Sample records for rgcm program subsurface

  1. Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven National LaboratoryJeffreyMs.Princeton PlasmaU.S.RecommenderScience

  2. Evaluation of Subsurface Exploration Programs By Photios G. Ioannou, A.M. ASCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of Subsurface Exploration Programs By Photios G. Ioannou, A.M. ASCE Abstract: This paper presents a decision support system for the evaluation of geologic explo- ration programs in underground construction. This system can be used to quantify the economic value of different subsurface investigation

  3. Subsurface Planar Vitrification Treatment of Problematic TRU Wastes: Status of a Technology Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morse, M.K.; Nowack, B.R.; Thompson, L.E. [AMEC, 1135 Jadwin Avenue, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a status of the In Situ Transuranic Waste Delineation and Removal Project in which the GeoMelt{sup R} Subsurface Planar Vitrification{sup TM} (SPV{sup TM}) process is being evaluated for the in situ treatment of burial sites containing remote handled mixed transuranic (TRU) waste. The GeoMelt{sup R} SPV{sup TM} process was invented and patented by Geosafe Corporation. AMEC holds the exclusive worldwide license to use this technology. The current project is part of a three-phase demonstration program to evaluate the effectiveness of the GeoMelt{sup R} SPV{sup TM} process to treat waste contained in vertical pipe units (VPUs) and caissons that were used for the disposal of remote handled transuranic wastes located at Hanford's 618-10 and 618-11 burial grounds. This project is being performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for use at the Hanford site and other DOE installations. The Phase I evaluation determined that removal and treatment of the 618-10/11 VPUs are beyond what can be safely accomplished using conventional excavation methods. Accordingly, a careful stepwise non-intrusive delineation approach and treatment using the GeoMelt{sup R} SPV{sup TM} technology, followed by removal, characterization, and disposal of the resulting inert vitrified mass was identified as the preferred alternative. Phase II of the project, which started in July 2004, included a full-scale non-radioactive demonstration of AMEC's GeoMelt{sup R} SPV{sup TM} process on a mock VPU configured to match the actual VPUs. The non-radioactive demonstration (completed in May 2005) was performed to confirm the approach and design before proceeding to a radioactive ('hot') demonstration on an actual VPU. This demonstration took approximately 130 hours, processed the entire mock VPU, and resulted in a vitrified monolith weighing an estimated 90 tonnes. [1] Plans for a radioactive demonstration on an actual VPU are being developed for CY 2006. In addition to demonstrating GeoMelt{sup R} SPV{sup TM}, delineation techniques are being evaluated as part of the project to confirm the locations of the actual VPUs and to progressively determine their physical and chemical contents. The initial calibration and testing activities were completed in December 2005. The techniques included non-intrusive geophysical measurements from adjacent boreholes (ground penetrating radar, neutron-gamma radiography, etc.). Other methods available for use, on an as needed basis, include gas headspace sampling and boro-scope examinations inside the VPUs/caissons. (authors)

  4. Addressing Common Subsurface Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Common Subsurface Challenges Mastering the subsurface for energy production and storage and for the management of energy waste streams constitutes an energy "grand challenge." To...

  5. subsurface science | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instruments: Radiological XPS Tags: fluorescence spectrometer SPEX Fluorolog 2 excitation emission spectra single photon ultraviolet subsurface science Volume: Issue: Pages:...

  6. Microbial life in the deep terrestrial subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliermans, C.B. [E.I. DuPont de Nemours and Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Lab.; Balkwill, D.L. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Beeman, R.E. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)] [and others

    1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution and function of microorganisms is a vital issue in microbial ecology. The US Department of Energy`s Program, ``Microbiology of the Deep Subsurface,`` concentrates on establishing fundamental scientific information about organisms at depth, and the use of these organisms for remediation of contaminants in deep vadose zone and groundwater environments. This investigation effectively extends the Biosphere hundreds of meters into the Geosphere and has implications to a variety of subsurface activities.

  7. Subsurface Flow and Transport | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subsurface related to contaminant transport, carbon cycling, enhanced oil recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration. See a complete list of Subsurface Flow and Transport...

  8. Subsurface Excavations (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation addresses subsurface excavations conducted for all purposes other than the exploration or production of gas and oil resources that may adversely affect water resources of the state...

  9. Subsurface Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Yuan

    2001-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

  10. Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Rigby; M. Mrugala; G. Shideler; T. Davidsavor; J. Leem; D. Buesch; Y. Sun; D. Potyondy; M. Christianson

    2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain Project is entering a the license application (LA) stage in its mission to develop the nation's first underground nuclear waste repository. After a number of years of gathering data related to site characterization, including activities ranging from laboratory and site investigations, to numerical modeling of processes associated with conditions to be encountered in the future repository, the Project is realigning its activities towards the License Application preparation. At the current stage, the major efforts are directed at translating the results of scientific investigations into sets of data needed to support the design, and to fulfill the licensing requirements and the repository design activities. This document addresses the program need to address specific technical questions so that an assessment can be made about the suitability and adequacy of data to license and construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. In July 2002, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an Integrated Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2002). Included in this report were the Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) Key Technical Issues (KTI). Geotechnical agreements were formulated to resolve a number of KTI subissues, in particular, RDTME KTIs 3.04, 3.05, 3.07, and 3.19 relate to the physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the host rock (NRC 2002, pp. 2.1.1-28, 2.1.7-10 to 2.1.7-21, A-17, A-18, and A-20). The purpose of the Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report is to present an accounting of current geotechnical information that will help resolve KTI subissues and some other project needs. The report analyzes and summarizes available qualified geotechnical data. It evaluates the sufficiency and quality of existing data to support engineering design and performance assessment. In addition, the corroborative data obtained from tests performed by a number of research organizations is presented to reinforce conclusions derived from the pool of data gathered within a full QA-controlled domain. An evaluation of the completeness of the current data is provided with respect to the requirements for geotechnical data to support design and performance assessment.

  11. Subsurface connection methods for subsurface heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Bass, Ronald Marshall (Houston, TX); Kim, Dong Sub (Sugar Land, TX); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX); Keltner, Thomas Joseph (Spring, TX); Carl, Jr., Frederick Gordon (Houston, TX)

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a first elongated heater in a first opening in the formation. The first elongated heater includes an exposed metal section in a portion of the first opening. The portion is below a layer of the formation to be heated. The exposed metal section is exposed to the formation. A second elongated heater is in a second opening in the formation. The second opening connects to the first opening at or near the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated. At least a portion of an exposed metal section of the second elongated heater is electrically coupled to at least a portion of the exposed metal section of the first elongated heater in the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated.

  12. Poster on Subsurface Technology & Engineering Research, Development...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Subsurface Initiative, focused on revolutionizing sustainable subsurface energy production and storage through transformational improvements in the ability to access,...

  13. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  14. Radionuclide Sensors for Subsurface Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy DeVol

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination of the subsurface by radionuclides is a persistent and vexing problem for the Department of Energy. These radionuclides must be measured in field studies and monitoed in the long term when they cannot be removed. However, no radionuclide sensors existed for groundwater monitoring prior to this team's research under the EMSP program Detection of a and b decays from radionuclides in water is difficult due to their short ranges in condensed media.

  15. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.

    1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A barrier is disclosed for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates. 5 figs.

  16. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, John C. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A barrier for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates.

  17. Crosscutting Subsurface Initiative: Adaptive Control of Subsurface Fractures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The subsurface provides most of the world’s energy and offers great potential for CO2, nuclear waste, and energy storage.  Despite decades of research and recent successes in new extraction methods...

  18. Maintaining Subsurface Drip Irrigation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enciso, Juan; Porter, Dana; Bordovsky, Jim; Fipps, Guy

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A subsurface drip irrigation system should last more than 20 years if properly maintained. Important maintenance procedures include cleaning the filters, flushing the lines, adding chlorine and injecting acids. Details of these procedures...

  19. Microbial Transport in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginn, Timothy R.; Camesano, Terri; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Nelson, Kirk B.; Clement, T. P.; Wood, Brian D.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we focus on the physical, chemical, and biological processes involved in the transport of bacteria in the saturated subsurface. We will first review conceptual models of bacterial phases in the subsurface, and then the processes controlling fate and transport on short (e.g., bioremediation) time scales. Finally we briefly review field bacterial transport experiments and discuss a number of issues that impact the application of current process descriptions and models at the field scale.

  20. ESF Subsurface Standby Generator Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Fernandez

    1998-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis is to outline and recommend two standby generator systems. These systems shall provide power during a utility outage to critical Alcove No.5's thermal test loads and to subsurface flow through ventilation loads. Critical loads that will be supported by these generator systems will be identified and evaluated. Additionally, other requirements from the Exploratory Studies Facilities Design Requirements (ESFDR) document will be evaluated. Finally, the standby generator systems will be integrated into the existing ESF subsurface distribution system. The objective of this analysis is to provide design inputs for an efficient and reliable standby generator systems which will provide power for critical loads during a power outage; specifically, Alcove No.5's thermal test loads and the subsurface flow through ventilation loads. Additionally, preliminary one-line diagrams will be developed using this analysis as a primary input.

  1. Lower-Temperature Subsurface Layout and Ventilation Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christine L. Linden; Edward G. Thomas

    2001-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis combines work scope identified as subsurface facility (SSF) low temperature (LT) Facilities System and SSF LT Ventilation System in the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001b, pp. 6 and 7, and pp. 13 and 14). In accordance with this technical work plan (TWP), this analysis is performed using AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models. It also incorporates the procedure AP-SI.1Q, Software Management. The purpose of this analysis is to develop an overall subsurface layout system and the overall ventilation system concepts that address a lower-temperature operating mode for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). The objective of this analysis is to provide a technical design product that supports the lower-temperature operating mode concept for the revision of the system description documents and to provide a basis for the system description document design descriptions. The overall subsurface layout analysis develops and describes the overall subsurface layout, including performance confirmation facilities (also referred to as Test and Evaluation Facilities) for the Site Recommendation design. This analysis also incorporates current program directives for thermal management.

  2. Anticorrelation between Surface and Subsurface Point Defects...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between Surface and Subsurface Point Defects and the Impact on the Redox Chemistry of TiO2(110). Anticorrelation between Surface and Subsurface Point Defects and the...

  3. SUBSURFACE VISUAL ALARM SYSTEM ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.W. Markman

    2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The ''Subsurface Fire Hazard Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 1998, page 61), and the document, ''Title III Evaluation Report for the Surface and Subsurface Communication System'', (CRWMS M&O 1999a, pages 21 and 23), both indicate the installed communication system is adequate to support Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) activities with the exception of the mine phone system for emergency notification purposes. They recommend the installation of a visual alarm system to supplement the page/party phone system The purpose of this analysis is to identify data communication highway design approaches, and provide justification for the selected or recommended alternatives for the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system. This analysis is being prepared to document a basis for the design selection of the data communication method. This analysis will briefly describe existing data or voice communication or monitoring systems within the ESF, and look at how these may be revised or adapted to support the needed data highway of the subsurface visual alarm. system. The existing PLC communication system installed in subsurface is providing data communication for alcove No.5 ventilation fans, south portal ventilation fans, bulkhead doors and generator monitoring system. It is given that the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system will be a digital based system. It is also given that it is most feasible to take advantage of existing systems and equipment and not consider an entirely new data communication system design and installation. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Briefly review and describe existing available data communication highways or systems within the ESF. (2) Examine technical characteristics of an existing system to disqualify a design alternative is paramount in minimizing the number of and depth of a system review. (3) Apply general engineering design practices or criteria such as relative cost, and degree of difficulty and complexity in determining requirements in adapting existing data communication highways to support the subsurface visual alarm system. These requirements would include such things as added or new communication cables, added Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), Inputs and Outputs (I/O), and communication hardware components, and human machine interfaces and their software operating system. (4) Select the best data communication highway system based on this review of adapting or integrating with existing data communication systems.

  4. Method of installing subsurface barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A. (Shelley, ID); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sloan, Paul A. (Rigby, ID)

    2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  5. Characterization and monitoring of subsurface processes using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subsurface processes using parallel computing and electrical resistivity imaging."AGU Hydrology Section Newsletter (December 2011):24-28. Authors: TC Johnson MJ Truex DM Wellman J...

  6. Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials. Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials. Abstract: Uranium(VI) diffusion was investigated in...

  7. Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

  8. MSTS - Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator theory manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, M.D.; Nichols, W.E.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, through the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office, has designated the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada for detailed study as the candidate US geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Site characterization will determine the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for the potential waste repository. If the site is determined suitable, subsequent studies and characterization will be conducted to obtain authorization from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to construct the potential waste repository. A principal component of the characterization and licensing processes involves numerically predicting the thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment of the Yucca Mountain site to the potential repository over a 10,000-year period. The thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment to the repository is anticipated to include complex processes of countercurrent vapor and liquid migration, multiple-phase heat transfer, multiple-phase transport, and geochemical reactions. Numerical simulators based on mathematical descriptions of these subsurface phenomena are required to make numerical predictions of the thermal and hydrologic response of the Yucca Mountain subsurface environment The engineering simulator called the Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator (MSTS) was developed at the request of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office to produce numerical predictions of subsurface flow and transport phenomena at the potential Yucca Mountain site. This document delineates the design architecture and describes the specific computational algorithms that compose MSTS. Details for using MSTS and sample problems are given in the {open_quotes}User`s Guide and Reference{close_quotes} companion document.

  9. Subsurface clade of Geobacteraceae that predominates in a diversity of Fe(III)-reducing subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, Dawn; O'Neil, Regina; Vrionis, Helen A.; N'guessan, Lucie A.; Ortiz-Bernad, Irene; Larrahondo, Maria J.; Adams, Lorrie A.; Ward, Joy A.; Nicoll, Julie S.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Chavan, Milind A.; Johnson, Jessica P.; Long, Philip E.; Lovely, Derek R.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are distinct differences in the physiology of Geobacter species available in pure culture. Therefore, to understand the ecology of Geobacter species in subsurface environments, it is important to know which species predominate. Clone libraries were assembled with 16S rRNA genes and transcripts amplified from three subsurface environments in which Geobacter species are known to be important members of the microbial community: (1) a uranium-contaminated aquifer located in Rifle, CO, USA undergoing in situ bioremediation; (2) an acetate-impacted aquifer that serves as an analog for the long-term acetate amendments proposed for in situ uranium bioremediation and (3) a petroleum-contaminated aquifer in which Geobacter species play a role in the oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons coupled with the reduction of Fe(III). The majority of Geobacteraceae 16S rRNA sequences found in these environments clustered in a phylogenetically coherent subsurface clade, which also contains a number of Geobacter species isolated from subsurface environments. Concatamers constructed with 43 Geobacter genes amplified from these sites also clustered within this subsurface clade. 16S rRNA transcript and gene sequences in the sediments and groundwater at the Rifle site were highly similar, suggesting that sampling groundwater via monitoring wells can recover the most active Geobacter species. These results suggest that further study of Geobacter species in the subsurface clade is necessary to accurately model the behavior of Geobacter species during subsurface bioremediation of metal and organic contaminants

  10. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  11. Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Bass, Ronald M. (Houston, TX)

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

  12. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Contractor-Grantee Workshop--Abstracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Area Subsurface Sediments Grantee-Led Research Beyenal H.of Reactive Transport Grantee-Led Research Choreover J.Subsurface Metal Contaminants Grantee-Led Research Daley R.

  13. Carbon Tetrachloride Flow and Transport in the Subsurface of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Tetrachloride Flow and Transport in the Subsurface of the 216-Z-9 Trench at the Hanford Site. Carbon Tetrachloride Flow and Transport in the Subsurface of the 216-Z-9 Trench...

  14. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Subsurface Drip Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A subsurface drip system distributes wastewater to the lawn through a system of tubing installed below the ground. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of subsurface drip distribution systems, as well as estimated costs...

  15. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Subsurface clade of Geobacteraceae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    undergoing in situ bioremediation; (2) an acetate-impacted aquifer that serves as an analog for the long-term acetate amendments proposed for in situ uranium bioremediation and (3) a petroleum-contaminated aquifer subsurface bioremediation of metal and organic contaminants. The ISME Journal (2007) 1, 663­677; doi:10

  16. Methods for forming long subsurface heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Dong Sub

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming a longitudinal subsurface heater includes longitudinally welding an electrically conductive sheath of an insulated conductor heater along at least one longitudinal strip of metal. The longitudinal strip is formed into a tubular around the insulated conductor heater with the insulated conductor heater welded along the inside surface of the tubular.

  17. New Horizons for Deep Subsurface Microbiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onstott, Tullis

    University in Sweden, the En- vironmental Institute in Denmark, and at sev- eral institutions in Russia, beneath 0.5 km of permafrost, and within and beneath gas hydrate deposits of varying depths. Deep, hot to the marine realm, the terrestrial subsurface contains ecosystems whose chemo- autotrophic nature increases

  18. Prospects for Subsurface CO2 Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Prospects for Subsurface CO2 Sequestration Abbas Firoozabadi and Philip Cheng Dept. of Chemical in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). Keywords: CO2 sequestration, mixing, diffusion coal in the future. Coal has a high carbon to hydrogen ratio while natural gas, the premium fuel

  19. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Contractor-Grantee Workshop--Abstracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sediments undergoing U(VI) bioremediation. Abstracts Designinto subsurface bioremediation. Abstracts BUGS Modeling:attenuation or engineered bioremediation conditions, to

  20. A Design Model for Subsurface Drip Irrigation in Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    and useful tool when applied to the design of subsurface irrigation systems #12;Acknowledgements This projectA Design Model for Subsurface Drip Irrigation in Arizona Michael Liga Advisor: Dr. Don Slack Biosystems Engineering University of Arizona #12;Water Issue Subsurface Drip Irrigation · Benefits ·Increased

  1. Subsurface materials management and containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  2. Subsurface materials management and containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kosteinik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  3. STOMP Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases: Application guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, W.E.; Aimo, N.J.; Oostrom, M.; White, M.D.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through the Office of Technology Development, has requested the demonstration of remediation technologies for the cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated radionuclides within the soil and ground water at arid sites. This demonstration program, called the VOC-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstrated Program (Arid-ID), has been initially directed at a volume of unsaturated and saturated soil contaminated with carbon tetrachloride on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. A principal subtask of the Arid-ID program involves the development of an integrated engineering simulator for evaluating the effectiveness and efficiency of various remediation technologies. The engineering simulator`s intended users include scientists and engineers who are investigating soil physics phenomena associated with remediation technologies. Principal design goals for the engineering simulator include broad applicability, verified algorithms, quality assurance controls, and validated simulations against laboratory and field-scale experiments. An important goal for the simulator development subtask involves the ability to scale laboratory and field-scale experiments to full-scale remediation technologies, and to transfer acquired technology to other arid sites. The STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for modeling remediation technologies. Information on the use, application, and theoretical basis of the STOMP simulator are documented in three companion guide guides. This document, the Application Guide, provides a suite of example applications of the STOMP simulator.

  4. STOMP Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases: User`s guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, M.D.; Oostrom, M.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, through the Office of Technology Development, has requested the demonstration of remediation technologies for the cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated radionuclides within the soil and groundwater at arid sites. This demonstration program, called the VOC-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration Program (Arid-ID), has been initially directed at a volume of unsaturated and saturated soil contaminated with carbon tetrachloride, on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. A principal subtask of the Arid-ID program involves the development of an integrated engineering simulator for evaluating the effectiveness and efficiency of various remediation technologies. The engineering simulator`s intended users include scientists and engineers who are investigating soil physics phenomena associated with remediation technologies. Principal design goals for the engineer simulator include broad applicability, verified algorithms, quality assurance controls, and validated simulations against laboratory and field-scale experiments. An important goal for the simulator development subtask involves the ability to scale laboratory and field-scale experiments to full-scale remediation technologies, and to transfer acquired technology to other arid sites. The STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator has been developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for modeling remediation technologies. Information on the use, application, and theoretical basis of the STOMP simulator theory and discussions on the governing equations, constitutive relations, and numerical solution algorithms for the STOMP simulator.

  5. Complex Systems Science for Subsurface Fate and Transport Report from the August 2009 Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The subsurface environment, which encompasses the vadose and saturated zones, is a heterogeneous, geologically complex domain. Believed to contain a large percentage of Earth's biomass in the form of microorganisms, the subsurface is a dynamic zone where important biogeochemical cycles work to sustain life. Actively linked to the atmosphere and biosphere through the hydrologic and carbon cycles, the subsurface serves as a storage location for much of Earth's fresh water. Coupled hydrological, microbiological, and geochemical processes occurring within the subsurface environment cause the local and regional natural chemical fluxes that govern water quality. These processes play a vital role in the formation of soil, economically important fossil fuels, mineral deposits, and other natural resources. Cleaning up Department of Energy (DOE) lands impacted by legacy wastes and using the subsurface for carbon sequestration or nuclear waste isolation require a firm understanding of these processes and the documented means to characterize the vertical and spatial distribution of subsurface properties directing water, nutrient, and contaminant flows. This information, along with credible, predictive models that integrate hydrological, microbiological, and geochemical knowledge over a range of scales, is needed to forecast the sustainability of subsurface water systems and to devise ways to manage and manipulate dynamic in situ processes for beneficial outcomes. Predictive models provide the context for knowledge integration. They are the primary tools for forecasting the evolving geochemistry or microbial ecology of groundwater under various scenarios and for assessing and optimizing the potential effectiveness of proposed approaches to carbon sequestration, waste isolation, or environmental remediation. An iterative approach of modeling and experimentation can reveal powerful insights into the behavior of subsurface systems. State-of-science understanding codified in models can provide a basis for testing hypotheses, guiding experiment design, integrating scientific knowledge on multiple environmental systems into a common framework, and translating this information to support informed decision making and policies. Subsurface behavior typically has been investigated using reductionist, or bottom-up approaches. In these approaches, mechanisms of small-scale processes are quantified, and key aspects of their behaviors are moved up to the prediction scale using scaling laws and models. Reductionism has and will continue to yield essential and comprehensive understanding of the molecular and microscopic underpinnings of component processes. However, system-scale predictions cannot always be made with bottom-up approaches because the behaviors of subsurface environments often simply do not result from the sum of smaller-scale process interactions. Systems exhibiting such behavior are termed complex and can range from the molecular to field scale in size. Complex systems contain many interactive parts and display collective behavior including emergence, feedback, and adaptive mechanisms. Microorganisms - key moderators of subsurface chemical processes - further challenge system understanding and prediction because they are adaptive life forms existing in an environment difficult to observe and measure. A new scientific approach termed complex systems science has evolved from the critical need to understand and model these systems, whose distinguishing features increasingly are found to be common in the natural world. In contrast to reductionist approaches, complexity methods often use a top-down approach to identify key interactions controlling diagnostic variables at the prediction scale; general macroscopic laws controlling system-scale behavior; and essential, simplified models of subsystem interactions that enable prediction. This approach is analogous to systems biology, which emphasizes the tight coupling between experimentation and modeling and is defined, in the context of Biological Systems Science research programs under DOE'

  6. Parallel heater system for subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Christopher Kelvin (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

    2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of substantially horizontally oriented or inclined heater sections located in a hydrocarbon containing layer in the formation. At least a portion of two of the heater sections are substantially parallel to each other. The ends of at least two of the heater sections in the layer are electrically coupled to a substantially horizontal, or inclined, electrical conductor oriented substantially perpendicular to the ends of the at least two heater sections.

  7. Low temperature monitoring system for subsurface barriers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); McKinzie, II. Billy John (Houston, TX)

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for monitoring temperature of a subsurface low temperature zone is described. The system includes a plurality of freeze wells configured to form the low temperature zone, one or more lasers, and a fiber optic cable coupled to at least one laser. A portion of the fiber optic cable is positioned in at least one freeze well. At least one laser is configured to transmit light pulses into a first end of the fiber optic cable. An analyzer is coupled to the fiber optic cable. The analyzer is configured to receive return signals from the light pulses.

  8. Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO OverviewRepositoryManagementFacilityExcellence | DepartmentSubsurface

  9. Evaluation of subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to solid earth tidal strain Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Evaluation of...

  10. Subsurface Examination of a Foliar Biofilm Using Scanning Electron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Examination of a Foliar Biofilm Using Scanning Electron- and Focused-Ion-Beam Microscopy. Subsurface Examination of a Foliar Biofilm Using Scanning Electron- and Focused-Ion-Beam...

  11. aerated subsurface flow: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 81 DRILLING AUTOMATION FOR SUBSURFACE PLANETARY EXPLORATION ABSTRACT CiteSeer Summary: Future in-situ lunarmartian resource utilization and...

  12. Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    microearthquake seismorgrams Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the...

  13. Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Field California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface...

  14. Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Induction Logging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada,...

  15. Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Abstract In...

  16. Characterization of Microbial Communities in Subsurface Nuclear Blast Cavities of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane P. Moser, Jim Bruckner, Jen Fisher, Ken Czerwinski, Charles E. Russell, and Mavrik Zavarin

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this program’s Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

  17. Historical Perspective on Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Success: Counting the Things That Really Count

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, J. A. Jr.; Middleman, L. I.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area, (SCFA) is committed to, and has been accountable for, identifying and providing solutions for the most pressing subsurface contamination problems in the DOE Complex. The SCFA program is a DOE end user focused and problem driven organization that provides the best technical solutions for the highest priority problems. This paper will discuss in some detail specific examples of the most successful, innovative technical solutions and the DOE sites where they were deployed or demonstrated. These solutions exhibited outstanding performance in FY 2000/2001 and appear poised to achieve significant success in saving end users money and time. They also provide a reduction in risk to the environment, workers, and the public while expediting environmental clean up of the sites.

  18. 1D subsurface electromagnetic fields excited by energized steel casing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    1D subsurface electromagnetic fields excited by energized steel casing Wei Yang1 , Carlos Torres the possibility of enabling steel-cased wells as galvanic sources to detect and quantify spatial variations of electrical conductivity in the subsurface. The study assumes a vertical steel-cased well that penetrates

  19. Optimal joule heating of the subsurface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berryman, J.G.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating is disclosed. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

  20. Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard C. Logan

    2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

  1. Accelerating Subsurface Transport Simulation on Heterogeneous Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villa, Oreste; Gawande, Nitin A.; Tumeo, Antonino

    2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactive transport numerical models simulate chemical and microbiological reactions that occur along a flowpath. These models have to compute reactions for a large number of locations. They solve the set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that describes the reaction for each location through the Newton-Raphson technique. This technique involves computing a Jacobian matrix and a residual vector for each set of equation, and then solving iteratively the linearized system by performing Gaussian Elimination and LU decomposition until convergence. STOMP, a well known subsurface flow simulation tool, employs matrices with sizes in the order of 100x100 elements and, for numerical accuracy, LU factorization with full pivoting instead of the faster partial pivoting. Modern high performance computing systems are heterogeneous machines whose nodes integrate both CPUs and GPUs, exposing unprecedented amounts of parallelism. To exploit all their computational power, applications must use both the types of processing elements. For the case of subsurface flow simulation, this mainly requires implementing efficient batched LU-based solvers and identifying efficient solutions for enabling load balancing among the different processors of the system. In this paper we discuss two approaches that allows scaling STOMP's performance on heterogeneous clusters. We initially identify the challenges in implementing batched LU-based solvers for small matrices on GPUs, and propose an implementation that fulfills STOMP's requirements. We compare this implementation to other existing solutions. Then, we combine the batched GPU solver with an OpenMP-based CPU solver, and present an adaptive load balancer that dynamically distributes the linear systems to solve between the two components inside a node. We show how these approaches, integrated into the full application, provide speed ups from 6 to 7 times on large problems, executed on up to 16 nodes of a cluster with two AMD Opteron 6272 and a Tesla M2090 per node.

  2. Factors Affecting Indoor Air Concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds at a Site of Subsurface Gasoline Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, M.L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L. Fischer, AbraOF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L. Fischer, Abrareporting indoor air contamination (6,7). Estimation of

  3. FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR SUBSURFACE HYDROLOGY USING A MIXED EXPLICIT-IMPLICIT SCHEME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    METHOD FOR SUBSURFACE HYDROLOGY USING A MIXED EXPLICIT-arising in subsurface hydrology. These problems includeFinite Element Method in Hydrology," Int. Jour. Num. Meth.

  4. Development of Enabling Scientific Tools to Characterize the Geologic Subsurface at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenna, Timothy C.; Herron, Michael M.

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report to the Department of Energy provides a summary of activities conducted under our exploratory grant, funded through U.S. DOE Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program in the category of enabling scientific tools, which covers the period from July 15, 2010 to July 14, 2013. The main goal of this exploratory project is to determine the parameters necessary to translate existing borehole log data into reservoir properties following scientifically sound petrophysical relationships. For this study, we focused on samples and Ge-based spectral gamma logging system (SGLS) data collected from wells located in the Hanford 300 Area. The main activities consisted of 1) the analysis of available core samples for a variety of mineralogical, chemical and physical; 2) evaluation of selected spectral gamma logs, environmental corrections, and calibration; 3) development of algorithms and a proposed workflow that permits translation of log responses into useful reservoir properties such as lithology, matrix density, porosity, and permeability. These techniques have been successfully employed in the petroleum industry; however, the approach is relatively new when applied to subsurface remediation. This exploratory project has been successful in meeting its stated objectives. We have demonstrated that our approach can lead to an improved interpretation of existing well log data. The algorithms we developed can utilize available log data, in particular gamma, and spectral gamma logs, and continued optimization will improve their application to ERSP goals of understanding subsurface properties.

  5. Enhanced bioremediation of subsurface contamination: Enzyme recruitment and redesign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockman, F.J.; Ornstein, R.L.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface systems containing radionuclide, heavy metal, and organic wastes must be carefully attended to avoid further impacts to the environment or exposures to human populations. It is appropriate, therefore, to invest in basic research to develop the requisite tools and methods for addressing complex cleanup problems. The rational modification of subsurface microoganisms by enzyme recruitment and enzyme design, in concert with engineered systems for delivery of microorganisms and nutrients to the contaminated zone, are potentially useful tools in the spectrum of approaches that will be required for successful remediation of deep subsurface contamination.

  6. RADIOIODINE GEOCHEMISTRY IN THE SRS SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.; Emerson, H.; Powell, B.; Roberts, K.; Zhang, S.; Xu, C.; Schwer, K.; Li, H.; Ho, Y.; Denham, M.; Yeager, C.; Santschi, P.

    2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Iodine-129 is one of the key risk drivers for several Savannah River Site (SRS) performance assessments (PA), including that for the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility in E-Area. In an effort to reduce the uncertainty associated with the conceptual model and the input values used in PA, several studies have recently been conducted dealing with radioiodine geochemistry at the SRS. The objective of this report was to review these recent studies and evaluate their implications on SRS PA calculations. For the first time, these studies measured iodine speciation in SRS groundwater and provided technical justification for assuming the presence of more strongly sorbing species (iodate and organo-iodine), and measured greater iodine sediment sorption when experiments included these newly identified species; specifically they measured greater sorption coefficients (K{sub d} values: the concentration ratio of iodine on the solid phase divided by the concentration in the aqueous phase). Based on these recent studies, new best estimates were proposed for future PA calculations. The new K{sub d} values are greater than previous recommended values. These proposed K{sub d} values reflect a better understanding of iodine geochemistry in the SRS subsurface environment, which permits reducing the associated conservatism included in the original estimates to account for uncertainty. Among the key contributing discoveries supporting the contention that the K{sub d} values should be increased are that: 1) not only iodide (I{sup -}), but also the more strongly sorbing iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup -}) species exists in SRS groundwater (average total iodine = 15% iodide, 42% iodate, and 43% organoiodine), 2) when iodine was added as iodate, the measured K{sub d} values were 2 to 6 times greater than when the iodine was added as iodide, and perhaps most importantly, 3) higher desorption (10 to 20 mL/g) than (ad)sorption (all previous studies) K{sub d} values were measured. The implications of this latter point is that the iodine desorption process would be appreciably slower than the (ad)sorption process, and as such would control the rate (and the PA K{sub d} value) that iodine sorbed to and therefore migrated through the subsurface sediment. High desorption K{sub d} values would result in the “effective K{sub d}” for a reactive transport model being closer to the desorption K{sub d} value (the rate limiting value) than the (ad)sorption K{sub d} value. In summary, our understanding of {sup 129}I geochemistry has greatly improved, reducing the uncertainty associated with the PA’s conceptual model, thereby permitting us to reduce the conservatism presently incorporated in PA input values to describe {sup 129}I fate and transport in the SRS subsurface environment.

  7. Installing a Subsurface Drip Irrigation System for Row Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enciso, Juan

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication describes the components of a subsurface drip irrigation system and the procedure for installing such a system. Each step is outlined and illustrated. Steps include tape injection, trenching, connecting drip lines, back...

  8. Research review Geophysical subsurface imaging for ecological applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Research review Geophysical subsurface imaging for ecological applications Author resistivity imaging, geophysical imaging, ground-penetrating radar, plant­soil interactions, soil be costly, time consuming, andinfeasible, especially if the spatial scales involved are large. Geophysical

  9. Subsurface characterization of the San Jacinto River Research site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leik, Jason Allan

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to develop an effective petroleum repudiation ics. strategy, the interaction between surface and shallow subsurface water was determined for the San Jacinto River Oi1 Spill Remediation Research site. The ten-acre wetland is located...

  10. Laboratory simulation of subsurface airflow beneath a building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corsello, Joseph William

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor intrusion is the vapor-phase migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings due to subsurface soil or groundwater contamination. Oxygen replenishment rates beneath a building are significant for ...

  11. Monitoring the subsurface with quasi-static deformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sneider, Roel; Spetzler, Hartmut

    2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This project consisted of three sub-projects that are all aimed at monitoring the subsurface with geophysical methods. The objectives of these sub-projects are: to investigate the use of seismic waves for remote monitoring of temperature changes in the Yucca Mountain nuclear repository; to investigate the use of measured changes in the tidal tilt as a diagnostic for the infiltration of fluids in the subsurface; and to extract the electrostatic response from dynamic field fluctuations.

  12. Enhancing technology acceptance: The role of the subsurface contaminants focus area external integration team

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirwan-Taylor, H.; McCabe, G.H. [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States); Lesperance, A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kauffman, J.; Serie, P.; Dressen, L. [EnvironIssues (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE is developing and deploying innovative technologies for cleaning up its contaminated facilities using a market-oriented approach. This report describes the activities of the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area`s (SCFA) External Integration Team (EIT) in supporting DOE`s technology development program. The SCFA program for technology development is market-oriented, driven by the needs of end users. The purpose of EIT is to understand the technology needs of the DOE sites and identify technology acceptance criteria from users and other stakeholders to enhance deployment of innovative technologies. Stakeholders include regulators, technology users, Native Americans, and environmental and other interest groups. The success of this national program requires close coordination and communication among technology developers and stakeholders to work through all of the various phases of planning and implementation. Staff involved must be willing to commit significant amounts of time to extended discussions with the various stakeholders.

  13. The microbial methane cycle in subsurface sediments. Final project report, July 1, 1993--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossman, E.L.; Ammerman, J.W. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Suflita, J.M. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Botany and Microbiology

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this study were to determine the factors controlling microbial activity and survival in the subsurface and, specifically, to determine whether microbial communities in aquitards and in aquifer microenvironments provide electron donors and/or acceptors that enhance microbial survival in aquifers. Although the original objectives were to focus on methane cycling, the authors pursued an opportunity to study sulfur cycling in aquifer systems, a process of much greater importance in microbial activity and survival, and in the mobility of metals in the subsurface. Furthermore, sulfur cycling is pertinent to the Subsurface Science Program`s study at Cerro Negro, New Mexico. The study combined field and laboratory approaches and microbiological, molecular, geochemical, and hydrogeological techniques. During drilling operations, sediments were collected aseptically and assayed for a variety of microorganisms and metabolic capabilities including total counts, viable aerobic heterotrophs, total anaerobic heterotrophs, sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfate reduction activity (in situ and in slurries), methanogens, methanotrophs, and Fe- and S-oxidizers, among others. Geochemical analyses of sediments included organic carbon content and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio, sulfur chemistry (reduced sulfur, sulfate), {sup 34}S/{sup 32}S, {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C, {sup 14}C, tritium, etc. The authors drilled eight boreholes in the Eocene Yegua formation at four localities on the Texas A&M University campus using a hollow-stem auger drilling rig. The drilling pattern forms a T, with three well clusters along the dip direction and two along strike. Four boreholes were sampled for sediments and screened at the deepest sand interval encountered, and four boreholes were drilled to install wells in shallower sands. Boreholes range in depth from 8 to 31 m, with screened intervals ranging from 6 to 31 m. Below are the results of these field studies.

  14. The Stimulation of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs with Subsurface Nuclear Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LORENZ,JOHN C.

    2000-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1965 and 1979 there were five documented and one or more inferred attempts to stimulate the production from hydrocarbon reservoirs by detonating nuclear devices in reservoir strata. Of the five documented tests, three were carried out by the US in low-permeability, natural-gas bearing, sandstone-shale formations, and two were done in the USSR within oil-bearing carbonates. The objectives of the US stimulation efforts were to increase porosity and permeability in a reservoir around a specific well by creating a chimney of rock rubble with fractures extending beyond it, and to connect superimposed reservoir layers. In the USSR, the intent was to extensively fracture an existing reservoir in the more general vicinity of producing wells, again increasing overall permeability and porosity. In both countries, the ultimate goals were to increase production rates and ultimate recovery from the reservoirs. Subsurface explosive devices ranging from 2.3 to about 100 kilotons were used at depths ranging from 1208 m (3963 ft) to 2568 m (8427 ft). Post-shot problems were encountered, including smaller-than-calculated fracture zones, formation damage, radioactivity of the product, and dilution of the BTU value of tie natural gas with inflammable gases created by the explosion. Reports also suggest that production-enhancement factors from these tests fell short of expectations. Ultimately, the enhanced-production benefits of the tests were insufficient to support continuation of the pro-grams within increasingly adversarial political, economic, and social climates, and attempts to stimulate hydrocarbon reservoirs with nuclear devices have been terminated in both countries.

  15. Intercellular Genomics of Subsurface Microbial Colonies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortoleva, Peter; Tuncay, Kagan; Gannon, Dennis; Meile, Christof

    2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes progress in the second year of this project. The objective is to develop methods and software to predict the spatial configuration, properties and temporal evolution of microbial colonies in the subsurface. To accomplish this, we integrate models of intracellular processes, cell-host medium exchange and reaction-transport dynamics on the colony scale. At the conclusion of the project, we aim to have the foundations of a predictive mathematical model and software that captures the three scales of these systems – the intracellular, pore, and colony wide spatial scales. In the second year of the project, we refined our transcriptional regulatory network discovery (TRND) approach that utilizes gene expression data along with phylogenic similarity and gene ontology analyses and applied it successfully to E.coli, human B cells, and Geobacter sulfurreducens. We have developed a new Web interface, GeoGen, which is tailored to the reconstruction of microbial TRNs and solely focuses on Geobacter as one of DOE’s high priority microbes. Our developments are designed such that the frameworks for the TRND and GeoGen can readily be used for other microbes of interest to the DOE. In the context of modeling a single bacterium, we are actively pursuing both steady-state and kinetic approaches. The steady-state approach is based on a flux balance that uses maximizing biomass growth rate as its objective, subjected to various biochemical constraints, for the optimal values of reaction rates and uptake/release of metabolites. For the kinetic approach, we use Karyote, a rigorous cell model developed by us for an earlier DOE grant and the DARPA BioSPICE Project. We are also investigating the interplay between bacterial colonies and environment at both pore and macroscopic scales. The pore scale models use detailed representations for realistic porous media accounting for the distribution of grain size whereas the macroscopic models employ the Darcy-type flow equations and up-scaled advective-diffusive transport equations for chemical species. We are rigorously testing the relationship between these two scales by evaluating macroscopic parameters using the volume averaging methodology applied to pore scale model results.

