National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for rfc serc spp

  1. SERC Grants Interactive Map

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View SERC Grants in a larger map. To report corrections, please email SustainableEnergyWAP@ee.doe.gov.

  2. Solar Energy Research Center (SERC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Energy Research Center (SERC) Community Berkeley Global Campus Environmental Documents Tours Community Programs Friends of Berkeley Lab Navigate Section Community ...

  3. Recording of SERC Monitoring Technologies - Solar Photovoltaics |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Recording of SERC Monitoring Technologies - Solar Photovoltaics Recording of SERC Monitoring Technologies - Solar Photovoltaics This document provides a transcript of the of SERC Monitoring Technologies - Solar Photovoltaics webinar, presented on 10/20/2011 by Peter McNutt. PDF icon serc_webinar_20111020_solar_pv_transcipt.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings

  4. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Photovoltaic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Solar Photovoltaics Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Photovoltaics This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) ...

  5. SERC Grant Webinar | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Grant Webinar SERC Grant Webinar Evaluation Overview PDF icon sercwebinarpresentationevaluationoverviewfinaljan18.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy ...

  6. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) -Geothermal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications DOE Webinar Residential Geothermal Heat Pump Retrofits (Presentation) Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water ...

  7. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) -Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transcript of a presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Geothermal...

  8. Monitoring SERC Technologies - Solar Photovoltaics | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaics Monitoring SERC Technologies - Solar Photovoltaics On Oct. 20, 2011, Peter McNutt, an electrical engineer with the Market Transformation Center at NREL, presented a ...

  9. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maryland Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Maryland This document contains information on how the Maryland SERC program leverages diverse and bold ...

  10. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document contains information on how Montana SERC Program Delivers Strong Changes through Targeted Low-Income Weatherization Efforts.

  11. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - On-Demand Tankless

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Heaters | Department of Energy On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters. PDF icon serc_webinar_presentation_20111004.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot

  12. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Solar Hot Water. PDF icon solar_thermal_presentation.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Montana Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat

  13. SERC Community-Based Social Marketing for Weatherization Programs...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential Geothermal Heat Pump Retrofit Transcript Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Geothermal...

  14. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Maryland

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document contains information on how the Maryland SERC program leverages diverse and bold energy upgrade measures to maximize savings.

  15. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy PDF icon solar_thermal_transcript.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar Transcript Recording of SERC Monitoring Technologies - Solar Photovoltaics

  16. Property:EIA/861/NercRfc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    operations within the RFC region (Y or N) 1 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2008 - F861 File Layout-2008.doc Pages using the property "EIA861NercRfc"...

  17. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight (Fact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sheet), Weatherization And Intergovernmental Programs (WIP) | Department of Energy Vermont Highlight (Fact Sheet), Weatherization And Intergovernmental Programs (WIP) Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight (Fact Sheet), Weatherization And Intergovernmental Programs (WIP) Case study on Vermont's innovative strategy for helping low-income families save energy through its Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) program. PDF icon serc_vt_highlight.pdf More

  18. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Idaho Highlight

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document provides an overview of the successes acheived by Idaho's Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) through Tankless Hot Water Systems, Solar Photovoltaics and Behavioral Changes.

  19. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This document contains information on how Montana SERC Program Delivers Strong Changes through Targeted Low-Income Weatherization Efforts. PDF icon sercmthighlight.pdf More ...

  20. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Case study on Vermont's innovative strategy for helping low-income families save energy through its Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) program. PDF icon ...

  1. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC)- Solar Photovoltaics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Solar Photovoltaics.

  2. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - On-Demand...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for ...

  3. Kansas Gas & Electric Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SPP NERC ERCOT Yes NERC MRO Yes NERC RFC Yes NERC SERC Yes NERC SPP Yes ISO Ercot Yes RTO PJM Yes RTO SPP Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes...

  4. Monitoring SERC Technologies -Geothermal/Ground Source Heat Pumps |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Monitoring SERC Technologies -Geothermal/Ground Source Heat Pumps Monitoring SERC Technologies -Geothermal/Ground Source Heat Pumps On Nov. 3, 2011, Dave Peterson, a Project Leader at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, presented a Webinar about Geothermal/Ground Source Heat Pumps and how to properly monitor their installation. View the webinar presentation or read the transcript. More Information Some resources and tools mentioned in the presentation include: U.S.

  5. Monitoring SERC Technologies: On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program » Pilot Projects » Monitoring SERC Technologies: On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters Monitoring SERC Technologies: On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters On Oct. 4, 2011, Ethan MacCormick, VP for Services to Energy Businesses at Performance Systems Development, presented a Webinar about On-Demand Tankless Water Heaters and how to properly monitor their installation. View the webinar presentation. More Information Some resources and tools mentioned in the

  6. JP Morgan | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NPCC Yes NERC RFC Yes NERC SERC Yes NERC SPP Yes NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes ISO Ercot Yes RTO PJM Yes ISO NY Yes RTO SPP Yes ISO MISO Yes ISO NE Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Retail...

  7. Monitoring SERC Technologies - Solar Hot Water | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hot Water Monitoring SERC Technologies - Solar Hot Water On October 27, 2011, Eliza Hotchkiss, an analyst at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, presented a Webinar about Solar Hot Water systems and how to properly monitor their installation. View the webinar presentation or read the transcript. More Information Some resources and tools mentioned in the presentation include: Database for State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency NREL Solar Technology Analysis Models and Tools SunShot

  8. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Maryland

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Maryland The Maryland SERC program leverages diverse and bold energy upgrade measures to maximize savings Maryland boosts energy savings for low-income residences with wind turbines; solar photovoltaics (PV); geothermal heat pumps; mini-split ductless heat pumps; hybrid heat pump water heaters; and high-efficiency heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. In 2007, the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) included a provision that in any year for which the U.S. Department

  9. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Success Story: Montana

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Montana Montana Delivers Strong Changes through Targeted Low-Income Weatherization Efforts Montana has developed an innovative strategy for helping low-income families save energy through the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) program. The DOE Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) granted Montana $923,270 to install a variety of renewable and energy efficiency approaches across a thirteen-county territory. Low-income homeowners in this area

  10. SERC Community-Based Social Marketing for Weatherization Programs Webinar |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Community-Based Social Marketing for Weatherization Programs Webinar SERC Community-Based Social Marketing for Weatherization Programs Webinar A presentation sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy about fostering sustainable behaviors in a community for saving energy. PDF icon social_marketing_webinar_transcript.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential Geothermal Heat Pump Retrofit Transcript Sustainable

  11. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC)- Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transcript of a presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps.

  12. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC)- Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, aimed at Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grantees, provides information on Monitoring Checklists for the installation of Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps.

  13. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Outages by Type and NERC region, 2013 Outage Type FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Circuit Outage Counts Automatic Outages...

  14. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Data include the U.S. portion of NERC only. 3 Historically, the MRO, RFC, SERC, and SPP ...www.eia.govelectricity. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), ...

  15. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight (Fact Sheet), Weatherization And Intergovernmental Programs (WIP)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Efficiency Coaches Aim for Long-Lasting Changes Through Solar and Weatherization Vermont has developed an innovative strategy for helping low-income families save energy through the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) program. The DOE Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) granted Vermont to give its weatherization clients access to solar energy systems and one-on-one assistance from energy efficiency coaches to help clients achieve meaningful and

  16. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0.A. Existing Transmission Capacity by High-Voltage Size, 2014 Voltage Circuit Miles Type Operating (kV) frcc mro npcc rfc serc spp tre wecc Contiguous U.S. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Voltage Circuit Counts Type Operating (kV) frcc mro npcc rfc serc spp tre wecc Contiguous U.S. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Notes: NERC region and reliability assessment area maps are provided on EIA's Electricity Reliability web page: http://www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia411/eia411.html Circuit miles do not

  17. summer_peak_2005.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a . Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 2005 and Projected 2006 through 2010 (Megawatts and 2005 Base Year) Summer Noncoincident Peak Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Projected Year Base Year FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 2005 758,876 46,396 39,918 58,960 190,200 190,705 41,727 60,210 130,760 Projected Contiguous U.S. FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP

  18. summer_peak_2006.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a . Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2006 and Projected 2007 through 2011 (Megawatts and 2006 Base Year) Summer Noncoincident Peak Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Projected Year Base Year FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 2006 789,475 45,751 42,194 63,241 191,920 199,052 42,882 62,339 142,096 Projected Contiguous U.S. FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC

  19. An RFC 1179 Compatible Remote Print Server for Windows 3.1

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-11-09

    Internet RFC 1179 describes the protocol to be used for printing files on a remote printer in a TCP/IP network. The protocol is client/server, meaning that the client initiates the print request, and the server receives the request and performs the actual printing locally. This protocol has been in long use on Unix systems derived from the Berkeley Software Distribution, such as DEC''s Ultrix and Sun''s SunOS. LPD Services implements the server portion of thismore » protocol. It handles both the network communication and conformance with the protocol, and printing using the Microsoft Windows device independent printing interface.« less

  20. net_energy_load_2005.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2005 and Projected 2006 through 2010 (Thousands of Megawatthours and 2005 Base Year) Net Energy For Load (Annual) Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Projected Year Base Year FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 2005 3,900,461 226,544 216,633 303,607 1,005,226 962,054 201,548 299,225 685,624 Projected Contiguous U.S. FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) In 2005 for 2006 3,926,389 232,561 220,006 301,893 992,742

  1. ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2005 and 2006 through 2010 " ,"(Megawatts and Percent)" ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid" ,,,"Contiguous U.S." ,,,,,,"FRCC",,,"MRO",,,"NPCC",,,"RFC",,,"SERC",,,"SPP",,,"ERCOT",,,"WECC" " ",,,"Net Internal Demand

  2. Analysis of Unit-Level Changes in Operations with Increased SPP Wind from EPRI/LCG Balancing Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W

    2012-01-01

    Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The Department of Energy funded the project 'Integrating Midwest Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' to be led by EPRI in coordination with the main authorities for the regions: SPP, Entergy, TVA, Southern Company and OPC. EPRI utilized several subcontractors for the project including LCG, the developers of the model UPLAN. The study aims to evaluate the operating cost benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of regional cooperation for integrating mid-western wind energy into southeast electricity markets. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. DOE funded Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide additional support to the project, including a review of results and any side analysis that may provide additional insight. This report is a unit-by-unit analysis of changes in operations due to the different scenarios used in the overall study. It focuses on the change in capacity factors and the number of start-ups required for each unit since those criteria summarize key aspects of plant operations, how often are they called upon and how much do they operate. The primary analysis of the overall project is based on security-constrained unit commitment (SCUC) and economic dispatch (SCED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The SCUC/SCED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as best as possible in the model. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy.

  3. Old Dominion Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Id 40229 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC RFC Yes NERC SERC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  4. Wabash Valley Power Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Utility Id 40211 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC,SERC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying...

  5. SERC Grant Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of occupant energy consumption behavior factor into home energy savings with ... able to allot the proposed number of innovative or renewable technology units to ...

  6. Table 8.12a Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Summer Peak Period, 1986-2011 (Megawatts, Except as Noted)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Summer Peak Period, 1986-2011 (Megawatts, Except as Noted) Year Noncoincident Peak Load 1 by North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) 2 Regional Assessment Area Capacity Margin 21 (percent) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT 4 Western Inter- connection All Inter- connections FRCC 5 NPCC 6 Balance of Eastern Region 3 ECAR 7,8 MAAC 8,9 MAIN 8,10 MAPP 11 MISO 12 MRO 13 PJM 14 RFC 8,15 SERC 16 SPP 17 Subtotal TRE 18 WECC 19 Total 20

  7. Table 8.12b Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Winter Peak Period, 1986-2011 (Megawatts, Except as Noted)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Winter Peak Period, 1986-2011 (Megawatts, Except as Noted) Year Noncoincident Peak Load 1 by North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) 2 Regional Assessment Area Capacity Margin 21 (percent) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT 4 Western Inter- connection All Inter- connections FRCC 5 NPCC 6 Balance of Eastern Region 3 ECAR 7,8 MAAC 8,9 MAIN 8,10 MAPP 11 MISO 12 MRO 13 PJM 14 RFC 8,15 SERC 16 SPP 17 Subtotal TRE 18 WECC 19 Total 20

  8. Next Update: October 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Released: February 2009 Next Update: October 2009 Table 3a . January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region (Megawatts and 2007 Base Year) Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE (ERCOT) WECC Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) 2007 613,068

  9. Next Update: October 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    January 2010 Next Update: October 2010 Table 3a . January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, (Megawatts and 2008 Base Year) Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) 2008 635,911 41,705 34,462 46,803

  10. ,"Month","Year","Contiguous U.S.","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3a. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2005 through 2009 " ,"(Megawatts)",,," " " " ,"Month","Year","Contiguous U.S.","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid" ,,,,"FRCC"," MRO (U.S.)","NPCC (U.S.)","RFC","SERC","SPP","TRE (ERCOT)","WECC

  11. ,"Net Energy For Load (Annual)",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Historical Net Energy For Load, Actual by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2005 through 2009. " ,"(Thousands of Megawatthours)" ,"Net Energy For Load (Annual)",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid" ,,"Year",,"FRCC","MRO (U.S.) ","NPCC (U.S.) ","RFC","SERC","SPP","TRE","WECC

  12. ,"Summer Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    e. Historical Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2005 through 2009 " ,"(Megawatts)" ,,,,," " ,"Summer Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid" ,,"Year",,"FRCC"," MRO (U.S.) ","NPCC (U.S.) ","RFC","SERC","SPP","TRE

  13. ,"Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, "

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2005 and Projected 2006 through 2010 " ,"(Thousands of Megawatthours and 2005 Base Year)" ,"Net Energy For Load (Annual)",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid" ,"Projected Year Base","Year",,"FRCC","MRO (U.S.) ","NPCC (U.S.) ","RFC","SERC","SPP","ERCOT","WECC (U.S.) "

  14. ,"Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, "

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2005 and Projected 2006 through 2010 " ,"(Megawatts and 2005 Base Year)" ,"Summer Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid" ,"Projected Year Base","Year",,"FRCC","MRO (U.S.) ","NPCC (U.S.) ","RFC","SERC","SPP","ERCOT","WECC (U.S.) "

  15. ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    f. Historical Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2005 through 2010 " ,"(Megawatts)" ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid" ,,"Year",,"FRCC","MRO (U.S.) ","NPCC (U.S.) ","RFC","SERC","SPP","TRE ","WECC

  16. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7.A. Net Energy for Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2004 - 2014, Actual Net Energy (Thousands of Megawatthours) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region ECAR MAAC MAIN MAPP MISO MRO PJM RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 2004 220,335 292,725 2,313,180 553,236 283,646 274,760 -- -- 152,975 -- -- 856,734 191,829 289,146 682,053 3,797,439 2005 226,544 303,607 2,385,461 -- -- --

  17. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9.A. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, 2004 - 2014, Actual Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Winter Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region ECAR MAAC MAIN MAPP MISO MRO PJM RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 2004 / 2005 41,449 47,859 371,011 91,800 45,565 40,618 -- -- 24,446 -- -- 139,486 29,096 44,010 101,002 605,331 2005 /

  18. monthly_peak_2005.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3a . January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 2005 and Projected 2006 through 2010 (Megawatts and 2005 Base Year) Projected Monthly Base Year Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP ERCOT WECC Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak

  19. monthly_peak_2006.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Released: February 7, 2008 Next Update: October 2008 Table 3a . January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region 2006 and Projected 2007 through 2011 (Megawatts and 2006 Base Year) Projected Monthly Base Year Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP ERCOT WECC Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak

  20. net_energy_load_2006.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2006 and Projected 2007 through 2011 (Thousands of Megawatthours and 2006 Base Year) Net Energy For Load (Annual) Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Projected Year Base Year FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 2006 3,911,914 230,115 222,748 294,319 926,279 1,011,173 201,521 305,672 720,087 Projected Contiguous U.S. FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC

  1. winter_peak_2005.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2b . Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 2005 and Projected 2006 through 2010 (Megawatts and 2005 Base Year) Winter Noncoincident Peak Load Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Projected Year Base Year FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 2005/2006 626,365 42,657 33,748 46,828 151,600 164,638 31,260 48,141 107,493 Contiguous U.S. Projected FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.)

  2. winter_peak_2006.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b . Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2006 and Projected 2007 through 2011 (Megawatts and 2006 Base Year) Winter Noncoincident Peak Load Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Projected Year Base Year FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 2006/2007 640,981 42,526 34,677 46,697 149,631 175,163 30,792 50,402 111,093 Contiguous U.S. Projected FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.)

  3. SERC Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arkansas: The Central Arkansas Development Council, Inc. in Benton and Crawford-Sebastian Community Development Council, Inc., based in Fort Smith, have been selected to receive ...

  4. Public Serv Comm of Yazoo City | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Id 21095 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes...

  5. City of Prescott, Arkansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 15337 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  6. City of New Madrid, Missouri (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13470 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  7. Southwest Louisiana E M C | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 17684 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You...

  8. Crawford Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 4524 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  9. Jefferson Davis Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 9682 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  10. Property:EIA/861/RtoSpp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RtoSpp Jump to: navigation, search Property Name RTOSPP Property Type Boolean Description Indicates that the organization conducts operations in the SPP RTO. 1 References ...

  11. rfc:fsn | NSAC Subcommittee 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    illustrated in measurements of electric dipole moments (EDM), where the observation of a signal in a given system will not be sufficient to disentangle new possible sources of...

  12. rfc:gen | NSAC Subcommittee 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I believe continuing RHIC program is vital for the future science in this country. Logan RIce, 20121130 12:52 CST I am an undergraduate who participated in nuclear physics...

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    9 2009 Peak Load and Capacity Margin, Summer and Winter by NERC Region (MW) NERC Region Capacity Margin Capacity Margin TRE 16.7% 19.1% FRCC 6.0% 2.0% MRO (U.S.) 24.6% 26.8% NPCC (U.S.) 29.1% 43.2% RFC 25.2% 33.3% SERC 24.6% 26.2% SPP 16.4% 34.6% WECC 19.4% 29.6% U.S. TOTAL 22.2% 28.5% Note(s): Source(s): 128,245 109,565 725,958 668,818 1) Summer Demand includes the months of June, July, August, and September. 2) Winter Demand includes December of the previous year and January-March of the

  14. Next Update: December 2011 Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2009 and Projected 2010 through 2014 2009 3,832,180 225,966 213,797 285,625 880,377 997,142 202,301 308,278 718,694 Contiguous U.S. FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC (U.S.) 3,969,750 223,174 225,167 291,540 961,436 1,027,470 211,438 310,444 719,081 4,084,175 225,498 229,258 292,816 1,024,183 1,051,645 215,333 316,194 729,248 4,203,875 229,393 240,817 295,623 1,081,320 1,072,124

  15. Next Update: December 2011 Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Released: December 2010 Next Update: December 2011 Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2009 and Projected 2010 through 2014 (Megawatts and 2009 Base Year) 2009 725,958 46,550 37,963 55,944 161,241 191,032 41,465 63,518 128,245 Contiguou s U.S. FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC (U.S.) 772,089 46,006 42,240 60,215 177,688 201,350 43,395 63,810 137,385 785,069 46,124 42,733 60,820 181,867 205,351

  16. Next Update: December 2011 Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2009 and Projected 2010 through 2014 (Megawatts and 2009 Base Year) 2009/2010 668,818 53,022 35,351 44,864 143,827 193,135 32,863 56,191 109,565 Contiguous U.S. FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC (U.S.) 639,073 46,235 35,722 46,374 143,040 183,614 31,415 43,823 108,850 646,845 46,821 36,816 46,529 146,591 186,364 33,047 43,823 106,854 657,839 47,558 37,359 46,753

  17. Next Update: October 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a . Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2007 and Projected 2008 through 2012 (Megawatts and 2007 Base Year) 2007 782,227 46,676 41,684 58,314 181,700 209,109 43,167 62,188 139,389 Contiguous U.S. FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP TRE (ERCOT) WECC (U.S.) 789,915 47,364 41,222 61,779 184,000 204,791 43,800 64,927 142,032 806,672 48,181 43,208 62,647 187,100 209,288 44,784 66,247 145,217 822,889 49,093 44,737 63,399

  18. Next Update: October 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b . Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2007 and Projected 2008 through 2012 (Megawatts and 2007 Base Year) 2007/2008 637,905 41,701 33,191 46,795 141,900 179,888 31,322 50,408 112,700 Contiguous U.S. FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP TRE (ERCOT) WECC (U.S.) 656,989 49,601 34,100 48,323 147,100 182,055 31,954 47,270 116,586 669,111 50,463 35,085 48,911 149,100 185,850 32,585 48,285 118,832 680,673 51,606 36,298

  19. Next Update: October 2009 Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2006 and Projected 2008 through 2012 2007 4,012,728 232,405 217,602 301,766 954,700 1,049,298 210,875 307,064 739,018 Contiguous U.S. FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP TRE (ERCOT) WECC (U.S.) 4,085,683 242,923 225,058 301,767 973,800 1,073,081 208,532 313,946 746,575 4,149,201 248,996 230,745 305,223 984,000 1,086,304 212,884 319,355 761,694 4,226,516 255,216 239,483 308,534 999,200

  20. Next Update: October 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Released: February 2010 Next Update: October 2010 Table 2a . Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2008 and Projected 2009 through 2013 (Megawatts and 2008 Base Year) 2008 752,470 44,836 39,677 58,543 169,155 199,779 43,476 62,174 134,829 Contiguous U.S. FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC (U.S.) 779,716 45,734 43,172 61,327 178,100 202,738 44,462 63,491 140,692 790,116 45,794 44,184 61,601 180,400 206,218

  1. Next Update: October 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 2b . Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2008 and Projected 2009 through 2013 (Megawatts and 2008 Base Year) 2008/2009 643,557 45,275 36,029 46,043 142,395 179,596 32,809 47,806 113,605 Contiguous U.S. FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC (U.S.) 642,383 44,446 36,571 47,098 145,800 181,045 32,636 43,463 111,324 651,534 45,099 36,884 47,076 148,000 183,608 33,308 44,463 113,096 664,867 46,140 37,613

  2. Next Update: October 2010 Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jaunary 2010 Next Update: October 2010 Table 1. Net Energy For Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2008 and Projected 2009 through 2013 2008 3,989,058 226,874 227,536 297,362 936,201 1,035,390 207,603 312,401 745,691 Contiguous U.S. FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC (U.S.) 4,025,705 227,690 233,519 295,883 958,792 1,051,350 207,850 312,205 738,416 4,076,698 228,579 239,702 295,753 967,962 1,067,893 211,343 315,065 750,401

  3. SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar Transcript

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A presentation sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy about using solar photovoltaics (PV) systems to provide electricity for homes.

  4. Strategic Partnership Projects (SPP) | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract Research Strategic Partnership Projects (SPP) The Laboratory can conduct work for industry, small businesses or other federal agencies. SPP project plans are usually specified by the external partner(s), and the execution of the work is performed by technically qualified Laboratory staff using Laboratory facilities. The work must not affect the Laboratory's achievement of its Department of Energy (DOE) program requirements, and must not directly compete with capabilities available in

  5. Property:EIA/861/NercSpp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    operations within the SPP region (Y or N) 1 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2008 - F861 File Layout-2008.doc Pages using the property "EIA861NercSpp"...

  6. SPP Staff appreciates the opportunity to provide input regarding...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... from MISO, SPP, ERCOT and others dealing with the reliability and economic ... On page 107 of the pdf, change "Midwest" in the sentence starting with "Alabama Power..." ...

  7. Woodruff Electric Coop Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 20963 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  8. Valley Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 19688 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  9. City of Waterville, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 20189 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SERC Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  10. RFC Sand Creek Development LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Colorado Zip: 80014 Product: Subsidiary of Republic Financial Corporation set up to invest in Sand Creek Energy LLC, a planned gas to liquid facility. Coordinates: 39.325162,...

  11. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Idaho Highlight

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... flters, overall furnace maintenance and the use of programmable thermostats. * A multimedia residential energy-effciency education CBSM pilot project was launched in the South ...

  12. Property:EIA/861/NercSerc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Coop + true + Beauregard Electric Coop, Inc + true + Benton County + true + Berkeley Electric Coop Inc + true + (previous 25) (next 25) Retrieved from "http:...

  13. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Photovoltaic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Future www.oregon.govENERGYRENEWSolardocsSunChart.pdf Sun Chart Solar Access Shading analysis prior to installation (remember - small trees grow into tall trees) ...

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - spp_presentation.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPP Presentation 2 Southwestern Regional Hydropower Conference Kansas City, Missouri June 7-8, 2006 Ron Ciesiel Director of Compliance Southwest Power Pool 3 Organization Registration Generation Owners and Generation Operators 4 United States Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Mexico Comision Reguladora de Energia Canada NEB, Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Quebec, and Saskatchewan Electric Reliability Organization Overview Electric Reliability

  15. Strategic Partnership Projects (SPP) | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Events Research Education Organization Business Operations Careers/ Human Resources Directory Environment, Safety & Health Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Current Projects Patents Disclosures Contact Information Forms Strategic Partnership Projects (SPP) Contact Us Business Operations Careers/ Human Resources Directory Environment, Safety & Health Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Current

  16. DOE: Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Daniel, EPRI; Tuohy, Aidan, EPRI; Deb, Sidart, LCG Consulting; Jampani, Srinivas, LCG Consulting; Kirby, Brendan, Consultant; King, Jack, Consultant

    2011-11-29

    Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The DOE-funded project 'Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' aims to evaluate the benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of different balancing approaches with increasing levels of inter-regional cooperation. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. The primary analysis of the project is based on unit commitment (UC) and economic dispatch (ED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The UC/ED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as accurately as possible realizing that all such future scenario models are quite uncertain. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy. The analysis aspects of the project comprised 4 primary tasks: (1) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with only 7 GW of installed wind capacity in SPP for internal SPP consumption with no intended wind exports to SERC. This model is referred to as the 'Non-RES' model as it does not reflect the need for the SPP or SERC BAs to meet a federal Renewable Energy Standard (RES). (2) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of the Non-RES model for the year 2022 to provide project stakeholders with confidence in the model and analytical framework for a scenario that is similar to the existing system and more easily evaluated than the high-wind transfer scenarios that are analyzed subsequently. (3) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with sufficient installed wind capacity in SPP (approximately 48 GW) for both SPP and the participating SERC BAs to meet an RES of 20% energy. This model is referred to as the 'High-Wind Transfer' model with several different scenarios represented. The development of the High-Wind Transfer model not only included identification and allocation of SPP wind to individual SERC BAs, but also included the evaluation of various methods to allow the model to export the SPP wind to SERC without developing an actual transmission plan to support the transfers. (4) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of several different High-Wind Transfer model scenarios for the year 2022 to determine balancing costs and potential benefits of collaboration among SPP and SERC BAs to provide the required balancing.

  17. Terpenoid biosynthesis in Euphorbia lathyris and Copaifera spp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skrukrud, C.L.

    1987-07-01

    Biosynthesis of triterpenoids by isolated latex of Euphorbia lathyris was investigated. The rate of in vitro incorporation of mevalonic acid into triterpenoids was thirty times greater than acetate incorporation indicating that the rate-limiting step in the pathway occurs prior to mevalonate. Both HMG-CoA reductase (EC 1.1.1.34) and HMG-CoA lyase (EC 4.1.3.4) activities were detected in isolated latex. HMG-CoA reductase was localized to a membrane-bound fraction of a 5000g pellet of latex. The rate of conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate by this enzyme is comparable to the overall rate of acetate incorporation into the triterpenoids suggesting that this enzyme is rate-determining in the biosynthesis of triterpenoids in E. lathyris latex. HMG-CoA reductase of E. lathyris vegetative tissue was localized to the membrane-bound portion of a particulate fraction (18,000g), and was solubilized by treatment with 2% polyoxyethylene ether W-1. Differences in the optimal pH for activity of HMG-CoA reductase from the latex and vegetative tissue suggest that isozymes of the enzyme may be present in the two tissue types. Studies of the incorporation of various precursors into leaf discs and cuttings taken from Copaifera spp. show differences in the rate of incorporation into Copaifera sesquiterpenes suggesting that the site of sesquiterpene biosynthesis may differ in its accessibility to the different substrates and/or reflecting the metabolic controls on carbon allocation to the terpenes. Mevalonate incorporation by Copaifera langsdorfii cuttings into sesquiterpenes was a hundred-fold greater than either acetate or glucose incorporation, however, its incorporation into squalene and triterpenoids was also a hundred-fold greater than the incorporation into sesquiterpenes. 119 refs., 58 figs., 16 tabs.

