National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for rfc serc spp

  1. SERC Grants Interactive Map

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View SERC Grants in a larger map. To report corrections, please email SustainableEnergyWAP@ee.doe.gov.

  2. SERC Grant Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EVALUATION OVERVIEW Bruce Tonn Erin Rose Tim Hendrick Oak Ridge National Laboratory g y Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Grant Webinar January 18, 2011 OAK RIDGE...

  3. Justin Graff RFC -College Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -4354 Position Vacant Peter Vidmar RFC - San Angelo (979) 218-2405 Bill Davis RFC - Fort Stockton (979) 218

  4. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) -Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - GeothermalGround-Source Heat Pumps Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - GeothermalGround-Source Heat Pumps...

  5. Recording of SERC Monitoring Technologies- Solar Photovoltaics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document provides a transcript of the of SERC Monitoring Technologies - Solar Photovoltaics webinar, presented on 10/20/2011 by Peter McNutt.

  6. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Success Story: Montana Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Montana This document contains information on how Montana SERC Program Delivers Strong...

  7. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vermont Highlight (Fact Sheet), Weatherization And Intergovernmental Programs (WIP) Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight (Fact Sheet), Weatherization...

  8. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC)- Solar Photovoltaics

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Solar Photovoltaics.

  9. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - On-Demand...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters....

  10. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    upgrade measures to maximize savings. sercmdhighlight.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Fact Sheet July 2011 SERC Grant Webinar...

  11. SERC Grant Webinar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectData Dashboard Rutland County DataBuilding |the Wind |March 16, 2012SERC

  12. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC)- Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps.

  13. Property:EIA/861/NercSerc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of typeNercSerc Jump to:

  14. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-01-01

    Case study on Vermont's innovative strategy for helping low-income families save energy through its Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) program. The DOE Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) granted Vermont to give its weatherization clients access to solar energy systems and one-on-one assistance from energy efficiency coaches to help clients achieve meaningful and long-lasting reductions in their energy bills. Vermont-SERC is administered by the Vermont Office of Economic Opportunity and is carried out by five local weatherization agencies. The purpose of the program is to identify technologies and new approaches-in this case, solar energy and energy efficiency coaches-that can improve weatherization services to low-income clients. The program selects households that have previously received weatherization services. This has several advantages. First, the clients already understand how weatherization works and are willing to strive for additional energy savings. Second, the weatherization agencies are working with clients who have previously had weatherization and therefore have complete energy usage data from utility bills collected during the first energy upgrade installation. This allows the agencies to select the best potential candidates for solar energy. Agencies have existing knowledge of the homes and can pre-screen them for potential structural problems or lack of south-facing exposure.

  15. RFC Sand Creek Development LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/NevadaaTools <REpower Systems AG JumpRFC Sand

  16. Property:EIA/861/NercRfc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation, search PropertyIsoOther Jump to: navigation,NercRfc Jump to:

  17. DNA structure(s) recognized and bound by large subunit of Replication Factor C (ls RFC) in Drosophila melanogaster 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaur, Lalit Kumar

    1995-01-01

    the formation of the predicted branched structures. Tsurimoto and Stillman (I 99 1) used DNase and micrococcal nuclease footprinting assays to define a primer template junction as a substrate for the RFC complex binding. A synthetic primer-template junction...

  18. Analysis of Unit-Level Changes in Operations with Increased SPP Wind from EPRI/LCG Balancing Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W

    2012-01-01

    Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The Department of Energy funded the project 'Integrating Midwest Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' to be led by EPRI in coordination with the main authorities for the regions: SPP, Entergy, TVA, Southern Company and OPC. EPRI utilized several subcontractors for the project including LCG, the developers of the model UPLAN. The study aims to evaluate the operating cost benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of regional cooperation for integrating mid-western wind energy into southeast electricity markets. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. DOE funded Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide additional support to the project, including a review of results and any side analysis that may provide additional insight. This report is a unit-by-unit analysis of changes in operations due to the different scenarios used in the overall study. It focuses on the change in capacity factors and the number of start-ups required for each unit since those criteria summarize key aspects of plant operations, how often are they called upon and how much do they operate. The primary analysis of the overall project is based on security-constrained unit commitment (SCUC) and economic dispatch (SCED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The SCUC/SCED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as best as possible in the model. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy.

  19. SERC Grant Webinar

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-AA-1 SECTION J APPENDIX A ADVANCE- FEORDER|Biodiesel |

  20. Monitoring SERC Technologies — Solar Photovoltaics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A webinar by National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Market Transformation Center electrical engineer Peter McNutt about Solar Photovoltaics and how to properly monitor its installation.

  1. Solar Energy Research Center (SERC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 *ImpactScience(Technical Report) |(TechnicalField

  2. SERC Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectData Dashboard Rutland County DataBuilding |the Wind |March 16,

  3. Property:EIA/861/NercSpp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation, search PropertyIsoOther Jump to: navigation,NercRfc Jump

  4. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) -Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of GeothermalGround-Source Heat Pumps. geothermalgroundsourceheatpumps.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  5. SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar Transcript

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A presentation sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy about using solar photovoltaics (PV) systems to provide electricity for homes.

  6. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department ofSUPPLEMENT NOVEMBERSupporting

  7. Genomics and Transcriptomics of Plant Beneficial Serratia spp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genomics and Transcriptomics of Plant Beneficial Serratia spp. Saraswoti Neupane Faculty of Natural. proteamaculans S4 (photo: S. Neupane) #12;Genomics and transcriptomics of plant beneficial Serratia spp. Abstract, and have potential as possible biocontrol agents in agriculture. This thesis provides the detailed genomic

  8. nsac-2012-rfc | NSAC Subcommittee 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAboutXu Named|Got Solitons? S andia'sAboutViewing this page

  9. NSAC-2012-RFC | NSAC Subcommittee 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatialDevelopment of09 August 7, 2009

  10. rfc:fac | NSAC Subcommittee 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 r m m m m portresponding to emergencies

  11. rfc:fsn | NSAC Subcommittee 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 r m m m m portresponding to

  12. rfc:gen | NSAC Subcommittee 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 r m m m m portresponding toGeneral Comments

  13. rfc:lep | NSAC Subcommittee 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 r m m m m portresponding toGeneral CommentsLow

  14. rfc:mep | NSAC Subcommittee 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 r m m m m portresponding toGeneral

  15. rfc:rhi | NSAC Subcommittee 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 r m m m m portresponding toGeneralRelativistic

  16. rfc:the | NSAC Subcommittee 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 r m m m m portresponding

  17. Ecological analysis of secondary metabolite production in Aspergillus spp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaswamy, Anitha

    2002-01-01

    A complex and fascinating aspect of fungal development is the production of secondary metabolites. One of the best characterized secondary metabolite pathway is the aflatoxin (AF) and sterigmatocystin (ST) pathway, found in many Aspergillus spp...

  18. Molecular characterization of Theileria spp. using ribosomal RNA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bendele, Kylie Gayle

    2005-11-01

    The molecular characterization of twenty six Theileria spp. isolates and one C. felis isolate were done on the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene, the 5.8S gene, and the two internal transcribed spacer regions ...

  19. The relationship between iron and nitrogen fixation in Trichodesmium spp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Phoebe Dreux

    2009-01-01

    Trichodesmium spp. are considered the dominant nitrogen (N) fixing cyanobacteria in tropical and subtropical oceans, regimes frequently characterized by low iron (Fe). Limited information exists about what levels of Fe ...

  20. Antimicrobial Interventions to Reduce Listeria spp. Contamination on Shrimp 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Tsui-Yin

    2010-01-14

    The effects of selected antimicrobials, applied singularly or in combination, and frozen or refrigerated storage conditions on the survival of Listeria spp. on inoculated shrimp was evaluated in this study. A combination ...

  1. http://spp.sagepub.com/ Social Psychological and Personality Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehman, Barbara J.

    ://spp.sagepub.com/content/1/1/51 The online version of this article can be found at: DOI: 10.1177/1948550609354924 2010 1: 51://www.sagepub.com/journalsReprints.navReprints: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.navPermissions: http://spp.sagepub.com/content/1/1/51.refs studies of its situational determinants remain scarce. This work investigates the correlates of naturally

  2. Formation, regeneration and fusion of protoplasts from Gliocladium spp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seh, Monica Leigh

    1987-01-01

    FORMATION, REGENERATION AND FUSION OF PROTOPLASTS FROM GLIOCLADIUM SPP. A Thesis by MONICA LEIGH SEH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1987 Major Subject: Plant Pathology FORMATION, REGENERATION AND FUSION OF PROTOPLASTS FROM GLIOCLADIUM SPP. A Thesis MONICA LEIGH SEH Approved as to style and content by: Charles M. X nerle (Chairperson of Committee) ic ael D. Thomas...

  3. The glass beakers of the eleventh-century Serc?e Limani shipwreck: a preliminary study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitson-MimMack, Joy Joan

    1988-01-01

    and composed of deep shades. And las+ly, despite 'ooth vessel shapes having engraved examples, the design themes on short cylinders are significantly 'ess varied than those on truncated cones. The beaker is one of the most ancient forms of drinking vessels... and Classification to the Sixteenth Century New York 1927 2 vole. L'E o ue romaine Musee d'Histoire et d' Art, La Verrerie de 1' ' 66 * 1 6~1969 Ettinghausen R. Ettinghausen, "The 'Beveled Style' in the Post-Samarra Period, " in George C. Miles, ed...

  4. The Status of Diporeia spp. in Lake Ontario, 1994-Stephen J. Lozano1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    233 The Status of Diporeia spp. in Lake Ontario, 1994- 1997 Stephen J. Lozano1 DOC/NOAA Great Lakes in Lake Ontario between 1994 and 1997 revealed a recent decline in Diporeia spp. (Amphipoda) abundance on fish production in Lake Ontario. Introduction The abundance of the deep-water amphipod, Diporeia spp

  5. Identification and Pathogenicity of Chrysoporthe cubensis on Eucalyptus and Syzygium spp. in South China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Identification and Pathogenicity of Chrysoporthe cubensis on Eucalyptus and Syzygium spp. in South cubensis on Eucalyptus and Syzygium spp. in South China. Plant Dis. 94:1143-1150. The genus Chrysoporthe includes important pathogens of plantation-grown Eucalyptus spp. and has been reported from several tree

  6. Prevalence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. in surface waters of southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selinger, Brent

    Prevalence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. in surface waters of southern Alberta and Salmonella spp. in surface water within the basin. This study is the first of its kind to identify E. coli O and Salmonella spp. in water samples was 0.9% (n = 1483) and 6.2% (n = 1429), respectively. While data examined

  7. RESPONSES OF STREAM BIOFILM TO PACIFIC SALMON (ONCORHYNCHUS SPP.) SPAWNERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamberti, Gary A.

    Pacific Rim. The dynam- ics of salmon runs and environmental conditions of streams in which they spawn canRESPONSES OF STREAM BIOFILM TO PACIFIC SALMON (ONCORHYNCHUS SPP.) SPAWNERS: THE ROLE by Janine R¨uegg 2011 All Rights Reserved #12;RESPONSES OF STREAM BIOFILM TO PACIFIC SALMON (ONCORHYNCHUS

  8. Reliability of the U.S. electric system -- Recent trends and current issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborn, Julie; Kawann, Cornelia

    2002-01-01

    since 1990, the average SAIDI and SAIFI indices attributableTrends and Current Issues SAIDI SAIFI SC SCADA SERC SPP TO? N C N i ? r N ? N i i i SAIDI SAIFI 5. LOLE (Loss of Load

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - spp_presentation.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganismsnowReportJ.Next Quarter-CenturyFuture ofSPP

  10. Property:EIA/861/RtoSpp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation, search PropertyIsoOther Jump to:RtoSpp Jump to: navigation,

  11. Preliminary Investigations for Causes of the Disappearance of Diporeia spp. from Lake Ontario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    203 Preliminary Investigations for Causes of the Disappearance of Diporeia spp. from Lake Ontario for Fisheries and Aquatic Science Fisheries and Oceans Canada Burlington, Ontario, Canada L7R 4A6 Thomas F-80% of the benthos in offshore Lake Ontario and was an important food for fish. In eastern Lake Ontario, Diporeia spp

  12. In vivo gene regulation in Salmonella spp. by a salicylate-dependent control circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    In vivo gene regulation in Salmonella spp. by a salicylate-dependent control circuit Jose´ Luis acid (ASA) in attenuated Salmonella enterica that carries an expression module with a gene of interest in vitro and in vivo. To validate the circuit, we administered Salmonella spp., carrying an expression

  13. Clonal Diversity in an Expanding Community of Arctic Salix spp. and a Model for Recruitment Modes of Arctic Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldsmith, Greg

    Clonal Diversity in an Expanding Community of Arctic Salix spp. and a Model for Recruitment Modes identity in a population of Salix spp. shrubs at an arctic site with a known history of woody shrub

  14. Monitoring SERC Technologies: On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A webinar by Ethan MacCormick, VP for Services to Energy Businesses at Performance Systems Development, about On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters and how to properly monitor the installation.

  15. The history of the anchorage at Serce Liman, Turkey 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slane, Dorothy Anne

    1982-01-01

    . Hazor Yadin, Yigael et al, 1960, Hazor II. An Account' cf the Second Season of Excavation, 956. Jerusalem. KWS Slane, Kathleen Warner, personal communica- tion. Hayes, John, 1972, Late Roman Potter A Catalo ue of Roman Fine Wares. London. Ostia I...

  16. SERC Community-Based Social Marketing for Weatherization Programs Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A presentation sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy about fostering sustainable behaviors in a community for saving energy.

  17. Monitoring SERC Technologies —Geothermal/Ground Source Heat Pumps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A webinar by National Renewable Energy Laboratory Project Leader Dave Peterson about Geothermal/Ground Source Heat Pumps and how to properly monitor its installation.

  18. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - On-Demand Tankless

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher iSlide 1 MoresteelmakingRenewable EnergyMaintenanceMaximizing<EnergyWater

  19. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Idaho Highlight |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternational Affairs, Before theFebruary 1, 2006ofWorkshop SustainableDepartment of

  20. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department ofSUPPLEMENT NOVEMBERSupportingDepartment of Energy

  1. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department ofSUPPLEMENT NOVEMBERSupportingDepartment of

  2. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Maryland

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department ofSUPPLEMENT NOVEMBERSupportingDepartment of Idaho Maryland

  3. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Montana

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department ofSUPPLEMENT NOVEMBERSupportingDepartment of Idaho

  4. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Idaho Highlight

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutory Authority SustainX Inc IsothermalSustainableResources for

  5. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Maryland |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutory Authority SustainX Inc IsothermalSustainableResources

  6. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Montana |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutory Authority SustainX Inc

  7. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight (Fact

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutory Authority SustainX IncSheet), Weatherization And

  8. The glass lamps from the 11th-century shipwreck at Serc?e Liman, Turkey: a thesis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morden, Margaret Elizabeth

    1982-01-01

    was then broken down into four one-meter grids called upper left (UL), upper right (UR), lower left (LL) and lower right (LR, '. These one-meter grids were then further div1ded into 4 half- meter squares des1gnated by numerals. This system enabled one... type (Append1ces I and II), with the1r significant deta1ls noted, making the information accessible for future study. UL 1 UL 2 UR 1 UR 2 UL3 UL4 UR3 UR4 LL1 LL 2 LR1 LR 2 LL3 LL4 LR3 LR 4 I11. 4. Section of Grid System on Glass W?eck 22 30 24...

  9. Phytochemical analyses and inheritance of resistance to TEV (Tobacco Etch Virus) in pepper (Capsicum spp.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jinsuk

    2002-01-01

    Peppers, Capsicum spp., were grown under 3 different locations for phytochemical analyses. They were produced in the greenhouse at College Station and under the field conditions at Uvalde and Weslaco, TX. Among the pepper samples grown...

  10. DOE: Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Daniel, EPRI; Tuohy, Aidan, EPRI; Deb, Sidart, LCG Consulting; Jampani, Srinivas, LCG Consulting; Kirby, Brendan, Consultant; King, Jack, Consultant

    2011-11-29

    Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The DOE-funded project 'Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' aims to evaluate the benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of different balancing approaches with increasing levels of inter-regional cooperation. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. The primary analysis of the project is based on unit commitment (UC) and economic dispatch (ED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The UC/ED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as accurately as possible realizing that all such future scenario models are quite uncertain. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy. The analysis aspects of the project comprised 4 primary tasks: (1) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with only 7 GW of installed wind capacity in SPP for internal SPP consumption with no intended wind exports to SERC. This model is referred to as the 'Non-RES' model as it does not reflect the need for the SPP or SERC BAs to meet a federal Renewable Energy Standard (RES). (2) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of the Non-RES model for the year 2022 to provide project stakeholders with confidence in the model and analytical framework for a scenario that is similar to the existing system and more easily evaluated than the high-wind transfer scenarios that are analyzed subsequently. (3) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with sufficient installed wind capacity in SPP (approximately 48 GW) for both SPP and the participating SERC BAs to meet an RES of 20% energy. This model is referred to as the 'High-Wind Transfer' model with several different scenarios represented. The development of the High-Wind Transfer model not only included identification and allocation of SPP wind to individual SERC BAs, but also included the evaluation of various methods to allow the model to export the SPP wind to SERC without developing an actual transmission plan to support the transfers. (4) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of several different High-Wind Transfer model scenarios for the year 2022 to determine balancing costs and potential benefits of collaboration among SPP and SERC BAs to provide the required balancing.

  11. BBF RFC 106: A Standard Type IIS Syntax for Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Virginia

    2015-03-17

    Here we define a standard syntax for assembling standard parts for expression in plant cells, extensible to all other eukaryotes. Variations of the Type IIS mediated cloning method known as Golden Gate Cloning, most notably ...

  12. Terpenoid biosynthesis in Euphorbia lathyris and Copaifera spp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skrukrud, C.L.

    1987-07-01

    Biosynthesis of triterpenoids by isolated latex of Euphorbia lathyris was investigated. The rate of in vitro incorporation of mevalonic acid into triterpenoids was thirty times greater than acetate incorporation indicating that the rate-limiting step in the pathway occurs prior to mevalonate. Both HMG-CoA reductase (EC 1.1.1.34) and HMG-CoA lyase (EC 4.1.3.4) activities were detected in isolated latex. HMG-CoA reductase was localized to a membrane-bound fraction of a 5000g pellet of latex. The rate of conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate by this enzyme is comparable to the overall rate of acetate incorporation into the triterpenoids suggesting that this enzyme is rate-determining in the biosynthesis of triterpenoids in E. lathyris latex. HMG-CoA reductase of E. lathyris vegetative tissue was localized to the membrane-bound portion of a particulate fraction (18,000g), and was solubilized by treatment with 2% polyoxyethylene ether W-1. Differences in the optimal pH for activity of HMG-CoA reductase from the latex and vegetative tissue suggest that isozymes of the enzyme may be present in the two tissue types. Studies of the incorporation of various precursors into leaf discs and cuttings taken from Copaifera spp. show differences in the rate of incorporation into Copaifera sesquiterpenes suggesting that the site of sesquiterpene biosynthesis may differ in its accessibility to the different substrates and/or reflecting the metabolic controls on carbon allocation to the terpenes. Mevalonate incorporation by Copaifera langsdorfii cuttings into sesquiterpenes was a hundred-fold greater than either acetate or glucose incorporation, however, its incorporation into squalene and triterpenoids was also a hundred-fold greater than the incorporation into sesquiterpenes. 119 refs., 58 figs., 16 tabs.

  13. New species, hyper-diversity and potential importance of Calonectria spp. from Eucalyptus in South China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New species, hyper-diversity and potential importance of Calonectria spp. from Eucalyptus in South in the Guangdong, Guangxi and Hainan Provinces of South China, where Eucalyptus trees in plantations or cuttings to Eucalyptus forestry in China. The remarkable diversity of Calonectria species in a relatively small area

  14. STUDIES IN MYCOLOGY 50: 343358. 2004. Speciation and distribution of Botryosphaeria spp. on native and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . on native and introduced Eucalyptus trees in Australia and South Africa Bernard Slippers1* , Gerda Fourie1-back pathogens that affect Eucalyptus spp. They also occur endophytically in Eucalyptus leaves and stems. For the purpose of this study, Botryosphaeria strains were isolated from diseased and symptomless Eucalyptus

  15. Lineage specific transcriptional profiles of Symbiodinium spp. unaltered by heat stress in a coral host

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palumbi, Stephen

    treatments (i.e. attributable solely to type, not heat exposure). These include many genes related to known!"#$%$ $ Lineage specific transcriptional profiles of Symbiodinium spp. unaltered by heat stress unexplored. Here, we examine the transcriptome-wide response to heat stress via RNA- Seq of two types

  16. Habitat and Nursery Grounds of Pacific Rockfish, Sebastes spp., in Rocky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ocean perch, Sebastes alutus, and most other rockfishes, Sebastes spp., in the North Pacific Ocean of southeastern Alaska were important nursery grounds for Pacific ocean perch. These rough areas extend off- shore Pacific ocean perch, have been trawled nearshore in coastal bays and fiords of southeastern Alaska over

  17. Supraoptimal root-zone temperature effects on water use of three Cercis spp 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Beth Jez

    1993-01-01

    Committee: Dr. Jayne M. Zajicek Stem flow rates of three Cercis spp. exposed to supraoptimal root- zone temperatures were characterized in a controlled environment chamber using a water bath to maintain treatment temperatures. Flow rates of sap... in the xylem were measured every 15 sec and averaged over 15 min intervals. Sap flow measurements were correlated to root-zone temperatures recorded during the same time intervals. Whole plant transpiration was also measured gravimetrically. Root...

  18. SPP Staff appreciates the opportunity to provide input regarding the Draft Conge

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-AA-1 SECTION J APPENDIXAllegations Related to the Energy|U.S.SPP

  19. SPP Membership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Western Area Power Administration (Western) Transmission and Ancillary Services Formula Rates for Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin Program--Eastern Division (P-SMBP--ED ) was...

  20. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Shewanella spp. Reveals Evolutionary Robustness in Central Carbon Metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Martin, Hector Garcia; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Deutschbauer, Adam; Llora, Xavier; Meadows, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-08-19

    Shewanella spp. are a group of facultative anaerobic bacteria widely distributed in marine and fresh-water environments. In this study, we profiled the central metabolic fluxes of eight recently sequenced Shewanella species grown under the same condition in minimal med-ium with [3-13C] lactate. Although the tested Shewanella species had slightly different growth rates (0.23-0.29 h31) and produced different amounts of acetate and pyruvate during early exponential growth (pseudo-steady state), the relative intracellular metabolic flux distributions were remarkably similar. This result indicates that Shewanella species share similar regulation in regard to central carbon metabolic fluxes under steady growth conditions: the maintenance of metabolic robustness is not only evident in a single species under genetic perturbations (Fischer and Sauer, 2005; Nat Genet 37(6):636-640), but also observed through evolutionary related microbial species. This remarkable conservation of relative flux profiles through phylogenetic differences prompts us to introduce the concept of metabotype as an alternative scheme to classify microbial fluxomics. On the other hand, Shewanella spp. display flexibility in the relative flux profiles when switching their metabolism from consuming lactate to consuming pyruvate and acetate.

  1. Fuel Cell-Shaft Power Packs (FC-SPP) Frank Elefsen, Centre Manager, Ph.D., and Sten Frandsen, Head of Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuel Cell-Shaft Power Packs (FC-SPP) Frank Elefsen, Centre Manager, Ph.D., and Sten Frandsen, Head and an improved environment. 1 Fuel Cell-Shaft Power Packs (FC-SPP) A. Background In line with the growing global technology is receiving a great deal of attention. Hydrogen and fuel cells have the potential to replace

  2. Abundance and spread of the invasive red algae, Kappaphycus spp., in Kane'ohe Bay, Hawai'i and an experimental assessment of management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jennifer E.

    ) investigate control options including manual removal and the use of biocontrol agents. Kappaphycus spp-808-236-7443) Received 7 July 2003; accepted in revised form 29 April 2004 Key words: algal blooms, biocontrol be a useful bio- control agent. Because Kappaphycus spp. are still spreading in Kane'ohe Bay and can overgrow

  3. Quantum Moduli Space of the Cascading Sp(p+M) x Sp(p) Gauge Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fumikazu Koyama; Futoshi Yagi

    2006-12-27

    We extend the detailed analysis of the quantum moduli space of the cascading SU(p+M) x SU(p) gauge theory in the recent paper of Dymarsky, Klebanov, and Seiberg for the Sp(p+M) x Sp(p) cascading gauge theory, which lives on the world volume of p D3-branes and M fractional D3-branes at the tip of the orientifolded conifold. As in their paper, we also find in this case that the ratio of the deformation parameters of the quantum constraint on the different branches in the gauge theory can be reproduced by the ratio of the deformation parameters of the conifold with different numbers of mobile D3-branes.

  4. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight (Fact Sheet), Weatherization And Intergovernmental Programs (WIP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department ofSUPPLEMENT NOVEMBERSupportingDepartment of

  5. Temperature effect on gastric emptying time of hybrid grouper (Epinephelus spp.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De, Moumita; Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd. [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Das, Simon K. [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Marine Ecosystem Research Centre (EKOMAR), Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    Knowledge of fish gastric emptying time is a necessary component for understanding the fish feeding rates, energy budgets and commercial production of fishes in aquaculture. The hybrid grouper Epinephelus spp. is getting popular as a culture species in Malaysia for their faster growth rate compared to commonly cultured grouper species (giant grouper Epinephelus lanceolatus and tiger grouper Epinephelus fuscoguttatus). There are data suggests that elevated sea water temperature affects gastric emptying time (GET) of fishes. Hence, this study aims to study the GET of hybrid grouper at different temperature (22, 26, 30, 34°C) in laboratory condition with commercial diet pellet. The gastric emptying times (GETs) at different temperatures were determined X-radiographically, using barium sulfate (BaSO{sub 4}) as a contrast medium food marker. The food marker and X-radiography showed that initial voidance of fecal matter began 4-6 h after feeding at all temperature. The fastest GET (13 h) was obsereved in the 30°C group, whereas the longest (17 h) GET was seen in 22°C group fed with artificial diet pellet. Not much differences in GET were recorded between the 26 and 34°C groups as 34°C groups fed lesser amount compared to 26°C groups. Nevertheless a substantial delay in GET was observed in the 22°C group. The findings of this study suggest to culture hybrid grouper between 26 to 30°C with commercial diet pellet as this temperature ranges proliferate the faster digestion process which may contribute faster growth rate of this commerical important fish species. Overall, these findings may have important consequences for optimization of commercial production of hybrid grouper.

  6. Invasion of a Sphagnum-peatland by Betula spp and Molinia caerulea impacts on organic matter biochemistry. Implications for carbon and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the extent of the influence of this invasion on the biochemical characteristics of the peat. Elemental substrate injection as invading plants have a lower ratio than Sphagnum spp and Sphagnum peat. Total the availability of resources to other species (Jones et al, 1994). Sphagnum species, by regulating

  7. The effectiveness of chemical herbicides for the control of prickly pear cactus (Opuntia spp.) in the vicinity of the Sonora Ranch Experiment Station 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleason, Lowell S

    1951-01-01

    , 19&1 THE EFFHCTIVENEM OF CHENICAL HERBICINES FCR THE CONTROL OF PRICRLI PEAR CACTUS (/gratia spp. ) IN THE VICINITY OF THE SONORA BAlCH EXPERINENT STATION LONELL S, GLEASON A Thesis Subsitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural aud... DISCUSSION ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ i 3l S UMMARI ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ LITERATURE CITED ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 3S APPEHDIX ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ AQ LIST OF TABLES Table Page I. The monthly...

  8. Abstract Plantations of Pinus spp. constitute approximately 50% of the South African forestry industry. The first aim of this study was to develop a reliable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    industry. The first aim of this study was to develop a reliable inoculation technique to screen Pinus spp. Kietzka Mondi Business Paper, P.O. Box 179, Pietermaritzburg, KZN, South Africa 123 New Forests DOI 10 African forestry industry is crucially important for the continued sustainability of this important

  9. Calculation of Nox Emissions Reductions from Energy Efficient Residential Building Construction in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Gilman, D.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Muns, S.; Verdict, M.

    2004-01-01

    severe sanctions if attainment is not reached by 2007. This paper provides an overview of the procedures that have been developed and used to calculate the electricity savings and NOx reductions from code-compliant residential construction in non...,000 ft2 single-family residence. ESL Code Traceable DOE-2 Simulation (Residential, Commercial, Industrial, Renewables) County-wide Electricity Use (w/ and w/o code) E-GRID Database Model For ERCOT, SERC, SPP, and WSCC Regions 1999 Building...

  10. A dynamic focusing x-ray monochromator for a wiggler beam line at the SRS of the SERC Daresbury Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Bruijn, D.; Van Zuylen, P. ); Kruizinga, G. , P.O. Box 93138, 2509 AC Den Haag State University of Utrecht, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3508 TB Utrecht )

    1992-01-01

    A Si(220) double-crystal monochromator for the energy range 10--30 keV is presented. It will be used for EXAFS as well as powder diffraction measurements. To determine the requirements for this monochromator we looked, apart from mean considerations, at the requirements dictated by EXAFS in transmission mode. For good data analyses the proper shape, amplitude, and location at the energy axis of each wiggle is required. Moreover it is essential to separate the wiggles from background and noise. For the latter a high flux through the sample is desirable, which can be achieved by horizontal focusing of the beam. For that we have chosen to bend the second crystal sagitally. The sagittal bending radius is adjustable between 50 and 0.8 m, because for different energies different sagittal radii are necessary to focus the beam on the sample. The mean meridional radius of the second crystal is fixed at 130 m, which is an optimization for 20 keV. The meridional radius of the first crystal can be tuned between 100 and 500 m. When this radius is set to 130 m the energy resolution is calculated to be 6, 3, and 35 eV for 10, 20, and 30 keV (for perfectly bent crystals). By changing the meridional radius of the first crystal, future users of this monochromator can make the trade off between resolution and intensity. Movement of the monochromator exit beam, during a scan, will occur due to the monochromator geometry, but is reduced as much as possible by using an asymmetrically cut second crystal, with an asymmetry angle of 2.5{degree}. The average exit beam movement of the monochromator for a 1-keV scan is 20 {mu}m. For 40% of the energy range (10--30 keV) the exit beam position remains within 10 {mu}m. For the second crystal no translation stage is used.

  11. Passiflora spp. (Cultivated) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monique D. Reed

    2011-08-10

    ??2) D(5)=25. ?(X??Z)+(OMEGA??2) F(LpL)=AM(2)+AM(3) Fi, ), 2)=(H(Z)??Z)+(Hi', 31??2)?AR(2)?AMf3) F(L, 31'=AM(ZI?(H(3)??2)?AM(31?(H(2)??2) Fi L, 4!= i H(21??2)?( H( 3)??2) Ff)p'5!'=F(). sLJ+AM(4) F(). , 61=F(J. pZJ+AM(4)?F('L, ()+(H(4)??2) Fffp7)=F..."=Filp71+AM(5)?FIL?6)+(H(5)??21?F(J?5) FiLp L4)=-i=(fp81', +AM(51?F(L, 71+(H(5)??2)?F(Lp6) F(LpL5)=F(Lp9!'+AM(51'?F(Lp8)+(H(51??2)?F(fp7) F:L, L6)=F(LpLDI+AM('5J'?F((, 9)?(H(5)??2)?F(. fp81 F(LpL7)=AM(51?F(L, LD)+(H(5)??21?F((p9) F(Lp)81'=(H(51??2)?F...

  12. POCKET REFERENCE GUIDE SANS Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuanzhu Peter

    Address Resolution Protocol (RFC 826) BGP Border Gateway Protocol (RFC 1771) CWR Congestion Window Reduced) IGMP Internet Group Management Protocol (RFC 2236) IGRP Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (Cisco) IMAP Association & Key Management Protocol (RFC 2408) L2TP Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (RFC 2661) NNTP Network News

  13. 1David Wilczynski, 6/14/10 3:41 PM -0700, Fwd: FAA Design Competition for University A Original-recipient: rfc822;mankin@usc.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    DbJAantL+wwNw9sq4uotuS2n2TzWsxbDBxJzG8mN9X R0lnSpgbanYAQeNzoqnVCT+D0gGhMGVugUWL5Tl53RYDUPs8BnHlSCYXs7RwQVPh+lnm q to proceed with announcing your award to your institution and media contacts. Please send Virginia Space Design Competition for University A Mary Sandy Director Virginia Space Grant Consortium Debbie Ross

  14. Leveraging Resources for the Weatherization Innovation Pilot...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Pilot Projects (WIPP) Presentation Leveraging Resources for Weatherization Innovation Pilot Projects (WIPP) SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar Transcript...

  15. Questions Asked during the Financing Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets Transcript Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar Transcript...

  16. Curriculum Vitae Henry R. Glyde

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glyde, Henry R.

    ­1975 Physicist, Atomic Energy of Canada, Chalk River, Ontario 1965­1969 SERC Fellow, University of Sussex, United

  17. Transcript from 12/05/08 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    from 120508 More Documents & Publications Transcript from 120108 Manufacturing Pre-Solicitation Transcript SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar Transcript...

  18. Springfield Processing Plant (SPP) Facility Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, Janice; Torres, Teresa M.

