Sample records for revised voluntary reporting

  1. Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program was suspended May 2011. It was a mechanism by which corporations, government agencies, individuals, voluntary organizations, etc., could report to the Energy Information Administration, any actions taken that have or are expected to reduce/avoid emissions of greenhouse gases or sequester carbon.

  2. Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Voluntary Reporting Program for greenhouse gases is part of an attempt by the U.S. Government to develop innovative, low-cost, and nonregulatory approaches to limit emissions of greenhouse gases. It is one element in an array of such programs introduced in recent years as part of the effort being made by the United States to comply with its national commitment to stabilize emissions of greenhouse gases under the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions of greenhouse gases.

  3. Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

  4. Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program, required by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, records the results of voluntary measures to reduce, avoid, or sequester greenhouse gas emissions. In 1998, 156 US companies and other organizations reported to the Energy information Administration that, during 1997, they had achieved greenhouse gas emission reductions and carbon sequestration equivalent to 166 million tons of carbon dioxide, or about 2.5% of total US emissions for the year. For the 1,229 emission reduction projects reported, reductions usually were measured by comparing an estimate of actual emissions with an estimate of what emissions would have been had the project not been implemented.

  5. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Why Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work withJerseyMarketsWhy Report Voluntary Reporting

  6. Final voluntary release assessment/corrective action report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Carlsbad Area Office (DOE-CAO) has completed a voluntary release assessment sampling program at selected Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This Voluntary Release Assessment/Corrective Action (RA/CA) report has been prepared for final submittal to the Environmental protection Agency (EPA) Region 6, Hazardous Waste Management Division and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) Hazardous and Radioactive Materials Bureau to describe the results of voluntary release assessment sampling and proposed corrective actions at the SWMU sites. The Voluntary RA/CA Program is intended to be the first phase in implementing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and corrective action process at the WIPP. Data generated as part of this sampling program are intended to update the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) for the WIPP (Assessment of Solid Waste Management Units at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), NMED/DOE/AIP 94/1. This Final Voluntary RA/CA Report documents the results of release assessment sampling at 11 SWMUs identified in the RFA. With this submittal, DOE formally requests a No Further Action determination for these SWMUs. Additionally, this report provides information to support DOE`s request for No Further Action at the Brinderson and Construction landfill SWMUs, and to support DOE`s request for approval of proposed corrective actions at three other SWMUs (the Badger Unit Drill Pad, the Cotton Baby Drill Pad, and the DOE-1 Drill Pad). This information is provided to document the results of the Voluntary RA/CA activities submitted to the EPA and NMED in August 1995.

  7. Senate Committee Report on 2004 Appropriations for Energy and Water Strongly Endorses the Department's Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Senate Committee Report on 2004 Appropriations for Energy and Water Strongly Endorses the Department's Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP)

  8. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Reporting Guidelines

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877SouthwestWisconsin profileDatabaseReporting

  9. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program -Data and Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work withJerseyMarketsWhy Report Voluntary

  10. ASRS: The Case for Confidential Incident Reporting Systems In April 2001, the world's largest confidential voluntary aviation reporting system, the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA the aviation community, both individually, and collectively, could place a high degree of trust. The FAA confidential voluntary aviation reporting system, the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS), celebrated

  11. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Under Construction

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877SouthwestWisconsin profileDatabaseReportingUnder

  12. Costs and benefits of industrial reporting and voluntary targets for energy efficiency. A report to the Congress of the United States. Volume II: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This part sets forth the regulations for the Industrial Energy conservation Program established under Part E of Title III of the Act. It includes criteria and procedures for the identification of reporting corporations, reporting requirements, criteria and procedures for exemption from filing reports directly with DOE, voluntary industrial energy efficiency improvement targets and voluntary recovered materials utilization targets. The purpose of the program is to promote increased energy conservation by American industry and, as it relates to the use of recovered materials, to conserve valuable energy and scarce natural resources.

  13. 2005 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R)Voluntary Labeling Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla

    2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed toidentify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices.Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and theU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Star labels exist for more thanforty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating andcooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics,and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subsetof ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy,dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2004, whatwe expect in 2005, and provide savings forecasts for two marketpenetration scenarios for the periods 2005 to 2010 and 2005 to 2020. Thetarget market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of futureENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goalsfor each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumptionof 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasersbuy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiencyproducts throughout the analysis period.

  14. 2007 Status Report: Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R)VoluntaryLabeling Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Marla; Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Homan,Gregory K.

    2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed toidentify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices.Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and theU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more thanthirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating andcooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics,and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subsetof ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy,dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2006, whatwe expect in 2007, and provide savings forecasts for two marketpenetration scenarios for the periods 2007 to 2015 and 2007 to 2025. Thetarget market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of futureENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goalsfor each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumptionof 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasersbuy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiencyproducts throughout the analysis period.

  15. 2006 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R)Voluntary Labeling Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla; Homan,Gregory K.

    2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed toidentify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices.Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and theU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more thanthirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating andcooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics,and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subsetof ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy,dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2005, whatwe expect in 2006, and provide savings forecasts for two marketpenetration scenarios for the periods 2006 to 2015 and 2006 to 2025. Thetarget market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of futureENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goalsfor each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumptionof 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasersbuy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiencyproducts throughout the analysis period.

  16. Voluntary Truck and Bus Fuel-Economy-Program marketing plan. Final technical report, September 29, 1980-January 29, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the program is to improve the utilization of fuel by commercial trucks and buses by updating and implementing specific approaches for educating and monitoring the trucking industry on methods and means of conserving fuels. The following outlines the marketing plan projects: increase use of program logo by voluntary program members and others; solicit trade publication membership and support; brief Congressional delegations on fuel conservation efforts; increase voluntary program presence before trade groups; increase voluntary program presence at truck and trade shows; create a voluntary program display for use at trade shows and in other areas; review voluntary program graphics; increase voluntary program membership; and produce placemats carrying fuel conservation messages; produce a special edition of Fuel Economy News, emphasizing the driver's involvement in fuel conservation; produce posters carrying voluntary program fuel conservation message. Project objectives, activities, and results for each project are summarized.

  17. Computer Integrated Revision Total Hip Replacement Surgery: Preliminary Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taubin, Gabriel

    in a primary case because there is little good bone left and because the surgical manipulations are more deliComputer Integrated Revision Total Hip Replacement Surgery: Preliminary Report Leo Joskowicz1 milling, and the re- duction of bone sacri ced to t the new implant. Our starting points are Robodoc

  18. REVISED PRELIMINARY REVIEW COPY Technical Report Documentation Page

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    of Centrifuge Testing for Swelling Properties of Highly Plastic Clays 5. Report Date March 2013; Revised June Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration. 16. Abstract A novel centrifuge of a small centrifuge device to provide direct measurement of the vertical swelling of clays. In this test

  19. Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992: General Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of concerns with the growing threat of global climate change from increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, Congress authorized a voluntary program for the public to report achievements in reducing those gases. This document offers guidance on recording historic and current greenhouse gas emissions, emissions reductions, and carbon sequestration. Under the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) reporters will have the opportunity to highlight specific achievements. If you have taken actions to lessen the greenhouse gas effect, either by decreasing greenhouse gas emissions or by sequestering carbon, the Department of Energy (DOE) encourages you to report your achievements under this program. The program has two related, but distinct parts. First, the program offers you an opportunity to report your annual emissions of greenhouse gases. Second, the program records your specific projects to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase carbon sequestration. Although participants in the program are strongly encouraged to submit reports on both, reports on either annual emissions or emissions reductions and carbon sequestration projects will be accepted. These guidelines and the supporting technical documents outline the rationale for the program and approaches to analyzing emissions and emissions reduction projects. Your annual emissions and emissions reductions achievements will be reported.

  20. Guide to preparing SAND reports. Revised

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Locke, T.K. [ed.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide contains basic information needed to produce a SAND report. Its guidelines reflect DOE regulation and Sandia policy. The guide includes basic writing instructions in an annotated sample report; guidance for organization, format, and layout of reports produced by line organizations; and information about conference papers, journal articles, and brochures. The appendixes contain sections on Sandia`s preferred usage, equations, references, copyrights and permissions, and publishing terms.

  1. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Facility Engineering...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Facility Engineering Services KCP, LLC - November 2008 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Facility Engineering Services KCP, LLC - November 2008 November 2008 This report...

  2. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Bechtel National...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Bechtel National Incorporated Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Site Report from the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review November...

  3. Hanford Site Pollution Prevention Plan progress report, 1994. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report tracks progress made during 1994 against the goals stated in DOE/RL-92-62, Executive Summary, Hanford Site Pollution Prevention Plan. The Executive Summary of the plan was submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in September 1992. The plan, Executive Summary, and the progress reports are elements of a pollution prevention planning program that is required by WAC 173-307, ``Plans,`` for all hazardous substance users and/or all hazardous waste generators regulated by Ecology. These regulations implement RCW 70.95C, ``Waste Reduction,`` an act relating to hazardous waste reduction. The act encourages voluntary efforts to redesign industrial processes to help reduce or eliminate hazardous substances and hazardous waste byproducts, and to maximize the in-process reuse or reclamation of valuable spent material. The Hanford Site is voluntarily complying with this state regulatory-mandated program. All treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facilities are exempt from participating; the Hanford Site is classified as a TSD.

  4. HWMA/RCRA CLOSURE PLAN FOR THE MATERIALS TEST REACTOR WING (TRA-604) LABORATORY COMPONENTS VOLUNTARY CONSENT ORDER ACTION PLAN VCO-5.8 D REVISION2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KIRK WINTERHOLLER

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the laboratory components of the Test Reactor Area Catch Tank System (TRA-630) that are located in the Materials Test Reactor Wing (TRA-604) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan VCO-5.8.d. The TRA-604 laboratory components addressed in this closure plan were deferred from the TRA-630 Catch Tank System closure plan due to ongoing laboratory operations in the areas requiring closure actions. The TRA-604 laboratory components include the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping, undersink drains, subheaders, and the east TRA-604 laboratory drain header. Potentially contaminated surfaces located beneath the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping and beneath the island sinks located in Laboratories 126 and 128 (located in TRA-661) are also addressed in this closure plan. The TRA-604 laboratory components will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, Subparts G and J. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and the methods for achieving those standards.

  5. GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY FABRICATED PROPERTY REPORT Revised 07-2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY FABRICATED PROPERTY REPORT Revised 07-2014 TO: Property Control: ____________________________________________ Phone: _______________ COST OF PROPERTY Materials or Component Parts $ _______________ External Labor Costs $ _______________ Transportation $ _______________ Other Costs (explain on back

  6. STUDENT / VISITOR ACCIDENT REPORT FORM nco/revised 10/06/03

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azevedo, Ricardo

    STUDENT / VISITOR ACCIDENT REPORT FORM nco/revised 10/06/03 (To Be Completed By Individual Involved In Accident) 1. Name: ________________________________________ Student ID or DL No.: _______________________ 2 No - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6. Date of Accident: ___________________ Day of Week: _______________________ Time: ____________ 7

  7. Finance Data Warehouse Reports Training Revision Date 10.11.10 1 of 30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crews, Stephen

    Finance Data Warehouse Reports Training Revision Date 10.11.10 1 of 30 Finance Data Warehouse Reports Manual Purpose: This manual is used in conjunction with the Finance Data Warehouse Financial Reports classroom training. This manual and training will cover using the Reports function of Finance Data

  8. Revised Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the East Branch Dam, Clarion River,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    was assigned a Dam Safety Action Classification (DSAC) rating of II, generally indicating that failure couldRevised Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the East Branch Dam, Clarion River, Elk County, Pennsylvania: Dam Safety Modification Report Prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute Prepared

  9. Voluntary Protection Program Announcement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary O'Leary formally announced a new initiative, "The Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOEVPP)," which is designed to recognize contractor sites that are providing excellent safety and health protection to their employees.

  10. Voluntary Protection Program- Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) promotes safety and health excellence through cooperative efforts among labor, management, and government at the Department of Energy (DOE) contractor sites. DOE has also formed partnerships with other Federal agencies and the private sector for both advancing and sharing its Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) experiences and preparing for program challenges in the next century. The safety and health of contractor and federal employees are a high priority for the Department.

  11. Market Brief: Status of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Market (2011 Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Armstrong, P.; Bird, L.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the status and trends of U.S. 'voluntary' markets -- those in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. Voluntary REC markets continue to exhibit growth and spur renewable energy development. Voluntary green power markets provide an additional revenue stream for renewable energy projects and raise consumer awareness of the benefits of renewable energy. Although a full estimate of the size of the voluntary market is not available for 2011, this review uses indicative metrics to capture 2011 voluntary market trends.

  12. Hop-by-hop Computing for Green Internet Routing (Technical report, under revision)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Dan

    Hop-by-hop Computing for Green Internet Routing (Technical report, under revision) Yuan Yang@cernet.edu.cn Abstract--Energy conservation is a global concern nowadays and it is widely expected that energy cost will continuously increase in the near future. The design of the Internet, un- fortunately, has not taken energy

  13. 2009 Revisions EIA-914

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Revisions Quantifying the Change to the New Methodology EIA-914 Monthly Gas Production Report April 2010 This month the 2009 gas production estimates are revised. The previously...

  14. Safety analysis report for the Waste Storage Facility. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bengston, S.J.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This safety analysis report outlines the safety concerns associated with the Waste Storage Facility located in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The three main objectives of the report are: define and document a safety basis for the Waste Storage Facility activities; demonstrate how the activities will be carried out to adequately protect the workers, public, and environment; and provide a basis for review and acceptance of the identified risk that the managers, operators, and owners will assume.

  15. Fuel Storage Facility Final Safety Analysis Report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linderoth, C.E.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) is an integral part of the Fast Flux Test Facility. Its purpose is to provide long-term storage (20-year design life) for spent fuel core elements used to provide the fast flux environment in FFTF, and for test fuel pins, components and subassemblies that have been irradiated in the fast flux environment. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) and its supporting documentation provides a complete description and safety evaluation of the site, the plant design, operations, and potential accidents.

