for the Department.

  15. Undergraduate Program Salary Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Salary Structure Undergraduate Program Salary Structure Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-8899 Email Undergraduate salary determination process Salaries are evaluated from students' current transcripts based on college academic progression and hours completed in a degree program. Professional Salary Structure Years

  16. Programs & User Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Programs » Office of Science » Programs & User Facilities Programs & User Facilities Enabling remarkable discoveries, tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy security Advanced Scientific Computing Research Applied Mathematics Co-Design Centers Exascale Co-design Center for Materials in Extreme Environments (ExMatEx) Center for Exascale Simulation of Advanced Reactors (CESAR) Center for Exascale Simulation of

  17. Critical Skills Master's Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Skills Master's Program (CSMP): The Critical Skills Master's Program (CSMP) provides exceptional bachelor's-level candidates with the opportunity to pursue a fully funded Master's of Science degree. Successful applicants will become regular full-time Sandia employees and join multidisciplinary teams that are advancing the frontiers of science and technology to solve the world's greatest challenges. Program Requirements: * Apply to a minimum of 3 nationally accredited universities. * Successfully

  18. NREL International Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    International Programs NREL International Programs G lobally, some two billion people live without electricity and the services it provides. These people-without such things as clean water, refrigerated foods and medicines, telephones, and radios-miss the social, economic, and health benefits that these necessities afford the rest of the world. The expert staff involved in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's International Programs, along with their industrial colleagues and organizational

  19. NREL: Education Center - Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Center Printable Version Programs NREL's Education Center in Golden, Colorado, offers a variety of program topics and experiences for students and adult groups addressing renewable energy and energy efficiency innovations and introducing the work of NREL. Monthly tours are also offered to give visitors an overview of our sustainable campus and featured buildings. Printable Version Education Center Home Hours, Directions & Contact Information Group Programs Students Adults Campus

  20. ORISE: Science Education Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interested in conducting undergraduate research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory? DOE is currently seeking undergraduate students for paid internships at ORNL for the 2015 spring term of the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Program. The program at ORNL is administered by ORAU, through a contract with DOE to manage ORISE. Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Science Education Programs The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and more than a dozen other federal agencies rely on the Oak

  1. Civilian Nuclear Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office is the focal point for nuclear energy research and development and next-generation repository science at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Civilian Nuclear Programs Los Alamos is committed to using its advanced nuclear expertise and unique facilities to meet the civilian nuclear national security demands of the future. CONTACT US Program Director Venkateswara Rao Dasari (Rao) (505) 667-5098 Email Los Alamos partners extensively with other laboratories,

  2. Programs & Workshops

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CrossConnects Workshop Series Operating Innovative Networks Workshop Series Enlighten Your Research Global Program Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Blog ESnet Live Home » Science Engagement » Programs & Workshops Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops CrossConnects Workshop Series Operating Innovative Networks Workshop Series Enlighten Your Research Global

  3. STEM Education Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STEM Education Programs STEM Education Programs Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) views its investment in STEM education as strengthening the Lab's strategic direction and developing its current and future workforce. Contacts Education Janelle Vigil-Maestas Community Relations & Partnerships (505) 665-4329 Email "We don't have to teach children to ask questions. That comes naturally. We have to not stop them." - LANL Director Charlie McMillan STEM education programs Certificate

  4. DOE Technical Assistance Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Procuring and Implementing Solar Projects on Public Buildings Sarah Truitt, NREL Kim Owens & Craig Schultz, ICF International December 8, 2010 Photo courtesy of Bella Energy 2 | TAP Webinar eere.energy.gov What is TAP? DOE's Technical Assistance Program (TAP) supports the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program (EECBG) and the State Energy Program (SEP) by providing state, local, and tribal officials the tools and resources needed to implement successful and sustainable clean

  5. Voluntary Separation Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    I. Use of Waivers and Releases of Claims with Incentivized Voluntary Separation Programs Where the Department has conducted incentivized voluntary separation programs, it has consistently been the Department's policy to require waivers and releases of claims from employees separating. A voluntary separation program is considered to be incentivized if severance above that provided to involuntarily separated employees is offered. The Department developed a sample waiver and release of claims for

  6. Emerging Technologies Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emerging Technologies Program Pat Phelan Program Manager patrick.phelan@ee.doe.gov (202)287-1906 April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How ET Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers * Solve technical barriers and test innovations to prove effectiveness * Measure and validate energy