    2012-10-01

    The Springfield Processing Plant is a hypothetical facility. It has been constructed for use in training workshops. Information is provided about the facility and its surroundings, particularly security-related aspects such as target identification, threat data, entry control, and response force data.

  19. Symmetric and asymmetric hybridization in citrus spp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bona, Claudine M.

    2009-05-15

    The United States is the second largest producer of oranges and grapefruit. However, the US citrus industry experiences constraints in production due to pests, diseases and environmental concerns. Furthermore, due to the low diversity in current...

  20. Introduction The quahog, Mercenaria spp., rang-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    07732; Allan Morrison is with the Prince Edward Island Department of Agri- culture, Fisheries, and Forestry, P.O. Box 2000, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada; David L. Taylor is with the Division

  1. Introduction The quahog, Mercenaria spp., rang-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magruder Road, Highlands, NJ 07732; Allan Morrison is with the Prince Edward Island Department of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Forestry, P.O. Box 2000, Char- lottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada; David L

  2. Strategic Partnership Projects (SPP) | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhoton Source Parameters StorageHeatStrategic Focus

  3. Arctic lemmings, Lemmus spp. and Dicrostonyx spp.: integrating ecological and evolutionary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oksanen, Lauri

    on the following aspects: (1) changes in morphology related to feeding ecology; (2) per capita rate of population increase their foraging efficiency under harsh conditions at the cost of reduced agility. These features

  4. Reusable rapid assembly of genetic parts for Neurospora crassa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odsen, Raymond

    2011-10-17

    This BBF RFC provides a method in which standardized parts can be easily created for Neurospora crassa.

  5. TAP Webcast Transcript July-29, 2009 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Documents & Publications How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar Transcript Sustainable Energy Resources...

  6. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report covers the states that largely fall into the Southeastern Reliability Corporation (SERC) region: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

  7. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Fact Sheet July 2011...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energys Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grants, including information on the programs history, who is eligible, and how to participate....

  8. Market Protocols for SPP Integrated Marketplace Market Protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    ....................................................................... 61 4.1.2.2 Wind-Power Generation Resource Output Forecasts .................................. 61 4

  9. Predicting suitable environments and potential occurrences for coelacanths (Latimeria spp.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, Hannah L.; Bentley, Andrew C.; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2011-01-01

    ). Latimeria chalumnae is now known to inhabit a range encompassing the east coast of Africa from Kenya to South Africa, and extending east to Madagascar and the Comoros Islands. In 1997, a second species of coelacanth, L. menadoensis, was discovered off... coelacanth species. Among these areas are several previously postulated as harboring coelacanths (although sightings remain unconfirmed), including localities locations off the northern coast of Madagascar and the islands of Mwali and Maore in the Comoros...

  10. BEHAVIOR, CHEMICAL ECOLOGY Lutzomyia spp. (Diptera: Psychodidae) Response to Olfactory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Phillip E.

    - and Light Emitting Diode-Modified Mosquito Magnet X (MM-X) Traps RAJINDER S. MANN,1 PHILLIP E. KAUFMAN-green- red light-emitting diodes and olfactory attractants to determine the response of Lutzomyia shannoni

  11. Toxicity studies with Sesbania spp. in domestic and laboratory animals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whall, Jeffrey DePass

    1982-01-01

    were all recorded simultaneously by the physiograph. The animal was anesthetized with sodium penotobarbitol, intubated, and allowed to stabilize, then baseline readings were taken. Intravenous injections of the extract were then made at time... were evaluated for Packed Cell Volume (PCV), total serum protein (TSP), serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (SGOT), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), Serum Potassium (k) and Sodium (Na), levels. PCV, TSPs, and SGOT's were run within two days after...

  12. Request for Addition or Change to SPP Submitted By

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Recycled Content % Pre-Consumer % Post-Consumer Locally Harvested/ Extracted Materials Within 500 Mi assembly of components)? Where is the product extracted, harvested or recovered from? Additional Comments? Product Disposal Recyclable? Hazardous Disposal? Energy Efficiency R-value: COP: Reduced Water Consumption

  13. Phylogenetic analyses of phytopathogenic isolates of Verticillium spp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Q M; Vallad, G E; Wu, B M; Subbarao, K V

    2006-01-01

    26 to 50% vascular area discolored, 3 = 51 to 75%, 4 = 76 toto 50% vascular area discolored, 3 = 51 to 75% vascular area

  14. Trapping Phyllophaga spp. (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln NE fbaxendale1@unl.edu 8 Georgia Experiment Station, Griffin, GA kbraman@griffin, Marion Junction, AL jhollima@acesag.auburn.edu 26 Univ. of Georgia, Tifton, GA wghudson@uga.edu 27 Ohio, GA bsp

  15. Evidenceforthe existenceof endospermbalance true clovers (Trifolium Spp.)l

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    tissuendospermique comporte un ratio de 2 BNE du parent femelle etde line BNE du parentmale. LeSBNE peuventetre

  16. Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) experience relatively high mortality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the marine environment, where smaller individu- als are believed to experience higher size at sea, when smaller indi- viduals may not have sufficient energy reserves to survive late fall is proportional to fish body length (Francis, 1990; Ricker, Early marine growth in relation to marine

  17. Characterization of Resistance to Black Spot Disease of Rosa Spp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Qianni

    2014-12-01

    Young-Ki Jo Joshua Yuan Head of Department, Daniel R. Lineberger December 2014 Choose an item. Choose an item. Major Subject: Horticulture Copyright.... These trials typically last 2-3 years to ensure sufficient disease pressure to properly assess the resistance of the plants (Carlson-Nilsson, 2000; Noack, 2003; Shupert, 2005). Lab based detached leaf 4 assay (DLA) is a tool for observing disease...

  18. Strategic Partnership Projects (SPP) | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhoton Source Parameters StorageHeatStrategic Focus

  19. A New Standard to Connect BioBrick Parts for Precise Extraction of an Enzyme Digestion Product

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uekusa, Kousuke

    2010-12-05

    This BioBricks Foundation Request for Comments (BBF RFC) introduces a new standard to connect BioBrick parts using BglI site.

  20. Units for Promoter Measurement in Mammalian Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velten, Lars

    2009-10-21

    The purpose of this RFC is to provide units for the characterization of promoter strength for use in mammalian cells. RMPU is mRNA based and

  1. Seasonal Abundance of the Greenbug and its Natural Enemies in Grain Sorghum in the Texas High Plains. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teetes, George L.; Lopez, Ector G.; Schaefer, Curtis A.

    1975-01-01

    . Major predators recorded weekly were: Hippodanzia spp., Chn~sopa spp., Scyrnrzus spp., Syriphid spp. (larvae), spiders, and three hemipteran species, Orius spp., Nabis spp.. and Geocoris spp. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Greenbugs infested grain sorghum...

  2. Performance of Routing Protocols in HF Wireless Networks Eric E. Johnson*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Balakrishnan* , and Zibin Tang* Klipsch School of Electrical and Computer Engineering New Mexico State and Routing Protocol (WARRP) and the Internet standard Optimized Link State Routing (OLSR) protocol (RFC-3626 in the Internet. The Optimized Link State Routing (OLSR) protocol (RFC-3626) [1] is an optimization

  3. Modeling Interregional Transmission Congestion in the National Energy Modeling System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gumerman, Etan; Chan, Peter; Lesieutre, Bernard; Marnay, Chris; Wang, Juan

    2006-01-01

    Administration. 2005a. Annual Energy Outlook 2005. EIA/DOE.RON SERC TWh WECC Annual Energy Outlook U.S. Department ofAccording to the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2004 Reference

  4. Tassajara Creek restoration project: Continued riparian habitat monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trinh, Michelle; Percelay, Julie

    2008-01-01

    brush (Baccharis pilularis ) Willow species (Salix spp. )Willow species (Salix spp. )Willow species (Salix spp. ) Willow species (Salix spp. )

  5. Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) W. Kumari Request for Comments: 6472 Google, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    . Sriram Category: Best Current Practice U.S. NIST ISSN: 2070-1721 December 2011 Recommendation as described in the Simplified BSD License. Kumari & Sriram Best Current Practice [Page 1] #12;RFC 6472 AS

  6. Fast multiple gene fragment ligation method based on Type IIs restriction enzyme DraIII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Zhenyu

    2010-10-31

    With the established BioBrick Assembly standards, ligation of different parts has to be accomplished step by step. It can be time-consuming when dealing with multiple fragment ligation. BBF RFC 61 is developed aimed at ...

  7. Fast multiple gene fragment ligation method based on homologous recombination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ruiyan

    2010-10-31

    With the established BioBrick Assembly standards, ligation of different parts has to be accomplished step by step. It can be time-consuming when dealing with multiple fragment ligation. BBF RFC 62 is developed aimed at ...

  8. INTERNET PROTOCOL DARPA INTERNET PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBrien, Peter

    RFC: 791 INTERNET PROTOCOL DARPA INTERNET PROGRAM PROTOCOL SPECIFICATION September 1981 prepared Way Marina del Rey, California 90291 #12;#12;September 1981 Internet Protocol TABLE OF CONTENTS ...................................................... 9 3. SPECIFICATION ................................................... 11 3.1 Internet Header Format

  9. RPL {sbjeong, hskim, kschoi, sbahk}@netlab.snu.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    , IoT (Internet of Things) . RPL , . . RPL , . . IETF ROLL (Internet Engineering Task Force Routing Over Low-power and Lossy networks) working group. "The Minimum Rank with Hysteresis Objective Function," Internet Engineering Task Force, RFC 6719, Sep

  10. Over 90 species of rockfish (Sebastes spp.) are found in kelp beds, rocky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ): a bioenergetics approach Chris J. Harvey Northwest Fisheries Science Center National Marine Fisheries Service 2725 by the Scientific Editor. Fish. Bull. 103:71­83 (2005). Fish bioenergetics models relate the energy consumption (Madenjian et al., 2000). At the scale of the indi- vidual fish, bioenergetics models can estimate effects

  11. The comparison of three methods for isolation of Arcobacter spp. in raw ground pork 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohlendorf, Dawn Suzanne

    2000-01-01

    Arcobacter is an aerotolerant organism similar to Campylobacter, which has been studied recently due to its implication in foodborne illness. Arcobacter has been isolated from the food supply in two primary commodities, ...

  12. A successional study of Willows (Salix spp.) on sandbar islands in the Mississippi River using GIS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Genevieve Ann

    1996-01-01

    Willows (Salix nigra Marsh. and Salix interior Row.) are short-lived, early successional species which require moist, sandy soil to germinate and can withstand long periods of innundation. Sandbar islands in the Mississippi River possess...

  13. Investigating the role of Trichodesmium spp. in the oceanic nitrogen cycle through observations and models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Elise Marie Black

    2014-01-01

    This work concerns the nitrogen fixation and abundance of Trichodesmium colonies in the western subtropical-tropical North Atlantic and their connections with physical processes. Data were collected in fall 2010 and spring ...

  14. Conventional Breeding and Molecular Techniques to Improve Phytochemical Concentrations in Pepper (Capsicum spp.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butcher, Justin

    2012-02-14

    tissues of different pepper material. From our results, we were able to arguably conclude that an environmental component may serve a more essential role in activating the necessary physiological processes to produce specific secondary metabolites...

  15. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Shewanella spp. Reveals Evolutionary Robustness in Central Carbon Metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Yinjie J.

    2010-01-01

    used in microbial fuel cell applications: via an electrodepotential application in bioremediation and fuel cells.

  16. Physiological tolerances across latitudes: thermal sensitivity of larval marine snails (Nucella spp.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zippay, Mackenzie L.; Hofmann, Gretchen E.

    2010-01-01

    were less tolerant of heat stress than those from centralinduced by the acute heat stress, a second experiment wasegg capsules with no heat stress (“control”), survival rates

  17. Microbial interactions associated with biofilms attached to Trichodesmium spp. and detrital particles in the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hmelo, Laura Robin

    2010-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) via acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) was discovered in the ocean, yet little is known about its role in the ocean beyond its involvement in certain symbiotic interactions. The objectives of this ...

  18. Market Protocols for SPP Integrated Marketplace Version 2.0 7/12/2011 584

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    steam turbine or 2 gas turbines and 1 steam turbine etc. CM Commercial Model The financial entities Combined Cycle (Resource) Resource comprised of many operational configurations such as 1 gas turbine & 1

  19. Pyrolytic oil of banana (Musa spp.) pseudo-stem via fast process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdullah, Nurhayati; Sulaiman, Fauziah; Taib, Rahmad Mohd; Miskam, Muhamad Azman

    2015-04-24

    This study was an attempt to produce bio-oil from banana pseudo-stem, a waste of banana cultivation, using fast pyrolysis technology. The compositions were determined and the thermal degradation behaviour of the raw material was analyzed using Perkin-Elmer Simultaneous Thermal Analyzer (STA) 6000. A 300?g/h fluidized bed bench scale fast pyrolysis unit, assembled with double screw feeders and cyclones, operating at atmospheric pressure, was used to obtain the pyrolysis liquid. The study involves the impact of the following key variables; the reactor temperature in the range of 450–650 °C, and the residence time in the range of 1.00–3.00 s. The particle size was set at 224-400?µm. The properties of the liquid product were analyzed for calorific heating value, pH value, conductivity, water and char content. The basic functional groups of the compositions were also determined using FTIR. The properties of the liquid product were compared with other wood derived bio-oil. The pyrolysis liquids derived from banana pseudo-stem were found to be in an aqueous phase.

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF DROUGHT-RELATED QUANTITATIVE TRAIT LOCI (QTLs) IN SUGARCANE (Saccharum spp.) USING GENIC MARKERS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Vivek

    2011-08-08

    associations in this study. Fifty-six polymorphisms produced by 13 EST-SSR primers were used to produce genetic similarity matrix for 80 genotypes. Dendrogram prepared from this genetic similarity matrix will be useful in selecting parents carrying diversity...

  1. MAXIMUM YIELD ESTIMATES FOR THE PACIFIC THREAD HERRING, OPISTHONEMA SPP., FISHERY IN COSTA RICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and standardized to account for presumed increases in fishing power and "real" fishing time (time spent searching. medirastre) are found in continental waters between northern Mexico and Peru while a fourth species (0

  2. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Shewanella spp. Reveals Evolutionary Robustness in Central Carbon Metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Yinjie J.

    2010-01-01

    acids (precursors from gluconeogenesis and serine metabolismacids (precursors from gluconeogenesis and pentose phosphateDoudoroff (ED) pathway, gluconeogenesis, and the pentose

  3. A survey of Meloidogyne spp. parasitizing peaches in Texas and their effects on four peach rootstocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jerral D

    1964-01-01

    compared with reproduction or 42 p nt of' ttl M. ~fnfta ~fc it p p 1 tf ns, nd 31 percent f th N, ~fnco nit cr1. ta populati (Tables 3, 5 and. 7). The wide variation that existed between populations of M. ~fn nfta ~fc nit (Bable 2B) nd N. ~no nits a... ntt nd n. dn ntta var. st . Ft nt nts. Reptr. Supp. 8K-8 McBeth, C. W. , A. L. Taylor, and A. L. Smith. 1941. Note on staining nematodes in root tissue. Proc. Helminth. Soc. Wash. 8: 26. 32. 33 ' 34. 35. McClintock, J. A. 1922. Resistant plants...

  4. Genetic diversity of the Leptospiral immunoglobulin-like (Lig) genes in pathogenic Leptospira spp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suchard, Marc A.

    Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Pelotas, RS, Brazil c Department of Biomathematics, David Geffen

  5. NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-144 ABUNDANCES OF THE AMPHIPOD DIPOREIA SPP. AND THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Site coordinates are given in Table 1.....................................15 Figure 3. Designation. Site coordinates are given in Table 1 .......................................16 Figure 4. Designation. Site coordinates are given in Table 1.....................................17 Figure 5. Designation

  6. Wide Hybridization, Genomic, and Overwintering Characterization of High-Biomass Sorghum Spp. Feedstocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitmire, David Kyle

    2012-10-19

    The federally mandated 36 billion gallons a year production goal for "advanced biofuels" by 2022 has created a demand for lignocellulosic feedstocks that are inexpensive to produce. The current lack of market development for lignocellulosic...

  7. Molecular and genetic analysis of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts : sources and genotypes in the environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jellison, Kristen L. (Kristen Leigh), 1975-

    2003-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is responsible for an acute gastrointestinal disease that is self-limiting in immunocompetent people but potentially life-threatening for the immunocompromised. Until recently, C. parvum was the only ...

  8. An antigenic and serologic study of six strains of Trichomonas SPP 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speights, Stephen Ryan

    1974-01-01

    strain agglutination reactions Summary of ZM strain agglutination reactions Summary of CS strain agglutination reactions 69 70 71 72 VII . Summary of JB VI strain agglutination reactions . . 73 VIII. IX, XI. XII . Summary of AT strain IFA... tests Summary of SB strain IFA tests Summary of ZM strain IFA tests Summary of CS strain IFA tests Summary of JB VI strain IFA tests 80 81 82 83 84 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page El ph t F g ph f 1'. all' Necropsy of diseased pigeon...

  9. The Association of Virulent Vibrio Spp. Bacteria on Gafftopsail and Hardhead Catfish in Galveston Bay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Leslie Deanne

    2011-10-21

    Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) and V. parahaemolyticus (Vp) are gram negative, halophilic bacteria that occur naturally in estuarine waters of Galveston Bay. Both bacteria have the potential to cause infections in humans either via consumption or direct...

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - MISO-SPP Market Impacts HydPwrConf 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganismsnow widely usingOverview ofWeSchool MACRUC 15

  11. Recovery of aboveground plant biomass and productivity after fire in mesic and dry black spruce forests of interior Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    and tall shrubs (mainly Salix spp. ), which may re- sproutis likely important, mainly Salix spp. and trees less thanincluding Festuca altaica, Salix spp. , ,Ledum palustre,

  12. ON EQUILIBRIUM POINTS OF LOGARITHMIC AND NEWTONIAN POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eremenko, Alexandre

    . Received 9 July 1991; revised 15 January 1992. 1991 Mathematics Subject Classification 31A05. This research and Engineering Research Council (SERC) fellow. He gratefully acknowledges the hospitality and support extended. In the opposite direction we have EXAMPLE 2.3. For every p ^ 1 there exists an entire function F of order p

  13. Recognising rotationally symmetric surfaces from their outlines ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisserman, Andrew

    of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA. 2 The General Electric Corporate Research and Development Laboratory of the GE Coolidge Fellowship. AZ acknowledges the support of SERC. CAR acknowledges the support of GE strongly constrain the viewed surface, but has the disadvantage that it cannot recover surface parameters

  14. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C8, supplbment au no 12, Tome 47, dkcembre 1986

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    [ O S ~ ( C O ) ~ ~ ]avec HS(CH2)jSIL conduit la formation de HOs3(CO)10 [S(CH2)3 S I ~ ]dont la on Line 7 of the Synchrotron Radiation Source at the SERC Daresbury Laboratory. The procedures used

  15. Performance Analysis of a Space-Based GMTI Radar System Using Separated Spacecraft Interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troy L. Hacker, Raymond J. Sedwick, and David W. Miller May 2000 SERC #2-2000 This report is based on the unaltered thesis of Troy L. Hacker submitted to the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics in partial Interferometry by TROY L. HACKER Submitted to the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics on May 24, 2000

  16. Comparative breeding ecology of Lesser Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis canadensis) and Siberian cranes (G. leucogeranus) in Eastern Siberia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2007-04-25

    in the Kytalyk Resource Reserve in July 2000. 22 of arctic polygonal tundra includes sedges (Carex spp.), cotton grasses (Eriophrum spp.), bluegrasses (Poa spp.), and dwarf willows (Salix spp.) (Uspenskii et al. 1962, Matveev 1989...

  17. A rapid and direct approach to find promoters for high-level gene expression in sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Meizhu

    2000-01-01

    with radioactively labeled first strand cDNA probes synthesized from sugarcane leaf mRNA. Southern analysis of these 11 genomic clones with pooled first strand cDNA indicated that 8 of them probably contain genes with expression levels similar to or higher than...

  18. Biodiversity Conservation in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Case Study of the African Dwarf Crocodiles (Osteolaemus Spp.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smolensky, Nicole Limunga

    2014-11-20

    Overexploitation of wildlife is a leading threat to biodiversity in tropical Africa. Effective management requires integrating information on the extent of exploitation, distribution, and status of exploited species. I ...

  19. The distribution and relative abundance of Nematopsis spp., as found in Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin) in the Galveston Bay area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Roger Dean

    1969-01-01

    the pathogenicity of N, ostrearum in the host oyster with inconclusive results. Thus, he attributed deaths of oysters to an unknown factor. This was clarified when Mackin, Owen and Collier (1950) described Dermo- t'd ', k L bvbh-, . . . ::. (V Owen and Collier...) Mackin and Ray (1966). This organism has been convincingly shown to play a major role in the loss of condition and death of oysters (Mackin et al. , 1950; lvIackin, 1953; Ray, 1954a, 1954b, 1954c). It is now known that L. marina can be found at both...

  20. Molecular detection and speciation of pathogenic Leptospira spp. in blood from patients with culture-negative leptospirosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonsilp, Siriphan; Thaipadungpanit, Janjira; Amornchai, Premjit; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Day, Nicholas P; Peacock, Sharon J

    2011-12-13

    ’ GGTTCGTTACTGAGGGTTAAAAC CCCC3’), rrs-inner-F (5’ CTGGCGGCGCGTCTTA 3’), and rrs-inner-R (5’ GTTTTCACACCTGACTTACA 3’). The resulting amplicon was 547 bp. A 25 ?l PCR reaction contained 4.5 mM of MgCl2, 200 ?M of dNTP, 1.25 unit of Tag DNA polymerase (Roche, USA), 0.150 pmol... of each outer primer, 1.25 pmol of rrs-inner-F, 5 pmol of rrs- inner-R, 1 M of Betaine (Sigma-Aldrich, USA) and either 1 ?l of DNA extracted from laboratory cultures or 5 ?l of DNA extracted from EDTA blood samples taken from febrile patients. PCR...

  1. Comparative Genomics of Gossypium spp. through GBS and Candidate Genes – Delving into the Controlling Factors behind Photoperiodic Flowering 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Carla Jo Logan

    2013-08-09

    to design low-degeneracy PCR primers that amplify genomic sequence tags (GSTs) for members of the PHYA, PHYB/D, PHYC and PHYE gene sub-families from A- and D-genome diploid and AD-genome allotetraploid Gossypium species. We identified two paralogous PHYA...) and G. barbadense (designated AD2) on the order of 1 MYA [62,63]. In this study, we utilized a PCR-based approach with low-degeneracy primers to obtain gene fragments, or 'genome sequence tags' (GSTs) that yield an initial description...

  2. Pseudacteon spp. (Diptera: Phoridae) Effect on Foraging Strategies of Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and Spatiotemporal Monitoring in Urban Habitats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Janis Johnson

    2013-11-07

    the words to express what his support of me and this project means. He has been my motivator, my mentor, my counselor, my friend, but most importantly, never waveringly, has given me love. I can never and will never repay him for the sacrifices he made... and expertise with GIS and mapping, his technical assistance with lab experimental design and last, but not least, his awesome driving skills. Thanks to Karyn Boyd for her technical assistance in Microsoft Office, her support, encouragement and just...

  3. Analysis of anti-inflammatory effects of phytochemicals from prickly pear fruit (Opuntia spp.) in human cell culture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Benjamin 1990-

    2012-05-08

    ,112 1,511 1034.39 103.44 3 Mangosteen Juice (11G07SP.XNG.V110252) 12,377 1,238 132.64 13.26 4 Nopal Juice (11G07SP.ULM.SCR033) 11,290 1,129 353.52 35.35 5 Aseptic Prickly Pear Puree Non-Acidified (10J29SP.LMM.973.10P173) 5,658 707 80.92 10.12 6...702) 1,511 2.81897 281.897 3 Mangosteen Juice (11G07SP.XNG.V110252) 1,238 5.15717 515.717 4 Nopal Juice (11G07SP.ULM.SCR033) 1,129 8.250232 825.0232 5 Aseptic Prickly Pear Puree Non-Acidified (10J29SP.LMM.973.10P173) 707 8.681983 868.1983 6...

  4. ANALYSIS OF ANTI-INFLAMMATORY EFFECTS OF PHYTOCHEMICALS FROM PRICKLY PEAR FRUIT (OPUNTIA SPP.) IN HUMAN CELL CULTURE 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Julia 1989-

    2012-05-08

    ,112 1,511 1034.39 103.44 3 Mangosteen Juice (11G07SP.XNG.V110252) 12,377 1,238 132.64 13.26 4 Nopal Juice (11G07SP.ULM.SCR033) 11,290 1,129 353.52 35.35 5 Aseptic Prickly Pear Puree Non-Acidified (10J29SP.LMM.973.10P173) 5,658 707 80.92 10.12 6....897 3 Mangosteen Juice (11G07SP.XNG.V110252) 1,238 5.15717 515.717 4 Nopal Juice (11G07SP.ULM.SCR033) 1,129 8.250232 825.0232 5 Aseptic Prickly Pear Puree Non-Acidified (10J29SP.LMM.973.10P173) 707 8.681983 868.1983 6 Aseptic Prickly Pear Puree...

  5. Demonstrating biocompatibility with supercritical CO? : biphasic cultivation of Bacillus spp. and probing acclimation mechanisms through proteome and lipid analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peet, Kyle Creighton

    2015-01-01

    Supercritical (sc) CO? usage is increasing globally with applications as a sterilizing agent, as a non-toxic solvent, and as the form of the greenhouse gas CO? injected underground for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS). ...

  6. Managing scab diseases of potato and radish caused by Streptomyces spp. using Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BAC03 and other biomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    on location and year. Therefore, BAC03 can be a good biological control agent for potato common scab.1016/j.biocontrol.2013.09.009 Corresponding author. Address: School of Food and Agriculture, University

  7. Host specificity testing of Gonatocerus spp. egg-parasitoids used in a classical biological control program against Homalodisca vitripennis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irvin, Nicola A.

    range of potential biological control agents. We implemented a rigorous host specificity testing for and verifying the existence and magnitude of non-target impacts of an arthropod biological control agent (ABCA Ó 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.biocontrol.2007.04.010 * Corresp

  8. A clinical, histopathological, and immuno-fluorescent study of Babesia spp. infection in white-tailed deer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emerson, Harold Ray

    1969-01-01

    , which apparently were the primary hosts of the hemoprotozoan. Splenectomised deer had a febrile response and a 3 to 9% parasitemia Z days after intravenou. s inoculation of 10 ml. of blood in which 1% of the exythrocytes contained Babesia. Anemia...% parasitemia, although no other clinical signs occurred. Gross lesions observed during necropsy of the splenectomised deer were subendocardial and subepicardial hemorrhages; thin, watery blood; edematous iliac, prefemoral, prescapular, and renal lymph nodes...

  9. Two new complete genome sequences offer insight into host and tissue specificity of plant pathogenic Xanthomonas spp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Complete Genome Sequences Offer Insight into Host and TissueComplete Genome Sequences Offer Insight into Host and Tissue

  10. Relationship of salinity and depth to the water table on Tamarix spp. (Saltcedar) growth and water use. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Kurtiss Michael

    2004-09-30

    Saltcedar is an invasive shrub that has moved into western United States riparian areas and is continuing to spread. Saltcedar is a phreatophyte that can utilize a saturated water table for moisture once established and ...

  11. Monitoring and Management of Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) Production Facilities in Texas, USA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenthal, Cassie Ann

    2015-05-01

    two-year sampling study of Ceratopogonidae near deer-breeding pens. Results showed that filth flies were the most abundant group measured throughout the experiment and up to eight ceratopogonids were sampled at a time for a specific location...

  12. ANALYSIS OF ANTI-INFLAMMATORY EFFECTS OF PHYTOCHEMICALS FROM PRICKLY PEAR FRUIT (OPUNTIA SPP.) IN HUMAN CELL CULTURE 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltmann, Matthew

    2012-05-08

    Gallic Acid Equivalent LPS Lipopolysaccharide SD Standard Deviation SE Standard Error VCAM-1 Vascular Adhesion Molecule 1 TNF-alpha Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha HPLC-MS High Performance Liquid Chromatography – Mass Spectroscopy ORAC Oxygen.... qRT- PCR was carried out with the SYBR Green PCR Master Mix from Applied Biosystems (Foster City, Ca) on an ABI Prism 7900 Sequence Detection System (Applied Biosystems Inc, Foster City, CA). Primers were designed using Primer Express software...

  13. Morphological and Genetic Comparisons between Babesia bovis and Trypanosoma spp. Found in Cattle and White-tailed Deer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Amanda

    2012-10-19

    Babesia bovis has been an important disease agent in the U.S. cattle industry for over a century. Recently, B. bovis-like parasites have been identified in white-tailed deer (WTD; Odocoileus virginianus) in Texas. If the ...

  14. Interannual variability of surface energy exchange depends on stand age in a boreal forest fire chronosequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Heping; Randerson, James T

    2008-01-01

    Populus trem- uloides and Salix spp. ). The aspen had a meanvegetation included shrubs (Salix spp. , Ledum paustre, Rosa

  15. Patterns of NPP, GPP, respiration, and NEP during boreal forest succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    mariana [Mill. ]), and willow (Salix spp. )] were calculatedAlnus crispa), willow (Salix spp. ), poplar, and aspen (

  16. Ultra-High Efficiency and Low-Emissions Combustion Technology for Manufacturing Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atreya, Arvind

    2013-04-15

    The purpose of this research was to develop and test a transformational combustion technology for high temperature furnaces to reduce the energy intensity and carbon footprint of U.S. manufacturing industries such as steel, aluminum, glass, metal casting, and petroleum refining. A new technology based on internal and/or external Flue Gas Recirculation (FGR) along with significant enhancement in flame radiation was developed. It produces "Radiative Flameless Combustion (RFC)" and offers tremendous energy efficiency and pollutant reduction benefits over and above the now popular "flameless combustion." It will reduce the energy intensity (or fuel consumption per unit system output) by more than 50% and double the furnace productivity while significantly reducing pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions (10^3 times reduction in NOx and 10 times reduction in CO & hydrocarbons and 3 times reduction in CO2). Product quality improvements are also expected due to uniform radiation, as well as, reduction in scale/dross formation is expected because of non-oxidative atmosphere. RFC is inexpensive, easy to implement, and it was successfully tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at the University of Michigan during the course of this work. A first-ever theory with gas and particulate radiation was also developed. Numerical programs were also written to design an industrial-scale furnace. Nine papers were published (or are in the process of publication). We believe that this early stage research adequately proves the concept through laboratory experiments, modeling and computational models. All this work is presented in the published papers. Important conclusions of this work are: (1) It was proved through experimental measurements that RFC is not only feasible but a very beneficial technology. (2) Theoretical analysis of RFC was done in (a) spatially uniform strain field and (b) a planar momentum jet where the strain rate is neither prescribed nor uniform. Four important non-dimensional parameters controlling RFC in furnaces were identified. These are: (i) The Boltzmann number; (ii) The Damkohler number, (iii) The dimensionless Arrhenius number, and (iv) The equivalence ratio. Together they define the parameter space where RFC is possible. It was also found that the Damkohler number must be small for RFC to exist and that the Boltzmann number expands the RFC domain. The experimental data obtained during the course of this work agrees well with the predictions made by the theoretical analysis. Interestingly, the equivalence ratio dependence shows that it is easier to establish RFC for rich mixtures than for lean mixtures. This was also experimentally observed. Identifying the parameter space for RFC is necessary for controlling the RFC furnace operation. It is hoped that future work will enable the methodology developed here to be applied to the operation of real furnaces, with consequent improvement in efficiency and pollutant reduction. To reiterate, the new furnace combustion technology developed enables intense radiation from combustion products and has many benefits: (i) Ultra-High Efficiency and Low-Emissions; (ii) Uniform and intense radiation to substantially increase productivity; (iii) Oxygen-free atmosphere to reduce dross/scale formation; (iv) Provides multi-fuel capability; and (v) Enables carbon sequestration if pure oxygen is used for combustion.

  17. INTEROPERABILITY AND PERFORMANCE ISSUES IN HF E-MAIL Eric E. Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    INTEROPERABILITY AND PERFORMANCE ISSUES IN HF E-MAIL Eric E. Johnson New Mexico State University exceed those experi- enced in the wired Internet. Beyond the delays imposed by low data bandwidths network.) · The Simple Mail Transfer Protocol SMTP [RFC-821] is the standard within the Internet. Its

  18. c 2001, Dr.Y.N.Singh, EED, IITK 1 Network Layer Routing -V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh Yatindra Nath

    c 2001, Dr.Y.N.Singh, EED, IITK 1 ' & $ Network Layer Routing - V Border Gateway Protocol -4 Yatindra Nath Singh ynsingh@ieee.org Dept. Of Electrical Engineering IIT Kanpur-208016 22 August 2001 #12;c 2001, Dr.Y.N.Singh, EED, IITK 2 ' & $ Border Gateway Protocol - 4 BGP-4 RFC 1771 - http: www

  19. Yeast Rad17 Mec3 Ddc1: A sliding clamp for the DNA damage checkpoint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgers, Peter M.

    lead to inhibition of the cdk kinases that drive the cell cycle are relatively well understood to cell cycle arrest. Rad24 interacts with the four small subunits of replication factor C (RFC) to form of cellular responses which includes DNA repair, apoptosis, and cell- cycle arrest. The DNA damage checkpoint

  20. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Using the resources of the Moon to create a permanent,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spudis, Paul D.