  16. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News,Program Direction and Analysis DeputyStructure

  17. Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard C. Logan

    2002-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment; Vital U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

  18. Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Kubicek

    2001-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire or related event. (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment. (3) Vital US. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards. (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE. (5) Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

  19. Detecting urbanization effects on surface and subsurface thermal environment --A case study of Osaka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Shaopeng

    of the human impacts on the subsurface thermal environment. The objective of this study is to analyze surface island effects Subsurface thermal environment 1. Introduction 20th century global warming is well

  20. Subsurface Defect Detection in Metals with Pulsed Eddy Current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plotnikov, Yuri A. [GE Global Research Center, One Research Circle, Niskayuna, NY 12309-1135 (United States); Bantz, Walter J. [GE Aircraft Engines M and QTD, 10270 St. Rita Lane, Cincinnati, OH 45215 (United States)

    2005-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The eddy current (EC) method is traditionally used for open surface crack detection in metallic components. Subsurface voids in bulk metals can also be detected by the eddy current devices. Taking into consideration the skin effect in conductive materials, a lower frequency of electromagnetic excitation is used for a deeper penetration. A set of special specimens was designed and fabricated to investigate sensitivity to subsurface voids. Typically, flat bottom holes (FBHs) are used for subsurface defect simulation. This approach is not very representative of real defects for eddy current inspection because the FBH depth extends to the bottom of the specimen. Two-layer specimens with finite depth FBHs were fabricated and scanned with conventional EC of variable frequency. Sensitivity and spatial resolution of EC diminish with flaw depth. The pulsed EC approach was applied for flaw detection at variable distance under the surface. The transient response from multi-layer model was derived and compared to experiments. The multi-frequency nature of pulsed excitation provides effective coverage of a thick layer of material in one pass. Challenging aspects of subsurface flaw detection and visualization using the EC technique are discussed.

  1. METHANE IN SUBSURFACE: MATHEMATICAL MODELING AND COMPUTATIONAL CHALLENGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peszynska, Malgorzata

    consortium led by Chevron, in gas hydrate drilling, research expeditions [6], and observatories [5, 7] which help to evaluate methane hydrate as an energy resource. Although the existence of gas hydrates and energy recovery involving the evolution of methane gas in the subsurface. In particular, we develop

  2. METHANE IN SUBSURFACE: MATHEMATICAL MODELING AND COMPUTATIONAL CHALLENGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peszynska, Malgorzata

    ), in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and an industry consortium led by Chevron, in gas hydrate as an energy resource. Although the existence of gas hydrates in nature has been known for many decades, our and energy recovery involving the evolution of methane gas in the subsurface. In particular, we develop

  3. USING OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY TO EXAMINE THE SUBSURFACE MORPHOLOGY OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barton, Jennifer K.

    : (1) a homogeneous glassy phase; (2) a liquid­liquid phase separated state; and (3) a crystallizedUSING OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY TO EXAMINE THE SUBSURFACE MORPHOLOGY OF CHINESE GLAZES M of their glazes. The images revealed unique phase assemblage modes in different samples. The results suggest

  4. Subsurface Ambient Thermoelectric Power for Moles and Penetrators1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    1 Subsurface Ambient Thermoelectric Power for Moles and Penetrators1 Ralph D. Lorenz, Lunar for electrical power generation for planetary exploration applications using thermoelectric conversion of the vehicle. Proof-of-concept experiments are described using off-the-shelf thermoelectric CPU cooling plates

  5. mineral grains pore spaces Subsurface Geology and Resource Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    mineral grains pore spaces Subsurface Geology and Resource Exploration Locating earth resources deals with the exploration for oil, which is important to Louisiana, the Gulf of Mexico area oil (petroleum) and natural gas, that are refined for use as fuels. When sediments are deposited

  6. Variability of the methane trapping in martian subsurface clathrate hydrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caroline Thomas; Olivier Mousis; Sylvain Picaud; Vincent Ballenegger

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations have evidenced traces of methane CH4 heterogeneously distributed in the martian atmosphere. However, because the lifetime of CH4 in the atmosphere of Mars is estimated to be around 300-600 years on the basis of photochemistry, its release from a subsurface reservoir or an active primary source of methane have been invoked in the recent literature. Among the existing scenarios, it has been proposed that clathrate hydrates located in the near subsurface of Mars could be at the origin of the small quantities of the detected CH4. Here, we accurately determine the composition of these clathrate hydrates, as a function of temperature and gas phase composition, by using a hybrid statistical thermodynamic model based on experimental data. Compared to other recent works, our model allows us to calculate the composition of clathrate hydrates formed from a more plausible composition of the martian atmosphere by considering its main compounds, i.e. carbon dioxyde, nitrogen and argon, together with methane. Besides, because there is no low temperature restriction in our model, we are able to determine the composition of clathrate hydrates formed at temperatures corresponding to the extreme ones measured in the polar caps. Our results show that methane enriched clathrate hydrates could be stable in the subsurface of Mars only if a primitive CH4-rich atmosphere has existed or if a subsurface source of CH4 has been (or is still) present.

  7. Heating subsurface formations by oxidizing fuel on a fuel carrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Costello, Michael; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of heating a portion of a subsurface formation includes drawing fuel on a fuel carrier through an opening formed in the formation. Oxidant is supplied to the fuel at one or more locations in the opening. The fuel is combusted with the oxidant to provide heat to the formation.

  8. The Subsurface Fluid Mechanics of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Subsurface Fluid Mechanics of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage by Michael Lawrence Szulczewski S Mechanics of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage by Michael Lawrence Szulczewski Submitted to the Department capture and storage (CCS), CO2 is captured at power plants and then injected into deep geologic reservoirs

  9. Adaptive Methods for Modelling Transport Processes in Fractured Subsurface Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    ­ discrete Galerkin method applying finite differences for the discretization in time and the StreamlineAdaptive Methods for Modelling Transport Processes in Fractured Subsurface Systems 3rd­adaptive methods for modelling transport processes in fractured rock. As a simplification, ideal tracers

  10. SUBSURFACE COLLOIDS: STABILITY, SAMPLING, AND TRANSPORT UNDER GRAVITATIONAL AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    and warm friendship. I also wish to extend my appreciation to the EMSP (Environmental Management ScienceSUBSURFACE COLLOIDS: STABILITY, SAMPLING, AND TRANSPORT UNDER GRAVITATIONAL AND CENTRIFUGAL for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY Department of Crop and Soil Sciences August

  11. Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE's Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

  12. Processes in microbial transport in the natural subsurface Timothy R. Ginn a,*, Brian D. Wood b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Processes in microbial transport in the natural subsurface Timothy R. Ginn a,*, Brian D. Wood b microbial transport in the saturated subsurface. We begin with the conceptual models of the biophase of bioremediation and pathogen transport in the natural subsurface. Ă? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved

  13. Using electrical impedance tomography to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Roberts, Jeffery J. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity. EIT can be used to map hydraulic conductivity in the subsurface where measurements of both amplitude and phase are made. Hydraulic conductivity depends on at least two parameters: porosity and a length scale parameter. Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) measures and maps electrical conductivity (which can be related to porosity) in three dimensions. By introducing phase measurements along with amplitude, the desired additional measurement of a pertinent length scale can be achieved. Hydraulic conductivity controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the surface. Thus inexpensive maps of hydraulic conductivity would improve planning strategies for subsequent remediation efforts. Fluid permeability is also of importance for oil field exploitation and thus detailed knowledge of fluid permeability distribution in three-dimension (3-D) would be a great boon to petroleum reservoir analysts.

  14. Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleman, S.E.

    1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media. The code is designed specifically to handle complex multi-layer and/or heterogeneous aquifer systems in an efficient manner and accommodates a wide range of boundary conditions. Additionally, 1-D and 2-D (in Cartesian coordinates) problems are handled in FACT by simply limiting the number of elements in a particular direction(s) to one. The governing equations in FACT are formulated only in Cartesian coordinates.

  15. Chitinozoans in the subsurface Lower Paleozoic of West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kauffman, A. E.

    1971-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS October 22, 1971 Paper 54 CHITINOZOANS IN THE SUBSURFACE LOWER PALEOZOIC OF WEST TEXAS A. E. KAUFFMAN Humble Oil & Refining Company, Midland, Texas ABSTRACT Studies based on both comprehensive... are found throughout the West Texas area. As generally accepted by operational petroleum geologists, the Simpson Group comprises the Joins Formation (limestone and dolomite); Oil Creek Formation (sandstone, shale, and limestone); McLish Formation (sand...

  16. Method of sealing casings of subsurface materials management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  17. Multi-step heater deployment in a subsurface formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for installing a horizontal or inclined subsurface heater includes placing a heating section of a heater in a horizontal or inclined section of a wellbore with an installation tool. The tool is uncoupled from the heating section. A lead in section is mechanically and electrically coupled to the heating section of the heater. The lead-in section is located in an angled or vertical section of the wellbore.

  18. Downhole burner systems and methods for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmayan, Walter Farman (Houston, TX); Giles, Steven Paul (Damon, TX); Brignac, Jr., Joseph Phillip (Katy, TX); Munshi, Abdul Wahid (Houston, TX); Abbasi, Faraz (Sugarland, TX); Clomburg, Lloyd Anthony (Houston, TX); Anderson, Karl Gregory (Missouri City, TX); Tsai, Kuochen (Katy, TX); Siddoway, Mark Alan (Katy, TX)

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas burner assembly for heating a subsurface formation includes an oxidant conduit, a fuel conduit, and a plurality of oxidizers coupled to the oxidant conduit. At least one of the oxidizers includes a mix chamber for mixing fuel from the fuel conduit with oxidant from the oxidant conduit, an igniter, and a shield. The shield includes a plurality of openings in communication with the oxidant conduit. At least one flame stabilizer is coupled to the shield.

  19. Interdependency of Subsurface Carbon Distribution and Graphene-Catalyst Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weatherup, Robert S.; Amara, Hakim; Blume, Raoul; Dlubak, Bruno; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Diarra, Mamadou; Bahri, Mounib; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Caneva, Sabina; Kidambi, Piran R.; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Deranlot, Cyrile; Seneor, Pierre; Schloegl, Robert; Ducastelle, François; Bichara, Christophe; Hofmann, Stephan

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Interdependency of Subsurface Carbon Distribution and Graphene? Catalyst Interaction Robert S. Weatherup,*,† Hakim Amara,‡ Raoul Blume,§ Bruno Dlubak,?,? Bernhard C. Bayer,† Mamadou Diarra,?,# Mounib Bahri,‡ Andrea Cabrero-Vilatela,† Sabina Caneva... , France * S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The dynamics of the graphene?catalyst interaction during chemical vapor deposition are investigated using in situ, time- and depth- resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and complementary grand canonical...

  20. Methods and system for subsurface stabilization using jet grouting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loomis, Guy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Weidner, Jerry R. (Iona, ID); Farnsworth, Richard K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jessmore, James J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems are provided for stabilizing a subsurface area such as a buried waste pit for either long term storage, or interim storage and retrieval. A plurality of holes are drilled into the subsurface area with a high pressure drilling system provided with a drill stem having jet grouting nozzles. A grouting material is injected at high pressure through the jet grouting nozzles into a formed hole while the drill stem is withdrawn from the hole at a predetermined rate of rotation and translation. A grout-filled column is thereby formed with minimal grout returns, which when overlapped with other adjacent grout-filled columns encapsulates and binds the entire waste pit area to form a subsurface agglomeration or monolith of grout, soil, and waste. The formed monolith stabilizes the buried waste site against subsidence while simultaneously providing a barrier against contaminate migration. The stabilized monolith can be left permanently in place or can be retrieved if desired by using appropriate excavation equipment. The jet grouting technique can also be utilized in a pretreatment approach prior to in situ vitrification of a buried waste site. The waste encapsulation methods and systems are applicable to buried waste materials such as mixed waste, hazardous waste, or radioactive waste.

  1. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research FY11 Second Quarter Performance Measure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Long Term Measure for 2011 under the Performance Assessment Rating Tool (PART) measure is to "Refine subsurface transport models by developing computational methods to link important processes impacting contaminant transport at smaller scales to the field scale." The second quarter performance measure is to "Provide a report on computational methods linking genome-enabled understanding of microbial metabolism with reactive transport models to describe processes impacting contaminant transport in the subsurface." Microorganisms such as bacteria are by definition small (typically on the order of a micron in size), and their behavior is controlled by their local biogeochemical environment (typically within a single pore or a biofilm on a grain surface, on the order of tens of microns in size). However, their metabolic activity exerts strong influence on the transport and fate of groundwater contaminants of significant concern at DOE sites, in contaminant plumes with spatial extents of meters to kilometers. This report describes progress and key findings from research aimed at integrating models of microbial metabolism based on genomic information (small scale) with models of contaminant fate and transport in aquifers (field scale).

  2. Linking deposit morphology and clogging in subsurface remediation: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, David C. [University of Colorado Denver

    2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater is a crucial resource for water supply, especially in arid and semiarid areas of the United States west of the 100th meridian. Accordingly, remediation of contaminated groundwater is an important application of science and technology, particularly for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which oversees a number of groundwater remediation sites from Cold War era mining. Groundwater remediation is complex, because it depends on identifying, locating, and treating contaminants in the subsurface, where remediation reactions depend on interacting geological, hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological factors. Within this context, permeability is a fundamental concept, because it controls the rates and pathways of groundwater flow. Colloid science is intimately related to permeability, because when colloids are present (particles with equivalent diameters between 1 nanometer and 10 micrometers), changes in hydrological or geochemical conditions can trigger a detrimental reduction in permeability called clogging. Accordingly, clogging is a major concern in groundwater remediation. Several lines of evidence suggest that clogging by colloids depends on (1) colloid deposition, and (2) deposit morphology, that is, the structure of colloid deposits, which can be quantified as a fractal dimension. This report describes research, performed under a 2-year, exploratory grant from the DOE’s Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) program. This research employed a novel laboratory technique to simultaneously measure flow, colloid deposition, deposit morphology, and permeability in a flow cell, and also collected field samples from wells at the DOE’s Old Rifle remediation site. Field results indicate that suspended solids at the Old Rifle site have fractal structures. Laboratory results indicate that clogging is associated with colloid deposits with smaller fractal dimensions, in accordance with previous studies on initially clean granular media. Preliminary modeling has identified the deposit radius of gyration as a candidate variable to account for clogging as a function of (1) colloid accumulation and (2) deposit morphology.

  3. Outcrop gamma-ray logging applied to subsurface petroleum geology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slatt, R.M.; Borer, J.M.; Horn, B.W. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a gamma-ray log profile of an outcrop with a hand-held scintillometer has many applications to subsurface petroleum geology. The outcrop gamma-ray log provides a readily understandable bridge between what is observed in outcrop and what is to be interpreted on well logs and seismic records. Several examples are presented in this paper that demonstrate major applications. An outcrop from the Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in Colorado provides an excellent example of the use of outcrop gamma-ray logs to better visualize spatial variability of depositional settings for improved well log correlations. Out crops from the Cretaceous Almond Formation, Niobrara Formation, and Graneros Shale in Colorado serve as examples of outcrop gamma-ray logging used to correlate outcrops with their subsurface equivalents for improved lithologic and stratigraphic interpretation of well logs. Outcrops of the Cretaceous Sharon Springs Member of the Pierre Shale in Colorado and the Eocene Green River Formation in Wyoming provide examples of the application of outcrop-gamma ray logging to identify and characterize organic-rich shales in outcrops and on well logs. Outcrops of the Pennsylvanian Jackfork Formation in Arkansas demonstrate the use of outcrop logging to yield improved interpretation of reservoir quality on well logs and for one- and two-dimensional seismic modeling. An outcrop of Precambrian and Cambro-Ordovician rocks from Algeria provides an example of outcrop logging to recognize unconformities and other major surfaces on well logs. An outcrop of the Niobrara Formation in Colorado is used as an example for improved understanding of horizontal gamma-ray log response. The example logs presented are all drived with a hand-held scintillometer. This technique is simple, quick, and relatively inexpensive, so is recommended for any outcrop work that is intended to be applied t;o subsurface well logs or seismic interpretation.

  4. Subsurface drip systems for land application of residential wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neal, Byron Anthony

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    classification of the most restrictive soil layer ranging between 4. 12 I/m /day (0. 1 gal/ft /day) for class IV (clay) soils to 20. 6 Vm /day (0. 50 gaV ft /day) for class Ia (sand/gravel) soils (TNRCC, 1997). Texas's design criteria for hydraulic loading... gallons) of wastewater per day. The soil type used for designing the subsurface drip system is a sandy clay loam (type III, 30 TAC Chapter 285, 1997). From the TNRCC (1995) regulations, the hydraulic application rate is 8. 15 I/m /day (0. 20 gal/ft /day...

  5. Interdisciplinary investigation of subsurface contaminant transport and fate at point-source releases of gasoline containing MTBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buxton, H.T.; Baehr, A.L. [Geological Survey, West Trenton, NJ (United States); Landmeyer, J.E. [Geological Survey, Columbia, SC (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is commonly found at concentrations above the current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency draft lifetime health advisory for drinking water (20 to 200 micrograms per liter) at many point-source gasoline release sites. MTBE is significantly more persistent than benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene and xylenes (BTEX) in the subsurface. Therefore, evaluation of the implications of its presence in gasoline to monitored natural attenuation and engineered bioremediation alternatives is warranted. An interdisciplinary, field-based investigation of the subsurface transport and fate of MTBE and petroleum hydrocarbons is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Toxic Substances Hydrology Program at the site of an underground gasoline storage-tank release near Beaufort, South Carolina. The objective of the investigation is to provide a systematic evaluation of natural attenuation of MTBE compared to BTEX. Results of the field and laboratory studies at this site will be generalized to a broader range of hydrogeochemical conditions through experiments at other sites. Furthermore, newly developed methods of analysis can be applied to sites across the Nation. This investigation of MTBE at point-source release sites is coordinated with investigations of the occurrence of MTBE in shallow ground water, surface water, precipitation, and the atmosphere being conducted by the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment Program.

  6. Influence of Mg2+ on CaCO3 precipitation during subsurface reactive...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subsurface reactive transport in a homogeneous silicon-etched pore network. Abstract: Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) geochemical reactions exert a fundamental control on the...

  7. An Electrode-based approach for monitoring in situ microbial activity during subsurface bioremediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, K.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    associated with bioremediation of uranium to submicromolarGenes during in Situ Bioremediation of Uranium-Contaminatedduring subsurface bioremediation Kenneth H. Williams 1* ,

  8. Advanced Polymer Technology for Containing and Immobilizing Strontium-90 in the Subsurface - 8361

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Baker; G. Heath; C. Scott; A. Schafer; S. Bryant; M. Sharma; C. Huh; S. K. Choi

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many Department of Energy (DOE) sites, including Idaho and Hanford, have heavy metals and/or radionuclides (e.g. strontium-90) present that are strongly adsorbed in the vadose zone, but which nevertheless are propagating toward the water table. A key challenge for immobilization of these contaminants is bringing the chosen amendment or remediation technology into contact with the contaminated porous medium, while ensuring that contaminated water and colloids do not escape. This is particularly challenging when the subsurface geology is complex and highly heterogeneous, as is the case at many DOE sites. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in collaboration with the University of Texas at Austin (UT) has conducted research sponsored through the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) Advanced Remediation Technologies Phase I program that successfully demonstrated application of a novel, pH-triggered advanced polymer for creating a physical barrier that prevents heavy metals and radionuclides in vadose zone soil and soil-pore water from migrating to the groundwater. The focus of this paper is on the column and sandbox experiments conducted by researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory in support of the Phase I program objectives. Proof of these concepts provides a technology basis for confining or isolating a volume of contaminated groundwater, to be implemented in future investigations at the Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP) at INL.

  9. Method for Implementing Subsurface Solid Derived Concentration Guideline Levels (DCGL) - 12331

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lively, J.W. [MACTEC Development Corporation (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other federal agencies currently approve the Multi-Agency Radiation Site Survey and Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) as guidance for licensees who are conducting final radiological status surveys in support of decommissioning. MARSSIM provides a method to demonstrate compliance with the applicable regulation by comparing residual radioactivity in surface soils with derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs), but specifically discounts its applicability to subsurface soils. Many sites and facilities undergoing decommissioning contain subsurface soils that are potentially impacted by radiological constituents. In the absence of specific guidance designed to address the derivation of subsurface soil DCGLs and compliance demonstration, decommissioning facilities have attempted to apply DCGLs and final status survey techniques designed specifically for surface soils to subsurface soils. The decision to apply surface soil limits and surface soil compliance metrics to subsurface soils typically results in significant over-excavation with associated cost escalation. MACTEC, Inc. has developed the overarching concepts and principles found in recent NRC decommissioning guidance in NUREG 1757 to establish a functional method to derive dose-based subsurface soil DCGLs. The subsurface soil method developed by MACTEC also establishes a rigorous set of criterion-based data evaluation metrics (with analogs to the MARSSIM methodology) that can be used to demonstrate compliance with the developed subsurface soil DCGLs. The method establishes a continuum of volume factors that relate the size and depth of a volume of subsurface soil having elevated concentrations of residual radioactivity with its ability to produce dose. The method integrates the subsurface soil sampling regime with the derivation of the subsurface soil DCGL such that a self-regulating optimization is naturally sought by both the responsible party and regulator. This paper describes the concepts and basis used by MACTEC to develop the dose-based subsurface soil DCGL method. The paper will show how MACTEC's method can be used to demonstrate that higher concentrations of residual radioactivity in subsurface soils (as compared with surface soils) can meet the NRC's dose-based regulations. MACTEC's method has been used successfully to obtain the NRC's radiological release at a site with known radiological impacts to subsurface soils exceeding the surface soil DCGL, saving both time and cost. Having considered the current NRC guidance for consideration of residual radioactivity in subsurface soils during decommissioning, MACTEC has developed a technically based approach to the derivation of and demonstration of compliance with subsurface soil DCGLs for radionuclides. In fact, the process uses the already accepted concepts and metrics approved for surface soils as the foundation for deriving scaling factors used to calculate subsurface soil DCGLs that are at least equally protective of the decommissioning annual dose standard. Each of the elements identified for consideration in the current NRC guidance is addressed in this proposed method. Additionally, there is considerable conservatism built into the assumptions and techniques used to arrive at subsurface soil scaling factors and DCGLs. The degree of conservatism embodied in the approach used is such that risk managers and decision makers approving and using subsurface soil DCGLs derived in accordance with this method can be confident that the future exposures will be well below permissible and safe levels. The technical basis for the method can be applied to a broad variety of sites with residual radioactivity in subsurface soils. Given the costly nature of soil surveys, excavation, and disposal of soils as low-level radioactive waste, MACTEC's method for deriving and demonstrating compliance with subsurface soil DCGLs offers the possibility of significant cost savings over the traditional approach of applying surface soil DCGLs to subsurface soils. Furthermore, while yet u

  10. Variability of the methane trapping in martian subsurface clathrate hydrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Caroline; Picaud, Sylvain; Ballenegger, Vincent

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations have evidenced traces of methane CH4 heterogeneously distributed in the martian atmosphere. However, because the lifetime of CH4 in the atmosphere of Mars is estimated to be around 300-600 years on the basis of photochemistry, its release from a subsurface reservoir or an active primary source of methane have been invoked in the recent literature. Among the existing scenarios, it has been proposed that clathrate hydrates located in the near subsurface of Mars could be at the origin of the small quantities of the detected CH4. Here, we accurately determine the composition of these clathrate hydrates, as a function of temperature and gas phase composition, by using a hybrid statistical thermodynamic model based on experimental data. Compared to other recent works, our model allows us to calculate the composition of clathrate hydrates formed from a more plausible composition of the martian atmosphere by considering its main compounds, i.e. carbon dioxyde, nitrogen and argon, together with met...

  11. DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE FACILITIES INCLUDING NON-METALLIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mr. Herb Duvoisin

    2003-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    CyTerra has leveraged our unique, shallow buried plastic target detection technology developed under US Army contracts into deeper buried subsurface facilities and including nonmetallic pipe detection. This Final Report describes a portable, low-cost, real-time, and user-friendly subsurface plastic pipe detector (LULU- Low Cost Utility Location Unit) that relates to the goal of maintaining the integrity and reliability of the nation's natural gas transmission and distribution network by preventing third party damage, by detecting potential infringements. Except for frequency band and antenna size, the LULU unit is almost identical to those developed for the US Army. CyTerra designed, fabricated, and tested two frequency stepped GPR systems, spanning the frequencies of importance (200 to 1600 MHz), one low and one high frequency system. Data collection and testing was done at a variety of locations (selected for soil type variations) on both targets of opportunity and selected buried targets. We developed algorithms and signal processing techniques that provide for the automatic detection of the buried utility lines. The real time output produces a sound as the radar passes over the utility line alerting the operator to the presence of a buried object. Our unique, low noise/high performance RF hardware, combined with our field tested detection algorithms, represents an important advancement toward achieving the DOE potential infringement goal.

  12. Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Chesnut, Dwayne A. (San Francisco, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations.

  13. Stochastic and Deterministic Assembly Processes in Subsurface Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stegen, James C.; Lin, Xueju; Konopka, Allan; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A major goal of microbial community ecology is to understand the forces that structure community composition. Deterministic selection by specific environmental factors is sometimes important, but in other cases stochastic or ecologically neutral processes dominate. Lacking is a unified conceptual framework aiming to understand why deterministic processes dominate in some contexts but not others. Here we work towards such a framework. By testing predictions derived from general ecological theory we aim to uncover factors that govern the relative influences of deterministic and stochastic processes. We couple spatiotemporal data on subsurface microbial communities and environmental parameters with metrics and null models of within and between community phylogenetic composition. Testing for phylogenetic signal in organismal niches showed that more closely related taxa have more similar habitat associations. Community phylogenetic analyses further showed that ecologically similar taxa coexist to a greater degree than expected by chance. Environmental filtering thus deterministically governs subsurface microbial community composition. More importantly, the influence of deterministic environmental filtering relative to stochastic factors was maximized at both ends of an environmental variation gradient. A stronger role of stochastic factors was, however, supported through analyses of phylogenetic temporal turnover. While phylogenetic turnover was on average faster than expected, most pairwise comparisons were not themselves significantly non-random. The relative influence of deterministic environmental filtering over community dynamics was elevated, however, in the most temporally and spatially variable environments. Our results point to general rules governing the relative influences of stochastic and deterministic processes across micro- and macro-organisms.

  14. Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramirez, A.L.; Chesnut, D.A.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations. 1 fig.

  15. Sequestration of ethane in the cryovolcanic subsurface of Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Mousis; Bernard Schmitt

    2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Saturn's largest satellite, Titan, has a thick atmosphere dominated by nitrogen and methane. The dense orange-brown smog hiding the satellite's surface is produced by photochemical reactions of methane, nitrogen and their dissociation products with solar ultraviolet, which lead primarily to the formation of ethane and heavier hydrocarbons. In the years prior to the exploration of Titan's surface by the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft, the production and condensation of ethane was expected to have formed a satellite-wide ocean one kilometer in depth, assuming that it was generated over the Solar system's lifetime. However, Cassini-Huygens observations failed to find any evidence of such an ocean. Here we describe the main cause of the ethane deficiency on Titan: cryovolcanic lavas regularly cover its surface, leading to the percolation of the liquid hydrocarbons through this porous material and its accumulation in subsurface layers built up during successive methane outgassing events. The liquid stored in the pores may, combined with the ice layers, form a stable ethane-rich clathrate reservoir, potentially isolated from the surface. Even with a low open porosity of 10% for the subsurface layers, a cryovolcanic icy crust less than 2300 m thick is required to bury all the liquid hydrocarbons generated over the Solar system's lifetime.

  16. Surface and Subsurface Geochemical Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Surface and Subsurface Geochemical Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil C. Magnier1, V Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil -- This paper presents a surface and subsurface geochemical survey of the Buracica EOR-CO2 field onshore Brazil. We adopted a methodology coupling the stable

  17. Sulfur Cycling in the Terrestrial Subsurface: Commensal Interactions, Spatial Scales, and Microbial Heterogeneity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Ethan L.

    Sulfur Cycling in the Terrestrial Subsurface: Commensal Interactions, Spatial Scales, and Microbial microbial processes in the terrestrial subsurface. Previous geochemical studies suggested that sulfide environment in shallow sediments (5 m), and produces acidic waters (pH 3.8) that are rich in sulfate (28 m

  18. High spatial resolution subsurface thermal emission microscopy S. B. Ippolito,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a total optical power proportional to its absolute temperature to the fourth power. An object that hasHigh spatial resolution subsurface thermal emission microscopy S. B. Ippolito,a) S. A. Thorne, M. G increasing lens technique to subsurface thermal emission microscopy of Si integrated circuits. We achieve

  19. Optimal Spacing in an Array of Fully Penetrating Ditches for Subsurface Drainage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chahar, B. R.

    Optimal Spacing in an Array of Fully Penetrating Ditches for Subsurface Drainage Bhagu R. Chahar1 courses, race courses, parks, and other amenities Chahar and Vadodaria 2008 . Subsurface drainage system 1995 . An extensive solu- tion has been obtained by Chahar and Vadodaria 2008 for drain- age from

  20. Analytical solutions to a hillslope-storage kinematic wave equation for subsurface flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loon, E. Emiel van

    Analytical solutions to a hillslope-storage kinematic wave equation for subsurface flow Peter Troch­617] to describe the bedrock slope, we derive more general solutions to the hillslope-storage kinematic wave reserved. Keywords: Hillslope hydrology; Subsurface flow; Kinematic wave approximation; Method

  1. SUBSURFACE DRIP IRRIGATION SYSTEMS FOR SPECIALTY CROP PRODUCTION IN NORTH DAKOTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steele, Dean D.

    SUBSURFACE DRIP IRRIGATION SYSTEMS FOR SPECIALTY CROP PRODUCTION IN NORTH DAKOTA D.D.Steele, R.G.Greenland, B. L. Gregor ABSTRACT. Subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) systems offer advantages over other types of irrigation systems for specialty crop production, including water savings, improved trafficability

  2. FACT (Version 2.0) - Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleman, S.E.

    2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media.

  3. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Jerry P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  4. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Jerry P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  5. Development of microwave and millimeter-wave integrated-circuit stepped-frequency radar sensors for surface and subsurface profiling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Joongsuk

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    ) for various surface and subsurface applications, such as profiling the surface and subsurface of pavements, detecting and localizing small buried Anti-Personnel (AP) mines and measuring the liquid level in a tank. These sensors meet the critical requirements...

  6. Ranging methods for developing wellbores in subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Duncan (Houston, TX)

    2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming two or more wellbores in a subsurface formation includes forming a first wellbore in the formation. A second wellbore is directionally drilled in a selected relationship relative to the first wellbore. At least one magnetic field is provided in the second wellbore using one or more magnets in the second wellbore located on a drilling string used to drill the second wellbore. At least one magnetic field is sensed in the first wellbore using at least two sensors in the first wellbore as the magnetic field passes by the at least two sensors while the second wellbore is being drilled. A position of the second wellbore is continuously assessed relative to the first wellbore using the sensed magnetic field. The direction of drilling of the second wellbore is adjusted so that the second wellbore remains in the selected relationship relative to the first wellbore.

  7. TITLE III EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE SUBSURFACE LIGHTING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.J. Fernandez

    1998-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this evaluation is to provide recommendations to ensure consistency between the technical baseline requirements, baseline design, and the as-constructed Subsurface Lighting System. Recommendations for resolving discrepancies between the as-constructed system, and the technical baseline requirements are included in this report. Cost and Schedule estimates are provided for all recommended modifications. This report does not address items which do not meet current safety or code requirements. These items are identified to the CMO and immediate action is taken to correct the situation. The report does identify safety and code items for which the A/E is recommending improvements. The recommended improvements will exceed the minimum requirements of applicable code and safety guide lines. These recommendations are intended to improve and enhance the operation and maintenance of the facility.

  8. Characterization of Microbial Communities in Subsurface Nuclear Blast Cavities of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, Duane; Russell, Chuck; Marshall, Matthew; Czerwinski, Ken; Daly, Michael J; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This exploratory research project is designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the possible existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations in Nevada Test Site (NTS) subsurface nuclear blast cavities. Although subsurface microbiological studies have been performed at the NTS in the past, radioactive zones have yet to be addressed. Nuclear blast zone microbiology is a completely new field and our team is well-positioned to collect and analyze samples that have never before been available to microbiologists. Relevant samples are now being obtained by incorporating microbiological collections into an ongoing annual hot well sampling program being conducted by other agencies. A combination of cultivation-based and molecular microbial detection protocols is being utilized at multiple locations to survey for uncultivable microorganisms and to develop a culture collection which will be characterized for radionuclide- and metal-reduction capabilities. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, a positive outcome from this work would have significant implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites. A primary objective of the project has been the establishment of the regulatory and technical framework necessary to enable our acquisition of samples. Thus, much of our activity in the first phase of this work has involved the development an approved Field Area Work Plan (FAWP), Radiological Work Permit (RWP), and other documentation required for radiological work at the NTS. We have also invested significant time into ensuring that all personnel possess the required training (e.g. Radworker II and 40 hr. HAZWOPER) for access to the hot well sampling sites. Laboratory facilities, required for field processing of radioactive samples as well as DNA extraction and other manipulations, have been secured both the NTS (Mercury, NV) and UNLV. Although our year-1 field work was delayed due to non-availability of samples, an aggressive sampling campaign is now underway and our first hot well samples were collected on Feb 5th, 2008. The unique nature of this site, coupled with the combined expertise of the collaborating laboratories (DRI, LLNL, PNNL, and the Harry Reid Center) makes the likelihood of our achieving discoveries of value to DOE, the individual researchers, and society high. As the selective pressures at atomic blast sites are probably different from those of production and disposal sites, these habitats may contain novel organisms of utility for bioremediation. Such organisms will have had to develop physiological mechanisms to survive high doses of ionizing radiation over the variety of rock types and hydrologic environments present at the NTS.

  9. Molten salt as a heat transfer fluid for heating a subsurface formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in an opening in the subsurface formation. An insulated conductor is located in the conduit. A material is in the conduit between a portion of the insulated conductor and a portion of the conduit. The material may be a salt. The material is a fluid at operating temperature of the heating system. Heat transfers from the insulated conductor to the fluid, from the fluid to the conduit, and from the conduit to the subsurface formation.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water content in the subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Hendricks; T. Yao; A. Kearns

    1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous theoretical and experimental studies indicated that surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has the potential to provide cost-effective water content measurements in the subsurface and is a technology ripe for exploitation in practice. The objectives of this investigation are (a) to test the technique under a wide range of hydrogeological conditions and (b) to generalize existing NMR theories in order to correctly model NMR response from conductive ground and to assess properties of the inverse problem. Twenty-four sites with different hydrogeologic settings were selected in New Mexico and Colorado for testing. The greatest limitation of surface NMR technology appears to be the lack of understanding in which manner the NMR signal is influenced by soil-water factors such as pore size distribution, surface-to-volume ratio, paramagnetic ions dissolved in the ground water, and the presence of ferromagnetic minerals. Although the theoretical basis is found to be sound, several advances need to be made to make surface NMR a viable technology for hydrological investigations. There is a research need to investigate, under controlled laboratory conditions, how the complex factors of soil-water systems affect NMR relaxation times.

  11. A high-performance workflow system for subsurface simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Xingyuan; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Freshley, Mark D.; Gorton, Ian; Gosink, Luke J.; Keating, Elizabeth; Lansing, Carina; Moeglein, William AM; Murray, Christopher J.; Pau, George Shu Heng; Porter, Ellen A.; Purohit, Sumit; Rockhold, Mark L.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Vesselinov, Velimir V.; Waichler, Scott R.

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface modeling applications typically neglect uncertainty in the conceptual models, past or future scenarios, and attribute most or all uncertainty to errors in model parameters. In this contribution, uncertainty in technetium-99 transport in a heterogeneous, deep vadose zone is explored with respect to the conceptual model using a next generation user environment called Akuna. Akuna provides a range of tools to manage environmental modeling projects, from managing simulation data to visualizing results from high-performance computational simulators. Core toolsets accessible through the user interface include model setup, grid generation, parameter estimation, and uncertainty quantification. The BC Cribs site at Hanford in southeastern Washington State is used to demonstrate Akuna capabilities. At the BC Cribs site, conceptualization of the system is highly uncertain because only sparse information is available for the geologic conceptual model, the physical and chemical properties of the sediments, and the history of waste disposal operations. Using the Akuna toolset to perform an analysis of conservative solute transport, significant prediction uncertainty in simulated concentrations is demonstrated by conceptual model variation. This demonstrates that conceptual model uncertainty is an important consideration in sparse data environments such as BC Cribs. It is also demonstrated that Akuna and the underlying toolset provides an integrated modeling environment that streamlines model setup, parameter optimization, and uncertainty analyses for high-performance computing applications.

  12. Stability of natural gas in the deep subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, C.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas is becoming increasingly important as a fuel because of its widespread occurrence and because it has a less significant environmental impact than oil. Many of the known gas accumulations were discovered by accident during exploration for oil, but with increasing demand for gas, successful exploration will require a clearer understanding of the factors that control gas distribution and gas composition. Natural gas is generated by three main processes. In oxygen-deficient, sulfate-free, shallow (few thousand feet) environments bacteria generate biogenic gas that is essentially pure methane with no higher hydrocarbons ({open_quotes}dry gas{close_quotes}). Gas is also formed from organic matter ({open_quotes}kerogen{close_quotes}), either as the initial product from the thermal breakdown of Type III, woody kerogens, or as the final hydrocarbon product from all kerogen types. In addition, gas can be formed by the thermal cracking of crude oil in the deep subsurface. The generation of gas from kerogen requires higher temperatures than the generation of oil. Also, the cracking of oil to gas requires high temperatures, so that there is a general trend from oil to gas with increasing depth. This produces a well-defined {open_quotes}floor for oil{close_quotes}, below which crude oil is not thermally stable. The possibility of a {open_quotes}floor for gas{close_quotes} is less well documented and understanding the limits on natural gas occurrence was one of the main objectives of this research.

  13. The effect of subsurface temperature variability on the predictability of SST in the tropical Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Susan Carr

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were used in experiment 3. All variations reveal the same results; SST predictions are improved with the addition of subsurface variability in the equatorial region at longer lead times, while the north tropical and western regions show little...

  14. Effects of droplet size on intrusion of sub-surface oil spills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Godine Kok Yan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the effects of droplet size on droplet intrusion in sub-surface oil spills. Laboratory experiments were performed where glass beads of various sizes, which serve to simulate oil droplets in deepsea oil ...

  15. Full wavefield inversion methods for monitoring time-lapse subsurface velocity changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Di, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative measurements of seismic velocity changes from time-lapse seismic experiments provide dynamic information about the subsurface that improves the understanding of the geology and reservoir properties. In this ...

  16. Exploring the Earth’s subsurface with virtual seismic sources and receivers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolson, Heather Johan

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional methods of imaging the Earth’s subsurface using seismic waves require an identifiable, impulsive source of seismic energy, for example an earthquake or explosive source. Naturally occurring, ambient seismic waves form an ever...

  17. Design and implementation of a new low-cost subsurface mooring system for efficient data recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun; Tian, Jiwei; Zhao, Wei; Song, Dalei; Xu, Ming; Xu, Xiaoyang; Lu, Jun

    2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Mooring systems are the most effective method for making sustained time series observations in the oceans. Generally there are two types of ocean mooring systems: surface and subsurface. Subsurface mooring system is less likely to be damaged after deployment than surface system. However, subsurface system usually needs to be retrieved from the ocean for data recovery. This paper describes the design and implementation of a new low-cost subsurface mooring system for efficient data recovery: Timed Communication Buoy System (TCBS). TCBS is usually integrated in the main float and the designated data is downloaded from the control system. After data retrieval, TCBS will separate from main float, rise up to the sea surface, and transmit data by satellite communication.

  18. Stochastic analysis of dense nonaqueous phase liquid dissolution in naturally heterogeneous subsurface systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Xin, 1973-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field-scale Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) dissolution in three-dimensional heterogeneous subsurface systems is investigated using a stochastic approach that treats the variability of flow properties as three-dimensional ...

  19. Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone Contamination at Hanford Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – Cold War waste disposal practices resulted in both planned and unplanned releases of large amounts of radionuclide and heavy metal contamination into the subsurface throughout the DOE complex.