  18. Microbial Community Succession During Lactate Amendment of Chromium Contaminated Groundwater Reveals a Predominance of Pelosinus spp.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, Jennifer J; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Drake, Meghan M; Campbell, James H; Moberly, James G; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Podar, Mircea; Brown, Steven D; Hazen, Terry; Arkin, Adam; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Faybishenko, Boris A; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    Microbial community structure and metabolism in contaminated ecosystems are potentially controlled not only by the different populations within the community, but a myriad of dynamic physicochemical parameters as well. The goal of the current work was to determine the impact of organic acid enrichment, in this case lactate, on the succession of the native microbial community from a contaminated groundwater aquifer. Triplicate anaerobic, continuous-flow glass reactors were inoculated with Hanford 100-H groundwater and incubated for 95 days to obtain a stable, enriched community. The microbial community experienced a shift in the population dynamics over time to eventually form a community with far less diversity than the original. The final community was dominated by Pelosinus spp. and to a lesser degree, Acetobacterium spp. with small amounts of other bacteria and archaea including methanogens. The resultant diversity was far decreased from 63 genera within 12 phyla to 11 bacterial genera (from three phyla) and 2 archaeal genera (from one phylum). Isolation efforts were successful in attaining new species of Pelosinus and known members of Methanosarcina barkerii along with several sulfate- and Fe(III)- reducing consortia members. The continuous-flow reactors allowed for testing physiochemical factors with microbial community dynamics on a smaller, replicable, scale while also facilitating the isolation of several previously uncultured community members. These lab-scale simulations will presumably allow for a deeper understanding of the community metabolism with specific carbon amendments that can inform future in situ efforts.

  19. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah

    2015-04-29

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ{sup 2} value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ{sup 2} value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies.

  20. Temperature effect on gastric emptying time of hybrid grouper (Epinephelus spp.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De, Moumita; Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd.; Das, Simon K.

    2014-09-03

    Knowledge of fish gastric emptying time is a necessary component for understanding the fish feeding rates, energy budgets and commercial production of fishes in aquaculture. The hybrid grouper Epinephelus spp. is getting popular as a culture species in Malaysia for their faster growth rate compared to commonly cultured grouper species (giant grouper Epinephelus lanceolatus and tiger grouper Epinephelus fuscoguttatus). There are data suggests that elevated sea water temperature affects gastric emptying time (GET) of fishes. Hence, this study aims to study the GET of hybrid grouper at different temperature (22, 26, 30, 34°C) in laboratory condition with commercial diet pellet. The gastric emptying times (GETs) at different temperatures were determined X-radiographically, using barium sulfate (BaSO{sub 4}) as a contrast medium food marker. The food marker and X-radiography showed that initial voidance of fecal matter began 4-6 h after feeding at all temperature. The fastest GET (13 h) was obsereved in the 30°C group, whereas the longest (17 h) GET was seen in 22°C group fed with artificial diet pellet. Not much differences in GET were recorded between the 26 and 34°C groups as 34°C groups fed lesser amount compared to 26°C groups. Nevertheless a substantial delay in GET was observed in the 22°C group. The findings of this study suggest to culture hybrid grouper between 26 to 30°C with commercial diet pellet as this temperature ranges proliferate the faster digestion process which may contribute faster growth rate of this commerical important fish species. Overall, these findings may have important consequences for optimization of commercial production of hybrid grouper.

  1. A dynamic focusing x-ray monochromator for a wiggler beam line at the SRS of the SERC Daresbury Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Bruijn, D.; Van Zuylen, P. ); Kruizinga, G. , P.O. Box 93138, 2509 AC Den Haag State University of Utrecht, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3508 TB Utrecht )

    1992-01-01

    A Si(220) double-crystal monochromator for the energy range 10--30 keV is presented. It will be used for EXAFS as well as powder diffraction measurements. To determine the requirements for this monochromator we looked, apart from mean considerations, at the requirements dictated by EXAFS in transmission mode. For good data analyses the proper shape, amplitude, and location at the energy axis of each wiggle is required. Moreover it is essential to separate the wiggles from background and noise. For the latter a high flux through the sample is desirable, which can be achieved by horizontal focusing of the beam. For that we have chosen to bend the second crystal sagitally. The sagittal bending radius is adjustable between 50 and 0.8 m, because for different energies different sagittal radii are necessary to focus the beam on the sample. The mean meridional radius of the second crystal is fixed at 130 m, which is an optimization for 20 keV. The meridional radius of the first crystal can be tuned between 100 and 500 m. When this radius is set to 130 m the energy resolution is calculated to be 6, 3, and 35 eV for 10, 20, and 30 keV (for perfectly bent crystals). By changing the meridional radius of the first crystal, future users of this monochromator can make the trade off between resolution and intensity. Movement of the monochromator exit beam, during a scan, will occur due to the monochromator geometry, but is reduced as much as possible by using an asymmetrically cut second crystal, with an asymmetry angle of 2.5{degree}. The average exit beam movement of the monochromator for a 1-keV scan is 20 {mu}m. For 40% of the energy range (10--30 keV) the exit beam position remains within 10 {mu}m. For the second crystal no translation stage is used.

  2. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    the former utility members joined RFC. Reliability First Corporation (RFC) came into existence on January 1, 2006. RFC submitted a consolidated filing covering the historical NERC...

  3. AUTOMATED DEAD-END ULTRAFILTRATION FOR ENHANCED SURVEILLANCE OF LEGIONELLA 2 PNEUMOPHILA AND LEGIONELLA SPP. IN COOLING TOWER WATERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brigmon, R.; Leskinen, S.; Kearns, E.; Jones, W.; Miller, R.; Betivas, C.; Kingsley, M.; Lim, D.

    2011-10-10

    Detection of Legionella pneumophila in cooling towers and domestic hot water systems involves concentration by centrifugation or membrane filtration prior to inoculation onto growth media or analysis using techniques such as PCR or immunoassays. The Portable Multi-use Automated Concentration System (PMACS) was designed for concentrating microorganisms from large volumes of water in the field and was assessed for enhancing surveillance of L. pneumophila at the Savannah River Site, SC. PMACS samples (100 L; n = 28) were collected from six towers between August 2010 and April 2011 with grab samples (500 ml; n = 56) being collected before and after each PMACS sample. All samples were analyzed for the presence of L. pneumophila by direct fluorescence immunoassay (DFA) using FITC-labeled monoclonal antibodies targeting serogroups 1, 2, 4 and 6. QPCR was utilized for detection of Legionella spp. in the same samples. Counts of L. pneumophila from DFA and of Legionella spp. from qPCR were normalized to cells/L tower water. Concentrations were similar between grab and PMACS samples collected throughout the study by DFA analysis (P = 0.4461; repeated measures ANOVA). The same trend was observed with qPCR. However, PMACS concentration proved advantageous over membrane filtration by providing larger volume, more representative samples of the cooling tower environment, which led to reduced variability among sampling events and increasing the probability of detection of low level targets. These data highlight the utility of the PMACS for enhanced surveillance of L. pneumophila by providing improved sampling of the cooling tower environment.

  4. Nanolipoprotein Particles (NLPs) as Versatile Vaccine Platforms for Co-delivery of Multiple Adjuvants with Subunit Antigens from Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis - Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, N. O.

    2015-01-06

    The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate that colocalization of protein subunit antigens and adjuvants on nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) can increase the protective efficacy of subunit antigens from Burkholderia spp. and Francisella tularensis against an aerosol challenge. In the second quarter of the third year, LLNL finalized all immunological assessments of NLP vaccine formulations in the F344 model. Battelle has immunized rats with three unique NLP formulations by either intramuscular or intranasal administration. All inoculations have been completed, and protective efficacy against an aerosolized challenge will begin at the end of October, 2014.

  5. Nanolipoprotein Particles (NLPs) as Versatile Vaccine Platforms for Co-delivery of Multiple Adjuvants with Subunit Antigens from Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis - Annual Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, N. O.

    2015-04-16

    The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate that co-localization of protein subunit antigens and adjuvants on nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) can increase the protective efficacy of recombinant subunit antigens from Burkholderia spp. and Francisella tularensis against an aerosol challenge. NLPs are are biocompatible, high-density lipoprotein mimetics that are amenable to the incorporation of multiple, chemically-disparate adjuvant and antigen molecules. We hypothesize that the ability to co-localize optimized adjuvant formulations with subunit antigens within a single particle will enhance the stimulation and activation of key immune effector cells, increasing the protective efficacy of subunit antigen-based vaccines. While Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis subunit antigens are the focus of this proposal, we anticipate that this approach is applicable to a wide range of DOD-relevant biothreat agents. The F344 rat aerosol challenge model for F. tularensis has been successfully established at Battelle under this contract, and Year 3 efficacy studies performed at Battelle demonstrated that an NLP vaccine formulation was able to enhance survival of female F344 rats relative to naïve animals. In addition, Year 3 focused on the incorporation of multiple Burkholderia antigens (both polysaccharides and proteins) onto adjuvanted NLPs, with immunological analysis poised to begin in the next quarter.

  6. Nanolipoprotein Particles (NLPs) as Versatile Vaccine Platforms for Co-delivery of Multiple Adjuvants with Subunit Antigens from Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis - Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, N. O.

    2015-01-13

    The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate that colocalization of protein subunit antigens and adjuvants on nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) can increase the protective efficacy of subunit antigens from Burkholderia spp. and Francisella tularensis against an aerosol challenge. In the third quarter of the third year, F344 rats vaccinated with adjuvanted NLP formulations were challenged with F. tularensis SCHU S4 at Battelle. Preliminary data indicate that up to 65% of females vaccinated intranasally with an NLP-based formulation survived this challenge, compared to only 20% survival of naïve animals. In addition, NLPs were successfully formulated with Burkholderia protein antigens. IACUC approval for immunological assessments in BALB/c mice was received and we anticipate that these assessments will begin by March 2015, pending ACURO approval.

  7. City of Franklin, Virginia (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 6715 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes...

  8. Town of Culpeper, Virginia (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 4619 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes...

  9. North Carolina El Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13683 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying...

  10. City of College Park, Georgia (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes...

  11. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, "

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 and Projected 2004 through 2008 " ,"(Megawatts and 2003 Base Year)" ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid" ,"Projected Year Base","Year",,"ECAR","FRCC","MAAC","MAIN","MAPP (U.S.) ","NPCC (U.S.) ","SERC","SPP","ERCOT","WECC (U.S.)

  12. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, "

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 and Projected 2005 through 2009 " ,"(Megawatts and 2004 Base Year)" ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid" ,"Projected Year Base","Year",,"ECAR","FRCC","MAAC","MAIN","MAPP/MRO (U.S.) ","NPCC (U.S.) ","SERC","SPP","ERCOT","WECC (U.S.)

  13. monthly_peak_1996_2004.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Next Update: October 2007 Table 3a . January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 1996 through 2004 (Megawatts) Month Year Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid ECAR FRCC MAAC MAIN MAPP/MRO NPCC SERC SPP ERCOT WECC Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW)

  14. monthly_peak_2003.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    O Form EIA-411 for 2005 Released: February 7, 2008 Next Update: October 2007 Table 3a . January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 1996 through 2003 and Projected 2004 through 2005 (Megawatts and 2003 Base Year) Projected Monthly Base Year Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid ECAR FRCC MAAC MAIN MAPP/MR NPCC SERC SPP ERCOT WECC Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW)

  15. monthly_peak_2004.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 3a . January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 1996 through 2004 and Projected 2005 through 2006 (Megawatts and 2004 Base Year) Projected Monthly Base Year Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid ECAR FRCC MAAC MAIN MAPP/MRO NPCC SERC SPP ERCOT WECC Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour

  16. winter_peak_2003.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ) Form EIA-411 for 2005 Released: February 7, 2008 Next Update: October 2007 Table 2b . Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 1990 through 2003 and Projected 2004 through 2008 (Megawatts and 2003 Base Year) Winter Noncoincident Peak Load Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Projected Year Base Year ECAR FRCC MAAC MAIN MAPP (U.S. NPCC (U.S.) SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 1990/1991 484,231 67,097

  17. winter_peak_2004.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b . Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 1990 through 2004 and Projected 2005 through 2009 (Megawatts and 2004 Base Year) Winter Noncoincident Peak Load Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Projected Year Base Year ECAR FRCC MAAC MAIN MAPP/MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 1990/1991 484,231 67,097 30,800 36,551 32,461 21,113 40,545 86,648 38,949 35,815 94,252 1991/1992 485,761

  18. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Multifamily Housing through Partnerships overcomingpersistentbarriersenergyefficiencymultifamilyhousing.doc Recording of SERC Monitoring Technologies - Solar Photovoltaics

  19. City of Sturgis, Michigan (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 18252 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  20. West Penn Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 20387 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale...

  1. City of Orrville, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 14194 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  2. Village of Winnetka, Illinois (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 20824 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes...

  3. Pennsylvania Electric Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 14711 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity...

  4. Ohio Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 14006 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  5. PECO Energy Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 14940 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services...

  6. Potomac Electric Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 15270 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity...

  7. Clyde Light & Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 3824 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity...

  8. City of St Marys, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 17891 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying...

  9. Town of Berlin, Maryland (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 1615 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying...

  10. Analysis of the Clean Energy Standard Act of 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Appendix C: Map of NEMS Electricity Market Module Regions 1 Texas Regional Entity (ERCT) 12 SERC / Delta (SRDA) 2 Florida Reliability Coordinating Council (FRCC) 13 SERC / Gateway (SRGW) 3 Midwest Reliability Organization / East (MROE) 14 SERC / Southeastern (SRSE) 4 Midwest Reliability Organization / West (MROW) 15 SERC / Central (SRCE) 5 NPCC / Northeast (NEWE) 16 SERC / Virginia-Carolina (SRVC) 6 NPCC / NYC-Westchester (NYCW) 17 Southwest Power Pool / North (SPNO) 7 NPCC / Long Island

  11. Northern Virginia Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13640 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes This...

  12. Town of Windsor, North Carolina (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 20811 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  13. Northern Neck Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13762 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  14. Community Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 4117 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  15. Central Virginia Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 3291 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes This...

  16. Next Update: October 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...ISO US SERC - AC 200-299 230 100 6 2013 Hamilton Middleburg 17 UG - Und other undergroun ...ISO US SERC - AC 200-299 230 800 5 2010 Hamilton Pleasant View 12 OH - Ove steel single ...

  17. Fairfield Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Id 5929 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate...

  18. Pontotoc Electric Power Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Id 15211 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate...

  19. Southeastern Power Admin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location SERC NERC FRCC Yes NERC SERC Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility...

  20. Piedmont Municipal Power Agny | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    P NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility...

  1. Toledo Bend Project Joint Oper | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility...

  2. Crisp County Power Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 4538 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity...

  3. Grady Electric Membership Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 7450 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can...

  4. Questions Asked during the Financing Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets Transcript Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar...

  5. net_energy_load_1990_2004.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Not applicable for this table format Table 1a . Historical Net Energy For Load, Actual by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 1990 through 2004. (Thousands of Megawatthours) Net Energy For Load (Annual) Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Year ECAR FRCC MAAC MAIN MAPP/MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 1990 2,886,496 442,507 142,502 221,099 197,326 127,102 250,681 485,205 252,037 209,789 558,248 1991 2,941,669 450,586 146,903

  6. net_energy_load_2003.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 and Projected 2004 through 2008 (Thousands of Megawatthours and 2003 Base Year) Net Energy For Load (Annual) Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Projected Year Base Year ECAR FRCC MAAC MAIN MAPP (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 1990 2,886,496 442,507 142,502 221,099 197,326 127,102 250,681 485,205 252,037 209,789 558,248 1991 2,941,669 450,586 146,903 228,588 205,880 129,826 253,701 501,794 257,434 211,568 555,389 1992 2,942,910 450,853 147,464

  7. net_energy_load_2004.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 and Projected 2005 through 2009 (Thousands of Megawatthours and 2004 Base Year) Net Energy For Load (Annual) Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Projected Year Base Year ECAR FRCC MAAC MAIN MAPP/MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 1990 2,886,496 442,507 142,502 221,099 197,326 127,102 250,681 485,205 252,037 209,789 558,248 1991 2,941,669 450,586 146,903 228,588 205,880 129,826 253,701 501,794 257,434 211,568 555,389 1992 2,942,910 450,853

  8. summer_peak_1990_2004.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c . Historical Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 1990 through 2004 (Megawatts) Summer Noncoincident Peak Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Year ECAR FRCC MAAC MAIN MAPP/MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 1990 546,331 79,258 27,266 42,613 40,740 24,994 44,116 94,677 52,541 42,737 97,389 1991 551,418 81,224 28,818 45,937 41,598 25,498 46,594 95,968 51,885 41,870 92,026 1992 548,707

  9. winter_peak_1990_2004.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    d . Historical Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 1990 through 2004 (Megawatts) Winter Noncoincident Peak Load Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Year ECAR FRCC MAAC MAIN MAPP/MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 1990/1991 484,231 67,097 30,800 36,551 32,461 21,113 40,545 86,648 38,949 35,815 94,252 1991/1992 485,761 71,181 31,153 37,983 33,420 21,432 41,866 88,422 38,759 35,448 86,097

  10. Springfield Processing Plant (SPP) Facility Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, Janice; Torres, Teresa M.

    2012-10-01

    The Springfield Processing Plant is a hypothetical facility. It has been constructed for use in training workshops. Information is provided about the facility and its surroundings, particularly security-related aspects such as target identification, threat data, entry control, and response force data.

  11. Village of Plymouth, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 15203 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a...

  12. City of Columbiana, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 4061 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  13. Craig-Botetourt Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 4471 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  14. Borough of Olyphant, Pennsylvania (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 14124 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  15. South Central Power Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 18085 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes This...

  16. Town of Avilla, Indiana (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 1028 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes This article is a stub....

  17. The Energy Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 49746 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  18. City of Dowagiac, Michigan (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 5343 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  19. Village of Republic, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 15865 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a...

  20. Village of Versailles, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 19805 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a...

  1. Borough of Kutztown, Pennsylvania (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 10494 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a...

  2. Borough of South River, New Jersey (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 17571 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  3. Village of Sycamore, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 18393 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  4. Village of Bloomdale, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 1677 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a...

  5. Virginia Tech Electric Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 19882 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  6. City of Westerville, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 20477 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You...

  7. Adams Rural Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 118 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  8. Allegheny Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 332 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  9. City of Garrett, Indiana (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 6970 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  10. Paulding-Putman Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 14599 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  11. Firelands Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 6335 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  12. City of Seaford, Delaware (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 16852 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  13. City of Niles, Michigan (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13604 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  14. United Electric Coop, Inc (Pennsylvania) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 40219 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  15. South Jersey Energy Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 17549 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes ISO NE Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help...

  16. Sussex Rural Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 40299 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  17. PEPCO Energy Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Yes Ownership R NERC Location RFC NERC ERCOT Yes NERC RFC Yes ISO Ercot Yes RTO PJM Yes ISO NY Yes ISO NE Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services...

  18. Pioneer Rural Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 15054 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  19. Borough of Goldsboro, Pennsylvania (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 7359 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  20. Borough of New Wilmington, Pennsylvania (Utility Company) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13489 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  1. Northeastern Rural E M C | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 20603 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  2. City of Galion, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 6914 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  3. City of Gas City, Indiana (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 6993 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  4. City of New Martinsville, West Virginia (Utility Company) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13471 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  5. Borough of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania (Utility Company) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 3329 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes...

  6. Borough of Weatherly, Pennsylvania (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 20232 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  7. Village of Cygnet, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 4685 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a...

  8. Appalachian Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 733 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  9. Union Rural Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 19501 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes This...

  10. Guernsey-Muskingum El Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 7891 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  11. Carroll Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 3076 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  12. Central Electric Coop, Inc (Pennsylvania) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 40224 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  13. Village of Beach City, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 1386 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a...

  14. Borough of Park Ridge, New Jersey (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 14472 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  15. Frontier Power Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 6804 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You...

  16. Easton Utilities Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 5625 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes...

  17. PPL Electric Utilities Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 14715 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt...

  18. American Mun Power-Ohio, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 40577 Utility Location Yes Ownership A NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity...

  19. City of Dover, Delaware (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 5335 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes...

  20. Borough of Mifflinburg, Pennsylvania (Utility Company) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 12523 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  1. City of Mishawaka, Indiana (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 12674 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  2. Village of New Bremen, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13420 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  3. Borough of Quakertown, Pennsylvania (Utility Company) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 15541 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a...

  4. CECG Maine, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4166 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate...

  5. CinCap V LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Yes Ownership W NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO NE Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate...

  6. Prospect Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Id 15432 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate...

  7. Dublin Municipal Electric Util | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility...

  8. CinCap IV, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 3575 Utility Location Yes Ownership W NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO NE Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  9. DTE Energy Trading, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Id 25262 Utility Location Yes Ownership W NERC Location RFC NERC ERCOT Yes NERC RFC Yes ISO Ercot Yes RTO PJM Yes ISO NY Yes ISO MISO Yes ISO NE Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing...

  10. Village of Eldorado, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 5752 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a...

  11. PEPCO Energy Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Id 14405 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC Location RFC NERC ERCOT Yes NERC RFC Yes ISO Ercot Yes RTO PJM Yes ISO NY Yes ISO NE Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity...

  12. Miami Power Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 12323 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Transmission Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  13. Borough of Girard, Pennsylvania (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 7256 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC ERCOT Yes NERC RFC Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a...

  14. Village of Centuria, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 3298 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes...

  15. Village of Wharton, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 20471 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This...

  16. Village of Georgetown, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 7131 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can...

  17. Village of Carey, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 3008 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity...

  18. SITE SPECIFIC ADVISORY BOARD CHAIRS MEETING

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SERC Projects SERC Projects Projects funded by Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Grants $90 million under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to support the use of a wide range of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies by 101 high-performing local weatherization providers across the country View SERC Grants in a larger map. To report corrections, please email SustainableEnergyWAP@ee.doe.gov. Alabama: Community Action Agency of Northwest Alabama in Florence has been

  19. Kentucky Utilities Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 10171 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC SERC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  20. Working Copy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... disposition schedule RQ reportable quantity SA Scientific Advisor SERC State Emergency ... (MOC) and the Scientific Advisor (SA) organizations to the appropriate CBFO staff. ...

  1. Berkeley Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Berkeley Lab masthead U.S. Department of Energy logo Phone Book Jobs Search sun abstract Helios logo Overview Goals & Challenges Publications Research Highlights In the News SERC...

  2. Prospects for Higgs coupling measurements in SUSY with radiatively...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Prospects for Higgs coupling measurements in SUSY with radiatively-driven naturalness Authors: Bae, Kyu Jung ; Baer, Howard ; Nagata, Natsumi ; Serce, Hasan Publication ...

  3. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report covers the states that largely fall into the Southeastern Reliability Corporation (SERC) region: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

  4. schedule6_2001.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 43 OH T S 956 ACSRD 1 1 17543 S 100 U SERC VAC AC 230 230 0 Nov-06 Pleasant View Hamilton 5 OH 0 0 0 19876 I 100 U SERC VAC AC 230 230 0 Dec-06 Fredericksburg Possum Point ...

  5. schedule6_2004.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 43 OH P S 1272 ACSR 2 1 1 17543 S 0 U SERC VAC AC 230 230 800 4202007 Pleasant View Hamilton 12 OH P S 636 ACSR 2 1 1 19876 I 0 U SERC ENT AC 230 230 640 5202007 Panama Dutch ...

  6. schedule6_2003.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... TS 1 OH T S 1351 ACSR 1 1 1 195 I1 0 U SERC VAC AC 230 230 800 May-07 Pleasant View Hamilton 12 OH P S 636 ACSR 2 1 1 19876 I1 0 U SERC ENT AC 230 230 884 Jun-07 Cypress Jacinto ...

  7. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Fact Sheet July 2011

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WEATHERIZATION AND INTERGOVERNMENTAL PROGRAM SERC Grants Expand Weatherization Technologies The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) launched Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grants, which allow selected local weatherization agencies to install renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies over and above what they can install through the traditional Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). In 2007, the Energy Independence and

  8. City of Bedford, Virginia (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 1456 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFO NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying...

  9. Responses Posted to DOE Inaugural National Collegiate Wind Competition RFP Questions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The RFP and responses to technical questions (Amendment 1) are available on the Federal Business Opportunities website, solicitation number RFC-3-23003.

  10. Responses to Collegiate Wind Competition 2016 RFP Questions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Responses to technical questions are posted on the Federal Business Opportunities website, solicitation number RFC-5-52004. Proposals are due December 15, 2014.

  11. Renewable Fuels Consulting | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Consulting Jump to: navigation, search Name: Renewable Fuels Consulting Place: Mason City, Iowa Sector: Renewable Energy Product: RFC specializes in providing technical solutions...

  12. Strategic Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yes NERC SERC Yes NERC WECC Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  13. Rappahannock Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes This article is a stub. You can help...

  14. schedule6_2005.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Progress Energy Carolinas IOU 100 U SERC VAC AC 230 230 800 6302008 Pleasant View Hamilton 12 - Overh single pole steel 636 ACSR Double 1 1 19876 Dominion Virginia Power IOU ...

  15. ,"Table 6. Proposed High-voltage Transmission Line Additions...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,100,"Planned","Reliability"," " ,"US","SERC","VACAR","AC","200-299",230,800,11,2010,"Hamilton","Pleasant View",12,"OH","single pole","steel",636,"ACSR","Double",1,1,"-","PJM ...

  16. Next Update: December 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Double 2 2 - PJM Interconnection, LLC 100 US SERC VACAR AC 200-299 230 800 11 2010 Hamilton Pleasant View 12.0 OH single polesteel 636 ACSR Double 1 1 - PJM Interconnection, LLC ...

  17. schedule6_2006.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Valley Authority FederalState 100 U SERC VACAR AC 230 230 800 6-2008 Pleasant View Hamilton 12 - Overh single pole steel 636 ACSR Double 1 1 19876 Dominion Virginia Power IOU ...

  18. Next Update: October 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 1 1 South Carolina Electric & Gas IOU 100 US SERC VACAR AC 230 230 800 050110 Hamilton Pleasant View 12 OH single pole steel 636 ACSR Double 1 1 19876 Virginia Electric and ...

  19. CX-010381: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Solar Energy Research Center (SERC) Building CX(s) Applied: A7; B1.15; B3.6 Date: 01/18/2011 Location(s): California Offices(s): Berkeley Site Office

  20. Natural little hierarchy for SUSY from radiative breaking of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Natural little hierarchy for SUSY from radiative breaking of the Peccei-Quinn symmetry Authors: Bae, Kyu Jung ; Baer, Howard ; Serce, Hasan Publication Date: 2015-01-06 OSTI ...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Huang, Peisi (10) Bae, Kyu Jung (8) Mickelson, Dan (7) Balazs, Csaba (5) Serce, Hasan (5) Belyaev, Alexander (4) Lessa, Andre (4) Savoy, Michael (4) Kraml, Sabine Laboratoire de ...

  2. WEATHERIZATION PROGRAM NOTICE 09-1C

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WEATHERIZATION PROGRAM NOTICE 10-19 EFFECTIVE DATE: September 22, 2010 SUBJECT: GUIDANCE FOR GRANT AMENDMENTS FOR THE SUSTAINABLE ENERGY RESOURCES FOR CONSUMERS FUNDING PURPOSE: To issue guidance for the Grantees who need to complete grant amendments based on the receipt of funding to undertake Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) projects. SCOPE: The provisions of this guidance apply to States or other entities named as recipients of SERC Grants funding within the Department of

  3. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Fact Sheet July 2011 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Fact Sheet July 2011 Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Fact Sheet July 2011 Provides an overview on the U.S. Department of Energys Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grants, including information on the programs history, who is eligible, and how to participate. PDF icon serc_factsheet.pdf More Documents & Publications WPN 10-19: Guidance for Grant Amendments for the Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumer's Funding WEATHERIZATION PROGRAM

  4. expanding_chp_in_your_state.doc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    expanding_chp_in_your_state.doc expanding_chp_in_your_state.doc expanding_chp_in_your_state.doc Microsoft Office document icon expanding_chp_in_your_state.doc More Documents & Publications Combined Heat and Power: Expanding CHP in Your State Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Geothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps

  5. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix F

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis. 1 2 3 4 5 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 6 7 1. ERCT TRE All 2. FRCC FRCC All 3. MROE MRO East 4. MROW MRO West 5. NEWE NPCC New England 6. NYCW NPCC NYC/Westchester 7. NYLI NPCC Long Island 8. NYUP NPCC Upstate NY 9. RFCE RFC East 10. RFCM RFC Michigan 11. RFCW RFC West 12. SRDA

  6. Village of Minster, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 12660 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location ECAR NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  7. Conectiv Energy Supply Inc. | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 4318 Utility Location Yes Ownership W NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes ISO NY Yes ISO MISO Yes ISO NE Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity...