  16. Revised CTUIR Renewable Energy Feasibility Study Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Cox; Thomas Bailor; Theodore Repasky; Lisa Breckenridge

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This preliminary assessment of renewable energy resources on the Umatilla Indian Reservation (UIR) has been performed by CTUIR Department of Science and Engineering (DOSE). This analysis focused primarily identifying renewable resources that may be applied on or near the Umatilla Indian Reservation. In addition preliminary technical and economic feasibility of developing renewable energy resources have been prepared and initial land use planning issues identified. Renewable energies examined in the course of the investigation included solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, wind, bioethanol, bio-diesel and bio-pellet fuel. All renewable energy options studied were found to have some potential for the CTUIR. These renewable energy options are environmentally friendly, sustainable, and compliment many of the policy goals of the CTUIR. This report seeks to provide an overall review of renewable energy technologies and applications. It tries to identify existing projects near to the CTUIR and the efforts of the federal government, state government and the private sector in the renewable energy arena. It seeks to provide an understanding of the CTUIR as an energy entity. This report intends to provide general information to assist tribal leadership in making decisions related to energy, specifically renewable energy deve lopment.

  17. HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM ELECTROLYSIS - REVISED FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IBRAHIM, SAMIR; STICHTER, MICHAEL

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE GO13028-0001 DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT This report is a summary of the work performed by Teledyne Energy Systems to understand high pressure electrolysis mechanisms, investigate and address safety concerns related to high pressure electrolysis, develop methods to test components and systems of a high pressure electrolyzer, and produce design specifications for a low cost high pressure electrolysis system using lessons learned throughout the project. Included in this report are data on separator materials, electrode materials, structural cell design, and dissolved gas tests. Also included are the results of trade studies for active area, component design analysis, high pressure hydrogen/oxygen reactions, and control systems design. Several key pieces of a high pressure electrolysis system were investigated in this project and the results will be useful in further attempts at high pressure and/or low cost hydrogen generator projects. An important portion of the testing and research performed in this study are the safety issues that are present in a high pressure electrolyzer system and that they can not easily be simplified to a level where units can be manufactured at the cost goals specified, or operated by other than trained personnel in a well safeguarded environment. The two key objectives of the program were to develop a system to supply hydrogen at a rate of at least 10,000 scf/day at a pressure of 5000psi, and to meet cost goals of $600/ kW in production quantities of 10,000/year. On these two points TESI was not successful. The project was halted due to concerns over safety of high pressure gas electrolysis and the associated costs of a system which reduced the safety concerns.

  18. Implementation of Revision 19 of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Amico, E.; O'Leary, J.; Bell, S.; Djordjevic, S.; Givens, C,; Shokes, T.; Thompson, S.; Stahl, S.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on July 27, 2001 approved Revision 19 of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and the associated TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC). Key initiatives in Revision 19 included matrix depletion, unlimited mixing of shipping categories, a flammability assessment methodology, and an alternative methodology for the determination of flammable gas generation rates. All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites shipping transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were required to implement Revision 19 methodology into their characterization and waste transportation programs by May 20, 2002. An implementation process was demonstrated by the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Golden, Colorado. The three-part process used by RFETS included revision of the site-specific TRAMPAC, an evaluation of the contact-handled TRU waste inventory against the regulations in Revision 19, and design and development of software to facilitate future inventory analyses.

  19. Solid waste integrated forecast technical (SWIFT) report: FY1997 to FY 2070, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valero, O.J.; Templeton, K.J.; Morgan, J.

    1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This web site provides an up-to-date report on the radioactive solid waste expected to be managed by Hanford's Waste Management (WM) Project from onsite and offsite generators. It includes: an overview of Hanford-wide solid waste to be managed by the WM Project; program-level and waste class-specific estimates; background information on waste sources; and comparisons with previous forecasts and with other national data sources. This web site does not include: liquid waste (current or future generation); waste to be managed by the Environmental Restoration (EM-40) contractor (i.e., waste that will be disposed of at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF)); or waste that has been received by the WM Project to date (i.e., inventory waste). The focus of this web site is on low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (both non-mixed and mixed) (TRU(M)). Some details on low-level waste and hazardous waste are also provided. Currently, this web site is reporting data th at was requested on 10/14/96 and submitted on 10/25/96. The data represent a life cycle forecast covering all reported activities from FY97 through the end of each program's life cycle. Therefore, these data represent revisions from the previous FY97.0 Data Version, due primarily to revised estimates from PNNL. There is some useful information about the structure of this report in the SWIFT Report Web Site Overview.

  20. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program NVLAP Assessor Training NIST Handbook 150 ISO/IEC ­ September 24, 2013 2 ISO/IEC 17025:2005 #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program General or electronic documentation of facts or events Sources: ISO /IEC Directives, Part 2, 2004 ISO/IEC 17000

  1. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    procedure lists all the items Handbook 150 requires be covered in a management review. The records do and Management Reviews #12;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Pre-assessment... · A laboratory;National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program Pre-assessment... · A laboratory's management review

  2. Voluntary Initiative on Incentives: Toolkit Training Webinar...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Voluntary Initiative on Incentives: Toolkit Training Webinar Voluntary Initiative on Incentives: Toolkit Training Webinar March 26, 2015 12:30PM to 2:0...

  3. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Facility Engineering...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Facility Engineering Services KCP, LLC - September 2012 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Facility Engineering Services KCP,...

  4. 2010 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 19)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 2010 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 19) provides water use information (monthly annual average and total annual volume) for production and potable water wells at the Idaho National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2010. It also provides detailed information for new, modified, and abandoned (decommissioned) wells and holes. Five new wells were drilled and completed in the latter part of Calendar Years 2009 and 2010. Two wells were modified in Calendar Year 2010 and 66 wells and boreholes reported as abandoned (decommissioned). Detailed construction information for the new and modified wells, along with abandonment information for older wells, is provided. Location maps are provided if survey information was available. This report is being submitted in accordance with the Water Rights Agreement between the State of Idaho and the United States, for the United States Department of Energy (dated 1990) and the subsequent Partial Decree for Water Right 34-10901 issued June 20, 2003.

  5. 2011 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 20)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renee Bowser

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 2011 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 20) provides water use information (monthly annual average and total annual volume) for production and potable water wells at the Idaho National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2011. It also provides detailed information for new, modified, and abandoned (decommissioned) wells and holes. One new well was drilled and completed and one well was modified in Calendar Year 2011. A total of 14 wells and boreholes were reported as decommissioned. Detailed construction information for the new and modified wells is provided. Details are provided for the wells and boreholes that have been decommissioned, and if available, construction diagrams. Location maps are included, provided survey information was available. This report is being submitted in accordance with the Water Rights Agreement between the State of Idaho and the United States, for the United States Department of Energy (dated 1990) and the subsequent Partial Decree for Water Right 34-10901 issued June 20, 2003.

  6. Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 2: Part 4, Transportation sector; Part 5, Forestry sector; Part 6, Agricultural sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume, the second of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program, discuss in general how to analyze emissions and emission reduction/carbon sequestration projects, and address programmatic issues such as minimum reporting requirements, time parameters, international projects, confidentiality, and certification. Together, the General Guidelines and the guidance in these supporting documents will provide concepts and approaches needed to prepare the reporting forms. This second volume of sector-specific guidance covers the transportation sector, the forestry sector, and the agricultural sector.

  7. 2013 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 22)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 2013 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 22) provides water use information for production and potable water wells at the Idaho National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2013. It also provides detailed information for new, modified, and decommissioned wells and holes. Two new wells were drilled and completed in Calendar Year 2013. No modifications were performed on any wells. Seven wells were decommissioned in Calendar Year 2013. Detailed construction information for the new and decommissioned wells is provided. Location maps are included, provided survey information was available. This report is being submitted in accordance with the Water Rights Agreement between the State of Idaho and the United States, for the United States Department of Energy (dated 1990) and the subsequent Partial Decree for Water Right 34-10901 issued June 20, 2003.

  8. Voluntary Green Power Market Forecast through 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Holt, E.; Sumner, J.; Kreycik, C.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various factors influence the development of the voluntary 'green' power market--the market in which consumers purchase or produce power from non-polluting, renewable energy sources. These factors include climate policies, renewable portfolio standards (RPS), renewable energy prices, consumers' interest in purchasing green power, and utilities' interest in promoting existing programs and in offering new green options. This report presents estimates of voluntary market demand for green power through 2015 that were made using historical data and three scenarios: low-growth, high-growth, and negative-policy impacts. The resulting forecast projects the total voluntary demand for renewable energy in 2015 to range from 63 million MWh annually in the low case scenario to 157 million MWh annually in the high case scenario, representing an approximately 2.5-fold difference. The negative-policy impacts scenario reflects a market size of 24 million MWh. Several key uncertainties affect the results of this forecast, including uncertainties related to growth assumptions, the impacts that policy may have on the market, the price and competitiveness of renewable generation, and the level of interest that utilities have in offering and promoting green power products.

  9. Policy Flash 2015-01 - Revision to the Federal Assistance Reporting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    has been revised. The subject form has been posted on the DOE Financial Assistance web page on the Recipients Page under the Financial Assistance Forms and Information for...

  10. Canada's Voluntary Industrial Energy Conservation Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, C. A., Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial Energy Conservation in Canada is organized and promoted through a voluntary program that is administered by industry. Industry is divided into fifteen sectors, each of which is represented by a Voluntary Task Force. Information exchange...

  11. Conservation Behavior: From Voluntary Restraint to a Voluntary Price Premium*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    predictions of the model in an empirical study of household electricity consumption with introduction of a price-premium, green-electricity program. We ...nd evidence of voluntary restraint and its relation test its predictions in an empirical study of household demand for electricity in Traverse City

  12. Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 1: Part 1, Electricity supply sector; Part 2, Residential and commercial buildings sector; Part 3, Industrial sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE encourages you to report your achievements in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and sequestering carbon under this program. Global climate change is increasingly being recognized as a threat that individuals and organizations can take action against. If you are among those taking action, reporting your projects may lead to recognition for you, motivation for others, and synergistic learning for the global community. This report discusses the reporting process for the voluntary detailed guidance in the sectoral supporting documents for electricity supply, residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, forestry, and agriculture. You may have reportable projects in several sectors; you may report them separately or capture and report the total effects on an entity-wide report.

  13. Voluntary Initiative: Partnering to Enhance Program Capacity...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Enhance Program Capacity Better Buildings Residential Network Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call Series: Voluntary Initiative: Partnering to Enhance Program...

  14. Technical Review Report for the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging Model 9977 S-SARP-G-00001 Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiSabatino, A; Hafner, R; West, M

    2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Review Report (TRR) summarizes the review findings for the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) for the Model 9977 B(M)F-96 shipping container. The content analyzed for this submittal is Content Envelope C.1, Heat Sources, in assemblies of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators or food-pack cans. The SARP under review, i.e., S-SARP-G-00001, Revision 2 (August 2007), was originally referred to as the General Purpose Fissile Material Package. The review presented in this TRR was performed using the methods outlined in Revision 3 of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Packaging Review Guide (PRG) for Reviewing Safety Analysis Reports for Packages. The format of the SARP follows that specified in Revision 2 of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's, Regulatory Guide 7.9, i.e., Standard Format and Content of Part 71 Applications for Approval of Packages for Radioactive Material. Although the two documents are similar in their content, they are not identical. Formatting differences have been noted in this TRR, where appropriate. The Model 9977 Package is a 35-gallon drum package design that has evolved from a family of packages designed by DOE contractors at the Savannah River Site. The Model 9977 Package design includes a single, 6-inch diameter, stainless steel pressure vessel containment system (i.e., the 6CV) that was designed and fabricated in accordance with Section III, Subsection NB, of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code. The earlier package designs, i.e., the Model 9965, 9966, 9967 and 9968 Packages, were originally designed and certified in the 1980s. In the 1990s, updated package designs that incorporated design features consistent with new safety requirements, based on International Atomic Energy Agency guidelines, were proposed. The updated package designs were the Model 9972, 9973, 9974 and 9975 Packages, respectively. The Model 9975 Package was certified by the Packaging Certification Program, under the Office of Safety Management and Operations. Differences between the Model 9975 Package and the Model 9977 Package include: (1) The lead shield present in the Model 9975 Package is absent in the Model 9977 Package; (2) The Model 9975 Package has eight allowable contents, while the Model 9977 Package has a single allowable content. (3) The 6CV of the Model 9977 Package is similar in design to the outer Containment Vessel of the Model 9975 Package that also incorporates a 5-inch Containment Vessel as the inner Containment Vessel. (4) The Model 9975 Package uses a Celotex{reg_sign}-based impact limiter while the Model 9977 Package uses Last-A-Foam{reg_sign}, a polyurethane foam, for the impact limiter. (5) The Model 9975 Package has two Containment Vessels, while the Model 9977 Package has a single Containment Vessel.

  15. International Voluntary Renewable Energy Markets (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of international voluntary renewable energy markets, with a focus on the United States and Europe. The voluntary renewable energy market is the market in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. In 2010, the U.S. voluntary market was estimated at 35 terawatt-hours (TWh) compared to 300 TWh in the European market, though key differences exist. On a customer basis, Australia has historically had the largest number of customers, pricing for voluntary certificates remains low, at less than $1 megawatt-hour, though prices depend on technology.

  16. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization Report, Revision 17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many environmental documents being prepared by DOE contractors concerning the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). No statements about significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year’s report is the seventeenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the eighteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology; air quality; geology; hydrology; ecology; cultural, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; noise; and occupational health and safety. Sources for extensive tabular data related to these topics are provided in the chapter. Most subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information, where available, of the 100, 200, 300, and other areas. This division allows the reader to go directly to those sections of particular interest. When specific information on each of these separate areas is not complete or available, the general Hanford Site description should be used. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities. Information in Chapter 6 of this document can be adapted and supplemented with specific information for a chapter covering statutory and regulatory requirements in an environmental assessment or environmental impact statement. When preparing environmental assessments and EISs, authors should also be cognizant of the document titled Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements published by the DOE Office of NEPA Oversight (DOE 2004). Additional guidance on preparing DOE NEPA documents can be found at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/nepa/guidance.html. Any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities may also use the information contained in this document to evaluate projected activities and their impacts. For this 2005 revision, the following sections of the document were reviewed by the authors and updated with the best available information through May 2005: Climate and Meteorology Air Quality Geology – Seismicity section only Hydrology – Flow charts for the Columbia and Yakima rivers only Ecology – Threatened and Endangered Species subsection only Socioeconomics Occupational Safety All of Chapter 6.