  20. Geophysical characterization of the effects of fractures and stress on subsurface reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Xinding, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of fractures on reservoir characterization and subsurface rock property measurements using seismic data. Based on the scale of a fracture relative to seismic wavelength, we divide the dissertation into ...

  1. Calculation Notes for Subsurface Leak Resulting in Pool, TWRS FSAR Accident Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, B.W.

    1996-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This document includes the calculations performed to quantify the risk associated with the unmitigated and mitigated accident scenarios described in the TWRS FSAR for the accident analysis titled: Subsurface Leaks Resulting in Pool.

  2. Wastewater treatment and flow patterns in an onsite subsurface flow constructed wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stecher, Matthew C

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common as a secondary treatment of onsite domestic wastewater. Even though SFCWs are being used widely, sufficient data has not been collected to determine how parameters...

  3. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, February 2011 to January 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, P.E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHARACTERIZATION OF U CONTAMINATION AND SOLID PHASE MINERALOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY IN THE RIFLE SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS. Geological

  4. Thickness estimation of subsurface layers in asphalt pavement using monstatic ground penetrating radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Chun Lok

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THICKNESS ESTIMATION OF SUBSURFACE LAYERS IN ASPHALT PAVEMENT USING MONSTATIC GROUND PENETRATING RADAR A Thesis CHUN LOK LAU Approved as to style and content by... ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS. LIST OF FIGURES. . CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION. 1. 1 Importance of pavement profile data. 1. 2 Principle of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) . . . 1. 3 Subsurface layer thickness measurement method. . . . . . II GPR ANTENNA AND SYSTEM CALIBRATION...

  5. Final Report: A Model Management System for Numerical Simulations of Subsurface Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachmann, David

    2013-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE and several other Federal agencies have committed significant resources to support the development of a large number of mathematical models for studying subsurface science problems such as groundwater flow, fate of contaminants and carbon sequestration, to mention only a few. This project provides new tools to help decision makers and stakeholders in subsurface science related problems to select an appropriate set of simulation models for a given field application.

  6. Review of Geophysical Techniques to Define the Spatial Distribution of Subsurface Properties or Contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Truex, Michael J.

    2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a letter report to Fluor Hanford, Inc. The purpose of this report is to summarize state-of-the-art, minimally intrusive geophysical techniques that can be used to clarify subsurface geology, structure, moisture, and chemical composition. The technology review focused on geophysical characterization techniques that provide two- or three-dimensional information about the spatial distribution of subsurface properties and/or contaminants.

  7. Sub-surface dissolution of evaporites in the Eastern Mediterranean sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camerlenghi, Angelo Alessandro

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SUB-SURFACE DISSOLUTION OF EVAPORITES IN THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA A Thesis by ANGELO ALESSANDRO CAMERLENGHI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Oceanography SUB-SURFACE DISSOLUTION OF EVAPORITES IN THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA A Thesis by ANGELO ALESSANDRO CAMERLENGHI Approved as to style and content by: Pl&DWa~rg~~~ William R. Bryair...

  8. Biogeochemical Processes In Ethanol Stimulated Uranium Contaminated Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanty, Santosh R.; Kollah, Bharati; Hedrick, David B.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Roden, Eric E.

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted with uranium contaminated subsurface sediment to assess the geochemical and microbial community response to ethanol amendment. A classical sequence of TEAPs was observed in ethanol-amended slurries, with NO3- reduction, Fe(III) reduction, SO4 2- reduction, and CH4 production proceeding in sequence until all of the added 13C-ethanol (9 mM) was consumed. Approximately 60% of the U(VI) content of the sediment was reduced during the period of Fe(III) reduction. No additional U(VI) reduction took place during the sulfate-reducing and methanogenic phases of the experiment. Only gradual reduction of NO3 -, and no reduction of U(VI), took place in ethanol-free slurries. Stimulation of additional Fe(III) or SO4 2- reduction in the ethanol-amended slurries failed to promote further U(VI) reduction. Reverse transcribed 16S rRNA clone libraries revealed major increases in the abundance of organisms related to Dechloromonas, Geobacter, and Oxalobacter in the ethanolamended slurries. PLFAs indicative of Geobacter showed a distinct increase in the amended slurries, and analysis of PLFA 13C/12C ratios confirmed the incorporation of ethanol into these PLFAs. A increase in the abundance of 13C-labeled PLFAs indicative of Desulfobacter, Desulfotomaculum, and Desulfovibrio took place during the brief period of sulfate reduction which followed the Fe(III) reduction phase. Our results show that major redox processes in ethanol-amended sediments can be reliably interpreted in terms of standard conceptual models of TEAPs in sediments. However, the redox speciation of uranium is complex and cannot be explained based on simplified thermodynamic considerations.

  9. ACID GASES IN CO2-RICH SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chialvo, Ariel A [ORNL] [ORNL; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL] [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University] [Ohio State University

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of species behavior involving dilute fluid environments has been crucial for the advance of modern solvation thermodynamics through molecular-based formalisms to guide the development of macroscopic regression tools in the description of fluid behavior and correlation of experimental data (Chialvo 2013). Dilute fluid environments involving geologic formations are of great theoretical and practical relevance regardless of the thermodynamic state conditions. The most challenging systems are those involving highly compressible and reactive confined environments, i.e., where small perturbations of pressure and/or temperature can trigger considerable density changes. This in turn can alter significantly the species solvation, their preferential solvation, and consequently, their reactivity with one another and with the surrounding mineral surfaces whose outcome is the modification of the substrate porosity and permeability, and ultimately, the integrity of the mineral substrates. Considering that changes in porosity and permeability resulting from dissolution and precipitation phenomena in confined environments are at the core of the aqueous CO2-mineral interactions, and that caprock integrity (e.g., sealing capacity) depends on these key parameters, it is imperative to gain fundamental understanding of the mineral-fluid interfacial phenomena and fluid-fluid equilibria under mineral confinement at subsurface conditions. In order to undertand the potential effects of acid gases as contaminants of supercritical CO2 streams, in the next section we will discuss the thermodynamic behavior of CO2 fluid systems by addressing two crucial issues in the context of carbon capture, utilization and sequestration (CCUS) technologies: (i) Why should we consider (acid gas) CO2 impurities? and (ii) Why are CO2 fluid - mineral interactions of paramount relevance?

  10. New barrier fluids for subsurface containment of contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G.J.; Persoff, P.; Holman, H.Y.; Muller, S.J.; Pruess, K.; Radke, C.J.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In some situations, containment of contaminants in the subsurface may be preferable to removal or treatment in situ. In these cases, it maybe possible to form barriers by injecting fluids (grouts) that set in place and reduce the formation permeability. This paper reports laboratory work to develop two types of fluids for this application: colloidal silica (CS) and polysiloxane (PSX). Falling-head permeameter tests of grouted Hanford sand, lasting 50 days, showed hydraulic conductivities of order 10{sup -7} cm/sec for these two materials. Low initial viscosity of the grout is necessary to permit injection without causing fracturing or surface uplift. Experiments with crosslinked polysiloxanes showed that they could be diluted to achieve adequately low viscosity without losing their ability to cure. Control of the gel time is important for grout emplacement. Gel time of CS grouts increased with increasing pH (above 6.5) and with decreasing ionic strength. Salt solutions were added to the colloid-to increase the ionic strength and control gel time. When injected into Hanford sand, the CS grout gelled much more quickly than the same formula without sand. This effect results from salinity that is present in pore water and from multi-valent ions that are desorbed from clays and ion-exchanged for mono-valent ions in the grout. Ion-exchange experiments showed that most of the multi-valent ions could be removed-by flushing the sand with 15 PV of 4% NaCl and sand treated in this manner did not accelerate the gelling of the grout. When grout is injected into unsaturated soil it slumps, leaving the soil only partially saturated and achieving less permeability reduction upon gelling. Multiple injections of CS grout in 1-D sand columns demonstrated that by accumulating the residual gelled grout saturations from several injections, low permeability can be achieved.

  11. Technical considerations for the implementation of subsurface microbial barriers for restoration of groundwater at UMTRA sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, M.D.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action (UMTRA) Program is responsible for the assessment and remedial action at the 24 former uranium mill tailings sites located in the United States. The surface remediation phase, which has primarily focused on containment and stabilization of the abandoned uranium mill tailings piles, is nearing completion. Attention has now turned to the groundwater restoration phase. One alternative under consideration for groundwater restoration at UMTRA sites is the use of in-situ permeable reactive subsurface barriers. In this type of a system, contaminated groundwater will be allowed to flow naturally through a barrier filled with material which will remove hazardous constituents from the water by physical, chemical or microbial processes while allowing passage of the pore water. The subject of this report is a reactive barrier which would remove uranium and other contaminants of concern from groundwater by microbial action (i.e., a microbial barrier). The purpose of this report is to assess the current state of this technology and to determine issues that must be addressed in order to use this technology at UMTRA sites. The report focuses on six contaminants of concern at UMTRA sites including uranium, arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, cadmium and chromium. In the first section of this report, the fundamental chemical and biological processes that must occur in a microbial barrier to control the migration of contaminants are described. The second section contains a literature review of research which has been conducted on the use of microorganisms to immobilize heavy metals. The third section addresses areas which need further development before a microbial barrier can be implemented at an UMTRA site.

  12. Heat flow and subsurface temperature distributions in central and western New York. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, D.S.; Fromm, K.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initiation of a geothermal energy program in western and central New York requires knowledge of subsurface temperatures for targeting areas of potential resources. The temperature distribution in possible geothermal reservoirs, calculated from heat flow measurements and modeling techniques, shows that a large area of New York can be considered for exploitation of geothermal resources. Though the temperatures at currently accessible depths show the availability of only a low-temperature (less than 100/sup 0/C), direct-use resource, this can be considered as an alternative for the future energy needs of New York State. From analysis of bottom-hole-temperature data and direct heat flow measurements, estimates of temperatures in the Cambrian Sandstones provide the basis of the economic evaluation of the reservoir. This reservoir contains the extractable fluids needed for targeting a potential geothermal well site in the low-temperature geothermal target zone. In the northern section of the Appalachian basin, reservoir temperatures in the Cambrian are below 50/sup 0/C but may be over 80/sup 0/C in the deeper parts of the basin in southern New York State. Using a minimum of 50/sup 0/C as a useful reservoir temperature, temperatures in excess of this value are encountered in the Theresa Formation at depths in excess of 1300 meters. Considering a maximum depth for economical drilling to be 2500 meters with present technology, the 2500 meters to the Theresa (sea level datum) forms the lower limit of the geothermal resource. Temperatures in the range of 70/sup 0/C to 80/sup 0/C are predicted for the southern portion of New York State.

  13. GRADUATE PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SELF STUDY GRADUATE PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE COLLEGE OF LIBERALARTS TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY March 2007 #12;SELF STUDY GRADUATE PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT........................................................................................ 4 Brief History of Degree Programs and the Department

  14. Optical method and apparatus for detection of surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellingson, W.A.; Brada, M.P.

    1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser is used in a non-destructive manner to detect surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics and particularly in ceramic bodies with complex shapes such as ceramic bearings, turbine blades, races, and the like. The laser`s wavelength is selected based upon the composition of the ceramic sample and the laser can be directed on the sample while the sample is static or in dynamic rotate or translate motion. Light is scattered off surface and subsurface defects using a preselected polarization. The change in polarization angle is used to select the depth and characteristics of surface/subsurface defects. The scattered light is detected by an optical train consisting of a charge coupled device (CCD), or vidicon, television camera which, in turn, is coupled to a video monitor and a computer for digitizing the image. An analyzing polarizer in the optical train allows scattered light at a given polarization angle to be observed for enhancing sensitivity to either surface or near-subsurface defects. Application of digital image processing allows subtraction of digitized images in near real-time providing enhanced sensitivity to subsurface defects. Storing known ``feature masks`` of identified defects in the computer and comparing the detected scatter pattern (Fourier images) with the stored feature masks allows for automatic classification of detected defects. 29 figs.

  15. Optical method and apparatus for detection of surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellingson, William A. (Naperville, IL); Brada, Mark P. (Goleta, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser is used in a non-destructive manner to detect surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics and particularly in ceramic bodies with complex shapes such as ceramic bearings, turbine blades, races, and the like. The laser's wavelength is selected based upon the composition of the ceramic sample and the laser can be directed on the sample while the sample is static or in dynamic rotate or translate motion. Light is scattered off surface and subsurface defects using a preselected polarization. The change in polarization angle is used to select the depth and characteristics of surface/subsurface defects. The scattered light is detected by an optical train consisting of a charge coupled device (CCD), or vidicon, television camera which, in turn, is coupled to a video monitor and a computer for digitizing the image. An analyzing polarizer in the optical train allows scattered light at a given polarization angle to be observed for enhancing sensitivity to either surface or near-subsurface defects. Application of digital image processing allows subtraction of digitized images in near real-time providing enhanced sensitivity to subsurface defects. Storing known "feature masks" of identified defects in the computer and comparing the detected scatter pattern (Fourier images) with the stored feature masks allows for automatic classification of detected defects.

  16. Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramirez, A.L.; Cooper, J.F.; Daily, W.D.

    1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination. 1 fig.

  17. Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination.

  18. Advances in quantitative nanoscale subsurface imaging by mode-synthesizing atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitry, P.; Bourillot, E.; Plassard, C.; Lacroute, Y.; Lesniewska, E. [ICB, UMR CNRS 6303 CNRS-University of Bourgogne, Dijon F-21078 (France); Tetard, L. [Nanoscience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826 (United States)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on advances toward quantitative non-destructive nanoscale subsurface investigation of a nanofabricated sample based on mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy with heterodyne detection, addressing the need to correlate the role of actuation frequencies of the probe f{sub p} and the sample f{sub s} with depth resolution for 3D tomography reconstruction. Here, by developing a simple model and validating the approach experimentally through the study of the nanofabricated calibration depth samples consisting of buried metallic patterns, we demonstrate avenues for quantitative nanoscale subsurface imaging. Our findings enable the reconstruction of the sample depth profile and allow high fidelity resolution of the buried nanostructures. Non-destructive quantitative nanoscale subsurface imaging offers great promise in the study of the structures and properties of complex systems at the nanoscale.

  19. Surface and subsurface characterization of uranium contamination at the Fernald environmental management site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schilk, A.J.; Perkins, R.W.; Abel, K.H.; Brodzinski, R.L.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The past operations of uranium production and support facilities at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites have occasionally resulted in the local contamination of some surface and subsurface soils, and the three-dimensional distribution of the uranium at these sites must be thoroughly characterized before any effective remedial protocols can be established. To this end, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked by the DOE`s Office of Technology Development with adapting, developing, and demonstrating technologies for the measurement of uranium in surface and subsurface soils at the Fernald Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration site. These studies are detailed in this report.

  20. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: One-dimensional soil thaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

    Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport Freezing and thawing a b s t r a c t Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have of powerful simulators of cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport have emerged in recent years

  1. Revisiting the Foundations of Subsurface Scattering Gladimir V. G. Baranoski Aravind Krishnaswamy Bradley Kimmel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterloo, University of

    images. For applications in several areas (e.g., entertainment and games industries) believable images. Our investigation is supported by comparisons involving the original measured data that motivated the application of phase functions in tissue subsurface scattering simulations. We hope that the results of our

  2. Feasibility study of tank leakage mitigation using subsurface barriers. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treat, R.L.; Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J. [Enserch Environmental, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reflects the evaluations and analyses performed in response to Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07A - {open_quotes}Complete Evaluation of Subsurface Barrier Feasibility{close_quotes} (September 1994). In addition, this feasibility study was revised reflecting ongoing work supporting a pending decision by the DOE Richland Operations Office, the Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency regarding further development of subsurface barrier options for SSTs and whether to proceed with demonstration plans at the Hanford Site (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07B). Analyses of 14 integrated SST tank farm remediation alternatives were conducted in response to the three stated objectives of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07A. The alternatives include eight with subsurface barriers and six without. Technologies used in the alternatives include three types of tank waste retrieval, seven types of subsurface barriers, a method of stabilizing the void space of emptied tanks, two types of in situ soil flushing, one type of surface barrier, and a clean-closure method. A no-action alternative and a surface-barrier-only alternative were included as nonviable alternatives for comparison. All other alternatives were designed to result in closure of SST tank farms as landfills or in clean-closure. Revision 1 incorporates additional analyses of worker safety, large leak scenarios, and sensitivity to the leach rates of risk controlling constituents. The additional analyses were conducted to support TPA Milestone M-45-07B.

  3. Subsurface and Atmospheric Influences on Solar Activity ASP Conference Series, Vol. 383, c 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Yong

    hemisphere with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope on 26 August 2003. The upper panel shows the filament spineSubsurface and Atmospheric Influences on Solar Activity ASP Conference Series, Vol. 383, c 2008 R and their Interrelation Y. Lin,1 S. F. Martin,2 and O. Engvold1 Abstract. The main structural components of solar

  4. SOURCE SEPARATION TECHNIQUES APPLIED TO THE DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE DEFECTS IN THE EDDY CURRENT NDT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SOURCE SEPARATION TECHNIQUES APPLIED TO THE DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE DEFECTS IN THE EDDY CURRENT NDT component analysis, to process the data from the eddy current inspection of riveted lap joints. An eddy methods are proposed for processing such eddy current data by means of both the considered source

  5. Multicomponent seismic data registration for subsurface characterization in the shallow Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Gulf of Mexico Sergey Fomel, Milo M. Backus, Michael V. DeAngelo, Paul E. Murray, Bob A. Hardage with application to subsurface characterization in the shallow Gulf of Mexico. In this study, we extend-S images. Application of this technique to data from the Gulf of Mexico reveals the structure of sediments

  6. Subsurface and Atmospheric Influences on Solar Activity ASP Conference Series, Vol. 383, c 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Subsurface and Atmospheric Influences on Solar Activity ASP Conference Series, Vol. 383, c 2008 R descriptions of the ambient coronal magnetic field struc- ture and the associated solar wind streams thanks twist, cur- rent sheets, and other unstable or energized configurations in the active region vicinity. 1

  7. Recent developments in model-based optimization and control of subsurface flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    ; identifiability; model reduction. 1. INTRODUCTION The production of oil and gas from petroleum reservoirs the pores of subsurface rock lay- ers. The production life of a petroleum reservoir generally lasts a number configurations and production strategies, but an emerging use is in the 'real-time' optimization and control

  8. Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

    1984-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

  9. TOPOGRAPHY OF TITAN'S ARCTIC LAKE DISTRICT: IMPLICATIONS FOR SUBSURFACE LIQUID ALKANE FLOW. K. L. Mitchell1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TOPOGRAPHY OF TITAN'S ARCTIC LAKE DISTRICT: IMPLICATIONS FOR SUBSURFACE LIQUID ALKANE FLOW. K. L Monopulse Amplitude Comparison method [3]. This technique estimates surface heights by comparing of good radar return where topography varies within the measurement width, and insufficient in areas

  10. SOLAR SUB-SURFACE FLUID DYNAMICS DESCRIPTORS DERIVED FROM GONG AND MDI DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbard, Thierry

    SOLAR SUB-SURFACE FLUID DYNAMICS DESCRIPTORS DERIVED FROM GONG AND MDI DATA R. Komm National Solar Observatory 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 komm@noao.edu ABSTRACT We analyze GONG and MDI observations closer to the surface. GONG and MDI data show the same results. Di#11;erences occur mainly at high

  11. Device and nondestructive method to determine subsurface micro-structure in dense materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sun, Jiangang (Westmont, IL)

    2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and a device to detect subsurface three-dimensional micro-structure in a sample by illuminating the sample with light of a given polarization and detecting light emanating from the sample that has a different direction of polarization by means of a confocal optical system.

  12. Atomic-Scale Chemical, Physical and Electronic Properties of the Subsurface Hydride of Palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, Paul

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We employed low-temperature, extreme-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to investigate the roles of subsurface hydride (H) and deuteride (D) in the surface reconstruction and surface reactivity of Pd{110}. Specifically, we gained the ability to tailor the surface structure of Pd{110} both by preparation method and by deposition of deuterium from the gas phase. We observed thiophene at low coverage on Pd{110} to determine its adsorption orientation and electronic structure through scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) – namely, conductance spectroscopy and differential conductance imaging. We developed the methods necessary to coadsorb D adatoms with thiophene molecules, and to induce the reaction of individual molecules with predefined subsurface H or D features. In the case of Pd{110}, we found a much more pronounced effect from subsurface D, as it is influenced by the surface directionality. These experiments facilitate an understanding of the role of surface and subsurface H and D in heterogeneous catalytic processes, specifically in the hydrodesulfuization (HDS) of thiophene, an important and ubiquitous component found to be detrimental to petroleum refining.

  13. Diversity of Life at the Geothermal Subsurface--Surface Interface: The Yellowstone Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be the primary energy source for life in this geothermal sys- tem, the main organisms identified by phylotype energy source that drives primary productivity in this and potentially other geothermal ecosystemsDiversity of Life at the Geothermal Subsurface--Surface Interface: The Yellowstone Example

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Injection in the Subsurface for Improved Hydrocarbon Recovery and Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Mathematical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Injection in the Subsurface for Improved Hydrocarbon Recovery and Sequestration Philip C. Myint, Laurence Rongy, Kjetil B. Haugen, Abbas Firoozabadi Department. Combustion of fossil fuels contributes to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels that have been

  15. Relationship Between Soil Moisture Storage and Deep Percolation and Subsurface Return Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nieber, J. L.

    . The one-dimensional form of the Richards equation was used for the percolation process and the two-dimensional form of the Richards equation was used for the subsurface return flow process. In each case the Richards equation was transformed to a set...

  16. TRACER AND DARCY-BASED IDENTIFICATION OF SUBSURFACE FLOW, BUKIT TIMAH FOREST,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Nick A

    that catchment or even slope scale simulation using parameters of the Darcy-Buckingham-Richards equation, the validity of the Richards equation (or the Darcy- Buckingham equation in its steady-state form) at slopeTRACER AND DARCY-BASED IDENTIFICATION OF SUBSURFACE FLOW, BUKIT TIMAH FOREST, SINGAPORE M

  17. Background: Subsurface Water Retention Technology (SWRT) Durable and easy to install: Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Background: Subsurface Water Retention Technology (SWRT) Benefits Durable and easy to install: Water retaining membranes can last at least 40 years and can be installed quickly and costeffectively permeable marginal soils converting them to much higher production levels of food crops. Better water

  18. Simulating heat transport of harmonic temperature signals in the Earth's shallow subsurface: Lower-boundary sensitivities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smerdon, Jason E.

    Simulating heat transport of harmonic temperature signals in the Earth's shallow subsurface: Lower changes, freeze-thaw cycles, and hydrologic dynamics. It is uncertain, however, whether the reported atmospheric simulations. Citation: Smerdon, J. E., and M. Stieglitz (2006), Simulating heat transport

  19. Category: Subsurface Hydrology Theoretical prediction of poroelastic properties of argillaceous rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    have to be measured with accuracy. Index terms: Physical properties of rocks: 5199 GeneralCategory: Subsurface Hydrology Theoretical prediction of poroelastic properties of argillaceous rocks from in situ specific storage coefficient Ph. Cosenza1 '2 , M. Ghoreychi3 , G. de Marsily \\ G

  20. Author's personal copy Model-based control of multiphase flow in subsurface oil reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    wells. However, even when using such secondary recovery tech- niques, most of the oil remains trapped t An emerging method to increase the recovery of oil from subsurface reservoirs is the application of mea this primary recovery phase ends, and it will be necessary to inject water or gas into the reservoir

  1. IMPROVED UNDERSTANDING OF SUBSURFACE HYDROLOGY IN VARIABLE SOURCE AREAS AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    and nutrient transport from a greater distance has to be considered in water management during events with wet and subsurface runoff generation and chemical transport and how these processes can be captured in ungaged basins was instrumented (trenched) in the southern tier of New York, U.S. Water flux from different soil layers

  2. NEPTUNIUM IV AND V SORPTIN TO END-MEMBER SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS TO THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.

    2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Migration of Np through the subsurface is expected to be primarily controlled by sorption to sediments. Therefore, understanding and quantifying Np sorption to sediments and sediments from the Savannah River Site (SRS) is vital to ensure safe disposal of Np bearing wastes. In this work, Np sorption to two sediments representing the geological extremes with respect to sorption properties expected in the SRS subsurface environment (named 'subsurface sandy sediment' and 'subsurface clayey sediment') was examined under a variety of conditions. First a series of baseline sorption tests at pH 5.5 under an oxic atmosphere was performed to understand Np sorption under typical subsurface conditions. These experiments indicated that the baseline K{sub d} values for the subsurface sandy and subsurface clayey sediments are 4.26 {+-} 0.24 L kg{sup -1} and 9.05 {+-} 0.61 L kg{sup -1}, respectively. These Np K{sub d} values of SRS sediments are the first to be reported since Sheppard et al. (1979). The previous values were 0.25 and 0.16 L kg{sup -1} for a low pH sandy sediment. To examine a possible range of K{sub d} values under various environmental scenarios, the effects of natural organic matter (NOM, also a surrogate for cellulose degradation products), the presence of various chemical reductants, and an anaerobic atmosphere on Np sorption were examined. The presence of NOM resulted in an increase in the Np K{sub d} values for both sediments. This behavior is hypothesized to be the result of formation of a ternary Np-NOM-sediment complex. Slight increases in the Np sorption (K{sub d} 13-24 L kg{sup -1}) were observed when performing experiments in the presence of chemical reductants (dithionite, ascorbic acid, zero-valent iron) or under anaerobic conditions. Presumably, the increased sorption can be attributed to a slight reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV), the stronger sorbing form of Np. The most significant result of this study is the finding that Np weakly sorbs to both end member sediments and that Np only has a slight tendency to reduce to its stronger sorbing form, even under the most strongly reducing conditions expected under natural SRS conditions. Also, it appears that pH has a profound effect on Np sorption. Based on the these new measurements and the revelations about Np redox chemistry, the following changes to 'Best K{sub d}' values, as defined in Kaplan (2006), for SRS performance assessment calculations are recommended.

  3. Determination of Importance Evaluation for Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Subsurface Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.J. Byrne

    2001-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas including the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. This evaluation applies specifically to site characterization testing activities ongoing and planned in the Subsurface ESF. ESF site characterization activities are being performed to obtain the information necessary to determine whether the Yucca Mountain Site is suitable as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. A more detailed description of these testing activities is provided in Section 6 of this DIE. Generally, the construction and operation of excavations associated with these testing activities are evaluated in the DIE for the Subsurface ESF (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and the DIE for the ESF ECRB Cross Drift (CRWMS M&O 2000a). The scope of this DIE also entails the proposed Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test at Busted Butte. Although, not a part of the TS Loop or ECRB Cross Drift, the associated testing activities are Subsurface testing activities. Busted Butte is located to the south south-east of the TS Loop and is outside the Conceptual Controlled Area Boundary (CCAB). These activities provide access to the Calico Hills (CH) geologic structure. In the case of Busted Butte, construction and operation of excavations are evaluated herein (since this activity was not previously evaluated in CRWMS M&O 1999a). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether Subsurface ESF testing, and associated activities, could potentially impact site characterization testing and/or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified in Section 13. The validity and veracity of the individual tests, including data collection, are the responsibility of the assigned Principal Investigator(s) (PIS) and are not evaluated in this DIE. This DIE focuses on integrating and compiling the evaluations of previous DIES which were prepared for various ESF subsurface testing activities, including the use of temporary items currently located or being developed for these testing activities, and to provide a bounding evaluation for potential future ESF subsurface testing activities that are sufficiently similar to the generic testing activities addressed herein. Subsurface testing activities items/facilities evaluated herein include: ongoing and planned testing in the TS Loop, alcoves, and niches, planned testing in the ECRB Starter Tunnel, borehole drilling and workover, and tracers, fluids, and materials (TFM) usage. Detailed identification of individual testing items/facilities and generic descriptions for subsurface-testing-related activities are provided in Section 6. The conclusions and requirements of this DIE conservatively bound the conclusions and requirements of previously approved DIES for the ESF subsurface testing activities addressed herein, based on conservative engineering judgment and on concurrence with this DIE (via a formal review process) by the originating and reviewing organizations of the previously approved evaluations. Hence, this DIE supersedes the following DIES listed in Table 1.1.

  4. Subsurface microbial community structure correlates with uranium redox phases during in situ field manipulation in a contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostka, Joel [Florida State University; Green, Stefan [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Criddle, Craig [Stanford University; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term field manipulation experiments investigating the effects of subsurface redox conditions on the fate and transport of soluble uranium(VI) were conducted over a 3 year period at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Center (OR-IFRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. In the highly contaminated source zone, introduction of ethanol to the subsurface stimulated native denitrifying, sulfate-reducing, iron-reducing and fermentative microorganisms and reduced U to below 0.03 mg/L. Subsequently, oxygen and nitrate were experimentally re-introduced into the subsurface to examine the potential for re-oxidation and re-mobilization of U(IV). Introduction of oxygen or nitrate caused changes in subsurface geochemistry and re-oxidation of U. After reoxidation, the subsurface experienced several months of starvation conditions before ethanol injection was restored to reduce the treatment zone. Subsurface microorganisms were characterized by community fingerprinting, targeted population analyses, and quantitative PCR of key functional groups in 50 samples taken during multiple phases of field manipulation. Statistical analysis confirmed the hypothesis that the microbial community would co-vary with the shifts in the subsurface geochemistry. The level of hydraulic connectivity of sampling wells to the injection well was readily tracked by microbial community analysis. We demonstrate quantitatively that specific populations, especially Desulfosporosinus, are heavily influenced by geochemical conditions and positively correlate with the immobilization of uranium. Following nitrate reoxidation, populations of Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate reducing organisms (Thiobacillus) showed an increase in relative abundance.

  5. Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Grover S.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin

    2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation & decommissioning (D&D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites.

  6. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES AFFECTING RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AND BIOIMMOBILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel E. Kostka; Lee Kerkhof; Kuk-Jeong Chin; Martin Keller; Joseph W. Stucki

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project were to: (1) isolate and characterize novel anaerobic prokaryotes from subsurface environments exposed to high levels of mixed contaminants (U(VI), nitrate, sulfate), (2) elucidate the diversity and distribution of metabolically active metal- and nitrate-reducing prokaryotes in subsurface sediments, and (3) determine the biotic and abiotic mechanisms linking electron transport processes (nitrate, Fe(III), and sulfate reduction) to radionuclide reduction and immobilization. Mechanisms of electron transport and U(VI) transformation were examined under near in situ conditions in sediment microcosms and in field investigations at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination predominated by uranium and nitrate. A total of 20 publications (16 published or 'in press' and 4 in review), 10 invited talks, and 43 contributed seminars/ meeting presentations were completed during the past four years of the project. PI Kostka served on one proposal review panel each year for the U.S. DOE Office of Science during the four year project period. The PI leveraged funds from the state of Florida to purchase new instrumentation that aided the project. Support was also leveraged by the PI from the Joint Genome Institute in the form of two successful proposals for genome sequencing. Draft genomes are now available for two novel species isolated during our studies and 5 more genomes are in the pipeline. We effectively addressed each of the three project objectives and research highlights are provided. Task I - Isolation and characterization of novel anaerobes: (1) A wide range of pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and denitrifying bacteria (32 strains) were isolated from subsurface sediments of the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination of uranium and nitrate. These isolates which are new to science all show high sequence identity to sequences retrieved from ORFRC subsurface. (2) Based on physiological and phylogenetic characterization, two new species of subsurface bacteria were described: the metal-reducer Geobacter daltonii, and the denitrifier Rhodanobacter denitrificans. (3) Strains isolated from the ORFRC show that Rhodanobacter species are well adapted to the contaminated subsurface. Strains 2APBS1 and 116-2 grow at high salt (3% NaCl), low pH (3.5) and tolerate high concentrations of nitrate (400mM) and nitrite (100mM). Strain 2APBS1 was demonstrated to grow at in situ acidic pHs down to 2.5. (4) R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 is the first described Rhodanobacter species shown to denitrify. Nitrate is almost entirely converted to N2O, which may account for the large accumulation of N2O in the ORFRC subsurface. (5) G. daltonii, isolated from uranium- and hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface sediments of the ORFRC, is the first organism from the subsurface clade of the genus Geobacter that is capable of growth on aromatic hydrocarbons. (6) High quality draft genome sequences and a complete eco-physiological description are completed for R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and G. daltonii strain FRC-32. (7) Given their demonstrated relevance to DOE remediation efforts and the availability of detailed genotypic/phenotypic characterization, Rhodanobacter denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and Geobacter daltonii strain FRC-32 represent ideal model organisms to provide a predictive understanding of subsurface microbial activity through metabolic modeling. Tasks II and III-Diversity and distribution of active anaerobes and Mechanisms linking electron transport and the fate of radionuclides: (1) Our study showed that members of genus Rhodanobacter and Geobacter are abundant and active in the uranium and nitrate contaminated subsurface. In the contaminant source zone of the Oak Ridge site, Rhodanobacter spp. are the predominant, active organisms detected (comprising 50% to 100% of rRNA detected). (2) We demonstrated for the first time that the function of micro

  7. Further RAGE modeling of asteroid mitigation: surface and subsurface explosions in porous objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Robert P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Plesko, Catherine S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dearholt, William R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Disruption or mitigation of a potentially hazardous object (PHO) by a high-energy subsurface burst is considered. This is just one possible method of impact-hazard mitigation. We present RAGE hydrocode models of the shock-generated disruption of PHOs by subsurface nuclear bursts using scenario-specific models from realistic RADAR shape models. We will show 2D and 3D models for the disruption by a large energy source at the center of such PHO models ({approx}100 kt-10 Mt) specifically for the shape of the asteroid 25143 Itokawa. We study the effects of non-uniform composition (rubble pile), shallow buried bursts for the optimal depth of burial and porosity.

  8. Insulated conductor temperature limited heater for subsurface heating coupled in a three-phase WYE configuration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Sandberg, Chester Ledlie (Palo Alto, CA)

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation is described. The heating system includes a first heater, a second heater, and a third heater placed in an opening in the subsurface formation. Each heater includes: an electrical conductor; an insulation layer at least partially surrounding the electrical conductor; and an electrically conductive sheath at least partially surrounding the insulation layer. The electrical conductor is electrically coupled to the sheath at a lower end portion of the heater. The lower end portion is the portion of the heater distal from a surface of the opening. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are electrically coupled at the lower end portions of the heaters. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are configured to be electrically coupled in a three-phase wye configuration.

  9. Demonstration of close-coupled barriers for subsurface containment of buried waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, B.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heiser, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Stewart, W. [Applied Geotechnical Engineering and Construction, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a close-coupled barrier for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional cement grout curtain followed by a thin inner lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. Close-coupled barrier technology is applicable for final, interim, or emergency containment of subsurface waste forms. Consequently, when considering the diversity of technology application, the construction emplacement and material technology maturity, general site operational requirements, and regulatory compliance incentives, the close-coupled barrier system provides an alternative for any hazardous or mixed waste remediation plan. This paper discusses the installation of a close-coupled barrier and the subsequent integrity verification.

  10. Changes in the subsurface stratification of the Sun with the 11-year activity cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandrine Lefebvre; Alexander Kosovichev

    2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the changes of the Sun's subsurface stratification inferred from helioseismology data. Using SOHO/MDI (SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager) data for the last 9 years and, more precisely, the temporal variation of f-mode frequencies, we have computed the variation of the radius of subsurface layers of the Sun by applying helioseismic inversions. We have found a variability of the ``helioseismic'' radius in antiphase with the solar activity, with the strongest variations of the stratification being just below the surface around 0.995$R_{\\odot}$. Besides, the radius of the deeper layers of the Sun, between 0.975$R_{\\odot}$ and 0.99$R_{\\odot}$ changes in phase with the 11-year cycle.

  11. Laboratory and Field Evidence for Long-Term Starvation Survival of Microorganisms in Subsurface Terrestrial Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieft, T.L. [Biology Dept., New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Murphy, E.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Amy, P.S.; Haldeman, D.L. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ringelberg, D. B. [Center for Environmental Biotechnology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    BIOGEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND NUTRIENT FLUX IN SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS INDICATES THAT INHABITANT MICROORGANISMS EXPERIENCE SEVERE NUTRIENT LIMITATION. USING LABORATORY AND FIELD METHODS, WE HAVE BEEN TESTING STARVATION SURVIVAL IN SUBSURFACE MICROORGANISMS. IN MICROCOSM EXPERIMENTS, WE HAVE SHOWN THAT STRAINS OF TWO COMMONLY ISOLATED SUBSURFACE GENERA, ARTHROBACTER AND PSEUDOMONAS, ARE ABLE TO MAINTAIN VIABILITY IN LOW-NUTRIENT, NATURAL SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS FOR OVER ONE YEAR. THESE NON-SPORE-FORMING BACTERIA UNDERGO RAPID INITIAL MINIATURIZATION FOLLOWED BY A STABILIZATION OF CELL SIZE. MEMBRANE LIPID PHOSPHOLIPID FATTY ACID (PLFA) PROFILES OF THE PSEUDOMONAS ARE CONSISTENT WITH ADAPTATION TO NUTRIENT STRESS; ARTHROBACTER APPARENTLY RESPONDS TO NUTRIENT DEPRIVATION WITHOUT ALTERING MEMBRANE PLFA. TO TEST SURVIVABILITY OF MICROORGANISMS OVER A GEOLOGIC TIME SCALE, WE CHARACTERIZED MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES IN A SEQUENCE OF UNSATURATED SEDIMENTS RANGING IN AGE FROM MODEM TO {gt}780,000 years. Sediments were relatively uniform silts in Eastern Washington State. Porewater ages at depth (measured by the chloride mass-balance approach) were as old as 3,600 years. Microbial abundance, biomass, and activities (measured by direct counts, culture counts, total PLFAs, and radiorespirometry) declined with sediment age. The pattern is consistent with laboratory microcosm studies of Microbial survival: rapid short-term change followed by long-term survival of a proportion of cells. Even the oldest sediments evinced a small but viable Microbial community. Microbial survival appeared to be a function of sediment age. Porewater age appeared to influence the markup of surviving communities, as indicated by PLFA profiles. Sites with different Porewater recharge rates and patterns of Pleistocene flooding had different communities.

  12. Subsurface materials management and containment system, components thereof and methods relating thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  13. Geochemistry of silicate-rich rocks can curtail spreading of carbon dioxide in subsurface aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardoso, S. S. S.; Andres, J. T. H.

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    of carbon sequestration and dissolution rates in the subsurface, suggesting that pooled carbon dioxide may remain in the shallower regions of the formation for hundreds to thousands of years. The deeper regions of the reservoir can remain virtually carbon... interests. References 1. Marini, L. Geochemical Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. (Elsevier 2007). 2. IPCC Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage, edited by Metz B. et al. (Cambridge University Press, UK and New York, USA, 2005). 3. Falkowski...

  14. Uranium Contamination in the Subsurface Beneath the 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Mark D.

    2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a description of uranium contamination in the subsurface at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The principal focus is a persistence plume in groundwater, which has not attenuated as predicted by earlier remedial investigations. Included in the report are chapters on current conditions, hydrogeologic framework, groundwater flow modeling, and geochemical considerations. The report is intended to describe what is known or inferred about the uranium contamination for the purpose of making remedial action decisions.

  15. Development of microwave and millimeter-wave integrated-circuit stepped-frequency radar sensors for surface and subsurface profiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Joongsuk

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    for subsurface and surface measurements including small size, light weight, good accuracy, fine resolution and deep penetration. In addition, two novel wideband microstrip quasi-TEM horn antennae that are capable of integration with a seamless connection have...