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency PSLV Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (India) RFC Rechargeable Fuel to be implemented under constrained and uncertain funding conditions. In addition, the stepwise, incremental Vehicle CL Cargo Lander CTS Cislunar Transfer Stage CWS Cislunar Way Station (fuel depot) DoD Department

  1. NIST Special Publication 432, 2002 Edition NIST Time and Frequency Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    10 Chapter 2 Synchronizing the Nation's Clocks: NIST Radio Station WWVB 13 History of WWVB 13 WWVB History and Site Description of WWV 29 History and Site Description of WWVH 32 Station Specifications 33 Services 57 Internet Time Service (ITS) 57 ITS Servers 57 ITS Time Code Formats 58 Daytime Protocol (RFC

  2. GPU-based relative fuzzy connectedness image segmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuge Ying; Ciesielski, Krzysztof C.; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Miller, Robert W. [Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Department of Mathematics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States) and Medical Image Processing Group, Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Medical Image Processing Group, Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose:Recently, clinical radiological research and practice are becoming increasingly quantitative. Further, images continue to increase in size and volume. For quantitative radiology to become practical, it is crucial that image segmentation algorithms and their implementations are rapid and yield practical run time on very large data sets. The purpose of this paper is to present a parallel version of an algorithm that belongs to the family of fuzzy connectedness (FC) algorithms, to achieve an interactive speed for segmenting large medical image data sets. Methods: The most common FC segmentations, optimizing an Script-Small-L {sub {infinity}}-based energy, are known as relative fuzzy connectedness (RFC) and iterative relative fuzzy connectedness (IRFC). Both RFC and IRFC objects (of which IRFC contains RFC) can be found via linear time algorithms, linear with respect to the image size. The new algorithm, P-ORFC (for parallel optimal RFC), which is implemented by using NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) platform, considerably improves the computational speed of the above mentioned CPU based IRFC algorithm. Results: Experiments based on four data sets of small, medium, large, and super data size, achieved speedup factors of 32.8 Multiplication-Sign , 22.9 Multiplication-Sign , 20.9 Multiplication-Sign , and 17.5 Multiplication-Sign , correspondingly, on the NVIDIA Tesla C1060 platform. Although the output of P-ORFC need not precisely match that of IRFC output, it is very close to it and, as the authors prove, always lies between the RFC and IRFC objects. Conclusions: A parallel version of a top-of-the-line algorithm in the family of FC has been developed on the NVIDIA GPUs. An interactive speed of segmentation has been achieved, even for the largest medical image data set. Such GPU implementations may play a crucial role in automatic anatomy recognition in clinical radiology.

  3. 6 A QUANTUM LEAP 13 THE POWER OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaumont, Christopher

    applications in materials research are grounded in the basic sciences of physics, chemistry, engineeringSerc ­ nATUrAl ScienceS AnD enGineerinG reSeArch coUncil oF cAnADA makes strategic investments in Canada's researchers pursue projects with social and economic benefits in virtually any sector. The fund helps Nova

  4. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01

    and Retails Electricity Markets in SPP The Southwest Powerand Retails Electricity Markets in SPP.3 2.1 Wholesale Markets in the Southwest PowerRetail Demand Response in SPP Wholesale Markets in the Southwest Power

  5. The effect of resource provisioning and sugar composition of foods on longevity of three Gonatocerus spp., egg parasitoids of Homalodisca vitripennis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irvin, Nicola A; Hoddle, M S; Castle, S J

    2007-01-01

    ment. The honey–water treatment produced the longest averagespecies were produced on the honey–water treatment wherewater only treatment (Table 1). Coccus hesperidum honeydew produced

  6. Effects of Lactic Acid and Commercial Chilling Processes on Survival of Salmonella spp., Yersinia enterocolitica, and Campylobacter coli in Pork Variety Meats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Amanda Mardelle

    2011-10-21

    (water wash + lactic acid spray + freeze), 2 (freeze), 3 (water wash + lactic acid spray + chill + freeze), 4 (chill + freeze), and 5 (water wash + freeze). Samples were analyzed between treatment steps and after 2 months, 4 months, and 6 months of frozen...

  7. A reliable method for the selection and confirmation of transconjugants of plant growth-promoting bacteria especially plant-associated Burkholderia spp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    pUTgfp2x on LB. D. Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ca18 carryingtools for tagging Gram-negative bacteria with mCherry fora marker for detection of bacteria in environmental samples.

  8. Characterization of developmental changes during the establishment and progression of pregnancy in viviparous nearshore rockfish (Sebastes spp.) and the determination of patterns of post-natal growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaillé, Peter M.

    2006-01-01

    on both sides of the Pacific Rim (Wourms, 1991; Bowers,fishery on the Eastern Pacific Rim by both the commercialrockfish of the eastern Pacific rim and available data on

  9. Phase-Trafficking Methods in Natural Products, Modulators of Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides from Rollinia emarginata, and Pregnane and Cardiac Glycosides from Asclepias spp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araya Barrantes, Juan Jose

    2012-05-31

    findings, three plants were selected for detailed investigation: Asclepias verticillata, Asclepias syriaca, and Asclepias sullivantii. As a result, a total of 46 compounds were isolated and identified, half of which represented novel structures...

  10. Some Fungi and Water Molds in Waters of Lake Michigan with Emphasis on Those Associated with the Benthic Amphipod Diporeia spp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOTE Some Fungi and Water Molds in Waters of Lake Michigan with Emphasis on Those Associated) were used to grow fungi in Lake Michigan water, a rich and diverse fungal and water mold community occur within the division Oomycota (water molds). The *Corresponding author. E-mail: Thomas

  11. The Interaction of Propanil+Thiobencarb with Imazethapyr and Imazamox for Enhanced Red Rice (Oryza spp.) Control in Imidazolinone-Tolerant Rice (Oryza sativa L.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Trevor Nelson

    2014-04-28

    from each plant and analyzed using Liquid Scintillation Spectrometry to quantify radioactivity. Significantly more ^(14)C-imazamox was recovered from the cuticle when imazamox was applied alone, resulting in lower amounts of imazamox absorption...

  12. Determination of the trophic mode of Beggiatoa spp. found at hydrocarbon seeps on the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolaus, Roxanne Lee

    1995-01-01

    on the source of energy used and was not clearly determined in this study. PCR using primers from the large subunit of the RuBisCo gene from Zea showed possible amplification of the RuBisCo gene in pigmented and non-pigmented Beggiatoa DNA. However, the non...

  13. A comparison of diagnostic techniques for detecting salmonella spp in equine fecal samples using culture methods, gel-based pcr, and real-time pcr assays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Shelle Ann

    2007-09-17

    of presenting complaints .......................... 25 viii LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page 1 Sequence of PCR primers and probe .......................................................... 14 2 Salmonella... serogroups and serotypes detected by the real-time primer/probe sequence................................................................................ 17 3. Frequency and percent negative and positive for culture and PCR procedures...

  14. The effect of resource provisioning and sugar composition of foods on longevity of three Gonatocerus spp., egg parasitoids of Homalodisca vitripennis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irvin, Nicola A; Hoddle, M S; Castle, S J

    2007-01-01

    food sprays to increase eVectiveness of entomophagous insects.food resources such as Xoral nectars, extraXoral nectar, arthropod waste products, honey–water solutions, and a commercially available insect

  15. Characterization of developmental changes during the establishment and progression of pregnancy in viviparous nearshore rockfish (Sebastes spp.) and the determination of patterns of post-natal growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaillé, Peter M.

    2006-01-01

    system (Pixera Corp. , Los Gatos, CA). 2.2.3 Cross-sectionalsystem (Pixera Corp. , Los Gatos, CA, USA) attached to asystem (Pixera Corp. , Los Gatos, CA) attached was used to

  16. Volatile organic compounds from vegetation in southern Yunnan Province, China: Emission rates and some potential regional implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    in the genera Bambusa, Elaeis, Eucalyptus, Hevea, Pinus, ande.g. Bambusa spp. and Eucalyptus spp. ) are also projectedpotential such as Hevea, Eucalyptus, Arecaceae (Palmae),

  17. Methodological Issues In Forestry Mitigation Projects: A Case Study Of Kolar District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    activities (such as eucalyptus plantation, fruit orchards offruit orchard and low for Eucalyptus and Tectona grandis +Species opted by the community Eucalyptus spp. , Acacia spp.

  18. Method and applications of time-resolved space-heterodyne imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rokitski, Rostislav

    2006-01-01

    of SPP pulse provides additional electromagnetic ?eldof SPP pulse provides additional electromagnetic ?eldpulses leads to com- plete 3D and temporal localization of electromagnetic ?

  19. NIST cooperative laboratory for OSI routing technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, D.

    1994-05-23

    This document is one of two reports on the Integrated ISIS protocol. Required by the IAB/IESG in order for an Internet routing protocol to advance to Draft Standard Status. Integrated ISIS is an Interior Gateway Protocol and is designed to carry both IP and ISO CLNP routing information. Integrated ISIS is currently designated as a Proposed Standard. The protocol was first published in RFC 1195. Internet Draft was published subsequently to RFC 1195 and documents the current version of the protocol. This report documents experience with Integrated ISIS. This includes reports on interoperability testing, field experience and the current state of Integrated ISIS implementations. It also presents a summary of the Integrated ISIS Management Information Base (MIB), and a summary of the Integrated ISIS authentication mechanism.

  20. Regenerative fuel cells for High Altitude Long Endurance Solar Powered Aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitlitsky, F.; Colella, N.J.; Myers, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Anderson, C.J. [Aero Vironment, Inc., Monrovia, CA (United States)

    1993-06-02

    High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) unmanned missions appear to be feasible using a lightweight, high efficiency, span-loaded, Solar Powered Aircraft (SPA) which includes a Regenerative Fuel Cell (RFC) system and novel tankage for energy storage. An existing flightworthy electric powered flying wing design was modified to incorporate present and near-term technologies in energy storage, power electronics, aerodynamics, and guidance and control in order to design philosophy was to work with vendors to identify affordable near-term technological opportunities that could be applied to existing designs in order to reduce weight, increase reliability, and maintain adequate efficiency of components for delivery within 18 months. The energy storage subsystem for a HALE SPA is a key driver for the entire vehicle because it can represent up to half of the vehicle weight and most missions of interest require the specific energy to be considerably higher than 200 W-hr/kg for many cycles. This stringent specific energy requirement precludes the use of rechargeable batteries or flywheels and suggests examination of various RFC designs. An RFC system using lightweight tankage, a single fuel cell (FC) stack, and a single electrolyzer (EC) stack separated by the length of a spar segment (up to 39 ft), has specific energy of {approximately}300 W-hr/kg with 45% efficiency, which is adequate for HALE SPA requirements. However, this design has complexity and weight penalties associated with thermal management, electrical wiring, plumbing, and structural weight. A more elegant solution is to use unitized RFC stacks (reversible stacks that act as both FCs and ECs) because these systems have superior specific energy, scale to smaller systems more favorably, and have intrinsically simpler thermal management.

  1. Paradigms and Syntagms of Ethnobotanical Practice in Pre-Hispanic Northwestern Honduras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morell-Hart, Shanti

    2011-01-01

    four locations. Chia (Salvia spp. ) seeds were recoveredare not unknowns. Chia (Salvia sp. ) seeds were recovered

  2. Recommended Flowering Plants and Groundcovers for Wildlife A Garden for Wildlife: Natural Landscaping for a Better Backyard a Speaking for Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    ) Allium spp. Atlantic Camas Camassia scilloides Barren Strawberry Scilla Siberica Spring Beauty Claytonia virginica Strawberry

  3. CHRYSOPORTHE CANKER Causal agent: Chrysoporthe austroafricana, Chr. cubensis and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deuterocubensis (previously Cryphonectria cubensis). Species range: Eucalyptus spp., Tibouchina spp., Syzygium spp on Eucalyptus species is mainly a problem in the Zululand area. It has also been found on Eucalyptus spp Eucalyptus seedlings and stem cankers on older trees. Stem cankers may result in wind breakage and reduced

  4. Establishment phase greenhouse gas emissions in short rotation woody biomass plantations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    February 2014 Keywords: SRWC Populus Salix Greenhouse gas balance Bioenergy Land use change a b s t r a c plantations with willow (Salix spp.), hybrid-poplar (Populus spp.), and control plots in spring 2010 at two-rotation woody bio- energy crops (SRWC), specifically hybrid-poplar (Populus spp.) and willow (Salix spp.), being

  5. RESTORING AND MAINTAINING RIPARIAN HABITAT ON PRIVATE PASTURELAND1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Salix spp.) Younger stands have less species diversity. Willows are typical pioneers in disturbed ar

  6. Acer glabrum mountain maple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Salix spp. willow · Buds with single cap-like scale, lateral · Catkins erect · Usually riparian #12

  7. Conversion of open lands to short-rotation woody biomass crops: site variability affects nitrogen cycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    incomplete. In this study, we investigated the effects of converting pasture and hayfields to willow (Salix: bioenergy, GHG, land use conversion, leaching, nitrogen, plantation establishment, Populus spp., Salix spp spp.) and willow (Salix spp.) have emerged as possible sources of biomass energy in the Northern Lake

  8. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    skipjack tuna, Katsuwonnus pelamis, in an offshore area oflittle tuna), Katsuwonus pelamis (skipj ack), spp. ,

  9. Control of rabbits to protect island birds from cat predation Franck Courchamp a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courchamp, Franck

    notorious and harmful introduced predators are domestic cats Felis catus, rats Rattus spp. and mon- gooses

  10. Property:EIA/861/NercWecc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of typeNercSerc Jump

  11. Property:Email | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of typeNercSerc JumpEmail

  12. Property:EnergyPurchaser | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of typeNercSerc

  13. SES CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOA Applicantof YearsRevolving3164 |SERC Grant Webinar SERCSENIOR

  14. SES CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOA Applicantof YearsRevolving3164 |SERC Grant Webinar SERCSENIOR34

  15. SES CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOA Applicantof YearsRevolving3164 |SERC Grant Webinar SERCSENIOR345

  16. SITE SPECIFIC ADVISORY BOARD CHAIRS MEETING

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOA Applicantof YearsRevolving3164 |SERC GrantDepartment

  17. MAGDAS Project for Space Weather Research and Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yumoto, Kiyohumi [Space Environment Research Center, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, 812-8581 (Japan)

    2009-06-16

    The Space Environment Research Center (SERC), Kyushu University, is currently deploying a new ground-based magnetometer network of MAGnetic Data Acqusition System (MAGDAS), in cooperation with about 30 organizations in the world, in order to understand the complex Sun-Earth system for space weather research and application. SERC will conducts MAGDAS observation at 50 stations in the Circum-pan Pacific Magnetometer Network (CPMN) region, and FM-CW radar observation along the 210 deg. magnetic meridian (MM) during the IHY/ILWS/CAWSES periods. This project is actively providing the following space weather monitoring:(1) Global 3-dimensional current system to know electromagnetic coupling of the region 1 and 2 field-aligned currents, auroral electrojet current, Sq current, and equatorial electrojet current. (2) Plasma mass density along the 210 deg. MM to understand plasma environment change during space storms. (3) Ionospheric electric field intensity with 10-sec sampling at L = 1.26 to understand how the external electric field penetrates into the equatorial ionosphere.

  18. Hymenaea courbaril Marine construction, heavy construction,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FSC Jatoba Hymenaea courbaril Marine construction, heavy construction, light construction, interior construction, furniture FSC Pine Pinus spp. Marine construction, heavy construction, light construction, interior construction, panel products, furniture FSC Larch Larix spp. (European Larch, Larix decidua

  19. Manipulation of Host Signaling by Vector-Borne and Non-Vector-Borne Pathogens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakhon, Olivia S.

    2013-01-01

    Aedes spp. , Mansonia spp. Nod-like receptor NLRP3 Nod1 Nod22009) Short Report?: Disruption of Nod-like Receptors Altersal. (2008) Caspase-12 modulates NOD signaling and regulates

  20. Spectral dependence of the magnetic modulation of surface plasmon polaritons in noble/ferromagnetic/noble metal films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temnov, Vasily V.

    The magnetic field is an interesting candidate for the development of active plasmonic devices as it is able to modify the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) wave vector. Both real and imaginary parts of the SPP wave vector ...

  1. Common benthic algae and cyanobacteria in southern California tidal wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janousek, Christopher N

    2011-01-01

    2001b. Form-genus VIII. Gloeocapsa. In: Bergey’s Manual ® of1969. Nitrogen fixation by Gloeocapsa. Science 165:908-909.Chroococcus sp(p). Gloeocapsa sp(p). Synechocystis *

  2. Research Article Effects of spawning salmon on dissolved nutrients and epilithon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamberti, Gary A.

    and freshwater ecosystems. Through- out the northern Pacific Rim, millions of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp migrations of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) represent a significant nutrient pulse to freshwater. Pacific salmon; salmon-derived nutrients; estuaries; streams; water chemistry; epilithon. Introduction

  3. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 38 (2006) 794807 www.elsevier.com/locate/ympev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Wc on Alnus, although a few are mycobionts of Salix or other hosts. The diVerent species of Alnicola exhibit spp.), while a small number of species are mycobionts of willows (Salix spp.) or other hosts. The host

  4. The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 120(4):830839, 2008 RESPONSE OF SONGBIRDS TO RIPARIAN WILLOW HABITAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    ABSTRACT.--We compared the structure of riparian willow (Salix spp.) habitat and songbird diversity across- itat changes in other environments. Montane riparian willows (Salix spp.) support the great- est

  5. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theimer, Tad

    Available online 22 May 2008 Keywords: Arizona Arthropod diversity Exotic Malaise traps Native Salix a b dominated by native cottonwoods (Populus spp.) and willows (Salix spp.) have transitioned to habitats

  6. Ecology, 90(9), 2009, pp. 24542466 2009 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creel, Scott

    Abstract. Recent increases in the height and growth ring width of willow (Salix spp.) and other woody; elk; nonconsumptive effect; predation; risk effect; Salix spp.; trophic cascade; willow; wolf

  7. 2000 The Society for the Study of Evolution. All rights reserved. Evolution, 54(2), 2000, pp. 526533

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyman, Tommi

    species of nematine sawflies that induce galls on willows (Salix spp.). Most of the species are mono sawflies that induce galls on willows (Salix spp.) also offer a good model system for the study of evo

  8. BEAVER DISTRIBUTION 233 CM. Fish ,md Cime 75(4): 233-238 1 989

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beier, Paul

    . tremuloides, willow, Salix spp, and alder, Ainus incana, were the most heavily used woody forage species tremuloides, cottonwood, P. trichocarpa, willow, Salix spp., mountain alder, AInus incana, gray dogwood

  9. July 2003 / Vol. 53 No. 7 BioScience 647 Throughout the world, rivers support particularly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rood, Stewart

    and shrubs, especially cottonwoods (Popu- lus spp.) and willows (Salix spp.) along rivers throughout landscape shaped by and dependent on the flowing river. However, rivers also provide water and energy

  10. Natural mortality of bollworm in northern Texas Blacklands cotton 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griset, Janet Virginia

    1998-01-01

    seasons. Life tables were construed for bookworm. An important egg predator, Orius spp., was assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine the proportion of the Orius spp. population that had consumed bookworm eggs. The life tables...

  11. Marine Conservation Resource overexploitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine Conservation · Overview · Resource overexploitation % Impacts on target spp % Impacts on non'target spp, % Impacts on community/ecosystem % Marine protected areas Friday: · Global climate change · Invasive species · Solutions · Study Guide: Monday !" April · Discussion: Wednesday# !$ April % Marine

  12. Successes, Failures and Suggested Future Directions for Ecosystem Restoration of the Middle Sacramento River, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    woody stems such as willows (Salix spp. ), blue elderberry (Goodding’s black willow (Salix gooddingii)]. • Percent of

  13. Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Ecohydrologists at UAF and ORNL set up new water isotope collaboration. Genomic resources for Salix spp. lay

  14. California black rails depend on irrigation-fed wetlands in the Sierra Nevada foothills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Orien M. W.; Chen, Stephanie K.; Risk, Benjamin B.; Tecklin, Jerry; Beissinger, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    Juncaceae) and willows (Salix spp. ). At each point we alsoOther sedges Rushes Salix Habitat loss and degradation are

  15. Encroachment of upland Mediterranean plant species in riparian ecosystems of southern Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Maria J.

    2010-01-01

    angustifolia), grey willow (Salix atrocinerea), AfricanSalicaceae Citrus sinensis Populus alba Populus nigra Salixalba Salix babilonica (*) Salix spp. Tamaricaceae

  16. Tensile and thickness swelling properties of strands from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    were investigated in this study. Strands from four Louisiana-grown species--willow (Salix spp.), yellow

  17. Historical Logbook Databases from California's Commercial Passenger Fishing Vessel (Partyboat) Fishery, 1936-1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Kevin T.; Schneider, Niklas

    1999-01-01

    Tuna, longtail Katsuwonus pelamis Tuna, skipjack Euthynnusthresher Katsuwonus pelamis Tuna, skipjack Leptocottusmarmoratus Katsuwonus pelamis Citharichthys spp. Sebastes

  18. G SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE Forest andRU. S.DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1 Eucalyptus spp. (794):232.11:422.1. Retrieval Terms: Eucalyptus species; exotic species; species trials

  19. Ecological Applications, 21(6), 2011, pp. 22832296 2011 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Songbird response to increased willow (Salix spp.) growth in Yellowstone's northern range LISA M. BARIL,1, Montana 59717 USA Abstract. After nearly a century of height suppression, willows (Salix spp Mountains, USA; riparian; Salix spp.; songbirds; vegetation structure; willow communities; willow

  20. c0013 Hormones and Reproductive Cycles in Primates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Wendy

    ); and the Haplorhini, comprising the tarsiers, Platyrrhini (New World monkeys), Cercopithecoi- dea (Old World monkeys spp.) and baboons (Papio spp.), and the New World squirrel monkeys (Saimiri spp.) and marmosets0020 The AQ1 order Primates includes roughly 230 extant species in two suborders: the Strepsirhini

  1. RKG Photovoltaik GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/NevadaaTools <REpower Systems AG JumpRFC SandRKG

  2. RLR Consultants LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/NevadaaTools <REpower Systems AG JumpRFC

  3. Property:EIA/861/OperatesGeneratingPlant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation, search PropertyIsoOther Jump to: navigation,NercRfc

  4. Property:EIA/861/Ownership | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation, search PropertyIsoOther Jump to: navigation,NercRfcOwnership

  5. Human Capacity Building in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy System Maintenance for the Yurok Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, R. A.' Zoellick, J J.

    2007-07-31

    From July 2005 to July 2007, the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in the implementation of a program designed to build the Tribe’s own capacity to improve energy efficiency and maintain and repair renewable energy systems in Tribal homes on the Yurok Reservation. Funding for this effort was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Tribal Program under First Steps grant award #DE-FG36-05GO15166. The program’s centerpiece was a house-by-house needs assessment, in which Tribal staff visited and conducted energy audits at over fifty homes. The visits included assessment of household energy efficiency and condition of existing renewable energy systems. Staff also provided energy education to residents, evaluated potential sites for new household renewable energy systems, and performed minor repairs as needed on renewable energy systems.

  6. Quantization of surface plasmon polariton on the metal slab by Green's tensor method in amplifying and attenuating media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Allameh; R. Roknizadeh; R. Masoudi

    2015-07-15

    A quantized form of Surface Plasmon Polariton (SPP) modes propagating on the metal thin film is provided, which is based on the Green's tensor method. Since the media will be considered lossy and dispersive, the amplification and attenuation of the SPP modes in various dielectric media, by applying different field frequencies, can be studied. We will also illustrate the difference between behavior of coherent and squeezed SPP modes in the amplifying media.

  7. Ecological Applications, 18(3), 2008, pp. 681700 2008 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . To determine the consequences of avian predation, we used a bioenergetics approach to estimate the consumption; bioenergetics modeling; Columbia River; dams; larids; mergansers; northern pikeminnow; Oncorhynchus spp

  8. Stationary shapes of deformable particles moving at low Reynolds numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horst-Holger Boltz; Jan Kierfeld

    2015-10-05

    Lecture Notes of the Summer School ``Microswimmers -- From Single Particle Motion to Collective Behaviour'', organised by the DFG Priority Programme SPP 1726 (Forschungszentrum J{\\"{u}}lich, 2015).

  9. Upper Great Plains Rates information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 2014 (112 KB .pdf) FRN Notice of Proposed Transmission and Ancillary Services Formula Rates November 3, 2014 (93 KB .pdf) SPP Membership Information Integrated System (IS)...

  10. Selective Association Between the Free-Living Nematode Acrobeloides maximus and Soil Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sedky, Sammy Farid

    2013-01-01

    from intracellular bacteria to multicellular eukaryotes.gene transfer between bacteria and animals. Trends inof the symbiotic-pathogenic bacteria Xenorhabdus spp. and

  11. Identification of a novel nuclear localization signal and speckle-targeting sequence of tuftelin-interacting protein 11, a splicing factor involved in spliceosome disassembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tannukit, S; Crabb, TL; Hertel, KJ; Wen, X; Jans, DA; Paine, ML

    2009-01-01

    G, Barrass JD, Droop AP, Dez C, Beggs JD. Yeast ntr1/ spp382EJ, Maeda A, Wei J, Smith P, Beggs JD, Lin RJ. Interaction

  12. The Cultivar, Spring/Summer 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    spp. (Hemiptera: Miridae) in strawberries on the Centralmanagement BMPs in strawberry and vegetable production.conventional and organic strawberry systems. –Martha Brown

  13. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2009-01-01

    focused primarily on market design and structure, albeit9 In terms of wholesale market design, SPP administers anmarket. market in 2007, the design of the Emergency and ALM

  14. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 34:11591166, 2014 C American Fisheries Society 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwak, Thomas J.

    ., Luxilus spp.) at 8.2% (SE, 2.2%) and suckers (Catostomidae) at 6.6% (SE, 3.2%). Macrohabitat type, fish

  15. Impacts of seasonal and regional variability in biogenic VOC emissions on surface ozone in the Pearl River delta region, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    chained carbonyl compounds from Eucalyptus spp. in southernby changing all forest to eucalyptus, except for protectedlocal natural parks. The eucalyptus BVOC emission fac- tors

  16. Examining California Chaparral and Coastal Sage Scrub Responses to Environmental Change: A Hydraulics Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pivovaroff, Alexandria Lynn

    2015-01-01

    in nitrogen-fertilized Eucalyptus grandis trees. Treesylvatica Prunus cerasifera Eucalyptus sp. Maximum vesselPrunus cerasifera, and Eucalyptus spp. Maximum vessel length

  17. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01

    23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

  18. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool More Documents &...

  19. CHARACTERISTICS OF LEAST BELL'S VIREO NEST SITES ALONG THE SANTA YNEZ RIVER1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Most next (59.4%) were located in willows (Salix spp.) or mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana) at heights (Populus fremontii), arroyo willow (Salix lasio

  20. University of Joensuu, PhD Dissertations in Biology Phylogeny and ecological evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyman, Tommi

    -plant interactions, Nematinae, phylogeny, Salix, sawfly, speciation The nematine sawflies (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae) that induce galls on willows (Salix spp.) form one of the most abundant and speciose herbivore

  1. Salix exigua clonal growth and population dynamics in relation to disturbance regime variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douhovnikoff, V; McBride, J R; Dodd, R S

    2005-01-01

    of clones: application to Salix exigua . Theoretical andcolonization and coexistence of Salix spp. in a seasonally ?of arroyo willow ( Salix lasiolepis : Salicaceae). American

  2. A sensitivity analysis of the treatment of wind energy in the AEO99 version of NEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborn, Julie G.; Wood, Frances; Richey, Cooper; Sanders, Sandy; Short, Walter; Koomey, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    refers to the distance to tranmission lines. Existing 115 kVSTV SPP NWP RA CNV This tranmission extension cost is added

  3. Cubing the Kyoto Protocol: Post-Copenhagen Regulatory Reforms to Reset the Global Thermostat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrey, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Country Analysis Briefs: India, ENERGY INFO. ADMIN. (Aug.Blog/Blogging-Clean-Energy/india-rejects-mandatory-ghg-cuts/India and Thailand are from SPP independent renewable energy

  4. Cubing the Kyoto Protocol: Post-Copenhagen Regulatory Reforms to Reset the Global Thermostat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrey, Steven

    2010-01-01

    India and Thailand are from SPP independent renewable energyRenewable Energy Controlled period Sri Lanka No Hydro Open offer India:

  5. Interwoven Threads: Some Thoughts on Professor MacKinnon's Esaay Of Mice and Men

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Lee

    2005-01-01

    Domestic Cat (Felis catus), at http:// www.columbia.edu/itc/invasion.bio/inv spp-summ/Felis catus. html (last visited

  6. Graphene-Based Surface Plasmon-Polaritons for Terahertz Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Xuefeng

    2013-01-01

    efficient excitation of graphene-metal SPP mode using narrowwith the advancement of graphene fabrication technology, ourOF CALIFORNIA Los Angeles Graphene-Based Surface Plasmon-

  7. Market Technical Analysis for the iMarket Meter Data Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, Patrick

    2005-12-16

    been granted RTO status by FERC. SPP is currently implementing a wholesale electric market for its member utilities and other non-member utilities that plan to sell energy into the SPP market. There are currently ten other established and proposed...

  8. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    which are similar in description and life cycle. While small numbers of these organisms on a fish gen and ultimately, death of fish. Small fish and fry are espe- cially susceptible, and mortality can occur quickly if undiagnosed. How does Trichodina spp. affect the fish? Trichodina spp. cause irritation by feeding on the epi

  9. Pathogenicity of Cryphonectria eucalypti to Eucalyptus clones in South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pathogenicity of Cryphonectria eucalypti to Eucalyptus clones in South Africa Marieka Gryzenhouta in revised form 8 April 2002; accepted 16 May 2002 Abstract Eucalyptus spp. are planted in many parts of the forestry industry. The canker pathogen, Cryphonectria eucalypti, is pathogenic to Eucalyptus spp

  10. The Eucalyptus canker pathogen Holocryphia eucalypti on Eucalyptus in New Zealand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Eucalyptus canker pathogen Holocryphia eucalypti on Eucalyptus in New Zealand M. Gryzenhout canker pathogen of Eucalyptus and Corymbia spp. (Myrtaceae, Myrtales) in Australia and South Africa on Eucalyptus spp. Holocryphia eucalypti (=Cryphonectria eucalypti) causes die-back, and stem and branch cankers

  11. Mycosphaerella species associated with leaf disease of Eucalyptus globulus in Ethiopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mycosphaerella species associated with leaf disease of Eucalyptus globulus in Ethiopia By Alemu), University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa. E-mail: jolanda.roux@fabi.up.ac.za Summary Eucalyptus are known from Eucalyptus spp. worldwide. Of these, Mycosphaerella spp. are among the most important

  12. Occurrence and pathogenicity of Neofusicoccum parvum and N. mangiferae on ornamental Tibouchina species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    plants, including Eucalyptus spp. The recent discovery of the Eucalyptus pathogen, Chrysoporthe be alternative hosts for other Eucalyptus pathogens. Therefore, the aim of this study was to consider whether species of the Botryosphaeriaceae occurring on Eucalyptus spp. might also occur on ornamental Tibouchina

  13. Expansion of Canopy-Forming Willows Over the Twentieth Century on Herschel Island, Yukon Territory, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krebs, Charles J.

    of each of the dominant canopy-forming willow species (Salix richardsonii, Salix glauca and Salix pulchra, disease, or growing conditions. Keywords Arctic Á Tundra Á Climate change Á Willows (Salix spp.) Á Shrub and Zhang 2009). Willows (Salix spp.) are well adapted to invading ecosystems when conditions change. Pollen

  14. Effects of Cellulase and Xylanase Enzymes on the Deconstruction of Solids from Pretreatment of Poplar by Leading Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    ; and (6) woody energy crops such as willow (Salix spp.), eucalyptus (Eucalyptus spp.), as- pen, and hybrid additive (http://www1. eere.energy.gov/biomass). Currently, starch ethanol substi- tutes for over 5; (5) herba- ceous energy crops including miscanthus, alfalfa, switch- grass, and red canary grass

  15. Development of a Chemically Defined Medium to Assay the Metabolism of Lactic Acid Bacteria 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Inhye

    2014-04-16

    with health and might reduce the risk of colon cancer decreasing apoptosis in the colon (MacDonald and Wagner, 2012). Many Lactobacillus spp. are found in the intestinal tract and Lactobacillus spp. are also well-studied probiotics (Axelsson and Ahrné, 2000...

  16. Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Thomas, J.; Papanikolas, John, P.