  17. Use of Energy Management and Control Systems for Performance Monitoring of Retrofit Projects: Final Summary Report for USDOE Office of Conservation and Energy, Final Revision, March 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Sparks, R. J.; Bryant, J.; Poyner, B.; Belur, R.; Bryant, J.; Akbari, H.; Heinemeier, K. E.; Lippman, R.; McBride, J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Appropriate Technology, Butte, Montana September 1991, First Revision March 1992, Final Revision March 1993 USDOE EMCS Report p. i 1.0 Executive Summary Traditionally, Energy Management and Control Systems (EMCSs) have been used to control HVAC, lighting, fire... of utilizing existing systems for energy monitoring at LoanSTAR sites. Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University March 1993 USDOE EMCS Report p. ii This EMCS Performance Monitoring project consists of three major tasks: (1) review the monitoring...

  18. Office of Inspector General inspection report on ``Inspection of an allegation regarding the voluntary separation program at the Savannah River Operations Office``

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 1996, the Savannah River Operations Office received approval from DOE Headquarters to offer Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) and Bechtel Savannah River, Inc. (BSRI) employees early termination incentives to facilitate downsizing of the contractor workforce thereby minimizing involuntary separations. In 1996, 217 individuals at the Savannah River Site (SRS) accepted a Voluntary Separation Program (VSP) incentive. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) received an allegation that a former senior manager of the WSRC was provided an opportunity to terminate employment through a VSP. The complainant wrote that after separating from WSRC, and receiving a large bonus for doing so, the former senior manager returned to work at the Savannah River Site (SRS) without observing a required waiting period of one year. The inspection determined that the former senior manager terminated employment with WSRC under the VSP program. It was found that the former senior manager`s departure from WSRC was delayed for six months, until December 31, 1996, in order for a replacement to be relocated from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to SRS and be familiarized with the position. The underlying principle of the VSP was to allow WSRC and BSRI employees to voluntarily leave the SRS workforce, and, if necessary, only be replaced by current SRS employees. The Office of Inspector General concluded that WSRC allowed the former senior manager to participate in the VSP, and then replaced the senior manager with an individual from Westinghouse`s headquarters in Pittsburgh. Consequently, WSRC did not meet the test of prudent business judgment required by its contract with DOE. It was recommended that both the former senior manager`s VSP bonus payment of $99,762, as well as $36,892 in travel and relocation costs expended to move the replacement from Pittsburgh to SRS, be recovered from WSRC. They also recommended that the Manager, Savannah River Operations Office, determine whether any other senior WSRC or BSRI personnel who participated in the VSP were replaced by non-SRS personnel, and, if so, recover from the appropriate contractor the associated costs.

  19. Status and Trends in the U.S. Voluntary Green Power Market (2013 Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Belyeu, K.; Kuskova-Burns, K.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voluntary green power markets are those in which consumers and institutions voluntarily purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs. This report surveys utilities, competitive suppliers, renewable energy certificate (REC) marketers, and, for the first time, the community choice aggregation market. This report finds that the voluntary market totaled 62 million megawatt-hours in 2013. Approximately 5.4 million customers are purchasing green power. This report presents data and analysis on voluntary market sales and customer participation, products and premiums, green pricing marketing, and administrative expenses. The report also details trends in REC tracking systems, REC pricing in voluntary and compliance markets, community and crowd-funded solar, and interest in renewable energy by the information and communication technologies sector.

  20. Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Markets (2010 Data) Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Technical Report NRELTP-6A20-52925 October 2011 NREL...

  1. Revised Spring 2008 NIH Public Access Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revised Spring 2008 NIH Public Access Policy Notice Number: NOT-OD-08-033 - (See Notice NOT-OD-08-161 (Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008), the NIH voluntary Public Access Policy (NOT-OD-05-022) is now mandatory shall implement the public access policy in a manner consistent with copyright law. Specifics 1. The NIH

  2. Report on NOx Emissions Reduction from Voluntary Energy Efficiency Projects within the Alamo Area Council of Governments to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, August 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Verdict, M.; Yazdani, B.; Zhu, Y.; Im, P.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to thank Dr. Dean Schnider and Susan Strover of the Brooks Energy and Sustainability Laboratory for their data collection efforts, and to Ms. Sherrie Hughes for meticulously editing the final report. ii Table of Contents Section Page 1. Background...

  3. Microsoft Word - SAR 536 Revised

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SITE INSPECTION REPORT AND SWMU ASSESSMENT REPORT UNIT NUMBER: 536 UNIT NAME: Concrete Truck Washout Area DATE: 060302 Revised 071502 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION:...

  4. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, National Security...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Onsite Review, Los Alamos Operations - November 2011 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute - November 2012...

  5. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Volpentest HAMMER...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Volpentest HAMMER Training Center January 2011 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Volpentest HAMMER Training Center January 2011 January 2011 Evaluation to determine...

  6. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Infrastructure Support...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2013 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Infrastructure Support Contract Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - May 2013 May 2013 Evaluation to determine whether Infrastructure...

  7. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Infrastructure Support...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2012 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Infrastructure Support Contract Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - March 2012 March 2012 Evaluation to determine whether the...

  8. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Bechtel National...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Bechtel National Inc., Waste Treatment Plant Construction Site - November 2013 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Bechtel National Inc., Waste Treatment Plant Construction...

  9. RELAP5/MOD3 code manual: Summaries and reviews of independent code assessment reports. Volume 7, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, R.L.; Sloan, S.M.; Schultz, R.R.; Wilson, G.E. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summaries of RELAP5/MOD3 code assessments, a listing of the assessment matrix, and a chronology of the various versions of the code are given. Results from these code assessments have been used to formulate a compilation of some of the strengths and weaknesses of the code. These results are documented in the report. Volume 7 was designed to be updated periodically and to include the results of the latest code assessments as they become available. Consequently, users of Volume 7 should ensure that they have the latest revision available.

  10. Voluntary Examinations | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 -Visualizing Brain MetalsVoluntary Examinations

  11. Revision Policy for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage...

    Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

    April 26, 2005 This report consists of the following sections: General EIA Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Revisions Policy - a description of how revisions to the Weekly Natural...

  12. Changing Dynamics in the Voluntary Market (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voluntary green power markets are those in which consumers and institutions voluntarily purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs. This presentation, presented at the Renewable Energy Markets Conference in December 2014, outlines the voluntary market in 2013, including community choice aggregation and community solar.

  13. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Hanford Mission Support...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Security - October 2011 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Volpentest HAMMER Training Center January 2011 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL...

  14. Neurobiological and Physiological Underpinnings of High Voluntary Wheel Running

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolb, Erik Mason

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for high voluntary wheel running. Physiol. Behav. 83, 515-for high voluntary wheel-running: effect on skeletal musclefor high endurance running increases hindlimb symmetry.

  15. Changing Dynamics in the Voluntary Market (Presentation) | OSTI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Changing Dynamics in the Voluntary Market (Presentation) Re-direct Destination: Voluntary green power markets are those in which consumers and institutions voluntarily purchase...

  16. Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Markets (2010 Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the status and trends of 'compliance'--renewable energy certificate (REC) markets used to meet state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements--and 'voluntary' markets--those in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. Today, 29 states and the District of Columbia have an RPS, more than half of all U.S. electricity customers have an option to purchase some type of green power product directly from a retail electricity provider, and all consumers have the option to purchase RECs. This report documents REC activities and trends in the United States. The compliance REC market analysis includes analysis of REC trading, regional REC markets, REC tracking systems, types of compliance RECs, compliance REC pricing trends, and an overview of compliance with RPS polices. The voluntary REC analysis presents data and analysis on voluntary market sales and customer participation, products and premiums, green pricing marketing and administrative expenses, voluntary REC pricing, and the voluntary carbon offsets market. The report concludes with a discussion of upcoming guidance from the Federal Trade Commission on green marketing claims, the emergence of community solar programs, and the potential impact of Dodd-Frank regulations on the REC market.

  17. Underground Test Area Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Quality Assurance Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnham, Irene; Marutzky, Sam

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is mandated by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and identifies the UGTA quality assurance (QA) activities for fiscal year (FY) 2012. All UGTA organizations—U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); Desert Research Institute (DRI); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I); National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec); and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)—conducted QA activities in FY 2012. The activities included conducting assessments, identifying findings and completing corrective actions, evaluating laboratory performance, revising the QAPP, and publishing documents. In addition, processes and procedures were developed to address deficiencies identified in the FY 2011 QAPP gap analysis.

  18. Climate VISION: 1605 (B) Reporting Guidelines

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Voluntary GHG Reporting Guidelines Established by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program (also known as the 1605(b)...

  19. PHMC Year 2000: Status reporting for mission essential Year 2000 projects. Revision 0, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layfield, K.A.

    1998-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHMC Year 2000 status reporting process is designed to encompass the reporting requirements of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), DOE HQ, RL and the PHMC for mission essential Year 2000 projects. Status reporting is required for all Year 2000 projects. The Year 2000 project list will be maintained current as Year 2000 projects are modified, added or deleted. Reporting is required until a Year 2000 project has completed compliance assurance. Some projects will be identified as DOE HQ reportable. These are projects determined to be the most critical and due the attention of DOE HQ.

  20. Technical Review Report for the Model 9975-96 Package Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (S-SARP-G-00003, Revision 0, January 2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, M

    2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Review Report (TRR) documents the review, performed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Staff, at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), on the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging, Model 9975, Revision 0, dated January 2008 (S-SARP-G-00003, the SARP). The review includes an evaluation of the SARP, with respect to the requirements specified in 10 CFR 71, and in International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safety Standards Series No. TS-R-1. The Model 9975-96 Package is a 35-gallon drum package design that has evolved from a family of packages designed by DOE contractors at the Savannah River Site. Earlier package designs, i.e., the Model 9965, the Model 9966, the Model 9967, and the Model 9968 Packagings, were originally designed and certified in the early 1980s. In the 1990s, updated package designs that incorporated design features consistent with the then newer safety requirements were proposed. The updated package designs at the time were the Model 9972, the Model 9973, the Model 9974, and the Model 9975 Packagings, respectively. The Model 9975 Package was certified by the Packaging Certification Program, under the Office of Safety Management and Operations. The safety analysis of the Model 9975-85 Packaging is documented in the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging, Model 9975, B(M)F-85, Revision 0, dated December 2003. The Model 9975-85 Package is certified by DOE Certificate of Compliance (CoC) package identification number, USA/9975/B(M)F-85, for the transportation of Type B quantities of uranium metal/oxide, {sup 238}Pu heat sources, plutonium/uranium metals, plutonium/uranium oxides, plutonium composites, plutonium/tantalum composites, {sup 238}Pu oxide/beryllium metal.

  1. Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program, Technical Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation

    2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hood River Production Program (HRPP) is a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded program initiated as a mitigation measure for Columbia River hydrosystem effects on anadromous fish. The HRPP began in the early 1990s with the release of spring Chinook and winter steelhead smolts into the basin. Prior to implementation, co-managers, including the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife drafted the Hood River Production Master Plan (O'Toole and ODFW 1991a; O'Toole and ODFW 1991b) and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan (Smith and CTWSR 1991). Both documents were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Council in 1992 and authorized through a BPA-led Environmental Impact Statement in 1996. In 2003, a 10-year programmatic review was conducted for BPA-funded programs in the Hood River (Underwood et al. 2003). The primary objective of the HRPP Review (Review) was to determine if program goals were being met, and if modifications to program activities would be necessary in order to meet or revise program goals. In 2003, an agreement was signed between PacifiCorp and resource managers to remove the Powerdale Dam (RM 10) and associated adult trapping facility by 2010. The HRPP program has been dependant on the adult trap to collect broodstock for the hatchery programs; therefore, upon the dam's removal, some sort of replacement for the trap would be needed to continue the HRPP. At the same time the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) was being written and prompted the co-managers to considered future direction of the program. This included revising the numerical adult fish objectives based on the assimilated data and output from several models run on the Hood River system. In response to the Review as well as the Subbasin Plan, and intensive monitoring and evaluation of the current program, the HRPP co-managers determined the spring Chinook program was not achieving the HRPP's defined smolt-to-adult (SAR) survival rate guidelines. The observed low SAR was due to precocity, straying, and incidence of BKD in the spring Chinook program; which ultimately led to the program's inability to achieve the subbasin's overly optimistic biological fish objectives. The summer steelhead hatchery program was not providing the fishery or population benefits anticipated and will be discontinued. The winter steelhead program was performing as planned and no changes are foreseen. This updated Master Plan addresses the several proposed changes to the existing HRPP, which are described.

  2. Guidance for implementing the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program. Final report, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has issued a general license for the custody and long-term care of US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project permanent disposal sites. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA disposal sites will be cared for in such a manner as to protect the public health and safety and the environment upon completion of remedial actions. The general license will be in effect for a disposal site when NRC accepts the disposal site long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) that meets the requirements of 10 CFR 40.27. The site LTSP describes in detail the long-term surveillance program, including any monitoring, maintenance, and emergency measures necessary to fulfill the conditions of the general license. This guidance document provides (1) instructions for preparing the disposal site LTSPs and (2) instructions for carrying out the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program, including any monitoring that may be required. The information provided in this document also is in accordance with the regulatory requirements set forth in 40 CFR 192. On January 5, 1985, the US Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals remanded the groundwater standards, 40 CFR 192.02. Proposed groundwater standards were issued for comment on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 3600). When the groundwater standards become final, this document will be revised, as appropriate. This document also will be updated in response to any changes to 10 CFR 40, or in response to changes in the manner in which the long-term care of the licensed disposal sites is carried out.