  16. On using rational enzyme redesign to improve enzyme-mediated microbial dehalogenation of recalcitrant substances in deep-subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ornstein, R.L.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavily halogenated hydrocarbons are one of the most prevalent classes of man-made recalcitrant environmental contaminants and often make their way into subsurface environments. Biodegradation of heavily chlorinated compounds in the deep subsurface often occurs at extremely slow rates because native enzymes of indigenous microbes are unable to efficiently metabolize such synthetic substances. Cost-effective engineering solutions do not exist for dealing with disperse and recalcitrant pollutants in the deep subsurface (i.e., ground water, soils, and sediments). Timely biodegradation of heavily chlorinated compounds in the deep subsurface may be best accomplished by rational redesign of appropriate enzymes that enhance the ability of indigenous microbes to metabolize these substances. The isozyme family cytochromes P450 are catalytically very robust and are found in all aerobic life forms and may be active in may anaerobes as well. The author is attempting to demonstrate proof-of-principle rational enzyme redesign of cytochromes P450 to enhance biodehalogenation.

  17. Seeing inside chips and cells: High-resolution subsurface imaging of integrated circuits, quantum dots and subcellular structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    techniques for IC failure analysis ­ solid immersion lens microscopy and solid immersion lens thermography improvement from >5µm to a resolution of 1.3µm, representing the best subsurface thermography to date

  18. Characterizing the Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions in Different Subsurface Geologic Environments Using Geochemical and Isotopic Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Molly

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Shallow aquifers located near streams can be affected by groundwater contamination as a result of recharge from surface water; however, stream stage variation, subsurface geology, and seasonal changes can alter the magnitude of groundwater...

  19. Subsurface flow constructed wetland: treatment of domestic wastewater by gravel and tire chip media and ultraviolet disinfection of effluent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Amanda Yvette

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common in on-site treatment of wastewater. Gravel is the most popular form of wetland fill medium, but tire chips provide more porosity, are less dense, and cheaper. Before...

  20. Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

    2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89°C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

  1. Characterization of microbial communities in subsurface nuclear blast cavities of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane P. Moser; Ken Czerwinski; Charles E. Russell; Mavrik Zavarin

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this programâ??s Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

  2. Electrode-based approach for monitoring in situ microbial activity during subsurface bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Kenneth H.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Franks, Ashley; Englert, Andreas L.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current production by microorganisms colonizing subsurface electrodes and its relationship to substrate availability and microbial activity was evaluated in an aquifer undergoing bioremediation. Borehole graphite anodes were installed downgradient from a region of acetate injection designed to stimulate bioreduction of U(VI); cathodes consisted of graphite electrodes embedded at the ground surface. Significant increases in current density (?50 mA/m2) tracked delivery of acetate to the electrodes, dropping rapidly when acetate inputs were discontinued. An upgradient control produced low, steady currents (?0.2 mA/m2). Elevated current was strongly correlated with uranium removal but minimal correlation existed with elevated Fe(II). Confocal laser scanning microscopy of electrodes revealed firmly attached biofilms, and analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated the electrode surfaces were dominated (67-80%) by Geobacter species. These results suggest that oxidation of acetate coupled to electron transfer to electrodes by Geobacter species was the primary source of current. This is the first demonstration that electrodes can produce readily detectable currents despite long-range (6 m) separation of anode and cathode and that current levels are likely related to rates of subsurface metabolism. It is expected that current production may serve as an effective proxy for monitoring in situ microbial activity in a variety of subsurface anoxic environments.

  3. Quantifying the surface-subsurface biogeochemical coupling during the VERTIGO ALOHA and K2 studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, P.W.; Gall, M.P.; Silver, M.W.; Bishop, J.K.B.; Coale, Susan L.; Bidigare, Robert R.

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A central question addressed by the VERTIGO (VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean) study was 'What controls the efficiency of particle export between the surface and subsurface ocean'? Here, we present data from sites at ALOHA (N Central Pacific Gyre) and K2 (NW subarctic Pacific) on phytoplankton processes, and relate them via a simple planktonic foodweb model, to subsurface particle export (150-500 m). Three key factors enable quantification of the surface-subsurface coupling: a sampling design to overcome the temporal lag and spatial displacement between surface and subsurface processes; data on the size-partitioning of Net Primary Production (NPP) and subsequent transformations prior to export; estimates of the ratio of algal- to faecal-mediated vertical export flux. At ALOHA, phytoplankton were characterized by low stocks, NPP, F{sub v}/F{sub m} (N-limited), and were dominated by picoplankton. The HNLC waters at K2 were characterized by both two-fold changes in NPP and floristic shifts (high to low proportion of diatoms) between deployment 1 and 2. Prediction of export exiting the euphotic zone was based on size-partitioning of NPP, a copepod-dominated foodweb and a ratio of 0.2 (ALOHA) and 0.1 (K2) for algal:faecal particle flux. Predicted export was 20-22 mg POC m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at ALOHA (i.e. 10-11% NPP (0-125 m); 1.1-1.2 x export flux at 150 m (E{sub 150}). At K2, export was 111 mg C m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (21% NPP (0-50 m); 1.8 x E{sub 150}) and 33 mg POC m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (11% NPP, 0-55 m); 1.4 x E{sub 150}) for deployments 1 and 2, respectively. This decrease in predicted export at K2 matches the observed trend for E{sub 150}. Also, the low attenuation of export flux from 60 to 150 m is consistent with that between 150 to 500 m. This strong surface-subsurface coupling suggests that phytoplankton productivity and floristics play a key role at K2 in setting export flux, and moreover that pelagic particle transformations by grazers strongly influence to what extent sinking particles are further broken down in the underlying waters of the Twilight Zone.

  4. Enhanced Geothermal Systems Research and Development: Models of Subsurface Chemical Processes Affecting Fluid Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moller, Nancy; Weare J. H.

    2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful exploitation of the vast amount of heat stored beneath the earth’s surface in hydrothermal and fluid-limited, low permeability geothermal resources would greatly expand the Nation’s domestic energy inventory and thereby promote a more secure energy supply, a stronger economy and a cleaner environment. However, a major factor limiting the expanded development of current hydrothermal resources as well as the production of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is insufficient knowledge about the chemical processes controlling subsurface fluid flow. With funding from past grants from the DOE geothermal program and other agencies, we successfully developed advanced equation of state (EOS) and simulation technologies that accurately describe the chemistry of geothermal reservoirs and energy production processes via their free energies for wide XTP ranges. Using the specific interaction equations of Pitzer, we showed that our TEQUIL chemical models can correctly simulate behavior (e.g., mineral scaling and saturation ratios, gas break out, brine mixing effects, down hole temperatures and fluid chemical composition, spent brine incompatibilities) within the compositional range (Na-K-Ca-Cl-SO4-CO3-H2O-SiO2-CO2(g)) and temperature range (T < 350°C) associated with many current geothermal energy production sites that produce brines with temperatures below the critical point of water. The goal of research carried out under DOE grant DE-FG36-04GO14300 (10/1/2004-12/31/2007) was to expand the compositional range of our Pitzer-based TEQUIL fluid/rock interaction models to include the important aluminum and silica interactions (T < 350°C). Aluminum is the third most abundant element in the earth’s crust; and, as a constituent of aluminosilicate minerals, it is found in two thirds of the minerals in the earth’s crust. The ability to accurately characterize effects of temperature, fluid mixing and interactions between major rock-forming minerals and hydrothermal and/or injected fluids is critical to predict important chemical behaviors affecting fluid flow, such as mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions. We successfully achieved the project goal and objectives by demonstrating the ability of our modeling technology to correctly predict the complex pH dependent solution chemistry of the Al3+ cation and its hydrolysis species: Al(OH)2+, Al(OH)2+, Al(OH)30, and Al(OH)4- as well as the solubility of common aluminum hydroxide and aluminosilicate minerals in aqueous brines containing components (Na, K, Cl) commonly dominating hydrothermal fluids. In the sodium chloride system, where experimental data for model parameterization are most plentiful, the model extends to 300°C. Determining the stability fields of aluminum species that control the solubility of aluminum-containing minerals as a function of temperature and composition has been a major objective of research in hydrothermal chemistry.

  5. Final Technical Report: Viral Infection of Subsurface Microorganisms and Metal/Radionuclide Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Karrie A.; Bender, Kelly S.; Li, Yusong

    2013-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbially mediated metabolisms have been identified as a significant factor either directly or indirectly impacting the fate and transport of heavy metal/radionuclide contaminants. To date microorganisms have been isolated from contaminated environments. Examination of annotated finished genome sequences of many of these subsurface isolates from DOE sites, revealed evidence of prior viral infection. To date the role that viruses play influencing microbial mortality and the resulting community structure which directly influences biogeochemical cycling in soils and sedimentary environments remains poorly understood. The objective of this exploratory study was to investigate the role of viral infection of subsurface bacteria and the formation of contaminant-bearing viral particles. This objective was approached by examining the following working hypotheses: (i) subsurface microorganisms are susceptible to viral infections by the indigenous subsurface viral community, and (ii) viral surfaces will adsorb heavy metals and radionuclides. Our results have addressed basic research needed to accomplish the BER Long Term Measure to provide sufficient scientific understanding such that DOE sites would be able to incorporate coupled physical, chemical and biological processes into decision making for environmental remediation or natural attenuation and long-term stewardship by establishing viral-microbial relationships on the subsequent fate and transport of heavy metals and radionuclides. Here we demonstrated that viruses play a significant role in microbial mortality and community structure in terrestrial subsurface sedimentary systems. The production of viral-like particles within subsurface sediments in response to biostimulation with dissolved organic carbon and a terminal electron acceptor resulted in the production of viral-like particles. Organic carbon alone did not result in significant viral production and required the addition of a terminal electron acceptor (nitrate), indicating that nutrients are not limiting viral production, but rather substrates that can be converted into energy for host metabolism. Our results also revealed that cell abundance was not correlated to the mineralization of organic carbon, but rather viruses were positively correlated with carbon mineralization. This is a result of viral-mediated cell lysis and demonstrates that viruses are sensitive indicators of microbial activity. Viruses as an indicator of microbial activity was not unique to batch culture studies as results obtained from an in situ field experiment conducted at the DOE Old Rifle Field site. This study revealed that viral abundance increased in response to the injection of oxygenated groundwater and influx of dissolved organic carbon whereas cell abundance changes were minimal. However, the extent to which viral-mediated cell lysis alters organic matter pools subsequently influencing microbial community structure and biogeochemical function remains a critical question in subsurface biogeochemical cycling. The production of significant numbers of viruses in groundwater has implications for nanoparticulate metal as well as carbon transport in groundwater. We have demonstrated that the virus surface is reactive and will adsorb heavy metals. Thus viruses can promote colloidal contaminant mobility. Interestingly, the presence of heavy metals has a positive effect on infectivity of the phage, increasing phage infection which could lead to further production of viruses. Together, the results indicate that the sorption of metals to the surface of viruses could not only contribute to nanoparticulate metal as well as carbon transport but could also enhance infectivity further contributing to cell lysis which could subsequently influence biogeochemical cycling. As more viruses infect host microbial populations the high concentration of metals would enhance infection, resulting in cell lysis, and decreasing the metabolically active host population while yielding greater numbers of viruses capable of transporting contaminats. Additional studie

  6. Geophysical inversion in an integrated mineral exploration program: examples from the San Nicolas deposit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    Geophysical inversion in an integrated mineral exploration program: examples from the San Nicol´as deposit Nigel Phillips and Douglas W. Oldenburg, UBC-Geophysical Inversion Facility, University of British of the subsurface from surface geophysical data, coupled with an increasing need to explore for minerals

  7. Synoptic analysis of near surface and subsurface temperatures in the Atlantic Ocean following hurricane BETSY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Robert Clarence

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pressures Sea Surface Temperature Pattern before Hurricane Betsy 26 Sea Surface Temperature Pattern after Hur ricane Betsy 27 Seven-Day Average Sea Surface Temperatures; 23 - 29 August 1965 28 Seven-Day Average Sea Surface Temperatures; 8 - 14.... SHIIDEO ARE o IS / / / WATER 79'-80' F 73' 72' 71' BT NO. Ie 28 38 48 58 BETSY FIG, IB. SUBSURFACE THERMAL STRUCTURE BEFORE HURRICANE BETSY ALONG SECTION A. 204 21' 22' NORTH LATITUDE 23' 24' 25' 26 27' 28' 82. 5' 80. 5' 100 I 200 IJI IJI IJ...

  8. Three-phase heaters with common overburden sections for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation is described. The heating system includes three substantially u-shaped heaters with first end portions of the heaters being electrically coupled to a single, three-phase wye transformer and second end portions of the heaters being electrically coupled to each other and/or to ground. The three heaters may enter the formation through a first common wellbore and exit the formation through a second common wellbore so that the magnetic fields of the three heaters at least partially cancel out in the common wellbores.

  9. REVIEW AND ANALYSIS Research Activities at U.S. Government Agencies in Subsurface Reactive Transport Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    All T. Cygan; Caroline T. Stevens; Robert W. Puls; Steven B. Yabusaki; Robert D; David R. Turner

    Subsurface reactive transport modeling may be defi ned as the use of mathematical models to simulate the fate and transport of dissolved species and particulates in groundwater as these species are transported through porous media and react with each other, with mineral surfaces, and with microbes associated with the porous media matrix. This type of modeling has evolved over the last 30 yr from a specialized research topic involving a dozen or so practitioners (with often large stacks of computer punch cards) to a common offi ce tool found today on the personal computer (and occasional supercomputer) of many environmental chemists, geochemists, and soil scientists. The devel-

  10. Subsurface Temperature, Moisture, Thermal Conductivity and Heat Flux, Barrow, Area A, B, C, D

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    Subsurface temperature data are being collected along a transect from the center of the polygon through the trough (and to the center of the adjacent polygon for Area D). Each transect has five 1.5m vertical array thermistor probes with 16 thermistors each. This dataset also includes soil pits that have been instrumented for temperature, water content, thermal conductivity, and heat flux at the permafrost table. Area C has a shallow borehole of 2.5 meters depth is instrumented in the center of the polygon.

  11. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals » High School Rules,Subsurface Biogeochemical

  12. Final Report: DoE SBIR Phase 2 Low-Cost Small Diameter NMR Technologies for In-Situ Subsurface Characterization and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, David Oliver

    2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Phase 2 SBIR program, Vista Clara successfully developed and field-tested small diameter NNR logging tools for subsurface characterization and monitoring. This effort involved the design and development surface electronics, a winch with 470ft cable, and three interchangeable downhole probes: a 3.5â?ť diameter borehole NMR probe, a 1.67â?ť diameter borehole NMR probe, and a 2.5â?ť diameter NMR probe that can be deployed using a Geoprobe direct push machine. The 3.5â?ť probe was tested extensively over a 6 week period including 4â?ť to 8â?ť boreholes in Washington, Idaho, Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, Connecticut and Massachusetts. The field test campaign was highly successful. The 1.67â?ť probe was assembled, tested and calibrated in the laboratory. The 2.5â?ť Geoprobe probe is in final assembly and testing at the time of this report. The completed Phase 2 R&D program has resulted in the first NMR logging tool that can be deployed in boreholes of 4â?ť diameter, the first NMR logging tool that can be deployed in boreholes on 2â?ť diameter, and the first NMR logging tool that can be deployed by a direct push machine. These small diameter tools make NMR logging technically and economically feasible, for the first time. Previously available NMR logging tools were developed for oilfield applications and are prohibitively large and expensive for the majority of near surface groundwater characterization problems.

  13. In situ mapping of radionuclides in subsurface and surface soils: 1994 Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schilk, A.J.; Hubbard, C.W.; Knopf, M.A.; Abel, K.H.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium production and support facilities at several DOE sites occasionally caused local contamination of some surface and subsurface soils. The thorough cleanup of these sites is a major public concern and a high priority for the US Department of Energy, but before any effective remedial protocols can be established, the three-dimensional distributions of target contaminants must be characterized. Traditional means of measuring radionuclide activities in soil are cumbersome, expensive, time-consuming, and often do not accurately reflect conditions over very large areas. New technologies must be developed, or existing ones improved, to allow cheaper, faster, and safer characterization of radionuclides in soils at these sites. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was tasked with adapting, developing, and demonstrating technologies to measure uranium in surface and subsurface soils. In partial completion of this effort, PNL developed an improved in situ gamma-ray spectrometry system to satisfy the technical requirements. This document summarizes fiscal-year 1994 efforts at PNL to fulfill requirements for TTP {number_sign}321103 (project {number_sign}19307). These requirements included (a) developing a user-friendly software package for reducing field-acquired gamma-ray spectra, (b) constructing an improved data-acquisition hardware system for use with high-purity germanium detectors, (c) ensuring readiness to conduct field mapping exercises as specified by the sponsor, (d) evaluating the in situ gamma-ray spectrometer for the determination of uranium depth distribution, and (e) documenting these efforts.

  14. Intermediate-Scale Laboratory Experiments of Subsurface Flow and Transport Resulting from Tank Leaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington River Protection Solutions contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct laboratory experiments and supporting numerical simulations to improve the understanding of water flow and contaminant transport in the subsurface between waste tanks and ancillary facilities at Waste Management Area C. The work scope included two separate sets of experiments: •Small flow cell experiments to investigate the occurrence of potential unstable fingering resulting from leaks and the limitations of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator to predict flow patterns and solute transport behavior under these conditions. Unstable infiltration may, under certain conditions, create vertically elongated fingers potentially transporting contaminants rapidly through the unsaturated zone to groundwater. The types of leak that may create deeply penetrating fingers include slow release, long duration leaks in relatively permeable porous media. Such leaks may have occurred below waste tanks at the Hanford Site. •Large flow experiments to investigate the behavior of two types of tank leaks in a simple layered system mimicking the Waste Management Area C. The investigated leaks include a relatively large leak with a short duration from a tank and a long duration leak with a relatively small leakage rate from a cascade line.

  15. An iterative stochastic ensemble method for parameter estimation of subsurface flow models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elsheikh, Ahmed H., E-mail: aelsheikh@ices.utexas.edu [Center for Subsurface Modeling (CSM), Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), University of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Dept. of Earth Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Computational Sciences, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Wheeler, Mary F. [Center for Subsurface Modeling (CSM), Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), University of Texas at Austin, TX (United States)] [Center for Subsurface Modeling (CSM), Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), University of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Hoteit, Ibrahim [Dept. of Earth Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal (Saudi Arabia) [Dept. of Earth Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Computational Sciences, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parameter estimation for subsurface flow models is an essential step for maximizing the value of numerical simulations for future prediction and the development of effective control strategies. We propose the iterative stochastic ensemble method (ISEM) as a general method for parameter estimation based on stochastic estimation of gradients using an ensemble of directional derivatives. ISEM eliminates the need for adjoint coding and deals with the numerical simulator as a blackbox. The proposed method employs directional derivatives within a Gauss–Newton iteration. The update equation in ISEM resembles the update step in ensemble Kalman filter, however the inverse of the output covariance matrix in ISEM is regularized using standard truncated singular value decomposition or Tikhonov regularization. We also investigate the performance of a set of shrinkage based covariance estimators within ISEM. The proposed method is successfully applied on several nonlinear parameter estimation problems for subsurface flow models. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated by the small size of utilized ensembles and in terms of error convergence rates.

  16. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Derivation from regional analysis of streamflow recession curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Sheng; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Ali, Melkamu; Leng, Guoyong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Wang, Shaowen; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall–runoff response, especially in steep terrain. Its contribution to total runoff is, however, poorly represented in the current generation of land surface models. The lack of physical basis of these common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation of the stormflow (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global land surface models. This paper is aimed at deriving regionalized parameterizations of the storage–discharge relationship relating to subsurface stormflow from a top–down empirical data analysis of streamflow recession curves extracted from 50 eastern United States catchments. Detailed regression analyses were performed between parameters of the empirical storage–discharge relationships and the controlling climate, soil and topographic characteristics. The regression analyses performed on empirical recession curves at catchment scale indicated that the coefficient of the power-law form storage–discharge relationship is closely related to the catchment hydrologic characteristics, which is consistent with the hydraulic theory derived mainly at the hillslope scale. As for the exponent, besides the role of field scale soil hydraulic properties as suggested by hydraulic theory, it is found to be more strongly affected by climate (aridity) at the catchment scale. At a fundamental level these results point to the need for more detailed exploration of the co-dependence of soil, vegetation and topography with climate.

  17. Polymer/Silicate composites – New Materials for Subsurface Permeable Reactive Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason K. Harrup; Michael G. Jones; Linda Polson; Byron White

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations were performed into the suitability of novel nanocomposites to serve as materials for subsurface permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). These new materials are Type I nanocomposites – they are preformed organic polymers embedded in an inorganic matrix without significant covalent bonding between the components. The required properties for these materials to function efficiently are: 1) a tunable water passing rate to approximate the hydraulic conductivity of the subsurface environment where the PRB will be placed, 2) sufficient mechanical strength (both wet and dry) to maintain barrier integrity, 3) the ability to incorporate selective metal sequestration agents so that they remain active – yet do not leach from the barrier, and 4) to be deployable through direct injection methods such that trenching is not needed. Additionally, there is a need to keep the technology as low cost as possible, while remaining reliable. Results recently obtained in our laboratory show that our materials, remarkably, exhibit all of these properties and show great promise as vadose zone deployable PRBs.

  18. An Electrode-based approach for monitoring in situ microbial activity during subsurface bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.H.; Nevin, K.P.; Franks, A.; Englert, A.; Long, P.E.; Lovley, D.R.

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Current production by microorganisms colonizing subsurface electrodes and its relationship to substrate availability and microbial activity was evaluated in an aquifer undergoing bioremediation. Borehole graphite anodes were installed downgradient from a region of acetate injection designed to stimulate bioreduction of U(VI); cathodes consisted of graphite electrodes embedded at the ground surface. Significant increases in current density ({<=}50 mA/m{sup 2}) tracked delivery of acetate to the electrodes, dropping rapidly when acetate inputs were discontinued. An upgradient control electrode not exposed to acetate produced low, steady currents ({<=}0.2 mA/m{sup 2}). Elevated current was strongly correlated with uranium removal but minimal correlation existed with elevated Fe(II). Confocal laser scanning microscopy of electrodes revealed firmly attached biofilms, and analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated the electrode surfaces were dominated (67-80%) by Geobacter species. This is the first demonstration that electrodes can produce readily detectable currents despite long-range (6 m) separation of anode and cathode, and these results suggest that oxidation of acetate coupled to electron transfer to electrodes by Geobacter species was the primary source of current. Thus it is expected that current production may serve as an effective proxy for monitoring in situ microbial activity in a variety of subsurface anoxic environments.

  19. Demonstration of close-coupled barriers for subsurface containment of buried waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Dwyer, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a close-coupled barrier for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional cement grout curtain followed by a thin lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. Close-coupled barrier technology is applicable for final, interim, or emergency containment of subsurface waste forms. Consequently, when considering the diversity of technology application, the construction emplacement and material technology maturity, general site operational requirements, and regulatory compliance incentives, the close-coupled barrier system provides an alternative for any hazardous or mixed waste remediation plan. This paper will discuss the installation of a close-coupled barrier and the subsequent integrity verification. The demonstration will take place at a cold site at the Hanford Geotechnical Test Facility, 400 Area, Hanford, Washington.

  20. Geophysical Monitoring of Coupled Microbial and Geochemical Processes During Stimulated Subsurface Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Kenneth H.; Kemna, Andreas; Wilkins, Michael J.; Druhan, Jennifer L.; Arntzen, Evan V.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Long, Philip E.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding how microorganisms alter their physical and chemical environment during bioremediation is hindered by our inability to resolve subsurface microbial activity with high spatial resolution. Here we demonstrate the use of a minimally invasive geophysical technique to monitor stimulated microbial activity during acetate amendment in an aquifer near Rifle, Colorado. During electrical induced polarization (IP) measurements, spatiotemporal variations in the phase response between imposed electric current and the resultant electric field correlated with changes in groundwater geochemistry accompanying stimulated iron and sulfate reduction and sulfide mineral precipitation. The magnitude of the phase response varied with measurement frequency (0.125 and 1 Hz) andwasdependent upon the dominant metabolic process. The spectral effect was corroborated using a biostimulated column experiment containing Rifle sediments and groundwater. Fluids and sediments recovered from regions exhibiting an anomalous phase response were enriched in Fe(II), dissolved sulfide, and cell-associated FeS nanoparticles. The accumulation of mineral precipitates and electroactive ions altered the ability of pore fluids to conduct electrical charge, accounting for the anomalous IP response and revealing the usefulness of multifrequency IP measurements for monitoring mineralogical and geochemical changes accompanying stimulated subsurface bioremediation.

  1. Chemotactic behavior of deep subsurface bacteria toward carbohydrates, amino acids and a chlorinated alkene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez de Victoria, G. (Puerto Rico Univ., Rio Piedras (Puerto Rico). Dept. of Biology)

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemotactic behavior of deep terrestrial subsurface bacteria toward amino acids, carbohydrates and trichloroethylene was assayed using a modification of the capillary method and bacterial enumeration by acridine orange direct counts. Eleven isolates of bacteria isolated from six different geological formations were investigated. A bimodal response rather than an absolute positive or negative response was observed in most assays. Most of the isolates were positively chemotactic to low concentrations of substrates and were repelled by high concentrations of the same substrate. However, this was not the case for trichloroethylene (TCE) which was mostly an attractant and elicited the highest responses in all the isolates when compared with amino acids and carbohydrates. The movement rates of these isolates in aseptic subsurface sediments in the absence and presence of TCE were also determined using a laboratory model. All of the isolates showed distinct response range, peak, and threshold concentrations when exposed to the same substrates suggesting that they are possibly different species as has been inferred from DNA homology studies. 101 refs., 4 figs., 57 tabs.

  2. Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides, Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA project processing site. Final [report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface and subsurface soil cleanup protocols for the Gunnison, Colorado, processing sits are summarized as follows: In accordance with EPA-promulgated land cleanup standards (40 CFR 192), in situ Ra-226 is to be cleaned up based on bulk concentrations not exceeding 5 and 15 pCi/g in 15-cm surface and subsurface depth increments, averaged over 100-m{sup 2} grid blocks, where the parent Ra-226 concentrations are greater than, or in secular equilibrium with, the Th-230 parent. A bulk interpretation of these EPA standards has been accepted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and while the concentration of the finer-sized soil fraction less than a No. 4 mesh sieve contains the higher concentration of radioactivity, the bulk approach in effect integrates the total sample radioactivity over the entire sample mass. In locations where Th-230 has differentially migrated in subsoil relative to Ra-226, a Th-230 cleanup protocol has been developed in accordance with Supplemental Standard provisions of 40 CFR 192 for NRC/Colorado Department of Health (CDH) approval for timely implementation. Detailed elements of the protocol are contained in Appendix A, Generic Protocol from Thorium-230 Cleanup/Verification at UMTRA Project Processing Sites. The cleanup of other radionuclides or nonradiological hazards that pose a significant threat to the public and the environment will be determined and implemented in accordance with pathway analysis to assess impacts and the implications of ALARA specified in 40 CFR 192 relative to supplemental standards.

  3. Evaluation of a subsurface oxygenation technique using colloidal gas aphron injections into packed column reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, R.A.; Coles, P.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioremediation may be a remedial technology capable of decontaminating subsurface environments. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of colloidal gas aphron (CGA) injection, which is the injection of micrometer-size air bubbles in an aqueous surfactant solution, as a subsurface oxygenation technique to create optimal growth conditions for aerobic bacteria. Along with this, the capability of CGAs to act as a soil-washing agent and free organic components from a coal tar-contaminated matrix was examined. Injection of CGAs may be useful for remediation of underground coal gasification (UCG) sites. Because of this, bacteria and solid material from a UCG site located in northeastern Wyoming were used in this research. Colloidal gas aphrons were generated and pumped through packed column reactors (PCRS) containing post-burn core materials. For comparison, PCRs containing sand were also studied. Bacteria from this site were tested for their capability to degrade phenol, a major contaminant at the UCG site, and were also used to bioaugment the PCR systems. In this study we examined: (1) the effect of CGA injection on dissolved oxygen concentrations in the PCR effluents, (2) the effect of CGA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and phenol injections on bacterial populations, (3) the stability and transport of CGAs over distance, and (4) CGA injection versus H{sub 2}O{sub 2} injection as an oxygenation technique.

  4. Evaluation of a subsurface oxygenation technique using colloidal gas aphron injections into packed column reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, R.A.; Coles, P.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioremediation may be a remedial technology capable of decontaminating subsurface environments. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of colloidal gas aphron (CGA) injection, which is the injection of micrometer-size air bubbles in an aqueous surfactant solution, as a subsurface oxygenation technique to create optimal growth conditions for aerobic bacteria. Along with this, the capability of CGAs to act as a soil-washing agent and free organic components from a coal tar-contaminated matrix was examined. Injection of CGAs may be useful for remediation of underground coal gasification (UCG) sites. Because of this, bacteria and solid material from a UCG site located in northeastern Wyoming were used in this research. Colloidal gas aphrons were generated and pumped through packed column reactors (PCRS) containing post-burn core materials. For comparison, PCRs containing sand were also studied. Bacteria from this site were tested for their capability to degrade phenol, a major contaminant at the UCG site, and were also used to bioaugment the PCR systems. In this study we examined: (1) the effect of CGA injection on dissolved oxygen concentrations in the PCR effluents, (2) the effect of CGA, H[sub 2]O[sub 2], and phenol injections on bacterial populations, (3) the stability and transport of CGAs over distance, and (4) CGA injection versus H[sub 2]O[sub 2] injection as an oxygenation technique.

  5. Euclid Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programming Programming Compiling and linking programs on Euclid. Compiling Codes How to compile and link MPI codes on Euclid. Read More Using the ACML Math Library How to...

  6. On the possibility of cosmic ray-induced ionizing radiation-powered life in subsurface environments in the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atri, Dimitra

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photosynthesis is a highly efficient mechanism developed by terrestrial life to utilize the energy from photons of solar origin for biological use. Subsurface regions are isolated from the photosphere, and consequently are incapable of utilizing this energy. This opens up the opportunity for life to cultivate alternative mechanisms in order to take advantage of other available energy sources. Studies have shown that in subsurface environments, life can use energy generated from geochemical and geothermal processes to sustain a minimal metabolism. Another mechanism is radiolysis, in which particles emitted by radioactive substances are indirectly utilized for metabolism. One such example is the bacterium fueled by radiation, found 2 miles deep in a South African mine, which consumes hydrogen formed from particles emitted by radioactive U, Th and K present in rock. An additional source of radiation in the subsurface environments is secondary particles, such as muons generated by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs). It ...

  7. Interaction of atomic hydrogen with the {beta}-SiC(100) 3x2 surface and subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'angelo, M.; Enriquez, H.; Rodriguez, N.; Aristov, V. Yu.; Soukiassian, P.; Tejeda, A.; Michel, E. G.; Pedio, M.; Ottaviani, C.; Perfetti, P. [Laboratoire SIMA, DSM-DRECAM-SPCSI, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay, Bat. 462, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex, France and Departement de Physique, Universite de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain and Laboratoire SIMA, DSM-DRECAM-SPCSI, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay, Bat. 462, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); ISM-CNR, Via del fosso del cavaliere 100, 00133, Rome (Italy) and Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, 34012 Basovizza (Italy)

    2007-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate clean and atomic hydrogen exposed {beta}-SiC(100) 3x2 surfaces by synchrotron radiation-based Si 2p core-level photoemission spectroscopy. The clean 3x2 surface reconstruction exhibits three surface and subsurface components. Upon hydrogen exposures, those surface and subsurface components are shifted to lower binding energies by large values, indicating significant charge transfer to the surface and subsurface regions, in excellent agreement with the recently discovered H-induced {beta}-SiC(100) 3x2 surface metallization. In addition, the interaction of hydrogen results in a large reactive component at Si 2p supporting an asymmetric charge transfer in the third plane below the surface, in agreement with previous experimental investigations. However, the results are inconsistent with recent ab initio theoretical ''frozen'' calculations predicting H atom to be in a bridge-bond position.

  8. Manipulation of subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi?Sr?CaCu?O8+? using a scanning tunneling microscope

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stollenwerk, A. J.; Gu, G.; Hurley, N.; Beck, B.; Spurgeon, K.; Kidd, T. E.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present evidence that subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi?Sr?CaCu?O8+? can be manipulated with nanometer precision using a scanning tunneling microscope. High resolution images indicate that most of the carbon particles remain subsurface after transport observable as a local increase in height as the particle pushes up on the surface. Tunneling spectra in the vicinity of these protrusions exhibit semiconducting characteristics with a band gap of approximately 1.8 eV, indicating that the incorporation of carbon locally alters the electronic properties near the surface.

  9. Final report - Reduction of mercury in saturated subsurface sediments and its potential to mobilize mercury in its elemental form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakray, Tamar [Rutgers University

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of our project was to investigate Hg(II) reduction in the deep subsurface. We focused on microbial and abiotic pathways of reduction and explored how it affected the toxicity and mobility of Hg in this unique environment. The project’s tasks included: 1. Examining the role of mer activities in the reduction of Hg(II) in denitrifying enrichment cultures; 2. Investigating the biotic/abiotic reduction of Hg(II) under iron reducing conditions; 3. Examining Hg(II) redox transformations under anaerobic conditions in subsurface sediments from DOE sites.

  10. Student Internship Programs Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Student Internship Programs Program Description The objective of the Laboratory's student internship programs is to provide students with opportunities for meaningful hands- on...

  11. AN EVALUATION OF HANFORD SITE TANK FARM SUBSURFACE CONTAMINATION FY2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F.M.

    2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tank Farm Vadose Zone (TFVZ) Project conducts activities to characterize and analyze the long-term environmental and human health impacts from tank waste releases to the vadose zone. The project also implements interim measures to mitigate impacts, and plans the remediation of waste releases from tank farms and associated facilities. The scope of this document is to report data needs that are important to estimating long-term human health and environmental risks. The scope does not include technologies needed to remediate contaminated soils and facilities, technologies needed to close tank farms, or management and regulatory decisions that will impact remediation and closure. This document is an update of ''A Summary and Evaluation of Hanford Site Tank Farm Subsurface Contamination''. That 1998 document summarized knowledge of subsurface contamination beneath the tank farms at the time. It included a preliminary conceptual model for migration of tank wastes through the vadose zone and an assessment of data and analysis gaps needed to update the conceptual model. This document provides a status of the data and analysis gaps previously defined and discussion of the gaps and needs that currently exist to support the stated mission of the TFVZ Project. The first data-gaps document provided the basis for TFVZ Project activities over the previous eight years. Fourteen of the nineteen knowledge gaps identified in the previous document have been investigated to the point that the project defines the current status as acceptable. In the process of filling these gaps, significant accomplishments were made in field work and characterization, laboratory investigations, modeling, and implementation of interim measures. The current data gaps are organized in groups that reflect Components of the tank farm vadose zone conceptual model: inventory, release, recharge, geohydrology, geochemistry, and modeling. The inventory and release components address residual wastes that will remain in the tanks and tank-farm infrastructure after closure and potential losses from leaks during waste retrieval. Recharge addresses the impacts of current conditions in the tank farms (i.e. gravel covers that affect infiltration and recharge) as well as the impacts of surface barriers. The geohydrology and geochemistry components address the extent of the existing subsurface contaminant inventory and drivers and pathways for contaminants to be transported through the vadose zone and groundwater. Geochemistry addresses the mobility of key reactive contaminants such as uranium. Modeling addresses conceptual models and how they are simulated in computers. The data gaps will be used to provide input to planning (including the upcoming C Farm Data Quality Objective meetings scheduled this year).

  12. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters Final Report to the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    . In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Our study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area.

  13. Program School/ Career: Descripton ISIS Program Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Program School/ Career: Descripton ISIS Program Codes Program Career: Descripton College School;Program School/ Career: Descripton ISIS Program Codes Program Career: Descripton College School/ College 1

  14. Rates and products of degradation for MTBE and other oxygenate fuel additives in the subsurface environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tratnyek, P.G.; Church, C.D.; Pankow, J.F. [Oregon Graduate Inst., Portland, OR (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent realization that oxygenated fuel additives such as MTBE are becoming widely distributed groundwater contaminants has created a sudden and pressing demand for data on the processes that control their environmental fate. Explaining and predicting the subsequent environmental fate of these compounds is going to require extrapolations over long time frames that will be very sensitive to the quality of input data on each compound. To provide such data, they have initiated a systematic study of the pathways and kinetics of fuel oxygenate degradation under subsurface conditions. Batch experiments in simplified model systems are being performed to isolate specific processes that may contribute to MTBE degradation. A variety of degradation pathways can be envisioned that lead to t-butyl alcohol (TBA) as the primary or secondary product. However, experiments to date with a facultative iron reducing bacteria showed no evidence for TBA formation. Continuing experiments include mixed cultures from a range of aquifer materials representative of NAWQA study sites.

  15. Innovative technology for expedited site remediation of extensive surface and subsurface contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Audibert, J.M.E.; Lew, L.R.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Large scale surface and subsurface contamination resulted from numerous releases of feed stock, process streams, waste streams, and final product at a major chemical plant. Soil and groundwater was contaminated by numerous compounds including lead, tetraethyl lead, ethylene dibromide, ethylene dichloride, and toluene. The state administrative order dictated that the site be investigated fully, that remedial alternative be evaluated, and that the site be remediated within a year period. Because of the acute toxicity and extreme volatility of tetraethyl lead and other organic compounds present at the site and the short time frame ordered by the regulators, innovative approaches were needed to carry out the remediation while protecting plant workers, remediation workers, and the public.

  16. Hybrid nested sampling algorithm for Bayesian model selection applied to inverse subsurface flow problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elsheikh, Ahmed H., E-mail: aelsheikh@ices.utexas.edu [Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), University of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Institute of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Wheeler, Mary F. [Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), University of Texas at Austin, TX (United States)] [Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), University of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Hoteit, Ibrahim [Department of Earth Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)] [Department of Earth Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Hybrid Nested Sampling (HNS) algorithm is proposed for efficient Bayesian model calibration and prior model selection. The proposed algorithm combines, Nested Sampling (NS) algorithm, Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) sampling and gradient estimation using Stochastic Ensemble Method (SEM). NS is an efficient sampling algorithm that can be used for Bayesian calibration and estimating the Bayesian evidence for prior model selection. Nested sampling has the advantage of computational feasibility. Within the nested sampling algorithm, a constrained sampling step is performed. For this step, we utilize HMC to reduce the correlation between successive sampled states. HMC relies on the gradient of the logarithm of the posterior distribution, which we estimate using a stochastic ensemble method based on an ensemble of directional derivatives. SEM only requires forward model runs and the simulator is then used as a black box and no adjoint code is needed. The developed HNS algorithm is successfully applied for Bayesian calibration and prior model selection of several nonlinear subsurface flow problems.

  17. Evaluation of a low-cost and accurate ocean temperature logger on subsurface mooring systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Jun; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Ming

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring seawater temperature is important to understanding evolving ocean processes. To monitor internal waves or ocean mixing, a large number of temperature loggers are typically mounted on subsurface mooring systems to obtain high-resolution temperature data at different water depths. In this study, we redesigned and evaluated a compact, low-cost, self-contained, high-resolution and high-accuracy ocean temperature logger, TC-1121. The newly designed TC-1121 loggers are smaller, more robust, and their sampling intervals can be automatically changed by indicated events. They have been widely used in many mooring systems to study internal wave and ocean mixing. The logger’s fundamental design, noise analysis, calibration, drift test, and a long-term sea trial are discussed in this paper.

  18. Visual probes and methods for placing visual probes into subsurface areas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clark, Don T.; Erickson, Eugene E.; Casper, William L.; Everett, David M.

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Visual probes and methods for placing visual probes into subsurface areas in either contaminated or non-contaminated sites are described. In one implementation, the method includes driving at least a portion of a visual probe into the ground using direct push, sonic drilling, or a combination of direct push and sonic drilling. Such is accomplished without providing an open pathway for contaminants or fugitive gases to reach the surface. According to one implementation, the invention includes an entry segment configured for insertion into the ground or through difficult materials (e.g., concrete, steel, asphalt, metals, or items associated with waste), at least one extension segment configured to selectively couple with the entry segment, at least one push rod, and a pressure cap. Additional implementations are contemplated.

  19. Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area: Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA)--Programmatic, Technical, and Regulatory Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, Wayne J.