  8. Washington Gas Energy Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 20659 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  9. Champion Energy Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Id 54862 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes NERC RFC Yes ISO Ercot Yes RTO PJM Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help...

  10. CMS Energy Resource Management Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Utility Id 3991 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC Location RFC Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  11. Arapahoe County, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc New West Technologies LLC PV Solar Planet ProLogis ProtoFlex Corp formerly Alpha Optics Inc RFC Sand Creek Development LLC Simplicity Energy Farms Inc Tru-Lite Versa Power...

  12. Borough of Duncannon, Pennsylvania (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility...

  13. Panel 3, Giner Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High efficiency Low Cap Ex 15 N , 210 Nm 3 h Energy Storage Low Cap Ex Rapid Response time MW Stacks, 2 MW - 5 MW Systems RFC Electrolyzers UUV 20 Nm 3 Backup Power 2 ...

  14. Glacial Energy Holdings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 54871 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes NERC MRO Yes NERC NPCC Yes NERC RFC Yes Activity...

  15. NSAC Subcommittee 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nsac-2012-rfcdoku.phpdefaultsidebarleft?rev1337463090&dodiff * Index * GEN * LEP * RHI * MEP * FSN * THE * FAC texthtml 2012-05-19T16:30:41-06:00 burch rfc:mep -...

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - MISO-SPP Market Impacts HydPwrConf 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slide 7 Southwestern Power Administration early afternoon operating day prior. Customer Electrical Demand Loads Transmission System ConditionsOutages Electrical System Operations ...

  17. Pyrolytic oil of banana (Musa spp.) pseudo-stem via fast process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdullah, Nurhayati; Sulaiman, Fauziah; Taib, Rahmad Mohd; Miskam, Muhamad Azman

    2015-04-24

    This study was an attempt to produce bio-oil from banana pseudo-stem, a waste of banana cultivation, using fast pyrolysis technology. The compositions were determined and the thermal degradation behaviour of the raw material was analyzed using Perkin-Elmer Simultaneous Thermal Analyzer (STA) 6000. A 300 g/h fluidized bed bench scale fast pyrolysis unit, assembled with double screw feeders and cyclones, operating at atmospheric pressure, was used to obtain the pyrolysis liquid. The study involves the impact of the following key variables; the reactor temperature in the range of 450–650 °C, and the residence time in the range of 1.00–3.00 s. The particle size was set at 224-400 µm. The properties of the liquid product were analyzed for calorific heating value, pH value, conductivity, water and char content. The basic functional groups of the compositions were also determined using FTIR. The properties of the liquid product were compared with other wood derived bio-oil. The pyrolysis liquids derived from banana pseudo-stem were found to be in an aqueous phase.

  18. Wind Webinar Text Version | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Text Version Wind Webinar Text Version Download the text version of the audio from the DOE Office of Indian Energy webinar on wind renewable energy. PDF icon Text Version of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Foundational Course on Wind More Documents & Publications SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar Transcript strategiesforsuccessfulenergymanagement.doc Biomass Webinar

  19. Solar Webinar Text Version | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Text Version Solar Webinar Text Version Download the text version of the audio from the DOE Office of Indian Energy webinar on solar renewable energy. PDF icon DOE Office of Indian Energy Foundational Course on Solar: Text Version More Documents & Publications SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar Transcript text_alternative_stat_webinar_2012_8_15.doc Wind Webinar Text Version

  20. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential Water

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Heaters | Department of Energy Water Heaters Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential Water Heaters PDF icon 20110222_webinar_transcript.pdf More Documents & Publications Overcoming Persistent Barriers to Energy Efficiency in Multifamily Housing through Partnerships overcoming_persistent_barriers_energy_efficiency_multifamily_housing.doc Recording of SERC Monitoring Technologies - Solar Photovoltaics

  1. City Utilities of Springfield | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 17833 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  2. City of Wahoo, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 19968 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes...

  3. Southwestern Electric Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 17698 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  4. Public Service Co of Oklahoma | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 15474 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  5. Town of Laverne, Oklahoma (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 10777 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled...

  6. City of Malden, Missouri (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 11540 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying...

  7. Southwestern Power Admin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 17716 Utility Location Yes Ownership F NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  8. City of Oxford, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 14276 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes...

  9. City of Higginsville, Missouri (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 8567 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying...

  10. City of St John, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 17879 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes...

  11. Northeast Texas Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13670 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying...

  12. Sunflower Electric Power Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 18315 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  13. City of Burlington, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 2551 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying...

  14. City of Wellington, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 20315 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying...

  15. City of Lubbock, Texas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 11292 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  16. Southern Public Power District | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 17642 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Buying...

  17. City of Monett, Missouri (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 12782 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled...

  18. City of Savonburg, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 16876 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail...

  19. Western Farmers Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 20447 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  20. City of Lincoln Center, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 11017 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying...

  1. Kansas Electric Power Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 9961 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying...

  2. City of Burlingame, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 2547 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled...

  3. City of Piggott, Arkansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 15043 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying...

  4. City of Altus, Oklahoma (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 416 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing...

  5. Kansas Municipal Energy Agency | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 10035 Utility Location Yes Ownership A NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes This article...

  6. City of Augusta, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 998 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying...

  7. City Water and Light Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 9879 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying...

  8. City of Sikeston, Missouri (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 17177 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  9. Ultra-High Efficiency and Low-Emissions Combustion Technology for Manufacturing Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atreya, Arvind

    2013-04-15

    The purpose of this research was to develop and test a transformational combustion technology for high temperature furnaces to reduce the energy intensity and carbon footprint of U.S. manufacturing industries such as steel, aluminum, glass, metal casting, and petroleum refining. A new technology based on internal and/or external Flue Gas Recirculation (FGR) along with significant enhancement in flame radiation was developed. It produces "Radiative Flameless Combustion (RFC)" and offers tremendous energy efficiency and pollutant reduction benefits over and above the now popular "flameless combustion." It will reduce the energy intensity (or fuel consumption per unit system output) by more than 50% and double the furnace productivity while significantly reducing pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions (10^3 times reduction in NOx and 10 times reduction in CO & hydrocarbons and 3 times reduction in CO2). Product quality improvements are also expected due to uniform radiation, as well as, reduction in scale/dross formation is expected because of non-oxidative atmosphere. RFC is inexpensive, easy to implement, and it was successfully tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at the University of Michigan during the course of this work. A first-ever theory with gas and particulate radiation was also developed. Numerical programs were also written to design an industrial-scale furnace. Nine papers were published (or are in the process of publication). We believe that this early stage research adequately proves the concept through laboratory experiments, modeling and computational models. All this work is presented in the published papers. Important conclusions of this work are: (1) It was proved through experimental measurements that RFC is not only feasible but a very beneficial technology. (2) Theoretical analysis of RFC was done in (a) spatially uniform strain field and (b) a planar momentum jet where the strain rate is neither prescribed nor uniform. Four important non-dimensional parameters controlling RFC in furnaces were identified. These are: (i) The Boltzmann number; (ii) The Damkohler number, (iii) The dimensionless Arrhenius number, and (iv) The equivalence ratio. Together they define the parameter space where RFC is possible. It was also found that the Damkohler number must be small for RFC to exist and that the Boltzmann number expands the RFC domain. The experimental data obtained during the course of this work agrees well with the predictions made by the theoretical analysis. Interestingly, the equivalence ratio dependence shows that it is easier to establish RFC for rich mixtures than for lean mixtures. This was also experimentally observed. Identifying the parameter space for RFC is necessary for controlling the RFC furnace operation. It is hoped that future work will enable the methodology developed here to be applied to the operation of real furnaces, with consequent improvement in efficiency and pollutant reduction. To reiterate, the new furnace combustion technology developed enables intense radiation from combustion products and has many benefits: (i) Ultra-High Efficiency and Low-Emissions; (ii) Uniform and intense radiation to substantially increase productivity; (iii) Oxygen-free atmosphere to reduce dross/scale formation; (iv) Provides multi-fuel capability; and (v) Enables carbon sequestration if pure oxygen is used for combustion.

  10. SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORYREGENERATIVE FUEL CELL PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motyka, T

    2008-11-11

    A team comprised of governmental, academic and industrial partners led by the Savannah River National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a regenerative fuel cell system for backup power applications. Recent market assessments have identified emergency response and telecommunication applications as promising near-term markets for fuel cell backup power systems. The Regenerative Fuel Cell System (RFC) consisted of a 2 kg-per-day electrolyzer, metal-hydride based hydrogen storage units and a 5 kW fuel cell. Coupling these components together created a system that can produce and store its own energy from the power grid much like a rechargeable battery. A series of test were conducted to evaluate the performance of the RFC system under both steady-state and transit conditions that might be encountered in typical backup power applications. In almost all cases the RFC functioned effectively. Test results from the demonstration project will be used to support recommendations for future fuel cell and hydrogen component and system designs and support potential commercialization activities. In addition to the work presented in this report, further testing of the RFC system at the Center for Hydrogen Research in Aiken County, SC is planned including evaluating the system as a renewable system coupled with a 20kW-peak solar photovoltaic array.

  11. A Network Client Using the Gopher Information Discovery Protocol

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-10-05

    WSGOPHER uses the protocol known as Gopher, which is described in Internet RFC 1436. Specifically Gopher is a client/server protocol. Gopher servers provide information across the network to Gopher clients. WSGOPHER is an implementation of a Gopher client for Microsoft Windows 3.1 and Windows Sockets version 1.1.

  12. GPU-based relative fuzzy connectedness image segmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuge Ying; Ciesielski, Krzysztof C.; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Miller, Robert W. [Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Department of Mathematics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States) and Medical Image Processing Group, Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Medical Image Processing Group, Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose:Recently, clinical radiological research and practice are becoming increasingly quantitative. Further, images continue to increase in size and volume. For quantitative radiology to become practical, it is crucial that image segmentation algorithms and their implementations are rapid and yield practical run time on very large data sets. The purpose of this paper is to present a parallel version of an algorithm that belongs to the family of fuzzy connectedness (FC) algorithms, to achieve an interactive speed for segmenting large medical image data sets. Methods: The most common FC segmentations, optimizing an Script-Small-L {sub {infinity}}-based energy, are known as relative fuzzy connectedness (RFC) and iterative relative fuzzy connectedness (IRFC). Both RFC and IRFC objects (of which IRFC contains RFC) can be found via linear time algorithms, linear with respect to the image size. The new algorithm, P-ORFC (for parallel optimal RFC), which is implemented by using NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) platform, considerably improves the computational speed of the above mentioned CPU based IRFC algorithm. Results: Experiments based on four data sets of small, medium, large, and super data size, achieved speedup factors of 32.8 Multiplication-Sign , 22.9 Multiplication-Sign , 20.9 Multiplication-Sign , and 17.5 Multiplication-Sign , correspondingly, on the NVIDIA Tesla C1060 platform. Although the output of P-ORFC need not precisely match that of IRFC output, it is very close to it and, as the authors prove, always lies between the RFC and IRFC objects. Conclusions: A parallel version of a top-of-the-line algorithm in the family of FC has been developed on the NVIDIA GPUs. An interactive speed of segmentation has been achieved, even for the largest medical image data set. Such GPU implementations may play a crucial role in automatic anatomy recognition in clinical radiology.

  13. Clinch River Breeder Reactor: an assessment of need for power and regulatory issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamblin, D M; Tepel, R C; Bjornstad, D J; Hill, L J; Cantor, R A; Carroll, P J; Cohn, S M; Hadder, G R; Holcomb, B D; Johnson, K E

    1983-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of a research effort designed to assist the US Department of Energy in: (1) reviewing the need for power from the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) in the Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) region, not including Florida, and (2) isolating specific regulatory and institutional issues and physical transmission capacities that may constrain the market for CRBR power. A review of existing electric power wheeling arrangements in the Southeast and specific federal and state regulatory obstacles that may affect power sales from the CRBR was undertaken. This review was a contributing factor to a decision to target the service territory to SERC-less Florida.

  14. UNC EFRC - Center for Solar Fuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Catherine M. Heyer, PhD UNC EFRC Assistant Director Ralph House, PhD UNC SERC Translation and Outreach Manager RESEARCH STAFF M. Kyle Brennaman, PhD, UNC Senior Research Scientist & Laser Facility Director Seth L. Marquard, PhD, UNC Senior Research Scientist - Synthesis Postdoctoral Fellows & Research Scholars Leila Alibabaei, UNC Robert Dillon, UNC Michael Eberhart, UNC Gyu Leem, University of Florida Candy Mercado, University of Colorado-Boulder Animesh Nayak, UNC

  15. Combined Heat and Power: Expanding CHP in Your State | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combined Heat and Power: Expanding CHP in Your State Combined Heat and Power: Expanding CHP in Your State This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on Combined Heat and Power: Expanding CHP in Your State PDF icon Presentation Microsoft Office document icon Transcript More Documents & Publications expanding_chp_in_your_state.doc Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Sustainable Energy Resources for

  16. Natural little hierarchy for SUSY from radiative breaking of the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Peccei-Quinn symmetry (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect little hierarchy for SUSY from radiative breaking of the Peccei-Quinn symmetry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Natural little hierarchy for SUSY from radiative breaking of the Peccei-Quinn symmetry Authors: Bae, Kyu Jung ; Baer, Howard ; Serce, Hasan Publication Date: 2015-01-06 OSTI Identifier: 1180704 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 91;

  17. WPN 12-5: Updated Weatherization Assistance Program Monitoring Guidance |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy 2-5: Updated Weatherization Assistance Program Monitoring Guidance WPN 12-5: Updated Weatherization Assistance Program Monitoring Guidance Archived 12/18/15, Superseded by WPN 16-4 To issue the updated monitoring policy and procedures for the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) for both annual Appropriated awards and for the Recovery Act awards, which includes the Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Awards. This updated Guidance excludes the

  18. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Geothermal Heat Pump Retrofit Transcript | Department of Energy Geothermal Heat Pump Retrofit Transcript Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential Geothermal Heat Pump Retrofit Transcript Transcript for a U.S. Department of Energy Webinar on Dec. 14, 2010, about residential geothermal heat pump retrofits PDF icon 20101214_geothermal_webinar_transcript.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Geothermal/Ground-Source

  19. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Solar Water Heating

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transcript | Department of Energy Solar Water Heating Transcript Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Solar Water Heating Transcript Video recording transcript of a Webinar on Nov. 16, 2010 about residential solar water heating applications PDF icon solar_water_heating_webinar.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential Water Heaters Sustainable

  20. Prospects for Higgs coupling measurements in SUSY with radiatively-driven

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    naturalness (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Prospects for Higgs coupling measurements in SUSY with radiatively-driven naturalness Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on August 13, 2016 Title: Prospects for Higgs coupling measurements in SUSY with radiatively-driven naturalness Authors: Bae, Kyu Jung ; Baer, Howard ; Nagata, Natsumi ; Serce, Hasan Publication Date: 2015-08-14 OSTI Identifier: 1210124 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal

  1. DOE Webinar: Translating Behavior Change Research Into Consumer Action |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Webinar: Translating Behavior Change Research Into Consumer Action DOE Webinar: Translating Behavior Change Research Into Consumer Action DOE Webinar: Translating Behavior Change Research Into Consumer Action, May 28, 2013. PDF icon Webinar slides More Documents & Publications Incorporating Behavior Change Efforts Into Energy Efficiency Programs Outreach to Faith--Based Organizations SERC Community-Based Social Marketing for Weatherization Programs Webinar

  2. The Higgs mass and natural supersymmetric spectrum from the landscape

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The Higgs mass and natural supersymmetric spectrum from the landscape Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Higgs mass and natural supersymmetric spectrum from the landscape Authors: Baer, Howard ; Barger, Vernon ; Savoy, Michael ; Serce, Hasan Publication Date: 2016-07-01 OSTI Identifier: 1251748 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physics Letters. Section B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 758; Journal Issue: C; Related

  3. NIST cooperative laboratory for OSI routing technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, D.

    1994-05-23

    This document is one of two reports on the Integrated ISIS protocol. Required by the IAB/IESG in order for an Internet routing protocol to advance to Draft Standard Status. Integrated ISIS is an Interior Gateway Protocol and is designed to carry both IP and ISO CLNP routing information. Integrated ISIS is currently designated as a Proposed Standard. The protocol was first published in RFC 1195. Internet Draft was published subsequently to RFC 1195 and documents the current version of the protocol. This report documents experience with Integrated ISIS. This includes reports on interoperability testing, field experience and the current state of Integrated ISIS implementations. It also presents a summary of the Integrated ISIS Management Information Base (MIB), and a summary of the Integrated ISIS authentication mechanism.

  4. Responses by CPower, Inc. to DOE RFI | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Questions | Department of Energy Responses Posted to DOE Inaugural National Collegiate Wind Competition RFP Questions Responses Posted to DOE Inaugural National Collegiate Wind Competition RFP Questions January 30, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The RFP and responses to technical questions (Amendment 1) are available on the Federal Business Opportunities website, solicitation number RFC-3-23003. The deadline is February 19 at 5 p.m. Mountain Time. On January 8, 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy's

  5. Responses to IT-related Questions from the Transition Team | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Responses to Collegiate Wind Competition 2016 RFP Questions Responses to Collegiate Wind Competition 2016 RFP Questions November 18, 2014 - 11:15am Addthis Responses to technical questions are posted on the Federal Business Opportunities website, solicitation number RFC-5-52004. Proposals are due December 15, 2014. On October 30, 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) seeking teams of students to participate in

  6. summer_nid_cr_cm_2005.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    d Form EIA-411 for 2005 Released: February 7, 2008 Next Update: October 2007 Table 4. Summer Historic and Projected Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 2005 and 2006 through 2010 (Megawatts and Percent) Projected Year Base Year Summer Eastern Power Grid Contiguous U.S. FRCC MRO NPCC RFC Net Internal Demand (MW) Capacity Resources (MW) Capacity Margin (percent) Net Internal Demand (MW) Capacity Resources (MW)

  7. summer_nid_cr_cm_2006.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    h c Form EIA-411 for 2006 Released: February 7, 2008 Next Update: October 2008 Table 4. Summer Historic and Projected Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2006 and 2007 throug (Megawatts and Percent) Projected Year Base Year Summer Eastern Power Grid Contiguous U.S. FRCC MRO NPCC RFC Net Internal Demand (MW) Capacity Resources (MW) Capacity Margin (percent) Net Internal Demand (MW) Capacity Resources (MW)

  8. BBHRP_poster_ARM08.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiative Flux Closure Under Cloudy Conditions from a "Shadow" Dataset L. Oreopoulos 1 , E. Mlawer 2 , T. Shippert 3 , and J. Delamere 2 , 1. JCET- University of Maryland Baltimore County 2. Atmospheric and Environmental Research Inc. 3. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory To learn when and why we succeed or fail to achieve radiative flux closure (RFC) under cloudy conditions in BBHRP. Our goal Ice vs. mixed vs. liquid clouds How do we learn from such an approach? Specific tests If

  9. City of Lafayette, Louisiana (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 9096 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  10. Alfalfa Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 296 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  11. City of Iola, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 9418 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes...

  12. Empire District Electric Co (Missouri) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 5860 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  13. Rusk County Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 16461 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You...

  14. McCook Public Power District | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 10550 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You...

  15. City of Girard, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 7257 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes...

  16. City of Meade, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 12242 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes This article is a stub....

  17. Southeastern Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 17603 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  18. Town of Mannford, Oklahoma (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 11578 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  19. City of Blackwell, Oklahoma (Utility Company) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 1800 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You...

  20. Nemaha-Marshall E C A, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13386 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  1. North Plains Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13757 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You...

  2. Victory Electric Coop Assn Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 19820 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  3. Lafayette Public Power Auth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 11235 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes This article is a...

  4. City of Brownfield, Texas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 2404 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a...

  5. City of Pratt, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 15321 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes This article is a stub....

  6. City of Olustee, Oklahoma (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13966 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes This article is a stub....

  7. Seward County Rrl Pub Pwr Dist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 16954 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  8. City of Cushing, Oklahoma (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 4667 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes...

  9. Cookson Hills Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 4296 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  10. Ozarks Electric Coop Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 14289 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub....

  11. City of Scranton, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 16834 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  12. City of Frederick, Oklahoma (Utility Company) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 6750 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  13. City of Gardner, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 6949 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  14. City of Alexandria, Louisiana (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 298 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes...

  15. Western Coop Electric Assn Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 20476 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  16. Twin Valley Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 18962 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  17. City of Ellinwood, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 5802 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes This article is a stub....

  18. Upshur Rural Elec Coop Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 19579 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  19. City of Goodland, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 7374 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  20. Kay Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 10012 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  1. City of Haven, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 8279 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  2. City of Ponca City, Oklahoma (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 15202 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  3. City of Arma, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 832 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  4. Village of Spalding, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 17727 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes...

  5. City of Glasco, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 7269 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled...

  6. Mid-Kansas Electric Company, LLC (MKEC) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56324 Utility Location Yes Ownership W NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  7. City of Wisner, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 20880 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes...

  8. City of Franklin, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 6723 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled...

  9. UNC EFRC - Center for Solar Fuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Information AREA CONTACT PHONE Director Thomas Meyer, Prof. 919-843-8313 Co-Deputy Director John Papanikolas, Prof. 919-962-1619 Co-Deputy Director Gerald Meyer, Prof. 919-962-6320 Assistant Director Catherine Heyer, PhD 919-962-2304 SERC Translation and Outreach Manager Ralph House, PhD 919-962-5518 Downloadable Contact Sheet PDF Logo Center Mailing Address Energy Frontier Research Center Department of Chemistry Campus Box 3290 Caudill and Kenan Laboratories The University of North

  10. Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop Summary Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Summary Report Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop Summary Report Workshop summary report from the Flow Cell Workshop held March 7-8, 2012, in Washington, D.C., to investigate how a redow flow cell (RFC) can be a grid-scale electricalenergy-storage system and the associated technological needs. The specific objectives of the workshop were to understand the needs for applied research in RFCs; identify the grand challenges and prioritize R&D needs; and gather input for future

  11. Sharyland Utilities LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Id 17008 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC ERCOT Yes NERC SPP Yes ISO Ercot Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You...

  12. Basin Electric Power Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC&MRO NERC MRO Yes NERC SPP Yes NERC WECC Yes RTO SPP Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity...

  13. City of Crete, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Id 4527 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes...

  14. Nick's Utility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ownership F NERC Location WECC, MAPP NERC MRO Yes NERC SPP Yes NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes RTO SPP Yes ISO MISO Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  15. City of Spencer, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 17787 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes This article is a stub....

  16. City of Lucas, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 11299 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP RTO SPP Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  17. Loup Valleys Rural P P D | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 11250 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location MRO NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  18. City of Udall, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 19344 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP RTO SPP Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  19. Northwestern Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Id 13807 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate...

  20. Human Capacity Building in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy System Maintenance for the Yurok Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, R. A.' Zoellick, J J.

    2007-07-31

    From July 2005 to July 2007, the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in the implementation of a program designed to build the Tribe’s own capacity to improve energy efficiency and maintain and repair renewable energy systems in Tribal homes on the Yurok Reservation. Funding for this effort was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Tribal Program under First Steps grant award #DE-FG36-05GO15166. The program’s centerpiece was a house-by-house needs assessment, in which Tribal staff visited and conducted energy audits at over fifty homes. The visits included assessment of household energy efficiency and condition of existing renewable energy systems. Staff also provided energy education to residents, evaluated potential sites for new household renewable energy systems, and performed minor repairs as needed on renewable energy systems.

  1. inet

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-03-10

    INET's was developed in the 80's when the Internet was in it's infancy and various vendors were attempting to get into the ball game with half baked code that indicated a lack of understanding about basic IP standards in the area of IP and ICMP. Various test applications were written to test conformance to the early Internet RFC's especially ICMP. The INET program allows the user to exercise various minor internet services provided by amore » specified service host. See the DDN Protocol Handbook, Volume Two, Section 8 for a detailed description of various minor applications which one might attempt to exercise. The unix network daemon "inetd" was the inspiration for the name "inet". A simple C library generated at the time was recently used to build a program called 'dp' shich GROK uses to transfer BAG session information to some backend data collector such as DISARM (LA-CC number 05-D47)« less

  2. National and Regional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use inCost-Benefit Models and Evaluations of Water Efficiency Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Diane C.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Melody, Moya

    2006-09-01

    Calculating the benefits and costs of water conservation orefficiency programs requires knowing the marginal cost of the water andwastewater saved by those programs. Developing an accurate picture of thepotential cost savings from water conservation requires knowing the costof the last few units of water consumed or wastewater released, becausethose are the units that would be saved by increased water efficiency.This report describes the data we obtained on water and wastewater ratesand costs, data gaps we identified, and other issues related to using thedata to estimate the cost savings that might accrue from waterconservation programs. We identified three water and wastewater ratesources. Of these, we recommend using Raftelis Financial Corporation(RFC) because it: a) has the most comprehensive national coverage; and b)provides greatest detail on rates to calculate marginal rates. The figurebelow shows the regional variation in water rates for a range ofconsumption blocks. Figure 1A Marginal Rates of Water Blocks by Regionfrom RFC 2004Water and wastewater rates are rising faster than the rateof inflation. For example, from 1996 to 2004 the average water rateincreased 39.5 percent, average wastewater rate increased 37.8 percent,the CPI (All Urban) increased 20.1 percent, and the CPI (Water andSewerage Maintenance) increased 31.1 percent. On average, annualincreases were 4.3 percent for water and 4.1 percent for wastewater,compared to 2.3 percent for the All Urban CPI and 3.7 percent for the CPIfor water and sewerage maintenance. If trends in rates for water andwastewater rates continue, water-efficient products will become morevaluable and more cost-effective.

  3. Southwestern Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open Access Tariff Standards of Conduct Transmission Planning Open Access Tariff Pursuant to an agreement between Southwestern and Southwest Power Pool, Inc. (SPP), which became effective April 1, 2005, SPP administers Southwestern's Tariff for all new transactions using Southwestern's transmission system. All new requests for transmission service using Southwestern's transmission facilities should be made through SPP. Background In Order No. 888, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC)

  4. City of Nebraska City, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13334 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying...

  5. Nebraska Public Power District | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13337 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  6. SREL Reprint #3105

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and microtopographic conditions, indicated that three taxa (Fraxinus pennsylvanica, Quercus spp., and Ulmus americana) had patterns consistent with a floodshade tolerance...

  7. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... in the SPP RTO under terms and conditions that could ... Enter Southwestern and its customers. Within ten minutes of ... within his division to search for the necessary equipment. ...

  8. The generation fleet in MISO is being affected by time, fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Seam - Joint and Common Market process is making progress on a number of issues - Interchange Optimization - Coordinated Transaction Scheduling - Cross Border Planning * SPP Seam ...

  9. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Noncoincident Peak Load 1 by North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) 2 ... and SPP regional boundaries were altered as utilities changed reliability organizations. ...

  10. Microsoft Word - Economic Dispatch final Nov 18.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... SPP Southwest Power Pool TTC total ... scheduling requirements imposed by environmental laws, hydrological conditions, and fuel ... and falling in daily and weekly patterns. ...

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - Hydro Conf 6-15.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Value of Flexibility in the Markets June 2015 1 2 Value of Flexibility in the Markets * Basic overview of the SPP and MISO markets * Potential benefit to some SPA customers of using markets to schedule energy * Increasing need for ancillary services, and the value of ancillary services in the markets 3 4 4 MISO/SPP 5 5 SPP Locational Marginal Prices SPA - SPP Prices June 1 - June 7, 2015 -20 0 20 40 60 80 100 6/1/2015 6/2/2015 6/3/2015 6/4/2015 6/5/2015 6/6/2015 6/7/2015 $/MWh Day Ahead Real

  12. Suzlon Project VII | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project VII Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Suzlon Developer Suzlon Energy Purchaser QF on SPP Location Dumas TX...

  13. EIS-0294: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (kV) transmission line, approximately 3.5 miles in length, known as the Sutter Power Plant (SPP). DOEEIS-0294, Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration,...

  14. A Literature Review, Bibliographic Listing, and Organization of Selected References Relative to Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) and Abiotic and Biotic Attributes of the Columbia River Estuary and Adjacent Marine and Riverine Environs for Various Historical Periods : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 4 of 4, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, Ronald J.

    1996-05-01

    This report contains the results of a literature review on the carrying capacity of Pacific salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of the review was to find the information gaps relative to the determinants of salmon carrying capacity in the Columbia River Basin. The review was one activity designed to answer questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information learned during the literature review and the other work accomplished during this study the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) state concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. To increase understanding of ecology, carring capacity, and limiting factors, it is necessary to deal with the complexity of the sustained performance of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. The PNNL team suggests that the regions evaluated carrying capacity from more than one view point. The PNNL team recommends that the region use the contextualistic view for evaluating capacity.