  3. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2007 (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on key trends in the U.S. wind power market, with an emphasis on the latest year, and presents a wealth of data, some of which has not historically been mined by wind power analysts.

  4. 2003 Savannah River Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Savannah River Site. DOE is commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The report monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  5. Savannah River Site offsite hazardous waste shipment data validation report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, C.; Kudera, D.E.; Page, L.A.; Rohe, M.J.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this data validation is to verify that waste shipments reported in response to the US Department of Energy Headquarters data request are properly categorized according to DOE-HQ definitions. This report documents all findings and actions resulting from the independent review of the Savannah River Site data submittal, and provides a summary of the SRS data submittal and data validation strategy. The overall hazardous waste management and offsite release process from 1987--1991 is documented, along with an identification and description of the hazardous waste generation facilities. SRS did not ship any hazardous waste offsite before 1987. Sampling and analysis and surface surveying procedures and techniques used in determining offsite releasability of the shipments are also described in this report. SRS reported 150 manifested waste shipments from 1984 to 1991 that included 4,755 drums or lab packs and 13 tankers. Of these waste items, this report categorizes 4,251 as clean (including 12 tankers), 326 as likely clean, 138 as likely radioactive, and 55 as radioactive (including one tanker). Although outside the original scope of this report, 14 manifests from 1992 and 1993 are included, covering 393 drums or lab packs and seven tankers. From the 1992--1993 shipments, 58 drums or lab packs are categorized as radioactive and 16 drums are categorized as likely radioactive. The remainder are categorized as clean.

  6. Status report on resolution of Waste Tank Safety Issues at the Hanford Site. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dukelow, G.T.; Hanson, G.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., Kennewick, WA (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide and update the status of activities supporting the resolution of waste tank safety issues and system deficiencies at the Hanford Site. This report provides: (1) background information on safety issues and system deficiencies; (2) a description of the Tank Waste Remediation System and the process for managing safety issues and system deficiencies; (3) changes in safety issue description, prioritization, and schedules; and (4) a summary of the status, plans, order of magnitude, cost, and schedule for resolving safety issues and system deficiencies.

  7. Voluntary Self-Identification of Veterans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 -Visualizing Brain MetalsVoluntaryVoluntary

  8. Still Looking to the Future: Voluntary K-12 School Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legal Defense and Educational Fund, NAACP; Civil Rights Project, The

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supreme Court and School Integration: 1954- 1978. New York:Voluntary K-12 School Integration CHAPTER 3 the importanceVoluntary K-12 School Integration may be worthwhile for you

  9. National Voluntary Environmental Assessment Information System (NVEAIS) Notice of Participation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voluntary Environmental Assessment Information System (NVEAIS) Notice of Participation This document identifies the agency/program and personnel participating in the National Voluntary Environmental Assessment all foodborne illness outbreak environmental assessment data into the NVEAIS. Information collected

  10. 2003 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Pantex Plant. DOE is commited to assuring the health and safety of its workers. This includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  11. 2003 Kansas City Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Kansas City Plant. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  12. 2003 Fernald Environmental Management Project Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Fernald Environmental Management Project. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  13. 2003 Los Alamos National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Los Alamos National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  14. 2003 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Brookhaven National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  15. Preliminary waste form characteristics report Version 1.0. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stout, R.B.; Leider, H.R. [eds.

    1991-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on radioactive waste form characteristics that will be used to design a waste package and an engineered barrier system (EBS) for a suitable repository as part of the Yucca Mountain Project. The term waste form refers to irradiated reactor fuel, other high-level waste (HLW) in various physical forms, and other radioactive materials (other than HLW) which are received for emplacement in a geologic repository. Any encapsulating of stabilizing matrix is also referred to as a waste form.

  16. 2004 Hanford Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised October 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2004 for the Hanford site. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  17. 2003 Hanford Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised October 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for the Hanford site. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers. The prpogram is part of DOE's commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers and includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers.

  18. Weldon spring site environmental report for calendar year 1996. Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1996 describes the environmental monitoring programs at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). The objectives of these programs are to assess actual or potential exposure to contaminant effluents from the project area by providing public use scenarios and dose estimates, to demonstrate compliance with Federal and State permitted levels and regulations, and to summarize trends and/or changes in contaminant concentrations identified through environmental monitoring.

  19. Epidemiologic surveillance. [1994] amended annual report for Brookhaven National Laboratory. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Epidemiologic surveillance at DOE facilities consists of regular and systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on absences due to illness and injury in the work force. Its purpose is to provide an early warning system for health problems occurring among employees at participating sites. Data are collected by coordinators at each site and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and analyses are carried out. Rates of absences and rates of diagnoses associated with absences are analyzed by occupation and other relevant variables. They may be compared with the disease experience of different groups within the DOE work force and with populations that do not work for DOE to identify disease patterns or clusters that may be associated with work activities. This amended annual report corrects errors in the initial release of the BNL report for 1994. In this annual report, the 1994 morbidity data for BNL are summarized.

  20. Addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 372: Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews and Christy Sloop

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 372: Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision 0), April 2011.

  1. Pollution from motor vehicles and aircraft at Stapleton International Airport (abbreviated report). Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Segal, H.M.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The air-quality impact of the proposed runway-expansion program at Stapleton International Airport is determined in this report. The method of analysis is to model the dispersion of pollutants from motor vehicles and aircraft under both 1-hour and 8-hour worst-case conditions. Results show that aircraft pollution concentrations are reduced and, in some cases, completely disappear when the new runways are added. This is caused primarily by a reduction in takeoff delays, which are major objective of the runway-expansion program at the airport.

  2. RPP-ENV-39658 Revision 0 Hanford SX-Farm Leak Assessments Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. E. Johnson; J. G. Field; Revision Rpp-env

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy developed a process to reassess selected tank leak estimates (volumes and inventories), and to update single-shell tank leak and unplanned release volumes and inventory estimates as emergent field data is obtained (RPP-32681, Process to Assess Tank Farm Leaks in Support of Retrieval and Closure Planning). This process does not represent a formal tank leak assessment in accordance with procedure TFC-ENG-CHEM-D-42, “Tank Leak Assessment Process. ” This report documents reassessment of past leaks in the 241-SX Tank Farm. Tank waste loss events were reassessed for tanks 241-SX-104, 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108,

  3. Economic Development Benefits from Wind Energy in Nebraska: A Report for the Nebraska Energy Office (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the economic development impacts estimated from building and operating 7,800 MW of new wind power in Nebraska. This level of development is on the scale envisioned in the Department of Energy (DOE) report 20% Wind Energy by 2030. A practical first step to building 7,800 of wind is completing 1,000 MW. We also include the estimated economic impacts to Nebraska from building 1,000 MW of wind power. Our primary analysis indicates that the development and construction of approximately 7,800 MW of wind energy in Nebraska by 2030 will support 20,600 to 36,500 annual full-time equivalents (AFTE). In addition, operating the full 7,800 MW of wind energy could support roughly 2,000 to 4,000 full-time workers throughout the operating life of the wind facilities (LFTE). Nebraska's economy is estimated to see an average annual boost in economic activity ranging from $140 million to $260 million solely from construction and development related activities between 2011 and 2030. An additional boost of $250 - $442 million annually is estimated from operating 7,800 MW of wind capacity.

  4. Technical Review Report for the Model 9978-96 Package Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (S-SARP-G-00002, Revision 1, March 2009)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, M

    2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Review Report (TRR) documents the review, performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Staff, at the request of the Department of Energy (DOE), on the 'Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), Model 9978 B(M)F-96', Revision 1, March 2009 (S-SARP-G-00002). The Model 9978 Package complies with 10 CFR 71, and with 'Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material-1996 Edition (As Amended, 2000)-Safety Requirements', International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safety Standards Series No. TS-R-1. The Model 9978 Packaging is designed, analyzed, fabricated, and tested in accordance with Section III of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME B&PVC). The review presented in this TRR was performed using the methods outlined in Revision 3 of the DOE's 'Packaging Review Guide (PRG) for Reviewing Safety Analysis Reports for Packages'. The format of the SARP follows that specified in Revision 2 of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 7.9, i.e., 'Standard Format and Content of Part 71 Applications for Approval of Packages for Radioactive Material'. Although the two documents are similar in their content, they are not identical. Formatting differences have been noted in this TRR, where appropriate. The Model 9978 Packaging is a single containment package, using a 5-inch containment vessel (5CV). It uses a nominal 35-gallon drum package design. In comparison, the Model 9977 Packaging uses a 6-inch containment vessel (6CV). The Model 9977 and Model 9978 Packagings were developed concurrently, and they were referred to as the General Purpose Fissile Material Package, Version 1 (GPFP). Both packagings use General Plastics FR-3716 polyurethane foam as insulation and as impact limiters. The 5CV is used as the Primary Containment Vessel (PCV) in the Model 9975-96 Packaging. The Model 9975-96 Packaging also has the 6CV as its Secondary Containment Vessel (SCV). In comparison, the Model 9975 Packagings use Celotex{trademark} for insulation and as impact limiters. To provide a historical perspective, it is noted that the Model 9975-96 Packaging is a 35-gallon drum package design that has evolved from a family of packages designed by DOE contractors at the Savannah River Site. Earlier package designs, i.e., the Model 9965, the Model 9966, the Model 9967, and the Model 9968 Packagings, were originally designed and certified in the early 1980s. In the 1990s, updated package designs that incorporated design features consistent with the then-newer safety requirements were proposed. The updated package designs at the time were the Model 9972, the Model 9973, the Model 9974, and the Model 9975 Packagings, respectively. The Model 9975 Package was certified by the Packaging Certification Program, under the Office of Safety Management and Operations. The Model 9978 Package has six Content Envelopes: C.1 ({sup 238}Pu Heat Sources), C.2 ( Pu/U Metals), C.3 (Pu/U Oxides, Reserved), C.4 (U Metal or Alloy), C.5 (U Compounds), and C.6 (Samples and Sources). Per 10 CFR 71.59 (Code of Federal Regulations), the value of N is 50 for the Model 9978 Package leading to a Criticality Safety Index (CSI) of 1.0. The Transport Index (TI), based on dose rate, is calculated to be a maximum of 4.1.

  5. Final technical evaluation report for the proposed revised reclamation plan for the Atlas Corporation Moab Mill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final Technical Evaluation Report (TER) summarizes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff`s review of Atlas Corporation`s proposed reclamation plan for its uranium mill tailings pile near Moab, Utah. The proposed reclamation would allow Atlas to (1) reclaim the tailings pile for permanent disposal and long-term custodial care by a government agency in its current location on the Moab site, (2) prepare the site for closure, and (3) relinquish responsibility of the site after having its NRC license terminated. The NRC staff concludes that, subject to license conditions identified in the TER, the proposed reclamation plan meets the requirements identified in NRC regulations, which appear primarily in 10 CFR Part 40. 112 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs.

  6. Technical status report on the prediction of amorphous phase separation in multicomponent borosilicate glasses. Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeler, D.K.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This status report describes the current status for predicting of amorphous phase separation in multicomponent borosilicate glasses and the two major development criteria (composition and thermal history). The goal of this subtask is to perform targeted research activities to define and, where applicable, extend the boundaries of existing phase stability models that restrict HLW glass waste loading. Specifically, the focus will be on delimiting boundaries for immiscible phase separation. The development of data, understanding, and quantitative description for composition and kinetic effects on the development of amorphous phase separation will continue in FY98. This effort will provide insight into the compositional effects on phase stability and will lead to a better understanding of the methods used to predict the development of amorphous phase separation in HLW glasses.

  7. Search Hanford Accessible Reports Electronically system test plan and documentation: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, E.L.

    1994-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to describe the following items: the approach, resources, and sequence of the testing activities; identifies the components and features to be tested; the personnel responsible for testing; the risks associated with this plan; and test cases and procedures. This document contains all test documentation for the SHARE system. The Search Hanford Accessible Reports Electronically (SHARE) testing process is based upon WHC-CM-3-10, Software Practices, Section SP-3.3 REV 0, and Appendix J REV 0. These procedures and guidelines are based on IEEE Standard 829-1983. The planning in this document was further influenced through guidance in IEEE Standard 1012-1986. This document contains the System, Acceptance, Integration and Component Test Plans, Designs, Procedures, and Cases for SHARE. The Test Cases and procedures have been attached to the document.

  8. Characteristics of potential repository wastes. Peer review report for revision 1 of DOE/RW-0184

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowart, C.G.; Notz, K.J.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a fully documented peer review of DOE/RW-0184, Rev. 1, ``Characteristics of Potential Repository Wastes``. The peer review was chaired and administered by oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and was conducted in accordance with OCRWM QA procedure QAAP 3.3 ``Peer Review`` for the purpose of quailing the document for use in OCRWM quality-affecting work. The peer reviewers selected represent a wide range of experience and knowledge particularly suitable for evaluating the subject matter. A total of 596 formal comments were documented by the seven peer review panels, and all were successfully resolved. The peers reached the conclusion that DOE/RW-0184, Rev. 1, is quality determined and suitable for use in quality-affecting work.

  9. Report for slot cutter proof-of-principle test, Buried Waste Containment System project. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Several million cubic feet of hazardous and radioactive waste was buried in shallow pits and trenches within many US Department of Energy (US DOE) sites. The pits and trenches were constructed similarly to municipal landfills with both stacked and random dump waste forms such as barrels and boxes. Many of the hazardous materials in these waste sites are migrating into groundwater systems through plumes and leaching. On-site containment is one of the options being considered for prevention of waste migration. This report describes the results of a proof-of-principle test conducted to demonstrate technology for containing waste. This proof-of-principle test, conducted at the RAHCO International, Inc., facility in the summer of 1997, evaluated equipment techniques for cutting a horizontal slot beneath an existing waste site. The slot would theoretically be used by complementary equipment designed to place a cement barrier under the waste. The technology evaluated consisted of a slot cutting mechanism, muck handling system, thrust system, and instrumentation. Data were gathered and analyzed to evaluate the performance parameters.