  7. MST Research Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ADEPS » MST » MST Research Programs MST Research Programs Providing world-leading, innovative, and agile materials science and technology solutions for national security missions. Contact Us Division Leader David Teter Email Emphasizing the synergy among materials synthesis, processing, properties, and performance, the Materials Science and Technology Division applies fundamental materials science and technology expertise to a broad range of programs in support of national security needs,

  8. Master's Fellowship Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Master's Fellowship Program (MFP): The Master's Fellowship Program (MFP) provides exceptional minority bachelor's-level candidates with the opportunity to pursue a fully funded Masters of Science degree. The MFP is a minority based program for U.S. under-represented groups in an effort to help enhance the diversity of Sandia's technical workforce. Successful applicants will become regular full-time Sandia employees and join multidisciplinary teams that are advancing the frontiers of science and

  9. About the User Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Program at LANSCE LANSCE's User Program ensures the research it oversees represents the cutting edge of nuclear science. Neutron and Nuclear Science (WNR) User Program Proposal Process Those interested in obtaining beam time for experiments at one of the LANSCE neutron sources should follow the proposal process. Calls for proposals to all potential users are made yearly. The proposal consists of information about the research team, amount of beam time requested and a description of the

  10. California Energy Incentive Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California Energy Incentive Programs: An Annual Update on Key Energy Issues and Financial Opportunities for Federal Sites in California Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program December 2011 i Contacts Utility Acquisitions, ESPCs, PPAs Tracy Logan U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program EE-2L 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-0121 Phone: (202) 586-9973 E-mail: tracy.logan@ee.doe.gov Principal Research Associate Elizabeth

  11. Transmission Infrastructure Program

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    TRANSMISSION INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM DOE Tribal Energy Summit 2015 SECRETARYOF ENERGY'S FINANCING ROUNDTABLE Tracey A. LeBeau Senior Vice President & Transmission Infrastructure Program Manager 1 Program Description Western's Loan Authority * $3.25 billion permanent authority (revolving) * Goal: Attract investment in infrastructure & address market needs * Commercial underwriting standards TIP Portfolio Management Fundamentals * Reflective of Market Need(s) * Ensure Funds Revolve 2 Recent

  12. Tribal Energy Program Overview

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ENERGY OFFICE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY OFFICE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY DOE's Tribal Energy Program Lizana K. Pierce, Project Manager U.S. DOE, Golden Field Office Tribal Energy Program Review November 5, 2007 DOE's Tribal Energy Program Promote tribal energy sufficiency, economic development and employment on tribal lands through the use of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies Authority Title V of the Energy Policy Act (EPAct 2005) DOE's Tribal

  13. EEO and Diversity Program

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    EEO and Diversity Program EEO and Diversity: Collaborating for Mission Success Solutions to Workplace Conflict: What Mediation Can Do for You! FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT MEDIATION On October 27, 2006, the EEO and Diversity Program sponsored a panel presentation on the mediation program for all Service Center complex employees. Also, a session was held for the Service Center Leadership Team on November 15, 2006. At the end of the panel presentations, audience members were able to ask

  14. SES CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) DOE F 360.1 (11-03) Executive Development Plan (EDP) Name: Title: Organization: Office: RATIONALE FOR PLAN: APPROVALS: Candidate Signature: Date: Supervisor: Date: Mentor: Date: SES Candidate Development Program Manager: Date: DOE Executive Resources Board: Date: 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE F 360.1 (11-03) SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) Executive Development Plan (EDP) NAME OF SES CANDIDATE:

  15. Methane Hydrate Program

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fiscal Year 2013 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress October 2014 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy | October 2014 Fiscal Year 2013 Methane Hydrate Program Report to Congress | Page ii Message from the Secretary The Department of Energy is required 1 to submit to Congress an annual report on the actions taken to carry out methane hydrate research. I am pleased to submit the enclosed Report to Congress, Fiscal Year 2013 Methane Hydrate Program.