    2011-11-11

    SOLAR ENERGY RESEARCH CENTER INSTRUMENTATION FACILITY The mission of the Solar Energy Research Center (UNC SERC) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) is to establish a world leading effort in solar fuels research and to develop the materials and methods needed to fabricate the next generation of solar energy devices. We are addressing the fundamental issues that will drive new strategies for solar energy conversion and the engineering challenges that must be met in order to convert discoveries made in the laboratory into commercially available devices. The development of a photoelectrosynthesis cell (PEC) for solar fuels production faces daunting requirements: (1) Absorb a large fraction of sunlight; (2) Carry out artificial photosynthesis which involves multiple complex reaction steps; (3) Avoid competitive and deleterious side and reverse reactions; (4) Perform 13 million catalytic cycles per year with minimal degradation; (5) Use non-toxic materials; (6) Cost-effectiveness. PEC efficiency is directly determined by the kinetics of each reaction step. The UNC SERC is addressing this challenge by taking a broad interdisciplinary approach in a highly collaborative setting, drawing on expertise across a broad range of disciplines in chemistry, physics and materials science. By taking a systematic approach toward a fundamental understanding of the mechanism of each step, we will be able to gain unique insight and optimize PEC design. Access to cutting-edge spectroscopic tools is critical to this research effort. We have built professionally-staffed facilities equipped with the state-of the-art instrumentation funded by this award. The combination of staff, facilities, and instrumentation specifically tailored for solar fuels research establishes the UNC Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility as a unique, world-class capability. This congressionally directed project funded the development of two user facilities: TASK 1: SOLAR DEVICE FABRICATION LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT The space allocated for this laboratory was �¢����shell space�¢��� that required an upfit in order to accommodate nano-fabrication equipment in a quasi-clean room environment. This construction project (cost $279,736) met the non-federal cost share requirement of $250,000 for this award. The central element of the fabrication laboratory is a new $400,000+ stand-alone system, funded by other sources, for fabricating and characterizing photovoltaic devices, in a state-of-the-art nanofabrication environment. This congressionally directed project also included the purchase of an energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) detector for a pre-existing transmission electron microscope (TEM). This detector allows elemental analysis and elemental mapping of materials used to fabricate solar energy devices which is a key priority for our research center. TASK 2: SOLAR ENERGY SPECTROSCOPY LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT (INSTRUMENTATION) This laboratory provides access to modern spectroscopy and photolysis instrumentation for characterizing devices, materials and components on time scales ranging from femtoseconds to seconds and for elucidating mechanisms. The goals of this congressionally directed project included the purchase and installation of spectroscopy and photolysis instrumentation that would substantially and meaningfully enhance the capabilities of this laboratory. Some changes were made to the list of equipment proposed in the original budget. These changes did not represent a change in scope, approach or aims of this project. All of the capabilities and experiments represented in the original budget were maintained. The outcome of this Congressionally Directed Project has been the development of world-class fabrication and spectroscopy user facilities for solar fuels research at UNC-CH. This award has provided a significant augmentation of our pre-existing instrumentation capabilities which were funded by earlier UNC SERC projects, including the Energy Frontier

  17. Tribal Utility Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

    2007-06-30

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be developed and sold to the wholesale electricity market. • Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems – These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

  18. Hydrogen Technology and Energy Curriculum (HyTEC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagle, Barbara

    2013-02-28

    The Lawrence Hall of Science of the University of California, Berkeley has collaborated with scientists and engineers, a local transit agency, school districts, and a commercial curriculum publisher to develop, field-test nationally, and publish a two-week curriculum module on hydrogen and fuel cells for high school science. Key partners in this project are the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) of Humboldt State University, the Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit), FilmSight Productions, Lab-Aids, Inc., and 32 teachers and 2,370 students in field-test classrooms in California, Connecticut, Ohio, New York, South Carolina, and Washington. Field-test teachers received two to three days of professional development before teaching the curriculum and providing feedback used for revision of the curriculum. The curriculum, titled Investigating Alternative Energy: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells and published by Lab-Aids, Inc., includes a teachers guide (with lesson plans, resources, and student handout pages), two interactive computer animations, a video, a website, and a laboratory materials kit. The project has been disseminated to over 950 teachers through awareness workshops at state, regional, and national science teacher conferences.

  19. Contingency Analysis of Cascading Line Outage Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas L Baldwin; Magdy S Tawfik; Miles McQueen

    2011-03-01

    As the US power systems continue to increase in size and complexity, including the growth of smart grids, larger blackouts due to cascading outages become more likely. Grid congestion is often associated with a cascading collapse leading to a major blackout. Such a collapse is characterized by a self-sustaining sequence of line outages followed by a topology breakup of the network. This paper addresses the implementation and testing of a process for N-k contingency analysis and sequential cascading outage simulation in order to identify potential cascading modes. A modeling approach described in this paper offers a unique capability to identify initiating events that may lead to cascading outages. It predicts the development of cascading events by identifying and visualizing potential cascading tiers. The proposed approach was implemented using a 328-bus simplified SERC power system network. The results of the study indicate that initiating events and possible cascading chains may be identified, ranked and visualized. This approach may be used to improve the reliability of a transmission grid and reduce its vulnerability to cascading outages.

  20. Evaluation of Two CEDA Weatherization Pilot Implementations of an Exterior Insulation and Over-Clad Retrofit Strategy for Residential Masonry Buildings in Chicago

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, K.

    2013-08-01

    This project examines the implementation of an exterior insulation and over-clad strategy for brick masonry buildings in Chicago. The strategy was implemented at a free-standing two story two-family dwelling and a larger free-standing multifamily building. The test homes selected for this research represent predominant housing types for the Chicago area. High heating energy use typical in these buildings threaten housing affordability. Uninsulated mass masonry wall assemblies also have a strongly detrimental impact on comfort. Significant changes to the performance of masonry wall assemblies is generally beyond the reach of typical weatherization (Wx) program resources. The Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County, Inc. (CEDA) has secured a Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) innovation grant sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). This grant provides CEDA the opportunity to pursue a pilot implementation of innovative approaches to retrofit in masonry wall enclosures. The exterior insulation and over-clad strategy implemented through this project was designed to allow implementation by contractors active in CEDA weatherization programs and using materials and methods familiar to these contractors. The retrofit measures are evaluated in terms of feasibility, cost and performance. Through observations of the strategies implemented, the research described in this report identifies measures critical to performance as well as conditions for wider adoption. The research also identifies common factors that must be considered in determining whether the exterior insulation and over-clad strategy is appropriate for the building.

  1. Evaluation of Two CEDA Weatherization Pilot Implementations of an Exterior Insulation and Over-Clad Retrofit Strategy for Residential Masonry Buildings in Chicago

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, Ken

    2013-08-01

    This project examines the implementation of an exterior insulation and over-clad strategy for brick masonry buildings in Chicago—a free-standing two story two-family dwelling and a larger free-standing multifamily building. The test homes selected for this research represent predominant housing types for the Chicago area, in which high heating energy use typical in these buildings threaten housing affordability, and uninsulated mass masonry wall assemblies are uncomfortable for residents. In this project, the Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County, Inc. (CEDA) has secured a Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) innovation grant sponsored by DOE to pursue a pilot implementation of innovative approaches to retrofit in masonry wall enclosures. The retrofit measures are evaluated in terms of feasibility, cost and performance. Through observations of the strategies implemented, the research described in this report identifies measures critical to performance as well as conditions for wider adoption. The research also identifies common factors that must be considered in determining whether the exterior insulation and over-clad strategy is appropriate for the building.

  2. LIST OF PUBLICATIONS G. W. Minshall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :55-58. (R. L. Newell and G. W. Minshall). 21. 1979 Bioenergetics of a stream "collector" organism. 1979 Bioenergetics of lotic filter-feeding insects Simulium spp. (Diptera) and Hydropsyche occidentalis

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Alteromonas Macleodii Strain MIT1002, Isolated from an Enrichment Culture of the Marine Cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coe, Allison

    Alteromonas spp. are heterotrophic gammaproteobacteria commonly found in marine environments. We present here the draft genome sequence of Alteromonas macleodii MIT1002, which was isolated from an enrichment culture of the ...

  4. Business Plan for a New Engineering Consulting Firm in the Electrical Utility Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gois, Roberto Cavalcanti

    2009-05-15

    has been experiencing steady growth for more than ten years. Along with energy market regulatory agencies such as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and Southwest Power Pool (SPP), electrical utilities must ensure that the electricity...

  5. they move toward shore and into the estuary. Two primary factors that seem to affect growth are water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is dammed extensively for hydroelectric generation and irriga- tion, was extremely low during the spring at the hydroelectric projects. Consequently, many migrating juvenile Pacific salmon, Oncorhynchus spp., and steelhead

  6. The rapid differentiation of Streptomyces isolates using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, Gareth

    putative Streptomyces spp. isolated from soil were selected to be analysed using Fourier transform infrared-organism fingerprint- ing techniques such as Curie-point pyrolysis mass spectrometry [2], Fourier transform infrared

  7. Evidence for a Structural Role for Acid-Fast Lipids in Oocyst Walls of Cryptosporidium, Toxoplasma, and Eimeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushkin, G. Guy

    Coccidia are protozoan parasites that cause significant human disease and are of major agricultural importance. Cryptosporidium spp. cause diarrhea in humans and animals, while Toxoplasma causes disseminated infections in ...

  8. Distribution and composition of ą?C-labeled photosynthate within seedlings of mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa var. glandulosa torr. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hursey, Robert Allan

    1967-01-01

    , Rnennaceae, and ~Kssaceae. Kursanov et al. (IS)d published findings of oligo- saccharides in the translocation stream of double-grafted plants of Jeruselum-artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L. ) and sunflower (Helianthus spp. ). In several varieties...

  9. INTRODUCTION Several families within the class Cephalopoda (Mol-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    (bacteriogenic), with light produced by bacteria housed in a specialized light organ complex with- in the mantle. and Taningia spp. However, accord- ing to Herring (1977), these anal light organs never house luminous bacteria as ecological niche

  10. Wildlife Communities Autumn 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    or potentially interacting species living in the same area Ecological Communities e.g., pond community #12, predators) Trophic Interactions Primary producer Willow (Salix spp.) Herbivore White-tailed deer (O

  11. Assessing the Impact of Groundwater Pollution from Marine Caves on Nearshore Seagrass Beds in Bermuda 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cate, Jenipher R.

    2010-01-14

    ) and fecal bacteria (Enterococcus spp. and Escherichia coli) were measured in each cave. To qualify a link between terrestrial pollution and the nearshore environment, seagrass density within 100 m from cave entrances were measured. Bermuda caves were tidally...

  12. The biology and ecology of Ochrimnus mimulus (Stal, 1874): an assessment of its coevolution with Baccharis in Brazos County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gould, Georgianna Grimshaw

    1994-01-01

    The biology, ecology and behavior of Ochrimnus mimulus are described as they relate to its host plant, Baccharis spp. The ecological association between 0. mimulus and Baccharis was examined to determine temporal life cycle correspondence and insect...

  13. Herd-level Risk Factors Associated with Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns and Distributions in Fecal Bacteria of Porcine Origin. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollo, Susan Noble

    2012-10-19

    The purpose of this dissertation is threefold: to determine the differences in apparent prevalence and the antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter spp. between antimicrobial-free and conventional swine farms; secondly, to introduce...

  14. The use of agave, sotol, and yucca at Hinds Cave, Val Verde County, Texas: reconstructing methods of processing through the formation of behavioral chains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woltz, Ben vanDalsem

    1998-01-01

    , Pecos and Devils Rivers. This study seeks to analyze the plant macro-remains from Hinds Cave, specifically lechuguilla (Agave lechuguilla), sotol (Dasylirion texanum) and yucca (Yucca spp.), in an effort to gain insight into the diet, methods...

  15. MFR PAPER 1326 Use of Carbon Dioxide Dissolved in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrimp (Panda/us spp.) HAROLD J. BARNETT, RICHARD W. NELSON, PATRICK J HUNTER, and HERMAN GRONINGER the RSW method (Barnett et al., 197 I), we found Figure I. -A typical north Pacific shrimp boat

  16. Bacteria recovered from endometritis and pyometra in the beef cow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikulec, Rashel Thi

    1999-01-01

    One hundred and one uteri from beef cows with pyometra were collected from a slaughterhouse. Samples of uterine exudate were cultured for aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic bacteria, and also tested for Trichomonas spp. A section of uterine...

  17. Intertidal ecology of riprap jetties and breakwaters : marine communities inhabiting anthropogenic structures along the west coast of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pister, Benjamin Alan

    2007-01-01

    spp. Unid green crust (microalgae) Unid Red Watersipora sp.Crust Unid Green Crust (Microalgae) Unid Orange Crust UnidCrust Unid Green Crust (Microalgae) Yellow Mite H1-1 H1-2

  18. Intertidal Ecology of Riprap Jetties and Breakwaters: Marine Communities Inhabiting Anthropogenic Structures along the West Coast of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pister, Benjamin A.

    2007-01-01

    spp. Unid green crust (microalgae) Unid Red Watersipora sp.Crust Unid Green Crust (Microalgae) Unid Orange Crust UnidCrust Unid Green Crust (Microalgae) Yellow Mite H1-1 H1-2

  19. Effects of litter traits, soil biota, and soil chemistry on soil carbon stocks at a common garden with 14 tree species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Nematode density (min. soil) Bacterial-feeding nemat.C:N microb. biomass (min. soil) Ectomycorrh. sporocarp spp.R, McCartney D (2002) Soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics in

  20. Butterfly Gardening in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drees, Bastiaan M.; Jackman, John A.

    1999-07-14

    the parsleyworm caterpillar (black swal- lowtail); passionflower vines (Passiflora spp.) for rearing the gulf fritillary; citrus or Hercules club for rearing the orange dog caterpillar (giant swal- lowtail butterfly); canna (Canna x generalis) for rearing...

  1. Computational Biology and Bioinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steels, Luc

    angles 8Sunday 10 February 2013 #12;Folding 2 The sequence of amino acids folds in the lowest energy GHFTEEDKATITSLWGKVNVEDAGGETLGRLLVVYPWTQRFFDSFGNLSSASAIMGNPKVKAHGKKVLTSLGDAIKHL DDLKGTFAQLSELHCDKLHVDPENFKLLGNVLVTVLAIHFGKEFTPEVQASWQKMVTAVASALSSRYH >sp|P68871|2-147|beta

  2. Solar proton burning, photon and anti-neutrino disintegration of the deuteron in the relativistic field theory model of the deuteron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Ivanov; H. Oberhummer; N. I. Troitskaya; M. Faber

    1998-10-26

    The relativistic field theory model of the deuteron (RFMD) is applied to the calculation of the astrophysical factor S_{pp}(0) for the process of the solar proton burning p + p -> D + e^+ + \

  3. Knowledge of an animal's diet is important for understanding its for-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    throughout the North Pacific Rim from California to Japan (Loughlin et al., 1984; Pitcher et al., 2007 was Pacific hake (Merluccius productus), followed by salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.), skates (Rajidae), Pacific

  4. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access The large universal Pantoea plasmid LPP-1 plays a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - or endophytes, biocontrol agents, plant-growth promoters or as pathogens of both plant and animal hosts spp. to their various ecological niches and their specialization as pathogens, biocontrol agents

  5. The overexpression of an endo-?-1,3-glucanase, engl1, in Trichoderma virens 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waite, Deirdre Marie

    2001-01-01

    Many strains of Trichoderma spp. have been shown to be effective biocontrol agents against foliar and soilborne plant pathogens. The production and secretion of hydrolytic enzymes appear to play an important role in these antagonistic interactions...

  6. Downloaded from www.asmscience.org by IP: 128.101.134.61

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    , and Trichoderma spp. are abundant in plant disease-suppressive soils, and these microorganisms are used widely their gardens against infections. Such as- sociations with microorganisms appear to be common among insects

  7. Figure 10--Proportion of basal area accounted for by each tree spe-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    include lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), black oak, willow (Salix spp.), western white pine (P. monticola Forest QUKE Salix CADE PICO Figure 11--Spatial distribution of basal area of major tree species within

  8. --AMERICAN MIDLAND NATURALIST --Monday Jan 29 2001 02:05 PM 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rank, Nathan Egan

    of Symmorphuscristatuswasps,leaf beetle larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and willow (Salix spp.) trees is a model systemfor beetles and willow (Salix) tree species has become a model system for studying both chemical defense

  9. Recognizing and modeling variable drawdown due to evapotranspiration in a semiarid riparian zone considering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    .1002/wrcr.20122. 1. Introduction [2] Riparian areas are key to understanding regional water and energy.) and wil- lows (Salix spp.), in temperate, semiarid zones, are deep- rooted vegetation that fulfill

  10. Simultaneous estimation of actual litter enzymatic catalysis and respiration rates with a simple model of C dynamics in Sphagnum-dominated peatlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    caerulea, Betula spp, soluble carbohydrates, Water Extractable Organic Carbon. insu-00852055,version1-19Aug and decomposition, leading to organic matter (OM) accumulation and long-term C-sequestration in peat (Clymo, 1984

  11. Resonant scattering of surface plasmon polaritons by dressed quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Danhong; Cardimona, Dave; Easter, Michelle; Gumbs, Godfrey; Maradudin, A. A.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-06-23

    The resonant scattering of surface plasmon-polariton waves (SPP) by embedded semiconductor quantum dots above the dielectric/metal interface is explored in the strong-coupling regime. In contrast to non-resonant scattering by a localized dielectric surface defect, a strong resonant peak in the spectrum of the scattered field is predicted that is accompanied by two side valleys. The peak height depends nonlinearly on the amplitude of SPP waves, reflecting the feedback dynamics from a photon-dressed electron-hole plasma inside the quantum dots. This unique behavior in the scattered field peak strength is correlated with the occurrence of a resonant dip in the absorption spectrum of SPP waves due to the interband photon-dressing effect. Our result on the scattering of SPP waves may be experimentally observable and applied to spatially selective illumination and imaging of individual molecules.

  12. Ecology, 91(11), 2010, pp. 31893200 2010 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Ana

    of a grassland ecosystem to an experimental manipulation of a keystone rodent and domestic livestock ANA D (Cynomys spp.), a keystone burrowing rodent. Understanding the ecological relationships between cattle; grasshoppers; grassland; grazing; herbivores; keystone species; prairie dogs; vegetation. INTRODUCTION

  13. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Associates. 2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. LittlePool. David, A. 2011. U.S. Wind Turbine Trade in a Changing2011. David, A. 2010. Impact of Wind Energy Installations on

  14. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    ET2/TL-08-1474. May 19, 2010 Wind Technologies Market ReportAssociates. 2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. Little10, 2010. David, A. 2009. Wind Turbines: Industry and Trade

  15. International Journal of Bifurcation and Chaos, Vol. 19, No. 1 (2009) 403408 c World Scientific Publishing Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timmer, Jens

    2009-01-01

    International Journal of Bifurcation and Chaos, Vol. 19, No. 1 (2009) 403­408 c World Scientific MA 1026/7-2 in the framework of priority program SPP-1114. 403 #12;404 E. Mammen et al. phase

  16. Comparison of sampling techniques for Heliothis species in cotton 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walters, Michelle Lynn

    1986-01-01

    in cotton emerged. In 19S1, J. F. Leser, area Extension Entomologist at the Texas ASH University Research and Extension Center in Lubbock, reported a new sampling procedure developed for Heliothis spp. larvaes on High Plains cotton. This new method... of Advisory Committee: Nr. J. Knox Walker, Jr. The accuracy of several different sampling methods for Heliothis spp. larvae in cotton were compared during 1984 and 1985. These methods included those commonly used to estimate the density and dispersion...

  17. The establishment, biological success and host impact of Diorhabda elongata, imported biological control agents of invasive Tamarix in the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudgeons, Jeremy L.

    2009-05-15

    and high water usage. The ability of Tamarix to function as facultative phreatophytes in an arid floodplain has resulted in a shift in species composition from native cottonwoods (Populus spp.) and willows (Salix spp.), obligate phreatophytes which... (Neill 1985). Insect diversity at the family and species level are greatly reduced in 5 Tamarix stands when compared to native willow (Salix interior Rowlee) and seep- willow (Baccharis salicina Torr. & Gray) stands (Knutson et al. 2003). Measure...

  18. A systematic study of select species complexes of Eleocharis subgenus Limnochloa (Cyperaceae) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, David Jonathan

    2009-05-15

    largest worldwide (Reznicek 1990). The family has several very large cosmopolitan genera including Carex L. (ca. 2,000 spp.) and Cyperus L. (ca. 600 spp.; Goetghebeur 1998). Cyperaceous genera are concentrated in northern South America, southern... Sudano-Zambesian Africa, and SW Australia (Goetghebeur 1998). Endemism in the family, at the generic level, is also concentrated in tropical America, tropical South Africa, and Australia (Goetghebeur 1998). Members of Cyperaceae are mostly...

  19. Solar proton burning, neutrino disintegration of the deuteron and pep process in the relativistic field theory model of the deuteron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Ivanov; H. Oberhummer; N. I. Troitskaya; M. Faber

    1999-10-19

    The astrophysical factor S_pp(0) for the solar proton burning, p + p -> D + positron + neutrino, is recalculated in the relativistic field theory model of the deuteron (RFMD). We obtain S_pp(0) = 4.08 x 10^{-25} MeV b which agrees good with the recommended value S_pp(0) = 4.00 x 10^{-25} MeV b. The amplitude of low-energy elastic proton-proton (pp) scattering in the singlet S-wave state with the Coulomb repulsion contributing to the amplitude of the solar proton burning is described in terms of the S-wave scattering length and the effective range. This takes away the problem pointed out by Bahcall and Kamionkowski (Nucl. Phys. A625 (1997) 893) that in the RFMD one cannot describe low-energy elastic pp scattering with the Coulomb repulsion in agreement with low-energy nuclear phenomenology. The cross section for the neutrino disintegration of the deuteron, neutrino + D -> electron + p + p, is calculated with respect to S_pp(0) for neutrino energies from threshold to 10 MeV. The results can be used for the analysis of the data which will be obtained in the experiments planned by SNO. The astrophysical factor S_pep(0) for the pep process, p + electron + p -> neutrino + D, is calculated relative to S_pp(0) in complete agreement with the result obtained by Bahcall and May (ApJ. 155 (1969) 501).

  20. Polarization dependent formation of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures near stepped features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Ryan D. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, Ben [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Adams, David P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Yalisove, Steven M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-06-09

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are formed near 110?nm-tall Au microstructured edges on Si substrates after single-pulse femtosecond irradiation with a 150 fs pulse centered near a 780 nm wavelength. We investigate the contributions of Fresnel diffraction from step-edges and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation to LIPSS formation on Au and Si surfaces. For certain laser polarization vector orientations, LIPSS formation is dominated by SPP excitation; however, when SPP excitation is minimized, Fresnel diffraction dominates. The LIPSS orientation and period distributions are shown to depend on which mechanism is activated. These results support previous observations of the laser polarization vector influencing LIPSS formation on bulk surfaces.

  1. Facilitation of polymer looping and giant polymer diffusivity in crowded solutions of active particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, J; Kim, W K; Metzler, R

    2015-01-01

    We study the dynamics of polymer chains in a bath of self-propelled particles (SPP) by extensive Langevin dynamics simulations in a two dimensional system. Specifically, we analyse the polymer looping properties versus the SPP activity and investigate how the presence of the active particles alters the chain conformational statistics. We find that SPPs tend to extend flexible polymer chains while they rather compactify stiffer semiflexible polymers, in agreement with previous results. Here we show that larger activities of SPPs yield a higher effective temperature of the bath and thus facilitate looping kinetics of a passive polymer chain. We explicitly compute the looping probability and looping time in a wide range of the model parameters. We also analyse the motion of a monomeric tracer particle and the polymer's centre of mass in the presence of the active particles in terms of the time averaged mean squared displacement, revealing a giant diffusivity enhancement for the polymer chain via SPP pooling. Our...

  2. Electrically tunable graded index planar lens based on graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasari, H. Abrishamian, M. S.

    2014-08-28

    The realization of electrically tunable beam focusing using a properly designed conductivity pattern along a strip on a background single graphene flake with operation in the terahertz regime is proposed and numerically investigated. The strip is illuminated with a guided surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) plane wave and the physical origin of the design procedure is evaluated from the phase of effective mode index of propagating SPP wave on graphene. Upon tuning a gate voltage between the graphene sheet and the substrate, the focus tuning is achieved. Finite- difference time-domain numerical technique is employed to explore the propagation characteristic of SPP wave and the performance parameters of the lens include the focal length, full-width half-maximum, and focusing efficiency. Such a one atom thick planar lens with the capability of electrical focus tuning besides the compatibility with current planar optoelectronic systems can find valuable potential applications in the field of transformational plasmon optics.

  3. The effect of marbling and subcutaneous fat on the microbiological and sensory characteristics of beef strip loin steaks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Correale, Karen Kross

    1986-01-01

    in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and high-oxygen barrier (HOB) film and stored at 4+ice in the dark for up to 6 or 28 days, respectively. In a second experiment, beef strip loins of U. S. Choice were fabricated into steaks with subcutaneous fat present... characteristics of beef strip loin steaks packaged and stored in pVC or HOB film. Microbial distributions were dominated by Pseudomonas spp. on PVC-wrapped samples and by Lactobacillus spp. on samples packaged in HOB film by the end of the storage periods. Nean...

  4. The effect of intramuscular and subcutaneous fat on the microbiological and sensory characteristics of pork loin chops 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boxer, Mara Kaye

    1988-01-01

    and low intramuscular fat were trimmed free of subcutaneous fat and then packaged and stored in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) film for 0-6 days or in high oxygen barrier (HOB) film for 0-28 days at 4t1oC. In general, degr ee of marbling had no significant... effect (P)0. 05) on the aerobic plate count (APC) and did not result in major differences in the distribution of types in the microflora of pork loin chops. During storage of chops in PVC film, spp. became dominant in the microflora of chops; spp...

  5. Effect of acid decontamination on the microbiological and sensory characteristics of beef strip loin steaks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Zisca

    1987-01-01

    ) a mixture of 1g L-lactic acid, 2$ acetic acid, 0. 25$ citric acid and 0. 1$ ascorbic acid on the microbiological and sensory properties of beef steaks was investigated. Steaks were displayed either in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) film for 0-6 d... treatments. ~LULQII~ s p p ~ g ~M~~~ s p p . , Coryneform bacteria and spp. were a dominant or major part of the microbial flora of acid-treated and control steaks that were displayed in PVC film. For beef steaks packaged and stored in HOB film, ~~ spp...

  6. Impact of surface collisions on enhancement and quenching of the luminescence near the metal nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khurgin, Jacob B

    2015-01-01

    The fact that surface-induced damping rate of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in metal nanoparticles increases with the decrease of particle size is well known. We show that this rate also increases with the degree of the mode confinement, hence damping of the higher order nonradiative SPP modes in spherical particles is greatly enhanced relative to damping of the fundamental (dipole) SPP mode. Since higher order modes are the ones responsible for quenching of luminescence in the vicinity of metal surfaces, the degree of quenching increases resulting in a substantial decrease in the amount of attainable enhancement of the luminescence

  7. Habitat Use by Beaver Along the Big Sioux River in Eastern South Dakota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to livestock grazing (Smith and Flake 1983). Grazing can have negative effects on beaver Castor canadensis~ 0.01) than uncuttrees. Mean distance from water of cut trees was less (P ~ 0.01) than for uncut a gradual decline in stands of willow Salix spp. because beaver harvest mature woody plants and cattle

  8. Host habitat location mediated by olfactory stimuli in anaphes iole (hymenoptera: mymaridae), an egg parasitoid of lygus hesperus (hemiptera: miridae) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manrique, Veronica

    2005-02-17

    Lygus hesperus is an important pest on different crops including cotton and alfalfa in the western U.S. Anaphes iole is a common parasitoid of Lygus spp. eggs in the U.S. and has potential as a biological control agent ...

  9. Silicides for infrared surface plasmon resonance biosensors J. W. Cleary1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peale, Robert E.

    Silicides for infrared surface plasmon resonance biosensors J. W. Cleary1 , R. E. Peale1,2 , D, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816, U.S.A. 3 AFRL/RYHC, Sensors on silicon were evaluated as conducting hosts for surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in proposed long-wave IR

  10. Published by ORNL's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program (www.ornl.gov/Energy_Eff) November 1998 ORNL Reaches Out to State Energy AgenciesORNL Reaches Out to State Energy AgenciesORNL Reaches Out to State Energy AgenciesORNL Reaches Out to State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Energy Agencies ORNL's EE/RE research has always involved partnering with outside organizations (SEOs) and the Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI. By Kathi Vaughan, 423-241-4292, vhk@ornl.gov SPP Projects Cross All Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy

  11. Air Cushion Press for Excellent Uniformity, High Yield, and Fast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Cushion Press for Excellent Uniformity, High Yield, and Fast Nanoimprint Across a 100 mm Field, air cushion press (ACP), in which the mold and substrate are pressed against each other by gas pressure rather than solid plates, and compared it with a common method, solid parallel-plate press (SPP

  12. Gulf of Alaska Coastal Research (July and August 2001) on Juvenile Edward V. Farley, Jr., Bruce L. Wing, Edward D. Cokelet, Christine M. Kondzela,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Shelikof Strait as a primary migration corridor. This report summarizes the catch data collected during distribution, migration, and growth of juvenile salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) in relation to oceanographic with the Alaska Coastal Current) as a westward migration corridor rather than the seaward side of Kodiak Island

  13. Energetic costs of migration through the Fraser River Canyon, British Columbia, in adult pink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    the primary factors affecting migration activity and energetics. Fish increased their activity levels whenEnergetic costs of migration through the Fraser River Canyon, British Columbia, in adult pink spp.) depend on energy reserves to complete their upriver spawning migration. Little is known about

  14. Engineering Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) are a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for alternative energy generation and for degradation of organic wastes paradigm in which soluble oxidants are transported into cells for reduction during metabolism. The unique. In the case of Geobacter spp., anode biofilms can grow to be many microbes thick, confounding long

  15. Precious Corals in Hawaii: Discovery of a New Bed and Revised Management Measures for Existing Beds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Precious Corals in Hawaii: Discovery of a New Bed and Revised Management Measures for Existing Beds Introduction and History of Hawaii's Precious Coral Fishery Precious corals, Corallium spp., wereTheodore Chamberlain,oftheUniversityofHawaii, discovered a small bed of Corallium Richard W. Grigg (rgrigg@soest.hawaii

  16. INFORMATION For all orders outside the Americas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polle, Jürgen

    in the Americas: SCIENCE PUBLISHERS An imprint of Edenbridge Ltd., British Isles P.O. Box 699, 234 May Street-of-the art research in biochemistry, molecular biology and medical application. A glossary of specialized salina · Carbon Dioxide Fixation by Dunaliella spp. and the Possible Use of this Genus in Carbon Dioxide

  17. The nature of biodiversity has long been a central focus in biology. This may not seem the case any longer,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    restricted set of organisms--the house mouse (Mus musculus), the fruit fly (Drosophila spp.), the nematode of diversity is, in a sense, provided by"adaptation"to an "ecological niche." Adaptation results from the force of selection; and the notion of the ecological niche,to which the organism adapts,remains obscure and poorly

  18. Evolution of the Midwest ISO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Electric Power Corporation · Wolverine Power Supply Cooperative Transmission Owning Members #12;Non-Transmission, non-profit grid operator for the transmission of high voltage electricity across much of the Midwest Transmission Organization (RTO) #12;Scope (with SPP) 150+ GW peak load 144,000+ miles of transmission lines 20

  19. Structure of zirconium alloy oxides formed in pure water studied with synchrotron radiation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    SPP size is also needed in the Zircaloys for resistance to nodular corrosion in boiling water reactors of Zirca- loy-4 in pressurized water reactors (PWR) is improved when the size of the second-phase particlesStructure of zirconium alloy oxides formed in pure water studied with synchrotron radiation

  20. 1Wood Borer --WB-XX-W America's Least Wanted Wood-Borers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    1Wood Borer -- WB-XX-W WB-08-W America's Least Wanted Wood-Borers Department of Entomology OAK, these beetles feed on oak (Quercus spp). Direct damage results from galleries in the wood that are formed in the breeding season. The host trees for these beetles are important for the wood indus- try, orna

  1. Cyclone Performance for Reducing Biochar Concentrations in Syngas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saucier, David Shane

    2013-05-28

    and steam turbine power plant (SPP). The simulated cotton gin is a 40 bph rated facility operating for 2,000 hours a season (200% utilization) processing stripped cotton that yields approximately 180 kg/bale (400 lbs/bale) of CGT. Revenues consist...

  2. 324 Notes and brief articles demonstrated by other workers using techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Picea spp. after surface sterilization with hydrogen peroxide; and ethanol- soaked seeds of P. elliouiiUre, Private Mail Bag 10, Rydalmere, New South Wales, Australia A rust fungus is recorded on Acacia mearnsii for the first time in South Africa. It is a urcdinial rust, and comparison with rusts on this host in Australia

  3. www.frontiersinecology.org The Ecological Society of America One need only peruse a nursery catalog or visit a local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olden, Julian D.

    to the everyday American gar- dener. Unfortunately, this wealth of consumer choices comes at a steep cost. Non func- tion (Ehrenfeld 2010; Vilŕ et al. 2011). Several well- known invasive plants in the US were for aesthetics), and tamarisk (Tamarix spp; first planted for aesthetics and later to act as wind breaks). Indeed

  4. MFRPAPER1117 Net-Pen Culture of Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Oncorhynch us spp. , In the PacifIC Northwest. The National Marine Fisheries Service initiated the research capital cost~ anu the limited fresh \\\\ ater \\\\ ill prevent much new con- ~lrUCllon or e'\\pansl n of salmon annual ranges of water temperature (6.5- 16°C) and salinit) (26-3 I Il/oo!. helter from the wind. depths

  5. Engineering of thermotolerant Bacillus coagulans for production of D(-)-lactic acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qingzhao; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-12-02

    Genetically modified microorganisms having the ability to produce D(-)-lactic acid at temperatures between 30.degree. C. and 55.degree. C. are provided. In various embodiments, the microorganisms may have the chromosomal lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) gene and/or the chromosomal acetolactate synthase (alsS) gene inactivated. Exemplary microorganisms for use in the disclosed methods are Bacillus spp., such as Bacillus coagulans.