  10. COL Application Content Guide for HTGRs: Revision to RG 1.206, Part 1 - Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Moe

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined license (COL) application is required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for all proposed nuclear plants. The information requirements for a COL application are set forth in 10 CFR 52.79, “Contents of Applications; Technical Information in Final Safety Analysis Report.” An applicant for a modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) must develop and submit for NRC review and approval a COL application which conforms to these requirements. The technical information necessary to allow NRC staff to evaluate a COL application and resolve all safety issues related to a proposed nuclear plant is detailed and comprehensive. To this, Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.206, “Combined License Applications for Nuclear Power Plants” (LWR Edition), was developed to assist light water reactor (LWR) applicants in incorporating and effectively formatting required information for COL application review (Ref. 1). However, the guidance prescribed in RG 1.206 presumes a LWR design proposal consistent with the systems and functions associated with large LWR power plants currently operating under NRC license.

  11. FY 93 thermal loading systems study final report: Volume 2. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to meet the overall performance requirements for the proposed Mined Geology Disposal System at Yucca Mountain, Nevada requires the two major subsystem (natural barriers and engineered barriers) to positively contribute to containment and radionuclide isolation. In addition to the postclosure performance the proposed repository must meet preclosure requirements of safety, retrievability, and operability. Cost and schedule were also considered. The thermal loading strategy chosen may significantly affect both the postclosure and preclosure performance of the proposed repository. Although the current Site Characterization Plan reference case is 57 kilowatts (kW)/acre, other thermal loading strategies (different areal mass loadings) have been proposed which possess both advantages and disadvantages. The objectives of the FY 1993 Thermal Loading Study were to (1) place bounds on the thermal loading which would establish the loading regime that is ``too hot`` and the loading regime that is ``too cold``, to (2) ``grade`` or evaluate the performance, as a function of thermal loading, of the repository to contain high level wastes against performance criteria and to (3) evaluate the performance of the various options with respect to cost, safety, and operability. Additionally, the effort was to (4) identify important uncertainties that need to be resolved by tests and/or analyses in order to complete a performance assessment on the effects of thermal loading. The FY 1993 Thermal Loading Study was conducted from December 1, 1992 to December 30, 1993 and this final report provides the findings of the study. Volume 2 consists of 10 appendices which contain the following: Waste Stream Analysis; Waste Package Design Inputs; Subsurface Design Inputs; Thermal-Hydrologic Model Inputs; Near-Field Calculations; Far-Field; Reliability of Electronics as a Function of Temperature; Cost Analysis Details; Geochemistry; and Areas of Uncertainty in Thermal Loading.

  12. Evaluation of 2004 Toyota Prius Hybrid Electic Drive System Interim Report - Revised

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayers, C.W.; Hsu, J.S.; Marlino, L.D.; Miller, C.W.; Ott, G.W., Jr.; Oland, C.B.; Burress, T.A.

    2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2004 Toyota Prius is a hybrid automobile equipped with a gasoline engine and a battery-powered electric motor. Both of these motive power sources are capable of providing mechanical drive power for the vehicle. The engine can deliver a peak power output of 57 kilowatts (kW) at 5000 revolutions per minute (rpm) while the motor can deliver a peak power output of 50 kW at 1300 rpm. Together, this engine-motor combination has a specified peak power output of 82 kW at a vehicle speed of 85 kilometers per hour (km/h). In operation, the 2004 Prius exhibits superior fuel economy compared to conventionally powered automobiles. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the electrical and mechanical performance of the 2004 Toyota Prius and its hybrid electric drive system. As a hybrid vehicle, the 2004 Prius uses both a gasoline-powered internal combustion engine and a battery-powered electric motor as motive power sources. Innovative algorithms for combining these two power sources results in improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions compared to traditional automobiles. Initial objectives of the laboratory tests were to measure motor and generator back-electromotive force (emf) voltages and determine gearbox-related power losses over a specified range of shaft speeds and lubricating oil temperatures. Follow-on work will involve additional performance testing of the motor, generator, and inverter. Information contained in this interim report summarizes the test results obtained to date, describes preliminary conclusions and findings, and identifies additional areas for further study.

  13. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 130: Storage Tanks Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 130: Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 130 are located within Areas 1, 7, 10, 20, 22, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site. Corrective Action Unit 130 is comprised of the following CASs: • 01-02-01, Underground Storage Tank • 07-02-01, Underground Storage Tanks • 10-02-01, Underground Storage Tank • 20-02-03, Underground Storage Tank • 20-99-05, Tar Residue • 22-02-02, Buried UST Piping • 23-02-07, Underground Storage Tank This CR provides documentation supporting the completed corrective action investigations and provides data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 130 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Reviewed the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implemented any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly disposed of corrective action and investigation-derived wastes. From August 4 through September 30, 2008, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 130, Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, confirm that no residual contamination is present, and properly dispose of wastes. Constituents detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels to identify COCs for CAU 130. Assessment of the data generated from closure activities indicates that no further action is necessary because no COCs were identified at any CAU 130 CAS. Debris removal from these CASs was considered a best management practice because no contamination was detected. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective action is required at all CAU 130 CASs. • A Notice of Completion to DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 130. • Corrective Action Unit 130 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

  14. External Peer Review Team Report Underground Testing Area Subproject for Frenchman Flat, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sam Marutzky

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An external peer review was conducted to review the groundwater models used in the corrective action investigation stage of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) subproject to forecast zones of potential contamination in 1,000 years for the Frenchman Flat area. The goal of the external peer review was to provide technical evaluation of the studies and to assist in assessing the readiness of the UGTA subproject to progress to monitoring activities for further model evaluation. The external peer review team consisted of six independent technical experts with expertise in geology, hydrogeology,'''groundwater modeling, and radiochemistry. The peer review team was tasked with addressing the following questions: 1. Are the modeling approaches, assumptions, and model results for Frenchman Flat consistent with the use of modeling studies as a decision tool for resolution of environmental and regulatory requirements? 2. Do the modeling results adequately account for uncertainty in models of flow and transport in the Frenchman Flat hydrological setting? a. Are the models of sufficient scale/resolution to adequately predict contaminant transport in the Frenchman Flat setting? b. Have all key processes been included in the model? c. Are the methods used to forecast contaminant boundaries from the transport modeling studies reasonable and appropriate? d. Are the assessments of uncertainty technically sound and consistent with state-of-the-art approaches currently used in the hydrological sciences? 3. Are the datasets and modeling results adequate for a transition to Corrective Action Unit monitoring studies—the next stage in the UGTA strategy for Frenchman Flat? The peer review team is of the opinion that, with some limitations, the modeling approaches, assumptions, and model results are consistent with the use of modeling studies for resolution of environmental and regulatory requirements. The peer review team further finds that the modeling studies have accounted for uncertainty in models of flow and transport in the Frenchman Flat except for a few deficiencies described in the report. Finally, the peer review team concludes that the UGTA subproject has explored a wide range of variations in assumptions, methods, and data, and should proceed to the next stage with an emphasis on monitoring studies. The corrective action strategy, as described in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, states that the groundwater flow and transport models for each corrective action unit will consider, at a minimum, the following: • Alternative hydrostratigraphic framework models of the modeling domain. • Uncertainty in the radiological and hydrological source terms. • Alternative models of recharge. • Alternative boundary conditions and groundwater flows. • Multiple permissive sets of calibrated flow models. • Probabilistic simulations of transport using plausible sets of alternative framework and recharge models, and boundary and groundwater flows from calibrated flow models. • Ensembles of forecasts of contaminant boundaries. • Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of model outputs. The peer review team finds that these minimum requirements have been met. While the groundwater modeling and uncertainty analyses have been quite detailed, the peer review team has identified several modeling-related issues that should be addressed in the next phase of the corrective action activities: • Evaluating and using water-level gradients from the pilot wells at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site in model calibration. • Re-evaluating the use of geochemical age-dating data to constrain model calibrations. • Developing water budgets for the alluvial and upper volcanic aquifer systems in Frenchman Flat. • Considering modeling approaches in which calculated groundwater flow directions near the water table are not predetermined by model boundary conditions and areas of recharge, all of which are very uncertain. • Evaluating local-scale variations in hydraulic conductivity on the calculated contaminant boundaries. • Evaluat

  15. The Ohio State University Office of Human Resources Page 1 of 1 Policy 1.50 Preventing and Reporting Abuse in Programs with Minor Participants Revised 05/08/13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    and Reporting Abuse in Programs with Minor Participants Revised 05/08/13 Preventing and Reporting Abuse: overnight camps, child care, and 4-H. Resources Code of student conduct, studentaffairs.pdf Child Abuse, Sexual Abuse, or Neglect Incident Report, hr.osu.edu/policy/resources/150abuse

  16. Definitive design report: Design report project W-025, Radioactive Mixed Waste (RMW) Land Disposal Facility NON-DRAG-OFF. Revision 1, Volume 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roscha, V.

    1994-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to describe the definitive design of the Radioactive Mixed Waste (RMW) Non-Drag-Off disposal facility, Project W-025. This report presents a n of the major landfill design features and a discussion of how each of the criteria is addressed in the design. The appendices include laboratory test results, design drawings, and individual analyses that were conducted in support of the design. Revision 1 of this document incorporates design changes resulting from an increase in the required operating life of the W-025 landfill from 2 to 20 years. The rationale for these design changes is described in Golder Associates Inc. 1991a. These changes include (1) adding a 1.5-foot-thick layer of compacted admix directory-under the primary FML on the floor of the landfill to mitigate the effects of possible stress cracking in the primary flexible membrane liner (FML), and (2) increasing the operations layer thickness from two to three feet over the entire landfill area, to provide additional protection for the secondary admix layer against mechanical damage and the effects of freezing and desiccation. The design of the W-025 Landfill has also been modified in response to the results of the EPA Method 9090 chemical compatibility testing program (Golder Associates Inc. 1991b and 1991c), which was completed after the original design was prepared. This program consisted of testing geosynthetic materials and soil/bentonite admix with synthetic leachate having the composition expected during the life of the W-025 Landfill., The results of this program indicated that the polyester geotextile originally specified for the landfill might be susceptible to deterioration. On this basis, polypropylene geotextiles were substituted as a more chemically-resistant alternative. In addition, the percentage of bentonite in the admix was increased to provide sufficiently low permeability to the expected leachate.

  17. 2011 Revised Regulation FCOI Webinar for Grantees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    2011 Revised Regulation FCOI Webinar for Grantees Provided by the National Institutes of Health Overview of Other Changes Grantee Institution Responsibilities Noncompliance Submitting FCOI Reports

  18. REVISION POLICY

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    REVISION POLICY March 2007 Data are collected at the million cubic feet per month level and all calculations mentioned below are carried out at that precision. However, the data...

  19. Current State of the Voluntary Renewable Energy Market (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation highlights the status of the voluntary green power market in 2012. The voluntary green power market totaled more than 48 million MWh in 2012, with about 1.9 million customers participating. The supply continues to be dominated by wind, though solar is increasing its share of utility green pricing programs. Prices for voluntary renewable energy certificates (RECs) increased to above $1/MWh.

  20. SWAT Changes in Revision 481 and Revision 535: REVISION 481

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Forest REVISION 522 --DOX changes in code REVISION 525 --New code added to file.cio to print mm/dd/yyyy to daily

  1. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Y-12 National Security...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Y-12 National Security Complex - April 2012 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - April 2012 April 2012 Evaluation to determine whether Y-12...

  2. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC May 2006 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC May 2006 May...

  3. USE OF VOLUNTARY CONSENSUS STANDARDS AND INTERACTION WITH STANDARDS...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATIONS Purpose This procedure identifies the process by which DOE adopts Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCSs) and provides guidance for the interaction...

  4. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Waste Treatment Plant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Construction Project - June 2010 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Waste Treatment Plant Construction Project - June 2010 June 2010 Evaluation to determine whether Waste...

  5. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Salt Waste Processing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Project - February 2013 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Project - February 2013...

  6. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Intermech Inc., Waste...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Intermech Inc., Waste Treatment Plant Construction Site - November 2013 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Intermech Inc., Waste Treatment Plant Construction Site -...

  7. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Parsons Corp., Salt...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Parsons Corp., Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Project - May 2014 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Parsons Corp., Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction...

  8. 04/18/2005 1 of 3 Voluntary and Involuntary Termination Benefits Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Keith

    04/18/2005 1 of 3 Voluntary and Involuntary Termination Benefits Guidelines Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement #47 requires two classification types of termination benefits ­ voluntary and involuntary. Voluntary termination benefits include inducements to hasten separation from employment

  9. Original article Dynamic of voluntary intake, feeding behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    square design, a late-cut mixed grass hay, an early-cut cocksfoot hay and an early-cut lucerne hay and lucerne respectively. Voluntary DM intake was 1000, 1484 and 1608 g (P and lucerne respectively. Differences in voluntary intake among hays were mostly related to differences

  10. HEDR modeling approach: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shipler, D.B.; Napier, B.A.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a revision of the previous Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project modeling approach report. This revised report describes the methods used in performing scoping studies and estimating final radiation doses to real and representative individuals who lived in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. The scoping studies and dose estimates pertain to various environmental pathways during various periods of time. The original report discussed the concepts under consideration in 1991. The methods for estimating dose have been refined as understanding of existing data, the scope of pathways, and the magnitudes of dose estimates were evaluated through scoping studies.

  11. National Training Center (NTC) Launches a New DOE-Wide Voluntary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Training Center (NTC) Launches a New DOE-Wide Voluntary Training Reciprocity and Collaboration Initiative National Training Center (NTC) Launches a New DOE-Wide Voluntary...

  12. DOE-TSPP-3-2013, Using Voluntary Consensus Standards and Interacting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3-2013, Using Voluntary Consensus Standards and Interacting With Standards Development Organizations DOE-TSPP-3-2013, Using Voluntary Consensus Standards and Interacting With...