  15. Technology Transfer | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Projects Patents Disclosures Contact Information Forms Strategic Partnership Projects (SPP) Contact Us Business Operations Careers/ Human Resources Directory Environment, Safety & Health Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Current Projects Patents Disclosures Contact Information Forms Strategic Partnership Projects (SPP) Technology Transfer Overview Substantial physics, engineering, and technological efforts have been required to build

  16. Tribal Utility Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

    2007-06-30

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be developed and sold to the wholesale electricity market. • Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems – These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

  17. Contingency Analysis of Cascading Line Outage Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas L Baldwin; Magdy S Tawfik; Miles McQueen

    2011-03-01

    As the US power systems continue to increase in size and complexity, including the growth of smart grids, larger blackouts due to cascading outages become more likely. Grid congestion is often associated with a cascading collapse leading to a major blackout. Such a collapse is characterized by a self-sustaining sequence of line outages followed by a topology breakup of the network. This paper addresses the implementation and testing of a process for N-k contingency analysis and sequential cascading outage simulation in order to identify potential cascading modes. A modeling approach described in this paper offers a unique capability to identify initiating events that may lead to cascading outages. It predicts the development of cascading events by identifying and visualizing potential cascading tiers. The proposed approach was implemented using a 328-bus simplified SERC power system network. The results of the study indicate that initiating events and possible cascading chains may be identified, ranked and visualized. This approach may be used to improve the reliability of a transmission grid and reduce its vulnerability to cascading outages.

  18. Hydrogen Technology and Energy Curriculum (HyTEC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagle, Barbara

    2013-02-28

    The Lawrence Hall of Science of the University of California, Berkeley has collaborated with scientists and engineers, a local transit agency, school districts, and a commercial curriculum publisher to develop, field-test nationally, and publish a two-week curriculum module on hydrogen and fuel cells for high school science. Key partners in this project are the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) of Humboldt State University, the Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit), FilmSight Productions, Lab-Aids, Inc., and 32 teachers and 2,370 students in field-test classrooms in California, Connecticut, Ohio, New York, South Carolina, and Washington. Field-test teachers received two to three days of professional development before teaching the curriculum and providing feedback used for revision of the curriculum. The curriculum, titled Investigating Alternative Energy: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells and published by Lab-Aids, Inc., includes a teachers guide (with lesson plans, resources, and student handout pages), two interactive computer animations, a video, a website, and a laboratory materials kit. The project has been disseminated to over 950 teachers through awareness workshops at state, regional, and national science teacher conferences.

  19. Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Thomas, J.; Papanikolas, John, P.

    2011-11-11

    SOLAR ENERGY RESEARCH CENTER INSTRUMENTATION FACILITY The mission of the Solar Energy Research Center (UNC SERC) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) is to establish a world leading effort in solar fuels research and to develop the materials and methods needed to fabricate the next generation of solar energy devices. We are addressing the fundamental issues that will drive new strategies for solar energy conversion and the engineering challenges that must be met in order to convert discoveries made in the laboratory into commercially available devices. The development of a photoelectrosynthesis cell (PEC) for solar fuels production faces daunting requirements: (1) Absorb a large fraction of sunlight; (2) Carry out artificial photosynthesis which involves multiple complex reaction steps; (3) Avoid competitive and deleterious side and reverse reactions; (4) Perform 13 million catalytic cycles per year with minimal degradation; (5) Use non-toxic materials; (6) Cost-effectiveness. PEC efficiency is directly determined by the kinetics of each reaction step. The UNC SERC is addressing this challenge by taking a broad interdisciplinary approach in a highly collaborative setting, drawing on expertise across a broad range of disciplines in chemistry, physics and materials science. By taking a systematic approach toward a fundamental understanding of the mechanism of each step, we will be able to gain unique insight and optimize PEC design. Access to cutting-edge spectroscopic tools is critical to this research effort. We have built professionally-staffed facilities equipped with the state-of the-art instrumentation funded by this award. The combination of staff, facilities, and instrumentation specifically tailored for solar fuels research establishes the UNC Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility as a unique, world-class capability. This congressionally directed project funded the development of two user facilities: TASK 1: SOLAR DEVICE FABRICATION LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT The space allocated for this laboratory was “shell space” that required an upfit in order to accommodate nano-fabrication equipment in a quasi-clean room environment. This construction project (cost $279,736) met the non-federal cost share requirement of $250,000 for this award. The central element of the fabrication laboratory is a new $400,000+ stand-alone system, funded by other sources, for fabricating and characterizing photovoltaic devices, in a state-of-the-art nanofabrication environment. This congressionally directed project also included the purchase of an energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) detector for a pre-existing transmission electron microscope (TEM). This detector allows elemental analysis and elemental mapping of materials used to fabricate solar energy devices which is a key priority for our research center. TASK 2: SOLAR ENERGY SPECTROSCOPY LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT (INSTRUMENTATION) This laboratory provides access to modern spectroscopy and photolysis instrumentation for characterizing devices, materials and components on time scales ranging from femtoseconds to seconds and for elucidating mechanisms. The goals of this congressionally directed project included the purchase and installation of spectroscopy and photolysis instrumentation that would substantially and meaningfully enhance the capabilities of this laboratory. Some changes were made to the list of equipment proposed in the original budget. These changes did not represent a change in scope, approach or aims of this project. All of the capabilities and experiments represented in the original budget were maintained. The outcome of this Congressionally Directed Project has been the development of world-class fabrication and spectroscopy user facilities for solar fuels research at UNC-CH. This award has provided a significant augmentation of our pre-existing instrumentation capabilities which were funded by earlier UNC SERC projects, including the Energy Frontier Research Center UNC EFRC, funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Equipment funded by this congressional award has provided important new capabilities for UNC SERC and has greatly facilitated collaborative research by many multi-institutional teams in the six partner institutions of the UNC EFRC, including Duke University, North Carolina Central University, and North Carolina State University. This state-of-the-art instrumentation has allowed us to design cutting-edge experiments that provide insight into the molecular structure and dynamics of materials and components for solar energy conversion under real working conditions. This research has resulted in ten publications already published or in preparation that acknowledge support from DOE EERE for this congressionally directed project.

  20. Evaluation of Two CEDA Weatherization Pilot Implementations of an Exterior Insulation and Over-Clad Retrofit Strategy for Residential Masonry Buildings in Chicago

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, Ken

    2013-08-01

    This project examines the implementation of an exterior insulation and over-clad strategy for brick masonry buildings in Chicagoa free-standing two story two-family dwelling and a larger free-standing multifamily building. The test homes selected for this research represent predominant housing types for the Chicago area, in which high heating energy use typical in these buildings threaten housing affordability, and uninsulated mass masonry wall assemblies are uncomfortable for residents. In this project, the Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County, Inc. (CEDA) has secured a Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) innovation grant sponsored by DOE to pursue a pilot implementation of innovative approaches to retrofit in masonry wall enclosures. The retrofit measures are evaluated in terms of feasibility, cost and performance. Through observations of the strategies implemented, the research described in this report identifies measures critical to performance as well as conditions for wider adoption. The research also identifies common factors that must be considered in determining whether the exterior insulation and over-clad strategy is appropriate for the building.

  1. Evaluation of Two CEDA Weatherization Pilot Implementations of an Exterior Insulation and Over-Clad Retrofit Strategy for Residential Masonry Buildings in Chicago

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, K.

    2013-08-01

    This project examines the implementation of an exterior insulation and over-clad strategy for brick masonry buildings in Chicago. The strategy was implemented at a free-standing two story two-family dwelling and a larger free-standing multifamily building. The test homes selected for this research represent predominant housing types for the Chicago area. High heating energy use typical in these buildings threaten housing affordability. Uninsulated mass masonry wall assemblies also have a strongly detrimental impact on comfort. Significant changes to the performance of masonry wall assemblies is generally beyond the reach of typical weatherization (Wx) program resources. The Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County, Inc. (CEDA) has secured a Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) innovation grant sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). This grant provides CEDA the opportunity to pursue a pilot implementation of innovative approaches to retrofit in masonry wall enclosures. The exterior insulation and over-clad strategy implemented through this project was designed to allow implementation by contractors active in CEDA weatherization programs and using materials and methods familiar to these contractors. The retrofit measures are evaluated in terms of feasibility, cost and performance. Through observations of the strategies implemented, the research described in this report identifies measures critical to performance as well as conditions for wider adoption. The research also identifies common factors that must be considered in determining whether the exterior insulation and over-clad strategy is appropriate for the building.

  2. City of Needles, California (Utility Company) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13149 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  3. Northwest Rural Pub Pwr Dist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13805 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC NERC MRO Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  4. South Central Public Pwr Dist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 17548 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub....

  5. City of Hastings, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 8245 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  6. North Central Public Pwr Dist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13698 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  7. From: Jay Caspary To: Congestion Study Comments Cc: Meyer, David...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jay Caspary To: Congestion Study Comments Cc: Meyer, David; Lanny Nickell Subject: SPP Staff Comments on DOE Congestion Study Date: Monday, October 20, 2014 4:32:04 PM Attachments: ...

  8. Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at NERSC e) SPP in production mode (Jim Craw) i) Does it Work? ii) Throughput of big jobs is still problematic. - why not more than one job? - what can be done about this? f)...

  9. People's Electric Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 14788 Utility Location Yes Ownership W NERC Location SPP Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility...

  10. Resonant scattering of surface plasmon polaritons by dressed quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Danhong; Cardimona, Dave; Easter, Michelle; Gumbs, Godfrey; Maradudin, A. A.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-06-23

    The resonant scattering of surface plasmon-polariton waves (SPP) by embedded semiconductor quantum dots above the dielectric/metal interface is explored in the strong-coupling regime. In contrast to non-resonant scattering by a localized dielectric surface defect, a strong resonant peak in the spectrum of the scattered field is predicted that is accompanied by two side valleys. The peak height depends nonlinearly on the amplitude of SPP waves, reflecting the feedback dynamics from a photon-dressed electron-hole plasma inside the quantum dots. This unique behavior in the scattered field peak strength is correlated with the occurrence of a resonant dip in the absorption spectrum of SPP waves due to the interband photon-dressing effect. Our result on the scattering of SPP waves may be experimentally observable and applied to spatially selective illumination and imaging of individual molecules.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Strategic Partnership Projects, Non-Federal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Entity (SPP/NFE) Agreements Strategic Partnership Projects, Non-Federal Entity (SPP/NFE) Agreements Alt text Potential Sponsors Funding Terms and Conditions Click here to learn more... Potential Partners Our Process Process Flow Click here to learn more... Facilities Explore Sandia Click here to explore Sandia. Projects To support its missions, many of the technologies, processes, and special technical expertise developed at Sandia have been applied to solving problems in the private sector

  12. Characterizing performances of solder paste printing process at flexible manufacturing lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siew, Jit Ping; Low, Heng Chin; Teoh, Ping Chow

    2015-02-03

    Solder paste printing (SPP) has been a challenge on printed circuit board (PCB) manufacturing, evident by the proliferation of solder paste inspection equipment, or substituted by rigorous non-value added activity of manual inspections. The objective of this study is to characterize the SPP performance of various products manufactured in flexible production lines with different equipment configurations, and determine areas for process improvement. The study began by collecting information on SPP performance relative to component placement (CP) process, and to the proportion of mixed products. Using a clustering algorithm to group similar elements together, SPP performance across all product-production line pairs are statistically modeled to discover the trend and the influential factors. The main findings are: (a) Ratio of overall dpku for CP and SPP processes are 2:1; (b) logistic regression models of SPP performance indicated that only effects of product-production line and solder paste printer configuration are significant; (c) PCB circuitry design with BGA components and single solder paste printer line configurations generated the highest monthly defects, with the highest variation in the latter.

  13. Electrically tunable graded index planar lens based on graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasari, H. Abrishamian, M. S.

    2014-08-28

    The realization of electrically tunable beam focusing using a properly designed conductivity pattern along a strip on a background single graphene flake with operation in the terahertz regime is proposed and numerically investigated. The strip is illuminated with a guided surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) plane wave and the physical origin of the design procedure is evaluated from the phase of effective mode index of propagating SPP wave on graphene. Upon tuning a gate voltage between the graphene sheet and the substrate, the focus tuning is achieved. Finite- difference time-domain numerical technique is employed to explore the propagation characteristic of SPP wave and the performance parameters of the lens include the focal length, full-width half-maximum, and focusing efficiency. Such a one atom thick planar lens with the capability of electrical focus tuning besides the compatibility with current planar optoelectronic systems can find valuable potential applications in the field of transformational plasmon optics.

  14. Efficient out-coupling and beaming of Tamm optical states via surface plasmon polariton excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Garcia, M.; Ho, Y.-L. D.; Taverne, M. P. C.; Chen, L.-F.; Rarity, J. G.; Oulton, R.; Murshidy, M. M.; Edwards, A. P.; Adawi, A. M.; Serry, M. Y.

    2014-06-09

    We present evidence of optical Tamm states to surface plasmon polariton (SPP) coupling. We experimentally demonstrate that for a Bragg stack with a thin metal layer on the surface, hybrid Tamm-SPP modes may be excited when a grating on the air-metal interface is introduced. Out-coupling via the grating to free space propagation is shown to enhance the transmission as well as the directionality and polarization selection for the transmitted beam. We suggest that this system will be useful on those devices, where a metallic electrical contact as well as beaming and polarization control is needed.

  15. Effect of the band structure of InGaN/GaN quantum well on the surface plasmon enhanced light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yi; Zhang, Rong E-mail: bliu@nju.edu.cn; Liu, Bin E-mail: bliu@nju.edu.cn; Xie, Zili; Zhang, Guogang; Tao, Tao; Zhuang, Zhe; Zhi, Ting; Zheng, Youdou

    2014-07-07

    The spontaneous emission (SE) of InGaN/GaN quantum well (QW) structure with silver(Ag) coated on the n-GaN layer has been investigated by using six-by-six K-P method taking into account the electron-hole band structures, the photon density of states of surface plasmon polariton (SPP), and the evanescent fields of SPP. The SE into SPP mode can be remarkably enhanced due to the increase of electron-hole pairs near the Ag by modulating the InGaN/GaN QW structure or increasing the carrier injection. However, the ratio between the total SE rates into SPP mode and free space will approach to saturation or slightly decrease for the optimized structures with various distances between Ag film and QW layer at a high injection carrier density. Furthermore, the Ga-face QW structure has a higher SE rate than the N-face QW structure due to the overlap region of electron-hole pairs nearer to the Ag film.

  16. EIS-0294: Sutter Power Project, Sutter County, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes Western Area Power Administration's (Western) decision to support Calpine Corporation (Calpine) to construct an electric generating facility and associated 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line, approximately 3.5 miles in length, known as the Sutter Power Plant (SPP).

  17. Graphene-based terahertz tunable plasmonic directional coupler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Meng-Dong, E-mail: hemendong@sohu.com; Wang, Kai-Jun; Wang, Lei; Li, Jian-Bo [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha 410004 (China); Liu, Jian-Qiang [College of Science, Jiujiang University, Jiujiang 332005 (China); Huang, Zhen-Rong; Wang, Lingling [Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Optoelectronic Devices of Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Wang, Lin; Hu, Wei-Da; Chen, Xiaoshuang [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200083 (China)

    2014-08-25

    We propose and numerically analyze a terahertz tunable plasmonic directional coupler which is composed of a thin metal film with a nanoscale slit, dielectric grating, a graphene sheet, and a dielectric substrate. The slit is employed to generate surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), and the metal-dielectric grating-graphene-dielectric constructs a Bragg reflector, whose bandgap can be tuned over a wide frequency range by a small change in the Fermi energy level of graphene. As a graphene-based Bragg reflector is formed on one side of the slit, the structure enables SPP waves to be unidirectionally excited on the other side of the slit due to SPP interference, and the SPP waves in the Bragg reflector can be efficiently switched on and off by tuning the graphene's Fermi energy level. By introducing two optimized graphene-based Bragg reflectors into opposite sides of the slit, SPP waves can be guided to different Bragg reflectors at different Fermi energy levels, thus achieving a tunable bidirectional coupler.

  18. Molecular biological enhancement of coal desulfurization: Cloning and expression of the sulfoxide/sulfone/sulfonate/sulfate genes in Pseudomonads and Thiobacillae. [Rhodococcus erythropolis, Thiobacillus acidophilus, Thiobacillus novellus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawiec, S.

    1992-01-01

    Research continues on desulfurization of coal using microorganisms. Topics reported on this quarter include: desulfurization with N1-36 (presumptively identified as Rhodochrous erythropolis), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of chromosomal DNA's of Thiobacillus spp., and fresh isolates with the presumptive capacity to desulfurize dibenzothiophenes.

  19. Molecular biological enhancement of coal desulfurization: Cloning and expression of the sulfoxide/sulfone/sulfonate/sulfate genes in Pseudomonads and Thiobacillae. Eleventh quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawiec, S.

    1992-08-01

    Research continues on desulfurization of coal using microorganisms. Topics reported on this quarter include: desulfurization with N1-36 (presumptively identified as Rhodochrous erythropolis), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of chromosomal DNA`s of Thiobacillus spp., and fresh isolates with the presumptive capacity to desulfurize dibenzothiophenes.

  20. Engineering of thermotolerant Bacillus coagulans for production of D(-)-lactic acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qingzhao; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-12-02

    Genetically modified microorganisms having the ability to produce D(-)-lactic acid at temperatures between 30.degree. C. and 55.degree. C. are provided. In various embodiments, the microorganisms may have the chromosomal lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) gene and/or the chromosomal acetolactate synthase (alsS) gene inactivated. Exemplary microorganisms for use in the disclosed methods are Bacillus spp., such as Bacillus coagulans.

  1. VEHICLE ACCESS PORTALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jemez Road (Map 2) VEHICLE ACCESS PORTALS Changes Effective January 11, 2010 Traffc Lane 1: No stop required. Drivers must slow down to 15 MPH while nearing and driving through the lane Traffc Lane 2: Closed except for random inspections. Note: All vehicles (commercial, private, government) are subject to random inspections while on Laboratory property. More Information: spp-questions@lanl.gov

  2. Special Population Planner for Emergency Management

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-04-17

    The SPP is a tool for use by emergency management agencies in creating plans for possible events requiring their attention. It incorporates extensive data including those on special needs populations so that this segment of the population will be considered in general plans.

  3. Using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling to address nonlinear kinetics and changes in rodent physiology and metabolism due to aging and adaptation in deriving reference values for propylene glycol methyl ether and propylene glycol methyl ether acetate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirman, C R.; Sweeney, Lisa M.; Corley, Rick A.; Gargas, M L.

    2005-04-01

    Reference values, including an oral reference dose (RfD) and an inhalation reference concentration (RfC), were derived for propylene glycol methyl ether (PGME), and an oral RfD was derived for its acetate (PGMEA). These values were based upon transient sedation observed in F344 rats and B6C3F1 mice during a two-year inhalation study. The dose-response relationship for sedation was characterized using internal dose measures as predicted by a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for PGME and its acetate. PBPK modeling was used to account for changes in rodent physiology and metabolism due to aging and adaptation, based on data collected during weeks 1, 2, 26, 52, and 78 of a chronic inhalation study. The peak concentration of PGME in richly perfused tissues was selected as the most appropriate internal dose measure based upon a consideration of the mode of action for sedation and similarities in tissue partitioning between brain and other richly perfused tissues. Internal doses (peak tissue concentrations of PGME) were designated as either no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs) or lowest-observed-adverse-effect levels (LOAELs) based upon the presence or absence of sedation at each time-point, species, and sex in the two year study. Distributions of the NOAEL and LOAEL values expressed in terms of internal dose were characterized using an arithmetic mean and standard deviation, with the mean internal NOAEL serving as the basis for the reference values, which was then divided by appropriate uncertainty factors. Where data were permitting, chemical-specific adjustment factors were derived to replace default uncertainty factor values of ten. Nonlinear kinetics are were predicted by the model in all species at PGME concentrations exceeding 100 ppm, which complicates interspecies and low-dose extrapolations. To address this complication, reference values were derived using two approaches which differ with respect to the order in which these extrapolations were performed: (1) uncertainty factor application followed by interspecies extrapolation (PBPK modeling); and (2) interspecies extrapolation followed by uncertainty factor application. The resulting reference values for these two approaches are substantially different, with values from the former approach being 7-fold higher than those from the latter approach. Such a striking difference between the two approaches reveals an underlying issue that has received little attention in the literature regarding the application of uncertainty factors and interspecies extrapolations to compounds where saturable kinetics occur in the range of the NOAEL. Until such discussions have taken place, reference values based on the latter approach are recommended for risk assessments involving human exposures to PGME and PGMEA.

  4. Secure IRC Server

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-08-25

    The IRCD is an IRC server that was originally distributed by the IRCD Hybrid developer team for use as a server in IRC message over the public Internet. By supporting the IRC protocol defined in the IRC RFC, IRCD allows the users to create and join channels for group or one-to-one text-based instant messaging. It stores information about channels (e.g., whether it is public, secret, or invite-only, the topic set, membership) and users (who ismore » online and what channels they are members of). It receives messages for a specific user or channel and forwards these messages to the targeted destination. Since server-to-server communication is also supported, these targeted destinations may be connected to different IRC servers. Messages are exchanged over TCP connections that remain open between the client and the server. The IRCD is being used within the Pervasive Computing Collaboration Environment (PCCE) as the 'chat server' for message exchange over public and private channels. After an LBNLSecureMessaging(PCCE chat) client has been authenticated, the client connects to IRCD with its assigned nickname or 'nick.' The client can then create or join channels for group discussions or one-to-one conversations. These channels can have an initial mode of public or invite-only and the mode may be changed after creation. If a channel is public, any one online can join the discussion; if a channel is invite-only, users can only join if existing members of the channel explicity invite them. Users can be invited to any type of channel and users may be members of multiple channels simultaneously. For use with the PCCE environment, the IRCD application (which was written in C) was ported to Linux and has been tested and installed under Linux Redhat 7.2. The source code was also modified with SSL so that all messages exchanged over the network are encrypted. This modified IRC server also verifies with an authentication server that the client is who he or she claims to be and that this user is authorized to ain access to the IRCD.« less

  5. Fabrication of metal matrix composite by semi-solid powder processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yufeng

    2012-11-28

    Various metal matrix composites (MMCs) are widely used in the automotive, aerospace and electrical industries due to their capability and flexibility in improving the mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of a component. However, current manufacturing technologies may suffer from insufficient process stability and reliability and inadequate economic efficiency and may not be able to satisfy the increasing demands placed on MMCs. Semi-solid powder processing (SPP), a technology that combines traditional powder metallurgy and semi-solid forming methods, has potential to produce MMCs with low cost and high efficiency. In this work, the analytical study and experimental investigation of SPP on the fabrication of MMCs were explored. An analytical model was developed to understand the deformation mechanism of the powder compact in the semi-solid state. The densification behavior of the Al6061 and SiC powder mixtures was investigated with different liquid fractions and SiC volume fractions. The limits of SPP were analyzed in terms of reinforcement phase loading and its impact on the composite microstructure. To explore adoption of new materials, carbon nanotube (CNT) was investigated as a reinforcing material in aluminum matrix using SPP. The process was successfully modeled for the mono-phase powder (Al6061) compaction and the density and density distribution were predicted. The deformation mechanism at low and high liquid fractions was discussed. In addition, the compaction behavior of the ceramic-metal powder mixture was understood, and the SiC loading limit was identified by parametric study. For the fabrication of CNT reinforced Al6061 composite, the mechanical alloying of Al6061-CNT powders was first investigated. A mathematical model was developed to predict the CNT length change during the mechanical alloying process. The effects of mechanical alloying time and processing temperature during SPP were studied on the mechanical, microstructural and compositional properties of the Al6061-CNT composites. A shear lag model was applied to predict the mechanical property (hardness) of the composite. This work demonstrated the promising potential of SPP in the fabrication of particle/fiber (nanotube) reinforced MMCs.

  6. Seasonal food habits of the coyote in the South Carolina coastal plain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrecengost, J. D.; Kilgo, J. C.; Mallard, D.; Ray, H. Scott; Miller, K. V.

    2008-07-01

    Abstract - Spatial and temporal plasticity in Canis latrans (coyote) diets require regional studies to understand the ecological role of this omnivorous canid. Because coyotes have recently become established in South Carolina, we investigated their food habits by collecting 415 coyote scats on the Savannah River Site in western South Carolina from May 2005-July 2006. Seasonally available soft mast was the most common food item in 12 of the 15 months we sampled. Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) was the most common food item during December (40%) and March (37%). During May-June, fruits of Prunus spp. and Rubus spp. were the most commonly occurring food items. Fawns were the most common mammalian food item during May and June of both years despite low deer density.

  7. Special population planner, version 4.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, J.; Tanzman, E.; Metz, W.

    2007-03-26

    Emergencies happen every day. Many are caused by storms or auto accidents and can be planned for, if not predicted. Emergencies resulting from natural hazards often affect a large number of people, and planning for them can be difficult, since knowledge of the needs of the people involved is generally unavailable. Emergencies resulting from accidents at industrial and military facilities can also be large scale in nature if people must be evacuated or sheltered in place. Federal planning for large scale emergencies is the responsibility of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which provides assistance to various emergency management agencies at the national, state and local level. More information about FEMA is available at http://www.fema.gov/. The purpose of the Special Population Planner (SPP) is to help emergency planners address the needs of persons with special needs. The exact definition of 'special population' is a policy decision. Policymakers have included a variety of groups in this term, such as persons with disabilities, those who do not have vehicles with which to evacuate, children who are unattended at times (latchkey children), and many others. The SPP was developed initially for the Alabama Emergency Management Agency as part of its Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP), which aids emergency planning and preparedness in communities surrounding military installations across the United States where chemical weapons are stored pending their destruction under federal law. Like that specialized application, this open-source version contains a set of specialized Geographic Information System (GIS) tools to facilitate emergency planning on behalf of persons with special needs, regardless of how the term is defined. While the original SPP system was developed for emergency planning relating to chemical hazards, it can be applied to other threats as well. It is apparent from Hurricane Katrina and other natural and man-made disasters that many of the problems posed by emergency planning for a chemical weapons agent release are shared by other hazards as well. The notion that emergency planning shares common functions underlies the decision by FEMA to include the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) in its 'all-hazards' planning approach. The CSEPP's official planning guidance operationalizes this approach by suggesting that state and local CSEPP emergency plans 'should be appended to the existing all-hazards emergency plan.' The SPP is programmed as a set of tools within an ESRI ArcMap 9.1 project. ArcMap is a component of both ESRI ArcGIS 9.1 and ESRI ArcView 9.1, and it provides a rich GIS user interface for viewing spatial and tabular data, analyzing it, and producing output reports and maps. This GIS interface has been augmented with the SPP tools for a user interface that provides custom functionality for emergency planning. The system as released also includes some hypothetical example records for special needs populations, facilities, resources, control points and sirens sufficient for showing how the system would work with real information. A GIS database is included with some publicly available example layers. The SPP is designed to support emergency planners as they address emergency management issues, and includes capabilities that support the collection and importing of data, the review of data in a spatial context, and GIS tools for emergency planning. The SPP system allows for the identification and categorization of response zones to allow for multiple levels of preparedness. An Immediate Response Zone (IRZ) might be designated as the area 0 to 10 miles from a facility where the response would be the most urgent. SPP can support more than one set of planning zones to accommodate different types of emergencies or the different jurisdictions of emergency response organizations. These areas can be delineated by any number of criteria that make sense for the area. An area like New Orleans might designate response zones based on the depth above/below s

  8. Transformation of surface plasmon polaritons to radiation in graphene in terahertz regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Sen; Zhao, Tao; Hu, Min; Zhong, Renbin; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Shenggang; Sanderson, Matthew; Zhang, Chao

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate a concept that allows direct excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by a moving electron bunch above a single layer graphene sheet deposited on a dielectric substrate without any additional coupling requirements. We show that if the two-dimensional current in the graphene is dominated by the third order nonlinear effect when the surface electric field exceeds a moderate strength of ∼5 kV/cm, the SPP mode can cross the light line although the group velocity remains much smaller than the speed of light. This effect gives rise to direct transformation of SPPs into radiation. The underlying mechanism of the crossing of the SPP dispersion into the light line is the energy shift of charged particles in the nonlinear regime and the finite transport scattering time in graphene. Both the energy and lifetime of the SPPs increase with the field intensity. The radiation intensity and frequency can be tuned with an AC bias.