  16. DOE's Tribal Energy Program

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2013 Program Review March 24, 2013 Lizana Pierce, Project Manager Purpose Promote Tribal energy sufficiency, and foster economic development and employment on Tribal lands through the use of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. In cooperation with DOE's Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, the Tribal Energy Program provides financial and technical assistance to Tribes to develop their renewable energy resources and reduce their energy consumption. Mission Offering

  17. EERE Strategic Program Review

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy STRATEGIC PROGRAM REVIEW March 2002 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: DAVID K. GARMAN ASSISTANT SECRETARY ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY (EERE) COPIES TO: DEPUTY SECRETARY BLAKE UNDER SECRETARY CARD SUBJECT: EERE STRATEGIC PROGRAM REVIEW I am pleased to present the complete report of the Strategic Program Review (SPR). The SPR is the result of recommendations of the National Energy Policy Development Group as stated in the National Energy Policy.

  18. Strengthening Relationships Between Energy Programs and Housing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Relationships Between Energy Programs and Housing Programs Strengthening Relationships Between Energy Programs and Housing Programs Better Buildings Residential Network Multifamily ...

  19. 2002 Hydrogen Program Review Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program, the Fuel Cells for Transportation Program, and the Fuels for Fuel Cells Program held their inaugural combined Annual Program/Lab R&D Review May 6–10, 2002, in...

  20. WSHFC Sustainable Energy Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Washington State Housing Finance Commission (WSHFC) has established a Sustainable Energy Program to offer low-cost financing for new green construction, energy efficiency upgrades, and...

  1. California Energy Incentive Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Report from the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) discusses annual update on key energy issues and financial opportunities for federal sites in California.

  2. Supervisory Program Analyst (Transformation)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) conducts a relevant, reliable, and timely data collection program that covers the full spectrum of energy sources, end uses, and energy flows; generates...

  3. Technical skills training program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    The departmentally administered Technical Skills Training Program encompasses three functional areas: Program Management Skills, Project Management Skills and Procurement and Assistance Skills Training. Primary emphasis is directed at providing DOE employees the specific work related skills necessary to perform effectively and efficiently. This directory contains descriptions of the courses available in the three program areas and general information for participation in the training programs. Separate sections have been reserved for the Current Year Schedule and listings of the Headquarters and Field Training Office Coordinators.

  4. Programming Tuning Options

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tuning Options Programming Tuning Options Using Huge Pages Hugepages are virtual memory pages which are bigger than the default base page size of 4KB. Some applications may...

  5. Undergraduate Program Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-8899 Email Student hiring process Once an application is submitted online, it is made available for all interested Laboratory...

  6. Program Support Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will be responsible for planning, coordinating and accomplishing a wide variety of administrative functions and is the liaison between various program...

  7. Acquisition Career Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-05-14

    The order sets forth requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Management Program. Supersedes DOE O 361.1B.

  8. Visiting Faculty Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Visiting Faculty Program (VFP), formerly called Faculty and Student Teams (FaST), seeks to increase the research competitiveness of faculty members and their students at institutions...

  9. Multifamily Performance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under NYSERDA’s Multifamily Performance Program (MPP), new construction of multifamily buildings and existing multifamily buildings are eligible for incentives that improve energy savings through...

  10. Wind Program News

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-06

    Stay current on the news about the wind side of the Wind and Water Power Program and important wind energy events around the U.S.

  11. Wind Program Budget

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-06

    On this page, you can learn more about the Program's budget request for this fiscal year as well as actual budgets in previous fiscal years.

  12. New Commercial Program Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Commercial Program Development Commercial Current Promotions Industrial Federal Agriculture Beginning in spring of 2015, the BPA Commercial Team will be working with utilities...

  13. Radiological Assistance Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-04-10

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy, procedures, authorities, and responsibilities for its Radiological Assistance Program. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

  14. Graduate Program Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-8899 Email The student hiring process Thank you for your interest in Los Alamos National Laboratory's Student...

  15. Lease Financing Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liabilities Financial Plan Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases Rate Information Residential Exchange Program Surplus Power Sales...

  16. Independent Oversight Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-08-30

    The order prescribes the requirements and responsibilities for the DOE Independent Oversight Program. Cancels DOE O 470.2B. Superseded by DOE O 227.1A.

  17. Green Communities Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: The Green Communities Grant Program is not currently accepting applications. The application deadline to receive a Green Communities designation was October 17, 2014. For designated...

  18. EMS Programs Manual

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Environmental Management System Programs Manual (LMS/POL/S04388-3.0) is obsolete and has been removed from the LM website.