  13. DOE-TSPP-8-2013, Converting DOE Technical Standards to Voluntary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8-2013, Converting DOE Technical Standards to Voluntary Consensus Standards DOE-TSPP-8-2013, Converting DOE Technical Standards to Voluntary Consensus Standards Technical Standards...

  14. Senate Committee Report on 2004 Appropriations for Energy and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Senate Committee Report on 2004 Appropriations for Energy and Water Strongly Endorses the Department's Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Senate Committee Report on 2004...

  15. Human-system interface design review guideline -- Reviewer`s checklist: Final report. Revision 1, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUREG-0700, Revision 1, provides human factors engineering (HFE) guidance to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for its: (1) review of the human system interface (HSI) design submittals prepared by licensees or applications for a license or design certification of commercial nuclear power plants, and (2) performance of HSI reviews that could be undertaken as part of an inspection or other type of regulatory review involving HSI design or incidents involving human performance. The guidance consists of a review process and HFE guidelines. The document describes those aspects of the HSI design review process that are important to the identification and resolution of human engineering discrepancies that could adversely affect plant safety. Guidance is provided that could be used by the staff to review an applicant`s HSI design review process or to guide the development of an HSI design review plan, e.g., as part of an inspection activity. The document also provides detailed HFE guidelines for the assessment of HSI design implementations. NUREG-0700, Revision 1, consists of three stand-alone volumes. Volume 2 is a complete set of the guidelines contained in Volume 1, Part 2, but in a checklist format that can be used by reviewers to assemble sets of individual guidelines for use in specific design reviews. The checklist provides space for reviewers to enter guidelines evaluations and comments.

  16. LESSONS LEARNED THROUGH OPTIMIZATION OF THE VOLUNTARY CORRECTIVE ACTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thacker, M. S.; Freshour, P.; McDonald, W.

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Valuable experience in environmental remediation was gained at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (Sandia) by concurrently conducting Voluntary Corrective Actions (VCAs) at three Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs). Sandia combined the planning, implementation, and reporting phases of three VCAs with the goal of realizing significant savings in both cost and schedule. The lessons learned through this process have been successfully implemented within the Sandia Environmental Restoration (ER) Project and could be utilized at other locations with multiple ER sites. All lessons learned resulted from successful teaming with the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) Hazardous Waste Bureau (HWB), Sandia management, a Sandia risk assessment team, and Sandia waste management personnel. Specific lessons learned included the following: (1) potential efficiencies can be exploited by reprioritization and rescheduling of activities; (2) cost and schedule reductions can be realized by combining similar work at contiguous sites into a single effort; (3) working with regulators to develop preliminary remediation goals (PRGs) and gain regulatory acceptance for VCA planning prior to project initiation results in significant time savings throughout the remediation and permit modification processes; (4) effective and thoughtful contingency planning removes uncertainties and defrays costs so that projects can be completed without interruption; (5) timely collection of waste characterization samples allows efficient disposal of waste streams, and (6) concurrent reporting of VCA activities results in significant savings in time for the authors and reviewers.

  17. 2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Effective Safety Leadership

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Effective Safety Leadership

  18. 2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Follow The Yellow Brick Road to Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Follow The Yellow Brick Road to Safety

  19. Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program MOU

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program MOU

  20. 2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Gaps in your Safety Program?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Gaps in your Safety Program?

  1. 2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Conducting your Annual VPP Self Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Conducting your Annual VPP Self Assessment

  2. 2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Getting the most out of your Safety Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Getting the most out of your Safety Assessment

  3. Using Laboratory Experiments to Better Understand Voluntary Contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jacob Forrest

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation covers three papers concerning voluntary contributions. There are competing theories as to why individuals contribute to projects which help others (e.g., charities); many of the theoretical models have at their core...

  4. Essays on Voluntary Contribution with Private Information and Threshold Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Hui-Chun

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation concerns individual voluntary contributions in the subscription game with three important model considerations: private information on public good valuations, threshold uncertainty and the timing of the contribution — simultaneous...

  5. Voluntary Associations and Their Involvement in Collaborative Forest Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jiaying

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . This dissertation was aimed at gaining a better understanding of outdoor recreation and environmental voluntary associations and their involvement in collaborative forest management. Five objectives guided this study: (1) assessing the organizational characteristics...

  6. Revised users manual, Pulverized Coal Gasification or Combustion: 2-dimensional (87-PCGC-2): Final report, Volume 2. [87-PCGC-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, P.J.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and non-reactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. Recent code revisions and additions are described. The model, referred to as 87-PCGC-2, is applicable to cylindrical axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using either a flux method or discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a Lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. Several multi-step coal devolatilization schemes are included along with a heterogeneous reaction scheme that allows for both diffusion and chemical reaction. Major gas-phase reactions are modeled assuming local instantaneous equilibrium, and thus the reaction rates are limited by the turbulent rate mixing. A NO/sub x/ finite rate chemistry submodel is included which integrates chemical kinetics and the statistics of the turbulence. The gas phase is described by elliptic partial differential equations that are solved by an iterative line-by-line technique. Under-relaxation is used to achieve numerical stability. The generalized nature of the model allows for calculation of isothermal fluid mechanicsgaseous combustion, droplet combustion, particulate combustion and various mixtures of the above, including combustion of coal-water and coal-oil slurries. Both combustion and gasification environments are permissible. User information and theory are presented, along with sample problems. 106 refs.

  7. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand The California Energy Demand 2014 ­ 2024 Revised Forecast, Volume 2: Electricity Demand by Utility Planning Area Energy Policy Report. The forecast includes three full scenarios: a high energy demand case, a low

  8. Revision Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingofRetrofitting DoorsReviewEnergy RevisedFinal

  9. Revision notice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-RayReview/Verify3 June 201445RevisedRWPAll

  10. St. Louis Airport Site. Annual site environmental report, calendar year 1985. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1985, the environmental monitoring program was continued at the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS) in St. Louis County, Missouri. The ditches north and south of the site have been designated for cleanup as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The monitoring program at the SLAPS measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation dose rates; and uranium, thorium, and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. Potential radiation doses to the public are also calculated. Because the site is not controlled or regulated by the DOE, the DOE Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs) are not applicable to SLAPS, but are included only as a basis for comparison. The DOE DCGs and the DOE radiation protection standard have been revised. (Appendix B). During 1985, annual average radon levels in air at the SLAPS were below the DCG for uncontrolled areas. External gamma monitoring in 1985 showed measured annual gamma dose rates ranging from 3 to 2087 mrem/y, with the highest value occurring in an area known to be contaminated. The calculated maximum dose at the site boundary, assuming limited occupancy, would be 6 mrem/y. Average annual concentrations of /sup 230/Th, /sup 226/Ra, and total uranium in surface waters remained below the DOE DCG. The on-site groundwater measurements showed that average annual concentrations of /sup 230/Th, /sup 226/Ra and total uranium were within the DOE DCGs. Although there are no DCGs for sediments, all concentrations of total uraniu, /sup 230/Th, and /sup 226/Ra were below the FUSRAP Guidelines.

  11. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 177: Mud Pits and Cellars Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 177: Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This Closure Report complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The Corrective Action Sites (CASs) within CAU 177 are located within Areas 8, 9, 19, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of this Closure Report is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and data that confirm the corrective actions implemented for CAU 177 CASs.

  12. NRC Research Program on Plant Aging: Listing and summaries of reports issued through September 1993. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vora, J.P.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. This is a comprehensive hardware-oriented engineering research program focused on understanding the aging mechanisms of components and systems in nuclear power plants. The NPAR program also focuses on methods for simulating and monitoring the aging-related degradation of these components and systems. In addition, it provides recommendations for effective maintenance to manage aging and for implementation of the research results in the regulatory process. This document contains a listing and index of reports generated in the NPAR Program that were issued through September 1993 and summaries of those reports. Each summary describes the elements of the research covered in the report and outlines the significant results. For the convenience of the user, the reports are indexed by personal author, corporate author, and subject.

  13. Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosure at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Revision 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosure Preliminary Safety Analysis Report was completed as required by DOE Order 5480.23. The purpose of this document is to construct a safety basis that supports the design and permits construction of the facility. The facility has been designed to the requirements of a Radioactive Solid Waste Facility presented in DOE Order 6430.1A.

  14. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 124, Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with Errata Sheet, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 124, Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This report complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996; as amended January 2007). This CR provides documentation and justification for the closure of CAU 124 without further corrective action. This justification is based on process knowledge and the results of the investigative activities conducted in accordance with the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 124: Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The SAFER Plan provides information relating to site history as well as the scope and planning of the investigation. Therefore, this information will not be repeated in this CR.

  15. Native Americans and Yucca Mountain: A revised and updated summary report on research undertaken between 1987 and 1991; Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, C.S. [Cultural Resources Consultants Ltd., Reno, NV (United States)

    1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of Yucca Mountain Project bibliographies. It is the appendix to a report that summarizes data collected between September 1986 and September 1988 relative to Native American concerns involving the potential siting of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The data were collected from Western Shoshone and Southern Paiute people upon whose aboriginal lands the repository potentially is to be located. Western Shoshone people involved in the study were those resident or affiliated with reservation communities at Yomba and Duckwater, Nevada, and Death Valley, California. Southern Paiute people were at reservation communities at Moapa and Las Vegas. Additional persons of Western Shoshone and Southern Paiute descent were interviewed at Beatty, Tonopah, Caliente, Pahrump, and Las Vegas, Nevada. The work was part of a larger project of socioeconomic studies for the State of Nevada`s Nuclear Waste Projects office, conducted by Mountain West of Phoenix, Arizona.

  16. Integrated Data Base report--1993: U.S. spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. Revision 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and DOE spent nuclear fuel; also, commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1993. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program wastes, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given the calendar-year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal. 256 refs., 38 figs., 141 tabs.

  17. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL Analytical Technical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report |to 40% Whole-House EnergyVoluntaryServices -

  18. Review guidelines for software languages for use in nuclear power plant safety systems: Final report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecht, M.; Decker, D.; Graff, S.; Green, W.; Lin, D.; Dinsmore, G.; Koch, S. [SoHaR, Inc., Beverly Hills, CA (United States)

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guidelines for the programming and auditing of software written in high level languages for safety systems are presented. The guidelines are derived from a framework of issues significant to software safety which was gathered from relevant standards and research literature. Language-specific adaptations of these guidelines are provided for the following high level languages: Ada83 and Ada95; C and C++; International Electrochemical Commission (IEC) Standard 1131-3 Ladder Logic, Sequential Function Charts, Structured Text, and Function Block Diagrams; Pascal; and PL/M. Appendices to the report include a tabular summary of the guidelines and additional information on selected languages.

  19. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for radioactive materials packages: Report of NRC approved packages. Volume 1, Revision 18

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 of approved QA programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date.

  20. Neural network recognition of nuclear power plant transients. First annual report, April 15, 1992--April 15, 1993, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, E.B.; Danofsky, R.; Adams, J.; AlJundi, T.; Basu, A.; Dhanwada, C.; Kerr, J.; Kim, K.; Lanc, T.

    1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to describe results obtained during the first year of funding that will lead to the development of an artificial neural network (ANN) fault - diagnostic system for the real - time classification of operational transients at nuclear power plants. The ultimate goal of this three-year project is to design, build, and test a prototype diagnostic adviser for use in the control room or technical support center at Duane Arnold Energy Center (DAEC); such a prototype could be integrated into the plant process computer or safety - parameter display system. The adviser could then warn and inform plant operators and engineers of plant component failures in a timely manner. This report describes the work accomplished in the first of three scheduled years for the project. Included herein is a summary of the first year`s results as, well as individual descriptions of each of the major topics undertaken by the researchers. Also included are reprints of the articles written under this funding as well as those that were published during the funded period.

  1. Documentation of Hanford Site independent review of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herborn, D.I.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is the Integrating Contractor for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project, and as such is responsible for preparation of the HWVP Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR). The HWVP PSAR was prepared pursuant to the requirements for safety analyses contained in US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 4700.1, Project Management System (DOE 1987); 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities (DOE 1986a); 5481.lB, Safety Analysis and Review System (DOE 1986b) which was superseded by DOE order 5480-23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, for nuclear facilities effective April 30, 1992 (DOE 1992); and 6430.lA, General Design Criteria (DOE 1989). The WHC procedures that, in large part, implement these DOE requirements are contained in WHC-CM-4-46, Nonreactor Facility Safety Analysis Manual. This manual describes the overall WHC safety analysis process in terms of requirements for safety analyses, responsibilities of the various contributing organizations, and required reviews and approvals.

  2. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 88-391-2156, Morton Salt Company, Weeks Island, Louisiana. (Revised April 1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, R.P.; Knutti, E.B.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from the International Chemical Workers Union, an investigation was made of exposures to asbestos and diesel emissions at the Morton Salt Company, Weeks Island, Louisiana. The most significant source of particulates was diesel exhaust. None of the 20 personal breathing zone or area air samples collected in the mill exceeded limits for asbestos. An increased prevalence of chronic cough and phlegm was reported by workers. More complaints of eye irritation and tearing of the eyes were noted in underground workers, consistent with diesel byproduct exposure. Pulmonary function studies indicated that four workers had mild obstructive lung disease and one had moderate obstructive lung disease. Three workers with mild restriction of lung volume were also noted. None of the 61 chest films taken was positive for pneumoconiosis. The authors conclude that a potential hazard existed from exposure to diesel exhaust.

  3. Experimental testing of corpuscular-radiation detectors. Volume 1. Revision 1. Final report, 1 November 1987-31 January 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossi, M.D.

    1989-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations were performed by using Prof. Joe Weber's torsion balance, a room-temperature instrument that was constructed by University of Maryland under a subcontract from Raytheon, and was installed at LANL in Summer 1988. The torsion balance was mounted at a fixed location, close to the edge of a rotating table (1 RPM rotational speed) that Raytheon had constructed and moved to Los Alamos, NM. As the table rotated, the tritium-filled container (neutrino source) and the deuterium filled container (that provided a Newtonian force reference) were sensed by the instrument. At the time of writing this report, the results of the measurements are not fully conclusive. A six-month Contract extension, expected to last until 31 December 1989, will provide the final answer whether or not we could observe repulsion forces, attributable to neutrino pressure, with the torsion balance.