  9. January 2008 RFP Fixed Price Unit Contingent Products Results of Evaluation LPSC Staff Update February 11, 2008

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Pre-Congestion Study Regional Workshop for the 2012 National Electric Congestion Study Entergy System December 8, 2011 2 DOE 2009 Congestion Study DOE Study notes that: - Several load pockets exist on the Entergy system-Acadiana, Amite South, WOTAB (West of the Atchafalaya Basin). - McAdams flowgate (the interface between Entergy and TVA) is congested. - There is limited transfer capability in the Ozarks between Entergy and SPP. - ICT is studying the need for upgrades. DOE

  10. Department of Energy Idaho - Strategic Partnership Projects (formerly WFO)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inside ID > Strategic Partnership Projects blank, used for page layout only Strategic Partnership Projects Formerly Work For Others (WFO) SPP Administrator Jose Elizondo (208) 526-0965 wfo@id.doe.gov Technology Partnerships Program Specialist Sara Twining (208) 526-5987 wfo@id.doe.gov Office of Chief Counsel Stewart Forbes (208) 526-3715 Budget Services Division Laurie Acosta Peterson (208) 526-0459 Contracting Officer Jeff Fogg (208) 526-4958 Classification Officer John Gilmore (208)

  11. Energy Materials Network Funding Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Funding Opportunities Energy Materials Network Funding Opportunities Stakeholders from industry, academia, and the national labs can partner with the Energy Material Network's (EMN) consortia through several mechanisms. These mechanisms are intended to be available via short-form agreements that can be executed in less than one month. First, stakeholders can engage in strategic partnership projects (SPPs). In an SPP, an EMN consortium will assist stakeholders in identifying the appropriate

  12. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating

  13. Working with CMI: Associates | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Associates CMI Associates work with CMI researchers to define a scope of work, budget and timeline for the work. Once internally approved, the entity must execute either a CRADA or SPP with Ames or another Team national laboratory before work may begin. For more information, contact Stacy Joiner: joiner@ameslab.gov, 515-294-5932 CMIaffiliates@ameslab.gov CMI Membership Program, The Ames Laboratory, 311 TASF, Ames, IA, 50011-3020

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - Cherri Schmidt Working with National Labs.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE's National Laboratories Cherri J Schmidt Accelerator Stewardship Test Facility Pilot Program 28 April 2015 Overview * National Laboratories as Engines of Innovation * Several Partnership Mechanisms * A Few Rules of Engagement * Getting Started 4/30/2015 CSchmidt | Working with National Labs 2 National Laboratories as Engines of Innovation *Leveraging Unique Skills (SPP) *Partnering to Advance Technology (CRADA) *Driving New Jobs and New Industries (Procurement) *Leveraging Unique Facilities

  15. DOE's Policy Regarding Laboratories, Plants and Sites Engaging in Strategic Partnership Projects with Other Federal Agencies, Independent Organizations, and the Private Sector

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-12-17

    The purpose of this Policy is to set the context in which DOE and its laboratories, plants, and sites should pursue Strategic Partnership Projects (SPP) with other Federal government agencies, state and local institutions, universities, foreign entities and/or private companies. The Policy is applicable to the DOE laboratories, plants, and sites, and to the DOE programs that own them and facilitate their work. Does not cancel/supersede other directives.

  16. Click to add title

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Perspectives on Transmission Congestion Bob Bradish Managing Director, Transmission Planning & Business Development American Electric Power U.S. Department of Energy National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Workshop December 6, 2011 2 American Electric Power 5.2 million customers in 11 states ~18,000 employees Largest distributor of electricity in the U.S. - 215,800 miles Largest transmission owner - 39,000 miles 2 nd largest generator - 39,000 MW Operations in 3 RTOs - PJM, SPP,

  17. VEHICLE ACCESS PORTALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jemez Road (Map 1) VEHICLE ACCESS PORTALS Traffc Lane 1: Closed except for emergencies and maintenance operations. Traffc Lanes 2-7: Drivers required to stop and present LANL badges or other form of valid identifcation to Protective Force offcers. Drivers may proceed upon direction of the offcers. Note: Commercial delivery vehicle drivers must also pres- ent their inspection passes from Post 10. More Information: spp-questions@lanl.gov Non-work Hours Vehicles entering LANL at the East Jemez VAPs

  18. Microsoft Word - S11432_2013Annual Rpt.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    380 South Walnut Creek is interpreted to be insignificant. The uranium isotopic data summarized in Table 113 further support this interpretation. See Section 3.1.5 for additional discussion of groundwater quality in the SPP area. A third batch of samples was being identified for LBNL analysis as 2013 ended. Some will date to 2013, including just following the heavy precipitation of September. These samples will be selected and submitted to LBNL in 2014, and potentially additional batches will be

  19. The Exiguobacterium genus: biodiversity and biogeography (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect The Exiguobacterium genus: biodiversity and biogeography Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Exiguobacterium genus: biodiversity and biogeography Abstract. Bacteria of the genus Exiguobacterium are low G + C, Gram-positive facultative anaerobes that have been repeatedly isolated from ancient Siberian permafrost. In addition, Exiguobacterium spp. have been isolated from markedly diverse sources, including Greenland Glacial ice, hot springs at Yellowstone National

  20. Synthesis of mono-dispersed nanofluids using solution plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heo, Yong Kang; Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Ueno, Tomonaga; Saito, Nagahiro

    2014-07-14

    Small-sized and well-dispersed gold nanoparticles (NPs) for nanofluidics have been synthesized by electrical discharge in liquid environment using termed solution plasma processing (SPP). Electrons and the hydrogen radicals are reducing the gold ions to the neutral form in plasma gas phase and liquid phase, respectively. The gold NPs have the smallest diameter of 4.9?nm when the solution temperature was kept at 20?C. Nucleation and growth theory describe the evolution of the NP diameter right after the reduction reaction in function of the system temperature, NP surface energy, dispersion energy barrier, and nucleation rate. Negative charges on the NPs surface during and after SPP generate repulsive forces among the NPs avoiding their agglomeration in solution. Increasing the average energy in the SPP determines a decrease of the zeta potential and an increase of the NPs diameter. An important enhancement of the thermal conductivity of 9.4% was measured for the synthesized nanofluids containing NPs with the smallest size.

  1. Analysis of organic pollutant degradation in pulsed plasma by coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bratescu, Maria Antoneta; Hieda, Junko; Umemura, Tomonari; Saito, Nagahiro; Takai, Osamu

    2011-05-15

    The degradation of p-benzoquinone (p-BQ) in water was investigated by the coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) method, in which the change of the anti-Stokes signal intensity corresponding to the vibrational transitions of the molecule is monitored during and after solution plasma processing (SPP). In the beginning of SPP treatment, the CARS signal intensity of the ring vibrational molecular transitions at 1233 and 1660 cm{sup -1} increases under the influence of the electric field of the plasma, depending on the delay time between the plasma pulse and the laser firing pulse. At the same time, the plasma contributes to the degradation of p-BQ molecules by generating hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals, which decompose p-BQ into different carboxylic acids. After SPP, the CARS signal intensity of the vibrational bands of p-BQ ceased and the degradation of p-BQ was confirmed by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and liquid chromatography analysis.

  2. Evaluation of remedial alternatives for the Solar Ponds Plume, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hranac, K.C.; Chromec, F.W.; Fiehweg, R.; Hopkins, J.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes the process used to select a remedial alternative for handling contaminated groundwater emanating from the Solar Evaporation Ponds (Solar Ponds) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) and prevent it from reaching the nearest surface water body, North Walnut Creek. Preliminary results of field investigations conducted to provide additional information for the alternatives analysis are also presented. The contaminated groundwater is referred to as the Solar Ponds Plume (SPP). The primary contaminants in the SPP are nitrate and uranium; however, some metals exceed the site action levels at several locations and volatile organic compounds, originating from other sources, also have been detected. Currently the SPP, local surface water runoff, and infiltrated precipitation are collected by a trench system located downgradient of the Solar Ponds and pumped to three storage tanks. The water (two to three million gallons annually) is then pumped to an on-site treatment plant for evaporation at an approximate cost of $7.57 per liter.

  3. Mixing of Isotactic and Syndiotactic Polypropylenes in the Melt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CLANCY,THOMAS C.; PUTZ,MATHIAS; WEINHOLD,JEFFREY D.; CURRO,JOHN G.; MATTICE,WAYNE L.

    2000-07-14

    The miscibility of polypropylene (PP) melts in which the chains differ only in stereochemical composition has been investigated by two different procedures. One approach used detailed local information from a Monte Carlo simulation of a single chain, and the other approach takes this information from a rotational isomeric state model devised decades ago, for another purpose. The first approach uses PRISM theory to deduce the intermolecular packing in the polymer blend, while the second approach uses a Monte Carlo simulation of a coarse-grained representation of independent chains, expressed on a high-coordination lattice. Both approaches find a positive energy change upon mixing isotactic PP (iPP) and syndiotactic polypropylene (sPP) chains in the melt. This conclusion is qualitatively consistent with observations published recently by Muelhaupt and coworkers. The size of the energy chain on mixing is smaller in the MC/PRISM approach than in the RIS/MC simulation, with the smaller energy change being in better agreement with the experiment. The RIS/MC simulation finds no demixing for iPP and atactic polypropylene (aPP) in the melt, consistent with several experimental observations in the literature. The demixing of the iPP/sPP blend may arise from attractive interactions in the sPP melt that are disrupted when the sPP chains are diluted with aPP or iPP chains.

  4. Effect of graphene on photoluminescence properties of graphene/GeSi quantum dot hybrid structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. L.; Ma, Y. J.; Wang, W. Q.; Ding, K.; Wu, Q.; Fan, Y. L.; Yang, X. J.; Zhong, Z. Y.; Jiang, Z. M., E-mail: zmjiang@fudan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, Key Laboratory of Micro and Nano Photonic Structures (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Chen, D. D.; Xu, F. [SHU-SolarE R and D Lab, Department of Physics, College of Science, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2014-07-14

    Graphene has been discovered to have two effects on the photoluminescence (PL) properties of graphene/GeSi quantum dot (QD) hybrid structures, which were formed by covering monolayer graphene sheet on the multilayer ordered GeSi QDs sample surfaces. At the excitation of 488?nm laser line, the hybrid structure had a reduced PL intensity, while at the excitation of 325?nm, it had an enhanced PL intensity. The attenuation in PL intensity can be attributed to the transferring of electrons from the conducting band of GeSi QDs to the graphene sheet. The electron transfer mechanism was confirmed by the time resolved PL measurements. For the PL enhancement, a mechanism called surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) enhanced absorption mechanism is proposed, in which the excitation of SPP in the graphene is suggested. Due to the resonant excitation of SPP by incident light, the absorption of incident light is much enhanced at the surface region, thus leading to more exciton generation and a PL enhancement in the region. The results may be helpful to provide us a way to improve optical properties of low dimensional surface structures.

  5. When are surface plasmon polaritons excited in the Kretschmann-Raether configuration?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Foley, IV, Jonathan J.; Harutyunyan, Hayk; Rosenmann, Daniel; Divan, Ralu; Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Gray, Stephen K.

    2015-04-23

    It is widely believed that the reflection minimum in a Kretschmann-Raether experiment results from direct coupling into surface plasmon polariton modes. Our experimental results provide a surprising discrepancy between the leakage radiation patterns of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) launched on a layered gold/germanium film compared to the K-R minimum, clearly challenging this belief. We provide definitive evidence that the reflectance dip in K-R experiments does not correlate with excitation of an SPP mode, but rather corresponds to a particular type of perfectly absorbing (PA) mode. Results from rigorous electrodynamics simulations show that the PA mode can only exist under externalmore » driving, whereas the SPP can exist in regions free from direct interaction with the driving field. These simulations show that it is possible to indirectly excite propagating SPPs guided by the reflectance minimum in a K-R experiment, but demonstrate the efficiency can be lower by more than a factor of 3. We find that optimal coupling into the SPP can be guided by the square magnitude of the Fresnel transmission amplitude.« less

  6. Autecology of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in tropical waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivera, S.; Lugo, T.; Hazen, T.C.

    1988-12-31

    Water and shellfish samples collected from estuaries, mangroves, and beaches along the coast of Puerto Rico were examined for Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. An array of water quality parameters were also measured simultaneous with bacteria sampling. Both species of vibrio were associated with estuary and mangrove locations, and neither was isolated from sandy beaches. Densities of V. vulnificus were negatively correlated with salinity, 10--15 ppt being optimal. V. parahaemolyticus was isolated from sites with salinities between 20 and 35 ppt, the highest densities occurring at 20 ppt. Densities of Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus for a tropical estuary surpassed those reported for temperate estuaries by several orders of magnitude. Both densities of total Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus in the water were directly related to densities of fecal coliforms, unlike V. vulnificus. The incidence of ONPG(+) strains among sucrose({minus}) Vibrio spp. served as an indicator of the frequency of V. vulnificus in this group. More than 63% of the V. vulnificus isolated were pathogenic. V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus occupy clearly separate niches within the tropical estuarine-marine ecosystem.

  7. Hematology, Parasitology, and Serology of Free-Ranging Coyotes (Canis latrans) from South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Debra, Lee; Schrecengost, Joshua; Merrill, Anita; Kilgo, John; Ray, H., Scott; Karl V. Miller, Karl, V.; Baldwin, Charles, A.

    2009-07-01

    ABSTRACT: Blood and feces were collected from 34 adult (19 males, 15 females) and seven juvenile (three males, one female, three not reported) free-ranging coyotes (Canis latrans) on the US Department of Energys Savannah River Site (South Carolina, USA). Significant (P,0.05) hematologic differences by sex were noted for red blood cell counts, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. Biochemical differences by sex occurred only for albumen (P,0.05). Twentyone adults were antibody positive for at least one of four viruses: canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1; 68%), West Nile virus (WNV; 60%), Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV; 38%), and Canine distemper virus (CDV; 15%). Of the seven Leptospira serovars tested for, seven (25%) of 28 adults were positive for one or more of five serovars: Pomona, Grippotyphosa, Icterohaemorrhagiae, Bratislava, and Autumnalis. Three (43%) of seven juveniles had seropositivity for a virus, one each for CDV, CAV-1, and WNV. No juveniles were seropositive for EEEV or any of the seven Leptospira serovars. Blood smears of 12 adults were positive for Dirofilaria immitis microfilaria, but blood smears from all juveniles were negative. Parvovirus was identified by electron microscopy from the feces of one adult. Ancylostoma spp., Trichuris spp., and Isospora spp. were observed in fecal samples. These data may aid in understanding the role of coyotes in disease ecology.

  8. Improving Power Production in Acetate-Fed Microbial Fuel Cells via Enrichment of Exoelectrogenic Organisms in Flow-Through Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Leak, David; Andras, Calin

    2009-01-01

    An exoelectrogenic, biofilm-forming microbial consortium was enriched in an acetate-fed microbial fuel cell (MFC) using a flow-through anode coupled to an air-cathode. Multiple parameters known to improve MFC performance were integrated in one design including electrode spacing, specific electrode surface area, flow-through design, minimization of dead volume within anode chamber, and control of external resistance. In addition, continuous feeding of carbon source was employed and the MFC was operated at intermittent high flows to enable removal of non-biofilm forming organisms over a period of six months. The consortium enriched using the modified design and operating conditions resulted in a power density of 345 W m-3 of net anode volume (3650 mW m-2), when coupled to a ferricyanide cathode. The enriched consortium included -, -, -Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. Members of the order Rhodocyclaceae and Burkholderiaceae (Azospira spp. (49%), Acidovorax spp. (11%) and Comamonas spp. (7%)), dominated the microbial consortium. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis based on primers selective for Archaea suggested a very low abundance of methanogens. Limiting the delivery of the carbon source via continuous feeding corresponding to the maximum cathodic oxidation rates permitted in the flow-through, air-cathode MFC resulted in coulombic efficiencies reaching 88 5.7%.

  9. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction under Fermentative Conditions with Lactate Stimulated Native Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somenahally, Anil C; Mosher, Jennifer J; Yuan, Tong; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Brown, Steven D; Yang, Zamin Koo; Hazen, Terry C; Arkin, Adam; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Van Nostrand, Dr. Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong; Elias, Dwayne A

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in-situ is a plausible bioremediation strategy in electron-acceptor limited environments. However, higher [Cr(VI)] may impose stress on syntrophic communities and impact community structure and function. The study objectives were to understand the impacts of Cr(VI) concentrations on community structure and on the Cr(VI)-reduction potential of groundwater communities at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were used to grow native communities enriched with lactate (30 mM) and continuously amended with Cr(VI) at 0.0 (No-Cr), 0.1 (Low-Cr) and 3.0 (High-Cr) mg/L. Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI), 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) levels were below detection from week 1 until week 15. With lactate enrichment, native bacterial diversity substantially decreased as Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., became the dominant groups, but did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. The Archaea diversity also substantially decreased after lactate enrichment from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%). Methane production was lower in High-Cr reactors suggesting some inhibition of methanogens. Several key functional genes were distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant microbes, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not impact the overall bacterial community structure.

  10. Influence of hexavalent chromium on lactate-enriched Hanford groundwater microbial communities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somenahally, Anil C; Mosher, Jennifer J; Yuan, Tong; Podar, Mircea; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Brown, Steven D; Yang, Zamin Koo; Hazen, Terry C; Arkin, Adam; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Zhou, Jizhong; Elias, Dwayne A

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction and immobilization of chromate (Cr(VI)) is a plausible bioremediation strategy. However, higher Cr(VI) concentrations may impose stress on native Cr-reducing communities. We sought to determine if Cr(VI) would influence the lactate enriched native microbial community structure and function in groundwater from the Cr contaminated site at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were amended with lactate and Cr(VI) (0.0, 0.1 and 3.0 mg/L). Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI) concentrations, 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition in bioreactors were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and some differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) was reduced in the bioreactors. With lactate enrichment, the native communities did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. Native bacterial communities were diverse, whereas after lactate enrichment, Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., were the most predominant groups in all bioreactors. Similarly, the Archaea diversity significantly decreased from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%), Halobacteriales (12%), Methanoregula (8%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%) after lactate enrichment. Composition of several key functional genes was distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant probes (chrA), Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result the 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not appear to give chromate reducing strains a competitive advantage for proliferation or for increasing Cr-reduction.

  11. Functional Role of Infective Viral Particles on Metal Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coates, John D.

    2014-04-01

    A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites was based on the immobilization of U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Previous studies identified Geobacter sp., including G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens, as predominant U(VI)-reducing bacteria under acetate-oxidizing and U(VI)-reducing conditions. Examination of the finished genome sequence annotation of the canonical metal reducing species Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA and G. metallireduceans strain GS-15 as well as the draft genome sequence of G. uraniumreducens strain Rf4 identified phage related proteins. In addition, the completed genome for Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans and the draft genome sequence of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain G20, two more model metal-reducing bacteria, also revealed phage related sequences. The presence of these gene sequences indicated that Geobacter spp., Anaeromyxobacter spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. are susceptible to viral infection. Furthermore, viral populations in soils and sedimentary environments in the order of 6.4×10{sup 6}–2.7×10{sup 10} VLP’s cm{sup -3} have been observed. In some cases, viral populations exceed bacterial populations in these environments suggesting that a relationship may exist between viruses and bacteria. Our preliminary screens of samples collected from the ESR FRC indicated that viral like particles were observed in significant numbers. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential functional role viruses play in metal reduction specifically Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, the environmental parameters affecting viral infection of metal reducing bacteria, and the subsequent effects on U transport.

  12. Revisiting N2 fixation in Guerrero Negro intertidal microbial mats with a functional single-cell approach

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Woebken, Dagmar; Burow, Luke C.; Behnam, Faris; Mayali, Xavier; Schintlmeister, Arno; Fleming, Erich D.; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Singer, Steven W.; Cortes, Alehandro Lopez; Hoehler, Tori M.; et al

    2014-10-10

    Photosynthetic microbial mats are complex, stratified ecosystems in which high rates of primary production create a demand for nitrogen, met partially by N2 fixation. Dinitrogenase reductase (nifH) genes and transcripts from Cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria (for example, Deltaproteobacteria) were detected in these mats, yet their contribution to N2 fixation is poorly understood. We used a combined approach of manipulation experiments with inhibitors, nifH sequencing and single-cell isotope analysis to investigate the active diazotrophic community in intertidal microbial mats at Laguna Ojo de Liebre near Guerrero Negro, Mexico. Acetylene reduction assays with specific metabolic inhibitors suggested that both sulfate reducers andmore » members of the Cyanobacteria contributed to N2 fixation, whereas 15N2 tracer experiments at the bulk level only supported a contribution of Cyanobacteria. Cyanobacterial and nifH Cluster III (including deltaproteobacterial sulfate reducers) sequences dominated the nifH gene pool, whereas the nifH transcript pool was dominated by sequences related to Lyngbya spp. Single-cell isotope analysis of 15N2-incubated mat samples via high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) revealed that Cyanobacteria were enriched in 15N, with the highest enrichment being detected in Lyngbya spp. filaments (on average 4.4 at% 15N), whereas the Deltaproteobacteria (identified by CARD-FISH) were not significantly enriched. We investigated the potential dilution effect from CARD-FISH on the isotopic composition and concluded that the dilution bias was not substantial enough to influence our conclusions. As a result, our combined data provide evidence that members of the Cyanobacteria, especially Lyngbya spp., actively contributed to N2 fixation in the intertidal mats, whereas support for significant N2 fixation activity of the targeted deltaproteobacterial sulfate reducers could not be found.« less

  13. Using corngrass1 to engineer poplar as a bioenergy crop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meilan, Richard; Rubinelli, Peter Marius; Chuck, George

    2016-05-10

    Embodiments of the present invention relate generally to new bioenergy crops and methods of creating new bioenergy crops. For example, genes encoding microRNAs (miRNAs) are used to create transgenic crops. In some embodiments, over-expression of miRNA is used to produce transgenic perennials, such as trees, with altered lignin content or composition. In some embodiments, the transgenic perennials are Populus spp. In some embodiments, the miRNA is a member of the miR156 family. In some embodiments, the gene is Zea mays Cg1.

  14. Life history and habitat associations of the broad wood cockroach, Parcoblatta lata (Blattaria: Blattellidae) and other native cockroaches in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, Scott; Hanula, James, L.

    2002-06-18

    Wood cockroaches are an important prey of the red-cockaded woodpecker, Picoides borealis, an endangered species inhabiting pine forests in the southern United States. These woodpeckers forage on the boles of live pine trees, but their prey consists of a high proportion of wood cockroaches, Parcoblatta spp., that are more commonly associated with dead plant material. Cockroach population density samples were conducted on live pine trees, dead snags and coarse woody debris on the ground. The studies showed that snags and logs are also important habitats of wood cockroaches in pine forests.

  15. SREL Reprint #3113

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Investigation of Shell Disease in Map Turtles (Graptemys spp.) Stephen J. Hernandez-Divers1, Patrick Hensel1, Juliet Gladden1, Sonia M. Hernandez-Divers1, Kurt A. Buhlmann2, Chris Hagen2, Susan Sanchez3,4, Kenneth S. Latimer5, Mary Ard5, and Alvin C. Camus5 1Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602-7390, USA 2Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Aiken, South

  16. Trichoderma: the genomics of opportunistic success

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Druzhinina, Irina S.; Seiboth, Verena Seidl; Estrella, Alfredo Herrera; Horwitz, Benjamin A.; Kenerley, Charles M.; Monte, Enrique; Mukherjee, Prasun K.; Zeilinger, Susanne; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2011-01-01

    Trichoderma is a genus of common filamentous fungi that display a remarkable range of lifestyles and interactions with other fungi, animals and plants. Because of their ability to antagonize plant-pathogenic fungi and to stimulate plant growth and defence responses, some Trichoderma strains are used for biological control of plant diseases. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in molecular ecology and genomics which indicate that the interactions of Trichoderma spp. with animals and plants may have evolved as a result of saprotrophy on fungal biomass (mycotrophy) and various forms of parasitism on other fungi (mycoparasitism), combined with broad environmental opportunism.

  17. 2007 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Publications Journal Papers Y. Acremann, V. Chembrolu, J. P. Strachan, T. Tyliszczak and J. Stöhr, "Software Defined Photon Counting System for Time Resolved X-ray Experiments", Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 014702 (2007) M. V. Aldrich, J. R. Peralta-Videa, J. G. Parsons and J. L. Gardea-Torresdey, "Examination of Arsenic(III) and (V) Uptake by the Desert Plant Species Mesquite (Prosopis spp.) Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy", Sci. Total Environ. 279, 249 (2007) O. S.

  18. Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1989-12-31

    Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

  19. Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

  20. Special population planner 4 : an open source release.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, J.; Metz, W.; Tanzman, E.

    2008-01-01

    Emergencies like Hurricane Katrina and the recent California wildfires underscore the critical need to meet the complex challenge of planning for individuals with special needs and for institutionalized special populations. People with special needs and special populations often have difficulty responding to emergencies or taking protective actions, and emergency responders may be unaware of their existence and situations during a crisis. Special Population Planner (SPP) is an ArcGIS-based emergency planning system released as an open source product. SPP provides for easy production of maps, reports, and analyses to develop and revise emergency response plans. It includes tools to manage a voluntary registry of data for people with special needs, integrated links to plans and documents, tools for response planning and analysis, preformatted reports and maps, and data on locations of special populations, facility and resource characteristics, and contacts. The system can be readily adapted for new settings without programming and is broadly applicable. Full documentation and a demonstration database are included in the release.

  1. Phages of lactic acid bacteria: The role of genetics in understanding phage-host interactions and their co-evolutionary processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahony, Jennifer; Ainsworth, Stuart; Stockdale, Stephen; Sinderen, Douwe van

    2012-12-20

    Dairy fermentations are among the oldest food processing applications, aimed at preservation and shelf-life extension through the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) starter cultures, in particular strains of Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus spp. and Leuconostoc spp. Traditionally this was performed by continuous passaging of undefined cultures from a finished fermentation to initiate the next fermentation. More recently, consumer demands on consistent and desired flavours and textures of dairy products have led to a more defined approach to such processes. Dairy (starter) companies have responded to the need to define the nature and complexity of the starter culture mixes, and dairy fermentations are now frequently based on defined starter cultures of low complexity, where each starter component imparts specific technological properties that are desirable to the product. Both mixed and defined starter culture approaches create the perfect environment for the proliferation of (bacterio)phages capable of infecting these LAB. The repeated use of the same starter cultures in a single plant, coupled to the drive towards higher and consistent production levels, increases the risk and negative impact of phage infection. In this review we will discuss recent advances in tracking the adaptation of phages to the dairy industry, the advances in understanding LAB phage-host interactions, including evolutionary and genomic aspects.

  2. In Situ Bioreduction of Uranium (VI) to Submicromolar Levels and Reoxidation by Dissolved Oxygen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Weimin; Carley, Jack M; Luo, Jian; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A.; Cardenas, Erick; Leigh, Mary Beth; Hwang, Chaichi; Kelly, Shelly D; Ruan, Chuanmin; Wu, Liyou; Van Nostrand, Joy; Gentry, Terry J; Lowe, Kenneth Alan; Mehlhorn, Tonia L; Carroll, Sue L; Luo, Wensui; Fields, Matthew Wayne; Gu, Baohua; Watson, David B; Kemner, Kenneth M; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James; Zhou, Jizhong; Fendorf, Scott; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Jardine, Philip M; Criddle, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Groundwater within Area 3 of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, TN (ORFRC) contains up to 135 {micro}M uranium as U(VI). Through a series of experiments at a pilot scale test facility, we explored the lower limits of groundwater U(VI) that can be achieved by in-situ biostimulation and the effects of dissolved oxygen on immobilized uranium. Weekly 2 day additions of ethanol over a 2-year period stimulated growth of denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfate-reducing bacteria, and immobilization of uranium as U(IV), with dissolved uranium concentrations decreasing to low levels. Following sulfite addition to remove dissolved oxygen, aqueous U(VI) concentrations fell below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant limit (MCL) for drinking water (<30 {micro}g L{sup -1} or 0.126 {micro}M). Under anaerobic conditions, these low concentrations were stable, even in the absence of added ethanol. However, when sulfite additions stopped, and dissolved oxygen (4.0-5.5 mg L{sup -1}) entered the injection well, spatially variable changes in aqueous U(VI) occurred over a 60 day period, with concentrations increasing rapidly from <0.13 to 2.0 {micro}M at a multilevel sampling (MLS) well located close to the injection well, but changing little at an MLS well located further away. Resumption of ethanol addition restored reduction of Fe(III), sulfate, and U(VI) within 36 h. After 2 years of ethanol addition, X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) analyses indicated that U(IV) comprised 60-80% of the total uranium in sediment samples. At the completion of the project (day 1260), U concentrations in MLS wells were less than 0.1 {micro}M. The microbial community at MLS wells with low U(VI) contained bacteria that are known to reduce uranium, including Desulfovibrio spp. and Geobacter spp., in both sediment and groundwater. The dominant Fe(III)-reducing species were Geothrix spp.