    2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural attenuation processes are commonly used for remediation of contaminated sites. A variety of natural processes occur without human intervention at all sites to varying rates and degrees of effectiveness to attenuate (decrease) the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume, or concentration of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface water systems. The objective of this review is to identify potential technical investments to be incorporated in the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area Strategic Plan for monitored natural attenuation. When implemented, the technical investments will help evaluate and implement monitored natural attenuation as a remediation option at DOE sites. The outcome of this review is a set of conclusions and general recommendations regarding research needs, programmatic guidance, and stakeholder issues pertaining to monitored natural attenuation for the DOE complex.

  20. DEMONSTRATiON OF A SUBSURFACE CONTAINMENT SYSTEM FOR INSTALLATION AT DOE WASTE SITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas J. Crocker; Verna M. Carpenter

    2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1952 and 1970, DOE buried mixed waste in pits and trenches that now have special cleanup needs. The disposal practices used decades ago left these landfills and other trenches, pits, and disposal sites filled with three million cubic meters of buried waste. This waste is becoming harmful to human safety and health. Today's cleanup and waste removal is time-consuming and expensive with some sites scheduled to complete cleanup by 2006 or later. An interim solution to the DOE buried waste problem is to encapsulate and hydraulically isolate the waste with a geomembrane barrier and monitor the performance of the barrier over its 50-yr lifetime. The installed containment barriers would isolate the buried waste and protect groundwater from pollutants until final remediations are completed. The DOE has awarded a contract to RAHCO International, Inc.; of Spokane, Washington; to design, develop, and test a novel subsurface barrier installation system, referred to as a Subsurface Containment System (SCS). The installed containment barrier consists of commercially available geomembrane materials that isolates the underground waste, similar to the way a swimming pools hold water, without disrupting hazardous material that was buried decades ago. The barrier protects soil and groundwater from contamination and effectively meets environmental cleanup standards while reducing risks, schedules, and costs. Constructing the subsurface containment barrier uses a combination of conventional and specialized equipment and a unique continuous construction process. This innovative equipment and construction method can construct a 1000-ft-long X 34-ft-wide X 30-ft-deep barrier at construction rates to 12 Wday (8 hr/day operation). Life cycle costs including RCRA cover and long-term monitoring range from approximately $380 to $590/cu yd of waste contained or $100 to $160/sq ft of placed barrier based upon the subsurface geology surrounding the waste. Project objectives for Phase I were to validate the SCS construction equipment and process, evaluate the system performance, validate the barrier constructability, and assess the barrier effectiveness. The objectives for Phase 11, which is a full-scale demonstration at a DOE site, are to perform an extensive characterization of the test site, to demonstrate the equipment and the installation process under site-specific performance and regulatory requirements, to validate the operational performance of the equipment, and to perform long-term verification of the barrier using monitoring wells. To date, significant progress has been made to establish the technical and economical feasibility of the SCS. This report describes the SCS conventional and specialized equipment, barrier materials, and construction process. It presents results of the specialized equipment Factory Test, the SCS Control Test and the SCS Advance Control Test at the RAHCO facility. Provided herein are the system performance capabilities and an estimated construction cost and schedule for a 1000-ft-long X 34-ft-wide X 29-ft-deep containment barrier at the DOE Oak Ridge Bear Creek Burial Grounds are also provided.

  1. A Passive Probe for Subsurface Oceans and Liquid Water in Jupiter's Icy Moons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Maiwald, Frank; Heggy, Essam; Ries, Paul; Liewer, Kurt

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an interferometric reflectometer method for passive detection of subsurface oceans and liquid water in Jovian icy moons using Jupiter's decametric radio emission (DAM). The DAM flux density exceeds 3,000 times the galactic background in the neighborhood of the Jovian icy moons, providing a signal that could be used for passive radio sounding. An instrument located between the icy moon and Jupiter could sample the DAM emission along with its echoes reflected in the ice layer of the target moon. Cross-correlating the direct emission with the echoes would provide a measurement of the ice shell thickness along with its dielectric properties. The interferometric reflectometer provides a simple solution to sub-Jovian radio sounding of ice shells that is complementary to ice penetrating radar measurements better suited to measurements in the anti-Jovian hemisphere that shadows Jupiter's strong decametric emission. The passive nature of this technique also serves as risk reduction in case of radar transmi...

  2. Water ice permafrost on Mars: Layering structure and subsurface distribution according to HEND/Odyssey and MOLA/MGS data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuber, Maria

    . The first dataset measures the content of hydrogen (in the form of water or hydroxyl) in the soil previously analyzed neutron and gamma-ray data that subsurface water ice is present within this region of heavy water nuclei, D, and 2.2-MeV gamma-ray photons. Measurements of neutrons and 2.2-MeV gamma-rays

  3. Hanford tanks initiative work plan -- subsurface characterization to support the closure-readiness demonstration for tank 241-AX-104

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D.B.

    1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a plan for subsurface investigation near 241-AX-104 Single-Shell tank. Objectives of the investigation are soil sampling and analyses (physical and chemical), local stratigraphic correlation, groundwater background characterization, and geophysical surveys. The primary purpose of the investigation is to supply physical and hydraulic properties for numerical modeling of vadose zone flow and transport.

  4. Increasing subsurface water storage in discontinuous permafrost areas of the Lena River basin, Eurasia, detected from GRACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velicogna, I.; Tong, J.; Zhang, T.; Kimball, J. S

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or no change in ground water storage. Therefore, we con-ground- water table from 2002 through 2010 would be required to account for the subsurface water storageground water level over the same period repre- sents 1.9 cm of potential additional soil water storage

  5. A Many-Task Parallel Approach for Multiscale Simulations of Subsurface Flow and Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Yang, Xiaofan; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Agarwal, Khushbu; Chase, Jared M.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuum-scale models have long been used to study subsurface flow, transport, and reactions but lack the ability to resolve processes that are governed by pore-scale mixing. Recently, pore-scale models, which explicitly resolve individual pores and soil grains, have been developed to more accurately model pore-scale phenomena, particularly reaction processes that are controlled by local mixing. However, pore-scale models are prohibitively expensive for modeling application-scale domains. This motivates the use of a hybrid multiscale approach in which continuum- and pore-scale codes are coupled either hierarchically or concurrently within an overall simulation domain (time and space). This approach is naturally suited to an adaptive, loosely-coupled many-task methodology with three potential levels of concurrency. Each individual code (pore- and continuum-scale) can be implemented in parallel; multiple semi-independent instances of the pore-scale code are required at each time step providing a second level of concurrency; and Monte Carlo simulations of the overall system to represent uncertainty in material property distributions provide a third level of concurrency. We have developed a hybrid multiscale model of a mixing-controlled reaction in a porous medium wherein the reaction occurs only over a limited portion of the domain. Loose, minimally-invasive coupling of pre-existing parallel continuum- and pore-scale codes has been accomplished by an adaptive script-based workflow implemented in the Swift workflow system. We describe here the methods used to create the model system, adaptively control multiple coupled instances of pore- and continuum-scale simulations, and maximize the scalability of the overall system. We present results of numerical experiments conducted on NERSC supercomputing systems; our results demonstrate that loose many-task coupling provides a scalable solution for multiscale subsurface simulations with minimal overhead.

  6. Ordovician platform, slope, and basin facies in subsurface of southern North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alberstadt, L.P.; Colvin, G.; Sauve, J.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ordovician carbonates of the Nashville dome and Ozark dome regions have long been considered typical shelf deposits. In the subsurface to the south, in the Black Warrior basin, Mississippi Embayment, and Arkoma basin, these shelf carbonate units changed facies. The most significant change is the occurrence of a thick limestone unit characterized by a faunal and floral assemblage of Nuia, Girvanella (isolated long strands), Sphaerocodium, a delicate stacked-chambered organism (.algal), and sponge spicules and sponge mudstone clumps. In ascending order, the complete Ordovician sequence consists of: a lower dolostone, the Nuia-sponge limestone, a dolostone, and a limestone. The upper part of this four-fold sequence changes character westward into the Arkoma basin. The lower two units maintain their character for long distances along depositional strike and occur in parts of the Appalachians as far north as Newfoundland, and on the opposite side of the continent in Nevada. The Nuia-sponge assemblage is a distinctive petrographic marker and seems to be a persistent Ordovician rock and fossil assemblage of widespread occurrence. In Nevada, it occurs on the surface where it is associated with slump and slide features that suggest that it is an outer shelf or upper slope deposit. Coeval carbonates in the Ouachita Mountains are different and show indications of being deep water (basinal). Biostratigraphic evidence indicates that the succession in the subsurface is continuous; the regional Lower Ordovician-Middle Ordovician unconformity is absent. The Lower Ordovician-Middle Ordovician boundary falls near the top of the Nuia-sponge mudstone unit and not at the top of the underlying thick dolostone unit.

  7. Does aspartic acid racemization constrain the depth limit of the subsurface biosphere?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onstott, T. C. [Princeton University] [Princeton University; Aubrey, A.D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Kieft, T L [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology] [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology; Silver, B J [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL] [ORNL; Van Heerden, E. [University of the Free State] [University of the Free State; Opperman, D. J. [University of the Free State] [University of the Free State; Bada, J L. [Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Instition of Oceanography, Univesity of California San Diego,] [Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Instition of Oceanography, Univesity of California San Diego,

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies of the subsurface biosphere have deduced average cellular doubling times of hundreds to thousands of years based upon geochemical models. We have directly constrained the in situ average cellular protein turnover or doubling times for metabolically active micro-organisms based on cellular amino acid abundances, D/L values of cellular aspartic acid, and the in vivo aspartic acid racemization rate. Application of this method to planktonic microbial communities collected from deep fractures in South Africa yielded maximum cellular amino acid turnover times of ~89 years for 1 km depth and 27 C and 1 2 years for 3 km depth and 54 C. The latter turnover times are much shorter than previously estimated cellular turnover times based upon geochemical arguments. The aspartic acid racemization rate at higher temperatures yields cellular protein doubling times that are consistent with the survival times of hyperthermophilic strains and predicts that at temperatures of 85 C, cells must replace proteins every couple of days to maintain enzymatic activity. Such a high maintenance requirement may be the principal limit on the abundance of living micro-organisms in the deep, hot subsurface biosphere, as well as a potential limit on their activity. The measurement of the D/L of aspartic acid in biological samples is a potentially powerful tool for deep, fractured continental and oceanic crustal settings where geochemical models of carbon turnover times are poorly constrained. Experimental observations on the racemization rates of aspartic acid in living thermophiles and hyperthermophiles could test this hypothesis. The development of corrections for cell wall peptides and spores will be required, however, to improve the accuracy of these estimates for environmental samples.

  8. Molecular analysis of the metabolic rates of discrete subsurface populations of sulfate reducers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miletto, M.; Williams, K.H.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Lovley, D.R.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elucidating the in situ metabolic activity of phylogenetically diverse populations of sulfate-reducing microorganisms that populate anoxic sedimentary environments is key to understanding subsurface ecology. Previous pure culture studies have demonstrated that transcript abundance of dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase genes is correlated with the sulfate reducing activity of individual cells. To evaluate whether expression of these genes was diagnostic for subsurface communities, dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase gene transcript abundance in phylogenetically distinct sulfate-reducing populations was quantified during a field experiment in which acetate was added to uranium-contaminated groundwater. Analysis of dsrAB sequences prior to the addition of acetate indicated that Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, and Syntrophaceae-related sulfate reducers were the most abundant. Quantifying dsrB transcripts of the individual populations suggested that Desulfobacteraceae initially had higher dsrB transcripts per cell than Desulfobulbaceae or Syntrophaceae populations, and that the activity of Desulfobacteraceae increased further when the metabolism of dissimilatory metal reducers competing for the added acetate declined. In contrast, dsrB transcript abundance in Desulfobulbaceae and Syntrophaceae remained relatively constant, suggesting a lack of stimulation by added acetate. The indication of higher sulfate-reducing activity in the Desulfobacteraceae was consistent with the finding that Desulfobacteraceae became the predominant component of the sulfate-reducing community. Discontinuing acetate additions resulted in a decline in dsrB transcript abundance in the Desulfobacteraceae. These results suggest that monitoring transcripts of dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase genes in distinct populations of sulfate reducers can provide insight into the relative rates of metabolism of different components of the sulfate-reducing community and their ability to respond to environmental perturbations.

  9. TABLE 3.-Comparison of this work with literature values for the concentration of PCB's and DDT residues in surface films and subsurface waters. All values in nanograms per liter, and are the sum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    residues in surface films and subsurface waters. All values in nanograms per liter, and are the sum of filtrate and filter from Table 2 where applicable. PCB's DDT residues Subsurface Subsurface Reference Location Surface films waters Surface films waters Seba and Corcoran Biscayne Bay NO' NO 185-13,710

  10. Environmental Systems Research Candidates Program--FY2000 Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piet, Steven James

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Systems Research Candidates (ESRC) Program, which is scheduled to end September 2001, was established in April 2000 as part of the Environmental Systems Research and Analysis Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to provide key science and technology to meet the clean-up mission of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, and perform research and development that will help solve current legacy problems and enhance the INEEL’s scientific and technical capability for solving longer-term challenges. This report documents the progress and accomplishments of the ESRC Program from April through September 2000. The ESRC Program consists of 24 tasks subdivided within four research areas: A. Environmental Characterization Science and Technology. This research explores new data acquisition, processing, and interpretation methods that support cleanup and long-term stewardship decisions. B. Subsurface Understanding. This research expands understanding of the biology, chemistry, physics, hydrology, and geology needed to improve models of contamination problems in the earth’s subsurface. C. Environmental Computational Modeling. This research develops INEEL computing capability for modeling subsurface contaminants and contaminated facilities. D. Environmental Systems Science and Technology. This research explores novel processes to treat waste and decontaminate facilities. Our accomplishments during FY 2000 include the following: • We determined, through analysis of samples taken in and around the INEEL site, that mercury emissions from the INEEL calciner have not raised regional off-INEEL mercury contamination levels above normal background. • We have initially demonstrated the use of x-ray fluorescence to image uranium and heavy metal concentrations in soil samples. • We increased our understanding of the subsurface environment; applying mathematical complexity theory to the problem of transport of subsurface contaminants. • We upgraded the INEEL’s high-speed computer link to offsite supercomputers from T1 (1.5 MB/s) to DS3 (45 MB/s). Procurements have initiated a further upgrade to OC3 (155 MB/s) with additional onsite computational power that should put the INEEL on the Top 500 Supercomputing Sites list. • We developed advanced decontamination, decommissioning, and dismantlement techniques, including the Decontamination, Decommissioning, and Remediation Optimal Planning System.

  11. A Strategy to Conduct an Analysis of the Long-Term Performance of Low-Activity Waste Glass in a Shallow Subsurface Disposal System at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeway, James J.; Pierce, Eric M.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The federal facilities located on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State have been used extensively by the U.S. government to produce nuclear materials for the U.S. strategic defense arsenal. Currently, the Hanford Site is under the stewardship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste resulting from the production of nuclear materials has accumulated, mainly in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks located in the central plateau of the Hanford Site (Mann et al., 2001). The DOE-EM Office of River Protection (ORP) is proceeding with plans to immobilize and permanently dispose of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction onsite in a shallow subsurface disposal facility (the Integrated Disposal Facility [IDF]). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was contracted to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the IDF (the source term) as part of an immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass testing program to support future IDF performance assessments (PAs).

  12. Sponsored Program Resources SPONSORED PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Sponsored Program Resources - 1 - SPONSORED PROGRAMS Sponsored programs are research, instruction for sponsored programs is provided through an agreement between the sponsor and Syracuse University are being achieved and funds properly used Sponsored programs are managed by the Office of Sponsored

  13. Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experience, is a unique educational program designed to introduce students in geophysics and related fields to "hands on" geophysical exploration and research. The program...

  14. Program Administration

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume describes program administration that establishes and maintains effective organizational management and control of the emergency management program. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

  15. Environmental Programs Environmental Programs Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    162 Environmental Programs Environmental Programs Committee Walter Whitfield Isle, Chair (English) Katherine Bennett Ensor (Statistics) Mark R. Wiesner (Civil and Environmental Engineering) Donald Ostdiek (Architecture) The Environmental Programs Committee coordinates courses and curricula on environmental topics

  16. Accessible programming using program synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Rishabh

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New computing platforms have greatly increased the demand for programmers, but learning to program remains a big challenge. Program synthesis techniques have the potential to revolutionize programming by making it more ...

  17. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 3 with Errata Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Echelard

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447, Project Shoal Area (PSA)-Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 447 is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, approximately 48 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for CAU 447, as provided in the FFACO. Corrective Action Unit 447 consists of two corrective action sites (CASs): CAS 57-49-01, Emplacement Shaft, and CAS 57-57-001, Cavity. The emplacement shaft (CAS-57-49-01) was backfilled and plugged in 1996 and will not be evaluated further. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. The original Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for the PSA was approved in September 1996 and described a plan to drill and test four characterization wells, followed by flow and transport modeling (DOE/NV, 1996). The resultant drilling is described in a data report (DOE/NV, 1998e) and the data analysis and modeling in an interim modeling report (Pohll et al., 1998). After considering the results of the modeling effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the degree of uncertainty in transport predictions for PSA remained unacceptably large. As a result, a second CAIP was developed by DOE and approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in December 1998 (DOE/NV, 1998a). This plan prescribed a rigorous analysis of uncertainty in the Shoal model and quantification of methods of reducing uncertainty through data collection. This analysis is termed a Data Decision Analysis (Pohll et al., 1999a) and formed the basis for a second major characterization effort at PSA (Pohll et al., 1999b). The details for this second field effort are presented in an Addendum to the CAIP, which was approved by NDEP in April 1999 (DOE/NV, 1999a). Four additional characterization wells were drilled at PSA during summer and fall of 1999; details of the drilling and well installation are in IT Corporation (2000), with testing reported in Mihevc et al. (2000). A key component of the second field program was a tracer test between two of the new wells (Carroll et al., 2000; Reimus et al., 2003). Based on the potential exposure pathways, two corrective action objectives were identified for CAU 447: Prevent or mitigate exposure to groundwater contaminants of concern at concentrations exceeding regulatory maximum contaminant levels or risk-based levels; and Reduce the risk to human health and the environment to the extent practicable. Based on the review of existing data, the results of the modeling, future use, and current operations at PSA, the following alternatives have been developed for consideration at CAU 447: Alternative 1--No Further Action; Alternative 2--Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls; and Alternative 3--Contaminant Control. The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on the approach outlined in the ''Focused Evaluation of Selected Remedial Alternatives for the Underground Test Area'' (DOE/NV, 1998b). Each alternative was assessed against nine evaluation criteria. These criteria include overall protection of human health and the environment;

  18. Structure and Function of Metal- and Nitrate-reducing Microbial Communities in the FRC Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akob, Denise M.; Mills, Heath J.; Kerkhof, Lee; Gihring, Thomas M.; Kostk, Joel E.

    2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this study is to evaluate structure-function relationships of sedimentary microbial communities likely to regulate U(VI) reduction and immobilization in the subsurface of Area 2 at the Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge, TN. Microcosm experiments were conducted under near in situ conditions with FRC subsurface materials cocontaminated with high levels of U(VI) and nitrate. The activity, abundance, and community composition of microorganisms was determined in microcosm samples, stimulated with ethanol or glucose, and compared to those from sediment cores and unamended controls. Activity was assessed by monitoring terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs; nitrate, sulfate, uranium, and iron reduction) as well as electron donor utilization. Microbial functional groups, nitrate- and iron(III)-reducing bacteria, were enumerated during the nitrate- and metal-reduction phases of the incubation and in sediment core samples using a most probable number (MPN) serial dilution assay. U(VI) and Fe(III) were reduced concurrently in the glucose but not the ethanol treatments. In ethanol-amended microcosms, U(VI) was reduced during a 4-day lag phase between nitrate- and Fe(III)-reduction phases. Biostimulation resulted in 3 to 5 orders of magnitude higher counts of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, whereas populations of nitrate-reducers were enhanced by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude. One to 2 orders of magnitude more Fe(III)-reducers were observed in ethanol- as compared to glucose-amended treatments in parallel with enhanced U(VI) removal in ethanol treatments. Cultivatable Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in the ethanol treatments were dominated by Geobacter sp. while those cultured on glucose were dominated by fermentative organisms, i.e., Tolumonas sp. Currently, carbon substrate utilization is being examined through HPLC analysis of microcosm porewaters. In addition, changes in the overall microbial community composition are being assessed using cultivation-independent techniques, including fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (T-RFLP) and cloning/sequencing of structural and functional genes. Our results indicate that the microbially-catalyzed mechanism of U(VI) reduction is electron donor dependent and that more effective U(VI) removal is achieved in parallel with an enrichment of Geobacter sp. upon treatment with ethanol.

  19. Recovery Act: Web-based CO{sub 2} Subsurface Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paolini, Christopher; Castillo, Jose

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Web-based CO{sub 2} Subsurface Modeling project focused primarily on extending an existing text-only, command-line driven, isothermal and isobaric, geochemical reaction-transport simulation code, developed and donated by Sienna Geodynamics, into an easier-to-use Web-based application for simulating long-term storage of CO{sub 2} in geologic reservoirs. The Web-based interface developed through this project, publically accessible via URL http://symc.sdsu.edu/, enables rapid prototyping of CO{sub 2} injection scenarios and allows students without advanced knowledge of geochemistry to setup a typical sequestration scenario, invoke a simulation, analyze results, and then vary one or more problem parameters and quickly re-run a simulation to answer what-if questions. symc.sdsu.edu has 2x12 core AMD Opteron™ 6174 2.20GHz processors and 16GB RAM. The Web-based application was used to develop a new computational science course at San Diego State University, COMP 670: Numerical Simulation of CO{sub 2} Sequestration, which was taught during the fall semester of 2012. The purpose of the class was to introduce graduate students to Carbon Capture, Use and Storage (CCUS) through numerical modeling and simulation, and to teach students how to interpret simulation results to make predictions about long-term CO{sub 2} storage capacity in deep brine reservoirs. In addition to the training and education component of the project, significant software development efforts took place. Two computational science doctoral and one geological science masters student, under the direction of the PIs, extended the original code developed by Sienna Geodynamics, named Sym.8. New capabilities were added to Sym.8 to simulate non-isothermal and non-isobaric flows of charged aqueous solutes in porous media, in addition to incorporating HPC support into the code for execution on many-core XSEDE clusters. A successful outcome of this project was the funding and training of three new computational science students and one geological science student in technologies relevant to carbon sequestration and problems involving flow in subsurface media. The three computational science students are currently finishing their doctorial studies on different aspects of modeling CO{sub 2} sequestration, while the geological science student completed his master’s thesis in modeling the thermal response of CO{sub 2} injection in brine and, as a direct result of participation in this project, is now employed at ExxonMobil as a full-time staff geologist.

  20. Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides, Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA project processing site. Final report: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, D.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface and subsurface soil cleanup protocols for the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site are summarized as follows: In accordance with EPA-promulgated land cleanup standards, in situ Ra-226 is to be cleaned up based on bulk concentrations not exceeding 5 and 15 pCi/g in 15-cm surface and subsurface depth increments, averaged over 100m{sup 2} grid blocks, where the parent Ra-226 concentrations are greater than, or in secular equilibrium with, the Th-230 parent. In locations where Th-230 has differentially migrated in subsoil relative to Ra-226, a Th-230 clean up protocol has been developed. The cleanup of other radionuclides or nonradiological hazards that pose a significant threat to the public and the environment will be determined and implemented in accordance with pathway analysis to assess impacts and the implications of ALARA specified in 40 CFR Part 192 relative to supplemental standards.

  1. Fluctuations in Species-Level Protein Expression Occur during Element and Nutrient Cycling in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Williams, Kenneth H.; McCue, Lee Ann; Handley, Kim M.; Miller, C. S.; Giloteaux, L.; Montgomery, A. P.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Long, Philip E.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    While microbial activities in environmental systems play a key role in the utilization and cycling of essential elements and compounds, microbial activity and growth frequently fluctuates in response to environmental stimuli and perturbations. To investigate these fluctuations within a saturated aquifer system, we monitored a carbon-stimulated in situ Geobacter population while iron reduction was occurring, using 16S rRNA abundances and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry proteome measurements. Following carbon amendment, 16S rRNA analysis of temporally separated samples revealed the rapid enrichment of Geobacter-like environmental strains with strong similarity to G. bemidjiensis. Tandem mass spectrometry proteomics measurements suggest high carbon flux through Geobacter respiratory pathways, and the synthesis of anapleurotic four carbon compounds from acetyl-CoA via pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase activity. Across a 40-day period where Fe(III) reduction was occurring, fluctuations in protein expression reflected changes in anabolic versus catabolic reactions, with increased levels of biosynthesis occurring soon after acetate arrival in the aquifer. In addition, localized shifts in nutrient limitation were inferred based on expression of nitrogenase enzymes and phosphate uptake proteins. These temporal data offer the first example of differing microbial protein expression associated with changing geochemical conditions in a subsurface environment.

  2. EMSL Geochemistry, Biogeochemistry and Subsurface Science-Science Theme Advisory Panel Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Gordon E.; Chaka, Anne; Shuh, David K.; Roden, Eric E.; Werth, Charles J.; Hess, Nancy J.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Baer, Donald R.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Bowden, Mark E.; Grate, Jay W.; Hoyt, David W.; Kuprat, Laura R.; Lea, Alan S.; Mueller, Karl T.; Oostrom, Martinus; Orr, Galya; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Plata, Charity; Robinson, E. W.; Teller, Raymond G.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Wang, Hongfei; Wiley, H. S.; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the topics of discussion and the recommendations of the panel members. On December 8 and 9, 2010, the Geochemistry, Biogeochemistry, and Subsurface Science (GBSS) Science Theme Advisory Panel (STAP) convened for a more in-depth exploration of the five Science Theme focus areas developed at a similar meeting held in 2009. The goal for the fiscal year (FY) 2011 meeting was to identify potential topical areas for science campaigns, necessary experimental development needs, and scientific members for potential research teams. After a review of the current science in each of the five focus areas, the 2010 STAP discussions successfully led to the identification of one well focused campaign idea in pore-scale modeling and five longer-term potential research campaign ideas that would likely require additional workshops to identify specific research thrusts. These five campaign areas can be grouped into two categories: (1) the application of advanced high-resolution, high mass accuracy experimental techniques to elucidate the interplay between geochemistry and microbial communities in terrestrial ecosystems and (2) coupled computation/experimental investigations of the electron transfer reactions either between mineral surfaces and outer membranes of microbial cells or between the outer and inner membranes of microbial cells.

  3. Electrode Induced Removal and Recovery of Uranium (VI) from Acidic Subsurfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, Kelvin [Carnegie Mellon University

    2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The overarching objective of this research is to provide an improved understanding of how aqueous geochemical conditions impact the removal of U and Tc from groundwater and how engineering design may be utilized to optimize removal of these radionuclides. Experiments were designed to address the unique conditions in Area 3 of ORNL while also providing broader insight into the geochemical effectors of the removal rates and extent for U and Tc. The specific tasks of this work were to: 1) quantify the impact of common aqueous geochemical and operational conditions on the rate and extent of U removal and recovery from water, 2) investigate the removal of Tc with polarized graphite electrode, and determine the influence of geochemical and operational conditions on Tc removal and recovery, 3) determine whether U and Tc may be treated simultaneous from Area 3 groundwater, and examine the bench-scale performance of electrode-based treatment, and 4) determine the capacity of graphite electrodes for U(VI) removal and develop a mathematical, kinetic model for the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution. Overall the body of work suggests that an electrode-based approach for the remediation of acidic subsurface environments, such as those observed in Area 3 of ORNL may be successful for the removal for both U(VI) and Tc. Carbonaceous (graphite) electrode materials are likely to be the least costly means to maximize removal rates and efficiency by maximizing the electrode surface area.

  4. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface. Final performance report, June 1, 1990--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anaerobic bacteria were isolated from deep subsurface sediment samples taken at study sites in Idaho (INEL) and Washington (HR) by culturing on dilute and concentrated medium. Morphologically distinct colonies were purified, and their responses to 21 selected physiological tests were determined. Although the number of isolates was small (18 INEL, 27 HR) some general patterns could be determined. Most strains could utilize all the carbon sources, however the glycerol and melizitose utilization was positive for 50% or less of the HR isolates. Catalase activity (27.78% at INEL, 74.07% at HR) and tryptophan metabolism (11.12% at INEL, 40.74% at HR) were significantly different between the two study sites. MPN and viable counts indicate that sediments near the water table yield the greatest numbers of anaerobes. Deeper sediments also appear to be more selective with the greatest number of viable counts on low-nutrient mediums. Likewise, only strictly obligate anaerobes were found in the deepest sediment samples. Selective media indicated the presence of methanogens, acetogens, and sulfate reducers at only the HR site.

  5. Review: Some Low-Frequency Electrical Methods for Subsurface Characterization and Monitoring in Hydrogeology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revil, Andre; Karaoulis, M.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Kemna, Andreas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-frequency geoelectrical methods include mainly self-potential, resistivity, and induced polarization. These methods are commonly used to solve hydrogeological problems in the shallow subsurface and provide complementary information to each other and to in-situ measurements. The self-potential method is a passive measurement of the electrical response associated with the in-situ generation of current mainly due to the flow of pore water in porous media, a salinity gradient, and/or the concentration of redox-active species. It can be used to visualize groundwater flow patterns, to determine permeability, and to detect preferential flow paths. Electrical resistivity is dependent on the water content, the temperature, the salinity of the pore water, and the clay content and mineralogy. Induced polarization characterizes the ability of rocks to store electrical energy in terms of ion accumulations in the pore water. Electrical resistivity, time-domain and frequency-domain induced polarization methods can be used to image the permeability and the distribution of contaminants in the ground.

  6. Petrology and hydrocarbon reservoir potential of subsurface Pottsville (Pennsylvanian) sandstones, Black Warrior basin, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beard, R.H.; Maylan, M.A.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin of Mississippi and Alabama is a Paleozoic foreland basin developed between the North American craton and the Appalachian and Ouachita orogenic belts. The basin fill consists of a middle Mississippian to Lower Pennsylvanian clastic wedge, transitional in character, between Appalachian molasse and Ouachita flysch. Pottsville (Pennsylvanian) sandstones, shales, coals, and thin conglomerates make up the greater part of the wedge, thickening to 11,000 ft in northeast Mississippi. Although the outcropping and near-surface Pottsville is economically importance as a source of coal in Alabama, only minor amounts of gas have been derived from the subsurface Pottsville of Mississippi (Clay and Monroe Counties). Production from the Black Warrior basin, mostly gas, is chiefly from Chesterian (Mississippian) sands and limestones in the shallower part of the basin, principally in Monroe County. Cores of Pottsville sandstones from four wells in the deeper part of the Black Warrior basin (Calhoun and Choctaw Counties) have been examined to determine their petrography, diagenetic history, and reservoir quality. This part of the basin is relatively unexplored, and the primary objective of the study was to determine if suitable hydrocarbon reservoirs are present.

  7. DISTRIBUTION AND RANGE OF RADIONUCLIDE SORPTION COEFFICIENTS IN A SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SUBSURFACE: STOCHASTIC MODELING CONSIDERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.; et. al

    2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncertainty associated with the sorption coefficient, or K{sub d} value, is one of the key uncertainties in estimating risk associated with burying low-level nuclear waste in the subsurface. The objective of this study was to measure >648 K{sub d} values and provide a measure of the range and distribution (normal or log-normal) of radionuclide K{sub d} values appropriate for the E-Area disposal site, within the Savannah River Site, near Aiken South Carolina. The 95% confidence level for the mean K{sub d} was twice the mean in the Aquifer Zone (18-30.5 m depth), equal to the mean for the Upper Vadose Zone (3.3-10 m depth), and half the mean for the Lower Vadose Zone (3.10-18 m depth). The distribution of K{sub d} values was log normal in the Upper Vadose Zone and Aquifer Zone, and normal in the Lower Vadose Zone. To our knowledge, this is the first report of natural radionuclide Kd variability in the literature. Using ranges and distribution coefficients that are specific to the hydrostratigraphic unit improved model accuracy and reduced model uncertainty. Unfortunately, extension of these conclusions to other sites is likely not appropriate given that each site has its own sources of hydrogeological variability. However, this study provides one of the first examples of the development stochastic ranges and distributions of K{sub d} values for a hydrological unit for stochastic modeling.

  8. Subsurface contaminant monitoring by laser fluorescence excitation-emission spectroscopy in a cone penetrometer probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, J.; Hart, S.J.; Wang, W.; Namytchkine, D.; Kenny, J.E. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) excitation-emission matrix (EEM) probe has been developed for subsurface monitoring of fluorescent organic contaminants. The fourth harmonic of a flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG laser (at 266 nm) is used to pump a Raman shifter. Up to ten laser beams (in the wavelength region of 258 to 379 nm) from the Raman shifter are launched into optical fibers that conduct the light to the probe near the tip of the cone penetrometer. The fluorescence emission is excited through ten separate sapphire windows and collected by ten collection fibers that conduct the fluorescence to a spectrograph/CCD detection system. This probe allows real-time collection of LIF-EEMs of contaminants adsorbed on solids or dissolved in groundwater. LIF-EEMs provide a substantial amount of spectral information that can be used to determine the composition and quantity of contaminants in soils. The system was tested and calibrated in the laboratory. Spectra of different organic contaminants were measured in aqueous solutions, in organic solvents, and in different types of soils.

  9. Sub-surface characterization and three dimensional profiling of semiconductors by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammel, P.C.; Moore, G.; Roukes, M.; Zhenyong Zhang

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project successfully developed a magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) instrument to mechanically detect magnetic resonance signals. This technique provides an intrinsically subsurface, chemical-species-specific probe of structure, constituent density and other properties of materials. As in conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), an applied magnetic field gradient selects a well defined volume of the sample for study. However mechanical detection allows much greater sensitivity, and this in turn allows the reduction of the size of the minimum resolvable volume. This requires building an instrument designed to achieve nanometer-scale resolution at buried semiconductor interfaces. High-resolution, three-dimensional depth profiling of semiconductors is critical in the development and fabrication of semiconductor devices. Currently, there is no capability for direct, high-resolution observation and characterization of dopant density, and other critical features of semiconductors. The successful development of MRFM in conjunction with modifications to improve resolution will enable for the first time detailed structural and electronic studies in doped semiconductors and multilayered nanoelectronic devices, greatly accelerating the current pace of research and development.

  10. Development of a cement-polymer close-coupled subsurface barrier technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, B.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heiser, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Stewart, W.; Phillips, S. [Applied Geotechnical Engineering and Construction, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project was to further develop close-coupled barrier technology for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional cement grout curtain followed by a thin inner lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and chemically resistant polymer layer. The technology has matured from a regulatory investigation of issues concerning barriers and barrier materials to a pilot-scale, multiple individual column injections at Sandia National Labs (SNL) to full scale demonstration. The feasibility of this barrier concept was successfully proven in a full scale ``cold site`` demonstration at Hanford, WA. Consequently, a full scale deployment of the technology was conducted at an actual environmental restoration site at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), Long Island, NY. This paper discusses the installation and performance of a technology deployment implemented at OU-1 an Environmental Restoration Site located at BNL.

  11. An Integrated Assessment of Geochemical and Community Structure Determinants of Metal Reduction Rates in Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel E. Kostka

    2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This project represented a joint effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the University of Tennessee (UT), and Florida State University (FSU). ORNL served as the lead in-stitution with Dr. A.V. Palumbo responsible for project coordination, integration, and deliver-ables. In situ uranium bioremediation is focused on biostimulating indigenous microorganisms through a combination of pH neutralization and the addition of large amounts of electron donor. Successful biostimulation of U(VI) reduction has been demonstrated in the field and in the laboratory. However, little data is available on the dynamics of microbial populations capable of U(VI) reduction, and the differences in the microbial community dynamics between proposed electron donors have not been explored. In order to elucidate the potential mechanisms of U(VI) reduction for optimization of bioremediation strategies, structure-function relationships of microbial populations were investigated in microcosms of subsurface materials cocontaminated with radionuclides and nitrate from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  12. Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan; Moore, Dean A.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2012-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) were investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface Pleistocene flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in incubated Hanford sediments with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

  13. MICROSCALE METABOLIC, REDOX AND ABIOTIC REACTIONS IN HANFORD 300 AREA SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beyenal, Haluk [WSU] [WSU; McLEan, Jeff [JCVI] [JCVI; Majors, Paul [PNNL] [PNNL; Fredrickson, Jim [PNNL] [PNNL

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford 300 Area is a unique site due to periodic hydrologic influence of river water resulting in changes in groundwater elevation and flow direction. This area is also highly subject to uranium remobilization, the source of which is currently believed to be the region at the base of the vadose zone that is subject to period saturation due to the changes in the water levels in the Columbia River. We found that microbial processes and redox and abiotic reactions which operate at the microscale were critical to understanding factors controlling the macroscopic fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface. The combined laboratory and field research showed how microscale conditions control uranium mobility and how biotic, abiotic and redox reactions relate to each other. Our findings extended the current knowledge to examine U(VI) reduction and immobilization using natural 300 Area communities as well as selected model organisms on redox-sensitive and redox-insensitive minerals. Using innovative techniques developed specifically to probe biogeochemical processes at the microscale, our research expanded our current understanding of the roles played by mineral surfaces, bacterial competition, and local biotic, abiotic and redox reaction rates on the reduction and immobilization of uranium.

  14. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms : implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banaszak, J.E.; Reed, D.T.; Rittmann, B.E.

    1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, we assess how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. We describe how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility. We explain why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. We describe the development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions. Throughout, we identify the key research needs.

  15. A Method Of Evaluating A Subsurface Region Using Gather Sensitive Data Discrimination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lazaratos, Spyridon K. (Houston, TX)

    2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of evaluating a subsurface region by separating/enhancing a certain type of seismic event data of interest from an overall set of seismic event data which includes other, different types of seismic event data is disclosed herein. In accordance with one feature, a particular type of gather is generated from the seismic event data such that the gather includes at least a portion of the data which is of interest and at least a portion of the other data. A series of data discrimination lines are incorporated into the gather at positions and directions which are established in the gather in a predetermined way. Using the data discrimination lines, the data of interest which is present in the gather is separated/enhanced with respect to the other data within the gather. The separated data may be used for example in producing a map of the particular subterranean region. In accordance with another feature, the gather is selected such that the incorporated discrimination lines approach a near parallel relationship with one another. Thereby, the data is transformed in a way which causes the discrimination lines to be parallel with one another, resulting in reduced frequency distortion accompanied by improved accuracy in the separation/enhancement of data. In accordance with still another feature, the disclosed data separation/enhancement method is compatible with an iterative approach.

  16. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Up-scaling from physically based numerical simulations at hillslope scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Melkamu; Ye, Sheng; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Fiori, Aldo; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall-runoff response, especially in steep forested regions. However; its contribution is poorly represented in current generation of land surface hydrological models (LSMs) and catchment-scale rainfall-runoff models. The lack of physical basis of common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global models. This paper is aimed at deriving physically based parameterizations of the storage-discharge relationship relating to subsurface flow. These parameterizations are derived through a two-step up-scaling procedure: firstly, through simulations with a physically based (Darcian) subsurface flow model for idealized three dimensional rectangular hillslopes, accounting for within-hillslope random heterogeneity of soil hydraulic properties, and secondly, through subsequent up-scaling to the catchment scale by accounting for between-hillslope and within-catchment heterogeneity of topographic features (e.g., slope). These theoretical simulation results produced parameterizations of the storage-discharge relationship in terms of soil hydraulic properties, topographic slope and their heterogeneities, which were consistent with results of previous studies. Yet, regionalization of the resulting storage-discharge relations across 50 actual catchments in eastern United States, and a comparison of the regionalized results with equivalent empirical results obtained on the basis of analysis of observed streamflow recession curves, revealed a systematic inconsistency. It was found that the difference between the theoretical and empirically derived results could be explained, to first order, by climate in the form of climatic aridity index. This suggests a possible codependence of climate, soils, vegetation and topographic properties, and suggests that subsurface flow parameterization needed for ungauged locations must account for both the physics of flow in heterogeneous landscapes, and the co-dependence of soil and topographic properties with climate, including possibly the mediating role of vegetation.