  6. BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER Lemming winter habitat choice: a snow-fencing experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krebs, Charles J.

    to enhance winter reproduction and sur- vival by arctic lemmings (Lemmus and Dicrostonyx spp). This leads a component of this hypothesis, that snow depth influences habitat choice, at three Canadian Arctic sites is a primary determinant of winter habitat choice by tundra lemmings and voles. Keywords Arctic ecology Á

  7. Impacts of Stressors on Ranavirus Prevalence in American Bullfrog and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Pathogen Threat to Loss of Amphibian Biodiversity in North America. 5 spp. 1997 #12;2 Ranavirus 2006 Gray & Miller unpubl. data Impacts of Cattle on Amphibians Access Non-access Health of Amphibian Larval #12;3 Research Objectives Anthropogenic Stressor 1) Cattle access in wetlands on Ranavirus

  8. GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW-GTR-240 Breeding for Resistance in Norway Spruce to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW-GTR-240 162 Breeding for Resistance in Norway Spruce to the Root Results from previous studies of resistance in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) to the pathogens Heterobasidion spp. show significant genotypic variation in fungal growth and spore susceptibility among Norway

  9. Graphene-based terahertz tunable plasmonic directional coupler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Meng-Dong, E-mail: hemendong@sohu.com; Wang, Kai-Jun; Wang, Lei; Li, Jian-Bo [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha 410004 (China); Liu, Jian-Qiang [College of Science, Jiujiang University, Jiujiang 332005 (China); Huang, Zhen-Rong; Wang, Lingling [Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Optoelectronic Devices of Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Wang, Lin; Hu, Wei-Da; Chen, Xiaoshuang [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200083 (China)

    2014-08-25

    We propose and numerically analyze a terahertz tunable plasmonic directional coupler which is composed of a thin metal film with a nanoscale slit, dielectric grating, a graphene sheet, and a dielectric substrate. The slit is employed to generate surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), and the metal-dielectric grating-graphene-dielectric constructs a Bragg reflector, whose bandgap can be tuned over a wide frequency range by a small change in the Fermi energy level of graphene. As a graphene-based Bragg reflector is formed on one side of the slit, the structure enables SPP waves to be unidirectionally excited on the other side of the slit due to SPP interference, and the SPP waves in the Bragg reflector can be efficiently switched on and off by tuning the graphene's Fermi energy level. By introducing two optimized graphene-based Bragg reflectors into opposite sides of the slit, SPP waves can be guided to different Bragg reflectors at different Fermi energy levels, thus achieving a tunable bidirectional coupler.

  10. EIS-0294: Sutter Power Project, Sutter County, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes Western Area Power Administration's (Western) decision to support Calpine Corporation (Calpine) to construct an electric generating facility and associated 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line, approximately 3.5 miles in length, known as the Sutter Power Plant (SPP).

  11. Over the past 20 years, our understanding of the physiological and molecular interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Read, Andrew

    parasites, such as Plasmodium spp. and dengue virus, and their mosquito vectors1­3 has been radically. In particular, mosquito resistance to infection tends to be viewed as a static phenotype con- sisting solely that mosquito susceptibility to vector-borne parasites depends not only on genetic fac- tors, but also on a wide

  12. Parametric On-Line Packing x F. K. Miyazawa y Y. Wakabayashi z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    | C. Postal 6176 | 13083-970 | Campinas{SP | Brazil. z Instituto de Matem#19;atica e Estat#19~ao Paulo{SP | Brazil. #12; 1. Strip Packing Problem (SPP): Given a list L of rectangles, and a rectangle, and rectangles of unit dimensions R = (1; 1), called bins, pack the rectangles of L into a minimum number of bins

  13. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    chlorhexidine products) 180-300 ml hypertonic saline IMM infusionPseudomonas spp. Environmental Water and wet Yeast and mold Environmental Soil, plants, water Dirty infusions Aseptic infusions No treatment and DCT Prototheca Environmental Soil, plants, water Dirty infusions, infected udders Aseptic infusions

  14. Hard di raction at HERA in the dipole model of BFKL dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . Royon (DAPNIA/SPP) | Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex France are discussed, namely the e ective pomeron intercept, the scaling violations and the beta dependence. A di and lead to very large values at high beta and large virtuality Q which may lead to a discrimination

  15. Aquatic Toxicology 97 (2010) 125133 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosell, Martin

    2010-01-01

    in question. Published by Elsevier B.V. 1. Introduction Coral reefs are among the most biologically productive., 2003). In the Caribbean, coral reefs have experi- enced an estimated 80% reduction in coral cover of scleractinian corals and their algal symbionts (Symbiodinium spp.) G.K. Bielmyera, , M. Grosellb , R. Bhagoolic

  16. Axis-Aligned Filtering for Interactive Physically-Based Diffuse Indirect Lighting Soham Uday Mehta1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    -bounce indirect lighting, Our Method average 63 samples per pixel (spp) (b) Adaptive Sampling, based on a novel frequency analysis of indirect lighting. Our method combines adaptive sampling by MonteAxis-Aligned Filtering for Interactive Physically-Based Diffuse Indirect Lighting Soham Uday Mehta1

  17. Nitrogen uptake by plants subsidized by Pacific salmon carcasses: a hierarchical experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, John D.

    the Pacific Rim. Salmon are born in freshwater, with most popu- lations migrating as juveniles to the oceanNitrogen uptake by plants subsidized by Pacific salmon carcasses: a hierarchical experiment Morgan and transport large numbers of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) to riparian areas beside small coastal streams

  18. TPCP: Botryosphaeria canker and die-back of Eucalyptus BOTRYOSPHAERIA CANKER AND DIE-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TPCP: Botryosphaeria canker and die-back of Eucalyptus BOTRYOSPHAERIA CANKER AND DIE- BACK OF EUCALYPTUS INTRODUCTION Botryosphaeria canker and die- back is one of the most important diseases of Eucalyptus spp. in South Africa. This disease is caused by the fungal pathogen Botryosphaeria dothidea

  19. The Eucalyptus canker pathogen Chrysoporthe cubensis discovered in eastern Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Eucalyptus canker pathogen Chrysoporthe cubensis discovered in eastern Australia Geoffrey S of commercially planted Eucalyptus species (Myrtaceae) in tropical and subtropical parts of the world where these trees are planted as non-natives. Although the majority of Eucalyptus spp. are native to Australia, Chr

  20. A multi-gene phylogeny for species of Mycosphaerella occurring on Eucalyptus leaves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    147 A multi-gene phylogeny for species of Mycosphaerella occurring on Eucalyptus leaves Gavin C Eucalyptus spp. where they cause leaf diseases collectively known as Mycosphaerella Leaf Disease (MLD Eucalyptus. A further aim was to study the anamorph concepts and resolve the deeper nodes of Mycosphaerella

  1. Spatialtemporal patterns of Ceratocystis wilt in Eucalyptus plantations in Brazil By M. A. Ferreira1,7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, Thomas C.

    Spatial­temporal patterns of Ceratocystis wilt in Eucalyptus plantations in Brazil By M. A Ceratocystis wilt, caused by Ceratocystis fimbriata, has become the most important disease in eucalyptus (Eucalyptus spp. and hybrids) plantations in Brazil. To further our understanding of the epidemiology

  2. Pathogenicity of seven species of the Botryosphaeriaceae on Eucalyptus clones in Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pathogenicity of seven species of the Botryosphaeriaceae on Eucalyptus clones in Venezuela S. R. The Botryosphaeriaceae include several well recognised Eucalyptus pathogens of which various species have recently been found on Eucalyptus spp. in Venezuela. An initial inoculation trial was conducted using seven species

  3. Scientific paper A List of Eucalyptus Leaf Fungi and their Potential Importance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scientific paper A List of Eucalyptus Leaf Fungi and their Potential Importance to South African is made of the status of the fungi, and also of recent trends in Eucalyptus leaf pathology. INTRODUCTION Most of the approximately 600 Eucalyptus spp. and varieties are endemic to Australia and Papua New

  4. Len M. VAN ZYL1 , Teresa A. COUTINHO1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , caused by Coniothyrium zuluense, is a serious stem canker disease of Eucalyptus in subtropical parts. This was further confirmed when all Coniothyrium isolates associated with stem cankers on Eucalyptus spp. grouped Eucalyptus stem canker pathogen outside South Africa. INTRODUCTION Eucalyptus species are native to Australia

  5. A new species of CrypllOnectria from South Africa and Australia, pathogenic to Eucalyptus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A new species of CrypllOnectria from South Africa and Australia, pathogenic to Eucalyptus Marieka- genic to Eucalyptus. - Sydowia 54(1): 98-117. Endothia gyrosa causes cankers on several hardwood genera in North America, but occurs only on Eucalyptus spp. in South Africa and Australia. Previously, Australian

  6. TPCP: Bacterial Blight of Eucalyptus BACTERIAL BLIGHT OF EUCALYPTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TPCP: Bacterial Blight of Eucalyptus BACTERIAL BLIGHT OF EUCALYPTUS Typical symptoms of bacterial and commercial plantations and was reported from different Eucalyptus species, hybrids and clones. The causal Eucalyptus spp. It also records a serious new disease problem affecting one of the most widely planted forest

  7. 388 S. Afr. J. Bot. 1999,65(5 & 6); 388-391 Leptographium eucalyptophilum, a new species from Eucalyptus in the Congo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eucalyptus in the Congo K. Jacobs', M.J. Wingfeld and J. Raux Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology diseases on Eucalyptus in the Republic of Congo, West Africa, an unidentified Leptographium sp. was isolated from stems of Eucalyptus hybrids. Comparison with known Leptographium spp. led us to conclude

  8. Discovery of Ophiostoma tsotsi on Eucalyptus wood chips in China Joha W. Grobbelaar Z. Wilhelm de Beer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FULL PAPER Discovery of Ophiostoma tsotsi on Eucalyptus wood chips in China Joha W. Grobbelaar · Z-stain fungi Á Ophiostoma piceae complex Á Ophiostomatales Introduction Eucalyptus spp. are becoming plan- tations, approximately 2 million ha of which consist of Eucalyptus and Corymbia species, hybrids

  9. Proceedings of the Sudden Oak Death Third Science Symposium In Vitro Testing of Biological Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the biocontrol agents tested. Key words: Phytophthora ramorum, Trichoderma spp., Streptomyces, biological control in response to biocontrol agents among isolates of P. ramorum belonging to different mating types and from for screening of biocontrol agents (BCAs) (table 1). To test the efficacy of biocontrol products in controlling

  10. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC/TN APCRP-BC-33

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of Megamelus scutellaris Berg in the Southern United States as a Biocontrol Agent of Waterhyacinth (Eichhornia). Establishment of Neochetina spp. has been widespread, and the biocontrol agents are now ubiquitous biological control agents. Biological control of waterhyacinth has been attempted since the 1970's

  11. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Mar. 1989, p. 722-732 0099-2240/89/030722-1 1$02.00/()

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    and Distribution of Thermophilic Amoebae and Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri in a Newly Created Cooling Lake R. L/Accepted 9 November 1988 Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri is the causative agent of fatal human amoebic for the presence of thermophilic amoebae, thermophilic Naegleria spp., and the pathogen Naegleria fowleri. During

  12. Woods Safety SFRC UF 7/09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Woods Safety SFRC UF 7/09 #12;Working alone #12;Poison Plants Poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) Poison oak (Toxicodendron pubescens) #12;Commonly Mistaken Plants Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) Blackberry (Rubus spp.) Three leaflets let it be! #12;Poison Ivy/Oak Prevention: · Wear long

  13. &p.1:Abstract We conducted an experimental study of the effects of nutrient addition on the susceptibility of two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orians, Colin

    on the susceptibility of two species of willows (Salix eriocephala and S. sericea) and their hybrid to a pathogen plant susceptibility · Hybrid performance · Logit modeling · Salix spp. · Soil nutrient heterogeneity; Christensen et al. 1995). Two common willows of eastern North America, Salix eriocephala and S. sericea

  14. Mycologia, 96(6), 2004, pp. 13301338. 2004 by The Mycological Society of America, Lawrence, KS 66044-8897

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchette, Robert A.

    that occur on willow (Salix spp.) in North America in one species complex, Melampsora epitea Thu obtained from urediniospores from rust- infected Salix leaves collected in the Canadian arctic that arctic and tem- perate Melampsora species on Salix hosts in North America have evolved distinct molecular

  15. Proceedings of the 19th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-142 263 bLACk wILLow TRee IMPRoveMeNT: DeveLoPMeNT oF A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STRACT Introduction Short rotation woody crops, such as willows (Salix spp.), continue to be examined as biomass regenerated. Black willow (Salix nigra Marsh.) fits well into a biomass program for the southern United States number of sandbar willow (Salix exigua Nutt.) clones were included. Survival of the sandbar clones

  16. Ecological Monographs, 72(4), 2002, pp. 465485 2002 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    (Acer saccharinum, Betula nigra, Populus deltoides, and Salix spp.) on 30 sandbars along a 16-km reach and Salix), and models for old seedlings and saplings were stronger than those for new seedlings. Both local; multiple spatial scales; plant demography; Populus deltoides; riparian vegetation; Salix exigua; Salix

  17. Profitability of Willow Biomass Crops Affected by Incentive Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Crops in New York Short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) like shrub willow (Salix spp.) are a potential source of biomass for energy generation and bioproducts in the USA [1, 2] and globally [3]. While@syr.edu Bioenerg. Res. (2013) 6:53­64 DOI 10.1007/s12155-012-9234-y #12;result in a very positive net energy

  18. The Making of a Proficiency Test Sample: Vibrio cholerae in Blended, Pasteurized Oysters Chrissy M. Leopold Wager1, Lacey M. Guillen1, Christopher L. Conway1, Shannon M. Dugan1, Vishnu Y. Patel2, Glenn Tillman3, Wei Zhang1, and Ravinder M. Reddy2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    -Yeast Extract + 3% NaCl (TSB-YE 3% NaCl) and Alkaline Peptone Water (APW) were compared for suitability as ideal of cholera, infects thousands of people annually and is spread by contaminated food, water, or direct fecal of Vibrio spp. Various trials followed using raw oysters, post-harvest processed (PHP) oysters, and canned

  19. Ecology 2006 94, 253263

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silman, Miles R.

    Conservation, Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, Duke University, Box 90319, Durham, NC USA, Department of Biology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109 USA, and Herbario Vargas by leaf-cutter ants (Atta spp. and Acromyrmex sp.). Exposure to prevailing trade winds (windwardvs

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER Jennifer L. Macalady Martha M. Vestling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macalady, Jenn

    . Keywords Archaea Ć Acidophile Ć Acid mine drainage Ć Tetraether lipid Ć Membrane monolayer Introduction conditions), Ferroplasma spp probably play important roles in acid mine drainage generation, a serious to survival in acid Received: 14 November 2003 / Accepted: 19 May 2004 / Published online: 16 July 2004 Ó

  1. Distributed stability tests for large-scale systems with limited model information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulbrich, Michael

    . While the design of distributed control laws has received a lot of attention, the distributed analysis) within the Priority Program SPP 1305 "Control Theory of Digitally Networked Dynamical Systems-scale interconnected systems have attracted a lot of research recently in the field of system and control theory

  2. Limnol. Oceanogr., 49(4), 2004, 9971005 2004, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falkowski, Paul G.

    ) pathway in the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium spp., which forms massive blooms degradation of internal components including thylakoids, carboxysomes, and gas vesicles, whereas the plasma lead to the termination of natural Trichodesmium blooms and that can influence the fluxes of organic

  3. ELAEOPHOROSIS IN FREE-RANGING MULE DEER IN SOUTH DAKOTA --Elaeophora schneideri is an intraarterial parasitic nematode transmitted by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deer populations through- out many of the western United States is fairly common and rates of infection and portions of the southeastern United States. Deer (Odocoileus spp.) infected with E. schneideri generally of this parasite in mule deer in the northcentral United States and to our knowledge, the first occurrences

  4. Journal of Biogeography (1992)I9,383-390 Habitat distribution of canary chaffinchesamong islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    1992-01-01

    Journal of Biogeography (1992)I9,383-390 Habitat distribution of canary chaffinchesamong islands studied for the Canary Islands (Tenerife and El Hierro). The Common Chaffinch was significantly denser time. Key words. Canary Islands, Chaffinches (Fringilla spp.), habitat preferences, competitive

  5. Curriculum Vitae William R. Burnside

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conference, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Jan 2007 NSF Travel Grant ($1400), Internat Biogeog Society conference, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Jan. 2007 New Mexico Higher Education Department Graduate Scholarship, ($7200/yr site, 2008, 2009, foraging ecology of desert harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex spp) Barro Colorado Island

  6. L'EVOLUTION DU DESIGN DES SYSTEMES DE PILOTAGE DE LA PERFORMANCE DANS LES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ) et, essentiellement, des systčmes de pilotage de la performance (SPP) en contexte hospitalier; (2) ŕ of the management control systems and, mainly, performance monitoring systems in a hospital context; (2 in a conceptual contingent model allowing to understand how the management control systems of the hospital

  7. Giant Surface-Plasmon-Induced Drag Effect in Metal Nanowires Maxim Durach,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockman, Mark I.

    proved to be very practical for relatively fast detection of picosecond pulses in a wide frequency range in the nanowires, inducing giant THz electromotive force (emf) in the SPP propaga- tion direction. We have found that in thin ($5 nm radius) wires this emf can reach $10 V, with nanolocalized THz fields as high as $1 MV

  8. Plasmonics in the near-infrared : spatial, spectral, and temporal studies of surface plasmon polaritons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tetz, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    of SPP pulse provides additional electromagnetic ?eldpulses using a time-resolved spatial heterodyne imaging technique to obtain spatial distributions of the electromagnetic ?pulses using a time-resolved spatial heterodyne imaging (TRSHI) technique to obtain spatial distributions of the electromagnetic ?

  9. Halophilic Archaea determined from geothermal steam vent aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Scott

    Halophilic Archaea determined from geothermal steam vent aerosols Dean G. Ellis, Richard W. Bizzoco Hydrothermal vents, known as `fumaroles', are ubiq- uitous features of geothermal areas. Although their geology contained halophilic Archaea closely related to the Haloarcula spp. found in non-geothermal salt mats

  10. Large-scale (100s km) distributions of tuna larvae (family Scombridae), par-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    abundance and fecundity of T. albacares (yellowfin tuna) and K. pelamis (skipjack tuna) in the western. pelamis larvae. Other possible explanations, however, are that previous sampling scales of 100s km between waters (Miller, 1979), and Thunnus spp. and K. pelamis larvae were up to 100 times more concentrated

  11. Pelagic Predators Food Habits Project Tim Essington and Mary Hunsicker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    .pelamisinthedietofsharks %N %W %O %IRI N = 42 N = 5 Katsuwonus pelamis 0.00% 5.00% 10.00% 15.00% 20.00% 25.00% 30.00% 35 Thunnus albacares Thunnus alalunga Unid.Scombridae Sarda orientalis Katsuwonus pelamis Elagatis Unid.Scombridae Sarda orientalis Katsuwonus pelamis Elagatis bipinnulata Coryphaena hippurus Auxis spp

  12. Transposons Currently in Use in Genetic Analysis of Salmonella Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, John R.

    Transposons Currently in Use in Genetic Analysis of Salmonella Species ELLIOT ALTMAN, JOHN R. ROTH in genetic analysis, with emphasis on work done in Salmonella typhimurium (official designation, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium) and on the methods available for use in Salmonella spp. Many of these methods

  13. Fun at the Fusarium circinatum Genome Annotation Jamboree (24 27 May 2010)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in many countries where Pinus spp. are grown as non-natives. One example is found in South Africa where establishment in the country. It has also moved from the nursery environment to plantations in South Africa Africa. This work has developed to a point where knowledge of the genome of the pathogen has become

  14. Particle Physics Phenomenology 8. QCD jets and jet algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    Particle Physics Phenomenology 8. QCD jets and jet algorithms Torbj¨orn Sj¨ostrand Department k. All rotationally symmetric. SppS (CERN): need to separate beam jets from highp ones. First solution: cone jets in (, ) space, e.g. UA1. (Second solution: clustering like Durham

  15. Particle Physics Phenomenology 8. QCD jets and jet algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    Particle Physics Phenomenology 8. QCD jets and jet algorithms Torbj¨orn Sj¨ostrand Department rotationally symmetric. SppS (CERN): need to separate beam jets from highp ones. First solution: cone jets" infrared safe return to UA1 cone algorithm. Torbj¨orn Sj¨ostrand PPP 8: QCD jets and jet algorithms slide 2

  16. Molecular biological enhancement of coal desulfurization: Cloning and expression of the sulfoxide/sulfone/sulfonate/sulfate genes in Pseudomonads and Thiobacillae. [Rhodococcus erythropolis, Thiobacillus acidophilus, Thiobacillus novellus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawiec, S.

    1992-01-01

    Research continues on desulfurization of coal using microorganisms. Topics reported on this quarter include: desulfurization with N1-36 (presumptively identified as Rhodochrous erythropolis), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of chromosomal DNA's of Thiobacillus spp., and fresh isolates with the presumptive capacity to desulfurize dibenzothiophenes.

  17. Molecular biological enhancement of coal desulfurization: Cloning and expression of the sulfoxide/sulfone/sulfonate/sulfate genes in Pseudomonads and Thiobacillae. Eleventh quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawiec, S.

    1992-08-01

    Research continues on desulfurization of coal using microorganisms. Topics reported on this quarter include: desulfurization with N1-36 (presumptively identified as Rhodochrous erythropolis), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of chromosomal DNA`s of Thiobacillus spp., and fresh isolates with the presumptive capacity to desulfurize dibenzothiophenes.

  18. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Big dams and salmon evolution: changes in thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angilletta, Michael

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Big dams and salmon evolution: changes in thermal regimes and their potential (Oncorhynchus spp.) across portions of their natural range, dams have arguably played a major role in many locations (NRC 1996; Lichatowich 1999; Ruckelshaus et al. 2002). Large dams (>15 m tall)­ designed

  19. Rust disease of eucalypts, caused by Puccinia psidii, did not originate via host jump from guava in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Brazil RODRIGO N. GRACß A,*1 AMY L. ROSS-DAVIS, NED B. KLOPFENSTEIN, MEE-SOOK KIM, TOBIN L. PEEVER,§ PHIL Fitopatologia, Universidade Federal de Vicßosa, Vicßosa, MG 36570-000, Brazil, USDA Forest Service ­ Rocky, Puccinia psidii, is a devastating pathogen of introduced eucalypts (Eucalyptus spp.) in Brazil where

  20. Lamb shift due to surface plasmon polariton modes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Qingqing; Al-Amri, M.; Kamli, Ali; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2008-01-01

    The Lamb shift of a hydrogen atom due to the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes is calculated and we observe both band edge and surface enhancement. The atom sits inside a thin metal slab which is sandwiched by two semi-infinite dielectrics...

  1. Declines in deepwater sculpin Myoxocephalus thompsonii energy density associated with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Declines in deepwater sculpin Myoxocephalus thompsonii energy density associated thompsonii energy density associated with the disappearance of Diporeia spp. in lakes Huron and Michigan (in 2001 and 2009), and in Lake Huron off Harbor Beach, Michigan (in 2007) for energy density and diet

  2. Fabrication of metal matrix composite by semi-solid powder processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yufeng

    2012-11-28

    Various metal matrix composites (MMCs) are widely used in the automotive, aerospace and electrical industries due to their capability and flexibility in improving the mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of a component. However, current manufacturing technologies may suffer from insufficient process stability and reliability and inadequate economic efficiency and may not be able to satisfy the increasing demands placed on MMCs. Semi-solid powder processing (SPP), a technology that combines traditional powder metallurgy and semi-solid forming methods, has potential to produce MMCs with low cost and high efficiency. In this work, the analytical study and experimental investigation of SPP on the fabrication of MMCs were explored. An analytical model was developed to understand the deformation mechanism of the powder compact in the semi-solid state. The densification behavior of the Al6061 and SiC powder mixtures was investigated with different liquid fractions and SiC volume fractions. The limits of SPP were analyzed in terms of reinforcement phase loading and its impact on the composite microstructure. To explore adoption of new materials, carbon nanotube (CNT) was investigated as a reinforcing material in aluminum matrix using SPP. The process was successfully modeled for the mono-phase powder (Al6061) compaction and the density and density distribution were predicted. The deformation mechanism at low and high liquid fractions was discussed. In addition, the compaction behavior of the ceramic-metal powder mixture was understood, and the SiC loading limit was identified by parametric study. For the fabrication of CNT reinforced Al6061 composite, the mechanical alloying of Al6061-CNT powders was first investigated. A mathematical model was developed to predict the CNT length change during the mechanical alloying process. The effects of mechanical alloying time and processing temperature during SPP were studied on the mechanical, microstructural and compositional properties of the Al6061-CNT composites. A shear lag model was applied to predict the mechanical property (hardness) of the composite. This work demonstrated the promising potential of SPP in the fabrication of particle/fiber (nanotube) reinforced MMCs.

  3. Special population planner, version 4.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, J.; Tanzman, E.; Metz, W.

    2007-03-26

    Emergencies happen every day. Many are caused by storms or auto accidents and can be planned for, if not predicted. Emergencies resulting from natural hazards often affect a large number of people, and planning for them can be difficult, since knowledge of the needs of the people involved is generally unavailable. Emergencies resulting from accidents at industrial and military facilities can also be large scale in nature if people must be evacuated or sheltered in place. Federal planning for large scale emergencies is the responsibility of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which provides assistance to various emergency management agencies at the national, state and local level. More information about FEMA is available at http://www.fema.gov/. The purpose of the Special Population Planner (SPP) is to help emergency planners address the needs of persons with special needs. The exact definition of 'special population' is a policy decision. Policymakers have included a variety of groups in this term, such as persons with disabilities, those who do not have vehicles with which to evacuate, children who are unattended at times (latchkey children), and many others. The SPP was developed initially for the Alabama Emergency Management Agency as part of its Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP), which aids emergency planning and preparedness in communities surrounding military installations across the United States where chemical weapons are stored pending their destruction under federal law. Like that specialized application, this open-source version contains a set of specialized Geographic Information System (GIS) tools to facilitate emergency planning on behalf of persons with special needs, regardless of how the term is defined. While the original SPP system was developed for emergency planning relating to chemical hazards, it can be applied to other threats as well. It is apparent from Hurricane Katrina and other natural and man-made disasters that many of the problems posed by emergency planning for a chemical weapons agent release are shared by other hazards as well. The notion that emergency planning shares common functions underlies the decision by FEMA to include the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) in its 'all-hazards' planning approach. The CSEPP's official planning guidance operationalizes this approach by suggesting that state and local CSEPP emergency plans 'should be appended to the existing all-hazards emergency plan.' The SPP is programmed as a set of tools within an ESRI ArcMap 9.1 project. ArcMap is a component of both ESRI ArcGIS 9.1 and ESRI ArcView 9.1, and it provides a rich GIS user interface for viewing spatial and tabular data, analyzing it, and producing output reports and maps. This GIS interface has been augmented with the SPP tools for a user interface that provides custom functionality for emergency planning. The system as released also includes some hypothetical example records for special needs populations, facilities, resources, control points and sirens sufficient for showing how the system would work with real information. A GIS database is included with some publicly available example layers. The SPP is designed to support emergency planners as they address emergency management issues, and includes capabilities that support the collection and importing of data, the review of data in a spatial context, and GIS tools for emergency planning. The SPP system allows for the identification and categorization of response zones to allow for multiple levels of preparedness. An Immediate Response Zone (IRZ) might be designated as the area 0 to 10 miles from a facility where the response would be the most urgent. SPP can support more than one set of planning zones to accommodate different types of emergencies or the different jurisdictions of emergency response organizations. These areas can be delineated by any number of criteria that make sense for the area. An area like New Orleans might designate response zones based on the depth above/below s

  4. Seasonal food habits of the coyote in the South Carolina coastal plain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrecengost, J., D.; Kilgo, J., C.; Mallard, D.; Ray, H., S.; Miller, K., V.

    2008-07-01

    Abstract - Spatial and temporal plasticity in Canis latrans (coyote) diets require regional studies to understand the ecological role of this omnivorous canid. Because coyotes have recently become established in South Carolina, we investigated their food habits by collecting 415 coyote scats on the Savannah River Site in western South Carolina from May 2005-July 2006. Seasonally available soft mast was the most common food item in 12 of the 15 months we sampled. Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) was the most common food item during December (40%) and March (37%). During May-June, fruits of Prunus spp. and Rubus spp. were the most commonly occurring food items. Fawns were the most common mammalian food item during May and June of both years despite low deer density.

  5. Supplement 16, Parasite-Subject Catalogue: Parasites: Protozoa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segal, Dorothy B.; Humphrey, Judith M.; Beard, Mary I.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Kirby, Margie D.

    1966-01-01

    coxinga coxinga (blood) Babesia spp. life cycle "Babesia argentina, re- sembling" cattle Babesia argentina resistance of Drought- master cattle Babesia argentina bovine immunity to tick-transmitted Babesia argentina (Lig- Mahoney, D. F., 1964 a... ni?res, 1903) complement fixing antibody significsnce Babesia argentina Parra Orme?o, ?. E., 1953 f? Lignieres, I9OI pl. figs. 1-6 Syn.: Babesiella minor Rees, 1934 Alperin, A. L.; and Bevins, N. F., 1963 a, figs. 1-2 California Mc...

  6. Population genetic structure of Conophthorus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) inferred from mitochondrial DNA haplotypes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menard, Katrina Louise

    2006-10-30

    observed with some species (Kelley et al. 1999, Kerdelhue? et al. 2002, Jordal et al. 2002). However, lineage diversification among other species, including Conophthorus spp., has shown little association with host (Cognato et al. 2003, Cognato et al...) with an automatically recording flight mill. Journal of Applied Entomology, 112, 138-145. Jenkins, M.J. (1984) Effect of Western White pine cone production variability on mountain pine cone beetle populations. Great Basin Naturalist, 44(2), 310-312. Jordal, B...

  7. Buckhannon folio, West Virginia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taff, Joseph A. (Joseph Alexander), b. 1862.; Brooks, Alfred H. (Alfred Hulse), 1871-1924.

    1896-01-01

    of spiders throughout the state. Misumenops spp. were most abundant in West and Northwest Texas, with M. celer (Hentz) the most common species in these areas. Oxyopes saiticus was the most abundant spider in all areas of the state except West, Northwest... could then be eliminated as an important factor in predicting the dynamics of other arthropods. The cotton fleahopper (Pseudatomoscelis seriatus [Reuter]) model (Hartstack and Sterling 1986) uses numbers of six spider species to predict fleahopper...

  8. Effects of Cytosine-phosphate-Guanosine Oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) on vaccination and immunization of neonatal chickens 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barri, Adriana

    2005-02-17

    (CpG-ODN) on Vaccination and Immunization of Neonatal Chickens. (December 2004) Adriana Barri, D.V.M., Universidad Nacional Aut?noma de M?xico Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. David J. Caldwell The objective of this investigation... was to evaluate the effects of administering CpG-ODN to commercial strain chickens as a potential adjuvant to vaccination against Salmonella, Eimeria spp., and Newcastle disease virus, or immunization to bovine serum albumin (BSA). During Experiment 1, which...

  9. Comparative Analysis of the Morphology and Materials Properties of Pinniped Vibrissae 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginter, Carly C.

    2012-02-14

    in identifying benthic prey (Ognev 1935). Monk (Monachus spp.) seals, which also do not show the beaded profile, are opportunistic foraging generalists, with the Hawaiian subspecies (M. schauinslandi) hunting primarily benthic prey on coral reefs... species of phocid seals, except bearded and monk (Monachus sp.) seals, have a sinusoidal beaded profile to their mystacial vibrissal hair shafts (Dehnhardt and Kaminski 1995; Hyv?rinen and Katajisto 1984; King 1983; Marshall et al. 2006; Ognev 1935...