  3. Revisiting N2 fixation in Guerrero Negro intertidal microbial mats with a functional single-cell approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woebken, Dagmar; Burow, Luke C.; Behnam, Faris; Mayali, Xavier; Schintlmeister, Arno; Fleming, Erich D.; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Singer, Steven W.; Cortes, Alehandro Lopez; Hoehler, Tori M.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Spormann, Alfed M.; Wagner, Michael; Weber, Peter K.; Bebout, Brad M.

    2014-10-10

    Photosynthetic microbial mats are complex, stratified ecosystems in which high rates of primary production create a demand for nitrogen, met partially by N2 fixation. Dinitrogenase reductase (nifH) genes and transcripts from Cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria (for example, Deltaproteobacteria) were detected in these mats, yet their contribution to N2 fixation is poorly understood. We used a combined approach of manipulation experiments with inhibitors, nifH sequencing and single-cell isotope analysis to investigate the active diazotrophic community in intertidal microbial mats at Laguna Ojo de Liebre near Guerrero Negro, Mexico. Acetylene reduction assays with specific metabolic inhibitors suggested that both sulfate reducers and members of the Cyanobacteria contributed to N2 fixation, whereas 15N2 tracer experiments at the bulk level only supported a contribution of Cyanobacteria. Cyanobacterial and nifH Cluster III (including deltaproteobacterial sulfate reducers) sequences dominated the nifH gene pool, whereas the nifH transcript pool was dominated by sequences related to Lyngbya spp. Single-cell isotope analysis of 15N2-incubated mat samples via high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) revealed that Cyanobacteria were enriched in 15N, with the highest enrichment being detected in Lyngbya spp. filaments (on average 4.4 at% 15N), whereas the Deltaproteobacteria (identified by CARD-FISH) were not significantly enriched. We investigated the potential dilution effect from CARD-FISH on the isotopic composition and concluded that the dilution bias was not substantial enough to influence our conclusions. As a result, our combined data provide evidence that members of the Cyanobacteria, especially Lyngbya spp., actively contributed to N2 fixation in the intertidal mats, whereas support for significant N2 fixation activity of the targeted deltaproteobacterial sulfate reducers could not be found.

  4. N-myristoyltransferase inhibitors as new leads to treat sleeping sickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frearson, Julie A.; Brand, Stephen; McElroy, Stuart P.; Cleghorn, Laura A.T.; Smid, Ondrej; Stojanovski, Laste; Price, Helen P.; Guther, M. Lucia S.; Torrie, Leah S.; Robinson, David A.; Hallyburton, Irene; Mpamhanga, Chidochangu P.; Brannigan, James A.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Hodgkinson, Michael; Hui, Raymond; Qiu, Wei; Raimi, Olawale G.; van Aalten, Daan M.F.; Brenk, Ruth; Gilbert, Ian H.; Read, Kevin D.; Fairlamb, Alan H.; Ferguson, Michael A.J.; Smith, Deborah F.; Wyatt, Paul G.

    2010-11-05

    African sleeping sickness or human African trypanosomiasis, caused by Trypanosoma brucei spp., is responsible for {approx}30,000 deaths each year. Available treatments for this disease are poor, with unacceptable efficacy and safety profiles, particularly in the late stage of the disease when the parasite has infected the central nervous system. Here we report the validation of a molecular target and the discovery of associated lead compounds with the potential to address this lack of suitable treatments. Inhibition of this target - T. brucei N-myristoyltransferase - leads to rapid killing of trypanosomes both in vitro and in vivo and cures trypanosomiasis in mice. These high-affinity inhibitors bind into the peptide substrate pocket of the enzyme and inhibit protein N-myristoylation in trypanosomes. The compounds identified have promising pharmaceutical properties and represent an opportunity to develop oral drugs to treat this devastating disease. Our studies validate T. brucei N-myristoyltransferase as a promising therapeutic target for human African trypanosomiasis.

  5. How sulphate-reducing microorganisms cope with stress: Lessons from systems biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, J.; He, Q.; Hemme, C.L.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hillesland, K.; Zhou, A.; He, Z.; Nostrand, J.D. Van; Hazen, T.C.; Stahl, D.A.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.

    2011-04-01

    Sulphate-reducing microorganisms (SRMs) are a phylogenetically diverse group of anaerobes encompassing distinct physiologies with a broad ecological distribution. As SRMs have important roles in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and various metals, an understanding of how these organisms respond to environmental stresses is of fundamental and practical importance. In this Review, we highlight recent applications of systems biology tools in studying the stress responses of SRMs, particularly Desulfovibrio spp., at the cell, population, community and ecosystem levels. The syntrophic lifestyle of SRMs is also discussed, with a focus on system-level analyses of adaptive mechanisms. Such information is important for understanding the microbiology of the global sulphur cycle and for developing biotechnological applications of SRMs for environmental remediation, energy production, biocorrosion control, wastewater treatment and mineral recovery.

  6. Total DOE/NNSA

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 Actuals 2009 Actuals 2010 Actuals 2011 Actuals 2012 Actuals 2013 Actuals 2014 Actuals 2015 Actuals Total DOE/NNSA 4,385 4,151 4,240 4,862 5,154 5,476 7,170 7,593 Total non-NNSA 3,925 4,017 4,005 3,821 3,875 3,974 3,826 3765 Total Facility 8,310 8,168 8,245 8,683 9,029 9,450 10,996 11,358 non-NNSA includes DOE offices and Strategic Parternship Projects (SPP) employees NNSA M&O Employee Reporting

  7. Quantification of Libby Reservoir Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisholm, Ian

    1985-01-01

    The goal was to quantify seasonal water levels needed to maintain or enhance the reservoir fishery in Libby. This report summarizes data collected from July 1984 through July 1985, and, where appropriate, presents data collected since 1983. The Canada, Rexford, and Tenmile areas of the reservoir are differentially affected by drawdown. Relative changes in water volume and surface area are greatest in the Canada area and smallest in the Tenmile area. Reservoir morphology and hydraulics probably play a major role in fish distribution through their influence on water temperature. Greatest areas of habitat with optimum water temperature for Salmo spp. and kokanee occurred during the spring and fall months. Dissolved oxygen, pH and conductivity levels were not limiting during any sampling period. Habitat enhancement work was largely unsuccessful. Littoral zone vegetation plantings did not survive well, primarily the result of extreme water level fluctuations. Relative abundances of fish species varied seasonally within and between the three areas. Water temperature is thought to be the major influence in fish distribution patterns. Other factors, such as food availability and turbidity, may mitigate its influence. Sampling since 1975 illustrates a continued increase in kokanee numbers and a dramatic decline in redside shiners. Salmo spp., bull trout, and burbot abundances are relatively low while peamouth and coarsescale sucker numbers remain high. A thermal dynamics model and a trophic level components model will be used to quantify the impact of reservoir operation on the reservoir habitat, primary production, secondary production and fish populations. Particulate carbon will be used to track energy flow through trophic levels. A growth-driven population dynamics simulation model that will estimate the impacts of reservoir operation on fish population dynamics is also being considered.

  8. Leucaena and tall grasses as energy crops in humid lower south USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prine, G.M.; Woodard, K.R.; Cunilio, T.V.

    1994-12-31

    The tropical leguminous shrub/tree, leucaena (Leucaena spp. mainly leucocephala), and perennial tropical tall grasses such as elephantgrass (Pennisetum purpureum), sugarcane, and energycane (Saccharum spp.) are well adapted to the long growing seasons and high rainfall of the humid lower South. In much of the area the topgrowth is killed by frost during winter and plants regenerate from underground parts in spring. Selected accessions from a duplicated 373 accession leucaena nursery had an average annual woody stem dry matter production of 31.4 Mg ha{sup -1}. Average oven dry stem wood yields from selected accessions adjusted for environmental enrichment over the 4 growth seasons were 78.9 Mg ha{sup -1} total and average annual yield of 19.7 Mg ha{sup -1}. The tall perennial grasses have linear growth rates of 18 to 27 g m{sup 2}d{sup -1} for long periods (140 to 196 d and sometimes longer) each season. Oven dry biomass yields of tall grasses have varied from 20 to 45 Mg ha{sup -1} in mild temperature locations to over 60 Mg ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} in warm subtropics of the lower Florida peninsula. Tall grasses and leucaena, once established, may persist for many seasons. A map showing the possible range of the crops in lower South is shown. Highest biomass yields of tall grasses have been produced when irrigated with sewage effluent or when grown on phosphatic clay and muck soils of south Florida. Several companies are considering using leucaena and/or tall grasses for bioenergy in the phosphatic mining area of Polk County, Florida.

  9. Diel metabolomics analysis of a hot spring chlorophototrophic microbial mat leads to new hypotheses of community member metabolisms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Young-Mo; Nowack, Shane; Olsen, Millie; Becraft, Eric; Wood, Jason M.; Thiel, Vera; Klapper, Isaac; Kuhl, Michael; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bryant, Donald A.; et al

    2015-04-17

    Dynamic environmental factors such as light, nutrients, salt, and temperature continuously affect chlorophototrophic microbial mats, requiring adaptative and acclimative responses to stabilize composition and function. Quantitative metabolomics analysis can provide insights into metabolite dynamics for understanding community response to such changing environmental conditions. In this study, we quantified volatile organic acids, polar metabolites (amino acids, glycolytic and citric acid cycle intermediates, nucleobases, nucleosides, and sugars), wax esters, and polyhydroxyalkanoates, resulting in the identification of 104 metabolites and related molecules in thermal chlorophototrophic microbial mat cores collected over a diel cycle in Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park. A limited number ofmore » predominant taxa inhabiting this community and their functional potentials have been previously identified through metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses and in situ metabolisms and metabolic interactions among these taxa have been hypothesized. Our metabolomics results confirmed the diel cycling of photorespiration (e.g. glycolate) and fermentation (e.g. acetate, propionate, and lactate) products, the carbon storage polymers polyhydroxyalkanoates, and dissolved gases (e.g. H2 and CO2) in the waters overlying the mat, which were hypothesized to occur in major mat chlorophototrophic community members. In addition, we have formulated the following new hypotheses: 1) the morning hours are a time of biosynthesis of amino acids, DNA, and RNA; 2) Synechococcus spp. produce CH4 via metabolism of phosphonates, and photo-inhibited cells may also produce lactate via fermentation as an alternate metabolism; 3) glycolate and lactate are exchanged among Synechococcus and Roseiflexus spp.; and 4) fluctuations in many metabolite pools (e.g. wax esters) at different times of day result from species found at different depths within the mat responding to temporal differences in their niches.« less

  10. Diel metabolomics analysis of a hot spring chlorophototrophic microbial mat leads to new hypotheses of community member metabolisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Mo; Nowack, Shane; Olsen, Millie; Becraft, Eric; Wood, Jason M.; Thiel, Vera; Klapper, Isaac; Kuhl, Michael; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bryant, Donald A.; Ward, David M.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2015-04-17

    Dynamic environmental factors such as light, nutrients, salt, and temperature continuously affect chlorophototrophic microbial mats, requiring adaptative and acclimative responses to stabilize composition and function. Quantitative metabolomics analysis can provide insights into metabolite dynamics for understanding community response to such changing environmental conditions. In this study, we quantified volatile organic acids, polar metabolites (amino acids, glycolytic and citric acid cycle intermediates, nucleobases, nucleosides, and sugars), wax esters, and polyhydroxyalkanoates, resulting in the identification of 104 metabolites and related molecules in thermal chlorophototrophic microbial mat cores collected over a diel cycle in Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park. A limited number of predominant taxa inhabiting this community and their functional potentials have been previously identified through metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses and in situ metabolisms and metabolic interactions among these taxa have been hypothesized. Our metabolomics results confirmed the diel cycling of photorespiration (e.g. glycolate) and fermentation (e.g. acetate, propionate, and lactate) products, the carbon storage polymers polyhydroxyalkanoates, and dissolved gases (e.g. H2 and CO2) in the waters overlying the mat, which were hypothesized to occur in major mat chlorophototrophic community members. In addition, we have formulated the following new hypotheses: 1) the morning hours are a time of biosynthesis of amino acids, DNA, and RNA; 2) Synechococcus spp. produce CH4 via metabolism of phosphonates, and photo-inhibited cells may also produce lactate via fermentation as an alternate metabolism; 3) glycolate and lactate are exchanged among Synechococcus and Roseiflexus spp.; and 4) fluctuations in many metabolite pools (e.g. wax esters) at different times of day result from species found at different depths within the mat responding to temporal differences in their niches.

  11. Linking ceragenins to water-treatment membranes to minimize biofouling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Feng, Yanshu; Savage, Paul B.; Pollard, Jacob; Branda, Steven S.; Goeres, Darla; Buckingham-Meyer, Kelli; Stafslien, Shane; Marry, Christopher; Jones, Howland D. T.; Lichtenberger, Alyssa; Kirk, Matthew F.; McGrath, Lucas K.

    2012-01-01

    Ceragenins were used to create biofouling resistant water-treatment membranes. Ceragenins are synthetically produced antimicrobial peptide mimics that display broad-spectrum bactericidal activity. While ceragenins have been used on bio-medical devices, use of ceragenins on water-treatment membranes is novel. Biofouling impacts membrane separation processes for many industrial applications such as desalination, waste-water treatment, oil and gas extraction, and power generation. Biofouling results in a loss of permeate flux and increase in energy use. Creation of biofouling resistant membranes will assist in creation of clean water with lower energy usage and energy with lower water usage. Five methods of attaching three different ceragenin molecules were conducted and tested. Biofouling reduction was observed in the majority of the tests, indicating the ceragenins are a viable solution to biofouling on water treatment membranes. Silane direct attachment appears to be the most promising attachment method if a high concentration of CSA-121a is used. Additional refinement of the attachment methods are needed in order to achieve our goal of several log-reduction in biofilm cell density without impacting the membrane flux. Concurrently, biofilm forming bacteria were isolated from source waters relevant for water treatment: wastewater, agricultural drainage, river water, seawater, and brackish groundwater. These isolates can be used for future testing of methods to control biofouling. Once isolated, the ability of the isolates to grow biofilms was tested with high-throughput multiwell methods. Based on these tests, the following species were selected for further testing in tube reactors and CDC reactors: Pseudomonas ssp. (wastewater, agricultural drainage, and Colorado River water), Nocardia coeliaca or Rhodococcus spp. (wastewater), Pseudomonas fluorescens and Hydrogenophaga palleronii (agricultural drainage), Sulfitobacter donghicola, Rhodococcus fascians, Rhodobacter katedanii, and Paracoccus marcusii (seawater), and Sphingopyxis spp. (groundwater). The testing demonstrated the ability of these isolates to be used for biofouling control testing under laboratory conditions. Biofilm forming bacteria were obtained from all the source water samples.

  12. Genomic analyses of bacterial porin-cytochrome gene clusters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.

    2014-11-26

    In this study, the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteriamore » from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides.« less

  13. Bacterial diversity analysis of Huanglongbing pathogen-infected citrus, using PhyloChip and 16S rRNA gene clone library sequencing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankar Sagaram, U.; DeAngelis, K.M.; Trivedi, P.; Andersen, G.L.; Lu, S.-E.; Wang, N.

    2009-03-01

    The bacterial diversity associated with citrus leaf midribs was characterized 1 from citrus groves that contained the Huanglongbing (HLB) pathogen, which has yet to be cultivated in vitro. We employed a combination of high-density phylogenetic 16S rDNA microarray and 16S rDNA clone library sequencing to determine the microbial community composition of symptomatic and asymptomatic citrus midribs. Our results revealed that citrus leaf midribs can support a diversity of microbes. PhyloChip analysis indicated that 47 orders of bacteria from 15 phyla were present in the citrus leaf midribs while 20 orders from phyla were observed with the cloning and sequencing method. PhyloChip arrays indicated that nine taxa were significantly more abundant in symptomatic midribs compared to asymptomatic midribs. Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) was detected at a very low level in asymptomatic plants, but was over 200 times more abundant in symptomatic plants. The PhyloChip analysis was further verified by sequencing 16S rDNA clone libraries, which indicated the dominance of Las in symptomatic leaves. These data implicate Las as the pathogen responsible for HLB disease. Citrus is the most important commercial fruit crop in Florida. In recent years, citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also called citrus greening, has severely affected Florida's citrus production and hence has drawn an enormous amount of attention. HLB is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus (6,13), characterized by blotchy mottling with green islands on leaves, as well as stunting, fruit decline, and small, lopsided fruits with poor coloration. The disease tends to be associated with a phloem-limited fastidious {alpha}-proteobacterium given a provisional Candidatus status (Candidatus Liberobacter spp. later changed to Candidatus Liberibacter spp.) in nomenclature (18,25,34). Previous studies indicate that HLB infection causes disorder in the phloem and severely impairs the translocation of assimilates in host plants (5,27,40). Tatineni and colleagues discovered that the HLB bacteria were unevenly distributed in phloem of bark tissue, vascular tissue of the leaf midrib, roots, and different floral and fruit parts (43). Unsuccessful attempts in culturing the pathogen are notably hampering efforts to understand its biology and pathogenesis mechanism. Using a modified Koch's Postulates approach, Jagoueix and colleagues were able to re-infect periwinkle plants from a mixed microbial community harvested from HLB diseased plants (25). Emergence of the disease in otherwise healthy plants led to the conclusion that HLB was associated with Candidatus Liberibacter sp. based on its 16S rDNA sequence (18,25). Currently, three species of the pathogen are recognized from trees with HLB disease based on 16S rDNA sequence: Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus (Las), Ca. Liberibacter africanus (Laf), and Ca. Liberibacter americanus (Lam); Las is the most prevalent species among HLB diseased trees (5,12,18,25,44). Las is naturally transmitted to citrus by the psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, and can be artificially transmitted by grafting from citrus to citrus and dodder (Cuscuta campestris) to periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) or tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum Xanthi) (5). Based on current research regarding the associations of Liberibacter in planta there is not enough evidence to implicate Liberibacter as the definitive causal agent of HLB disease due to its resistance to cultivation in vitro. It is possible that HLB disease may be the result of complex etiology where Liberibacter interacts with other endophytic bacteria. However, there is not enough evidence regarding its association(s) in planta to make this conclusion, nor is it known whether associated microbial communities play a role in expression of pathogenic traits. The main objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that other bacteria besides Ca. Liberibacter spp. are associated with citrus greening disease. The differences between the relative abundance, species richness and phylogenetic diversity of the microbial communitie

  14. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part B; Limnology, Primary Production, and Zooplankton in Lake Roosevelt, Washington, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shields, John; Spotts, Jim; Underwood, Keith

    2002-11-01

    The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program is the result of a merger between two projects, the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 to continue work historically completed under the separate projects, and is now referred to as the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. The 1998 Annual Report, Part B. Limnology, Primary Production, and Zooplankton in Lake Roosevelt, Washington examined the limnology, primary production, and zooplankton at eleven locations throughout the reservoir. The 1998 research protocol required a continuation of the more complete examination of limnological parameters in Lake Roosevelt that began in 1997. Phytoplankton and periphyton speciation, phytoplankton and periphyton chlorophyll a analysis, complete zooplankton biomass analysis by taxonomic group, and an increased number of limnologic parameters (TDG, TDS, etc.) were examined and compared with 1997 results. Total dissolved gas levels were greatly reduced in 1998, compared with 1997, likely resulting from the relatively normal water year experienced in 1998. Mean water temperatures were similar to what was observed in past years, with a maximum of 22.7 C and a minimum of 2.6 C. Oxygen concentrations were also relatively normal, with a maximum of 16.6 mg/L, and a minimum of 0.9 mg/L. Phytoplankton in Lake Roosevelt was primarily composed of microplankton (29.6%), Cryptophyceae (21.7%), and Bacillriophyceae (17.0 %). Mean total phytoplankton chlorophyll a maximum concentration occurred in May (3.53 mg/m{sup 3}), and the minimum in January (0.39 mg/m{sup 3}). Phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations appear to be influenced by hydro-operations and temperature. Trophic status as indicated by phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations place Lake Roosevelt in the oligomesotrophic range. Periphyton colonization rates and biovolume were significantly greater at a depth of 1.5 m (5 ft) when compared with a 4.6 m (15 ft) depth, and during the shorter incubation periods (two and four weeks). Mean zooplankton densities were greatest for Copepoda (88 %), then Daphnia spp. (10%) and other Cladocera (2.1%), while the zooplankton biomass assessment indicated Daphnia spp. had the greatest biomass (53.6%), then Copepoda (44.0%) and other Cladocera (2.5%). Mean overall zooplankton densities were the lowest observed since 1991. The cause was unclear, but may have been an artifact of human error. It seems unlikely that hydro-operations played a significant part in the reduction of zooplankton in light of the relatively friendly water year of 1998.

  15. Salmon Life Histories, Habitat, and Food Webs in the Columbia River Estuary: An Overview of Research Results, 2002-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottom, Daniel L.; Anderson, Greer; Baptisa, Antonio

    2008-08-01

    From 2002 through 2006 we investigated historical and contemporary variations in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha life histories, habitat associations, and food webs in the lower Columbia River estuary (mouth to rkm 101). At near-shore beach-seining sites in the estuary, Chinook salmon occurred during all months of the year, increasing in abundance from January through late spring or early summer and declining rapidly after July. Recently emerged fry dispersed throughout the estuary in early spring, and fry migrants were abundant in the estuary until April or May each year. Each spring, mean salmon size increased from the tidal freshwater zone to the estuary mouth; this trend may reflect estuarine growth and continued entry of smaller individuals from upriver. Most juvenile Chinook salmon in the mainstem estuary fed actively on adult insects and epibenthic amphipods Americorophium spp. Estimated growth rates of juvenile Chinook salmon derived from otolith analysis averaged 0.5 mm d-1, comparable to rates reported for juvenile salmon Oncorhynchus spp. in other Northwest estuaries. Estuarine salmon collections were composed of representatives from a diversity of evolutionarily significant units (ESUs) from the lower and upper Columbia Basin. Genetic stock groups in the estuary exhibited distinct seasonal and temporal abundance patterns, including a consistent peak in the Spring Creek Fall Chinook group in May, followed by a peak in the Western Cascades Fall Chinook group in July. The structure of acanthocephalan parasite assemblages in juvenile Chinook salmon from the tidal freshwater zone exhibited a consistent transition in June. This may have reflected changes in stock composition and associated habitat use and feeding histories. From March through July, subyearling Chinook salmon were among the most abundant species in all wetland habitat types (emergent, forested, and scrub/shrub) surveyed in the lower 100 km of the estuary. Salmon densities within wetland habitats fell to low levels by July, similar to the pattern observed at mainstem beach-seining sites and coincident with high water temperatures that approached or exceeded 19 C by mid-summer. Wetland habitats were used primarily by small subyearling Chinook salmon, with the smallest size ranges (i.e., rarely exceeding 70 mm by the end of the wetland rearing season) at scrub/shrub forested sites above rkm 50. Wetland sites of all types were utilized by a diversity of genetic stock groups, including less abundant groups such as Interior Summer/Fall Chinook.

  16. Comparative genomic analysis of nine Sphingobium strains: Insights into their evolution and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) degradation pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Helianthous; Kumar, Roshan; Oldach, Phoebe; Sangwan, Naseer; Khurana, Jitendra P.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Lal, Rup

    2014-11-23

    Background: Sphingobium spp. are efficient degraders of a wide range of chlorinated and aromatic hydrocarbons. In particular, strains which harbour the lin pathway genes mediating the degradation of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers are of interest due to the widespread persistence of this contaminant. Here, we examined the evolution and diversification of the lin pathway under the selective pressure of HCH, by comparing the draft genomes of six newly-sequenced Sphingobium spp. (strains LL03, DS20, IP26, HDIPO4, P25 and RL3) isolated from HCH dumpsites, with three existing genomes (S. indicum B90A, S. japonicum UT26S and Sphingobium sp. SYK6). Results: Efficient HCH degraders phylogenetically clustered in a closely related group comprising of UT26S, B90A, HDIPO4 and IP26, where HDIPO4 and IP26 were classified as subspecies with ANI value >98%. Less than 10% of the total gene content was shared among all nine strains, but among the eight HCH-associated strains, that is all except SYK6, the shared gene content jumped to nearly 25%. Genes associated with nitrogen stress response and two-component systems were found to be enriched. The strains also housed many xenobiotic degradation pathways other than HCH, despite the absence of these xenobiotics from isolation sources. In addition, these strains, although non-motile, but posses flagellar assembly genes. While strains HDIPO4 and IP26 contained the complete set of lin genes, DS20 was entirely devoid of lin genes (except linKLMN) whereas, LL03, P25 and RL3 were identified as lin deficient strains, as they housed incomplete lin pathways. Further, in HDIPO4, linA was found as a hybrid of two natural variants i.e., linA1 and linA2 known for their different enantioselectivity. In conclusion, the bacteria isolated from HCH dumpsites provide a natural testing ground to study variations in the lin system and their effects on degradation efficacy. Further, the diversity in the lin gene sequences and copy number, their arrangement with respect to IS6100 and evidence for potential plasmid content elucidate possible evolutionary acquisition mechanisms for this pathway. This study further opens the horizon for selection of bacterial strains for inclusion in an HCH bioremediation consortium and suggests that HDIPO4, IP26 and B90A would be appropriate candidates for inclusion.

  17. Genomic analyses of bacterial porin-cytochrome gene clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.

    2014-11-26

    In this study, the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteria from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides.

  18. Comparative genomic analysis of nine Sphingobium strains: Insights into their evolution and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) degradation pathways

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Verma, Helianthous; Kumar, Roshan; Oldach, Phoebe; Sangwan, Naseer; Khurana, Jitendra P.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Lal, Rup

    2014-11-23

    Background: Sphingobium spp. are efficient degraders of a wide range of chlorinated and aromatic hydrocarbons. In particular, strains which harbour the lin pathway genes mediating the degradation of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers are of interest due to the widespread persistence of this contaminant. Here, we examined the evolution and diversification of the lin pathway under the selective pressure of HCH, by comparing the draft genomes of six newly-sequenced Sphingobium spp. (strains LL03, DS20, IP26, HDIPO4, P25 and RL3) isolated from HCH dumpsites, with three existing genomes (S. indicum B90A, S. japonicum UT26S and Sphingobium sp. SYK6). Results: Efficient HCH degraders phylogeneticallymore » clustered in a closely related group comprising of UT26S, B90A, HDIPO4 and IP26, where HDIPO4 and IP26 were classified as subspecies with ANI value >98%. Less than 10% of the total gene content was shared among all nine strains, but among the eight HCH-associated strains, that is all except SYK6, the shared gene content jumped to nearly 25%. Genes associated with nitrogen stress response and two-component systems were found to be enriched. The strains also housed many xenobiotic degradation pathways other than HCH, despite the absence of these xenobiotics from isolation sources. In addition, these strains, although non-motile, but posses flagellar assembly genes. While strains HDIPO4 and IP26 contained the complete set of lin genes, DS20 was entirely devoid of lin genes (except linKLMN) whereas, LL03, P25 and RL3 were identified as lin deficient strains, as they housed incomplete lin pathways. Further, in HDIPO4, linA was found as a hybrid of two natural variants i.e., linA1 and linA2 known for their different enantioselectivity. In conclusion, the bacteria isolated from HCH dumpsites provide a natural testing ground to study variations in the lin system and their effects on degradation efficacy. Further, the diversity in the lin gene sequences and copy number, their arrangement with respect to IS6100 and evidence for potential plasmid content elucidate possible evolutionary acquisition mechanisms for this pathway. This study further opens the horizon for selection of bacterial strains for inclusion in an HCH bioremediation consortium and suggests that HDIPO4, IP26 and B90A would be appropriate candidates for inclusion.« less

  19. SPRUCE: Spruce and Peatland Responses under Climatic and Environmental Change

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    SPRUCE is an experiment to assess the response of northern peatland ecosystems to increases in temperature and exposures to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. It is the primary component of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Scientific Focus Area of ORNL's Climate Change Program, focused on terrestrial ecosystems and the mechanisms that underlie their responses to climatic change. The experimental work is to be conducted in a Picea mariana [black spruce] - Sphagnum spp. bog forest in northern Minnesota, 40 km north of Grand Rapids, in the USDA Forest Service Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The site is located at the southern margin of the boreal peatland forest. It is an ecosystem considered especially vulnerable to climate change, and anticipated to be near its tipping point with respect to climate change. Responses to warming and interactions with increased atmospheric CO2 concentration are anticipated to have important feedbacks on the atmosphere and climate, because of the high carbon stocks harbored by such ecosystems.[copied from http://mnspruce.ornl.gov/] While some data files are restricted to access by project members only, others are available for public download now, even as research is being actively conducted.