  17. The influence of droplet size and biodegradation on the transport of subsurface oil droplets during the Deepwater Horizon: a model sensitivity study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Elizabeth W

    A better understanding of oil droplet formation, degradation, and dispersal in deep waters is needed to enhance prediction of the fate and transport of subsurface oil spills. This research evaluates the influence of initial ...

  18. Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgul, Ercin

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs ...

  19. The role of nanopores on U(VI) sorption and redox behavior in U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Huifang; Roden, Eric E.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Jung, Hun-Bok; Konishi, Hiromi; Boyanov, Maxim; Sun, Yubing; Mishra, Bhoopesh

    2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Most reactive surfaces in clay-dominated sediments are present within nanopores (pores of nm dimension). The behavior of geological fluids and minerals in nanopores is significantly different from those in normal non-nanoporous environments. The effect of nanopore surfaces on U(VI) sorption/desorption and reduction is likely to be significant in clay-rich subsurface environments. Our research results from both model nanopore system and natural sediments from both model system (synthetic nanopore alumina) and sediments from the ORNL Field Research Center prove that U(VI) sorption on nanopore surfaces can be greatly enhanced by nanopore confinement environments. The results from the project provide advanced mechanistic, quantitative information on the physiochemical controls on uranium sorption and redox behavior in subsurface sediments. The influence of nanopore surfaces on coupled uranium sorption/desorption and reduction processes is significant in virtually all subsurface environments, because most reactive surfaces are in fact nanopore surfaces. The results will enhance transfer of our laboratory-based research to a major field research initiative where reductive uranium immobilization is being investigated. Our results will also provide the basic science for developing in-situ colloidal barrier of nanoporous alumina in support of environmental remediation and long term stewardship of DOE sites.

  20. Phased Array Approach To Retrieve Gases, Liquids, Or Solids From Subsurface And Subaqueous Geologic Or Man-Made Formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rynne, Timothy M. (Long Beach, CA); Spadaro, John F. (Huntington Beach, CA); Iovenitti, Joe L. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Dering, John P. (Lakewood, CA); Hill, Donald G. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of enhancing the remediation of contaminated soils and ground water, production of oil and gas, and production of any solid, gas, and/or liquid from subsurface geologic and man-made formations including the steps of estimating the geometric boundaries of the region containing the material to be recovered, drilling a recovery well(s) into subsurface in a strategic location to recover the material of interest, establishing multiple sources of acoustical power in an array about and spaced-apart from the surface or at various depths below the surface in a borehole(s) and/or well(s), directing a volume of acoustical excitation from the sources into the region containing the material to be recovered, the excitation in the form of either controllable sinusoidal, square, pulsed, or various combinations of these three waveforms, and controlling the phasing, frequency, power, duration, and direction of these waveforms from the sources to increase and control the intensity of acoustical excitation in the region of the material to be recovered to enhance. the recovery of said material from the recovery well(s). The invention will augment any technology affecting the removal of materials from the subsurface.

  1. An Analysis of Surface and Subsurface Lineaments and Fractures for Oil and Gas Exploration in the Mid-Continent Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Genliang; and George, S.A.

    1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive literature search was conducted and geological and mathematical analyses were performed to investigate the significance of using surface lineaments and fractures for delineating oil and gas reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region. Tremendous amount of data were acquired including surface lineaments, surface major fracture zones, surface fracture traces, gravity and magnetic lineaments, and Precambrian basement fault systems. An orientation analysis of these surface and subsurface linear features was performed to detect the basic structural grains of the region. The correlation between surface linear features and subsurface oil and gas traps was assessed, and the implication of using surface lineament and fracture analysis for delineating hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region discussed. It was observed that the surface linear features were extremely consistent in orientation with the gravity and magnetic lineaments and the basement faults in the Mid-Continent region. They all consist of two major sets bending northeast and northwest, representing, therefore, the basic structural grains of the region. This consistency in orientation between the surface and subsurface linear features suggests that the systematic fault systems at the basement in the Mid-Continent region have probably been reactivated many times and have propagated upward all the way to the surface. They may have acted as the loci for the development of other geological structures, including oil and gas traps. Also observed was a strong association both in orientation and position between the surface linear features and the subsurface reservoirs in various parts of the region. As a result, surface lineament and fracture analysis can be used for delineating additional oil and gas reserves in the Mid-Continent region. The results presented in this paper prove the validity and indicate the significance of using surface linear features for inferring subsurface oil and gas reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region. Any new potential oil and gas reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region, if they exist, will be likely associated with the northeast- and northwest-trending surface lineaments and fracture traces in the region.

  2. Collaborative Research: hydrogeological-geophysical methods for subsurface site characterization. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G. [Stanford Univ., CA (US); Rubin, Y.N. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'The general purpose is the subsurface characterization of LLNL superfund site. The goal is to get the most accurate map of the hydrogeological parameters, necessary for modeling and designing the cleanup efforts at the site, using well log data and remote sensing geophysical techniques. In the second year of the project progress has been made in several areas: gathering and interpreting Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) and Electromagnetic (EM) surveys; investigating the impact of various seismic measurements on upscaling of rock physics relations between sediment properties; and developing a new approach to integrate geophysical and hydrological data using state of the art methods to characterize the subsurface lithology. Vertical Seismic Profile data has been gathered from selected wells at the Treatment Facility D (TFD) during April 1996 and April 1998. The most striking finding here is the detection of anomalies related to saturation conditions. Preliminary results have revealed three anomalously low acoustic velocity zones with velocities below 1,000 m/s; this is lower than the natural acoustic velocity in saturated media by pure water (1,500 m/s). These three zones appear to be associated with HSUs 3a, 3b and 5. Velocities below 600 m/s have been revealed in the 3a and 3b HSUs (http://www.ce.Berkeley.edu/{approximately}ezzedine/DOE/paul.html). The authors believe that these anomalies are indicative of partial saturation. This explanation is supported by the water samples taken from pumping stations near the VSP well sites which appears to contain air bubbles. A gas analysis of water samples has not yet been performed. The authors hypothesize that this gas can be either air being sucked-in from the vadose zone above the water table, or from some chemical reaction. As a matter of fact, the natural water table level at this site was around 20 m below ground surface before any large scale pumping began, and had dropped to 25.5 m, in April 98. Furthermore, some of these low velocity zones are occurring not only in the major free-flowing sand or gravel parts of the HSU, but in boundary layers of silty sand either above or below the main HSU conductor. An electromagnetic survey was conducted at the site during June 4--25, 1997, and they worked on its interpretation. Seven cross well EM data sets were collected. Both 1D and 2D simulations, approximating the actual site and survey setup, were conducted. The 1D simulations were conducted using the code EM1D for one data set. Newman and Alumbaugh''s 3D forward code was used to simulate the response of both a resistive layer (representing HSU 4) and a conductive layer at the same location. Three separate inversion algorithms were applied to the data: Newman and Alumbaugh''s 2.5D finite difference and integral solution algorithm, Alumbaugh''s iterative Born approximation with a cylindrical symmetry, and Tseng''s 3D extended born approximation. The field EM data are still being analyzed.'

  3. STOMP Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases, Version 4.0, User’s Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Mark D.; Oostrom, Martinus

    2006-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide describes the general use, input file formatting, compilation and execution of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator, a scientific tool for analyzing single and multiple phase subsurface flow and transport. A description of the simulator’s governing equations, constitutive functions and numerical solution algorithms are provided in a companion theory guide. In writing these guides for the STOMP simulator, the authors have assumed that the reader comprehends concepts and theories associated with multiple-phase hydrology, heat transfer, thermodynamics, radioactive chain decay, and relative permeability-saturation-capillary pressure constitutive relations. The authors further assume that the reader is familiar with the computing environment on which they plan to compile and execute the STOMP simulator. Source codes for the sequential versions of the simulator are available in pure FORTRAN 77 or mixed FORTRAN 77/90 forms. The pure FORTRAN 77 source code form requires a parameters file to define the memory requirements for the array elements. The mixed FORTRAN 77/90 form of the source code uses dynamic memory allocation to define memory requirements, based on a FORTRAN 90 preprocessor STEP, that reads the input files. The simulator utilizes a variable source code configuration, which allows the execution memory and speed to be tailored to the problem specifics, and essentially requires that the source code be assembled and compiled through a software maintenance utility. The memory requirements for executing the simulator are dependent on the complexity of physical system to be modeled and the size and dimensionality of the computational domain. Likewise execution speed depends on the problem complexity, size and dimensionality of the computational domain, and computer performance. Selected operational modes of the STOMP simulator are available for scalable execution on multiple processor (i.e., parallel) computers. These versions of the simulator are written in pure FORTRAN 90 with imbedded directives that are interpreted by a FORTRAN preprocessor. Without the preprocessor, the scalable version of the simulator can be executed sequentially on a single processor computer. The scalable versions of the STOMP modes carry the “-Sc” designator on the operational mode name. For example, STOMP-WCS-Sc is the scalable version of the STOMP-WCS (Water-CO2-Salt) mode. A separate mode containing an evaporation model as a boundary condition on the upper surface of the computation domain has also been included. This mode, STOMP-WAE-B (Water-Air-Energy-Barriers) can be viewed as an extension of the STOMP-WAE (Water-Air-Energy) mode. Details of this particular mode are outlined by Ward et al. (2005)(a). STOMP V4.0 includes the reactive transport module ECKEChem (Equilibrium-Conservation-Kinetic Equation Chemistry) for the STOMP-W (Water) and STOMP-WCS (Water-CO2-Salt) modes. For this particular module, the “-R” designator is included in the operational mode name (e.g., STOMP-W-R, STOMP-WCS-R-Sc). This mode is described in detail by White and McGrail (2005)(b). For all operational modes and processor implementations, the memory requirements for executing the simulator are dependent on the complexity of physical system to be modeled and the size and dimensionality of the computational domain. Likewise execution speed depends on the problem complexity, size and dimensionality of the computational domain, and computer performance. Additional information about the simulator can be found on the STOMP webpage: http://stomp.pnl.gov. The website includes an introductory short course with problems ranging from simple one-dimensional saturated flow to complex multiphase system computations.

  4. Subsurface Hybrid Power Options for Oil & Gas Production at Deep Ocean Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C; Haut, R; Jahn, G; Goldman, J; Colvin, J; Karpinski, A; Dobley, A; Halfinger, J; Nagley, S; Wolf, K; Shapiro, A; Doucette, P; Hansen, P; Oke, A; Compton, D; Cobb, M; Kopps, R; Chitwood, J; Spence, W; Remacle, P; Noel, C; Vicic, J; Dee, R

    2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An investment in deep-sea (deep-ocean) hybrid power systems may enable certain off-shore oil and gas exploration and production. Advanced deep-ocean drilling and production operations, locally powered, may provide commercial access to oil and gas reserves otherwise inaccessible. Further, subsea generation of electrical power has the potential of featuring a low carbon output resulting in improved environmental conditions. Such technology therefore, enhances the energy security of the United States in a green and environmentally friendly manner. The objective of this study is to evaluate alternatives and recommend equipment to develop into hybrid energy conversion and storage systems for deep ocean operations. Such power systems will be located on the ocean floor and will be used to power offshore oil and gas exploration and production operations. Such power systems will be located on the oceans floor, and will be used to supply oil and gas exploration activities, as well as drilling operations required to harvest petroleum reserves. The following conceptual hybrid systems have been identified as candidates for powering sub-surface oil and gas production operations: (1) PWR = Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactor + Lead-Acid Battery; (2) FC1 = Line for Surface O{sub 2} + Well Head Gas + Reformer + PEMFC + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (3) FC2 = Stored O2 + Well Head Gas + Reformer + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (4) SV1 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (5) SV2 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Engine or Turbine + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (6) SV3 = Submersible Vehicle + Charge at Docking Station + ZEBRA & Li-Ion Batteries; (7) PWR TEG = PWR + Thermoelectric Generator + Lead-Acid Battery; (8) WELL TEG = Thermoelectric Generator + Well Head Waste Heat + Lead-Acid Battery; (9) GRID = Ocean Floor Electrical Grid + Lead-Acid Battery; and (10) DOC = Deep Ocean Current + Lead-Acid Battery.

  5. Deep subsurface drip irrigation using coal-bed sodic water: Part I. Water and solute movement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bern, Carleton R.; Breit, George N.; Healy, Richard W.; Zupancic, John W.; Hammack, Richard

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water co-produced with coal-bed methane (CBM) in the semi-arid Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana commonly has relatively low salinity and high sodium adsorption ratios that can degrade soil permeability where used for irrigation. Nevertheless, a desire to derive beneficial use from the water and a need to dispose of large volumes of it have motivated the design of a deep subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) system capable of utilizing that water. Drip tubing is buried 92 cm deep and irrigates at a relatively constant rate year-round, while evapotranspiration by the alfalfa and grass crops grown is seasonal. We use field data from two sites and computer simulations of unsaturated flow to understand water and solute movements in the SDI fields. Combined irrigation and precipitation exceed potential evapotranspiration by 300–480 mm annually. Initially, excess water contributes to increased storage in the unsaturated zone, and then drainage causes cyclical rises in the water table beneath the fields. Native chloride and nitrate below 200 cm depth are leached by the drainage. Some CBM water moves upward from the drip tubing, drawn by drier conditions above. Chloride from CBM water accumulates there as root uptake removes the water. Year over year accumulations indicated by computer simulations illustrate that infiltration of precipitation water from the surface only partially leaches such accumulations away. Field data show that 7% and 27% of added chloride has accumulated above the drip tubing in an alfalfa and grass field, respectively, following 6 years of irrigation. Maximum chloride concentrations in the alfalfa field are around 45 cm depth but reach the surface in parts of the grass field, illustrating differences driven by crop physiology. Deep SDI offers a means of utilizing marginal quality irrigation waters and managing the accumulation of their associated solutes in the crop rooting zone.

  6. Subsurface models of coal occurrence, Oak Grove field, Black Warrior basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashin, J.C. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface investigation of coal occurrence in the Black Creek-Cobb interval of Oak Grove field is based on cross sections and isopach maps made from more than 500 density logs. This study was designed to identify styles of coal occurrence in the Black Warrior basin to aid in coalbed-methane exploration and production. Coal occurrence in parts of the Black Warrior basin may be characterized in terms of end-member fluvial and structural control. Fluvial processes apparently were the major controls on coal occurrence in the Black Creek cycle, where sandstone and coal thickness are inversely related. Additionally, occurrence of thick sandstone sequences above the thickest coal beds suggests that peat compaction provided sites for channel avulsion. In the Mary Lee and Cobb cycles, more coal beds occur in a downthrown fault block than in an upthrown block, and in the Pratt and Cobb cycles, the thickest coal beds occur on the downthrown side of a fault. Only in the Mary Lee cycle, where thick peat accumulated in an abandoned tributary system, is coal thickest on the upthrown block. Most coal beds in Oak Grove field are thickest on the downthrown block because differential subsidence apparently promoted peat accumulation. Clastic influx favors beds splits in the downthrown block, but joining of beds in the Pratt cycle may reflect sheltering by the fault. In the Mary Lee cycle, in contrast, channel incision evidently provided local relief sufficient for thick peat to accumulate in lows on the upthrown block. Although fluvial and structural processes result in varied styles of coal occurrence, models of coal occurrence have resulted in a predictive framework that may aid in strategic well siting and completion.

  7. Influence of Acidic and Alkaline Waste Solution Properties on Uranium Migration in Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Wellman, Dawn M.; Resch, Charles T.; Zhong, Lirong

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study shows that acidic and alkaline wastes co-disposed with uranium into subsurface sediments has significant impact on changes in uranium retardation, concentration, and mass during downward migration. For uranium co-disposal with acidic wastes, significant rapid (i.e., hours) carbonate and slow (i.e., 100s of hours) clay dissolution resulted, releasing significant sediment-associated uranium, but the extent of uranium release and mobility change was controlled by the acid mass added relative to the sediment proton adsorption capacity. Mineral dissolution in acidic solutions (pH 2) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in aqueous carbonate (with Ca2+, Mg2+) and phosphate and a slow (100s of hours) increase in silica, Al3+, and K+, likely from 2:1 clay dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong acid resulted in significant shallow uranium mineral dissolution and deeper uranium precipitation (likely as phosphates and carbonates) with downward uranium migration of three times greater mass at a faster velocity relative to uranium infiltration in pH neutral groundwater. In contrast, mineral dissolution in an alkaline environment (pH 13) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in carbonate, followed by a slow (10s to 100s of hours) increase in silica concentration, likely from montmorillonite, muscovite, and kaolinite dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong base resulted in uranium-silicate precipitation (presumed Na-boltwoodite) but also desorption of natural uranium on the sediment due to the high ionic strength solution, or 60% greater mass with greater retardation compared with groundwater. Overall, these results show that acidic or alkaline co-contaminant disposal with uranium can result in complex depth- and time-dependent changes in uranium dissolution/precipitation reactions and uranium sorption, which alter the uranium migration mass, concentration, and velocity.

  8. Demonstration of close-coupled barriers for subsurface containment of buried waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, B.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies Dept.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional cement grout curtain followed by a thin inner lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. Close-coupled barrier technology is applicable for final, interim, or emergency containment of subsurface waste forms. Consequently, when considering the diversity of technology application, the construction emplacement and material technology maturity, general site operational requirements, and regulatory compliance incentives, the close-coupled barrier system provides an alternative for any hazardous or mixed waste remediation plan. This paper discusses the installation of a close-coupled barrier and the subsequent integrity verification. The demonstration was installed at a benign site at the Hanford Geotechnical Test Facility, 400 Area, Hanford, Washington. The composite barrier was emplaced beneath a 7,500 liter tank. The tank was chosen to simulate a typical DOE Complex waste form. The stresses induced on the waste form were evaluated during barrier construction. The barrier was constructed using conventional jet grouting techniques. Drilling was completed at a 45{degree} angle to the ground, forming a conical shaped barrier with the waste form inside the cone. Two overlapping rows of cylindrical cement columns were grouted in a honeycomb fashion to form the secondary backdrop barrier layer. The primary barrier, a high molecular weight polymer manufactured by 3M Company, was then installed providing a relatively thin inner liner for the secondary barrier. The primary barrier was emplaced by panel jet grouting with a dual wall drill stem, two phase jet grouting system.

  9. Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs to Unconfined and Confined Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Brown, Christopher F.; Wang, Guohui; Sullivan, E. C.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Harvey, Omar R.; Bowden, Mark

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental research work has been conducted and is undergoing at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to address a variety of scientific issues related with the potential leaks of the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas from deep storage reservoirs. The main objectives of this work are as follows: • Develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage is likely to influence pertinent geochemical processes (e.g., dissolution/precipitation, sorption/desorption and redox reactions) in the aquifer sediments. • Identify prevailing environmental conditions that would dictate one geochemical outcome over another. • Gather useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, policy-making, and public education efforts associated with geological carbon sequestration. In this report, we present results from experiments conducted at PNNL to address research issues related to the main objectives of this effort. A series of batch and column experiments and solid phase characterization studies (quantitative x-ray diffraction and wet chemical extractions with a concentrated acid) were conducted with representative rocks and sediments from an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer, i.e., Edwards aquifer in Texas, and a confined aquifer, i.e., the High Plains aquifer in Kansas. These materials were exposed to a CO2 gas stream simulating CO2 gas leaking scenarios, and changes in aqueous phase pH and chemical composition were measured in liquid and effluent samples collected at pre-determined experimental times. Additional research to be conducted during the current fiscal year will further validate these results and will address other important remaining issues. Results from these experimental efforts will provide valuable insights for the development of site-specific, generation III reduced order models. In addition, results will initially serve as input parameters during model calibration runs and, ultimately, will be used to test model predictive capability and competency. The results from these investigations will provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological, deep subsurface CO2 storage and sequestration.

  10. Using quantum dots to tag subsurface damage in lapped and polished glass samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Wesley B.; Mullany, Brigid A.; Parker, Wesley C.; Moyer, Patrick J.; Randles, Mark H.

    2009-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Grinding, lapping, and polishing are finishing processes used to achieve critical surface parameters in a variety of precision optical and electronic components. As these processes remove material from the surface through mechanical and chemical interactions, they may induce a damaged layer of cracks, voids, and stressed material below the surface. This subsurface damage (SSD) can degrade the performance of a final product by creating optical aberrations due to diffraction, premature failure in oscillating components, and a reduction in the laser induced damage threshold of high energy optics. As these defects lie beneath the surface, they are difficult to detect, and while many methods are available to detect SSD, they can have notable limitations regarding sample size and type, preparation time, or can be destructive in nature. The authors tested a nondestructive method for assessing SSD that consisted of tagging the abrasive slurries used in lapping and polishing with quantum dots (nano-sized fluorescent particles). Subsequent detection of fluorescence on the processed surface is hypothesized to indicate SSD. Quantum dots that were introduced to glass surfaces during the lapping process were retained through subsequent polishing and cleaning processes. The quantum dots were successfully imaged by both wide field and confocal fluorescence microscopy techniques. The detected fluorescence highlighted features that were not observable with optical or interferometric microscopy. Atomic force microscopy and additional confocal microscope analysis indicate that the dots are firmly embedded in the surface but do not appear to travel deep into fractures beneath the surface. Etching of the samples exhibiting fluorescence confirmed that SSD existed. SSD-free samples exposed to quantum dots did not retain the dots in their surfaces, even when polished in the presence of quantum dots.

  11. Latest development in seismic texture analysis for subsurface structure, facies, and reservoir characterization: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Dengliang

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In exploration geology and geophysics, seismic texture is still a developing concept that has not been sufficiently known, although quite a number of different algorithms have been published in the literature. This paper provides a review of the seismic texture concepts and methodologies, focusing on latest developments in seismic amplitude texture analysis, with particular reference to the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and the texture model regression (TMR) methods. The GLCM method evaluates spatial arrangements of amplitude samples within an analysis window using a matrix (a two-dimensional histogram) of amplitude co-occurrence. The matrix is then transformed into a suite of texture attributes, such as homogeneity, contrast, and randomness, which provide the basis for seismic facies classification. The TMR method uses a texture model as reference to discriminate among seismic features based on a linear, least-squares regression analysis between the model and the data within an analysis window. By implementing customized texture model schemes, the TMR algorithm has the flexibility to characterize subsurface geology for different purposes. A texture model with a constant phase is effective at enhancing the visibility of seismic structural fabrics, a texture model with a variable phase is helpful for visualizing seismic facies, and a texture model with variable amplitude, frequency, and size is instrumental in calibrating seismic to reservoir properties. Preliminary test case studies in the very recent past have indicated that the latest developments in seismic texture analysis have added to the existing amplitude interpretation theories and methodologies. These and future developments in seismic texture theory and methodologies will hopefully lead to a better understanding of the geologic implications of the seismic texture concept and to an improved geologic interpretation of reflection seismic amplitude

  12. 2008 Academic Program Review Graduate Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 Academic Program Review of Graduate Programs November 2008 Texas A&M University College ........................................................................................................12 III. Graduate Program.....................................................................................................14 B. Educational Programs

  13. 2012 Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area Subsurface Corrective Action Unit 447

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Project Shoal Area (PSA) in Nevada was the site of a 12-kiloton underground nuclear test in 1963. Although the surface of the site has been remediated, investigation of groundwater contamination resulting from the test is still in the corrective action process. Annual sampling and hydraulic head monitoring are conducted at the site as part of the subsurface corrective action strategy. Analytical results from the 2012 monitoring are consistent with those of the previous years, with tritium detected only in well HC-4. The tritium concentration in groundwater from well HC-4 remains far below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-established maximum contaminant level of 20,000 picocuries per liter. Concentrations of total uranium and gross alpha were also detected during this monitoring period, with uranium accounting for nearly all the gross alpha activity. The total uranium concentrations obtained from this monitoring period were consistent with previous results and reflect a slightly elevated natural uranium concentration, consistent with the mineralized geologic terrain. Isotopic ratios of uranium also indicate a natural source of uranium in groundwater, as opposed to a nuclear-test-related source. Water level trends obtained from the 2012 water level data were consistent with those of previous years. The corrective action strategy for the PSA is currently focused on revising the site conceptual model (SCM) and evaluating the adequacy of the current monitoring well network. Some aspects of the SCM are known; however, two major concerns are the uncertainty in the groundwater flow direction and the cause of rising water levels in site wells west of the shear zone. Water levels have been rising in the site wells west of the shear zone since the first hydrologic characterization wells were installed in 1996. While water levels in wells west of the shear zone continue to rise, the rate of increase is less than in previous years. The SCM will be revised, and an evaluation of the groundwater monitoring network will be conducted when water levels at the site have stabilized.

  14. Recovery Act: Understanding the Impact of CO{sub 2} Injection on the Subsurface Microbial Community in an Illinois Basin CCS Reservoir: Integrated Student Training in Geoscience and Geomicrobiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouke, Bruce

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated research and teaching program was developed to provide cross-­?disciplinary training opportunities in the emerging field of carbon capture and storage (CCS) for geobiology students attending the University of Illinois Urbana-­?Champaign (UIUC). Students from across the UIUC campus participated, including those from the departments of Geology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Animal Sciences and the Institute for Genomic Biology. The project took advantage of the unique opportunity provided by the drilling and sampling of the large-­?scale Phase III CCS demonstration Illinois Basin -­? Decatur Project (IBDP) in the central Illinois Basin at nearby Decatur, Illinois. The IBPD is under the direction of the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS, located on the UIUC campus) and the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC). The research component of this project focused on the subsurface sampling and identification of microbes inhabiting the subsurface Cambrian-­?age Mt. Simon Sandstone. In addition to formation water collected from the injection and monitoring wells, sidewall rock cores were collected and analyzed to characterize the cements and diagenetic features of the host Mt. Simon Sandstone. This established a dynamic geobiological framework, as well as a comparative baseline, for future studies of how CO2 injection might affect the deep microbial biosphere at other CCS sites. Three manuscripts have been prepared as a result of these activities, which are now being finalized for submission to top-­?tier international peer-­?reviewed research journals. The training component of this project was structured to ensure that a broad group of UIUC students, faculty and staff gained insight into CCS issues. An essential part of this training was that the UIUC faculty mentored and involved undergraduate and graduate students, as well as postdocs and research scientists, at all stages of the project in order to develop CCS-­?focused classroom and field courses, as well as seminars. This program provided an excellent opportunity for participants to develop the background necessary to establish longer-­?term research in CCS-­?related geology and microbial ecology. Further, the program provided an ongoing dynamic platform to foster long-­?term collaboration with the regional ISGS and MGSC sequestration partnership, while offering hands-­?on, applied learning experiences.

  15. Counterintelligence Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes Counterintelligence Program requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy, including the National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels: DOE 5670.3.

  16. Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Description Discover E (Engineering) is an evening of interesting, interactive and fun engineering, science, math, and technology demonstrations for K-12 students and their...

  17. Programming Stage

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter addresses plans for the acquisition and installation of operating environment hardware and software and design of a training program.

  18. Counterintelligence Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish the policies, procedures, and specific responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Counterintelligence (CI) Program. This directive does not cancel any other directive.

  19. Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MATHCOUNTS is a national enrichment, coaching and competition program that promotes middle school mathematic achievement. The mission of MATHCOUNTS is to increase enthusiasm for...

  20. Community Leadership Certificate Program Program Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Community Leadership Certificate Program Program Overview The undergraduate Community Leadership Certificate Program is an interdisciplinary program where students from any major can explore leadership in community engagement and leadership. The program is based on a social justice model of leadership

  1. Fiscal Year 2007 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RSI

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR) is to present the fiscal year (FY) 2007 results of characterization activities and recommended remedial actions (RAs) for 11 exposure units (EUs) in Zone 2 (Z2-01, Z2-03, Z2-08, Z2-23, Z2-24, Z2-28, Z2-34, Z2-37, Z2-41, Z2-43, and Z2-44) at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), which is located in the northwest corner of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Fig. 1). ETTP encompasses a total land area of approximately 5000 acres that has been subdivided into three zones--Zone 1 ({approx}1400 acres), Zone 2 ({approx}800 acres), and the Boundary Area ({approx}2800 acres). Zone 2, which encompasses the highly industrialized portion of ETTP shown in Fig. 1, consists of all formerly secured areas of the facility, including the large processing buildings and direct support facilities; experimental laboratories and chemical and materials handling facilities; materials storage and waste disposal facilities; secure document records libraries; and shipping and receiving warehouses. The Zone 2 Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2005) (Zone 2 ROD) specifies the future end use for Zone 2 acreage as uncontrolled industrial for the upper 10 ft of soils. Characterization activities in these areas were conducted in compliance with the Zone 2 ROD and the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS) and data quality objectives (DQOs) presented in the Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2007) (Zone 2 RDR/RAWP). The purpose of this PCCR is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for the accessible EUs in FY 2007; (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation for each EU, and determine if the EU met the Zone 2 ROD requirements for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs; (3) Identify additional areas not defined in the Zone 2 ROD that require remediation based on the DVS evaluation results; and (4) Describe the RAs performed in Zone 2. The Zone 2 ROD divided the Zone 2 area into 7 geographic areas and 44 EUs. To facilitate the DQOs of the DVS process, the Zone 2 RDR/RAWP regrouped the 44 EUs into 12 DQO scoping EU groups. These groups facilitated the DQO process by placing similar facilities and their support facilities together and allowed identification of data gaps. The EU groups were no longer pertinent after DQO planning was completed, and characterization was conducted as areas became accessible. As the opportunity to complete characterization became available, the planned DVS program was executed and completed in FY 2007 for the 11 EUs addressed in this document. The main body of this report describes both the DVS process and scope of work performed and the RAs completed. The scope and approach for performing DVS activities performed in FY 2007 that lead to action/no further action decisions are presented in Sects. 2 through 4. RAs performed in FY 2007 are presented in Sects. 5 through 10. Future land use is described in Sect. 11, and the status of all Zone 2 EUs as of this PCCR is presented in Sect. 12.

  2. Nontoxic chemical process for in situ permeability enhancement and accelerated decontamination of fine-grain subsurface sediments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kansa, Edward J. (Livermore, CA); Wijesinghe, Ananda M. (Tracy, CA); Viani, Brian E. (Oakland, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The remediation of heterogeneous subsurfaces is extremely time consuming and expensive with current and developing technologies. Although such technologies can adequately remove contaminants in the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, they cannot access the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The slow bleed of contaminants from the fine-grained sediments is the primary reason why subsurface remediation is so time-consuming and expensive. This invention addresses the problem of remediating contaminated fine-grained sediments. It is intended that, in the future, a heterogeneous site be treated by a hybrid process that first remediates the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, to be followed by the process, described in this invention, to treat the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The invention uses cationic flocculents and organic solvents to collapse the swelling negative double layer surrounding water saturated clay particles, causing a flocculated, cracked clay structure. The modification of the clay fabric in fine-grained sediments dramatically increases the hydraulic conductivity of previously very tight clays many orders of magnitude.

  3. Nontoxic chemical process for in situ permeability enhancement and accelerated decontamination of fine-grain subsurface sediments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kansa, E.J.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

    1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The remediation of heterogeneous subsurfaces is extremely time consuming and expensive with current and developing technologies. Although such technologies can adequately remove contaminants in the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, they cannot access the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The slow bleed of contaminants from the fine-grained sediments is the primary reason why subsurface remediation is so time-consuming and expensive. This invention addresses the problem of remediating contaminated fine-grained sediments. It is intended that, in the future, a heterogeneous site be treated by a hybrid process that first remediates the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, to be followed by the process, described in this invention, to treat the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The invention uses cationic flocculants and organic solvents to collapse the swelling negative double layer surrounding water saturated clay particles, causing a flocculated, cracked clay structure. The modification of the clay fabric in fine-grained sediments dramatically increases the hydraulic conductivity of previously very tight clays many orders of magnitude. 8 figs.

  4. HIGH-RESOLUTION HELIOSEISMIC IMAGING OF SUBSURFACE STRUCTURES AND FLOWS OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED BY HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Junwei; Kosovichev, Alexander G. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Sekii, Takashi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a solar active region observed by the Hinode Ca II H line using the time-distance helioseismology technique, and infer wave-speed perturbation structures and flow fields beneath the active region with a high spatial resolution. The general subsurface wave-speed structure is similar to the previous results obtained from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager observations. The general subsurface flow structure is also similar, and the downward flows beneath the sunspot and the mass circulations around the sunspot are clearly resolved. Below the sunspot, some organized divergent flow cells are observed, and these structures may indicate the existence of mesoscale convective motions. Near the light bridge inside the sunspot, hotter plasma is found beneath, and flows divergent from this area are observed. The Hinode data also allow us to investigate potential uncertainties caused by the use of phase-speed filter for short travel distances. Comparing the measurements with and without the phase-speed filtering, we find out that inside the sunspot, mean acoustic travel times are in basic agreement, but the values are underestimated by a factor of 20%-40% inside the sunspot umbra for measurements with the filtering. The initial acoustic tomography results from Hinode show a great potential of using high-resolution observations for probing the internal structure and dynamics of sunspots.

  5. Seismic sensitivity to sub-surface solar activity from 18 years of GOLF/SoHO observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salabert, D; Turck-Chieze, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar activity has significantly changed over the last two Schwabe cycles. After a long and deep minimum at the end of Cycle 23, the weaker activity of Cycle 24 contrasts with the previous cycles. In this work, the response of the solar acoustic oscillations to solar activity is used in order to provide insights on the structural and magnetic changes in the sub-surface layers of the Sun during this on-going unusual period of low activity. We analyze 18 years of continuous observations of the solar acoustic oscillations collected by the Sun-as-a-star GOLF instrument onboard the SoHO spacecraft. From the fitted mode frequencies, the temporal variability of the frequency shifts of the radial, dipolar, and quadrupolar modes are studied for different frequency ranges which are sensitive to different layers in the solar sub-surface interior. The low-frequency modes show nearly unchanged frequency shifts between Cycles 23 and 24, with a time evolving signature of the quasi-biennial oscillation, which is particularly...

  6. Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than Fe into the structure of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) has been shown to greatly enhance the magnetic properties of the particles, tailoring them to different commercial uses. However, synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is often carried out at high temperatures with toxic solvents resulting in high environmental and energy costs. Additionally, these ferrite nanoparticles are not intrinsically biocompatible, and to make them suitable for insertion into the human body is a rather intricate task. A relatively unexplored resource for magnetic nanomaterial production is subsurface Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, as these microorganisms are capable of producing large quantities of nanoscale magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) at ambient temperatures. Metal-reducing bacteria live in environments deficient in oxygen and conserve energy for growth through the oxidation of hydrogen or organic electron donors, coupled to the reduction of oxidized metals such as Fe(III)-bearing minerals. This can result in the formation of magnetite via the extracellular reduction of amorphous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides causing the release of soluble Fe(II) and resulting in complete recrystallization of the amorphous mineral into a new phase. Some previous studies have reported altering the composition of biogenic magnetite produced by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria for industrial and environmental applications. However, research into the commercial exploitation of bacteria to form magnetic minerals has focused primarily on magnetotactic bacteria which form magnetosomal magnetite internally using very different pathways to those bacteria forming magnetite outside the cell. Magnetotactic bacteria live at the sediment-water interface and use internal nanomagnets to guide them to their preferred environmental niche using the Earth's magnetic field. Since magnetotactic bacteria generally grow optimally under carefully controlled microaerobic conditions, the culturing processes for these organisms are challenging and result in low yields of nanomagnetite. Despite these limitations, magnetotactic bacteria have bee

  7. Influence of Mg2+ on CaCO3 precipitation during subsurface reactive transport in a homogeneous silicon-etched pore network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Victoria; Yoon, Hongkyu; Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus; Hess, Nancy J.; Fouke, Bruce W.; Valocchi, Albert J.; Werth, Charles J.

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) geochemical reactions exert a fundamental control on the evolution of porosity and permeability in shallow-to-deep subsurface siliciclastic and limestone rock reservoirs. As a result, these carbonate water-rock interactions play a critically important role in research on groundwater remediation, geological carbon sequestration, and hydrocarbon exploration. A study was undertaken to determine the effects of Mg2+ concentration on CaCO3 crystal morphology, precipitation rate, and porosity occlusion under flow and mixing conditions similar to those in subsurface aquifers.

  8. Solar Thermal Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: This program is not currently accepting applications. Check the program web site for information regarding future financing programs.

  9. ARRA Program Summary: Energy Smart Jobs Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARRA Program Summary: Energy Smart Jobs Program Statewide Program (Initially targeting urban 30,000 buildings surveyed, approximately 5,000 will be retrofitted, yielding approximately $40

  10. Machinist Pipeline/Apprentice Program Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Machinist PipelineApprentice Program Program Description The Machinist Pipeline Program was created by the Prototype Fabrication Division to fill a critical need for skilled...

  11. Programming models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, David J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Pherson, Allen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thorp, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barrett, Richard [SNL; Clay, Robert [SNL; De Supinski, Bronis [LLNL; Dube, Evi [LLNL; Heroux, Mike [SNL; Janssen, Curtis [SNL; Langer, Steve [LLNL; Laros, Jim [SNL

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A programming model is a set of software technologies that support the expression of algorithms and provide applications with an abstract representation of the capabilities of the underlying hardware architecture. The primary goals are productivity, portability and performance.

  12. SECO Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevino, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this web page address! ASSISTANCE AND FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES Energy Efficiency Technical Assistance Energy Efficiency Grants Renewable Energy Technology Grants Alternative Fuel Grants The LoanSTAR Revolving Loan Program Energy Efficiency... maximum of $50,000 per grant ? Funded on a reimbursement basis Renewable Energy Technology Grants ? Fort Worth ISD ? South Sills High School ? 5KW Wind Turbine Alternative Fuel Grants ? Grant program to convert city/county and ISD vehicle...

  13. RANGE AND DISTRIBUTION OF TECHNETIUM KD VALUES IN THE SRS SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance assessments (PAs) are risk calculations used to estimate the amount of low-level radioactive waste that can be disposed at DOE sites. Distribution coefficients (K{sub d} values) are input parameters used in PA calculations to provide a measure of radionuclide sorption to sediment; the greater the K{sub d} value, the greater the sorption and the slower the estimated movement of the radionuclide through sediment. Understanding and quantifying K{sub d} value variability is important for estimating the uncertainty of PA calculations. Without this information, it is necessary to make overly conservative estimates about the possible limits of K{sub d} values, which in turn may increase disposal costs. Finally, technetium is commonly found to be amongst the radionuclides posing potential risk at waste disposal locations because it is believed to be highly mobile in its anionic form (pertechnetate, TcO{sub 4}{sup -}), it exists in relatively high concentrations in SRS waste, and it has a long half-life (213,000 years). The objectives of this laboratory study were to determine under SRS environmental conditions: (1) whether and to what extent TcO{sub 4}{sup -} sorbs to sediments, (2) the range of Tc K{sub d} values, (3) the distribution (normal or log-normal) of Tc K{sub d} values, and (4) how strongly Tc sorbs to SRS sediments through desorption experiments. Objective 3, to identify the Tc K{sub d} distribution is important because it provides a statistical description that influences stochastic modeling of estimated risk. The approach taken was to collect 26 sediments from a non-radioactive containing sediment core collected from E-Area, measure Tc K{sub d} values and then perform statistical analysis to describe the measured Tc K{sub d} values. The mean K{sub d} value was 3.4 {+-} 0.5 mL/g and ranged from -2.9 to 11.2 mL/g. The data did not have a Normal distribution (as defined by the Shapiro-Wilk's Statistic) and had a 95-percentile range of 2.4 to 4.4 mL/g. The E-Area subsurface is subdivided into three hydrostratigraphic layers: Upper Vadose Zone (11 to 30 ft depth), Lower Vadose Zone (30 to 51 ft depth), and aquifer (51 to 95 ft depth). The Upper Vadose Zone generally contains more clay than the Lower Vadose Zone, and the Aquifer tends to be made up of mostly sand layers with clay strata. The mean K{sub d} values of each of these zones did not differ significantly and the K{sub d} values from each zone were not from the Normal distribution. The ranges of values were greatest in the Upper Vadose Zone and least in the Lower Vadose Zone. Previous Best Estimate Tc K{sub d} values for Sandy Sediment and Clayey Sediment were 0.1 and 0.2 mL/g, respectively (Kaplan 2007a). A more thorough review indicates that the Best Estimates for Sandy Sediment is 0.1 mL/g and for Clayey Sediment is 0.8 mL/g (Kaplan 2007b). This current dataset greatly increases the number of Tc K{sub d} values measured with SRS sediments, but perhaps more importantly, provides a better estimate for E-Area sediments, and provides a measure of Tc K{sub d} distributions. Based on this dataset, the best overall Tc K{sub d} value for E-Area is the mean, 3.4 mL/g, with a log-normal distribution between the 95 percentile values of 2.4 to 4.4 mL/g. This document version differs from the earlier version, SRNS-STI-2008-00286, in that it includes some editorial corrections. This version does not contain any technical changes or changes to the conclusions presented in the earlier version.