  10. Cross-comparison of spacecraft-environment interaction model predictions applied to Solar Probe Plus near perihelion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchand, R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada); Miyake, Y.; Usui, H. [Graduate School of System Informatics, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Deca, J.; Lapenta, G. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Matéo-Vélez, J. C. [Department of Space Environment, Onera—The French Aerospace Lab, Toulouse (France); Ergun, R. E.; Sturner, A. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Génot, V. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie, Université de Toulouse, France and CNRS, IRAP, 9 Av. colonel Roche, BP 44346, 31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Hilgers, A. [ESA, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, PO Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Markidis, S. [High Performance Computing and Visualization Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-06-15

    Five spacecraft-plasma models are used to simulate the interaction of a simplified geometry Solar Probe Plus (SPP) satellite with the space environment under representative solar wind conditions near perihelion. By considering similarities and differences between results obtained with different numerical approaches under well defined conditions, the consistency and validity of our models can be assessed. The impact on model predictions of physical effects of importance in the SPP mission is also considered by comparing results obtained with and without these effects. Simulation results are presented and compared with increasing levels of complexity in the physics of interaction between solar environment and the SPP spacecraft. The comparisons focus particularly on spacecraft floating potentials, contributions to the currents collected and emitted by the spacecraft, and on the potential and density spatial profiles near the satellite. The physical effects considered include spacecraft charging, photoelectron and secondary electron emission, and the presence of a background magnetic field. Model predictions obtained with our different computational approaches are found to be in agreement within 2% when the same physical processes are taken into account and treated similarly. The comparisons thus indicate that, with the correct description of important physical effects, our simulation models should have the required skill to predict details of satellite-plasma interaction physics under relevant conditions, with a good level of confidence. Our models concur in predicting a negative floating potential V{sub fl}??10V for SPP at perihelion. They also predict a “saturated emission regime” whereby most emitted photo- and secondary electron will be reflected by a potential barrier near the surface, back to the spacecraft where they will be recollected.

  11. The impacts of mining on the habitat ecology of raccoons in east-central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beucler, Michele

    1995-01-01

    and Movements Results Home Ranges Habitat Use Diel Activity and Movements Discussion. Management Implications. 10 13 13 15 18 . . 19 . . 20 20 . . 26 . . 32 37 . . 42 III RESTING SITE USE BY RACCOONS IN UNMINED AND RECLAIMED AREAS . 45.... (aimed Shrubland Ulrims stare Populus defrordes Borrhoos frofunlfoflo Panicum vrrgorum Elaeagrtris umbelloro Ulmus ufare Paulrorn I'Inorunt Herbaceous plams Rubus spp 35 34 06 202 Grove Improved Pasture Developed'. Poult rocdo Plntoms...

  12. Economic Decision Criteria for Fleahopper and Bollworm Management in Cotton: Texas Coastal Bend. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masud, Sharif M.; Benedict, John H.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    1990-01-01

    , this also resulted in higher profits than in lower insect growth rates. Regev et al. (1976) used a simplified version of the Gutierrez et al. (1976) alfalfa - Egyptian alfalfa weevil model to optimize a ' profit function for the alfalfa weevil... the analysis of pesticide use and timing for Lygus spp. control (Gutierrez et al. 1977) and biological control of boll weevil (Murty et al. 1980 and Curry and Cate 1984). Economic evaluations indicate considerable success owing to the implementation...

  13. DOE's Policy Regarding Laboratories, Plants and Sites Engaging in Strategic Partnership Projects with Other Federal Agencies, Independent Organizations, and the Private Sector

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-12-17

    The purpose of this Policy is to set the context in which DOE and its laboratories, plants, and sites should pursue Strategic Partnership Projects (SPP) with other Federal government agencies, state and local institutions, universities, foreign entities and/or private companies. The Policy is applicable to the DOE laboratories, plants, and sites, and to the DOE programs that own them and facilitate their work. Does not cancel/supersede other directives.

  14. Supplement 24, Part 5, Parasite-Subject Catalogue, Parasites: Arthropoda and Miscellaneous Phyla 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Shirley J.; Hood, Martha W.; Shaw, Judith H.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Kirby, Margie D.; Hanfman, Deborah T.; Zidar, Judith A.

    1982-01-01

    , 1897, H. dentipalpis Warburton ? Nuttall, 1909) (Burma, Viverra t_. tangalunga; Pahang, Negri Sembilan, North Borneo, Felis bengalensis tingia; Pahang, F. pardus fusca; Negri Sembilan, Paradoxurus hermaphroditus philippinensis; North Borneo...-99 (Dorcopsis sp. ; Merauke (Dutch New Guinea) ) Zwart, D., (1959C), 812-831 (wallaby; Dutch New Guinea) Haemaphysalis bandicota Hoogstraal, H. & Kohls, G, ?. , (1965A), 460-466 (Bandicota spp. ; Taiwan, Thailand and Burma) Haemaphysalis bartelsi Schulze...

  15. Supplement 18, Part 6, Parasite-Subject Catalogue: Subject Headings And Treatment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Martha L.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Humphrey, Judith M.; Segal, Dorothy B.

    1973-01-01

    Absorption. ?See also Osmosis] Absorption Arme. ?.; and Read, ?. P. acetate, butyrate, (?r.), 1968 a Hymenolepis diminuta, rats Absorption of phbsphorus by calf, Ostertagia spp. Bilkovich, F. R.j and Hansard, S. L., 1968 a Acarology Bregetova, N. G...., 1965 e Russia Acarology Singer, G., I967 a comparison of mounting techniques 2 INDEX-CATALOGUE OF MEDICAL AND VETERINARY ZOOLOGY Adaptation. [See also Evolution] Adaptation Dyl'ko, N. I., 1967 a mutual adaptations between parasite and host...

  16. Cotton Root Rot Studies with Special Reference to Sclerotia, Cover Crops, Rotations, Tillage, Seeding Rates, Soil Fungicides, and Effects on Seed Quality. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Cyril H.

    1942-01-01

    and Composition of Viable and Non-Viable Sclerotia------------ 19 of ,Certain Monocotyledonous Plants by the .Root-Rot Fungus 21 e of Legumes Under Blackland Conditions 24 Sweet Clovers 2 4 Sesbania 2 5 Guar 25 Cowpeas -_--. totations and Grr ires... to be adapted to blackland soils under rot conditions. Of the many legume species tested at the Blacl Experiment Station, the sweet clovers (Melibotus spp.) , Sesbania, (Cyarnopsia tetragonoloba) and cowpea (Vigna sinensis) have proved adaptable. S~veet c1o...

  17. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C2, supplment au n2, Tome *6, fvrier 1985 page C2-713

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    OF POLARIZED PROTONS IN SppS AND OTHER HIGH ENERGY HADRON COLLIDERS* E.D. Courant Brookhaven National-350 0.8, 14-30 Tevatron (FNAL) pp 800-1000 10, 150 RHIC (BNL) p-ion 250-350 20-30 HERA (DESY) e-p 850 40. 3. Traversal of polarization resonances in booster synchrotrons (up to 15-70 GeV). 4. Elimination

  18. Synthesis of mono-dispersed nanofluids using solution plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heo, Yong Kang; Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Ueno, Tomonaga; Saito, Nagahiro

    2014-07-14

    Small-sized and well-dispersed gold nanoparticles (NPs) for nanofluidics have been synthesized by electrical discharge in liquid environment using termed solution plasma processing (SPP). Electrons and the hydrogen radicals are reducing the gold ions to the neutral form in plasma gas phase and liquid phase, respectively. The gold NPs have the smallest diameter of 4.9?nm when the solution temperature was kept at 20?°C. Nucleation and growth theory describe the evolution of the NP diameter right after the reduction reaction in function of the system temperature, NP surface energy, dispersion energy barrier, and nucleation rate. Negative charges on the NPs surface during and after SPP generate repulsive forces among the NPs avoiding their agglomeration in solution. Increasing the average energy in the SPP determines a decrease of the zeta potential and an increase of the NPs diameter. An important enhancement of the thermal conductivity of 9.4% was measured for the synthesized nanofluids containing NPs with the smallest size.

  19. Evaluation of remedial alternatives for the Solar Ponds Plume, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hranac, K.C.; Chromec, F.W.; Fiehweg, R.; Hopkins, J.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes the process used to select a remedial alternative for handling contaminated groundwater emanating from the Solar Evaporation Ponds (Solar Ponds) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) and prevent it from reaching the nearest surface water body, North Walnut Creek. Preliminary results of field investigations conducted to provide additional information for the alternatives analysis are also presented. The contaminated groundwater is referred to as the Solar Ponds Plume (SPP). The primary contaminants in the SPP are nitrate and uranium; however, some metals exceed the site action levels at several locations and volatile organic compounds, originating from other sources, also have been detected. Currently the SPP, local surface water runoff, and infiltrated precipitation are collected by a trench system located downgradient of the Solar Ponds and pumped to three storage tanks. The water (two to three million gallons annually) is then pumped to an on-site treatment plant for evaporation at an approximate cost of $7.57 per liter.

  20. Analysis of organic pollutant degradation in pulsed plasma by coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bratescu, Maria Antoneta; Hieda, Junko; Umemura, Tomonari; Saito, Nagahiro; Takai, Osamu

    2011-05-15

    The degradation of p-benzoquinone (p-BQ) in water was investigated by the coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) method, in which the change of the anti-Stokes signal intensity corresponding to the vibrational transitions of the molecule is monitored during and after solution plasma processing (SPP). In the beginning of SPP treatment, the CARS signal intensity of the ring vibrational molecular transitions at 1233 and 1660 cm{sup -1} increases under the influence of the electric field of the plasma, depending on the delay time between the plasma pulse and the laser firing pulse. At the same time, the plasma contributes to the degradation of p-BQ molecules by generating hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals, which decompose p-BQ into different carboxylic acids. After SPP, the CARS signal intensity of the vibrational bands of p-BQ ceased and the degradation of p-BQ was confirmed by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and liquid chromatography analysis.

  1. Effect of graphene on photoluminescence properties of graphene/GeSi quantum dot hybrid structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. L.; Ma, Y. J.; Wang, W. Q.; Ding, K.; Wu, Q.; Fan, Y. L.; Yang, X. J.; Zhong, Z. Y.; Jiang, Z. M., E-mail: zmjiang@fudan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, Key Laboratory of Micro and Nano Photonic Structures (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Chen, D. D.; Xu, F. [SHU-SolarE R and D Lab, Department of Physics, College of Science, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2014-07-14

    Graphene has been discovered to have two effects on the photoluminescence (PL) properties of graphene/GeSi quantum dot (QD) hybrid structures, which were formed by covering monolayer graphene sheet on the multilayer ordered GeSi QDs sample surfaces. At the excitation of 488?nm laser line, the hybrid structure had a reduced PL intensity, while at the excitation of 325?nm, it had an enhanced PL intensity. The attenuation in PL intensity can be attributed to the transferring of electrons from the conducting band of GeSi QDs to the graphene sheet. The electron transfer mechanism was confirmed by the time resolved PL measurements. For the PL enhancement, a mechanism called surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) enhanced absorption mechanism is proposed, in which the excitation of SPP in the graphene is suggested. Due to the resonant excitation of SPP by incident light, the absorption of incident light is much enhanced at the surface region, thus leading to more exciton generation and a PL enhancement in the region. The results may be helpful to provide us a way to improve optical properties of low dimensional surface structures.

  2. When are surface plasmon polaritons excited in the Kretschmann-Raether configuration?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Foley, IV, Jonathan J.; Harutyunyan, Hayk; Rosenmann, Daniel; Divan, Ralu; Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Gray, Stephen K.

    2015-04-23

    It is widely believed that the reflection minimum in a Kretschmann-Raether experiment results from direct coupling into surface plasmon polariton modes. Our experimental results provide a surprising discrepancy between the leakage radiation patterns of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) launched on a layered gold/germanium film compared to the K-R minimum, clearly challenging this belief. We provide definitive evidence that the reflectance dip in K-R experiments does not correlate with excitation of an SPP mode, but rather corresponds to a particular type of perfectly absorbing (PA) mode. Results from rigorous electrodynamics simulations show that the PA mode can only exist under externalmore »driving, whereas the SPP can exist in regions free from direct interaction with the driving field. These simulations show that it is possible to indirectly excite propagating SPPs guided by the reflectance minimum in a K-R experiment, but demonstrate the efficiency can be lower by more than a factor of 3. We find that optimal coupling into the SPP can be guided by the square magnitude of the Fresnel transmission amplitude.« less

  3. Hematology, Parasitology, and Serology of Free-Ranging Coyotes (Canis latrans) from South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Debra, Lee; Schrecengost, Joshua; Merrill, Anita; Kilgo, John; Ray, H., Scott; Karl V. Miller, Karl, V.; Baldwin, Charles, A.

    2009-07-01

    ABSTRACT: Blood and feces were collected from 34 adult (19 males, 15 females) and seven juvenile (three males, one female, three not reported) free-ranging coyotes (Canis latrans) on the US Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site (South Carolina, USA). Significant (P,0.05) hematologic differences by sex were noted for red blood cell counts, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. Biochemical differences by sex occurred only for albumen (P,0.05). Twentyone adults were antibody positive for at least one of four viruses: canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1; 68%), West Nile virus (WNV; 60%), Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV; 38%), and Canine distemper virus (CDV; 15%). Of the seven Leptospira serovars tested for, seven (25%) of 28 adults were positive for one or more of five serovars: Pomona, Grippotyphosa, Icterohaemorrhagiae, Bratislava, and Autumnalis. Three (43%) of seven juveniles had seropositivity for a virus, one each for CDV, CAV-1, and WNV. No juveniles were seropositive for EEEV or any of the seven Leptospira serovars. Blood smears of 12 adults were positive for Dirofilaria immitis microfilaria, but blood smears from all juveniles were negative. Parvovirus was identified by electron microscopy from the feces of one adult. Ancylostoma spp., Trichuris spp., and Isospora spp. were observed in fecal samples. These data may aid in understanding the role of coyotes in disease ecology.

  4. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

    2009-01-30

    In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources among SPP members. For these entities, investment in DR is often driven by the need to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demand charges for each distribution cooperative. o About 65-70percent of the interruptible/curtailable tariffs and DLC programs are routinely triggered based on market conditions, not just for system emergencies. Approximately, 53percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and 447 MW can be dispatched with less than thirty minutes notice. o Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels ranged from $0.40 to $8.30/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $0.30 to $4.60/kW-month for DLC programs. A few interruptible programs offered incentive payments which were explicitly linkedto actual load reductions during events; payments ranged from 2 to 40 cents/kWh for load curtailed.

  5. Solar neutrino processes in the relativistic field theory model of the deuteron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Ivanov; H. Oberhummer; N. I. Troitskaya; M. Faber

    1998-11-04

    The generalized version of the relativistic field theory model of the deuteron (RFMD) is applied to the description of processes of astrophysical interest and low-energy elastic NN scattering. The value of the astrophysical factor S_{pp}(0) = 5.52x10^{-25} MeV b is found to be enhanced by a factor of 1.42 with respect to the classical value S^*_{pp}(0) = 3.89x10{-25} MeV b obtained by Kamionkowski and Bahcall in the potential model approach (PMA). The astrophysical aspects of this enhancement are discussed. The cross sections for the disintegration of the deuteron by (anti-) neutrinos nu_e + D -> e^- + p + p, anti-nu_e + D -> e^+ + n + n and nu_e(anti-nu_e) + D -> nu_e(anti-nu_e) + n + p are calculated for the energies of (anti-) neutrinos ranging from thresholds up to 10 MeV. The results are discussed in comparison with the PMA data. The cross sections for anti-nu_e + D -> e^+ + n + n and anti-nu_e + D -> anti-nu_e + n + p averaged over the reactor anti-neutrino energy spectrum agree well with experimental data. The astrophysical factor S_{pep}(0) for the process p + e^- + p -> nu_e + D (or pep-process) is calculated relative to S_{pp}(0) in complete agreement with the result obtained by Bahcall and May. The reaction rate for the neutron-proton radiative capture is calculated in agreement with the PMA result obtained for pure M1 transition. It is shown that in the RFMD one can describe low--energy elastic NN scattering in complete agreement with low-energy nuclear phenomenology.

  6. Influence of hexavalent chromium on lactate-enriched Hanford groundwater microbial communities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somenahally, Anil C; Mosher, Jennifer J; Yuan, Tong; Podar, Mircea; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Brown, Steven D; Yang, Zamin Koo; Hazen, Terry C; Arkin, Adam; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Zhou, Jizhong; Elias, Dwayne A

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction and immobilization of chromate (Cr(VI)) is a plausible bioremediation strategy. However, higher Cr(VI) concentrations may impose stress on native Cr-reducing communities. We sought to determine if Cr(VI) would influence the lactate enriched native microbial community structure and function in groundwater from the Cr contaminated site at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were amended with lactate and Cr(VI) (0.0, 0.1 and 3.0 mg/L). Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI) concentrations, 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition in bioreactors were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and some differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) was reduced in the bioreactors. With lactate enrichment, the native communities did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. Native bacterial communities were diverse, whereas after lactate enrichment, Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., were the most predominant groups in all bioreactors. Similarly, the Archaea diversity significantly decreased from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%), Halobacteriales (12%), Methanoregula (8%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%) after lactate enrichment. Composition of several key functional genes was distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant probes (chrA), Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result the 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not appear to give chromate reducing strains a competitive advantage for proliferation or for increasing Cr-reduction.

  7. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction under Fermentative Conditions with Lactate Stimulated Native Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somenahally, Anil C; Mosher, Jennifer J; Yuan, Tong; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Brown, Steven D; Yang, Zamin Koo; Hazen, Terry C; Arkin, Adam; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Van Nostrand, Dr. Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong; Elias, Dwayne A

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in-situ is a plausible bioremediation strategy in electron-acceptor limited environments. However, higher [Cr(VI)] may impose stress on syntrophic communities and impact community structure and function. The study objectives were to understand the impacts of Cr(VI) concentrations on community structure and on the Cr(VI)-reduction potential of groundwater communities at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were used to grow native communities enriched with lactate (30 mM) and continuously amended with Cr(VI) at 0.0 (No-Cr), 0.1 (Low-Cr) and 3.0 (High-Cr) mg/L. Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI), 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) levels were below detection from week 1 until week 15. With lactate enrichment, native bacterial diversity substantially decreased as Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., became the dominant groups, but did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. The Archaea diversity also substantially decreased after lactate enrichment from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%). Methane production was lower in High-Cr reactors suggesting some inhibition of methanogens. Several key functional genes were distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant microbes, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not impact the overall bacterial community structure.

  8. Functional Role of Infective Viral Particles on Metal Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coates, John D.

    2014-04-01

    A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites was based on the immobilization of U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Previous studies identified Geobacter sp., including G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens, as predominant U(VI)-reducing bacteria under acetate-oxidizing and U(VI)-reducing conditions. Examination of the finished genome sequence annotation of the canonical metal reducing species Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA and G. metallireduceans strain GS-15 as well as the draft genome sequence of G. uraniumreducens strain Rf4 identified phage related proteins. In addition, the completed genome for Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans and the draft genome sequence of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain G20, two more model metal-reducing bacteria, also revealed phage related sequences. The presence of these gene sequences indicated that Geobacter spp., Anaeromyxobacter spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. are susceptible to viral infection. Furthermore, viral populations in soils and sedimentary environments in the order of 6.4×10{sup 6}–2.7×10{sup 10} VLP’s cm{sup -3} have been observed. In some cases, viral populations exceed bacterial populations in these environments suggesting that a relationship may exist between viruses and bacteria. Our preliminary screens of samples collected from the ESR FRC indicated that viral like particles were observed in significant numbers. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential functional role viruses play in metal reduction specifically Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, the environmental parameters affecting viral infection of metal reducing bacteria, and the subsequent effects on U transport.

  9. Trichoderma: the genomics of opportunistic success

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Druzhinina, Irina S.; Seiboth, Verena Seidl; Estrella, Alfredo Herrera; Horwitz, Benjamin A.; Kenerley, Charles M.; Monte, Enrique; Mukherjee, Prasun K.; Zeilinger, Susanne; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2011-01-01

    Trichoderma is a genus of common filamentous fungi that display a remarkable range of lifestyles and interactions with other fungi, animals and plants. Because of their ability to antagonize plant-pathogenic fungi and to stimulate plant growth and defence responses, some Trichoderma strains are used for biological control of plant diseases. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in molecular ecology and genomics which indicate that the interactions of Trichoderma spp. with animals and plants may have evolved as a result of saprotrophy on fungal biomass (mycotrophy) and various forms of parasitism on other fungi (mycoparasitism), combined with broad environmental opportunism.

  10. High-Energy Physics Strategies and Future Large-Scale Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, F

    2014-01-01

    We sketch the actual European and international strategies and possible future facilities. In the near term the High Energy Physics (HEP) community will fully exploit the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). Post-LHC options include a linear e+e- collider in Japan (ILC) or at CERN (CLIC), as well as circular lepton or hadron colliders in China (CepC/SppC) and Europe (FCC). We conclude with linear and circular acceleration approaches based on crystals, and some perspectives for the far future of accelerator-based particle physics.

  11. Image excitons and plasmon-exciton strong coupling in two-dimensional perovskite semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Wendy; Ibbotson, Lindsey A.; Leipold, David; Runge, Erich; Prakash, G. Vijaya; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2015-04-10

    -inorganic perovskite semiconductors have attracted a great deal of attention for their optical and electrical properties1–13. 3D perovskites have re- cently been used to produce solar cells with efficiencies of up to 15%1–4, while 2D per- ovskites are known to form... frequency of ?FP = 65meV, the simple scaling above predicts ?SPP ? ?FP ? (22/72).(407/22)=156meV, in excellent agreement with our measurements. Using SPPs to strongly couple to the excitons thus dramatically reduces the cavity length, thus enhancing...

  12. Ethanol from sugar cane: flask experiments using the EX-FERM technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolz, C.; Cabrera, S.

    1980-09-01

    Alcohol production at the laboratory scale from sugar cane pieces by the EX-FERM technique was studied with 37 strains of Saccharomyces spp. The EX-FERM process is novel in that it employs the simultaneous extraction and fermentation of the sucrose in a cane-water suspension. The final ethanol concentration reached 4.27 to 5.37g per 100 ml, and sugar consumption was above 98% in three cases during a second EX-FERM cycle employing previously air-dried chips and pith. Product yields were within accepted values. Cane treatment did not appear to affect the results at this level.

  13. Corn Hybrids for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, J. S.; McAfee, T. E.

    1954-01-01

    Corn Hybrids for Terns ST LOCATIONS AREA I AREA II ARE4 Ill AREA IV 2Prdrie View 7.Tylw lZ.Lockhart 17.Waxahachie 22San Antonio 3.Cleveland 8.Mt. Pbctont I3Brsnha B.Garland 23Lamposas 4.Colbqe Sta. 9Sulphw Spp. 14Holland l9.0reenvilb 24...Stephenville ,J* 5.K'rbyvilb I0.Cbrkdb 15.Tanpk 2ODetiion 25.Wllothe TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS. DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS DIGEST The Texas corn acreage planted to hybrids increased from less than 1 percent of the total acrea...

  14. Design and Manufacture of the RF Power Supply and RF Transmission Line for SANAEM Project Prometheus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turemen, G; Unel, G; Alacakir, A

    2015-01-01

    A 1-5 MeV proton beamline is being built by the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority in collaboration with a number of graduate students from different universities. The most important aspect of the project, is to acquire the design ability and manufacturing capability of all the components locally. SPP will be an accelerator and beam diagnostics test facility and it will also serve the detector development community with its low beam current. This paper discusses the design and construction of the RF power supply and the RF transmission line components such as its waveguide converters and its circulator.

  15. Greeneville folio, Tennessee-North Carolina 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keith, Arthur.

    1905-01-01

    to develop SIP-creditable calcs Development of a procedure to calculate emissions reduction from all wind farms in ERCOT area Weather normalization of the daily wind power to the base year selected by TCEQ Energy Systems Laboratory 4 SUMMARYEMISSIONS... Shackleford Borden Scurry Howard Nolan Taylor 18162 3 22 19 21 30 31 Cottle 343335 Floyd 36 Jack 38 39 40 Martin 41 Childress 42 4443 46 4 10 Ector Wind Farms in ERCOT Wind Farms in WSCC Wind Farms in SPP ERCOT Power Grid and Wind Farms in Texas Wind Projects...

  16. Towards a consistent estimate of the chiral low-energy constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Cirigliano; G. Ecker; M. Eidemuller; R. Kaiser; A. Pich; J. Portoles

    2006-07-17

    Guided by the large-Nc limit of QCD, we construct the most general chiral resonance Lagrangian that can generate chiral low-energy constants up to O(p^6). By integrating out the resonance fields, the low-energy constants are parametrized in terms of resonance masses and couplings. Information on those couplings and on the low-energy constants can be extracted by analysing QCD Green functions of currents both for large and small momenta. The chiral resonance theory generates Green functions that interpolate between QCD and chiral perturbation theory. As specific examples we consider the VAP and SPP Green functions.

  17. Life history and habitat associations of the broad wood cockroach, Parcoblatta lata (Blattaria: Blattellidae) and other native cockroaches in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, Scott; Hanula, James, L.

    2002-06-18

    Wood cockroaches are an important prey of the red-cockaded woodpecker, Picoides borealis, an endangered species inhabiting pine forests in the southern United States. These woodpeckers forage on the boles of live pine trees, but their prey consists of a high proportion of wood cockroaches, Parcoblatta spp., that are more commonly associated with dead plant material. Cockroach population density samples were conducted on live pine trees, dead snags and coarse woody debris on the ground. The studies showed that snags and logs are also important habitats of wood cockroaches in pine forests.

  18. Property:EZFeed/ExpectedCapacity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation, search PropertyIsoOther Jump to:RtoSpp Jump to:

  19. Property:EZFeed/InstalledCapacity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation, search PropertyIsoOther Jump to:RtoSpp Jump to:Property Edit

  20. Property:EZFeed/JurisdictionDesc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation, search PropertyIsoOther Jump to:RtoSpp Jump to:Property

  1. Property:EZFeed/JurisdictionImage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation, search PropertyIsoOther Jump to:RtoSpp Jump

  2. Property:EZFeed/Relevant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  3. Property:Ease of Application | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  4. Property:Editor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  5. Property:ElectricPowerAttribute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  6. Property:ElectricalCurrentMeasurement | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  7. Lemnos Interoperable Security Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Stewart; Ron Halbgewachs; Adrian Chavez; Rhett Smith; David Teumim

    2012-01-31

    The manner in which the control systems are being designed and operated in the energy sector is undergoing some of the most significant changes in history due to the evolution of technology and the increasing number of interconnections to other system. With these changes however come two significant challenges that the energy sector must face; 1) Cyber security is more important than ever before, and 2) Cyber security is more complicated than ever before. A key requirement in helping utilities and vendors alike in meeting these challenges is interoperability. While interoperability has been present in much of the discussions relating to technology utilized within the energy sector and especially the Smart Grid, it has been absent in the context of cyber security. The Lemnos project addresses these challenges by focusing on the interoperability of devices utilized within utility control systems which support critical cyber security functions. In theory, interoperability is possible with many of the cyber security solutions available to utilities today. The reality is that the effort required to achieve cyber security interoperability is often a barrier for utilities. For example, consider IPSec, a widely-used Internet Protocol to define Virtual Private Networks, or â?? tunnelsâ?ť, to communicate securely through untrusted public and private networks. The IPSec protocol suite has a significant number of configuration options and encryption parameters to choose from, which must be agreed upon and adopted by both parties establishing the tunnel. The exercise in getting software or devices from different vendors to interoperate is labor intensive and requires a significant amount of security expertise by the end user. Scale this effort to a significant number of devices operating over a large geographical area and the challenge becomes so overwhelming that it often leads utilities to pursue solutions from a single vendor. These single vendor solutions may inadvertently lock utilities into proprietary and closed systems Lemnos is built on the successes of Open PCS Security Architecture for Interoperable Design (OPSAID), a previous DOE National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) project. It enhances security interoperability by identifying basic cyber security functions based on utility requirements and then selecting open source solutions, namely Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) RFCs, to support these functions. Once identified, specific configuration parameters for each RFC suitable for the electric utility control system environment are identified and documented. These configuration parameters are referred to as Interoperable Configuration Profiles (ICP) and their effectiveness within the utility control systems environment is verified with comprehensive testing as the final step in the process. The project focused on development of ICPs for four security protocols (IPsec, SSH, LDAP, and Syslog) which represent fundamental building blocks which can be utilized for securing utility control systems. These ICPs are product agnostic and can be applied modularly to any device (router, substation gateway, intelligent electronic device, etc.) within the utility control system as the end user deems necessary for their unique system architecture. The Lemnos Interoperable Security Program is a public-private partnership under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability's Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (CEDS) program and supports The Roadmap to Secure Energy Delivery Systems. In addition to EnerNex, the core team supporting the effort includes Tennessee Valley Authority, Sandia National Laboratories, and Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories. Adding to the core team effort is collaboration from additional industry participants in the project including the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Alien Vault, Cisco, Encore Networks, GarrettCom, Industrial Defender, N-Dimension Solutions, Phoenix Contact, RuggedCom, and Siemens.

  8. Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1989-12-31

    Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

  9. Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

  10. Phages of lactic acid bacteria: The role of genetics in understanding phage-host interactions and their co-evolutionary processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahony, Jennifer; Ainsworth, Stuart; Stockdale, Stephen; Sinderen, Douwe van

    2012-12-20

    Dairy fermentations are among the oldest food processing applications, aimed at preservation and shelf-life extension through the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) starter cultures, in particular strains of Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus spp. and Leuconostoc spp. Traditionally this was performed by continuous passaging of undefined cultures from a finished fermentation to initiate the next fermentation. More recently, consumer demands on consistent and desired flavours and textures of dairy products have led to a more defined approach to such processes. Dairy (starter) companies have responded to the need to define the nature and complexity of the starter culture mixes, and dairy fermentations are now frequently based on defined starter cultures of low complexity, where each starter component imparts specific technological properties that are desirable to the product. Both mixed and defined starter culture approaches create the perfect environment for the proliferation of (bacterio)phages capable of infecting these LAB. The repeated use of the same starter cultures in a single plant, coupled to the drive towards higher and consistent production levels, increases the risk and negative impact of phage infection. In this review we will discuss recent advances in tracking the adaptation of phages to the dairy industry, the advances in understanding LAB phage-host interactions, including evolutionary and genomic aspects.

  11. Phase transition in PT symmetric active plasmonic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattheakis, M; Molina, M I; Tsironis, G P

    2015-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are coherent electromagnetic surface waves trapped on an insulator-conductor interface. The SPPs decay exponentially along the propagation due to conductor losses, restricting the SPPs propagation length to few microns. Gain materials can be used to counterbalance the aforementioned losses. We provide an exact expression for the gain, in terms of the optical properties of the interface, for which the losses are eliminated. In addition, we show that systems characterized by lossless SPP propagation are related to PT symmetric systems. Furthermore, we derive an analytical critical value of the gain describing a phase transition between lossless and prohibited SPPs propagation. The regime of the aforementioned propagation can be directed by the optical properties of the system under scrutiny. Finally, we perform COMSOL simulations verifying the theoretical findings.

  12. Time-resolved measurement of single pulse femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kafka, K R P; Li, H; Yi, A; Cheng, J; Chowdhury, E A

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved diffraction microscopy technique has been used to observe the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) from the interaction of a single femtosecond laser pulse (pump) with a nano-scale groove mechanically formed on a single-crystal Cu substrate. The interaction dynamics (0-1200 ps) was captured by diffracting a time-delayed, frequency-doubled pulse from nascent LIPSS formation induced by the pump with an infinity-conjugate microscopy setup. The LIPSS ripples are observed to form sequentially outward from the groove edge, with the first one forming after 50 ps. A 1-D analytical model of electron heating and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation induced by the interaction of incoming laser pulse with the groove edge qualitatively explains the time-evloution of LIPSS formation.

  13. Facile residue analysis of recent and prehistoric cook-stones using handheld Raman spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Laura; Cao, Bin; Sinyukov, Alexander M; Joshi, Amitabh; Scully, Rob; Sanders, Virgil; Voronine, Dmitri V

    2013-01-01

    We performed food residue analysis of cook-stones from experimental and prehistoric earth ovens using a handheld Raman spectrometry. Progress in modern optical technology provides a facile means of rapid non-destructive identification of residue artifacts from archaeological sites. For this study spectral signatures were obtained on sotol (Dasylirion spp.) experimentally baked in an earth oven as well as sotol residue on an experimentally used processing tool. Inulin was the major residue component. The portable handheld Raman spectrometer also detected traces of inulin on boiling stones used to boil commercially obtained inulin. The Raman spectra of inulin and sotol may be useful as signatures of wild plant residues in archaeology. Spectroscopic analysis of millennia-old cook-stones from prehistoric archaeological sites in Fort Hood, TX revealed the presence of residues whose further identification requires improvement of current optical methods.

  14. Development of a Hybrid Power Supply and RF Transmission Line for SANAEM RFQ Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogur, S; Unel, G; Alacakir, A

    2015-01-01

    SANAEM Project Prometheus (SPP) has been building a proton beamline at MeV range. Its proton source, two solenoids, and a low energy diagnostic box have been already manufactured and installed. These are going to be followed by a 4-vane RFQ to be powered by two stage PSU. The first stage is a custom-built solid state amplifier providing 6 kW at 352.2 MHz operating frequency. The second stage, employing TH 595 tetrodes from Thales, will amplify this input to 160 kW in a short pulsed mode. The power transfer to the RFQ will be achieved by the means of a number of WR2300 full and half height waveguides, 3 1/8" rigid coaxial cables, joined by appropriate adapters and converters and by a custom design circulator. This paper summarizes the experience acquired during the design and the production of these components.