  19. EERE Strategic Program Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2002-03-01

    This Strategic Program Review presents the result of recommendations of the National Energy Policy Development Group as stated in the National Energy Policy.

  20. Supercomputing Challenge Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    program that teaches mid school and high school students how to use powerful computers to model real-world problems and to explore computational approaches to their...

  1. Technical Standards Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-02-23

    The order establishes the DOE Technical Standards Program. Admin Chg 1, dated 3-12-13 supersedes DOE O 252.1A.

  2. CEE Summer Program Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) is hosting the Summer Program Meeting to cover market transformation to accelerate uptake of efficient goods and services.

  3. Energy Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Missouri Energy Loan Program, administered by the Division of Energy in the Missouri Department of Economic Development (DED), is available for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects...

  4. Acquisition Career Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-01-24

    The order defines requirements and responsibilities for training, certification, and career development programs for the DOE acquisition workforce. Cancels DOE O 361.1A.

  5. Records Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-02-03

    The Order sets forth requirements and responsibilities for implementing and maintaining a cost-effective records management program throughout the Department of Energy.

  6. Records Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-26

    The Order sets forth requirements and responsibilities for establishing and maintaining a program for the efficient and economical management of records and information assets.

  7. Water Power Program: Publications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2014 Hydropower Market Report Details Bookmark & Share View Related Welcome to the Water Power Program Publication and Product Library. This library will allow you to find...

  8. PortablePrograms.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    --The OpenMP target directive Exercises to Introduce OpenMP Accelerator Directives --Matrix Multiplication: sending loops to an attached device --The Pi program reductions and...

  9. Life Extension Program

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    en NNSA, Air Force Complete Successful B61-12 Life Extension Program Development Flight Test at Tonopah Test Range http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleases...

  10. Life Extension Programs

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    B61-12 Life Extension Program Milestone: First Full-System Mechanical Environment Test Completed Successfully http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesb61lep

  11. Nuclear Physics Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hall A Hall B Hall C Hall D Physics Departments Administrative Office Data Acquisition Group Detector & Imaging Group Electronics Group User Liaison Nuclear Physics Program HALL A ...

  12. Applicants | Robotics Internship Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    program open to all qualified individuals without regard to race, color, age, sex, religion, national origin, mental or physical ability, genetic information, sexual orientation...

  13. Kenergy- Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kenergy is an electric cooperative that serves 51,000 households and commercial customers in 14 western Kentucky counties. Currently, Kenergy offers three rebate programs for residential customers...

  14. Parallel programming with PCN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, I.; Tuecke, S.

    1993-01-01

    PCN is a system for developing and executing parallel programs. It comprises a high-level programming language, tools for developing and debugging programs in this language, and interfaces to Fortran and Cthat allow the reuse of existing code in multilingual parallel programs. Programs developed using PCN are portable across many different workstations, networks, and parallel computers. This document provides all the information required to develop parallel programs with the PCN programming system. It includes both tutorial and reference material. It also presents the basic concepts that underlie PCN, particularly where these are likely to be unfamiliar to the reader, and provides pointers to other documentation on the PCN language, programming techniques, and tools. PCN is in the public domain. The latest version of both the software and this manual can be obtained by anonymous ftp from Argonne National Laboratory in the directory pub/pcn at info.mcs. ani.gov (cf. Appendix A). This version of this document describes PCN version 2.0, a major revision of the PCN programming system. It supersedes earlier versions of this report.

  15. Virgin Pulse Wellness Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to non-employee spouses. Employees and non-employee spouses can now embark on their fitness journey together. Join today Virgin Pulse resources Program Overview Provider...

  16. Management Control Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-04-18

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy Management Control Program. Cancels DOE O 413.1. Canceled by DOE O 413.1B.

  17. CEE Winter Program Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) is hosting its winter program meeting to work together and define market interventions that increase energy efficiency.

  18. CEE Winter Program Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) is hosting their Winter Program Meeting, a two-day conference held in Long Beach, California.

  19. Selecting chemical treatment programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.E. )

    1988-09-01

    Many process equipment performance and reliability problems can be solved economically by the proper selection and application of chemical treatment programs. It is important to choose an experienced chemical vendor and to work closely with the vendor to develop a good chemical treatment program. This requires devoting sufficient manpower to ensure that the treatment program development is thorough and timely. After the treatment program is installed, the system operation and performance should be routinely monitored to ensure that expected benefits are achieved and unexpected problems do not develop.