  14. Understanding the Subsurface Reactive Transport of Transuranic Contaminants at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, Mark O. [Auburn University] [Auburn University; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E. [University of Notre Dame] [University of Notre Dame; Saiers, James E. [Yale University] [Yale University; Shuh, David K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Our primary hypothesis is that actinides can interact with surfaces in fundamentally different ways than other metals, metalloids, and oxyanions and that this fundamental difference requires new approaches to studying and modeling transuranic sorption to minerals and geomedia. This project supports a key mission of the SBR program to develop sufficient scientific understanding such that DOE sites will be able to incorporate coupled physical, chemical, and biological processes into decision making for environmental management and long-term stewardship, while also supporting DOE’s commitment to education, training, and collaboration with DOE user facilities.

  15. Full-Wave Algorithm to Model Effects of Bedding Slopes on the Response of Subsurface Electromagnetic Geophysical Sensors near Unconformities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sainath, Kamalesh

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a full-wave pseudo-analytical numerical electromagnetic (EM) algorithm to model subsurface induction sensors, traversing planar-layered geological formations of arbitrary EM material anisotropy and loss, which are used, for example, in the exploration of hydrocarbon reserves. Unlike past pseudo-analytical planar-layered modeling algorithms that impose parallelism between the formation's bed junctions however, our method involves judicious employment of Transformation Optics techniques to address challenges related to modeling arbitrarily-oriented, relative slope (i.e., tilting) between said junctions. The algorithm exhibits this flexibility, both with respect to anisotropy in the formation layers as well as junction tilting, via employing special planar slabs that coat each "flattened" (i.e., originally tilted) planar interface, locally redirecting the incident wave within the coating slabs to cause wave fronts to interact with the flattened interfaces as if they were still tilted with a specific, ...

  16. Final Report Coupling in silico microbial models with reactive transport models to predict the fate of contaminants in the subsurface.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project successfully accomplished its goal of coupling genome-scale metabolic models with hydrological and geochemical models to predict the activity of subsurface microorganisms during uranium bioremediation. Furthermore, it was demonstrated how this modeling approach can be used to develop new strategies to optimize bioremediation. The approach of coupling genome-scale metabolic models with reactive transport modeling is now well enough established that it has been adopted by other DOE investigators studying uranium bioremediation. Furthermore, the basic principles developed during our studies will be applicable to much broader investigations of microbial activities, not only for other types of bioremediation, but microbial metabolism in diversity of environments. This approach has the potential to make an important contribution to predicting the impact of environmental perturbations on the cycling of carbon and other biogeochemical cycles.

  17. Subsurface characterization using time-domain electromagnetics at the Texas A&M University Brazos River Hydrologic Field Site, Burleson County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sananikone, Khamla

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that the surficial clays appear as zones of low electrical resistivity to depths of about 6m and the sandy unconsolidated alluvial unit which constitutes the main aquifer for subsurface transport of groundwater is apparent as a resistive zone at the depths between 6-20...

  18. Transport Processes in a Salt-Dome Environment We consider coupled subsurface flow and transport within a vertical cross section of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornhuber, Ralf

    Transport Processes in a Salt-Dome Environment ­ B ­ We consider coupled subsurface flow). (1) How is the conductive temperature distribution affected by the thermal conductivity of the salt in the simulation? In particular, compare the flow direction along the salt flanks. #12;Model domain No vertical

  19. Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgul, Ercin

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs of Jolliet (GC 184), Genesis...

  20. Program Year 2008 State Energy Program Formula

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) State Energy Program (SEP), SEP Program Guidance Fiscal Year 2008, Program Year 2008, energy efficiency and renewable energy programs in the states, DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  1. PROBABILISTIC SIMULATION OF SUBSURFACE FLUID FLOW: A STUDY USING A NUMERICAL SCHEME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buscheck, Timothy Eric

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been an increasing interest in probabilistic modeling of hydrogeologic systems. The classical approach to groundwater modeling has been deterministic in nature, where individual layers and formations are assumed to be uniformly homogeneous. Even in the case of complex heterogeneous systems, the heterogeneities describe the differences in parameter values between various layers, but not within any individual layer. In a deterministic model a single-number is assigned to each hydrogeologic parameter, given a particular scale of interest. However, physically there is no such entity as a truly uniform and homogeneous unit. Single-number representations or deterministic predictions are subject to uncertainties. The approach used in this work models such uncertainties with probabilistic parameters. The resulting statistical distributions of output variables are analyzed. A numerical algorithm, based on axiomatic principles of probability theory, performs arithmetic operations between probability distributions. Two subroutines are developed from the algorithm and incorporated into the computer program TERZAGI, which solves groundwater flow problems in saturated, multi-dimensional systems. The probabilistic computer program is given the name, PROGRES. The algorithm has been applied to study the following problems: one-dimensional flow through homogeneous media, steady-state and transient flow conditions, one-dimensional flow through heterogeneous media, steady-state and transient flow conditions, and two-dimensional steady-stte flow through heterogeneous media. The results are compared with those available in the literature.

  2. CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT CANCER PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT CANCER PROGRAM 2010 ANNUAL REPORT WITH STATISTICAL DATA FROM 2009 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS MEDICAL CENTER #12;2 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2 #12;3 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 3 UIMC CANCER PROGRAM CHANGING MULTIDISCIPLINARY CARE. FOR GOOD. #12;4 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT

  3. STEP Program Benchmark Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Program Benchmark Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  4. Maryland Efficiency Program Options

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maryland Efficiency Program Options, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  5. Program Summaries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35Information &Program PlanningProgram

  6. Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination - 12543

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerdes, Kurt; Chamberlain, Grover; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin [Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Wellman, Dawn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Deeb, Rula; Hawley, Elisabeth [ARCADIS U.S., Inc., Emeryville, CA 94608 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites. (authors)

  7. Proposed New Program: Planning New Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Proposed New Program: Planning New Programs Planning Program As outlined in the attached document, the Human Geography group is bringing forward a proposal for a new undergraduate program in Planning. The Curriculum Committee has discussed this program both last year, and in our Friday the 13th

  8. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Program Administrator Description

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Program Administrator Business Models, Program Administrator Description.

  9. Program Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers how to go about developing a human reliability program. In particular, it touches on conceptual thinking, raising awareness in an organization, the actions that go into developing a plan. It emphasizes evaluating all positions, eliminating positions from the pool due to mitigating factors, and keeping the process transparent. It lists components of the process and objectives in process development. It also touches on the role of leadership and the necessity for audit.

  10. Summer School Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summer School Programs Summer School Programs Focused technical enrichment programs. Contact Leader Francis J. Alexander (505) 665-4518 Email Deputy Carolyn Connor (505) 665-9891...

  11. Geothermal Technologies Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jay Nathwani Acting Program Manager Geothermal Technologies Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy The Geothermal Technologies Program Overview May 18 2010 Energy...

  12. Existing Facilities Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The NYSERDA Existing Facilities program merges the former Peak Load Reduction and Enhanced Commercial and Industrial Performance programs. The new program offers a broad array of different...

  13. URBAN LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTAL PROGRAM APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    URBAN LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTAL PROGRAM APPLICATION as part of your Graduate College application to the Urban Leadership Program/Supervisor: #12;Part 3: LEADERSHIP EXPERIENCES: Identify any educational leadership experiences

  14. Helioseismic Holography of Simulated Solar Convection and Prospects for the Detection of Small-Scale Subsurface Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. C. Braun; A. C. Birch; D. Benson; R. F. Stein; Ĺ. Nordlund

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform helioseismic holography on realistic solar convection simulations and compare the observed travel-time perturbations with the expected travel times from the horizontal flows in the simulations computed from forward models under the assumption of the Born approximation. We demonstrate reasonable agreement between the observed and model travel times which reinforces the validity of helioseismic holography in the detection of subsurface horizontal flows. From the variation of the signal-to-noise ratio with depth, we conclude that the helioseismic detection of individual flow structures with spatial scales of supergranulation or smaller is not possible for depths below about 5 Mm below the surface over time scales less than a day. Approximately half of the observed signal originates within the first 2 Mm below the surface. A consequence of this is a rapid decrease (and reversal in some cases) of the travel-time perturbations with depth due to the contribution to the measurements of oppositely directed surface flows in neighboring convective cells. This confirms an earlier interpretation of similar effects reported from observations.

  15. Final Report: Manganese Redox Mediation of UO2 Stability and Uranium Fate in the Subsurface: Molecular and Meter Scale Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tebo, Bradley M. [OSHU; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    One strategy to remediate U contamination in the subsurface is the immobilization of U via injection of an electron donor, e.g., acetate, which leads to stimulation of the bioreduction of U(VI), the more mobile form of U, to U(IV), the less mobile form. This process is inevitably accompanied by the sequential reductive dissolution of Mn and Fe oxides and often continuing into sulfate-reducing conditions. When these reducing zones, which accumulate U(IV), experience oxidizing conditions, reduced Fe and Mn can be reoxidized forming Fe and Mn oxides that, along with O2, can impact the stability of U(IV). The focus of our project has been to investigate (i) the effects of Mn(II) on the dissolution of UO2 under both reducing and oxidizing conditions, (ii) the oxidative dissolution of UO2 by soluble Mn(III), (iii) the fate of U once it is oxidized by MnO2 in both laboratory and field settings, and (iv) the effects of groundwater constituents on the coupled Mn(II)/U(IV) oxidation process. Additionally, studies of the interaction of Se, found at the DOE site at Rifle, CO, and Mn cycling were initiated to understand if observed seasonal fluctuations of Se and Mn are directly linked and whether any such linkages can affect the stability of U(IV).

  16. Approaches to identifying reservoir heterogeneity and reserve growth opportunities from subsurface data: The Oficina Formation, Budare field, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, D.S.; Raeuchle, S.K.; Holtz, M.H. [Bureau of Economic Geology, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We applied an integrated geologic, geophysical, and engineering approach devised to identify heterogeneities in the subsurface that might lead to reserve growth opportunities in our analysis of the Oficina Formation at Budare field, Venezuela. The approach involves 4 key steps: (1) Determine geologic reservoir architecture; (2) Investigate trends in reservoir fluid flow; (3) Integrate fluid flow trends with reservoir architecture; and (4) Estimate original oil-in-place, residual oil saturation, and remaining mobile oil, to identify opportunities for reserve growth. There are three main oil-producing reservoirs in the Oficina Formation that were deposited in a bed-load fluvial system, an incised valley-fill, and a barrier-strandplain system. Reservoir continuity is complex because, in addition to lateral facies variability, the major Oficina depositional systems were internally subdivided by high-frequency stratigraphic surfaces. These surfaces define times of intermittent lacustrine and marine flooding events that punctuated the fluvial and marginal marine sedimentation, respectively. Syn and post depositional faulting further disrupted reservoir continuity. Trends in fluid flow established from initial fluid levels, response to recompletion workovers, and pressure depletion data demonstrated barriers to lateral and vertical fluid flow caused by a combination of reservoir facies pinchout, flooding shale markers, and the faults. Considerable reserve growth potential exists at Budare field because the reservoir units are highly compartment by the depositional heterogeneity and structural complexity. Numerous reserve growth opportunities were identified in attics updip of existing production, in untapped or incompletely drained compartments, and in field extensions.

  17. Shallow groundwater and soil chemistry response to 3 years of subsurface drip irrigation using coalbed-methane-produced water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bern, C. R.; Boehlke, A. R.; Engle, M. A.; Geboy, N. J.; Schroeder, K. T.; Zupancic, J. W.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disposal of produced waters, pumped to the surface as part of coalbed methane (CBM) development, is a significant environmental issue in the Wyoming portion of the Powder River Basin, USA. High sodium adsorption ratios (SAR) of the waters could degrade agricultural land, especially if directly applied to the soil surface. One method of disposing of CBM water, while deriving beneficial use, is subsurface drip irrigation (SDI), where acidified CBM waters are applied to alfalfa fields year-round via tubing buried 0.92 m deep. Effects of the method were studied on an alluvial terrace with a relatively shallow depth to water table (?3 m). Excess irrigation water caused the water table to rise, even temporarily reaching the depth of drip tubing. The rise corresponded to increased salinity in some monitoring wells. Three factors appeared to drive increased groundwater salinity: (1) CBM solutes, concentrated by evapotranspiration; (2) gypsum dissolution, apparently enhanced by cation exchange; and (3) dissolution of native Na–Mg–SO{sub 4} salts more soluble than gypsum. Irrigation with high SAR (?24) water has increased soil saturated paste SAR up to 15 near the drip tubing. Importantly though, little change in SAR has occurred at the surface.

  18. Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Hao [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Hamilton, Mark F. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Bhalla, Rajan [Science Applications International Corporation] [Science Applications International Corporation; Brown, Walter E. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Hay, Todd A. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Whitelonis, Nicholas J. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Yang, Shang-Te [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Naqvi, Aale R. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

  19. DISTRIBUTION AND RANGE OF RADIONUCLIDE SORPTIOIN COEFFICIENTS IN A SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SUBSURFACE: STOCHASTIC MODELING CONSIDERATIONS - 10259

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.

    2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncertainty associated with the sorption coefficient, or K{sub d} value, is one of the key uncertainties in estimating risk associated with burying low-level nuclear waste in the subsurface. The objective of this study was to measure >648 K{sub d} values and provide a measure of the range and distribution (normal or log-normal) of radionuclide K{sub d} values appropriate for the E-Area disposal site, within the Savannah River Site, near Aiken South Carolina. The 95% confidence level for the mean K{sub d} was twice the mean in the Aquifer Zone (18-30.5 m depth), equal to the mean for the Upper Vadose Zone (3.3-10 m depth), and half the mean for the Lower Vadose Zone (3.3-18 m depth). The distribution of K{sub d} values was log normal in the Upper Vadose Zone and Aquifer Zone, and normal in the Lower Vadose Zone. To our knowledge, this is the first report of natural radionuclide K{sub d} variability in the literature. Using ranges and distribution coefficients that are specific to the hydrostratigraphic unit improved model accuracy and reduced model uncertainty. Unfortunately, extension of these conclusions to other sites is likely not appropriate given that each site has its own sources of hydrogeological variability. However, this study provides one of the first examples of the development stochastic ranges and distributions of K{sub d} values for a hydrological unit for stochastic modeling.

  20. Expression of acetate permease-like (apl) genes in subsurface communities of Geobacter species under fluctuating acetate concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elifantz, H.; N'Guessan, L.A.; Mouser, P.J.; Williams, K H.; Wilkins, M J.; Risso, C.; Holmes, D.E.; Long, P.E.; Lovley, D.R.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of acetate to uranium-contaminated aquifers in order to stimulate the growth and activity of Geobacter species that reduce uranium is a promising in situ bioremediation option. Optimizing this bioremediation strategy requires that sufficient acetate be added to promote Geobacter species growth. We hypothesized that under acetate-limiting conditions, subsurface Geobacter species would increase the expression of either putative acetate symporters genes (aplI and aplII). Acetate was added to a uranium-contaminated aquifer (Rifle, CO) in two continuous amendments separated by 5 days of groundwater flush to create changing acetate concentrations. While the expression of aplI in monitoring well D04 (high acetate) weakly correlated with the acetate concentration over time, the transcript levels for this gene were relatively constant in well D08 (low acetate). At the lowest acetate concentrations during the groundwater flush, the transcript levels of aplII were the highest. The expression of aplII decreased 2-10-fold upon acetate reintroduction. However, the overall instability of acetate concentrations throughout the experiment could not support a robust conclusion regarding the role of apl genes in response to acetate limitation under field conditions, in contrast to previous chemostat studies, suggesting that the function of a microbial community cannot be inferred based on lab experiments alone.

  1. Expression of Acetate Permease-like (apl) Genes in Subsurface Communities of Geobacter Species Under Fluctuating Acetate Concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elifantz, H.; N'Guessan, A. L.; Mouser, Paula; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Risso, Carla; Holmes, Dawn; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of acetate to uranium-contaminated aquifers in order to stimulate the growth and activity of Geobacter species that reduce uranium is a promising in situ bioremediation option. Optimizing this bioremediation strategy requires that suf?cient acetate be added to promote Geobacter species growth. We hypothesized that under acetate-limiting conditions, subsurface Geobacter species would increase the expression of either putative acetate symporters genes (aplI and aplII). Acetate was added to a uranium-contaminated aquifer (Ri?e, CO) in two continuous amendments separated by 5 days of groundwater ?ush to create changing acetate concentrations. While the expression of aplI in monitoring well D04 (high acetate) weakly correlated with the acetate concentration over time, the transcript levels for this gene were relatively constant in well D08 (low acetate). At the lowest acetate concentrations during the groundwater ?ush, the transcript levels of aplII were the highest. The expression of aplII decreased 2–10-fold upon acetate reintroduction. However, the overall instability of acetate concentrations throughout the experiment could not support a robust conclusion regarding the role of apl genes in response to acetate limitation under ?eld conditions, in contrast to previous chemostat studies, suggesting that the function of a microbial community cannot be inferred based on lab experiments alone.

  2. Evaluation of conceptual, mathematical and physical-and-chemical models for describing subsurface radionuclide transport at the Lake Karachai Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rumynin, V.G.; Mironenko, V.A.; Sindalovsky, L.N.; Boronina, A.V.; Konosavsky, P.K.; Pozdniakov, S.P.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this work was to develop the methodology and to improve understanding of subsurface radionuclide transport for application to the Lake Karachai Site and to identify the influence of the processes and interactions involved into transport and fate of the radionuclides. The report is focused on two sets of problems, which have to do both with, hydrodynamic and hydrogeochemical aspects of the contaminant transport.

  3. Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. Strain 300A, Isolated from Hanford 300A Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, B.; Cao, B.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Ica, Tuba; Dohnalkova, Alice; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Paksoy, Akin; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A facultative iron-reducing (Fe(III)-reducing) Paenibacillus sp. strain was isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms that was capable of reducing soluble Fe(III) complexes (Fe(III)-NTA and Fe(III)-citrate) but unable to reduce poorly crystalline ferrihydrite (Fh). However, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of reducing Fh in the presence of low concentrations (2 µM) of either of electron transfer mediators (ETMs) flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Maximum initial Fh reduction rates were observed at catalytic concentrations (<10 µM) of either FMN or AQDS. Higher FMN concentrations inhibited Fh reduction, while increased AQDS concentrations did not. We found that Paenibacillus sp. 300A also could reduce Fh in the presence of natural ETMs from Hanford 300A subsurface sediments. In the absence of ETMs, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of immobilizing U(VI) through both reduction and adsorption. The relative contributions of adsorption and microbial reduction to U(VI) removal from the aqueous phase were ~7:3 in PIPES and ~1:4 in bicarbonate buffer. Our study demonstrated that Paenibacillus sp. 300A catalyzes Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization and that these reactions benefit from externally added or naturally existing ETMs in 300A subsurface sediments.

  4. Wilcox sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy. Report of Investigations No. 117

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debout, D.G.; Weise, B.R.; Gregory, A.R.; Edwards, M.B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional studies of the lower Eocene Wilcox Group in Texas were conducted to assess the potential for producing heat energy and solution methane from geopressured fluids in the deep-subsurface growth-faulted zone. However, in addition to assembling the necessary data for the geopressured geothermal project, this study has provided regional information of significance to exploration for other resources such as lignite, uranium, oil, and gas. Because the focus of this study was on the geopressured section, emphasis was placed on correlating and mapping those sandstones and shales occurring deeper than about 10,000 ft. The Wilcox and Midway Groups comprise the oldest thick sandstone/shale sequence of the Tertiary of the Gulf Coast. The Wilcox crops out in a band 10 to 20 mi wide located 100 to 200 mi inland from the present-day coastline. The Wilcox sandstones and shales in the outcrop and updip shallow subsurface were deposited primarily in fluvial environments; downdip in the deep subsurface, on the other hand, the Wilcox sediments were deposited in large deltaic systems, some of which were reworked into barrier-bar and strandplain systems. Growth faults developed within the deltaic systems, where they prograded basinward beyond the older, stable Lower Cretaceous shelf margin onto the less stable basinal muds. Continued displacement along these faults during burial resulted in: (1) entrapment of pore fluids within isolated sandstone and shale sequences, and (2) buildup of pore pressure greater than hydrostatic pressure and development of geopressure.

  5. Solar Energy Incentives Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: The deadline for the most recent solicitation under this program has now passed. The program is currently closed, pending revisions to the program guidelines. Please see the program web site...

  6. HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM date ­ November 23, 2004 · Contract end date ­ March 31, 2006 #12;Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program in Pennsylvania · Objectives ­ Capture

  7. Human Reliability Program Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  8. Program Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prev next >Presentations Program Presentations

  9. Science Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomeland Science Stockpile2015HighlightsSciencePrograms

  10. Volunteer Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSiteEureka Analytics and VisualizationVolunteer

  11. Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News, informationPriorityPetroleumNotActivities |Program

  12. Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News, informationPriorityPetroleumNotActivities |Program

  13. Program Managers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News,Program Direction and Analysis Deputy Director

  14. SCIENCE Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobs Running jobsS2.Tour"Program early

  15. Resource Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of0 Resource Program

  16. Educational Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscoveringESnet UpdateEarthTroubleProgram

  17. DOE Technical Assistance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    energy management, and conservation strategies * Green building technologies * Building codes Program Design and Implementation * Policy and program development * Coordinating...

  18. Actuarial Sciences Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Purdue Actuarial Science Program is an interdisciplinary program offered jointly by the Department of Mathematics and Department of Statistics.

  19. Renewable Energy Grant Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: This program is no longer accepting applications. See the program web site for information regarding future solicitations. '''''

  20. Technology needs for remediation: Hanford and other DOE sites. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stapp, D.C.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technologies are being developed under the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program to facilitate remediation of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) buried and stored low-level radioactive, transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive and hazardous buried wastes. The BWID program is being coordinated by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho, a DOE site that has large volumes of buried radioactive wastes. The program is currently focusing its efforts on the problems at INEL`s Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). As specific technologies are successfully demonstrated, they will be available for transfer to applications at other DOE buried waste sites. The purpose of this study is to present buried waste technology needs that have been identified for DOE sites other than INEL.

  1. Corrective Action Decision Document/ Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Evans

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the subsurface at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443, CNTA - Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). CAU 443 is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, north of U.S. Highway 6, about 48 kilometers north of Warm Springs, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the corrective action plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for the UC-1 Cavity (Corrective Action Site 58-57-001) at CAU 443, as provided in the FFACO. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. A Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) was performed in several stages from 1999 to 2003, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites (Corrective Action Unit No. 443)'' (DOE/NV, 1999). Groundwater modeling was the primary activity of the CAI. Three phases of modeling were conducted for the Faultless underground nuclear test. The first involved the gathering and interpretation of geologic and hydrogeologic data into a three-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow, and use of the output of the flow model for a transport model of radionuclide release and migration behavior (Pohlmann et al., 2000). The second modeling phase (known as a Data Decision Analysis [DDA]) occurred after the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection reviewed the first model and was designed to respond to concerns regarding model uncertainty (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). The third modeling phase updated the original flow and transport model to incorporate the uncertainty identified in the DDA, and focused the model domain on the region of interest to the transport predictions. This third phase culminated in the calculation of contaminant boundaries for the site (Pohll et al., 2003).

  2. SUNY Programs: Australia and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    SUNY Programs: Australia and New Zealand Semester, Academic Year and Short Term #12;1 Table of Contents How to Use this Booklet 1 Choosing a Program in Australia and New Zealand 2 Exchange vs. Study Abroad 3 Programs Outside Sydney and Melbourne 4 Programs in Melbourne 10 Programs in Sydney 12 Programs

  3. The Use of Subsurface Barriers to Support Treatment of Metals and Reduce the Flux of Tritium to Fourmile Branch at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina - 13358

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blount, Gerald; Thibault, Jeffrey; Wells, Leslie [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC, 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC, 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Prater, Phillip [Department of Energy, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Department of Energy, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) produced tritium, plutonium, and special nuclear materials for national defense, medicine, and the space programs. Acidic groundwater plumes containing metals, metallic radionuclides, non-metallic radionuclides and tritium sourced from the F and H Area Seepage Basins have impacted the surface water of Fourmile Branch on SRS. Tritium releases from Fourmile Branch have impacted the water quality within areas of the Savannah River adjacent to the SRS, and this circumstance has been an ongoing regulatory concern. The F and H Area Seepage Basins operated until 1988 for the disposition of deionized acidic waste water from the F and H Separations Facilities. The waste water contained dilute nitric acid and low concentrations of non-radioactive metals, and radionuclides, with the major isotopes being Cs-137, Sr-90, U-235, U-238, Pu-239, Tc-99, I-129, and tritium. The tritium concentration in the waste water was relatively elevated because there is not a practicable removal method in water. The acid content of the waste water during the operational period of the basins was equal to 12 billion liters of nitric acid. The seepage basins were closed in 1988 and backfilled and capped by 1991. The plumes associated with the F and H basins cover an area of nearly 2.4 square kilometers (600 acres) and discharge along ?2,600 meters of Fourmile Branch. The acidic nature of the plumes and their overall discharge extent along the branch represent a large challenge with respect to reducing contaminant flux to Fourmile Branch. The introduction of nitric acid into the groundwater over a long time effectively reduced the retardation of metal migration from the basins to the groundwater and in the groundwater to Fourmile Branch, because most negatively charged surfaces on the aquifer materials were filled with hydrogen ion. Two large pump and treat systems were constructed in 1997 and operated until 2003 in an attempt to capture and control the releases to Fourmile Branch. The operating cost, including waste disposal, for the two systems was ?$1.3 M/month. Both systems employed reinjection of tritiated water up gradient of the extraction, and produced large quantities of waste from non-tritium isotopes and metals removal prior to reinjection. Both systems were determined to be ineffective and potentially detrimental with respect to limiting the flux of contaminants to Fourmile Branch. After it became apparent that there was very little benefit to continued operation of the systems, and the staggering cost of operations was recognized by the SRS and regulators, a new remedy was developed. The new system uses vertical subsurface barriers to redirect groundwater flow to limit the transport of contaminants to the stream. The barriers were constructed of acid resistant grout using deep soil mixing techniques. The grout mixture used low swelling clay, fly ash, and sodium hydroxide to form a pozzolana material with low permeability and low strength. The SRS and regulators agreed to a series of remedial goals, with the first goal to reduce tritium flux to the stream by 70% and bring constituents other than tritium to groundwater protection standards. (authors)

  4. A Strategy to Conduct an Analysis of the Long-Term Performance of Low-Activity Waste Glass in a Shallow Subsurface Disposal System at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BP McGrail, WL Ebert, DH Bacon, DM Strachan

    1998-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Privatized services are being procured to vitrify low-activity tank wastes for eventual disposal in a shallow subsurface facility at the Hanford Site. Over 500,000 metric tons of low-activity waste glass will be generated, which is among the largest volumes of waste within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex and is one of the largest inventories of long-lived radionuclides planned for disposal in a low-level waste facility. Before immobilized waste can be disposed, DOE must approve a "performance assessment," which is a document that describes the impacts of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. Because the release rate of radionuclides from the glass waste form is a key factor determining these impacts, a sound scientific basis for determining their long-term release rates must be developed if this disposal action is to be accepted by regulatory agencies, stakeholders, and the public. In part, the scientific basis is determined from a sound testing strategy. The foundation of the proposed testing strategy is a well accepted mechanistic model that is being used to calculate the glass corrosion behavior over the geologic time scales required for performance assessment. This model requires that six parameters be determined, and the testing program is defined by an appropriate set of laboratory experiments to determine these parameters, and is combined with a set of field experiments to validate the model as a whole. Three general classes of laboratory tests are proposed in this strategy: 1) characterization, 2) accelerated, and 3) service condition. Characterization tests isolate and provide specific information about processes or parameters in theoretical models. Accelerated tests investigate corrosion behavior that will be important over the regulated service life of a disposal system within a laboratory time frame of a few years or less. Service condition tests verify that the techniques used in accelerated tests do not change the alteration mechanisms. The recommended characterization tests are single-pass flow-through tests using a batch reactor design, Accelerated and service conditions tests include product consistency and pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) tests. Nonradioactive glasses will be used for the majority of the laboratory testing (-80%), with the remainder performed with glasses containing a selected set of key radionuclides. Additionally, a series of PUF experiments with a natural analog of basaltic glass is recommended to confirm that the alteration products observed under accelerated conditions in the PUF tests are similar to those found associated with the natural analog. This will provide additional confidence in using the PUF test results to infer long-term corrosion behavior. Field tests are proposed as a unique way to validate the glass corrosion and contaminant transport models being used in the performance assessment. To better control the test conditions, the field tests are to be performed in lysimeters (corrugated steel containers buried flush with the ground surface). Lysimeters provide a way to combine a glass, Hanford soil, and perhaps other engineered materials in a well-controlled test, but on a scale that is not practicable in the laboratory. The recommended field tests include some experiments where a steady flow rate of water is artificially applied. These tests use a glass designed to have a high corrosion rate so that it is easier to monitor contaminant release and transport. Existing lysimeters at the Hanford Site can be used for these experiments or new lysimeters that have been equipped with the latest in monitoring equipment and located near the proposed disposal site.

  5. International Programs and Services International Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    International Programs and Services _______________ 1.5 Page 1 International Programs and Services OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS Offices in Laurel Hall (970) 491-5917 www.international.colostate.edu James A. Cooney, Vice Provost for International Affairs The Office of International Programs acts

  6. International Programs and Services International Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    International Programs and Services International Programs and Services OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS Offices in Laurel Hall (970) 491-5917 international.colostate.edu James A. Cooney, Vice Provost for International Affairs The Office of International Programs acts as a catalyst for ideas that bring about

  7. Signature Program/Landmark Research Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Signature Program/Landmark Research Programs for the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences November 20, 2008 #12;SIGNATURE PROGRAM PROPOSAL: CARDIOVASCULAR SCIENCES/DEBAKEY INSTITUTE in Figure 1 to identify the participants in the cardiovascular science program and the central role

  8. Evaluation of Subsurface Flow and Free-water Surface Wetlands Treating NPR-3 Produced Water - Year No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, J. E.; Jackson, L. M.

    2001-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a summary of some of the activities conducted during the first year of a three-year cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between the Department of Energy (DOE) Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) and Texaco relating to the treatment of produced water by constructed wetlands. The first year of the CRADA is for design, construction and acclimation of the wetland pilot units. The second and third years of the CRADA are for tracking performance of pilot wetlands as the plant and microbial communities mature. A treatment wetland is a proven technology for the secondary and tertiary treatment of produced water, storm water and other wastewaters. Treatment wetlands are typically classified as either free-water surface (FWS) or subsurface flow (SSF). Both FWS and SSF wetlands work well when properly designed and operated. This paper presents a collection of kinetic data gathered from pilot units fed a slipstream of Wyoming (NPR-3) produced water. The pilot units are set up outdoors to test climatic influences on treatment. Monitoring parameters include evapotranspiration, plant growth, temperature, and NPDES discharge limits. The pilot wetlands (FWS and SSF) consist of a series of 100-gal plastic tubs filled with local soils, gravel, sharp sand and native wetland plants (cattail (Typha spp.), bulrush (Scirpus spp.), dwarf spikerush (Eleocharis)). Feed pumps control hydraulic retention time (HRT) and simple water control structures control the depth of water. The treated water is returned to the existing produced water treatment system. All NPDES discharge limits are met. Observations are included on training RMOTC summer students to do environmental work.

  9. Summary report on close-coupled subsurface barrier technology: Initial field trials to full-scale demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser, J.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Environmental and Waste Technology Center; Dwyer, B. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate the installation and measure the performance of a close-coupled barrier for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional, low-cost, cement-grout containment barrier followed by a thin lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement-polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. The technology has matured from a regulatory investigation of the issues concerning the use of polymers to laboratory compatibility and performance measurements of various polymer systems to a pilot-scale, single column injection at Sandia to full-scale demonstration. The feasibility of the close-coupled barrier concept was proven in a full-scale cold demonstration at Hanford, Washington and then moved to the final stage with a full-scale demonstration at an actual remediation site at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). At the Hanford demonstration the composite barrier was emplaced around and beneath a 20,000 liter tank. The secondary cement layer was constructed using conventional jet grouting techniques. Drilling was completed at a 45{degree} angle to the ground, forming a cone-shaped barrier. The primary barrier was placed by panel jet-grouting with a dual-wall drill stem using a two part polymer grout. The polymer chosen was a high molecular weight acrylic. At the BNL demonstration a V-trough barrier was installed using a conventional cement grout for the secondary layer and an acrylic-gel polymer for the primary layer. Construction techniques were identical to the Hanford installation. This report summarizes the technology development from pilot- to full-scale demonstrations and presents some of the performance and quality achievements attained.

  10. SCORPIO: A Scalable Two-Phase Parallel I/O Library With Application To A Large Scale Subsurface Simulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sreepathi, Sarat [ORNL] [ORNL; Sripathi, Vamsi [Intel Corporation] [Intel Corporation; Mills, Richard T [ORNL] [ORNL; Hammond, Glenn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Mahinthakumar, Kumar [North Carolina State University] [North Carolina State University

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inefficient parallel I/O is known to be a major bottleneck among scientific applications employed on supercomputers as the number of processor cores grows into the thousands. Our prior experience indicated that parallel I/O libraries such as HDF5 that rely on MPI-IO do not scale well beyond 10K processor cores, especially on parallel file systems (like Lustre) with single point of resource contention. Our previous optimization efforts for a massively parallel multi-phase and multi-component subsurface simulator (PFLOTRAN) led to a two-phase I/O approach at the application level where a set of designated processes participate in the I/O process by splitting the I/O operation into a communication phase and a disk I/O phase. The designated I/O processes are created by splitting the MPI global communicator into multiple sub-communicators. The root process in each sub-communicator is responsible for performing the I/O operations for the entire group and then distributing the data to rest of the group. This approach resulted in over 25X speedup in HDF I/O read performance and 3X speedup in write performance for PFLOTRAN at over 100K processor cores on the ORNL Jaguar supercomputer. This research describes the design and development of a general purpose parallel I/O library, SCORPIO (SCalable block-ORiented Parallel I/O) that incorporates our optimized two-phase I/O approach. The library provides a simplified higher level abstraction to the user, sitting atop existing parallel I/O libraries (such as HDF5) and implements optimized I/O access patterns that can scale on larger number of processors. Performance results with standard benchmark problems and PFLOTRAN indicate that our library is able to maintain the same speedups as before with the added flexibility of being applicable to a wider range of I/O intensive applications.

  11. Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Processing Site. Revision 3, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The supplemental standards provisions of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 192 (40 CFR Part 192) require the cleanup of radionuclides other than radium-226 (Ra-226) to levels ``as low as reasonably achievable`` (ALARA), taking into account site-specific conditions, if sufficient quantities and concentrations are present to constitute a significant radiation hazard. In this context, thorium-230 (Th-230) at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site will require remediation. However, a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table at the site significantly complicates conventional remedial action with respect to cleanup. Characterization data indicate that in the offpile areas, the removal of residual in situ bulk Ra-226 and Th-230 such that the 1000-year projected Ra-226 concentration (Ra-226 concentration in 1000 years due to the decay of in situ Ra-226 and the in-growth of Ra-226 from in situ Th-230) complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cleanup standard for in situ Ra-226 and the cleanup protocol for in situ Th-230 can be readily achieved using conventional excavation techniques for bulk contamination without encountering significant impacts due to groundwater. The EPA cleanup standard and criterion for Ra-226 and the 1000-year projected Ra-226 are 5 and 15 picocuries per gram (pCi/g) above background, respectively, averaged over 15-centimeter (cm) deep surface and subsurface intervals and 100-square-meter (m{sup 2}) grid areas. Significant differential migration of Th-230 relative to Ra-226 has occurred over 40 percent of the subpile area. To effectively remediate the site with respect to Ra-226 and Th-230, supplemental standard is proposed and discussed in this report.

  12. TOURGHREACT: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal MultiphaseReactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated GeologicMedia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The program was written in Fortran 77 and developed by introducing reactive geochemistry into the multiphase fluid and heat flow simulator TOUGH2. A variety of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes are considered under a wide range of conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, ionic strength, and pH and Eh. Interactions between mineral assemblages and fluids can occur under local equilibrium or kinetic rates. The gas phase can be chemically active. Precipitation and dissolution reactions can change formation porosity and permeability. The program can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. Here we present two examples to illustrate applicability of the program: (1) injectivity effects of mineral scaling in a fractured geothermal reservoir and (2) CO2 disposal in a deep saline aquifer.

  13. Graduate Programs Auburn University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forestry Graduate Programs Auburn University Auburn University, Alabama 368495414 Programs://www.forestry.auburn.edu/graduate/ University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, California 947203114 Program: Forestry http://espm.berkeley.edu/gradprograms/grad_programs_mf.html Clemson University Clemson, South Carolina 29634 Program: Forest Resources http

  14. Postdoctoral Mentoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Postdoctoral Mentoring Program Procedures, Guidelines and Resources As one of the largest Mentoring Program Procedures, Guidelines and Resources Overview of the Mentoring Program: As one-wide postdoc mentoring program was implemented to help us fulfill this goal. The Mentoring Program's chief

  15. Final technical report for project titled Quantitative Characterization of Cell Aggregation/Adhesion as Predictor for Distribution and Transport of Microorganisms in Subsurface Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, April Z [Northeastern University; Wan, Kai-tak [Northeastern Univeristy

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This project aims to explore and develop enabling methodology and techniques for nano-scale characterization of microbe cell surface contact mechanics, interactions and adhesion quantities that allow for identification and quantification of indicative properties related to microorganism migration and transport behavior in porous media and in subsurface environments. Microbe transport has wide impact and therefore is of great interest in various environmental applications such as in situ or enhanced subsurface bioremediation,filtration processes for water and wastewater treatments and protection of drinking water supplies. Although great progress has been made towards understanding the identities and activities of these microorganisms in the subsurface, to date, little is known of the mechanisms that govern the mobility and transport of microorganisms in DOE’s contaminated sites, making the outcomes of in situ natural attenuation or contaminant stability enhancement unpredictable. Conventionally, movement of microorganisms was believed to follows the rules governing solute (particle) transport. However, recent studies revealed that cell surface properties, especially those pertaining to cell attachment/adhesion and aggregation behavior, can cause the microbe behavior to deviate from non-viable particles and hence greatly influence the mobility and distribution of microorganisms in porous media.This complexity highlights the need to obtain detailed information of cell-cell and cell-surface interactions in order to improve and refine the conceptual and quantitative model development for fate and transport of microorganisms and contaminant in subsurface. Traditional cell surface characterization methods are not sufficient to fully predict the deposition rates and transport behaviors of microorganism observed. A breakthrough of methodology that would allow for quantitative and molecular-level description of intrinsic cell surface properties indicative for cell-surface interactions is essential for the field. To tackle this, we have developed a number of new Bio-nanomechanical techniques, including reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) and bio-AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy), for cell adhesion-detachment measurement of the long-range surface interactions, in combination with mathematical modeling, which would allow us to characterize the mechanical behavior from single cell to multi-cell aggregate, critical thresholds for large scale coaggregation and transportation of cells and aggregates in the presence of long range inter-surface forces etc. Although some technical and mathematical challenges remain, the preliminary results promise great breakthrough potential. In this study, we investigated the cellular surface characteristics of representative bio-remediating microorganisms relevant to DOE IFRC (Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenges) sites and their transport behaviors in porous media, aiming to draw a groundbreaking correlation between the micro-scale genetic and biological origin-based cell surface properties, the consequent mechanical adhesion and aggregation behaviors, and the macro-scale microbial mobility and retention in porous media, which are unavailable in the literature. The long-term goal is to significantly improve the mechanistic and quantitative understanding of microbial mobility, sorption, and transport within reactive transport models as needed to manipulate subsurface contaminant fate and transport predictions.