  15. Nonlinear behavior of vibrating molecules on suspended graphene waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Amrita

    2015-01-01

    Suspended graphene waveguides were deposited on micron-scale periodic metal (plasmonic) structures. Raman scattering of test molecules (B. Megaterium), deposited on the waveguides' surface, exhibited azimuthal cycles upon rotation: at these micron scales, spontaneous Raman ought to be independent of phase matching conditions. In addition, we observed angular-selective quadratic intensity dependence contrary to the typical linear behavior of spontaneous Raman. The effects were observed at very modest pump laser intensities (<10 MW/cm2 at the sample surface, oftenly used in Raman experiments). We attributed these observations to nonlinear coupling between the vibrating molecules and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes at the molecular vibration frequency. It was assessed that the polariton mode propagates through fairly long distances (over 100 microns).

  16. Occurrence of aflatoxins in human foodstuffs in South Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loetter, L.H.; Kroehm, H.J.

    1988-02-01

    Aflatoxins are toxic metabolites of Aspergillus spp and have been reported as contaminants in a number of foodstuffs, namely corn, rice, peanuts, and cereals. In the Republic of South Africa, aflatoxin levels in human foodstuffs are limited to a maximum of 10 ..mu..g/kg for the total and 5 ..mu..g/kg for aflatoxin B/sub 1/. During 1985 and 1986, samples of sorghum beer, sorghum cereal, peanuts, peanut butter and maize meal were purchased from supermarkets in Johannesburg and analyzed for aflatoxins. A total of 414 samples were analyzed during the survey. In 1985, roughly a third of the samples were contaminated with aflatoxins, with no levels in excess of the legal limit. In 1986 the percentage of contaminated samples rose significantly, but the levels of contamination remained low, with only one sample exceeding the legal maximum.

  17. How sulphate-reducing microorganisms cope with stress: Lessons from systems biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, J.; He, Q.; Hemme, C.L.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hillesland, K.; Zhou, A.; He, Z.; Nostrand, J.D. Van; Hazen, T.C.; Stahl, D.A.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.

    2011-04-01

    Sulphate-reducing microorganisms (SRMs) are a phylogenetically diverse group of anaerobes encompassing distinct physiologies with a broad ecological distribution. As SRMs have important roles in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and various metals, an understanding of how these organisms respond to environmental stresses is of fundamental and practical importance. In this Review, we highlight recent applications of systems biology tools in studying the stress responses of SRMs, particularly Desulfovibrio spp., at the cell, population, community and ecosystem levels. The syntrophic lifestyle of SRMs is also discussed, with a focus on system-level analyses of adaptive mechanisms. Such information is important for understanding the microbiology of the global sulphur cycle and for developing biotechnological applications of SRMs for environmental remediation, energy production, biocorrosion control, wastewater treatment and mineral recovery.

  18. Runoff water quality and vegetation production on reclaimed mine spoil in the Post Oak Savannah of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Losensky, Karen Mae

    1986-01-01

    FALL 1985 6oa 61bc 60ab 28b 22a 25b 58ab 79a 68a 36b 8b 22b 89b 79c 81 c 98a 95a 99a 77c 83c Blbc 80cd 76c 78d 88ab 93ab 89ab 93ab 96a 96a 1 Similar letters in each column are not significantly different at the P 45 level. 26 Planted... NON-SEEDED SPP ALL SPECIES COLLECTION DATES TS OB ALL TS OB ALL TS OB ALL SPRING 1984 S1RUIER 1984 FALL 1984 17ab 26b 46bc 66ab 56b 34b 34b 23a 29ab 47a 25a 36a 36b 23a 29ab 47c 42c 52bc 46c 53bc 46c 37c SPRING 1985 42c SUMl81ER 1985 39c...

  19. Multipole surface plasmons in metallic nanohole arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishida, Munehiro; Kadoya, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The quasi-bound electromagnetic modes for the arrays of nanoholes perforated in thin gold film are analyzed both numerically by the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) method and semi-analytically by the coupled mode method. It is shown that when the size of the nanohole occupies large portion of the unit cell, the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at both sides of the film are combined by the higher order waveguide modes of the holes to produce multipole surface plasmons: coupled surface plasmon modes with multipole texture on the electric field distributions. Further, it is revealed that the multipole texture either enhances or suppresses the couplings between SPPs depending on their diffraction orders and also causes band inversion and reconstruction in the coupled SPP band structure. Due to the multipole nature of the quasi-bound modes, multiple dark modes coexist to produce variety of Fano resonance structures on the transmission and reflection spectra.

  20. The Exiguobacterium genus: biodiversity and biogeography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Kathariou, Sophia [North Carolina State University; Tiedje, James M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2009-01-01

    Abstract. Bacteria of the genus Exiguobacterium are low G + C, Gram-positive facultative anaerobes that have been repeatedly isolated from ancient Siberian permafrost. In addition, Exiguobacterium spp. have been isolated from markedly diverse sources, including Greenland Glacial ice, hot springs at Yellowstone National Park, the rhizosphere of plants, and the environment of food processing plants. Strains of this hereto little known bacterium that have been retrieved from such different (and often extreme) environments are worthy of attention as they are likely to be specifically adapted to such environments and to carry variations in the genome which may correspond to psychrophilic and thermophilic adaptations. However, comparative genomic investigations of Exiguobacterium spp. from different sources have been limited. In this study, we employed different molecular approaches for the comparative analysis of 24 isolates from markedly diverse environments including ancient Siberian permafrost and hot springs at Yellowstone National Park. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with I-CeuI (an intron-encoded endonuclease), AscI and NotI were optimized for the determination of genomic fingerprints of nuclease-producing isolates. The application of a DNA macroarray for 82 putative stress-response genes yielded strain-specific hybridization profiles. Cluster analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequence data, PFGE I-CeuI restriction patterns and hybridization profiles suggested that Exiguobacterium strains formed two distinct divisions that generally agreed with temperature ranges for growth. With few exceptions (e.g., Greenland ice isolate GIC31), psychrotrophic and thermophilic isolates belonged to different divisions.

  1. Linking ceragenins to water-treatment membranes to minimize biofouling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Feng, Yanshu (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah); Savage, Paul B. (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah); Pollard, Jacob (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah); Branda, Steven S.; Goeres, Darla (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Buckingham-Meyer, Kelli (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Stafslien, Shane (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Marry, Christopher; Jones, Howland D. T.; Lichtenberger, Alyssa; Kirk, Matthew F.; McGrath, Lucas K. (LMATA, Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-01

    Ceragenins were used to create biofouling resistant water-treatment membranes. Ceragenins are synthetically produced antimicrobial peptide mimics that display broad-spectrum bactericidal activity. While ceragenins have been used on bio-medical devices, use of ceragenins on water-treatment membranes is novel. Biofouling impacts membrane separation processes for many industrial applications such as desalination, waste-water treatment, oil and gas extraction, and power generation. Biofouling results in a loss of permeate flux and increase in energy use. Creation of biofouling resistant membranes will assist in creation of clean water with lower energy usage and energy with lower water usage. Five methods of attaching three different ceragenin molecules were conducted and tested. Biofouling reduction was observed in the majority of the tests, indicating the ceragenins are a viable solution to biofouling on water treatment membranes. Silane direct attachment appears to be the most promising attachment method if a high concentration of CSA-121a is used. Additional refinement of the attachment methods are needed in order to achieve our goal of several log-reduction in biofilm cell density without impacting the membrane flux. Concurrently, biofilm forming bacteria were isolated from source waters relevant for water treatment: wastewater, agricultural drainage, river water, seawater, and brackish groundwater. These isolates can be used for future testing of methods to control biofouling. Once isolated, the ability of the isolates to grow biofilms was tested with high-throughput multiwell methods. Based on these tests, the following species were selected for further testing in tube reactors and CDC reactors: Pseudomonas ssp. (wastewater, agricultural drainage, and Colorado River water), Nocardia coeliaca or Rhodococcus spp. (wastewater), Pseudomonas fluorescens and Hydrogenophaga palleronii (agricultural drainage), Sulfitobacter donghicola, Rhodococcus fascians, Rhodobacter katedanii, and Paracoccus marcusii (seawater), and Sphingopyxis spp. (groundwater). The testing demonstrated the ability of these isolates to be used for biofouling control testing under laboratory conditions. Biofilm forming bacteria were obtained from all the source water samples.

  2. Genomic analyses of bacterial porin-cytochrome gene clusters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.

    2014-11-26

    In this study, the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteriamore »from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides.« less

  3. Diel metabolomics analysis of a hot spring chlorophototrophic microbial mat leads to new hypotheses of community member metabolisms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Young-Mo; Nowack, Shane; Olsen, Millie; Becraft, Eric; Wood, Jason M.; Thiel, Vera; Klapper, Isaac; Kuhl, Michael; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bryant, Donald A.; et al

    2015-04-17

    Dynamic environmental factors such as light, nutrients, salt, and temperature continuously affect chlorophototrophic microbial mats, requiring adaptative and acclimative responses to stabilize composition and function. Quantitative metabolomics analysis can provide insights into metabolite dynamics for understanding community response to such changing environmental conditions. In this study, we quantified volatile organic acids, polar metabolites (amino acids, glycolytic and citric acid cycle intermediates, nucleobases, nucleosides, and sugars), wax esters, and polyhydroxyalkanoates, resulting in the identification of 104 metabolites and related molecules in thermal chlorophototrophic microbial mat cores collected over a diel cycle in Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park. A limited number ofmore »predominant taxa inhabiting this community and their functional potentials have been previously identified through metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses and in situ metabolisms and metabolic interactions among these taxa have been hypothesized. Our metabolomics results confirmed the diel cycling of photorespiration (e.g. glycolate) and fermentation (e.g. acetate, propionate, and lactate) products, the carbon storage polymers polyhydroxyalkanoates, and dissolved gases (e.g. H2 and CO2) in the waters overlying the mat, which were hypothesized to occur in major mat chlorophototrophic community members. In addition, we have formulated the following new hypotheses: 1) the morning hours are a time of biosynthesis of amino acids, DNA, and RNA; 2) Synechococcus spp. produce CH4 via metabolism of phosphonates, and photo-inhibited cells may also produce lactate via fermentation as an alternate metabolism; 3) glycolate and lactate are exchanged among Synechococcus and Roseiflexus spp.; and 4) fluctuations in many metabolite pools (e.g. wax esters) at different times of day result from species found at different depths within the mat responding to temporal differences in their niches.« less

  4. Diel metabolomics analysis of a hot spring chlorophototrophic microbial mat leads to new hypotheses of community member metabolisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Mo; Nowack, Shane; Olsen, Millie; Becraft, Eric; Wood, Jason M.; Thiel, Vera; Klapper, Isaac; Kuhl, Michael; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bryant, Donald A.; Ward, David M.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2015-04-17

    Dynamic environmental factors such as light, nutrients, salt, and temperature continuously affect chlorophototrophic microbial mats, requiring adaptative and acclimative responses to stabilize composition and function. Quantitative metabolomics analysis can provide insights into metabolite dynamics for understanding community response to such changing environmental conditions. In this study, we quantified volatile organic acids, polar metabolites (amino acids, glycolytic and citric acid cycle intermediates, nucleobases, nucleosides, and sugars), wax esters, and polyhydroxyalkanoates, resulting in the identification of 104 metabolites and related molecules in thermal chlorophototrophic microbial mat cores collected over a diel cycle in Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park. A limited number of predominant taxa inhabiting this community and their functional potentials have been previously identified through metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses and in situ metabolisms and metabolic interactions among these taxa have been hypothesized. Our metabolomics results confirmed the diel cycling of photorespiration (e.g. glycolate) and fermentation (e.g. acetate, propionate, and lactate) products, the carbon storage polymers polyhydroxyalkanoates, and dissolved gases (e.g. H2 and CO2) in the waters overlying the mat, which were hypothesized to occur in major mat chlorophototrophic community members. In addition, we have formulated the following new hypotheses: 1) the morning hours are a time of biosynthesis of amino acids, DNA, and RNA; 2) Synechococcus spp. produce CH4 via metabolism of phosphonates, and photo-inhibited cells may also produce lactate via fermentation as an alternate metabolism; 3) glycolate and lactate are exchanged among Synechococcus and Roseiflexus spp.; and 4) fluctuations in many metabolite pools (e.g. wax esters) at different times of day result from species found at different depths within the mat responding to temporal differences in their niches.

  5. Leucaena and tall grasses as energy crops in humid lower south USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prine, G.M.; Woodard, K.R.; Cunilio, T.V.

    1994-12-31

    The tropical leguminous shrub/tree, leucaena (Leucaena spp. mainly leucocephala), and perennial tropical tall grasses such as elephantgrass (Pennisetum purpureum), sugarcane, and energycane (Saccharum spp.) are well adapted to the long growing seasons and high rainfall of the humid lower South. In much of the area the topgrowth is killed by frost during winter and plants regenerate from underground parts in spring. Selected accessions from a duplicated 373 accession leucaena nursery had an average annual woody stem dry matter production of 31.4 Mg ha{sup -1}. Average oven dry stem wood yields from selected accessions adjusted for environmental enrichment over the 4 growth seasons were 78.9 Mg ha{sup -1} total and average annual yield of 19.7 Mg ha{sup -1}. The tall perennial grasses have linear growth rates of 18 to 27 g m{sup 2}d{sup -1} for long periods (140 to 196 d and sometimes longer) each season. Oven dry biomass yields of tall grasses have varied from 20 to 45 Mg ha{sup -1} in mild temperature locations to over 60 Mg ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} in warm subtropics of the lower Florida peninsula. Tall grasses and leucaena, once established, may persist for many seasons. A map showing the possible range of the crops in lower South is shown. Highest biomass yields of tall grasses have been produced when irrigated with sewage effluent or when grown on phosphatic clay and muck soils of south Florida. Several companies are considering using leucaena and/or tall grasses for bioenergy in the phosphatic mining area of Polk County, Florida.

  6. Carbon dioxide fixation by Metallosphaera yellowstonensis and acidothermophilic iron-oxidizing microbial communities from Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, Ryan; Whitmore, Laura M.; Moran, James J.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Inskeep, William P.

    2014-05-01

    The fixation of inorganic carbon (as carbon dioxide) has been documented in all three domains of life and results in the biosynthesis of a diverse suite of organic compounds that support the growth of heterotrophic organisms. The primary aim of this study was to assess the importance of carbon dioxide fixation in high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat communities and in pure cultures of one of the dominant Fe(II)-oxidizing organisms (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis strain MK1) present in situ. Protein-encoding genes of the complete 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate (3-HP/4-HB) carbon fixation pathway were identified in pure-cultures of M. yellowstonensis strain MK1. Metagenome sequencing from the same environments also revealed genes for the 3-HP/4-HB pathway belonging to M. yellowstonensis populations, as well as genes for a complete reductive TCA cycle from Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales). Stable isotope (13CO2) labeling was used to measure the fixation of CO2 by M. yellowstonensis strain MK1, and in ex situ assays containing live Fe(III)-oxide microbial mats. Results showed that M. yellowstonensis strain MK1 fixes CO2 via the 3-HP/4-HB pathway with a fractionation factor of ~ 2.5 ‰. Direct analysis of the 13C composition of dissolved inorganic C (DIC), dissolved organic C (DOC), landscape C and microbial mat C showed that mat C is comprised of both DIC and non-DIC sources. The estimated contribution of DIC carbon to biomass C (> ~ 35%) is reasonably consistent with the relative abundance of known chemolithoautotrophs and corresponding CO2 fixation pathways detected in metagenome sequence. The significance of DIC as a major source of carbon for Fe-oxide mat communities provides a foundation for examining microbial interactions in these systems that are dependent on the activity of autotrophic organisms such as Hydrogenobaculum and Metallosphaera spp.

  7. Bacterial diversity analysis of Huanglongbing pathogen-infected citrus, using PhyloChip and 16S rRNA gene clone library sequencing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankar Sagaram, U.; DeAngelis, K.M.; Trivedi, P.; Andersen, G.L.; Lu, S.-E.; Wang, N.

    2009-03-01

    The bacterial diversity associated with citrus leaf midribs was characterized 1 from citrus groves that contained the Huanglongbing (HLB) pathogen, which has yet to be cultivated in vitro. We employed a combination of high-density phylogenetic 16S rDNA microarray and 16S rDNA clone library sequencing to determine the microbial community composition of symptomatic and asymptomatic citrus midribs. Our results revealed that citrus leaf midribs can support a diversity of microbes. PhyloChip analysis indicated that 47 orders of bacteria from 15 phyla were present in the citrus leaf midribs while 20 orders from phyla were observed with the cloning and sequencing method. PhyloChip arrays indicated that nine taxa were significantly more abundant in symptomatic midribs compared to asymptomatic midribs. Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) was detected at a very low level in asymptomatic plants, but was over 200 times more abundant in symptomatic plants. The PhyloChip analysis was further verified by sequencing 16S rDNA clone libraries, which indicated the dominance of Las in symptomatic leaves. These data implicate Las as the pathogen responsible for HLB disease. Citrus is the most important commercial fruit crop in Florida. In recent years, citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also called citrus greening, has severely affected Florida's citrus production and hence has drawn an enormous amount of attention. HLB is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus (6,13), characterized by blotchy mottling with green islands on leaves, as well as stunting, fruit decline, and small, lopsided fruits with poor coloration. The disease tends to be associated with a phloem-limited fastidious {alpha}-proteobacterium given a provisional Candidatus status (Candidatus Liberobacter spp. later changed to Candidatus Liberibacter spp.) in nomenclature (18,25,34). Previous studies indicate that HLB infection causes disorder in the phloem and severely impairs the translocation of assimilates in host plants (5,27,40). Tatineni and colleagues discovered that the HLB bacteria were unevenly distributed in phloem of bark tissue, vascular tissue of the leaf midrib, roots, and different floral and fruit parts (43). Unsuccessful attempts in culturing the pathogen are notably hampering efforts to understand its biology and pathogenesis mechanism. Using a modified Koch's Postulates approach, Jagoueix and colleagues were able to re-infect periwinkle plants from a mixed microbial community harvested from HLB diseased plants (25). Emergence of the disease in otherwise healthy plants led to the conclusion that HLB was associated with Candidatus Liberibacter sp. based on its 16S rDNA sequence (18,25). Currently, three species of the pathogen are recognized from trees with HLB disease based on 16S rDNA sequence: Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus (Las), Ca. Liberibacter africanus (Laf), and Ca. Liberibacter americanus (Lam); Las is the most prevalent species among HLB diseased trees (5,12,18,25,44). Las is naturally transmitted to citrus by the psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, and can be artificially transmitted by grafting from citrus to citrus and dodder (Cuscuta campestris) to periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) or tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum Xanthi) (5). Based on current research regarding the associations of Liberibacter in planta there is not enough evidence to implicate Liberibacter as the definitive causal agent of HLB disease due to its resistance to cultivation in vitro. It is possible that HLB disease may be the result of complex etiology where Liberibacter interacts with other endophytic bacteria. However, there is not enough evidence regarding its association(s) in planta to make this conclusion, nor is it known whether associated microbial communities play a role in expression of pathogenic traits. The main objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that other bacteria besides Ca. Liberibacter spp. are associated with citrus greening disease. The differences between the relative abundance, species richness and phylogenetic diversity of the microbial communitie

  8. Comparative genomic analysis of nine Sphingobium strains: Insights into their evolution and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) degradation pathways

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Verma, Helianthous; Kumar, Roshan; Oldach, Phoebe; Sangwan, Naseer; Khurana, Jitendra P.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Lal, Rup

    2014-11-23

    Background: Sphingobium spp. are efficient degraders of a wide range of chlorinated and aromatic hydrocarbons. In particular, strains which harbour the lin pathway genes mediating the degradation of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers are of interest due to the widespread persistence of this contaminant. Here, we examined the evolution and diversification of the lin pathway under the selective pressure of HCH, by comparing the draft genomes of six newly-sequenced Sphingobium spp. (strains LL03, DS20, IP26, HDIPO4, P25 and RL3) isolated from HCH dumpsites, with three existing genomes (S. indicum B90A, S. japonicum UT26S and Sphingobium sp. SYK6). Results: Efficient HCH degraders phylogeneticallymore »clustered in a closely related group comprising of UT26S, B90A, HDIPO4 and IP26, where HDIPO4 and IP26 were classified as subspecies with ANI value >98%. Less than 10% of the total gene content was shared among all nine strains, but among the eight HCH-associated strains, that is all except SYK6, the shared gene content jumped to nearly 25%. Genes associated with nitrogen stress response and two-component systems were found to be enriched. The strains also housed many xenobiotic degradation pathways other than HCH, despite the absence of these xenobiotics from isolation sources. In addition, these strains, although non-motile, but posses flagellar assembly genes. While strains HDIPO4 and IP26 contained the complete set of lin genes, DS20 was entirely devoid of lin genes (except linKLMN) whereas, LL03, P25 and RL3 were identified as lin deficient strains, as they housed incomplete lin pathways. Further, in HDIPO4, linA was found as a hybrid of two natural variants i.e., linA1 and linA2 known for their different enantioselectivity. In conclusion, the bacteria isolated from HCH dumpsites provide a natural testing ground to study variations in the lin system and their effects on degradation efficacy. Further, the diversity in the lin gene sequences and copy number, their arrangement with respect to IS6100 and evidence for potential plasmid content elucidate possible evolutionary acquisition mechanisms for this pathway. This study further opens the horizon for selection of bacterial strains for inclusion in an HCH bioremediation consortium and suggests that HDIPO4, IP26 and B90A would be appropriate candidates for inclusion.« less

  9. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part B; Limnology, Primary Production, and Zooplankton in Lake Roosevelt, Washington, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shields, John; Spotts, Jim; Underwood, Keith

    2002-11-01

    The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program is the result of a merger between two projects, the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 to continue work historically completed under the separate projects, and is now referred to as the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. The 1998 Annual Report, Part B. Limnology, Primary Production, and Zooplankton in Lake Roosevelt, Washington examined the limnology, primary production, and zooplankton at eleven locations throughout the reservoir. The 1998 research protocol required a continuation of the more complete examination of limnological parameters in Lake Roosevelt that began in 1997. Phytoplankton and periphyton speciation, phytoplankton and periphyton chlorophyll a analysis, complete zooplankton biomass analysis by taxonomic group, and an increased number of limnologic parameters (TDG, TDS, etc.) were examined and compared with 1997 results. Total dissolved gas levels were greatly reduced in 1998, compared with 1997, likely resulting from the relatively normal water year experienced in 1998. Mean water temperatures were similar to what was observed in past years, with a maximum of 22.7 C and a minimum of 2.6 C. Oxygen concentrations were also relatively normal, with a maximum of 16.6 mg/L, and a minimum of 0.9 mg/L. Phytoplankton in Lake Roosevelt was primarily composed of microplankton (29.6%), Cryptophyceae (21.7%), and Bacillriophyceae (17.0 %). Mean total phytoplankton chlorophyll a maximum concentration occurred in May (3.53 mg/m{sup 3}), and the minimum in January (0.39 mg/m{sup 3}). Phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations appear to be influenced by hydro-operations and temperature. Trophic status as indicated by phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations place Lake Roosevelt in the oligomesotrophic range. Periphyton colonization rates and biovolume were significantly greater at a depth of 1.5 m (5 ft) when compared with a 4.6 m (15 ft) depth, and during the shorter incubation periods (two and four weeks). Mean zooplankton densities were greatest for Copepoda (88 %), then Daphnia spp. (10%) and other Cladocera (2.1%), while the zooplankton biomass assessment indicated Daphnia spp. had the greatest biomass (53.6%), then Copepoda (44.0%) and other Cladocera (2.5%). Mean overall zooplankton densities were the lowest observed since 1991. The cause was unclear, but may have been an artifact of human error. It seems unlikely that hydro-operations played a significant part in the reduction of zooplankton in light of the relatively friendly water year of 1998.

  10. Comparative genomic analysis of nine Sphingobium strains: Insights into their evolution and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) degradation pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Helianthous; Kumar, Roshan; Oldach, Phoebe; Sangwan, Naseer; Khurana, Jitendra P.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Lal, Rup

    2014-11-23

    Background: Sphingobium spp. are efficient degraders of a wide range of chlorinated and aromatic hydrocarbons. In particular, strains which harbour the lin pathway genes mediating the degradation of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers are of interest due to the widespread persistence of this contaminant. Here, we examined the evolution and diversification of the lin pathway under the selective pressure of HCH, by comparing the draft genomes of six newly-sequenced Sphingobium spp. (strains LL03, DS20, IP26, HDIPO4, P25 and RL3) isolated from HCH dumpsites, with three existing genomes (S. indicum B90A, S. japonicum UT26S and Sphingobium sp. SYK6). Results: Efficient HCH degraders phylogenetically clustered in a closely related group comprising of UT26S, B90A, HDIPO4 and IP26, where HDIPO4 and IP26 were classified as subspecies with ANI value >98%. Less than 10% of the total gene content was shared among all nine strains, but among the eight HCH-associated strains, that is all except SYK6, the shared gene content jumped to nearly 25%. Genes associated with nitrogen stress response and two-component systems were found to be enriched. The strains also housed many xenobiotic degradation pathways other than HCH, despite the absence of these xenobiotics from isolation sources. In addition, these strains, although non-motile, but posses flagellar assembly genes. While strains HDIPO4 and IP26 contained the complete set of lin genes, DS20 was entirely devoid of lin genes (except linKLMN) whereas, LL03, P25 and RL3 were identified as lin deficient strains, as they housed incomplete lin pathways. Further, in HDIPO4, linA was found as a hybrid of two natural variants i.e., linA1 and linA2 known for their different enantioselectivity. Conclusion: The bacteria isolated from HCH dumpsites provide a natural testing ground to study variations in the lin system and their effects on degradation efficacy. Further, the diversity in the lin gene sequences and copy number, their arrangement with respect to IS6100 and evidence for potential plasmid content elucidate possible evolutionary acquisition mechanisms for this pathway. This study further opens the horizon for selection of bacterial strains for inclusion in an HCH bioremediation consortium and suggests that HDIPO4, IP26 and B90A would be appropriate candidates for inclusion.

  11. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River estuary. Volume I. Entrainment-impact estimates for six fish populations inhabiting the Hudson River estuary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boreman, J.; Barnthouse, L.W.; Vaughn, D.S.; Goodyear, C.P.; Christensen, S.W.; Kumar, K.D.; Kirk, B.L.; Van Winkle, W.

    1982-01-01

    This volume is concerned with the estimation of the direct (or annual) entrainment impact of power plants on populations of striped bass, white perch, Alosa spp. (blueback herring and alewife), American shad, Atlantic tomcod, and bay anchovy in the Hudson River estuary. Entrainment impact results from the killing of fish eggs, larvae, and young juveniles that are contained in the cooling water cycled through a power plant. An Empirical Transport Model (ETM) is presented as the means of estimating a conditional entrainment mortality rate (defined as the fraction of a year class which would be killed due to entrainment in the absence of any other source of mortality). Most of this volume is concerned with the estimation of several parameters required by the ETM: physical input parameters (e.g., power-plant withdrawal flow rates); the longitudinal distribution of ichthyoplankton in time and space; the duration of susceptibility of the vulnerable organisms; the W-factors, which express the ratios of densities of organisms in power plant intakes to densities of organisms in the river; and the entrainment mortality factors (f-factors), which express the probability that an organism will be killed if it is entrained. Once these values are obtained, the ETM is used to estimate entrainment impact for both historical and projected conditions.

  12. The soil microbiome influences grapevine-associated microbiota

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zarraonaindia, Iratxe; Owens, Sarah M.; Weisenhorn, Pamela; West, Kristin; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Lax, Simon; Bokulich, Nicholas A.; Mills, David A.; Martin, Gilles; Taghavi, Safiyh; et al

    2015-03-24

    Grapevine is a well-studied, economically relevant crop, whose associated bacteria could influence its organoleptic properties. In this study, the spatial and temporal dynamics of the bacterial communities associated with grapevine organs (leaves, flowers, grapes, and roots) and soils were characterized over two growing seasons to determine the influence of vine cultivar, edaphic parameters, vine developmental stage (dormancy, flowering, preharvest), and vineyard. Belowground bacterial communities differed significantly from those aboveground, and yet the communities associated with leaves, flowers, and grapes shared a greater proportion of taxa with soil communities than with each other, suggesting that soil may serve as a bacterialmore »reservoir. A subset of soil microorganisms, including root colonizers significantly enriched in plant growth-promoting bacteria and related functional genes, were selected by the grapevine. In addition to plant selective pressure, the structure of soil and root microbiota was significantly influenced by soil pH and C:N ratio, and changes in leaf- and grape-associated microbiota were correlated with soil carbon and showed interannual variation even at small spatial scales. Diazotrophic bacteria, e.g., Rhizobiaceae and Bradyrhizobium spp., were significantly more abundant in soil samples and root samples of specific vineyards. Vine-associated microbial assemblages were influenced by myriad factors that shape their composition and structure, but the majority of organ-associated taxa originated in the soil, and their distribution reflected the influence of highly localized biogeographic factors and vineyard management.« less

  13. Changes in the composition of the human fecal microbiome following bacteriotherapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khoruts, A.; Dicksved, J.; Jansson, J.K.; Sadowsky, M.J.

    2009-08-15

    CDAD is the major known cause of antibiotic-induced diarrhea and colitis, and the disease is thought to result from persistent disruption of commensal gut microbiota. Bacteriotherapy by way of fecal transplantation can be used to treat recurrent CDAD and is thought to re-establish the normal colonic microflora. However, limitations of conventional microbiologic techniques have until recently precluded testing of this idea. In this study we used T-RFLP and 16S rRNA gene sequencing approaches to characterize the bacterial composition of the colonic microflora in a patient suffering from recurrent CDAD, before and after treatment by fecal transplantation from a healthy donor. While the patient's residual colonic microbiota, prior to therapy, was deficient in members of the bacterial divisions-Firmicutes and Bacteriodetes, transplantation had a dramatic impact on the composition of the patient's gut microbiota. By 14 days post transplantation, the fecal bacterial composition of the recipient was highly similar to the donor and was dominated by Bacteroides spp. strains and an uncharacterized butyrate producing bacterium. The change in bacterial composition was accompanied by resolution of the patient's symptoms. The striking similarity of the recipient's and donor's intestinal microbiota following bacteriotherapy suggests that the donor's bacteria quickly occupied their requisite niches, resulting in restoration of both the structure and function of the microbial communities present.

  14. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Westchester Creek project area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B.

    1996-11-01

    The objective of the Westchester Creek project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from this area to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Westchester Creek was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in May 1995. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Westchester Creek project area consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic acute and water-column toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Thirteen individual sediment core samples were collected from this area and analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One composite sediment sample representing the Westchester Creek area to be dredged, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended- particulate phase (SPP) of the Westchester Creek sediment composite, was analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS.

  15. Current Status of the SANAEM RFQ Accelerator Beamline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turemen, G; Ogur, S; Yildiz, V; Mete, O; Oz, S; Ozbey, A; Yildiz, H; Yaman, F; Akgun, Y; Alacakir, A; Bolukdemir, S; Bozbey, A; Sahin, A; Unel, G; Erhan, S

    2015-01-01

    The design and production studies of the proton beamline of SPP, which aims to acquire know-how on proton accelerator technology thru development of man power and serves as particle accelerator technologies test bench, continue at TAEK-SANAEM as a multi-phase project. For the first phase, 20 keV protons will be accelerated to 1.3 MeV by a single piece RFQ. Currently, the beam current and stability tests are ongoing for the Inductively Coupled Plasma ion source. The measured magnetic field maps of the Low Energy Beam Transport solenoids are being used for matching various beam configurations of the ion source to the RFQ by computer simulations. The installation of the low energy diagnostics box was completed in Q1 of 2015. The production of the RFQ cavity was started with aluminum 7075-T6 which will be subsequently coated by Copper to reduce the RF (Ohmic) losses. On the RF side, the development of the hybrid power supply based on solid state and tetrode amplifiers continues. All RF transmission components hav...

  16. Parametric study of flow patterns behind the standing accretion shock wave for core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwakami, Wakana; Nagakura, Hiroki [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yamada, Shoichi, E-mail: wakana@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2014-05-10

    In this study, we conduct three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations systematically to investigate the flow patterns behind the accretion shock waves that are commonly formed in the post-bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. Adding small perturbations to spherically symmetric, steady, shocked accretion flows, we compute the subsequent evolutions to find what flow pattern emerges as a consequence of hydrodynamical instabilities such as convection and standing accretion shock instability for different neutrino luminosities and mass accretion rates. Depending on these two controlling parameters, various flow patterns are indeed realized. We classify them into three basic patterns and two intermediate ones; the former includes sloshing motion (SL), spiral motion (SP), and multiple buoyant bubble formation (BB); the latter consists of spiral motion with buoyant-bubble formation (SPB) and spiral motion with pulsationally changing rotational velocities (SPP). Although the post-shock flow is highly chaotic, there is a clear trend in the pattern realization. The sloshing and spiral motions tend to be dominant for high accretion rates and low neutrino luminosities, and multiple buoyant bubbles prevail for low accretion rates and high neutrino luminosities. It is interesting that the dominant pattern is not always identical between the semi-nonlinear and nonlinear phases near the critical luminosity; the intermediate cases are realized in the latter case. Running several simulations with different random perturbations, we confirm that the realization of flow pattern is robust in most cases.