  4. Experimental testing of corpuscular-radiation detectors. Volume 2. Revision 1. Final report, 1 November 1987-31 January 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossi, M.D.

    1989-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations were performed by using Prof. Joe Weber's torsion balance, a room-temperature instrument that was constructed by University of Maryland under a subcontract from Raytheon, and was installed at LANL in Summer 1988. The torsion balance was mounted at a fixed location, close to the edge of a rotating table (1 RPM rotational speed) that Raytheon had constructed and moved to Los Alamos, NM. As the table rotated, the tritium-filled container (neutrino source) and the deuterium-filled container (that provided a newtonian force reference) were sensed by the instrument. At the time of writing of this Report, the results of the measurements are not fully conclusive. A six-month Contract extension, expected to last until 31 December 1989, will provide the final answer whether or not we could observe repulsion forces, attributable to neutrino pressure, with the torsion balance.

  5. Underground Test Area Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Quality Assurance Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krenzien, Susan; Marutzky, Sam

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is required by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) and identifies the UGTA quality assurance (QA) activities for fiscal year (FY) 2013. All UGTA organizations—U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO); Desert Research Institute (DRI); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I); National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec); and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)—conducted QA activities in FY 2013. The activities included conducting assessments, identifying findings and completing corrective actions, evaluating laboratory performance, and publishing documents. In addition, integrated UGTA required reading and corrective action tracking was instituted.

  6. Native Americans and Yucca Mountain: A revised and updated summary report on research undertaken between 1987 and 1991; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, C.S. [Cultural Resources Consultants Ltd., Reno, NV (United States)

    1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes data collected between September 1986 and September 1988 relative to Native American concerns involving the potential siting of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The data were collected from Western Shoshone and Southern Paiute people upon whose aboriginal lands the repository potentially is to be located. Western Shoshone people involved in the study were those resident or affiliated with reservation communities at Yomba and Duckwater, Nevada, and Death Valley, California. Southern Paiute people were at reservation communities at Moapa and Las Vegas. Additional persons of Western Shoshone and Southern Paiute descent were interviewed at Beatty, Tonopah, Caliente, Pahrump, and Las Vegas, Nevada. The work was part of a larger project of socioeconomic studies for the State of Nevada`s Nuclear Waste Projects office, conducted by Mountain West of Phoenix, Arizona.

  7. National Voluntary Environmental Assessment Information System (NVEAIS) State Notice and Acknowledgment of Local Participation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voluntary Environmental Assessment Information System (NVEAIS) State Notice and Acknowledgment of Local/program) _______________________________ in the National Voluntary Environmental Assessment Information System (NVEAIS) of the National Center all foodborne illness outbreak environmental assessment data to the system. Information collected

  8. The Genetic Architecture of High Voluntary Wheel Running in House Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannon, Robert Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for high voluntary wheel running. J. Exper. Biol. 212, 238-A. , Garland, T. Jr. (2009). Running behavior and its energyfor high voluntary wheel-running. Behav. Genet. 31, 309-316.

  9. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Report from the Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartmentDepartment(GATE)Action Plan forArticles,KCP,2007Energy

  10. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Contact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work withJerseyMarkets 19, 4:00Markets914Contact

  11. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Getting Started

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work withJerseyMarkets 19,

  12. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - What's New

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work withJerseyMarkets

  13. Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Electricity Factors

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-11,113,016

  14. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:DeploymentSite Name: Email: Terminal2,7,7,of Greenhouse Gases

  15. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, September 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 03-02-004-0360, Underground Storage Tanks. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

  16. Status and Trends in the U.S. Voluntary Green Power Market (2012 Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Nicholas, T.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voluntary green power markets are those in which consumers and institutions voluntarily purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs. Voluntary action provides a revenue stream for renewable energy projects and raises consumer awareness of the benefits of renewable energy. These markets continued to exhibit growth and stimulate renewable energy development in 2012. This paper reviews the voluntary market and identifies market trends.

  17. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Burmeister

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 117 comprises Corrective Action Site (CAS) 26-41-01, Pluto Disassembly Facility, located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CAU 117 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 117 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. From May 2008 through February 2009, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117, Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purpose of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels to determine COCs for CAU 117. Assessment of the data generated from closure activities indicated that the final action levels were exceeded for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) reported as total Aroclor and radium-226. A corrective action was implemented to remove approximately 50 cubic yards of PCB-contaminated soil, approximately 1 cubic foot of radium-226 contaminated soil (and scabbled asphalt), and a high-efficiency particulate air filter that was determined to meet the criteria of a potential source material (PSM). Electrical and lighting components (i.e., PCB-containing ballasts and capacitors) and other materials (e.g., mercury-containing thermostats and switches, lead plugs and bricks) assumed to be PSM were also removed from Building 2201, as practical, without the need for sampling. Because the COC contamination and PSMs have been removed, clean closure of CAS 26-41-01 is recommended, and no use restrictions are required to be placed on this CAU. No further action is necessary because no other contaminants of potential concern were found above preliminary action levels. The physical end state for Building 2201 is expected to be eventual demolition to slab. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • Clean closure is the recommended corrective action for CAS 26-41-01 in CAU 117. • A Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 117. • Corrective Action Unit 117 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

  18. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 544: Cellars, Mud Pits, and Oil Spills, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss and Catherine Birney

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 544: Cellars, Mud Pits, and Oil Spills, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 544 are located within Areas 2, 7, 9, 10, 12, 19, and 20 of the Nevada National Security Site. Corrective Action Unit 544 comprises the following CASs: • 02-37-08, Cellar & Mud Pit • 02-37-09, Cellar & Mud Pit • 07-09-01, Mud Pit • 09-09-46, U-9itsx20 PS #1A Mud Pit • 10-09-01, Mud Pit • 12-09-03, Mud Pit • 19-09-01, Mud Pits (2) • 19-09-03, Mud Pit • 19-09-04, Mud Pit • 19-25-01, Oil Spill • 19-99-06, Waste Spill • 20-09-01, Mud Pits (2) • 20-09-02, Mud Pit • 20-09-03, Mud Pit • 20-09-04, Mud Pits (2) • 20-09-06, Mud Pit • 20-09-07, Mud Pit • 20-09-10, Mud Pit • 20-25-04, Oil Spills • 20-25-05, Oil Spills The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 544 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 544 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection.

  19. Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Processing Site. Revision 3, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The supplemental standards provisions of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 192 (40 CFR Part 192) require the cleanup of radionuclides other than radium-226 (Ra-226) to levels ``as low as reasonably achievable`` (ALARA), taking into account site-specific conditions, if sufficient quantities and concentrations are present to constitute a significant radiation hazard. In this context, thorium-230 (Th-230) at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site will require remediation. However, a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table at the site significantly complicates conventional remedial action with respect to cleanup. Characterization data indicate that in the offpile areas, the removal of residual in situ bulk Ra-226 and Th-230 such that the 1000-year projected Ra-226 concentration (Ra-226 concentration in 1000 years due to the decay of in situ Ra-226 and the in-growth of Ra-226 from in situ Th-230) complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cleanup standard for in situ Ra-226 and the cleanup protocol for in situ Th-230 can be readily achieved using conventional excavation techniques for bulk contamination without encountering significant impacts due to groundwater. The EPA cleanup standard and criterion for Ra-226 and the 1000-year projected Ra-226 are 5 and 15 picocuries per gram (pCi/g) above background, respectively, averaged over 15-centimeter (cm) deep surface and subsurface intervals and 100-square-meter (m{sup 2}) grid areas. Significant differential migration of Th-230 relative to Ra-226 has occurred over 40 percent of the subpile area. To effectively remediate the site with respect to Ra-226 and Th-230, supplemental standard is proposed and discussed in this report.

  20. Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality, Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, E. D.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Durst, Bonita E.; Erickson, David; Puigh, Raymond J.

    2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is revision 6 of the Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality. This report is required reading for the training of criticality professionals in many organizations both nationally and internationally. This report describes many different classes of nuclear criticality anomalies that are different than expected.

  1. Economic Analysis of Voluntary Carbon Offset Market and Bioenergy Policies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiva, Layla

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    baseline. This finding is similar to the study on the voluntary opt-in component of the sulfur dioxide emission trading program in (Montero 2000). This study favors a low baseline, which allows payments for non- additional production raises the costs...

  2. Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodland Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects ® Version 1.2 July trademark 10 3. Carbon sequestration 11 3.1 Units of carbon calculation 11 3.2 Carbon baseline 11 3.3 Carbon leakage 12 3.4 Project carbon sequestration 12 3.5 Net carbon sequestration 13 4. Environmental quality 14

  3. Department of Energy- Voluntary Protection Program Contract Transition Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) is to recognize and promote excellence in contractor occupational health and safety programs. These programs, composed of management systems for preventing and controlling occupational hazards, not only ensure that DOE Orders are met, but go beyond requirements to provide the best feasible health and safety protection at the site

  4. Voluntary Control of Human Jaw Stiffness Douglas M. Shiller,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stiffness. Using a robotic device, a series of force pulses was applied to the jaw to elicit changes of human arm movement in which variability in endpoint position has been related to cocontraction bothVoluntary Control of Human Jaw Stiffness Douglas M. Shiller,1 Guillaume Houle,1 and David J. Ostry1

  5. Final Characterization Report for Corrective Action Unit 109: Area 2 U-2BU Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ITLV

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 109, Area 2 U-2bu Crater, is an inactive Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part A Permit disposal unit located in Area 2 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The Corrective Action Unit has been characterized under the requirements of the Nevada Test Site Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part A Permit (NDEP, 1995) and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 265 (CFR, 1996). The site characterization was performed under the RCRA Part A Permit Characterization Plan for the U-2bu Subsidence Crater (DOE/NV, 1998c), as approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (Liebendorfer, 1998). The primary objective of the site characterization activities was to evaluate the presence, concentration, and extent of any Resource Conservation and Recovery Act contaminants in the crater. Surface soil samples were collected on April 22, 1998, and subsurface soil samples and geotechnical samples were collected from April 27-29, 1998. Soil samples were collected using a hand auger or a piston-type drive hammer to advance a 5-centimeter (2-inch) diameter steel sampling tool into the ground. The permit for the Nevada Test Site requires that Corrective Action Unit 109 be closed under 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265 Subpart G and 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 265.310 (CFR, 1996). Analysis of the data collected during the characterization effort indicates that lead was detected in Study Area 1 at 5.7 milligrams per liter, above the regulatory level in 40 Code of Federal Regulations 261.24 of 5.0 milligrams per liter. Except for the lead detection at a single location within the crater, the original Resource Conservation Recovery Act constituents of potential concern determined between the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office and the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection during the Data Quality Objectives process (DOE/NV, 1998b) were not found to be present at Corrective Action Unit 109 above regulatory levels of concern. The single lead detection that exceeded regulatory limits was discovered at a depth of 1.2 meters (4 feet) in Study Area 1. Total petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in Study Area 4 at two locations at concentrations of 130 and 190 milligrams per kilogram. These concentrations exceed the 100 milligram per kilogram action level established in Nevada Administrative Code 445A.2272 (NAC, 1996). The primary conceptual model identified during the Data Quality Objectives process appears to have been substantiated by the analytical results from site characterization; migration of contaminants of potential concern does not appear to be occurring, as none were detected in a significant percentage of the characterization samples. Based on the results of the characterization, clean closure by removal and disposal of impacted soil will be evaluated in the closure plan to address Study Area 1. An (a) through (k) analysis, as specified in Nevada Administrative Code 445A.227, should be used to evaluate total petroleum hydrocarbon contamination within Study Area 4. Study Areas 2, 3, and 5 should be clean closed without further assessment or remediation (see Figures 2-1 and 5-1 in the Characterization Report).