  20. The soil microbiome influences grapevine-associated microbiota

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zarraonaindia, Iratxe; Owens, Sarah M.; Weisenhorn, Pamela; West, Kristin; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Lax, Simon; Bokulich, Nicholas A.; Mills, David A.; Martin, Gilles; Taghavi, Safiyh; et al

    2015-03-24

    Grapevine is a well-studied, economically relevant crop, whose associated bacteria could influence its organoleptic properties. In this study, the spatial and temporal dynamics of the bacterial communities associated with grapevine organs (leaves, flowers, grapes, and roots) and soils were characterized over two growing seasons to determine the influence of vine cultivar, edaphic parameters, vine developmental stage (dormancy, flowering, preharvest), and vineyard. Belowground bacterial communities differed significantly from those aboveground, and yet the communities associated with leaves, flowers, and grapes shared a greater proportion of taxa with soil communities than with each other, suggesting that soil may serve as a bacterialmore » reservoir. A subset of soil microorganisms, including root colonizers significantly enriched in plant growth-promoting bacteria and related functional genes, were selected by the grapevine. In addition to plant selective pressure, the structure of soil and root microbiota was significantly influenced by soil pH and C:N ratio, and changes in leaf- and grape-associated microbiota were correlated with soil carbon and showed interannual variation even at small spatial scales. Diazotrophic bacteria, e.g., Rhizobiaceae and Bradyrhizobium spp., were significantly more abundant in soil samples and root samples of specific vineyards. Vine-associated microbial assemblages were influenced by myriad factors that shape their composition and structure, but the majority of organ-associated taxa originated in the soil, and their distribution reflected the influence of highly localized biogeographic factors and vineyard management.« less

  1. Chemical Concentrations in Field Mice from Open-Detonation Firing Sites TA-36 Minie and TA-39 Point 6 at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fresquez, Philip R.

    2011-01-01

    Field mice (mostly Peromyscus spp.) were collected at two open-detonation (high explosive) firing sites - Minie at Technical Area (TA) 36 and Point 6 at TA-39 - at Los Alamos National Laboratory in August of 2010 and in February of 2011 for chemical analysis. Samples of whole body field mice from both sites were analyzed for target analyte list elements (mostly metals), dioxin/furans, polychlorinated biphenyl congeners, high explosives, and perchlorate. In addition, uranium isotopes were analyzed in a composite sample collected from TA-36 Minie. In general, all constituents, with the exception of lead at TA-39 Point 6, in whole body field mice samples collected from these two open-detonation firing sites were either not detected or they were detected below regional statistical reference levels (99% confidence level), biota dose screening levels, and/or soil ecological chemical screening levels. The amount of lead in field mice tissue collected from TA-39 Point 6 was higher than regional background, and some lead levels in the soil were higher than the ecological screening level for the field mouse; however, these levels are not expected to affect the viability of the populations over the site as a whole.

  2. The soil microbiome influences grapevine-associated microbiota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarraonaindia, Iratxe; Owens, Sarah M.; Weisenhorn, Pamela; West, Kristin; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Lax, Simon; Bokulich, Nicholas A.; Mills, David A.; Martin, Gilles; Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2015-03-24

    Grapevine is a well-studied, economically relevant crop, whose associated bacteria could influence its organoleptic properties. In this study, the spatial and temporal dynamics of the bacterial communities associated with grapevine organs (leaves, flowers, grapes, and roots) and soils were characterized over two growing seasons to determine the influence of vine cultivar, edaphic parameters, vine developmental stage (dormancy, flowering, preharvest), and vineyard. Belowground bacterial communities differed significantly from those aboveground, and yet the communities associated with leaves, flowers, and grapes shared a greater proportion of taxa with soil communities than with each other, suggesting that soil may serve as a bacterial reservoir. A subset of soil microorganisms, including root colonizers significantly enriched in plant growth-promoting bacteria and related functional genes, were selected by the grapevine. In addition to plant selective pressure, the structure of soil and root microbiota was significantly influenced by soil pH and C:N ratio, and changes in leaf- and grape-associated microbiota were correlated with soil carbon and showed interannual variation even at small spatial scales. Diazotrophic bacteria, e.g., Rhizobiaceae and Bradyrhizobium spp., were significantly more abundant in soil samples and root samples of specific vineyards. Vine-associated microbial assemblages were influenced by myriad factors that shape their composition and structure, but the majority of organ-associated taxa originated in the soil, and their distribution reflected the influence of highly localized biogeographic factors and vineyard management.

  3. Integrating engineering design improvements with exoelectrogen enrichmentprocess to increase power output from microbial fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Leak, David; Andras, Calin; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Keller, Martin; Davison, Brian H

    2009-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFC) hold promise as a green technology for bioenergy production. The challenge is to improve the engineering design while exploiting the ability of microbes to generate and transfer electrons directly to electrodes. A strategy using a combination of improved anode design and an enrichment processwas formulated to improve power densities. The designwas based on a flow-through anode with minimal dead volume and a high electrode surface area per unit volume. The strategy focused on promoting biofilm formation via a combination of forced flow through the anode, carbon limitation, and step-wise reduction of external resistance. The enrichment process resulted in development of exoelectrogenic biofilm communities dominated by Anaeromusa spp. This is the first report identifying organisms fromthe Veillonellaceae family in MFCs. The power density of the resulting MFC using a ferricyanide cathode reached 300Wm?3 net anode volume (3220mWm?2), which is about a third of what is estimated to be necessary for commercial consideration. The operational stability of the MFC using high specific surface area electrodes was demonstrated by operating the MFC for a period of over four months.

  4. Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; US Geological Survey Reports, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J.

    2003-12-01

    This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1913. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attend to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first is to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort includes measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective is to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective is to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the second year of at least a three-year study, it is largely restricted to describing our efforts and findings for the first two objectives.

  5. Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; US Geological Survey Reports, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J.

    2003-01-01

    This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1914. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attend to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first is to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort includes measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective is to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for future genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective is to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the first year of a three-year study, this report is restricted to describing our work on the first two objectives only.

  6. Parametric study of flow patterns behind the standing accretion shock wave for core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwakami, Wakana; Nagakura, Hiroki [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yamada, Shoichi, E-mail: wakana@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2014-05-10

    In this study, we conduct three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations systematically to investigate the flow patterns behind the accretion shock waves that are commonly formed in the post-bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. Adding small perturbations to spherically symmetric, steady, shocked accretion flows, we compute the subsequent evolutions to find what flow pattern emerges as a consequence of hydrodynamical instabilities such as convection and standing accretion shock instability for different neutrino luminosities and mass accretion rates. Depending on these two controlling parameters, various flow patterns are indeed realized. We classify them into three basic patterns and two intermediate ones; the former includes sloshing motion (SL), spiral motion (SP), and multiple buoyant bubble formation (BB); the latter consists of spiral motion with buoyant-bubble formation (SPB) and spiral motion with pulsationally changing rotational velocities (SPP). Although the post-shock flow is highly chaotic, there is a clear trend in the pattern realization. The sloshing and spiral motions tend to be dominant for high accretion rates and low neutrino luminosities, and multiple buoyant bubbles prevail for low accretion rates and high neutrino luminosities. It is interesting that the dominant pattern is not always identical between the semi-nonlinear and nonlinear phases near the critical luminosity; the intermediate cases are realized in the latter case. Running several simulations with different random perturbations, we confirm that the realization of flow pattern is robust in most cases.

  7. New methods for tightly regulated gene expression and highly efficient chromosomal integration of cloned genes for Methanosarcina species

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guss, Adam M.; Rother, Michael; Zhang, Jun Kai; Kulkkarni, Gargi; Metcalf, William W.

    2008-01-01

    A highly efficient method for chromosomal integration of cloned DNA into Methanosarcina spp. was developed utilizing the site-specific recombination system from the Streptomyces phage φC31. Host strains expressing the φC31 integrase gene and carrying an appropriate recombination site can be transformed with non-replicating plasmids carrying the complementary recombination site at efficiencies similar to those obtained with self-replicating vectors. We have also constructed a series of hybrid promoters that combine the highly expressed M. barkeri P mcrB promoter with binding sites for the tetracycline-responsive, bacterial TetR protein. These promoters are tightly regulated by the presence or absence of tetracycline inmore » strains that express the tetR gene. The hybrid promoters can be used in genetic experiments to test gene essentiality by placing a gene of interest under their control. Thus, growth of strains with tetR -regulated essential genes becomes tetracycline-dependent. A series of plasmid vectors that utilize the site-specific recombination system for construction of reporter gene fusions and for tetracycline regulated expression of cloned genes are reported. These vectors were used to test the efficiency of translation at a variety of start codons. Fusions using an ATG start site were the most active, whereas those using GTG and TTG were approximately one half or one fourth as active, respectively. The CTG fusion was 95% less active than the ATG fusion.« less

  8. Changes in the composition of the human fecal microbiome following bacteriotherapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khoruts, A.; Dicksved, J.; Jansson, J.K.; Sadowsky, M.J.

    2009-08-15

    CDAD is the major known cause of antibiotic-induced diarrhea and colitis, and the disease is thought to result from persistent disruption of commensal gut microbiota. Bacteriotherapy by way of fecal transplantation can be used to treat recurrent CDAD and is thought to re-establish the normal colonic microflora. However, limitations of conventional microbiologic techniques have until recently precluded testing of this idea. In this study we used T-RFLP and 16S rRNA gene sequencing approaches to characterize the bacterial composition of the colonic microflora in a patient suffering from recurrent CDAD, before and after treatment by fecal transplantation from a healthy donor. While the patient's residual colonic microbiota, prior to therapy, was deficient in members of the bacterial divisions-Firmicutes and Bacteriodetes, transplantation had a dramatic impact on the composition of the patient's gut microbiota. By 14 days post transplantation, the fecal bacterial composition of the recipient was highly similar to the donor and was dominated by Bacteroides spp. strains and an uncharacterized butyrate producing bacterium. The change in bacterial composition was accompanied by resolution of the patient's symptoms. The striking similarity of the recipient's and donor's intestinal microbiota following bacteriotherapy suggests that the donor's bacteria quickly occupied their requisite niches, resulting in restoration of both the structure and function of the microbial communities present.

  9. Residential Building Energy Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1990-09-01

    PEAR (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences) provides an easy-to-use and accurate method of estimating the energy and cost savings associated with various energy conservation measures in site-built single-family homes. Measures such as ceiling, wall, and floor insulation; different window type and glazing layers; infiltration levels; and equipment efficiency can be considered. PEAR also allows the user to consider the effects of roof and wall color, movable night insulation on the windows, reflective and heatmore » absorbing glass, an attached sunspace, and use of a night temperature setback. Regression techniques permit adjustments for different building geometries, window areas and orientations, wall construction, and extension of the data to 880 U.S. locations determined by climate parameters. Based on annual energy savings, user-specified costs of conservation measures, fuel, lifetime of measure, loan period, and fuel escalation and interest rates, PEAR calculates two economic indicators; the Simple Payback Period (SPP) and the Savings-to-Investment Ratio (SIR). Energy and cost savings of different sets of conservation measures can be compared in a single run. The program can be used both as a research tool by energy policy analysts and as a method for nontechnical energy calculation by architects, home builders, home owners, and others in the building industry.« less

  10. New methods for tightly regulated gene expression and highly efficient chromosomal integration of cloned genes forMethanosarcinaspecies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guss, Adam M.; Rother, Michael; Zhang, Jun Kai; Kulkkarni, Gargi; Metcalf, William W.

    2008-01-01

    A highly efficient method for chromosomal integration of cloned DNA intoMethanosarcina spp.was developed utilizing the site-specific recombination system from theStreptomycesphage ?C31. Host strains expressing the ?C31 integrase gene and carrying an appropriate recombination site can be transformed with non-replicating plasmids carrying the complementary recombination site at efficiencies similar to those obtained with self-replicating vectors. We have also constructed a series of hybrid promoters that combine the highly expressedM. barkeriPmcrBpromoter with binding sites for the tetracycline-responsive, bacterial TetR protein. These promoters are tightly regulated by the presence or absence of tetracycline in strains that express thetetRgene. The hybrid promoters can bemoreused in genetic experiments to test gene essentiality by placing a gene of interest under their control. Thus, growth of strains withtetR-regulated essential genes becomes tetracycline-dependent. A series of plasmid vectors that utilize the site-specific recombination system for construction of reporter gene fusions and for tetracycline regulated expression of cloned genes are reported. These vectors were used to test the efficiency of translation at a variety of start codons. Fusions using an ATG start site were the most active, whereas those using GTG and TTG were approximately one half or one fourth as active, respectively. The CTG fusion was 95% less active than the ATG fusion.less

  11. Comparative genome analysis of Bacillus cereus group genomes withBacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Iain; Sorokin, Alexei; Kapatral, Vinayak; Reznik, Gary; Bhattacharya, Anamitra; Mikhailova, Natalia; Burd, Henry; Joukov, Victor; Kaznadzey, Denis; Walunas, Theresa; D'Souza, Mark; Larsen, Niels; Pusch,Gordon; Liolios, Konstantinos; Grechkin, Yuri; Lapidus, Alla; Goltsman,Eugene; Chu, Lien; Fonstein, Michael; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Overbeek, Ross; Kyrpides, Nikos; Ivanova, Natalia

    2005-09-14

    Genome features of the Bacillus cereus group genomes (representative strains of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis sub spp israelensis) were analyzed and compared with the Bacillus subtilis genome. A core set of 1,381 protein families among the four Bacillus genomes, with an additional set of 933 families common to the B. cereus group, was identified. Differences in signal transduction pathways, membrane transporters, cell surface structures, cell wall, and S-layer proteins suggesting differences in their phenotype were identified. The B. cereus group has signal transduction systems including a tyrosine kinase related to two-component system histidine kinases from B. subtilis. A model for regulation of the stress responsive sigma factor sigmaB in the B. cereus group different from the well studied regulation in B. subtilis has been proposed. Despite a high degree of chromosomal synteny among these genomes, significant differences in cell wall and spore coat proteins that contribute to the survival and adaptation in specific hosts has been identified.

  12. An Assessment of the Status of Captive Broodstock Technology of Pacific Salmon, 1995 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flagg, Thomas A.; Mahnaken, Conrad V.W.; Hard, Jeffrey J.

    1995-06-01

    This report provides guidance for the refinement and use of captive broodstock technology for Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) by bringing together information on the husbandry techniques, genetic risks, physiology, nutrition, and pathology affecting captive broodstocks. Captive broodstock rearing of Pacific salmon is an evolving technology, as yet without well defined standards. At present, we regard captive rearing of Pacific salmon as problematic: high mortality rates and low egg viability were common in the programs we reviewed for this report. One of the most important elements in fish husbandry is the culture environment itself. Many captive broodstock programs for Pacific salmon have reared fish from smolt-to-adult in seawater net-pens, and most have shown success in providing gametes for recovery efforts. However, some programs have lost entire brood years to diseases that transmitted rapidly in this medium. Current programs for endangered species of Pacific salmon rear most fish full-term to maturity in fresh well-water, since ground water is low in pathogens and thus helps ensure survival to adulthood. Our review suggested that captive rearing of fish in either freshwater, well-water, or filtered and sterilized seawater supplied to land-based tanks should produce higher survival than culture in seawater net-pens.

  13. Factors controlling pathogen destruction during anaerobic digestion of biowastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.R. . E-mail: s.r.smith@imperial.ac.uk; Lang, N.L.; Cheung, K.H.M.; Spanoudaki, K.

    2005-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion is the principal method of stabilising biosolids from urban wastewater treatment in the UK, and it also has application for the treatment of other types of biowaste. Increasing awareness of the potential risks to human and animal health from environmental sources of pathogens has focused attention on the efficacy of waste treatment processes at destroying pathogenic microorganisms in biowastes recycled to agricultural land. The degree of disinfection achieved by a particular anaerobic digester is influenced by a variety of interacting operational variables and conditions, which can often deviate from the ideal. Experimental investigations demonstrate that Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. are not damaged by mesophilic temperatures, whereas rapid inactivation occurs by thermophilic digestion. A hydraulic, biokinetic and thermodynamic model of pathogen inactivation during anaerobic digestion showed that a 2 log{sub 10} reduction in E. coli (the minimum removal required for agricultural use of conventionally treated biosolids) is likely to challenge most conventional mesophilic digesters, unless strict maintenance and management practices are adopted to minimise dead zones and by-pass flow. Efficient mixing and organic matter stabilisation are the main factors controlling the rate of inactivation under mesophilic conditions and not a direct effect of temperature per se on pathogenic organisms.

  14. Anaerobic metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds by sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boopathy, R.; Kulpa, C.F.

    1994-06-01

    Ecological observations suggest that sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria might metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment, but this ability had not been demonstrated until recently. Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds used aerobic microorganisms. In most cases no mineralization of nitroaromatics occurs, and only superficial modifications of the structures are reported. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds reportedly undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. For example, trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of ammonia from triaminotoluene is achieved by reductive deamination catalyzed by the enzyme reductive deaminase, with the production of ammonia and toluene. Some sulfate reducers can metabolize toluene to CO{sub 2}. Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. Many methanogenic bacteria can reduce nitroaromatic compounds to amino compounds. In this paper we review the anaerobic metabolic processes of nitroaromatic compounds under sulfate-reducing And methanogenic conditions.

  15. {phi}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{eta}{gamma} and {phi}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} decays and mixing between low and high mass scalar mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teshima, T.; Kitamura, I.; Morisita, N.

    2007-09-01

    Radiative decays {phi}{yields}{eta}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} and {phi}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} are studied assuming that these decays are caused through the intermediate a{sub 0}(980){gamma} and f{sub 0}(980){gamma} states, respectively. Fitting the experimental data of the {eta}{pi}{sup 0} and {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} invariant mass spectrum in the decays {phi}{yields}{eta}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} and {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, it is shown that the processes {phi}{yields}a{sub 0}{gamma} and {phi}{yields}f{sub 0}{gamma} are dominated by the K{sup +}K{sup -} loop interaction rather than the pointlike {phi}a{sub 0}(f{sub 0}){gamma} one both for the nonderivative and derivative SPP coupling. The experimental data of {gamma}[{phi}{yields}f{sub 0}{gamma}]/{gamma}[{phi}{yields}a{sub 0}{gamma}] predicts that g{sub f{sub 0}}{sub KK}/g{sub a{sub 0}}{sub KK}{approx}2. Considering the effects of the mixing between low mass scalar qqqq states and high mass scalar qq states to these coupling constants g{sub f{sub 0}}{sub KK} and g{sub a{sub 0}}{sub KK}, one suggests that this mixing is rather large.

  16. RHIC electron lens beam transport system design considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, X.; Pikin, A.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Jain, A.; Raparia, D.

    2010-10-01

    To apply head-on beam-beam compensation for RHIC, two electron lenses are designed and will be installed at IP10. Electron beam transport system is one of important subsystem, which is used to transport electron beam from electron gun side to collector side. This system should be able to change beam size inside superconducting magnet and control beam position with 5 mm in horizontal and vertical plane. Some other design considerations for this beam transport system are also reported in this paper. The head-on beam-beam effect is one of important nonlinear source in storage ring and linear colliders, which have limited the luminosity improvement of many colliders, such as SppS, Tevatron and RHIC. In order to enhance the performance of colliders, beam-beam effects can be compensated with direct space charge compensation, indirect space charge compensation or betatron phase cancellation scheme. Like other colliders, indirect space charge compensation scheme (Electron Lens) was also proposed for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam-beam compensation at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The two similar electron lenses are located in IR10 between the DX magnets. One RHIC electron lens consists of one DC electron gun, one superconducting magnet, one electron collector and beam transport system.

  17. The initial phase of a Longleaf Pine-Wiregrass Savanna restoration: species establishment and community responses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aschenbach, Todd, A; Foster, Bryan, L.; Imm, Donald, W.

    2010-09-01

    AbstractAbstract The significant loss of the longleaf pine-wiregrass ecosystem in the southeastern United States has serious implications for biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. In response to this loss, we have initiated a long-term and landscape-scale restoration experiment at the 80,125 ha (310 mi2) Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. Aristida beyrichiana (wiregrass), an important and dominant grass (i.e., a matrix species) of the longleaf pine savanna understory, and 31 other herbaceous non-matrix species were planted at six locations throughout SRS in 2002 and 2003. Of the 36,056 transplanted seedlings, 75% were still alive in June 2004, while mean 12 year survival across all planted species was 48%. Lespedeza hirta (hairy lespedeza) exhibited the greatest overall survival per 3 3 m cell at 95%, whereas Schizachyrium spp. (little bluestem) exhibited the greatest mean cover among individual species at 5.9%. Wiregrass survival and cover were significantly reduced when planted with non-matrix species. Aggregate cover of all planted species in restored cells averaged 25.9% in 2006. High rates of survival and growth of the planted species resulted in greater species richness (SR), diversity, and vegetative cover in restored cells. Results suggest that the loss of the longleaf pine-wiregrass ecosystem may be ameliorated through restoration efforts and illustrate the positive impact of restoration plantings on biodiversity and vegetative cover.

  18. Energetic Consequences of nitrite stress in Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough, inferred from global transcriptional analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Qiang; Huang, Katherine H.; He, Zhili; Alm, Eric J.; Fields,Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2005-11-03

    Many of the proteins that are candidates for bioenergetic pathways involved with sulfate respiration in Desulfovibrio spp. have been studied, but complete pathways and overall cell physiology remain to be resolved for many environmentally relevant conditions. In order to understand the metabolism of these microorganisms under adverse environmental conditions for improved bioremediation efforts, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was used as a model organism to study stress response to nitrite, an important intermediate in the nitrogen cycle. Previous physiological studies demonstrated that growth was inhibited by nitrite and that nitrite reduction was observed to be the primary mechanism of detoxification. Global transcriptional profiling with whole-genome microarrays revealed coordinated cascades of responses to nitrite in pathways of energy metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, oxidative stress response, and iron homeostasis. In agreement with previous observations, nitrite-stressed cells showed a decrease in the expression of genes encoding sulfate reduction functions in addition to respiratory oxidative phosphorylation and ATP synthase activity. Consequently, the stressed cells had decreased expression of the genes encoding ATP-dependent amino acid transporters and proteins involved in translation. Other genes up-regulated in response to nitrite include the genes in the Fur regulon, which is suggested to be involved in iron homeostasis, and genes in the Per regulon, which is predicted to be responsible for oxidative stress response.

  19. Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia; Shipley, Rochelle

    2003-11-01

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. FY 2002 was used to continue seasonal fish and lakewide creel surveys and adjust methods and protocols as needed. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 meters deep, with 16-17 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until August when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-meters deep. Secchi depths ranged from 2.5-8 meters and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in October 2002 and May and July 2003 using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Yellow Perch Perca flavescens (32 %) and cottid spp. (22 %) dominated the nearshore species composition in October; however, by May yellow perch (12 %) were the third most common species followed by smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (34 %) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (14 %). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during October (78 %) and May (81 %). Fish diet analysis indicated that juvenile fishes consumed primarily insects and zooplankton, while adult piscivores consumed cottids spp. and yellow perch most frequently. For FY 2002, the following creel statistics are comprehensive through August 31, 2003. The highest angling pressure occurred in June 2003, when anglers were primarily targeting walleye and smallmouth bass. Boat anglers utilized Steamboat State Park more frequently than any other boat ramp on Banks Lake. Shore anglers used the rock jetty at Coulee City Park 76 % of the time, with highest use occurring from November through April. An estimated total of 11,915 ({+-}140 SD) smallmouth bass, 6,412 ({+-}59 SD) walleye, 5,470 ({+-}260 SD) rainbow trout, and 1,949 ({+-}118 SD) yellow perch were harvested from Banks Lake in FY 2002. Only 3 kokanee were reported in the catch during the FY 2002 creel survey. In the future, data from the seasonal surveys and creel will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

  20. Ecological interactions between metals and microbes that impact bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allan Konopka; Cindy Nakatsu

    2004-03-17

    Distinct microbial communities had been found in contaminated soils that varied in their concentrations of Pb, Cr and aromatic compounds. It is difficult to distinguish between their effects as their presence is highly correlated. Microcosms were constructed in which either Pb{sup +2} or CrO{sub 4}{sup -2} was added at levels that produced acute modest or severe acute effects (50 or 90% reduction). We previously reported on changes in microbial activity and broad patterns of Bacterial community composition. These results showed that addition of an organic energy source selected for a relatively small number of phylotypes and the addition of Pb or Cr(VI) modulated the community response. We sequenced dominant phylotypes from microcosms amended with xylene and Cr(VI) and from those with the simple addition of glucose only. In both cases, the dominant selected phylotypes were diverse. We found a number of distinct Arthrobacter strains, as well as several Pseudomonas spp. In addition, the high GC-content bands belonged to members of the genera Nocardioides and Rhodococcus. The focus of amended microcosm work has now shifted to anaerobic processes. The reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) as a detoxification mechanism is of greater interest, as is the specific role of particular physiological groups of anaerobes in mediating Cr(VI) detoxification. The correlation between microbial activity, community structure, and metal level has been analyzed on 150 mg of soil collected at spatial scales <1, 5, 15 and 50 cm. There was no correlation between metal content and activity level. Soils <1 cm apart could differ in activity 10-fold and extractable Pb and Cr 7-fold. Therefore, we turned to geostatistical analysis. There was spatial periodicity which is likely to reflect the heterogeneous distribution of active microbes and metal contaminants. Variograms indicated that the range of spatial dependence was up to 20 cm. To visualize the spatial relationships between the primary variate (activity) and its covariates (lead and chromium content), block kriging was used. The kriging maps suggest that areas exist where increased metal concentrations have zones of decreased metabolic microbial activity. Cr(VI) resistant bacteria have been isolated from two contaminated sites. Most isolates are Arthrobacter, Rhodococcus, or Pseudomonas spp. A chrA gene has been cloned from Arthrobacter strain CR15 isolated from Cannelton, MI. PCR-primers have been produced against conserved motifs analyzed from 8 chrA sequences. Of the 96 Cr-resistant isolates from Cannelton, 85% gave a positive reaction to these primers. In contrast, none of the 38 isolates from Seymour, IN were positive. Therefore, at least for the culturable community, a particular resistance determinant appears to be widespread at a geographical site but rare (absent) at another site. The phylogenetic relatedness of the Arthrobacter strains is being evaluated via the distribution of repetitive elements as well as genome-wide restriction fragment analysis. Work to date on the latter has also suggested that Arthrobacter genomes are small (<2.5 Mbp). Gene capture experiments demonstrated that chromate-sensitive Gram-negative bacterial strains could obtain resistance from Cr-contaminated soil. However, frequency of transfer is low (10-6-10-8). Genetic diversity of the acquired chromate resistance mechanism is being assessed.

  1. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Sandy River Delta, Technical Report 2000-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Ann; Ratti, John

    2002-02-01

    Land managers are often challenged with the mandate to control exotic and invasive plant species. Reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea) and Himalayan blackberry (Rubus discolor) are 2 such species that are currently threatening natural areas in western United States. Reed canarygrass may be native to the inland northwest (Antieau 2000), but it has invaded many wetland areas as dense, monoculture stands. Spread of this plant species is largely attributed to human disturbances, e.g., draining, farming (Antieau 2000). Reed canarygrass often dominates other emergent vegetation such as cattail (Typha spp.) and bulrush (Scirpus spp.) (Whitson et al. 1996, Apfelbaum and Sams 1987), and the resulting habitat is largely unsuitable for wetland birds. Himalayan blackberry was introduced to the United States as a garden shrub and was planted at wildlife-management areas for food and cover. It easily colonizes disturbed places, such as roadsides, ditches, and flood plains (Hoshovsky 2000). Once established, it forms a thick, impenetrable stand, which excludes native shrub species. Although Himalayan blackberry does provide food and cover for wildlife, particularly during fall and winter, it decreases habitat diversity, and therefore, may decrease wildlife diversity. Furthermore, patterns of avian nest predation may be altered in some exotic-shrub communities (Schmidt and Whelan 1999). For land managers to make sound decisions regarding invasive-plant control, it is useful to obtain information on current plant distributions in relation to targeted wildlife species, and then use models to predict how those species may respond to changes in vegetation. The Habitat Evaluations Program was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to evaluate current and future habitat conditions for fish and wildlife (Stiehl 1994). The program is based on Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for specific wildlife species. Each model contains several variables that represent life requisites (e.g., food and nesting cover) for that species. These variables are evaluated with vegetation sampling, and/or through the interpretation of aerial photographs and the like. Variable values are assigned a numerical score. The score may be based on a categorical rating (e.g . , different vegetation types receive different scores based on their importance for that species) or may be the result of a linear relationship (e.g., the score increases with the variable value; Figure 1). Variable scores are then input into a mathematical formula, which results in an HSI score. The HSI score ranges from 0-1, with 0 representing poor-quality habitat and 1 optimal habitat. HSI models assume a positive, linear relationship between wildlife-species density and the HSI score. For example, with an HSI score of 1, we assume that a species will be present at its highest density. Models can be projected into the future by changing variable values and observing the corresponding changes in HSI scores. Most models are relatively simple, but some are complex. These models have come under considerable scrutiny in the last several years, particularly concerning the validity of model assumptions (Van Horne 1983, Laymon and Barrett 1986, Hobbs and Hanley 1990, Kellner et al. 1992). Regardless of criticisms, these models may be used with success when there is an understanding and acceptance of model limitations. Each model should be evaluated as to its applicability in a given situation. Model validation, where results have on-the-ground verification, is highly recommended. Specific objectives of this project were to (1) conduct avian surveys and measure the present vegetation at the Sandy River Delta, (2) input the vegetation data into HSI models for 5 avian species, (3) evaluate the current habitat suitability for these species, and (4) predict species responses to potential changes in vegetation, resulting from the removal of reed canarygrass and/or Himalayan blackberry.