  20. Commercialization Assistance Program | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The program specifically helps renewable energy and energy efficiency companies by providing free assistance or information to help small businesses with specific technology ...

  1. XFEL 2004 - Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Registration | Payment | Housing | Social Program | Tourism | First Announcement | Attendee List | Photos ICFA Future Light Sources Subpanel Miniworkshop on XFEL Short Bunch...

  2. DOE Technical Assistance Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Driving Demand: Door-to-Door Outreach & Tracking Impacts October 19, 2010 2 | TAP Webinar eere.energy.gov What is TAP? DOE"s Technical Assistance Program (TAP) supports the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program (EECBG) and the State Energy Program (SEP) by providing state, local, and tribal officials the tools and resources needed to implement successful and sustainable clean energy programs. 3 | TAP Webinar eere.energy.gov How Can TAP Help You? TAP offers: * One-on-one

  3. Commonwealth Wind Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the Commonwealth Wind Program, the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers site assessment grants of services, feasibility study grants, and development grants and loans for...

  4. Public Benefits Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Although Pennsylvania's December 1996 electricity restructuring law did not establish a clean-energy fund, four renewable and sustainable-energy funding programs were subsequently created through...

  5. DOE Technical Assistance Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Efficien cy Vermont Local Coordinator & Group Local Volunteers Home Participants Efficiency Vermont provided local partners with "turn-key" program that employed a "phone tree" ...

  6. ARM - Program Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Program Documents Annual...

  7. Pay for Performance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: Applications for the programs must be submitted before June 30, 2016 in order to be eligible for FY 2016 incentives. 

  8. Power Prepayment Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Overview Power Prepay Term Sheet Summary Request for Offers Prepayment Framework Business Case Model (Customer Prepay Impact Model) (updated 8202012) Instructions for...

  9. Laser programs highlights 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This report provides highlights of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories` laser programs. Laser uses and technology assessment and utilization are provided.

  10. LDRD Program Plan master

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... In addition, the LDRD Program Manager works with Division Offices and the Chief Financial ... Directors of the Engineering and Theory Divisions, and the laboratory's Head of ...

  11. LDRD Program Plan master

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... In addition, the LDRD Program Manager works with Division Offices and the Chief Financial ... Physics, Engineering, FEL and Theory, and the laboratories Chief Information Officer. ...

  12. LDRD Program Plan master

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... In addition, the LDRD Program Manager works with Division Offices and the Chief Financial ... Directors of the Engineering and Theory Divisions, and the laboratorys Chief ...

  13. Sandia Energy - Inverter Reliability Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inverter Reliability Program Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics PV Systems Reliability Inverter Reliability Program Inverter Reliability...

  14. California DOE ZERH Program Requiremets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    California specific program requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy's Zero Energy Ready Home Program.

  15. Water-Efficiency Program Prioritization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation outlines water-efficiency program requirements and priorities as presented to Federal agencies by the Federal Energy Management Program.

  16. Administering Nonprofit Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Peer Exchange Call: Administering Nonprofit Energy Efficiency Programs, call slides and discussion summary, March 24, 2013.

  17. Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs 101

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This webinar covers national energy efficiency program funding levels, funding sources, residential program characteristics, and a case study.

  18. Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan Program Overview 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2008-01-01

    Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan Program Overview 2008, including market overview and federal role, program vision, mission, design and structure, and goals and multi-year targets.

  19. Multiprocessor programming environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.B.; Fornaro, R.

    1988-12-01

    Programming tools and techniques have been well developed for traditional uniprocessor computer systems. The focus of this research project is on the development of a programming environment for a high speed real time heterogeneous multiprocessor system, with special emphasis on languages and compilers. The new tools and techniques will allow a smooth transition for programmers with experience only on single processor systems.

  20. Information Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-27

    Establishes an Information Security Program for the protection and control of classified and sensitive information. Extended until 5-11-06 by DOE N 251.63, dated 5-11-05. DOE O 471.2A, Information Security Program, dated 3/27/1997, extended by DOE N 251.57, dated 4/28/2004. Cancels: DOE O 471.2