  16. subsurface geological field | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assessment of the effect of the total charge state. Explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of fully oxidized and fully reduced MtrF employing ten independent 50-ns...

  17. Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cycle and ecosystem biogeochemistry and inform biogeochemistry components of Earth System Models. Theme Leads Instruments Science Highlights Publications Projects Leads Nancy...

  18. EMSL - Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cycle and ecosystem biogeochemistry and inform biogeochemistry components of Earth System Models. en Soil Composition http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebnewssoil-composition

  19. Subsurface well apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubbo, R.B.; Bangert, D.S.

    1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is described for completing a subterranean well, comprising: a tubular conduit portion made up within a tubular conduit string of the type extending from a point near the surface of the earth to a remote point downwardly within said well and which is in contact with a fluid source within said well, said tubular conduit portion forming an imperforate wall and defining a central bore radially inward and further defining an exterior surface; an activating fluid body in communication with, and disposed at least in-part within, said central bore of tubular conduit portion; signal generating means including at least one sensor member coupled to said exterior surface of said tubular conduit portion for detecting circumferential stress in said imperforate wall defined by said tubular conduit portion and for producing an output signal corresponding thereto; a well bore tool disposed exteriorly of said tubular conduit portion, and including an actuating member for performing at least one desired completion function; and control means responsive to a predetermined output signal from said signal generating means for selectively activating said well bore tool and causing said actuating member to perform at least one desired completion function.

  20. Addressing Common Subsurface Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of2 ofEmergencyAcrobat PDFMakerAdamAddressing Common

  1. Subsurface Site Characterization

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O'1 ~(3JlpV ProjectDear Mr.

  2. Program Management for Large Scale Engineering Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oehmen, Josef

    The goal of this whitepaper is to summarize the LAI research that applies to program management. The context of most of the research discussed in this whitepaper are large-scale engineering programs, particularly in the ...

  3. RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK Committee Draft Guidebook Third Edition.D. Commissioner Associate Member Kate Zocchetti Project Manager Tony Gonçalves Office Manager Renewable Energy Office Panama Bartholomy Deputy Director Efficiency and Renewable Energy Division Melissa Jones Executive

  4. RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK Staff Draft Guidebook Third Edition COMMISSION Kate Zocchetti Project Manager Tony Gonçalves Office Manager Renewable Energy Office Valerie Hall Deputy Director Efficiency and Renewable Energy Division Melissa Jones Executive Director The California

  5. RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK Final Committee Draft Guidebook Third Edition.D. Commissioner Associate Member Kate Zocchetti Project Manager Tony Gonçalves Office Manager Renewable Energy Office Panama Bartholomy Deputy Director Efficiency and Renewable Energy Division Melissa Jones Executive

  6. Environmental Certificate Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Environmental Management Certificate Program Accelerate Your Career Environmentaland Facilities of excellence. Environmental Management Certificate Program Compliance with regulatory requirements, remediation Irvine Extension's Certificate Program in Environmental Manage- ment prepares professionals at every

  7. Program Analyst (Recent Graduate)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is being filled under the Department of Energy's Recent Graduate Program. The Recent Graduate Program is a 1 year developmental program designed to promote careers in Federal Service...

  8. Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Land Management (BLM), and numerous county and local governments. The surveys have also involvedColorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan A Vision for Building Comprehensive Wetland Information for the State of Colorado Planning Years 2011­2015 #12;Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland

  9. Technology Innovation Program | Partnerships | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Program SHARE Technology Innovation Program The Technology Innovation Program (TIP) is a 1-year program designed to accelerate selected technologies to commercial...

  10. Approximating semidefinite packing programs ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we define semidefinite packing programs and describe an ... Semidefinite packing programs arise in many applications such as semidefinite.

  11. INL Small Business Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small Business Program The Idaho National Laboratory Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Small Business Program is a fundamental component of the Supply Chain Management organization....

  12. Hydrogen Program Overview

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to the DOE Hydrogen Program. It describes the program mission and answers the question: “Why Hydrogen?”

  13. JGI Fungal Genomics Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JGI Fungal Genomics Program Igor V. Grigoriev 1 Lawrenceof California. JGI Fungal Genomics Program Contact: IgorJGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi,

  14. JGI Fungal Genomics Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    View Supports functional genomics, user data deposition andJGI Fungal Genomics Program Igor V. Grigoriev 1 DOE Jointof California. JGI Fungal Genomics Program Contact: Igor

  15. Fungal Genomics Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strains Comparative genomics and transcriptomics of xyloseFungal Genomics Program Igor Grigoriev 1 * (complex communities Fungal Genomics Program Igor Grigoriev

  16. Surety Bond Program (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Surety Bond Program, a program of the Maryland Small Business Development Financing Authority, assists eligible small businesses in obtaining bid, performance or payment bonds necessary to...

  17. Alternative Fuel Transportation Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets "Alternative Fuel Transportation Program" Dana O'Hara, DOE Ted Sears, NREL Vehicle Technologies Program June 20,...

  18. DOE Technical Assistance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Designing Effective Residential Retrofit Programs eere.energy.gov The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii DOE Technical Assistance Program Quality Assurance for Residential...

  19. Science of Signatures Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Science of Signatures-Past Programs Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email Professional Staff Assistant Jutta Kayser (505) 663-5649 Email...

  20. DOE In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. In situ manipulation technologies subprogram plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1993-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISRP) supports and manages a balanced portfolio of applied research and development activities in support of DOE environmental restoration and waste management needs. ISRP technologies are being developed in four areas: containment, chemical and physical treatment, in situ bioremediation, and in situ manipulation (including electrokinetics). the focus of containment is to provide mechanisms to stop contaminant migration through the subsurface. In situ bioremediation and chemical and physical treatment both aim to destroy or eliminate contaminants in groundwater and soils. In situ manipulation (ISM) provides mechanisms to access contaminants or introduce treatment agents into the soil, and includes other technologies necessary to support the implementation of ISR methods. Descriptions of each major program area are provided to set the technical context of the ISM subprogram. Typical ISM needs for major areas of in situ remediation research and development are identified.

  1. Subsurface characterization of an oxidation-induced phase transformation and twinning in nickel-based superalloy exposed to oxy-combustion environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Jingxi; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Wise, Adam; Li, Jia; Laughlin, David E.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the integration of oxy-fuel combustion to turbine power generation system, turbine alloys are exposed to high temperature and an atmosphere comprised of steam, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. While surface and internal oxidation of the alloy takes place, the microstructure in the subsurface region also changes due to oxidation. In this study, bare metal coupons of Ni-base superalloys were exposed in oxy-fuel combustion environment for up to 1000 h and the oxidation-related microstructures were examined. Phase transformation occurred in the subsurface region in Ni-based superalloy and led to twinning. The transformation product phases were analyzed through thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and various electron microscopy techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The mechanism by which the phase transformation and the formation of the microstructure occurred was also discussed. The possible effects of the product phases on the performance of the alloy in service were discussed.

  2. Subsurface Analysis of the Mesaverde Group on and near the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico-its implication on Sites of Oil and Gas Accumulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridgley, Jennie

    2001-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the phase 2 Mesaverde study part of the Department of Energy funded project ''Analysis of oil-bearing Cretaceous Sandstone Hydrocarbon Reservoirs, exclusive of the Dakota Sandstone, on the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico'' was to define the facies of the oil-producing units within the subsurface units of the Mesaverde Group and integrate these results with outcrop studies that defined the depositional environments of these facies within a sequence stratigraphic context. The focus of this report will center on (1) integration of subsurface correlations with outcrop correlations of components of the Mesaverde, (2) application of the sequence stratigraphic model determined in the phase one study to these correlations, (3) determination of the facies distribution of the Mesaverde Group and their relationship to sites of oil and gas accumulation, (4) evaluation of the thermal maturity and potential source rocks for oil and gas in the Mesaverde Group, and (5) evaluation of the structural features on the Reservation as they may control sites of oil accumulation.

  3. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Models Guide, October 27, 2011.

  4. Fishery Biology Graduate Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishery Biology Graduate Programs University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska 997750820 Program/degrees/index.html University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 95721 Program: Fisheries Conservation and Management http://ag.arizona.edu/srnr/academicprograms/wildlifefisheries/gradstudiesFisheries.html Auburn University Auburn, Alabama 368490001 Programs: Aquaculture, Aquatic Ecology, Fishery Management

  5. SHIPBOARD LABORATORY SAFETY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ...................................................................................................10 Lockout/Tag-Out Program: IODP-USIO Policy Modification

  6. OSHWPP model programs guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Descriptions of model occupational health and safety programs implemented at DOE facilities are presented.

  7. DOE Mentoring Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Learning and Workforce Development coordinates this mentoring program for DOE Federal Employees.

  8. Technology Commercialization Program 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This reference compilation describes the Technology Commercialization Program of the Department of Energy, Defense Programs. The compilation consists of two sections. Section 1, Plans and Procedures, describes the plans and procedures of the Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Program. The second section, Legislation and Policy, identifies legislation and policy related to the Program. The procedures for implementing statutory and regulatory requirements are evolving with time. This document will be periodically updated to reflect changes and new material.

  9. Integrated Program Review Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Program Review (IPR) Fish and Wildlife Program Costs May 20, 2010 Presented to Northwest Total Annual Average Cost of BPA Fish & Wildlife Actions1/ 226 5 24 41 8 310 137 750 1/ FY 2012 White Sturgeon. These actions may include such things as dredging, restoration of channel complexity

  10. Bulk Storage Program Compliance Written Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Bulk Storage Program Compliance Written Program Cornell University 5/8/2013 #12;Bulk Storage.......................................................... 5 4.2.2 Aboveground Petroleum Storage Tanks­ University activities/operations designed to prevent releases of oil from Aboveground Petroleum Storage Tanks (ASTs) required to comply with following

  11. Dietetic Internship Program Structure of the Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Dietetic Internship Program Structure of the Program The UNLV Dietetic Internship (DI Internship are designed to provide well-trained dietetics professionals for the growing Southern Nevada Overview The goal of the Community Component of the Dietetic Internship is to provide the intern

  12. Science Policy Fellowship Program About the Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    Science Policy Fellowship Program About the Program This two-year fellowship at the IDA Science recipients to gain science and technology policy experience. Policy research will focus on areas research for leaders in the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in the Executive Office

  13. Environmental Assessment for Selection and Operation of the Proposed Field Research Centers for the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), within the Office of Science (SC), proposes to add a Field Research Center (FRC) component to the existing Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program. The NABIR Program is a ten-year fundamental research program designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. An FRC would be integrated with the existing and future laboratory and field research and would provide a means of examining the fundamental biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. The NABIR Program would continue to perform fundamental research that might lead to promising bioremediation technologies that could be demonstrated by other means in the future. For over 50 years, DOE and its predecessor agencies have been responsible for the research, design, and production of nuclear weapons, as well as other energy-related research and development efforts. DOE's weapons production and research activities generated hazardous, mixed, and radioactive waste products. Past disposal practices have led to the contamination of soils, sediments, and groundwater with complex and exotic mixtures of compounds. This contamination and its associated costs and risks represents a major concern to DOE and the public. The high costs, long duration, and technical challenges associated with remediating the subsurface contamination at DOE sites present a significant need for fundamental research in the biological, chemical, and physical sciences that will contribute to new and cost-effective solutions. One possible low-cost approach for remediating the subsurface contamination of DOE sites is through the use of a technology known as bioremediation. Bioremediation has been defined as the use of microorganisms to biodegrade or biotransform hazardous organic contaminants to environmentally safe levels in soils, subsurface materials, water, sludges, and residues.. While bioremediation technology is promising, DOE managers and non-DOE scientists have recognized that the fundamental scientific information needed to develop effective bioremediation technologies for cleanup of the legacy waste sites is lacking in many cases. DOE believes that field-based research is needed to realize the full potential of bioremediation. The Department of Energy faces a unique set of challenges associated with cleaning up waste at its former weapons production and research sites. These sites contain complex mixtures of contaminants in the subsurface, including radioactive compounds. In many cases, the fundamental field-based scientific information needed to develop safe and effective remediation and cleanup technologies is lacking. DOE needs fundamental research on the use of microorganisms and their products to assist DOE in the decontamination and cleanup of its legacy waste sites. The existing NABIR program to-date has focused on fundamental scientific research in the laboratory. Because subsurface hydrologic and geologic conditions at contaminated DOE sites cannot easily be duplicated in a laboratory, however, the DOE needs a field component to permit existing and future laboratory research results to be field-tested on a small scale in a controlled outdoor setting. Such field-testing needs to be conducted under actual legacy waste field conditions representative of those that DOE is most in need of remediating. Ideally, these field conditions should be as representative as practicable of the types of subsurface contamination conditions that resulted from legacy wastes from the nuclear weapons program activities. They should also be representative of the types of hydrologic and geologic conditions that exist across the DOE complex.

  14. A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangler, L.H.; Dobeck, L.M.; Nehrir, A.; Humphries, S.; Barr, J.; Keith, C.; Shaw, J.; Rouse, J.; Cunningham, A.; Benson, S.; Repasky, K.S.; Lewicki, J.; Wells, A.; Diehl, R.; Strazisar, B.; Fessenden, J.; Rahn, T.; Amonette, J.; Barr, J.; Pickles, W.; Jacobson, J.; Silver, E.; Male, E.; Rauch, H.; Gullickson, K.; Trautz, R.; Kharaka, Y.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Wielopolski, L.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A controlled field pilot has been developed in Bozeman, Montana, USA, to study near surface CO2 transport and detection technologies. A slotted horizontal well divided into six zones was installed in the shallow subsurface. The scale and CO2 release rates were chosen to be relevant to developing monitoring strategies for geological carbon storage. The field site was characterized before injection, and CO2 transport and concentrations in saturated soil and the vadose zone were modeled. Controlled releases of CO2 from the horizontal well were performed in the summers of 2007 and 2008, and collaborators from six national labs, three universities, and the U.S. Geological Survey investigated movement of CO2 through the soil, water, plants, and air with a wide range of near surface detection techniques. An overview of these results will be presented.

  15. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

  16. Summary of Inorganic Compositional Data for Groundwater, Soil-Water, and Surface-Water Samples at the Headgate Draw Subsurface Drip Irrigation Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geboy, Nicholas J.; Engle, Mark A.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Zupanic, John W.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a 5-year project on the impact of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) application of coalbed-methane (CBM) produced waters, water samples were collected from the Headgate Draw SDI site in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA. This research is part of a larger study to understand short- and long-term impacts on both soil and water quality from the beneficial use of CBM waters to grow forage crops through use of SDI. This document provides a summary of the context, sampling methodology, and quality assurance and quality control documentation of samples collected prior to and over the first year of SDI operation at the site (May 2008-October 2009). This report contains an associated database containing inorganic compositional data, water-quality criteria parameters, and calculated geochemical parameters for samples of groundwater, soil water, surface water, treated CBM waters, and as-received CBM waters collected at the Headgate Draw SDI site.

  17. State Energy Program Formula Grant Guidance Program Year 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    STATE ENERGY PROGRAM FORMULA GRANT GUIDANCE PROGRAM YEAR 2007 STATE ENERGY PROGRAM NOTICE 07-01 EFFECTIVE DATE: April 3, 2007 PURPOSE To establish grant guidance and management...

  18. Evidence for biological activity in mineralization of secondary sulphate deposits in a basaltic environment: implications for the search for life in the Martian subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Doc Richardson; Nancy W. Hinman; Jill R. Scott

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evidence of microbial activity associated with mineralization of secondary Na-sulphate minerals (thenardite, mirabilite) in the basaltic subsurface of Craters of the Moon National Monument (COM), Idaho were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, laser desorption Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LD-FTICR-MS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Peaks suggestive of bio/organic compounds were observed in the secondary Na-sulphate deposits by LD-FTICR-MS. FTIR provided additional evidence for the presence of bio/organic compounds. Sulphur fractionation was explored to assist in determining if microbes may play a role in oxidizing sulphur. The presence of bio/organic compounds associated with Na-sulphate deposits, along with the necessity of oxidizing reduced sulphur to sulphate, suggests that biological activity may be involved in the formation of these secondary minerals. The secondary Na-sulphate minerals probably form from the overlying basalt through leached sodium ions and sulphate ions produced by bio-oxidation of Fe-sulphide minerals. Since the COM basalts are one of the most comparable terrestrial analogues for their Martian counterparts, the occurrence of biological activity in the formation of sulphate minerals at COM has direct implications for the search for life on Mars. In addition, the presence of caves on Mars suggests the importance of these environments as possible locations for growth and preservation of microbial activity. Therefore, understanding the physiochemical pathways of abiotic and biotic mineralization in the COM subsurface and similar basaltic settings has direct implications for the search for extinct or extant life on Mars.

  19. Generic programming in Scala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N'guessan, Olayinka

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Generic programming is a programming methodology that aims at producing reusable code, defined independently of the data types on which it is operating. To achieve this goal, that particular code must rely on a set of requirements known as concepts...

  20. MMEECCHHAANNIICCAALL ENGINEERING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    for admission to the Department of Ocean and Mechanical Engineering in the Mechanical Engineering ProgramMMEECCHHAANNIICCAALL ENGINEERING PROGRAM UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS To be eligible Fundamentals of Engineering* 3 Engineering Graphics* 3 Electives 6 Total: 60 NOTE: Electives may include

  1. Ordinals and Interactive Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hancock, Peter

    have much to contribute to the theory of programming. This has indeed turned out to be the case. Various technologies developed in proof theory are now widely used in computer science for formulating and investigating programming languages and logics...

  2. Y-12 Apprentice Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an enviable placement rate of 100 percent. Until recently, another training program series, the Y-12 Apprentice Program, had not been provided at Y-12 for several years. Until...

  3. Parallel programming with PCN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, I.; Tuecke, S.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PCN is a system for developing and executing parallel programs. It comprises a high-level programming language, tools for developing and debugging programs in this language, and interfaces to Fortran and C that allow the reuse of existing code in multilingual parallel programs. Programs developed using PCN are portable across many different workstations, networks, and parallel computers. This document provides all the information required to develop parallel programs with the PCN programming system. In includes both tutorial and reference material. It also presents the basic concepts that underly PCN, particularly where these are likely to be unfamiliar to the reader, and provides pointers to other documentation on the PCN language, programming techniques, and tools. PCN is in the public domain. The latest version of both the software and this manual can be obtained by anonymous FTP from Argonne National Laboratory in the directory pub/pcn at info.mcs.anl.gov (c.f. Appendix A).

  4. Enterprise Risk Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT Introduction to Enterprise Risk Management at UVM 1 #12;Enterprise Risk Management Program DRAFT What is Enterprise Risk Management? Enterprise risk management governance, and accountability · Facilitates effective management of the uncertainty and associated risks

  5. Worker Training Program (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Worker Training Program is a business incentive program to support the retraining and upgrading of Nebraska’s current workforce. The amount of grant funding available quarterly is distributed...

  6. SREC Procurement Program (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: The SREC procurement program will accept applications from March 25 to April 12, 2013. The summary below is intended to reflect the 2013 program as described in the [http://depsc...

  7. Operational Demonstration Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program is currently closed. Applications were due in February 2012. Additional funding rounds have not yet been announced. Check the program web site for the latest available information.

  8. HAZARDOUS WASTE [Written Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    HAZARDOUS WASTE MANUAL [Written Program] Cornell University [10/7/13 #12;Hazardous Waste Program................................................... 8 3.0 MINIMIZING HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATION.........................................................10 4.0 HAZARDOUS WASTE GENERATOR REQUIREMENTS.....................................................10

  9. Commonwealth Hydropower Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: This program reopened March 15, 2013. There is $1,200,000 available for Round 5; applications will be accepted on a rolling basis until funding is exhausted. See the program web site for...

  10. COMPUTER SCIENCE SAMPLE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    COMPUTER SCIENCE SAMPLE PROGRAM (First Math Course MATH 198) This sample program suggests one way CS 181: Foundations of Computer Science II CS 180: Foundations of Computer Science I CS 191

  11. Sandia's Biofuels Program

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema; Lane, Todd; Reichardt, Tom; Davis, Ryan

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia's biofuels program is focused on developing next-generation, renewable fuel solutions derived from biomass. In this video, various Sandia researchers discuss the program and the tools they employ to tackle the technical challenges they face.

  12. Sandia's Biofuels Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema; Lane, Todd; Reichardt, Tom; Davis, Ryan

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia's biofuels program is focused on developing next-generation, renewable fuel solutions derived from biomass. In this video, various Sandia researchers discuss the program and the tools they employ to tackle the technical challenges they face.

  13. Acquisition Fellows Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition Fellows Program (AFP)- is a program designed to recruit, acquire, develop and retain 1102 series contract specialist. Fellows are recruited, hired, selected and funded by their sponsoring DOE/NNSA office.

  14. Protective Force Program Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 473.2, Protective Force Program, which establishes the requirements and responsibilities for management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Protective Force (PF) Program. Does not cancel other directives.

  15. Strengthening Relationships Between Energy Programs and Housing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strengthening Relationships Between Energy Programs and Housing Programs Strengthening Relationships Between Energy Programs and Housing Programs Better Buildings Residential...

  16. Geothermal materials program: strategy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following topics are discussed: program goal and objectives, program organization, and program status. Current program projects are described. (MHR)

  17. Sustainable Energy Management Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanner, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainable Energy Management Programs Steve Hanner Allen ISD/TEMA . ESL-KT-14-11-45 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Starting an Energy Management Program • Recognize need, Elicit District Commitment... • Appoint Energy Manager • Analyze Existing Conditions • Develop Plan • Implement and Monitor Program ESL-KT-14-11-45 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Sustainable Programs Feature – District Commitment...

  18. Symmetries in Integer Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bödi, R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion of symmetry is defined in the context of Linear and Integer Programming. Symmetric integer programs are studied from a group theoretical viewpoint. We investigate the structure of integer solutions of integer programs and show that any integer program on n variables having an alternating group A_n as a group of symmetries can be solved in linear time in the number of variables.

  19. Departmental Directives Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order is the primary directive for administering the Department's directives Program. Cancels: DOE O 251.1A

  20. Independent Oversight Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The order prescribes the requirements and responsibilities for the DOE Independent Oversight Program. Cancels DOE O 470.2B.

  1. Physics Illinois Undergraduate Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    , and business. In order to support the diverse career goals of our students, we have infused our programs

  2. SUNY Programs: Experiential Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    SUNY Programs: Experiential Learning Internships Volunteer & Service-Learning Field Work quite broad, although the offerings are more limited than the programs in the general section. Teaching the programs with experiential learning opportunities offered by SUNY campuses. These listings give just

  3. ARRA FUNDED ENERGY PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lower energy costs and fossil fuel energy use. Increasing arra funds with private and public sector. The Clean Energy Business Financing loan program is designed to leverage even more private sector funds programs (such as Clean Energy Business and Municipal Financing programs) when developing the federal

  4. Safeguards and Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish responsibilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Safeguards and Security (S&S) Program, and to establish program planning and management requirements for the S&S Program. Cancels DOE O 470.4A, DOE M 470.4-1, Chg. 2, and DOE O 142.1.

  5. Model Fire Protection Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To facilitate conformance with its fire safety directives and the implementation of a comprehensive fire protection program, DOE has developed a number of "model" program documents. These include a comprehensive model fire protection program, model fire hazards analyses and assessments, fire protection system inspection and testing procedures, and related material.

  6. Priorities and Allocations Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes responsibilities for administration of the DOE and NNSA priorities and allocations program for industrial products, materials, and services and requirements for maintaining a system for procurement of industrial products, materials, and services programs that promote the national defense and programs that are determined by DOE to maximize domestic energy supplies. Cancels DOE O 5560.1A.

  7. ACADEMIC PROGRAM PROCEDURE MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    1 ACADEMIC PROGRAM REVIEW PROCEDURE MANUAL 2014-2015 Office of the Senior Vice President Tucson, AZ 85721 #12;2 ACADEMIC PROGRAM REVIEW MANAGEMENT TEAM Web Site for Academic Program Review http Educational Policy Studies & Practice Spanish and Portuguese Electrical & Computer Engineering Teaching

  8. Multidimensional Model Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Galen

    #12;Multidimensional Model Programming SQL Server 2012 Books Online Summary: Analysis Services provides several APIs that you can use to program against an Analysis Services instance this information to choose the programming interface that best meets the requirements of a particular project

  9. BCB Graduate Program Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    Fall 2014 BCB Graduate Program Introduction Bioinformatics and Computational Biology www and Computational Biology #12;Program Overview One of the first Bioinformatics Ph.D. programs in the US With about-major professor (each in a different discipline) Bioinformatics and Computational Biology #12;Major Research

  10. Utility Partnerships Program Overview (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program overview brochure for the Utility Partnerships Program within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP).

  11. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Non-Metallic Materials Meeting Washington, DC Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview Dr. Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager...

  12. Utility Green Pricing Programs: A Statistical Analysis of Program Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Olson, S.; Bird, L.; Swezey, B.

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzes actual utility green pricing program data to provide further insight into which program features might help maximize both customer participation in green pricing programs and the amount of renewable energy purchased by customers in those programs.

  13. State Energy Program Program Year 2014 Administrative and Legal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center State Energy Program (SEP) Program Year 2014 Formula Awards SEP-ALRD-2014 CFDA Number: 81.041, State Energy Program Issue Date: 3192014 SEP Program Year Ending...

  14. Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009 is to provide an updated status of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commercial-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies (CCT). These demonstrations have been performed under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Program Update 2009 provides: (1) a discussion of the role of clean coal technology demonstrations in improving the nation’s energy security and reliability, while protecting the environment using the nation’s most abundant energy resource—coal; (2) a summary of the funding and costs of the demonstrations; and (3) an overview of the technologies being demonstrated, along with fact sheets for projects that are active, recently completed, or recently discontinued.

  15. Wind Energy Program: Top 10 Program Accomplishments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brochure on the top accomplishments of the Wind Energy Program, including the development of large wind machines, small machines for the residential market, wind tunnel testing, computer codes for modeling wind systems, high definition wind maps, and successful collaborations.

  16. Clean coal technology programs: program update 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2006 is to provide an updated status of the DOE commercial-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies (CCTs). These demonstrations are performed under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) and the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Program Update 2006 provides 1) a discussion of the role of clean coal technology demonstrations in improving the nation's energy security and reliability, while protecting the environment using the nation's most abundant energy resource - coal; 2) a summary of the funding and costs of the demonstrations; and 3) an overview of the technologies being demonstrated, with fact sheets for demonstration projects that are active, recently completed, withdrawn or ended, including status as of June 30 2006. 4 apps.

  17. Demand Response: Load Management Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs...

  18. Job Training Assistance Programs (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Job Training Assistance Programs in Tennessee are a combination of three programs: The FastTrack Job Training Assistance Program (FJTAP), The Tennessee Job Skills Program (TJS), and The Job...

  19. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Natural Resources Program, Environmental Program, Wildlife and Fisheries Program, the Forestry Program, and the Conservation Enforcement Program. There would also be a Tribal Court...

  20. Water-Efficiency Program Prioritization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation outlines water-efficiency program requirements and priorities as presented to Federal agencies by the Federal Energy Management Program.

  1. ORISE: Radiological program assessment services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental monitoring programs Operational environments Decontamination and decommissioning projects Compliance assessments Radiological release programs ORISE is actively...

  2. Reformulations in Mathematical Programming: Symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leo Liberti

    2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 3, 2008 ... ... is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

  3. SUNY Programs: The United Kingdom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    SUNY Programs: The United Kingdom & Ireland Semester, Academic Year and Short Term #12;1 Table of Contents How to Use This Booklet 1 Choosing a Program in the UK and Ireland 2 Exchange versus Study Abroad 3 Semester & Academic Year Programs 4 Programs in London 4 Programs outside of London 7 Programs

  4. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

  5. TOUGHREACT Version 2.0: A simulator for subsurface reactive transport under non-isothermal multiphase flow conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, T.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.; Zhang, G.; Zheng, L.; Pruess, K.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media, and was developed by introducing reactive chemistry into the multiphase fluid and heat flow simulator TOUGH2 V2. The first version of TOUGHREACT was released to the public through the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC) in August 2004. It is among the most frequently requested of ESTSC's codes. The code has been widely used for studies in CO{sub 2} geological sequestration, nuclear waste isolation, geothermal energy development, environmental remediation, and increasingly for petroleum applications. Over the past several years, many new capabilities have been developed, which were incorporated into Version 2 of TOUGHREACT. Major additions and improvements in Version 2 are discussed here, and two application examples are presented: (1) long-term fate of injected CO{sub 2} in a storage reservoir and (2) biogeochemical cycling of metals in mining-impacted lake sediments.

  6. Opportunities for industry participation in DOE`s environmental management technology development program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedick, R.C. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Walker, J.S. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Science and Technology

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    METC has managed about 85 research, development, and demonstration projects on behalf of DOE-EM`s Office of Science and Technology that include those in each of the four major environmental remediation and waste management problem areas: subsurface contaminants (radionuclides, heavy metals, dense nonaqueous phase liquids); decontamination and decommissioning of facilities; high-level waste tank remediation; and mixed waste characterization/treament/disposal. All projects within the Industry Programs are phased or have optional tasks at specific go/no-go decision points, allowing DOE to make investment decisions at various points in the technology development cycle to ensure that we are meeting the technology development goals and the needs of the customer or end-user. This decision making process is formalized in a Technology Investment Decision Model. A brief summary is given of R&D requirements (technology needs) in each of the above-mentioned 4 problem areas.

  7. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 1: Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The significant accomplishments of this program included (1) identification of the geopressured-geothermal onshore fairways in Louisiana and Texas, (2) determination that high brine flow rates of 20,000--40,000 barrels a day can be obtained for long periods of time, (3) brine, after gas extraction can be successfully reinjected into shallow aquifers without affecting the surface waters or the fresh water aquifers, (4) no observable subsidence or microseismic activity was induced due to the subsurface injection of brine, and no detrimental environmental effects attributable to geopressured-geothermal well testing were noticed, (5) sanding can be controlled by reducing flow rates, (6) corrosion controlled with inhibitors, (7) scaling controlled by phosphonate scale inhibitors, (8) demonstrated that production of gas from saturated brine under pressure was viable and (9) a hybrid power system can be successfully used for conversion of the thermal and chemical energy contained in the geopressured-geothermal resource for generation of electricity.

  8. Science Road Map for Phase 2 of the Tank-Farm Vadose Zone Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Mann, Frederick M.

    2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase 1 of the Tank-Farm Vadose Zone Program (TFVZP) developed information on the nature and extent of vadose zone contamination in the tank farms through field studies, laboratory analyses and experiments, and historical data searches; assembled data and performed tank-farm risk analysis; and initiated interim corrective actions to lessen the impacts of tank leak contaminants. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists and external collaborators at universities and U.S. Department of Energy user facilities sampled and analyzed contaminant plumes. These types of activities will continue during Phase 2 of the TFVZP to refine and expand scientific understanding of the subsurface beneath tank farms, especially of water movement, residual waste leaching, and contaminant transport.

  9. Acquisition Career Development Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes training and certification requirements and career development programs under the Acquisition Career Development (ACD) Program for DOE and NNSA acquisition workforce. The acquisition workforce includes contracting, purchasing, personal property management, program management, Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives. The ACD Program implements the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) requirements, Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) requirements, Federal Acquisition Reform Act (FARA) requirements, and the objectives of Executive Order (E.O.) 129231, Federal Procurement Reform, dated 10-13-1994. This order cancels DOE O 361.1, Acquisition Career Development Program, dated 11-10-99, AND Acquisition Letter 2003-05, Personal Property Management Career Development, Training, and Certification Program, dated 9-10-03. Cancels DOE O 361.1 Chg 2. Canceled by DOE O 361.1B.

  10. INTEGRATED OUTCROP AND SUBSURFACE STUDIES OF THE INTERWELL ENVIRONMENT OF CARBONATE RESERVOIRS: CLEAR FORK (LEONARDIAN-AGE) RESERVOIRS, WEST TEXAS AND NEW MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Jerry Lucia

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of the project ''Integrated Outcrop and Subsurface Studies of the Interwell Environment of Carbonate Reservoirs: Clear Fork (Leonardian-Age) Reservoirs, West Texas and New Mexico'', Department of Energy contract no. DE-AC26-98BC15105 and is the third in a series of similar projects funded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy and The University of Texas at Austin, Bureau of Economic Geology, Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonates. All three projects focus on the integration of outcrop and subsurface data for the purpose of developing improved methods for modeling petrophysical properties in the interwell environment. The first project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-89BC14470, was a study of San Andres outcrops in the Algerita Escarpment, Guadalupe Mountains, Texas and New Mexico, and the Seminole San Andres reservoir, Permian Basin. This study established the basic concepts for constructing a reservoir model using sequence-stratigraphic principles and rock-fabric, petrophysical relationships. The second project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-93BC14895, was a study of Grayburg outcrops in the Brokeoff Mountains, New Mexico, and the South Cowden Grayburg reservoir, Permian Basin. This study developed a sequence-stratigraphic succession for the Grayburg and improved methods for locating remaining hydrocarbons in carbonate ramp reservoirs. The current study is of the Clear Fork Group in Apache Canyon, Sierra Diablo Mountains, West Texas, and the South Wasson Clear Fork reservoir, Permian Basin. The focus was on scales of heterogeneity, imaging high- and low-permeability layers, and the impact of fractures on reservoir performance. In this study (1) the Clear Fork cycle stratigraphy is defined, (2) important scales of petrophysical variability are confirmed, (3) a unique rock-fabric, petrophysical relationship is defined, (4) a porosity method for correlating high-frequency cycles and defining rock-fabric flow layers is described, (5) Clear Fork fractures are described and geomechanical modeling of fractures is investigated, and (6) most importantly, new statistical methods are developed for scaleup of petrophysical properties from the core to the layer scale and for retaining stratigraphic layering in simulation models.

  11. Voluntary Protection Program- Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) promotes safety and health excellence through cooperative efforts among labor, management, and government at the Department of Energy (DOE) contractor sites. DOE has also formed partnerships with other Federal agencies and the private sector for both advancing and sharing its Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) experiences and preparing for program challenges in the next century. The safety and health of contractor and federal employees are a high priority for the Department.

  12. Site Support Program Plan Infrastructure Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fiscal Year 1996 Infrastructure Program Site Support Program Plan addresses the mission objectives, workscope, work breakdown structures (WBS), management approach, and resource requirements for the Infrastructure Program. Attached to the plan are appendices that provide more detailed information associated with scope definition. The Hanford Site`s infrastructure has served the Site for nearly 50 years during defense materials production. Now with the challenges of the new environmental cleanup mission, Hanford`s infrastructure must meet current and future mission needs in a constrained budget environment, while complying with more stringent environmental, safety, and health regulations. The infrastructure requires upgrading, streamlining, and enhancement in order to successfully support the site mission of cleaning up the Site, research and development, and economic transition.

  13. Credit Enhancement Program (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Credit Enhancement Program is a means by which the Oklahoma Finance Authority provides guarantees for small companies, manufacturing facilities and communities in need of funds for expansion...

  14. Records Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order sets forth requirements and responsibilities for implementing and maintaining a cost-effective records management program throughout the Department of Energy.

  15. Records Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order sets forth requirements and responsibilities for establishing and maintaining a program for the efficient and economical management of records and information assets.

  16. Parallel programming with PCN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, I.; Tuecke, S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PCN is a system for developing and executing parallel programs. It comprises a high-level programming language, tools for developing and debugging programs in this language, and interfaces to Fortran and Cthat allow the reuse of existing code in multilingual parallel programs. Programs developed using PCN are portable across many different workstations, networks, and parallel computers. This document provides all the information required to develop parallel programs with the PCN programming system. It includes both tutorial and reference material. It also presents the basic concepts that underlie PCN, particularly where these are likely to be unfamiliar to the reader, and provides pointers to other documentation on the PCN language, programming techniques, and tools. PCN is in the public domain. The latest version of both the software and this manual can be obtained by anonymous ftp from Argonne National Laboratory in the directory pub/pcn at info.mcs. ani.gov (cf. Appendix A). This version of this document describes PCN version 2.0, a major revision of the PCN programming system. It supersedes earlier versions of this report.

  17. Green Communities Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: The Green Communities Grant Program is not currently accepting applications. The application deadline to receive a Green Communities designation was October 17, 2014. For designated...

  18. Capital Access Program (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Capital Access Program provides loan guarantees to small businesses seeking access to commercial credit. Premiums paid by the borrower and matched by Vermont Economic Development Authority fund...

  19. Leadership Excellence Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Environmental Management (EM) recognizes that leadership enhancement is vital to the program and commits to the development and strengthening of leadership skills for all employees...

  20. Laser programs highlights 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides highlights of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories` laser programs. Laser uses and technology assessment and utilization are provided.

  1. RCx Program and UESC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the RCx Program and UESC and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

  2. Acquisition Career Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The order defines requirements and responsibilities for training, certification, and career development programs for the DOE acquisition workforce. Cancels DOE O 361.1A.

  3. Management Control Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy Management Control Program. Cancels DOE O 413.1. Canceled by DOE O 413.1B.

  4. Sustainable Agriculture Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Minnesota Sustainable Agriculture Loan program will provide loans to Minnesota residents actively engaged in farming for capital expenditures which enhance the environmental and economic...

  5. Aspiring Leader Program........................

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of GS-11 through GS-13. The program requires that participants attend four one-week residential sessions. Developmental Assignments: Developing the self as well as others is...

  6. Radiological Assistance Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy, procedures, authorities, and responsibilities for its Radiological Assistance Program. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

  7. Pipeline Operations Program (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pipeline Operations Program regulates the construction, acquisition, abandonment and interconnection of natural gas pipelines, as well as, the transportation and use of natural gas supplies.

  8. Acquisition Career Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The order sets forth requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Management Program. Cancels DOE O 361.1B.

  9. ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravois, Melanie

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL/PUB-5519 (1), Rev. 032 ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL LBNL/PUB-5519 (1), Rev.Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL/PUB-5519 (1), Rev. 0

  10. Weatherization Assistance Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Intergovernmental Program n Decreases electricity generation and resulting pollution-This improves local air quality and reduces adverse health effects, particularly...

  11. EMS Programs Manual

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Environmental Management System Programs Manual (LMS/POL/S04388-3.0) is obsolete and has been removed from the LM website.

  12. Renewable Energy Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In February 2009, the District Department of the Environment (DDOE) introduced the Renewable Energy Incentive Program (REIP), a rebate for solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. In April 2012, solar...

  13. DSW REC Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy Credits for DSW Hydro Power Projects The DSW Regional Office is proposing a program to make Renewable Energy Credits (RECS) from the Boulder Canyon andor...

  14. Brownfield Redevelopment Program (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brownfield Redevelopment Program provides financial incentives for the redevelopment of commercial/industrial sites that are contaminated with hazardous substances and have been abandoned or...

  15. Brownfield Assistance Program (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Brownfield Assistance Program, administrated by the Delaware Economic Development Office (DEDO) and funded from Delaware Strategic Fund, provides matching grants to owners and developers to...

  16. Retro-Commissioning Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Focus on Energy offers financial incentives to eligible business customers to retro-commission buildings to optimize performance. The program provides incentives for building efficiency studies...

  17. CEE Winter Program Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) is hosting their Winter Program Meeting, a two-day conference held in Long Beach, California.

  18. Methane Digester Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Established in 1998, the Minnesota Dept. of Agriculture Methane Digester Loan Program helps livestock producers install on-farm anaerobic digesters used for the production of electricity by...

  19. Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Keystone HELP Energy Efficiency Loan Program is designed to help homeowners improve energy efficiency with special financing for high-efficiency heating, air conditioning, insulation, windows,...

  20. DOE Hydrogen Program Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hydrogen Program A Prospectus for Biological H 2 Production The Hydrogen Economy The hydrogen economy pertains to a world fundamentally different from the one we now know. Hydrogen...