  17. Optimized Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detectors to Maximize Absorptance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csete, Maria; Szenes, Andras; Banhelyi, Balazs; Csendes, Tibor; Szabo, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Dispersion characteristics of four types of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors, nano-cavity-array- (NCA-), nano-cavity-deflector-array- (NCDA-), nano-cavity-double-deflector-array- (NCDDA-) and nano-cavity-trench-array- (NCTA-) integrated (I-A-SNSPDs) devices was optimized in three periodicity intervals commensurate with half-, three-quarter- and one SPP wavelength. The optimal configurations capable of maximizing NbN absorptance correspond to periodicity dependent tilting in S-orientation (90{\\deg} azimuthal orientation). In NCAI-A-SNSPDs absorptance maxima are reached at the plasmonic Brewster angle (PBA) due to light tunneling. The absorptance maximum is attained in a wide plasmonic-pass-band in NCDAI_1/2*lambda-A, inside a flat-plasmonic-pass-band in NCDAI_3/4*lambda-A and inside a narrow plasmonic-band in NCDAI_lambda-A. In NCDDAI_1/2*lambda-A bands of strongly-coupled cavity and plasmonic modes cross, in NCDDAI_3/4*lambda-A an inverted-plasmonic-band-gap develops, while in NCDDAI_lambda-A ...

  18. Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; US Geological Survey Reports, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J. (US Geological Survey, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Western Fisheries Research Center, Cook, WA)

    2003-12-01

    This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1913. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attend to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first is to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort includes measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective is to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective is to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the second year of at least a three-year study, it is largely restricted to describing our efforts and findings for the first two objectives.

  19. Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; US Geological Survey Reports, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

    2003-01-01

    This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1914. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attend to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first is to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort includes measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective is to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for future genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective is to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the first year of a three-year study, this report is restricted to describing our work on the first two objectives only.

  20. Crystal Ball: On the Future High Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium- and far-future of the accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance reach and cost range. We briefly review such post-LHC options as linear e+e- colliders in Japan (ILC) or at CERN (CLIC), muon collider, and circular lepton or hadron colliders in China (CepC/SppC) and Europe (FCC). We conclude with a look into ultimate energy reach accelerators based on plasmas and crystals, and some perspectives for the far future of ...

  1. SPRUCE: Spruce and Peatland Responses under Climatic and Environmental Change

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    SPRUCE is an experiment to assess the response of northern peatland ecosystems to increases in temperature and exposures to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. It is the primary component of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Scientific Focus Area of ORNL's Climate Change Program, focused on terrestrial ecosystems and the mechanisms that underlie their responses to climatic change. The experimental work is to be conducted in a Picea mariana [black spruce] - Sphagnum spp. bog forest in northern Minnesota, 40 km north of Grand Rapids, in the USDA Forest Service Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The site is located at the southern margin of the boreal peatland forest. It is an ecosystem considered especially vulnerable to climate change, and anticipated to be near its tipping point with respect to climate change. Responses to warming and interactions with increased atmospheric CO2 concentration are anticipated to have important feedbacks on the atmosphere and climate, because of the high carbon stocks harbored by such ecosystems.[copied from http://mnspruce.ornl.gov/] While some data files are restricted to access by project members only, others are available for public download now, even as research is being actively conducted.

  2. Chemical Concentrations in Field Mice from Open-Detonation Firing Sites TA-36 Minie and TA-39 Point 6 at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fresquez, Philip R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    Field mice (mostly Peromyscus spp.) were collected at two open-detonation (high explosive) firing sites - Minie at Technical Area (TA) 36 and Point 6 at TA-39 - at Los Alamos National Laboratory in August of 2010 and in February of 2011 for chemical analysis. Samples of whole body field mice from both sites were analyzed for target analyte list elements (mostly metals), dioxin/furans, polychlorinated biphenyl congeners, high explosives, and perchlorate. In addition, uranium isotopes were analyzed in a composite sample collected from TA-36 Minie. In general, all constituents, with the exception of lead at TA-39 Point 6, in whole body field mice samples collected from these two open-detonation firing sites were either not detected or they were detected below regional statistical reference levels (99% confidence level), biota dose screening levels, and/or soil ecological chemical screening levels. The amount of lead in field mice tissue collected from TA-39 Point 6 was higher than regional background, and some lead levels in the soil were higher than the ecological screening level for the field mouse; however, these levels are not expected to affect the viability of the populations over the site as a whole.

  3. New methods for tightly regulated gene expression and highly efficient chromosomal integration of cloned genes for Methanosarcina species

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guss, Adam M.; Rother, Michael; Zhang, Jun Kai; Kulkkarni, Gargi; Metcalf, William W.

    2008-01-01

    A highly efficient method for chromosomal integration of cloned DNA into Methanosarcina spp. was developed utilizing the site-specific recombination system from the Streptomyces phage ?C31. Host strains expressing the ?C31 integrase gene and carrying an appropriate recombination site can be transformed with non-replicating plasmids carrying the complementary recombination site at efficiencies similar to those obtained with self-replicating vectors. We have also constructed a series of hybrid promoters that combine the highly expressed M. barkeri P mcrB promoter with binding sites for the tetracycline-responsive, bacterial TetR protein. These promoters are tightly regulated by the presence or absence of tetracycline inmore »strains that express the tetR gene. The hybrid promoters can be used in genetic experiments to test gene essentiality by placing a gene of interest under their control. Thus, growth of strains with tetR -regulated essential genes becomes tetracycline-dependent. A series of plasmid vectors that utilize the site-specific recombination system for construction of reporter gene fusions and for tetracycline regulated expression of cloned genes are reported. These vectors were used to test the efficiency of translation at a variety of start codons. Fusions using an ATG start site were the most active, whereas those using GTG and TTG were approximately one half or one fourth as active, respectively. The CTG fusion was 95% less active than the ATG fusion. « less

  4. The initial phase of a Longleaf Pine-Wiregrass Savanna restoration: species establishment and community responses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aschenbach, Todd, A; Foster, Bryan, L.; Imm, Donald, W.

    2010-09-01

    AbstractAbstract The significant loss of the longleaf pine-wiregrass ecosystem in the southeastern United States has serious implications for biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. In response to this loss, we have initiated a long-term and landscape-scale restoration experiment at the 80,125 ha (310 mi2) Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. Aristida beyrichiana (wiregrass), an important and dominant grass (i.e., a “matrix” species) of the longleaf pine savanna understory, and 31 other herbaceous “non-matrix” species were planted at six locations throughout SRS in 2002 and 2003. Of the 36,056 transplanted seedlings, 75% were still alive in June 2004, while mean 1–2 year survival across all planted species was 48%. Lespedeza hirta (hairy lespedeza) exhibited the greatest overall survival per 3 ×3 m cell at 95%, whereas Schizachyrium spp. (little bluestem) exhibited the greatest mean cover among individual species at 5.9%. Wiregrass survival and cover were significantly reduced when planted with non-matrix species. Aggregate cover of all planted species in restored cells averaged 25.9% in 2006. High rates of survival and growth of the planted species resulted in greater species richness (SR), diversity, and vegetative cover in restored cells. Results suggest that the loss of the longleaf pine-wiregrass ecosystem may be ameliorated through restoration efforts and illustrate the positive impact of restoration plantings on biodiversity and vegetative cover.

  5. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries and Limnological Research : 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cichosz, Thomas A.; Underwood, Keith D.; Shields, John; Scholz, Allan; Tilson, Mary Beth

    1997-05-01

    The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program resulted from a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project. This project will model biological responses to reservoir operations, evaluate the effects of releasing hatchery origin kokanee salmon and rainbow trout on the fishery, and evaluate the success of various stocking strategies. In 1996, limnological, reservoir operation, zooplankton, and tagging data were collected. Mean reservoir elevation, storage volume and water retention time were reduced in 1996 relative to the last five years. In 1996, Lake Roosevelt reached a yearly low of 1,227 feet above mean sea level in April, a yearly high of 1,289 feet in July, and a mean yearly reservoir elevation of 1,271.4 feet. Mean monthly water retention times in Lake Roosevelt during 1996 ranged from 15.7 days in May to 49.2 days in October. Average zooplankton densities and biomass were lower in 1996 than 1995. Daphnia spp. and total zooplankton densities peaked during the summer, whereas minimum densities occurred during the spring. Approximately 300,000 kokanee salmon and 400,000 rainbow trout were released into Lake Roosevelt in 1996. The authors estimated 195,628 angler trips to Lake Roosevelt during 1996 with an economic value of $7,629,492.

  6. An Assessment of the Status of Captive Broodstock Technology of Pacific Salmon, 1995 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flagg, Thomas A.; Mahnaken, Conrad V.W.; Hard, Jeffrey J.

    1995-06-01

    This report provides guidance for the refinement and use of captive broodstock technology for Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) by bringing together information on the husbandry techniques, genetic risks, physiology, nutrition, and pathology affecting captive broodstocks. Captive broodstock rearing of Pacific salmon is an evolving technology, as yet without well defined standards. At present, we regard captive rearing of Pacific salmon as problematic: high mortality rates and low egg viability were common in the programs we reviewed for this report. One of the most important elements in fish husbandry is the culture environment itself. Many captive broodstock programs for Pacific salmon have reared fish from smolt-to-adult in seawater net-pens, and most have shown success in providing gametes for recovery efforts. However, some programs have lost entire brood years to diseases that transmitted rapidly in this medium. Current programs for endangered species of Pacific salmon rear most fish full-term to maturity in fresh well-water, since ground water is low in pathogens and thus helps ensure survival to adulthood. Our review suggested that captive rearing of fish in either freshwater, well-water, or filtered and sterilized seawater supplied to land-based tanks should produce higher survival than culture in seawater net-pens.

  7. Integrating engineering design improvements with exoelectrogen enrichmentprocess to increase power output from microbial fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Leak, David; Andras, Calin; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Keller, Martin; Davison, Brian H

    2009-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFC) hold promise as a green technology for bioenergy production. The challenge is to improve the engineering design while exploiting the ability of microbes to generate and transfer electrons directly to electrodes. A strategy using a combination of improved anode design and an enrichment processwas formulated to improve power densities. The designwas based on a flow-through anode with minimal dead volume and a high electrode surface area per unit volume. The strategy focused on promoting biofilm formation via a combination of forced flow through the anode, carbon limitation, and step-wise reduction of external resistance. The enrichment process resulted in development of exoelectrogenic biofilm communities dominated by Anaeromusa spp. This is the first report identifying organisms fromthe Veillonellaceae family in MFCs. The power density of the resulting MFC using a ferricyanide cathode reached 300Wm?3 net anode volume (3220mWm?2), which is about a third of what is estimated to be necessary for commercial consideration. The operational stability of the MFC using high specific surface area electrodes was demonstrated by operating the MFC for a period of over four months.

  8. New methods for tightly regulated gene expression and highly efficient chromosomal integration of cloned genes forMethanosarcinaspecies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guss, Adam M.; Rother, Michael; Zhang, Jun Kai; Kulkkarni, Gargi; Metcalf, William W.

    2008-01-01

    A highly efficient method for chromosomal integration of cloned DNA intoMethanosarcina spp.was developed utilizing the site-specific recombination system from theStreptomycesphage ?C31. Host strains expressing the ?C31 integrase gene and carrying an appropriate recombination site can be transformed with non-replicating plasmids carrying the complementary recombination site at efficiencies similar to those obtained with self-replicating vectors. We have also constructed a series of hybrid promoters that combine the highly expressedM. barkeriPmcrBpromoter with binding sites for the tetracycline-responsive, bacterial TetR protein. These promoters are tightly regulated by the presence or absence of tetracycline in strains that express thetetRgene. The hybrid promoters can bemore »used in genetic experiments to test gene essentiality by placing a gene of interest under their control. Thus, growth of strains withtetR-regulated essential genes becomes tetracycline-dependent. A series of plasmid vectors that utilize the site-specific recombination system for construction of reporter gene fusions and for tetracycline regulated expression of cloned genes are reported. These vectors were used to test the efficiency of translation at a variety of start codons. Fusions using an ATG start site were the most active, whereas those using GTG and TTG were approximately one half or one fourth as active, respectively. The CTG fusion was 95% less active than the ATG fusion.« less

  9. Ecological interactions between metals and microbes that impact bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allan Konopka; Cindy Nakatsu

    2004-03-17

    Distinct microbial communities had been found in contaminated soils that varied in their concentrations of Pb, Cr and aromatic compounds. It is difficult to distinguish between their effects as their presence is highly correlated. Microcosms were constructed in which either Pb{sup +2} or CrO{sub 4}{sup -2} was added at levels that produced acute modest or severe acute effects (50 or 90% reduction). We previously reported on changes in microbial activity and broad patterns of Bacterial community composition. These results showed that addition of an organic energy source selected for a relatively small number of phylotypes and the addition of Pb or Cr(VI) modulated the community response. We sequenced dominant phylotypes from microcosms amended with xylene and Cr(VI) and from those with the simple addition of glucose only. In both cases, the dominant selected phylotypes were diverse. We found a number of distinct Arthrobacter strains, as well as several Pseudomonas spp. In addition, the high GC-content bands belonged to members of the genera Nocardioides and Rhodococcus. The focus of amended microcosm work has now shifted to anaerobic processes. The reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) as a detoxification mechanism is of greater interest, as is the specific role of particular physiological groups of anaerobes in mediating Cr(VI) detoxification. The correlation between microbial activity, community structure, and metal level has been analyzed on 150 mg of soil collected at spatial scales <1, 5, 15 and 50 cm. There was no correlation between metal content and activity level. Soils <1 cm apart could differ in activity 10-fold and extractable Pb and Cr 7-fold. Therefore, we turned to geostatistical analysis. There was spatial periodicity which is likely to reflect the heterogeneous distribution of active microbes and metal contaminants. Variograms indicated that the range of spatial dependence was up to 20 cm. To visualize the spatial relationships between the primary variate (activity) and its covariates (lead and chromium content), block kriging was used. The kriging maps suggest that areas exist where increased metal concentrations have zones of decreased metabolic microbial activity. Cr(VI) resistant bacteria have been isolated from two contaminated sites. Most isolates are Arthrobacter, Rhodococcus, or Pseudomonas spp. A chrA gene has been cloned from Arthrobacter strain CR15 isolated from Cannelton, MI. PCR-primers have been produced against conserved motifs analyzed from 8 chrA sequences. Of the 96 Cr-resistant isolates from Cannelton, 85% gave a positive reaction to these primers. In contrast, none of the 38 isolates from Seymour, IN were positive. Therefore, at least for the culturable community, a particular resistance determinant appears to be widespread at a geographical site but rare (absent) at another site. The phylogenetic relatedness of the Arthrobacter strains is being evaluated via the distribution of repetitive elements as well as genome-wide restriction fragment analysis. Work to date on the latter has also suggested that Arthrobacter genomes are small (<2.5 Mbp). Gene capture experiments demonstrated that chromate-sensitive Gram-negative bacterial strains could obtain resistance from Cr-contaminated soil. However, frequency of transfer is low (10-6-10-8). Genetic diversity of the acquired chromate resistance mechanism is being assessed.

  10. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Sandy River Delta, Technical Report 2000-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Ann; Ratti, John

    2002-02-01

    Land managers are often challenged with the mandate to control exotic and invasive plant species. Reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea) and Himalayan blackberry (Rubus discolor) are 2 such species that are currently threatening natural areas in western United States. Reed canarygrass may be native to the inland northwest (Antieau 2000), but it has invaded many wetland areas as dense, monoculture stands. Spread of this plant species is largely attributed to human disturbances, e.g., draining, farming (Antieau 2000). Reed canarygrass often dominates other emergent vegetation such as cattail (Typha spp.) and bulrush (Scirpus spp.) (Whitson et al. 1996, Apfelbaum and Sams 1987), and the resulting habitat is largely unsuitable for wetland birds. Himalayan blackberry was introduced to the United States as a garden shrub and was planted at wildlife-management areas for food and cover. It easily colonizes disturbed places, such as roadsides, ditches, and flood plains (Hoshovsky 2000). Once established, it forms a thick, impenetrable stand, which excludes native shrub species. Although Himalayan blackberry does provide food and cover for wildlife, particularly during fall and winter, it decreases habitat diversity, and therefore, may decrease wildlife diversity. Furthermore, patterns of avian nest predation may be altered in some exotic-shrub communities (Schmidt and Whelan 1999). For land managers to make sound decisions regarding invasive-plant control, it is useful to obtain information on current plant distributions in relation to targeted wildlife species, and then use models to predict how those species may respond to changes in vegetation. The Habitat Evaluations Program was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to evaluate current and future habitat conditions for fish and wildlife (Stiehl 1994). The program is based on Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for specific wildlife species. Each model contains several variables that represent life requisites (e.g., food and nesting cover) for that species. These variables are evaluated with vegetation sampling, and/or through the interpretation of aerial photographs and the like. Variable values are assigned a numerical score. The score may be based on a categorical rating (e.g . , different vegetation types receive different scores based on their importance for that species) or may be the result of a linear relationship (e.g., the score increases with the variable value; Figure 1). Variable scores are then input into a mathematical formula, which results in an HSI score. The HSI score ranges from 0-1, with 0 representing poor-quality habitat and 1 optimal habitat. HSI models assume a positive, linear relationship between wildlife-species density and the HSI score. For example, with an HSI score of 1, we assume that a species will be present at its highest density. Models can be projected into the future by changing variable values and observing the corresponding changes in HSI scores. Most models are relatively simple, but some are complex. These models have come under considerable scrutiny in the last several years, particularly concerning the validity of model assumptions (Van Horne 1983, Laymon and Barrett 1986, Hobbs and Hanley 1990, Kellner et al. 1992). Regardless of criticisms, these models may be used with success when there is an understanding and acceptance of model limitations. Each model should be evaluated as to its applicability in a given situation. Model validation, where results have on-the-ground verification, is highly recommended. Specific objectives of this project were to (1) conduct avian surveys and measure the present vegetation at the Sandy River Delta, (2) input the vegetation data into HSI models for 5 avian species, (3) evaluate the current habitat suitability for these species, and (4) predict species responses to potential changes in vegetation, resulting from the removal of reed canarygrass and/or Himalayan blackberry.

  11. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrei L. Osterman, Ph.D.

    2012-12-17

    Integration of bioinformatics and experimental techniques was applied to mapping and characterization of the key components (pathways, enzymes, transporters, regulators) of the core metabolic machinery in Shewanella oneidensis and related species with main focus was on metabolic and regulatory pathways involved in utilization of various carbon and energy sources. Among the main accomplishments reflected in ten joint publications with other participants of Shewanella Federation are: (i) A systems-level reconstruction of carbohydrate utilization pathways in the genus of Shewanella (19 species). This analysis yielded reconstruction of 18 sugar utilization pathways including 10 novel pathway variants and prediction of > 60 novel protein families of enzymes, transporters and regulators involved in these pathways. Selected functional predictions were verified by focused biochemical and genetic experiments. Observed growth phenotypes were consistent with bioinformatic predictions providing strong validation of the technology and (ii) Global genomic reconstruction of transcriptional regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Of those, 45 regulons were inferred directly from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in other species. Selected regulatory predictions were experimentally tested. Integration of this analysis with microarray data revealed overall consistency and provided additional layer of interactions between regulons. All the results were captured in the new database RegPrecise, which is a joint development with the LBNL team. A more detailed analysis of the individual subsystems, pathways and regulons in Shewanella spp included bioinfiormatics-based prediction and experimental characterization of: (i) N-Acetylglucosamine catabolic pathway; (ii)Lactate utilization machinery; (iii) Novel NrtR regulator of NAD biosynthesis; (iv) HexR-controlled global regulon in central metabolism. In addition to numerous specific findings contributing to basic understanding of ecophysiology and evolution of Shewanella, the key components of the integrative genomic methodology of general utility for the community were optimized, validated and disseminated.

  12. The Slow:Fast substitution ratio reveals changing patterns of natural selection in gamma-proteobacterial genomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alm, Eric; Shapiro, B. Jesse

    2009-04-15

    Different microbial species are thought to occupy distinct ecological niches, subjecting each species to unique selective constraints, which may leave a recognizable signal in their genomes. Thus, it may be possible to extract insight into the genetic basis of ecological differences among lineages by identifying unusual patterns of substitutions in orthologous gene or protein sequences. We use the ratio of substitutions in slow versus fast-evolving sites (nucleotides in DNA, or amino acids in protein sequence) to quantify deviations from the typical pattern of selective constraint observed across bacterial lineages. We propose that elevated S:F in one branch (an excess of slow-site substitutions) can indicate a functionally-relevant change, due to either positive selection or relaxed evolutionary constraint. In a genome-wide comparative study of gamma-proteobacterial proteins, we find that cell-surface proteins involved with motility and secretion functions often have high S:F ratios, while information-processing genes do not. Change in evolutionary constraints in some species is evidenced by increased S:F ratios within functionally-related sets of genes (e.g., energy production in Pseudomonas fluorescens), while other species apparently evolve mostly by drift (e.g., uniformly elevated S:F across most genes in Buchnera spp.). Overall, S:F reveals several species-specific, protein-level changes with potential functional/ecological importance. As microbial genome projects yield more species-rich gene-trees, the S:F ratio will become an increasingly powerful tool for uncovering functional genetic differences among species.

  13. Long-term monitoring of reef corals at the Flower Garden Banks (northwest Gulf of Mexico): Reef coral population changes and historical incorporation of barium in Montastrea annularis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deslarzes, K.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Reef coral populations were monitored from 1988 to 1991 at the Flower Garden Banks located in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. The status of reef coral populations, and natural or man-made factors potentially affecting their well-being were determined. Man-made chronic disturbances are degrading coral reef resources on a global scale. Yet, the Flower Garden coral reefs seem to have been sheltered from the effects of regional stresses generated by population growth and increased industrial activity. Since 1974, reef coral population levels have remained unchanged in the Montastrea-Diploria Zones at the Flower Garden Banks. Live coral cover ranges between 46 and 46.5%. Montastrea annularis and Diploria strigosa comprise 80% of the coral cover on either bank. The remainder of the cover is mostly shared by eight other taxa. Coral taxa appear to be more homogeneously distributed on the West Bank. The relatively greater number of Agaricia spp., Madracis decastis, and P. astreoides colonies on the East Bank may be the source of a decreased evenness. The health of reef corals was assessed using repetitive and non-repetitive photographic methods, and accretionary growth measurements of M. annularis. Reef corals have undergone small scale changes at the Flower Gardens probably reflecting natural disturbance, predation, disease, and inter-specific competition. White mat disease (ridge disease) is shown to generate more tissue loss than any of the three bleaching events that took place at the Flower Gardens (1989, 1990, and 1991). Advance to retreat linear ratios of encrusting growth revealed a net tissue gain on the East Bank and a net tissue loss on the West Bank. Growth rates of M. annularis were highly variable. The annual barium content from 1910 in 1989 in a M. annularis colony from the West Flower Garden did not reveal trends associated with the extensive oil and gas exploration in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

  14. Radiological Impact Associated to Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM) from Coal-Fired Power Plants Emissions - 13436

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinis, Maria de Lurdes; Fiuza, Antonio; Soeiro de Carvalho, Jose; Gois, Joaquim [Geo-Environment and Resources Research Centre (CIGAR), Porto University, Faculty of Engineering - FEUP, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)] [Geo-Environment and Resources Research Centre (CIGAR), Porto University, Faculty of Engineering - FEUP, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Meira Castro, Ana Cristina [School of Engineering Polytechnic of Porto - ISEP, Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 431, 4200-072, Porto (Portugal)] [School of Engineering Polytechnic of Porto - ISEP, Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 431, 4200-072, Porto (Portugal)

    2013-07-01

    Certain materials used and produced in a wide range of non-nuclear industries contain enhanced activity concentrations of natural radionuclides. In particular, electricity production from coal is one of the major sources of increased human exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials. A methodology was developed to assess the radiological impact due to natural radiation background. The developed research was applied to a specific case study, the Sines coal-fired power plant, located in the southwest coastline of Portugal. Gamma radiation measurements were carried out with two different instruments: a sodium iodide scintillation detector counter (SPP2 NF, Saphymo) and a gamma ray spectrometer with energy discrimination (Falcon 5000, Canberra). Two circular survey areas were defined within 20 km of the power plant. Forty relevant measurements points were established within the sampling area: 15 urban and 25 suburban locations. Additionally, ten more measurements points were defined, mostly at the 20-km area. The registered gamma radiation varies from 20 to 98.33 counts per seconds (c.p.s.) corresponding to an external gamma exposure rate variable between 87.70 and 431.19 nGy/h. The highest values were measured at locations near the power plant and those located in an area within the 6 and 20 km from the stacks. In situ gamma radiation measurements with energy discrimination identified natural emitting nuclides as well as their decay products (Pb-212, Pb-2142, Ra-226, Th-232, Ac-228, Th-234, Pa-234, U- 235, etc.). According to the results, an influence from the stacks emissions has been identified both qualitatively and quantitatively. The developed methodology accomplished the lack of data in what concerns to radiation rate in the vicinity of Sines coal-fired power plant and consequently the resulting exposure to the nearby population. (authors)

  15. Biomass production, forage quality, and cation uptake of Quail bush, four-wing saltbush, and seaside barley irrigated with moderately saline-sodic water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauder, J.W.; Browning, L.S.; Phelps, S.D.; Kirkpatrick, A.D. [Montana State University, Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The study reported here investigated capacity of Atriplex lentiformis (Torr.) S. Wats. (Quail bush), Atriplex X aptera A. Nels. (pro sp.) (Wytana four-wing saltbush), and Hordeum marinum Huds. (seaside barley) to produce biomass and crude protein and take up cations when irrigated with moderately saline-sodic water, in the presence of a shallow water table. Water tables were established at 0.38, 0.76, and 1.14m below the surface in sand-filled columns. The columns were then planted to the study species. Study plants were irrigated for 224 days; irrigation water was supplied every 7 days equal to water lost to evapotranspiration (ET) plus 100mL (the volume of water removed in the most previous soil solution sampling). Water representing one of two irrigation sources was used: Powder River (PR) or coalbed natural gas (CBNG) wastewater. Biomass production did not differ significantly between water quality treatments but did differ significantly among species and water table depth within species. Averaged across water quality treatments, Hordeum marinum produced 79% more biomass than A. lentiformis and 122% more biomass than Atriplex X aptera, but contained only 11% crude protein compared to 16% crude protein in A. lentiformis and 14% crude protein in Atriplex X aptera. Atriplex spp. grown in columns with the water table at 0.38m depth produced more biomass, took up less calcium on a percentage basis, and took up more sodium on a percentage basis than when grown with the water table at a deeper depth. Uptake of cations by Atriplex lentiformis was approximately twice the uptake of cations by Atriplex X aptera and three times that of H. marinum. After 224 days of irrigation, crop growth, and cation uptake, followed by biomass harvest, EC and SAR of shallow groundwater in columns planted to A. lentiformis were less than EC and SAR of shallow ground water in columns planted to either of the other species.

  16. Systematic review of the influence of foraging habitat on red-cockaded woodpecker reproductive success.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garabedian, James E.

    2014-04-01

    Relationships between foraging habitat and reproductive success provide compelling evidence of the contribution of specific vegetative features to foraging habitat quality, a potentially limiting factor for many animal populations. For example, foraging habitat quality likely will gain importance in the recovery of the threatened red-cockaded woodpecker Picoides borealis (RCW) in the USA as immediate nesting constraints are mitigated. Several researchers have characterized resource selection by foraging RCWs, but emerging research linking reproductive success (e.g. clutch size, nestling and fledgling production, and group size) and foraging habitat features has yet to be synthesized. Therefore, we reviewed peer-refereed scientific literature and technical resources (e.g. books, symposia proceedings, and technical reports) that examined RCW foraging ecology, foraging habitat, or demography to evaluate evidence for effects of the key foraging habitat features described in the species’ recovery plan on group reproductive success. Fitness-based habitat models suggest foraging habitat with low to intermediate pine Pinus spp. densities, presence of large and old pines, minimal midstory development, and herbaceous groundcover support more productive RCW groups. However, the relationships between some foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success are not well supported by empirical data. In addition, few regression models account for > 30% of variation in reproductive success, and unstandardized multiple and simple linear regression coefficient estimates typically range from -0.100 to 0.100, suggesting ancillary variables and perhaps indirect mechanisms influence reproductive success. These findings suggest additional research is needed to address uncertainty in relationships between foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success and in the mechanisms underlying those relationships.

  17. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitats in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  18. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitat in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.; Miller, James, H.

    2004-07-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  19. Novel mechanism for scavenging of hypochlorite involving a periplasmic methionine-rich peptide and methionine sulfoxide reductase

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Melnyk, Ryan A.; Youngblut, Matthew D.; Clark, Iain C.; Carlson, Hans K.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Lavarone, Anthony T.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.; Coates, John D.

    2015-05-12

    Reactive chlorine species (RCS) defense mechanisms are important for bacterial fitness in diverse environments. In addition to the anthropogenic use of RCS in the form of bleach, these compounds are also produced naturally through photochemical reactions of natural organic matter and in vivo by the mammalian immune system in response to invading microorganisms. To gain insight into bacterial RCS defense mechanisms, we investigated Azospira suillum strain PS, which produces periplasmic RCS as an intermediate of perchlorate respiration. Our studies identified an RCS response involving an RCS stress-sensing sigma/anti-sigma factor system (SigF/NrsF), a soluble hypochlorite-scavenging methionine-rich periplasmic protein (MrpX), and amore »putative periplasmic methionine sulfoxide reductase (YedY1). We investigated the underlying mechanism by phenotypic characterization of appropriate gene deletions, chemogenomic profiling of barcoded transposon pools, transcriptome sequencing, and biochemical assessment of methionine oxidation. Our results demonstrated that SigF was specifically activated by RCS and initiated the transcription of a small regulon centering around yedY1 and mrpX. A yedY1 paralog (yedY2) was found to have a similar fitness to yedY1 despite not being regulated by SigF. Markerless deletions of yedY2 confirmed its synergy with the SigF regulon. MrpX was strongly induced and rapidly oxidized by RCS, especially hypochlorite. Our results suggest a mechanism involving hypochlorite scavenging by sacrificial oxidation of the MrpX in the periplasm. Reduced MrpX is regenerated by the YedY methionine sulfoxide reductase activity. The phylogenomic distribution of this system revealed conservation in several Proteobacteria of clinical importance, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Brucella spp., implying a putative role in immune response evasion in vivo. In addition, bacteria are often stressed in the environment by reactive chlorine species (RCS) of either anthropogenic or natural origin, but little is known of the defense mechanisms they have evolved. Using a microorganism that generates RCS internally as part of its respiratory process allowed us to uncover a novel defense mechanism based on RCS scavenging by reductive reaction with a sacrificial methionine-rich peptide and redox recycling through a methionine sulfoxide reductase. This system is conserved in a broad diversity of organisms, including some of clinical importance, invoking a possible important role in innate immune system evasion.« less

  20. Captive Rearing Program for Salmon River Chinook Salmon, 2000 Project Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venditti, David A.

    2002-04-01

    During 2000, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) continued to develop techniques to rear chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha to sexual maturity in captivity and to monitor their reproductive performance under natural conditions. Eyed-eggs were collected to establish captive cohorts from three study streams and included 503 eyed-eggs from East Fork Salmon River (EFSR), 250 from the Yankee Fork Salmon River, and 304 from the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (WFYF). After collection, the eyed-eggs were immediately transferred to the Eagle Fish Hatchery, where they were incubated and reared by family group. Juveniles collected the previous summer were PIT and elastomer tagged and vaccinated against vibrio Vibrio spp. and bacterial kidney disease before the majority (approximately 75%) were transferred to the National Marine Fisheries Service, Manchester Marine Experimental Station for saltwater rearing through sexual maturity. Smolt transfers included 158 individuals from the Lemhi River (LEM), 193 from the WFYF, and 372 from the EFSR. Maturing fish transfers from the Manchester facility to the Eagle Fish Hatchery included 77 individuals from the LEM, 45 from the WFYF, and 11 from the EFSR. Two mature females from the WFYF were spawned in captivity with four males in 2000. Only one of the females produced viable eggs (N = 1,266), which were placed in in-stream incubators by personnel from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe. Mature adults (N = 70) from the Lemhi River were released into Big Springs Creek to evaluate their reproductive performance. After release, fish distributed themselves throughout the study section and displayed a progression of habitat associations and behavior consistent with progressing maturation and the onset of spawning. Fifteen of the 17 suspected redds spawned by captive-reared parents in Big Springs Creek were hydraulically sampled to assess survival to the eyed stage of development. Eyed-eggs were collected from 13 of these, and survival ranged from 0% to 96%, although there was evidence that some eggs had died after reaching the eyed stage. Six redds were capped in an attempt to document fry emergence, but none were collected. A final hydraulic sampling of the capped redds yielded nothing from five of the six, but 75 dead eggs and one dead fry were found in the sixth. Smothering by fine sediment is the suspected cause of the observed mortality between the eyed stage and fry emergence.