  2. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, William D.; Smith, Steven G.; Zabel, Richard W.

    2003-07-01

    In 2002, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the tenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags). We PIT tagged and released a total of 19,891 hatchery steelhead at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and sites within the hydropower system. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the ''Single-Release Model''). Primary research objectives in 2002 were to (1) estimate reach and project survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss; (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions; and (3) evaluate the survival-estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2002 for PIT-tagged yearling chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures; details on methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Results for summer-migrating chinook salmon will be reported separately.

  3. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.; Marsh, Douglas M.

    2006-05-01

    In 2005, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the thirteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags). We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,439 hatchery steelhead, 5,315 wild steelhead, and 6,964 wild yearling Chinook salmon at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the ''single-release model''). Primary research objectives in 2005 were: (1) Estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss. (2) Evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions. (3) Evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2005 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here.

  4. Rock Island Dam Smolt Monitoring; 1994-1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truscott, Keith B.; Fielder, Paul C.

    1995-10-01

    Downstream migrating salmon and steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus spp.) smolts were monitored at the Rock Island Dam bypass trap from April 1 - August 31, 1954. This was the tenth consecutive year that the bypass trap was monitored. Data collected included: (1) number of fish caught by species, (2) number of adipose clipped and/or Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tagged fish caught by species, (3) daily average riverflow, (4) daily average powerhouse No. 1 and No. 2 flows and daily average spill. These data were transmitted to the Fish Passage Center, which manages the Smolt Monitoring Program throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Smolt Monitoring Program is used to manage the {open_quotes}water budget{close_quotes}, releasing upstream reservoir water storage allocated to supplement river flows to enhance survival of downstream migrating juvenile salmonids. The Rock Island Dam trapping facility collected 37,795 downstream migrating salmonids in 1994. Collected fish included 4 yearling and 4 sub-yearling chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) that had been previously PIT tagged to help determine migration rates. Additionally, 1,132 sub-yearling chinook, 4,185 yearling chinook, 6,627 steelhead, (O. mykiss) and 422 sockeye (O. nerka) with clipped adipose fins were collected. The middle 80% of the 1994 spring migration (excluding sub-yearling chinooks) passed Rock Island Dam during a 34 day period, April 25 - May 28. Passage rates of chinook and steelhead smolts released from hatcheries and the downstream migration timing of all salmonids are presented. The spring migration timing of juvenile salmonids is strongly influenced by hatchery releases above Rock Island Dam.

  5. Systematic review of the influence of foraging habitat on red-cockaded woodpecker reproductive success.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garabedian, James E.

    2014-04-01

    Relationships between foraging habitat and reproductive success provide compelling evidence of the contribution of specific vegetative features to foraging habitat quality, a potentially limiting factor for many animal populations. For example, foraging habitat quality likely will gain importance in the recovery of the threatened red-cockaded woodpecker Picoides borealis (RCW) in the USA as immediate nesting constraints are mitigated. Several researchers have characterized resource selection by foraging RCWs, but emerging research linking reproductive success (e.g. clutch size, nestling and fledgling production, and group size) and foraging habitat features has yet to be synthesized. Therefore, we reviewed peer-refereed scientific literature and technical resources (e.g. books, symposia proceedings, and technical reports) that examined RCW foraging ecology, foraging habitat, or demography to evaluate evidence for effects of the key foraging habitat features described in the species’ recovery plan on group reproductive success. Fitness-based habitat models suggest foraging habitat with low to intermediate pine Pinus spp. densities, presence of large and old pines, minimal midstory development, and herbaceous groundcover support more productive RCW groups. However, the relationships between some foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success are not well supported by empirical data. In addition, few regression models account for > 30% of variation in reproductive success, and unstandardized multiple and simple linear regression coefficient estimates typically range from -0.100 to 0.100, suggesting ancillary variables and perhaps indirect mechanisms influence reproductive success. These findings suggest additional research is needed to address uncertainty in relationships between foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success and in the mechanisms underlying those relationships.

  6. Event activity dependence of Y(nS) production in $$\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$$=5.02 TeV pPb and $$\\sqrt{s}$$=2.76 TeV pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-04-15

    The production of Y(1S), Y(2S), and Y(3S) is investigated in pPb and pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies per nucleon pair of 5.02 TeV and 2.76 TeV, respectively. The datasets correspond to integrated luminosities of about 31 nb–1 (pPb) and 5.4 pb–1 (pp), collected in 2013 by the CMS experiment at the LHC. Upsilons that decay into muons are reconstructed within the rapidity interval (yCM) < 1.93 in the nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass frame. Their production is studied as a function of two measures of event activity, namely the charged-particle multiplicity measured in the pseudorapidity interval |η| < 2.4, and the sum ofmore » transverse energy deposited at forward pseudorapidity, 4.0 < |η|< 5.2. The Y cross sections normalized by their event activity integrated values, Y(nS)/, are found to rise with both measures of the event activity in pp and pPb. In both collision systems, the ratios of the excited to the ground state cross sections, Y(nS)/Y(1S), are found to decrease with the charged-particle multiplicity, while as a function of the transverse energy the variation is less pronounced. Lastly, the event activity integrated double ratios, [Y(nS)/Y(1S)]pPb / [Y(nS)/Y(1S)]pp, are also measured and found to be 0.83 +/- 0.05 (stat.) +/- 0.05 (syst.) and 0.71 +/- 0.08 (stat.) +/- 0.09 (syst.) for Y(2S) and Y(3S), respectively.« less

  7. Radiation resistance of lactobacilli isolated from radurized meat relative to growth and environment. [Lactobacillus sake; Lactobacillus curvatus; Lactobacillus farciminis; Staphylococcus aureus; Salmonella typimurium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastings, J.W.; Holzapfel, W.H.; Niemand, J.G.

    1986-10-01

    Of 113 lactobacilli isolated from radurized (5 kGy) minced meat, 7 Lactobacillus sake strains, 1 L. curvatus strain, and 1 L. farciminis strain were used for radiation resistance studies in a semisynthetic substrate (i.e., modified MRS broth). Five reference Lactobacillus spp. one Staphylococcus aureus strain, and one Salmonella typhimurium strain were used for comparative purposes. All L. sake isolates exhibited the phenomenon of being more resistant to gamma-irradiation in the exponential (log) phase than in the stationary phase of their growth cycles by a factor of 28%. Four reference strains also exhibited this phenomenon, with L. sake (DSM 20017) showing a 68% increase in resistance in the log phase over the stationary phase. This phenomenon was not common to all bacteria tested and is not common to all strains with high radiation resistance. Four L. sake isolates and three reference strains were used in radiation sensitivity testing in a natural food system (i.e., meat). The bacteria were irradiated in minced meat and packaged under four different conditions (air, vacuum, CO/sub 2/, and N/sub 2/). Organisms exhibited the highest death rate (lowest D/sub 10/ values (doses required to reduce the logarithm of the bacterial population by 1) under CO/sub 2/ packaging conditions, but resistance to irradiation was increased under N/sub 2/. The D/sup 10/ values of the isolates were generally greater than those of the reference strains. The D/sup 10/ values were also higher (approximately two times) in meat than in a semisynthetic growth medium.

  8. Long-term monitoring of reef corals at the Flower Garden Banks (northwest Gulf of Mexico): Reef coral population changes and historical incorporation of barium in Montastrea annularis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deslarzes, K.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Reef coral populations were monitored from 1988 to 1991 at the Flower Garden Banks located in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. The status of reef coral populations, and natural or man-made factors potentially affecting their well-being were determined. Man-made chronic disturbances are degrading coral reef resources on a global scale. Yet, the Flower Garden coral reefs seem to have been sheltered from the effects of regional stresses generated by population growth and increased industrial activity. Since 1974, reef coral population levels have remained unchanged in the Montastrea-Diploria Zones at the Flower Garden Banks. Live coral cover ranges between 46 and 46.5%. Montastrea annularis and Diploria strigosa comprise 80% of the coral cover on either bank. The remainder of the cover is mostly shared by eight other taxa. Coral taxa appear to be more homogeneously distributed on the West Bank. The relatively greater number of Agaricia spp., Madracis decastis, and P. astreoides colonies on the East Bank may be the source of a decreased evenness. The health of reef corals was assessed using repetitive and non-repetitive photographic methods, and accretionary growth measurements of M. annularis. Reef corals have undergone small scale changes at the Flower Gardens probably reflecting natural disturbance, predation, disease, and inter-specific competition. White mat disease (ridge disease) is shown to generate more tissue loss than any of the three bleaching events that took place at the Flower Gardens (1989, 1990, and 1991). Advance to retreat linear ratios of encrusting growth revealed a net tissue gain on the East Bank and a net tissue loss on the West Bank. Growth rates of M. annularis were highly variable. The annual barium content from 1910 in 1989 in a M. annularis colony from the West Flower Garden did not reveal trends associated with the extensive oil and gas exploration in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

  9. Ecophysiology of an uncultivated lineage of Aigarchaeota from an oxic, hot spring filamentous ‘streamer’ community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, Jacob P.; Jay, Zackary J.; Schmid, Markus C.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Jennings, Ryan de M.; Kozubal, Mark A.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Wagner, Michael; Inskeep, William P.

    2015-07-03

    In this study, the candidate archaeal phylum ‘Aigarchaeota’ contains microorganisms from terrestrial and subsurface geothermal ecosystems. The phylogeny and metabolic potential of Aigarchaeota has been deduced from several recent single-cell amplified genomes; however, a detailed description of their metabolic potential and in situ transcriptional activity is absent. Here, we report a comprehensive metatranscriptome-based reconstruction of the in situ metabolism of Aigarchaeota in an oxic, hot spring filamentous ‘streamer’ community. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that these newly discovered Aigarchaeota are filamentous, which is consistent with the presence and transcription of an actin-encoding gene. Aigarchaeota filaments are intricately associated with other community members, which include both bacteria (for example, filamentous Thermocrinis spp.) and archaea. Metabolic reconstruction of genomic and metatranscriptomic data suggests that this aigarchaeon is an aerobic, chemoorganoheterotroph with autotrophic potential. A heme copper oxidase complex was identified in the environmental genome assembly and highly transcribed in situ. Potential electron donors include acetate, fatty acids, amino acids, sugars and aromatic compounds, which may originate from extracellular polymeric substances produced by other microorganisms shown to exist in close proximity and/or autochthonous dissolved organic carbon (OC). Transcripts related to genes specific to each of these potential electron donors were identified, indicating that this aigarchaeon likely utilizes several OC substrates. Characterized members of this lineage cannot synthesize heme, and other cofactors and vitamins de novo, which suggests auxotrophy. We propose the name Candidatus ‘Calditenuis aerorheumensis’ for this aigarchaeon, which describes its filamentous morphology and its primary electron acceptor, oxygen.

  10. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrei L. Osterman, Ph.D.

    2012-12-17

    Integration of bioinformatics and experimental techniques was applied to mapping and characterization of the key components (pathways, enzymes, transporters, regulators) of the core metabolic machinery in Shewanella oneidensis and related species with main focus was on metabolic and regulatory pathways involved in utilization of various carbon and energy sources. Among the main accomplishments reflected in ten joint publications with other participants of Shewanella Federation are: (i) A systems-level reconstruction of carbohydrate utilization pathways in the genus of Shewanella (19 species). This analysis yielded reconstruction of 18 sugar utilization pathways including 10 novel pathway variants and prediction of > 60 novel protein families of enzymes, transporters and regulators involved in these pathways. Selected functional predictions were verified by focused biochemical and genetic experiments. Observed growth phenotypes were consistent with bioinformatic predictions providing strong validation of the technology and (ii) Global genomic reconstruction of transcriptional regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Of those, 45 regulons were inferred directly from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in other species. Selected regulatory predictions were experimentally tested. Integration of this analysis with microarray data revealed overall consistency and provided additional layer of interactions between regulons. All the results were captured in the new database RegPrecise, which is a joint development with the LBNL team. A more detailed analysis of the individual subsystems, pathways and regulons in Shewanella spp included bioinfiormatics-based prediction and experimental characterization of: (i) N-Acetylglucosamine catabolic pathway; (ii)Lactate utilization machinery; (iii) Novel NrtR regulator of NAD biosynthesis; (iv) HexR-controlled global regulon in central metabolism. In addition to numerous specific findings contributing to basic understanding of ecophysiology and evolution of Shewanella, the key components of the integrative genomic methodology of general utility for the community were optimized, validated and disseminated.

  11. Influence of Carbon and Microbial Community Priming on the Attenuation of Uranium in a Contaminated Floodplain Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mouser, Paula J.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Qafoku, Nikolla; Sinha, M.; Williams, K. H.; Dangelmayr, M.; Resch, Charles T.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Wang, Zheming; Figueroa, Linda A.; Long, P. E.

    2015-07-01

    The capacity for subsurface sediments to sequester metal contaminants, such as uranium (U), and retain them after bioremediation efforts are completed is critical to site stewardship. Sediments enriched in natural organic matter are capable of sequestering significant quantities of U, but may also serve as sources to the aquifer, contributing to plume persistence. Two types of sediments were compared to better understand the mechanisms contributing to the sequestration and release of U in the presence of organic matter. Artificially bioreduced sediments were retrieved from a field experimental plot previously stimulated with acetate while naturally bioreduced sediments were collected from a location enriched in organic matter but never subject to acetate amendment. Batch incubations demonstrated that the artificially bioreduced sediments were primed to rapidly remove uranium from the groundwater whereas naturally bioreduced sediments initially released a sizeable portion of sediment U before U(VI)-removal commenced. Column experiments confirmed that U release persisted for 65 pore volumes in naturally bioreduced sediments, demonstrating the sink-source behavior of this sediment. Acetate addition to artificially bioreduced sediments shifted the microbial community from one dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria within Desulfobacteraceae to the iron-reducing family Geobacteraceae and Firmicutes during U(VI) reduction. In contrast, initial Geobacteraceae communities innaturally reduced sediments were replaced by clone sequences with similarity to opportunistic Pseudomonas spp. during U release, while U(VI) removal occurred concurrent with enrichment of Firmicutes. These investigations stress the importance of characterizing zones with heterogeneous carbon pools at U contaminated sites prior to the determination of a remedial strategy.

  12. Characterization of a novel insect-specific flavivirus from Brazil: Potential for inhibition of infection of arthropod cells with medically important flaviviruses.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kenney, Joan L.; Solberg, Owen D.; Langevin, Stanley A.; Brault, Aaron C.

    2014-01-12

    In the past decade, there has been an upsurge in the number of newly described insect-specific flaviviruses isolated pan-globally. We recently described the isolation of a novel flavivirus (tentatively designated ‘Nhumirim virus’; NHUV) that represents an example of a unique subset of apparently insect-specific viruses that phylogenetically affiliate with dual-host mosquito-borne flaviviruses despite appearing to be limited to replication in mosquito cells. We characterized the in vitro growth potential and 3' untranslated region (UTR) sequence homology with alternative flaviviruses, and evaluated the virus’s capacity to suppress replication of representative Culex spp.-vectored pathogenic flaviviruses in mosquito cells. Only mosquito cell linesmore » were found to support NHUV replication, further reinforcing the insect-specific phenotype of this virus. Analysis of the sequence and predicted RNA secondary structures of the 3' UTR indicated NHUV to be most similar to viruses within the yellow fever serogroup and Japanese encephalitis serogroup, and viruses in the tick-borne flavivirus clade. NHUV was found to share the fewest conserved sequence elements when compared with traditional insect-specific flaviviruses. This suggests that, despite apparently being insect specific, this virus probably diverged from an ancestral mosquito-borne flavivirus. Co-infection experiments indicated that prior or concurrent infection of mosquito cells with NHUV resulted in a significant reduction in virus production of West Nile virus (WNV), St Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) and Japanese encephalitis virus. As a result, the inhibitory effect was most effective against WNV and SLEV with over a 106-fold and 104-fold reduction in peak titres, respectively.« less

  13. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitats in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  14. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitat in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.; Miller, James, H.

    2004-07-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  15. Ecophysiology of an uncultivated lineage of Aigarchaeota from an oxic, hot spring filamentous ‘streamer’ community

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Beam, Jacob P.; Jay, Zackary J.; Schmid, Markus C.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Jennings, Ryan de M.; Kozubal, Mark A.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Wagner, Michael; Inskeep, William P.

    2015-07-03

    In this study, the candidate archaeal phylum ‘Aigarchaeota’ contains microorganisms from terrestrial and subsurface geothermal ecosystems. The phylogeny and metabolic potential of Aigarchaeota has been deduced from several recent single-cell amplified genomes; however, a detailed description of their metabolic potential and in situ transcriptional activity is absent. Here, we report a comprehensive metatranscriptome-based reconstruction of the in situ metabolism of Aigarchaeota in an oxic, hot spring filamentous ‘streamer’ community. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that these newly discovered Aigarchaeota are filamentous, which is consistent with the presence and transcription of an actin-encoding gene. Aigarchaeota filaments are intricately associated with othermore » community members, which include both bacteria (for example, filamentous Thermocrinis spp.) and archaea. Metabolic reconstruction of genomic and metatranscriptomic data suggests that this aigarchaeon is an aerobic, chemoorganoheterotroph with autotrophic potential. A heme copper oxidase complex was identified in the environmental genome assembly and highly transcribed in situ. Potential electron donors include acetate, fatty acids, amino acids, sugars and aromatic compounds, which may originate from extracellular polymeric substances produced by other microorganisms shown to exist in close proximity and/or autochthonous dissolved organic carbon (OC). Transcripts related to genes specific to each of these potential electron donors were identified, indicating that this aigarchaeon likely utilizes several OC substrates. Characterized members of this lineage cannot synthesize heme, and other cofactors and vitamins de novo, which suggests auxotrophy. We propose the name Candidatus ‘Calditenuis aerorheumensis’ for this aigarchaeon, which describes its filamentous morphology and its primary electron acceptor, oxygen.« less

  16. Radiological Impact Associated to Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM) from Coal-Fired Power Plants Emissions - 13436

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinis, Maria de Lurdes; Fiuza, Antonio; Soeiro de Carvalho, Jose; Gois, Joaquim; Meira Castro, Ana Cristina

    2013-07-01

    Certain materials used and produced in a wide range of non-nuclear industries contain enhanced activity concentrations of natural radionuclides. In particular, electricity production from coal is one of the major sources of increased human exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials. A methodology was developed to assess the radiological impact due to natural radiation background. The developed research was applied to a specific case study, the Sines coal-fired power plant, located in the southwest coastline of Portugal. Gamma radiation measurements were carried out with two different instruments: a sodium iodide scintillation detector counter (SPP2 NF, Saphymo) and a gamma ray spectrometer with energy discrimination (Falcon 5000, Canberra). Two circular survey areas were defined within 20 km of the power plant. Forty relevant measurements points were established within the sampling area: 15 urban and 25 suburban locations. Additionally, ten more measurements points were defined, mostly at the 20-km area. The registered gamma radiation varies from 20 to 98.33 counts per seconds (c.p.s.) corresponding to an external gamma exposure rate variable between 87.70 and 431.19 nGy/h. The highest values were measured at locations near the power plant and those located in an area within the 6 and 20 km from the stacks. In situ gamma radiation measurements with energy discrimination identified natural emitting nuclides as well as their decay products (Pb-212, Pb-2142, Ra-226, Th-232, Ac-228, Th-234, Pa-234, U- 235, etc.). According to the results, an influence from the stacks emissions has been identified both qualitatively and quantitatively. The developed methodology accomplished the lack of data in what concerns to radiation rate in the vicinity of Sines coal-fired power plant and consequently the resulting exposure to the nearby population. (authors)

  17. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulkner, James R.; Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.

    2009-06-23

    In 2008, the National Marine Fisheries Service completed the sixteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,565 hatchery steelhead O. mykiss, 15,991 wild steelhead, and 9,714 wild yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. These included 122,061 yearling Chinook salmon tagged at Lower Granite Dam for evaluation of latent mortality related to passage through Snake River dams. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2008 were to: (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead, (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions, and (3) evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2008 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2008 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. For yearling Chinook salmon, overall percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses in the Snake River were 80% hatchery-reared and 20% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 65% hatchery-reared and 35% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.939 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.935 for steelhead.

  18. A comparative multidimensional LC-MS proteomic analysis reveals mechanisms for furan aldehyde detoxification in Thermoanaerobacter pseudethanolicus 39E

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clarkson, Sonya M.; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D.; Giannone, Richard J.; Engle, Nancy L.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Hettich, Robert L.; Elkins, James G.

    2014-12-03

    Background: Chemical and physical pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass improves substrate reactivity for increased microbial biofuel production, but also restricts growth via the release of furan aldehydes such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF). The physiological effects of these inhibitors on thermophilic, fermentative bacteria is important to understand; especially as cellulolytic strains are being developed for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) of lignocellulosic feedstocks. Identifying mechanisms for detoxification of aldehydes in naturally resistant strains such as Thermoanaerobacter spp. may also enable improvements in candidate CBP microorganisms. Results: T. pseudethanolicus 39E, an anaerobic, saccharolytic thermophile, was found to grow readily in the presence of 30more » mM furfural and 20 mM 5-HMF and reduce these aldehydes to their respective alcohols in situ. The proteomes of T. pseudethanolicus 39E grown in the presence or absence of 15 mM furfural were compared to identify upregulated enzymes potentially responsible for the observed reduction. A total of 225 proteins were differentially regulated in response to the 15 mM furfural treatment with 152 upregulated vs. 73 downregulated. Only 86 proteins exhibited a 2-fold change in abundance in either direction. Of these, 53 were upregulated in the presence of furfural and 33 were downregulated. Two oxidoreductases were upregulated at least 2-fold by furfural and were targeted for further investigation: Teth39_1597, encodes a predicted butanol dehydrogenase (BdhA) and Teth39_1598, a predicted aldo/keto reductase (AKR). Both genes were cloned from T. pseudethanolicus 39E, with the respective enzymes overexpressed in E. coli and specific activities determined against a variety of aldehydes. BdhA showed significant activity with all aldehydes tested, including furfural and 5-HMF, using NADPH as the cofactor. AKR also showed significant activity with NADPH, but only with four carbon butyr- and isobutyraldehydes. Conclusions: Thermoanaerobacter pseudethanolicus 39E displays intrinsic tolerance to the common pretreatment inhibitors furfural and 5-HMF. Multidimensional proteomics analysis was used as an effective tool to identify putative mechanisms for detoxification of furfural and 5-HMF. T. pseudethanolicus was found to upregulate an NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase 6.8-fold in response to furfural. In vitro enzyme assays confirmed the reduction of furfural and 5-HMF to their respective alcohols.« less

  19. Novel mechanism for scavenging of hypochlorite involving a periplasmic methionine-rich peptide and methionine sulfoxide reductase

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Melnyk, Ryan A.; Youngblut, Matthew D.; Clark, Iain C.; Carlson, Hans K.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Lavarone, Anthony T.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.; Coates, John D.

    2015-05-12

    Reactive chlorine species (RCS) defense mechanisms are important for bacterial fitness in diverse environments. In addition to the anthropogenic use of RCS in the form of bleach, these compounds are also produced naturally through photochemical reactions of natural organic matter and in vivo by the mammalian immune system in response to invading microorganisms. To gain insight into bacterial RCS defense mechanisms, we investigated Azospira suillum strain PS, which produces periplasmic RCS as an intermediate of perchlorate respiration. Our studies identified an RCS response involving an RCS stress-sensing sigma/anti-sigma factor system (SigF/NrsF), a soluble hypochlorite-scavenging methionine-rich periplasmic protein (MrpX), and amore » putative periplasmic methionine sulfoxide reductase (YedY1). We investigated the underlying mechanism by phenotypic characterization of appropriate gene deletions, chemogenomic profiling of barcoded transposon pools, transcriptome sequencing, and biochemical assessment of methionine oxidation. Our results demonstrated that SigF was specifically activated by RCS and initiated the transcription of a small regulon centering around yedY1 and mrpX. A yedY1 paralog (yedY2) was found to have a similar fitness to yedY1 despite not being regulated by SigF. Markerless deletions of yedY2 confirmed its synergy with the SigF regulon. MrpX was strongly induced and rapidly oxidized by RCS, especially hypochlorite. Our results suggest a mechanism involving hypochlorite scavenging by sacrificial oxidation of the MrpX in the periplasm. Reduced MrpX is regenerated by the YedY methionine sulfoxide reductase activity. The phylogenomic distribution of this system revealed conservation in several Proteobacteria of clinical importance, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Brucella spp., implying a putative role in immune response evasion in vivo. In addition, bacteria are often stressed in the environment by reactive chlorine species (RCS) of either anthropogenic or natural origin, but little is known of the defense mechanisms they have evolved. Using a microorganism that generates RCS internally as part of its respiratory process allowed us to uncover a novel defense mechanism based on RCS scavenging by reductive reaction with a sacrificial methionine-rich peptide and redox recycling through a methionine sulfoxide reductase. As a result, this system is conserved in a broad diversity of organisms, including some of clinical importance, invoking a possible important role in innate immune system evasion.« less

  20. Refractory for Black Liquor Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William L. Headrick Jr; Musa Karakus; Xiaoting Laing

    2005-10-01

    The University of Missouri-Rolla will identify materials that will permit the safe, reliable and economical operation of combined cycle gasifiers by the pulp and paper industry. The primary emphasis of this project will be to resolve the material problems encountered during the operation of low-pressure high-temperature (LPHT) and low-pressure low-temperature (LPLT) gasifiers while simultaneously understanding the materials barriers to the successful demonstration of high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) black liquor gasifiers. This study will define the chemical, thermal and physical conditions in current and proposed gasifier designs and then modify existing materials and develop new materials to successfully meet the formidable material challenges. Resolving the material challenges of black liquor gasification combined cycle technology will provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits that include higher thermal efficiencies, up to three times greater electrical output per unit of fuel, and lower emissions. In the near term, adoption of this technology will allow the pulp and paper industry greater capital effectiveness and flexibility, as gasifiers are added to increase mill capacity. In the long term, combined-cycle gasification will lessen the industry's environmental impact while increasing its potential for energy production, allowing the production of all the mill's heat and power needs along with surplus electricity being returned to the grid. An added benefit will be the potential elimination of the possibility of smelt-water explosions, which constitute an important safety concern wherever conventional Tomlinson recovery boilers are operated. Developing cost-effective materials with improved performance in gasifier environments may be the best answer to the material challenges presented by black liquor gasification. Refractory materials may be selected/developed that either react with the gasifier environment to form protective surfaces in-situ; are functionally-graded to give the best combination of thermal, mechanical, and physical properties and chemical stability; or are relatively inexpensive, reliable repair materials. This report covers Task 1.4, Industrial Trial of candidate materials developed by refractory producers and in the laboratory based on the results of Task 1.1, 1.2 and 1.3. Refractories provided by in-kind sponsors to industrial installations tested by cup testing, density/porosity determinations, chemical analysis and microscopy. None of the materials produced in this program have been tried in high temperature gasifiers, but the mortar developed Morcocoat SP-P is outperforming other mortars tested at ORNL. MORCO PhosGun M-90-O has shown in laboratory testing to be an acceptable candidate for hot and cold repairs of existing high temperature gasifiers. It may prove to be an acceptable lining material.