  6. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 408: Bomblet Target Area Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 408: Bomblet Target Area (TTR), Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 408 is located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, and consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) TA-55-002-TAB2, Bomblet Target Areas. This CAS includes the following seven target areas: • Mid Target • Flightline Bomblet Location • Strategic Air Command (SAC) Target Location 1 • SAC Target Location 2 • South Antelope Lake • Tomahawk Location 1 • Tomahawk Location 2 The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and data confirming that the closure objectives for the CAS within CAU 408 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 408 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. From July 2009 through August 2010, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 408: Bomblet Target Area, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: • Identify and remove munitions of explosive concern (MEC) associated with DOE activities. • Investigate potential disposal pit locations. • Remove depleted uranium-contaminated fragments and soil. • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels to determine COCs for CAU 408. Assessment of the data indicated COCs are not present at CAS TA-55-002-TAB2; therefore, no corrective action is necessary. No use restrictions are required to be placed on this CAU because the investigation showed no evidence of remaining soil contamination or remaining debris/waste upon completion of all investigation activities. The MEC was successfully removed and dispositioned as planned using current best available technologies. As MEC guidance and general MEC standards acknowledge that MEC response actions cannot determine with 100 percent certainty that all MEC and unexploded ordnance (UXO) are removed, the clean closure of CAU 408 will implement a best management practice of posting UXO hazard warning signs near the seven target areas. The signs will warn future land users of the potential for encountering residual UXO hazards. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, provides the following recommendations: • A Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 408. • Corrective Action Unit 408 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

  7. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 566 comprises Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-99-20, EMAD Compound, located within Area 25 of the Nevada National Security Site. The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CAU 566 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 566 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. From October 2010 through May 2011, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) to determine COCs for CAU 566. Assessment of the data from collected soil samples, and from radiological and visual surveys of the site, indicates the FALs were exceeded for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and radioactivity. Corrective actions were implemented to remove the following: • Radiologically contaminated soil assumed greater than FAL at two locations • Radiologically contaminated soil assumed greater than FAL with lead shot • PCB-contaminated soil • Radiologically contaminated filters and equipment • Fuels, lubricants, engine coolants, and oils • Lead debris • Electrical and lighting components assumed to be potential source materials, including - fluorescent light bulbs - mercury switches (thermostats) - circuit boards - PCB-containing ballasts Closure of CAU 566 was achieved through a combination of removal activities and closure in place. Corrective actions to remove COCs, and known and assumed potential source materials, were implemented as was practical. The PCBs remaining at the site are bounded laterally, but not vertically, within CAS 25-99-20 based upon step-out sampling; the sources (e.g., PCB transformer oils, diesel fuel from locomotive reservoirs) have been removed; the practice of the application of PCB-containing oils for soil stabilization has ceased; and the COCs are not readily mobile in the environment. Closure in place is necessary, and future land use of the site will be restricted from intrusive activities. This will effectively eliminate inadvertent contact by humans with the contaminated media. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective action is required at CAS 25-99-20. • Closure in place of CAS 25-99-20. • A use restriction is required at CAU 566. • A Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 566. • Corrective Action Unit 566 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

  8. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 326: Areas 6 and 27 Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 326: Areas 6 and 27 Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision 1), December 2002 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 06-25-01, CP-1 Heating Oil Release. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

  9. Restrained Revision Richard Booth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Booth, Richard

    another, newer, piece of information comes along, Boutilier's natural revision [4, 5] being a caseRestrained Revision Richard Booth School of IT and Computer Science University of Wollongong of their proposed framework for iterated belief revision Darwiche and Pearl advanced a convincing argument against

  10. Evaluating self-reported pressure ulcer prevention measures in persons with1 spinal cord injury using the revised Skin Management Needs Assessment2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    using the revised Skin Management Needs Assessment2 Checklist : reliability study3 Gélis Anthony, MD 1, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de20 Bordeaux, France21 22 Corresponding author:23 Dr. Anthony GELIS, M: to translate, evaluate the reliability and cross-culturally adapt the Skin2 Management Needs Assessment

  11. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Durango, Colorado: Remedial action selection report. Revised final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The uranium mill tailings site near Durango, Colorado, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities that have been conducted by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium mill processing site near Durango, Colorado. Secondly, this document and the rest of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Colorado.

  12. Voluntary Protection Program Manuals | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartmentDepartment(GATE)Action Plan forArticles, reports

  13. Voluntary Protection programs Participants' Association - Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report |to 40% Whole-House2007 |Center -- April

  14. A NEW APPROACH TO DEVELOPMENT OF VOLUNTARY DECOMISSIONING STANDARDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence M. Zull; Richard H. Meservey; Lawrence E. Boing

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Decontamination, Decommissioning, and Reutilization (DDR) Division of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) is to advance the technology of decontamination, decommissioning, and reutilization of nuclear and former nuclear installations, materials, facilities, and sites [1]. This includes sharing collective decommissioning experiences and lessons learned with others in the industry. An integral part of the work of the DDR Division is the preparation of voluntary decommissioning standards through its recently re-established DDR Standards Committee. This Committee intends to support development of various standards with other divisions of the ANS. The Committee also intends to participate with external organizations to disseminate information and lessons learned regarding decontamination activities, and participate in the development of voluntary decommissioning standards. External organizations, such as ASTM International, are involved in the development of consensus standards for nuclear decommissioning work. This paper describes the work of the DDR Standards Committee on a new co-operative initiative with ASTM International to develop voluntary consensus standards for nuclear decommissioning work.

  15. revision:19970323 modified:19970323

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelah, Saharon

    596 revision:1997­03­23 modified:1997­03­23 Some independence results on reflection James Cummings. Publication number 596. 1 #12; 596 revision:1997­03­23 modified:1997­03­23 Baumgartner proved in [1­reflection principle captures 2 #12; 596 revision:1997­03­23 modified:1997­03­23 exactly that part of # which is useful

  16. Unchecked strategy diversification and collapse in continuous voluntary public good games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasaki, Tatsuya; Okada, Isamu; Unemi, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooperation or defection and participation or withdrawal are well-known options of behavior in game-like activities in free societies, yet the co-evolutionary dynamics of these behavioral traits in the individual level are not well understood. Here we investigate the continuous voluntary public good game, in which individuals have two types of continuous-valued options: a probability of joining the public good game and a level of cooperative investment in the game. Our numerical results reveal hitherto unreported phenomena: (i) The evolutionary dynamics are initially characterized by oscillations in individual cooperation and participation levels, in contrast to the population-level oscillations that have previously been reported. (ii) Eventually, the population's average cooperation and participation levels converge to and stabilize at a center. (iii) Then, a most peculiar phenomenon unfolds: The strategies present in the population diversify and give rise to a "cloud" of tinkering individuals who each tries...

  17. Status and Trends in the U.S. Voluntary Green Power Market (2012...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    renewable energy to match their electricity needs. Voluntary action provides a revenue stream for renewable energy projects and raises consumer awareness of the benefits of...

  18. Status and Trends in the U.S. Voluntary Green Power Market (2013...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Status and Trends in the U.S. Voluntary Green Power Market (2013 Data) Jenny Heeter National Renewable Energy Laboratory With contributions from: Kathy Belyeu Independent...

  19. Data Privacy and the Smart Grid: A Voluntary Code of Conduct...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    announcing the availability of a draft Voluntary Code of Conduct (VCC), which addresses data privacy surrounding smart grid technologies, for public comment. The primary goal of...

  20. Revision of the DELFIC Particle Activity Module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, David A [ORNL; Jodoin, Vincent J [ORNL

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC) was originally released in 1968 as a tool for modeling fallout patterns and for predicting exposure rates. Despite the continual advancement of knowledge of fission yields, decay behavior of fission products, and biological dosimetry, the decay data and logic of DELFIC have remained mostly unchanged since inception. Additionally, previous code revisions caused a loss of conservation of radioactive nuclides. In this report, a new revision of the decay database and the Particle Activity Module is introduced and explained. The database upgrades discussed are replacement of the fission yields with ENDF/B-VII data as formatted in the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code, revised decay constants, revised exposure rate multipliers, revised decay modes and branching ratios, and revised boiling point data. Included decay logic upgrades represent a correction of a flaw in the treatment of the fission yields, extension of the logic to include more complex decay modes, conservation of nuclides (including stable nuclides) at all times, and conversion of key variables to double precision for nuclide conservation. Finally, recommended future work is discussed with an emphasis on completion of the overall radiation physics upgrade, particularly for dosimetry, induced activity, decay of the actinides, and fractionation.

  1. PNNL DOE-Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) FY2003 Program Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Patrick A.; Bowers, Harold N.; Madson, Vernon J.; Isern, Nancy G.; Collins, Drue A.; Haney, Janice M.; Meicenheimer, Russell L.; Tinker, Mike R.; Williams, Susan C.

    2003-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This Program Evaluation report is an updated revision to the annual assessment of PNNL's VPP Program performance with respect to DOE-VPP criteria. It contains a summary of results and a data sheet for each of the VPP Elements, including strengths, weaknesses, recent/anticipated changes that will affect each Element, and a rating for each Element. Recommendations are also offered for continuous improvement.

  2. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads| DepartmentVictor Kane About UsforVoluntaryProject - May

  3. Belief Revision Revisited Thoughts on the Scope of Belief Revision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, Anthony

    Belief Revision Revisited or: Thoughts on the Scope of Belief Revision James Delgrande Simon Fraser University Canada NMR 2006 Windermere, UK, May 31, 2006 1 #12;Belief Revision · Current interest in belief revision is regarded as going back to the seminal work of Alchourr´on, G¨ardenfors, and Makinson (e.g. [AGM

  4. NIST ITL Participation in Voluntary Standards Developing Organizations (Key: Highlighted activities represent areas, which are international in scope; US TAG = US Technical Advisory Group)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NIST ITL Participation in Voluntary Standards Developing Organizations (Key: Highlighted activities ITL Participation in Voluntary Standards Developing Organizations (Key: Highlighted activities-Use Applications and Loads D. Su 772 #12;NIST ITL Participation in Voluntary Standards Developing Organizations

  5. Proposed Program: Voluntary Retirement Incentive Program for Staff Proposed by: University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture (UTIA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    : 1. Eligible for federal retirement benefits under a Voluntary Early Retirement Authority (VERA)2#12;#12;Proposed Program: Voluntary Retirement Incentive Program for Staff Proposed by: University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture (UTIA) Purpose: The UTIA Voluntary Retirement Incentive Program for Staff

  6. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Project Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis, Revision 00 - April 2015 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations...

  7. SOFA Component Revision Identification 1 Premysl Brada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOFA Component Revision Identification 1 Premysl Brada Department of Computer Science versions, component revision numbers and change indications are derived as a well- founded version called "component revisions" and the basic fine-grained "type revisions", can subsequently be used

  8. Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests, Progress Report, 6-99, Revised 12-99

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, T. A.; Elleson, J.; Haberl, J. S.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Spring 1999 progress report on ASHRAE Research Project RP 1004: Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests. This report presents an update concerning the work that has been accomplished since the June...

  9. Parallel Belief Revision: Revising by Sets of Formulas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgrande, James P.

    Parallel Belief Revision: Revising by Sets of Formulas James Delgrande and Yi Jin School of Computing Science Simon Fraser University Burnaby, B.C. V5A 1S6 Canada {jim,yij}@cs.sfu.ca March 15, 2012 Abstract The area of belief revision studies how a rational agent may incorporate new information about

  10. Radiation Safety (Revised March 2010)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    to Workers; Inspections 27 10 CFR Part 20Standards for Protection Against Radiation 28 10 CFR Part 35Radiation Safety Manual (Revised March 2010) Updated December 2012 Stanford University, Stanford California #12; #12; Radiation Safety Manual (Revised March 2010) Updated

  11. Closure Report (CR) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well with Errata Sheet and Certification, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarro Nevada Environmental Services

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The closure report for CAU 91 has no Use Restriction Form or drawing/map included in the document to describe the use restricted area, however, Section 3.3.3 states that the site will be fenced and signage placed indicating the area as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Unit. The drawing that was placed in the FFACO indicating the use restricted area lists the coordinates for the RCRA Unit in Nevada State Plan Coordinates - North American Datum of 1983. In the ensuing years the reporting of coordinates has been standardized so that all coordinates are reported in the same manner, which is: NAD 27 UTM Zone 11 N, meters. This Errata Sheet updates the coordinate reporting to the currently accepted method and includes an aerial photo showing the RCRA Unit with the coordinates listed showing the use restricted area.

  12. Optimal design of a phase-in emissions trading program with voluntary compliance options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montero, Juan Pablo

    In this paper we explore the welfare implications of voluntary compliance within an emissions trading program and derive optimal permits allocations to affected and opti-in sources when the environmental regulator has ...

  13. A Model of Fishery Harvests with a Voluntary Co-op

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deacon, Robert T; Costello, Christopher J; Parker, Dominic P

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Chignik Salmon Co-op. ” Mimeo, UCSB Department ofHarvest Rights to Fishery Co-operatives: Evidence fromFishery Harvests with a Voluntary Co-op Robert T. Deacon *

  14. Clinical Instructor Responsibilities The APTA has detailed voluntary guidelines for clinical instructors. The guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contractor, Anis

    Clinical Instructor Responsibilities The APTA has detailed voluntary guidelines for clinical instructors. The guidelines are divided into six key areas: · Clinical competence and legal and ethical behavior that meets or exceeds

  15. Local action for the global environment : municipal government participation in a voluntary climate protection program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravin, Amelia L., 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cities for Climate ProtectionTM (CCP) campaign is a voluntary environmental program for municipalities, which is increasingly being applied around the world by local governments taking action on climate change. This ...

  16. Environmental assessment in support of proposed voluntary energy conservation standard for new residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, D.L.; Parker, G.B.; Callaway, J.W.; Marsh, S.J.; Roop, J.M.; Taylor, Z.T.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this environmental assessment (EA) is to identify the potential environmental impacts that could result from the proposed voluntary residential standard (VOLRES) on private sector construction of new residential buildings. 49 refs., 15 tabs.

  17. Statistical Analysis of Occupational Safety Data of Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) and Non-VPP Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) was originally developed by Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in 1982 to foster greater ownership of safety and health in the workplace. The Department of Energy (DOE) adopted VPP in 1992; currently 23 sites across the DOE complex participate in the program. As its name implies, it is a voluntary program; i.e. not required by laws or regulations.

  18. Computer Science Revised Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Rooij, Robert

    Computer Science Revised Edition December 2004 #12;Quality Assurance Netherlands Universities (QANU of the Assessment Aspects 11 2 Structure and Funding of Computer Science in the Netherlands 13 2.1 Flow of Funds 13 2.2 Graduate Schools 13 2.3 Societal Relevance of Computer Science 14 3 Comments on Computer Science

  19. National spent fuel program preliminary report RCRA characteristics of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel DOE-SNF-REP-002. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information on the preliminary process knowledge to be used in characterizing all Department of Energy (DOE)-owned Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) types that potentially exhibit a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) characteristic. This report also includes the process knowledge, analyses, and rationale used to preliminarily exclude certain SNF types from RCRA regulation under 40 CFR {section}261.4(a)(4), ``Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste,`` as special nuclear and byproduct material. The evaluations and analyses detailed herein have been undertaken as a proactive approach. In the event that DOE-owned SNF is determined to be a RCRA solid waste, this report provides general direction for each site regarding further characterization efforts. The intent of this report is also to define the path forward to be taken for further evaluation of specific SNF types and a recommended position to be negotiated and established with regional and state regulators throughout the DOE Complex regarding the RCRA-related policy issues.

  20. Revised: 01-07-11 Instructions: This report must be submitted for any injury or illness within 24 hours of occurrence.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    (s) of witness(es): Report prepared by: Date prepared: Position/Title: Phone: Bowling Green State University. Submit to: Bowling Green Campus: Environmental Health and Safety, 1851 N. Research Drive Bowling Green be delivered or faxed to Environmental Health and Safety (Bowling Green Campus) or to the Budget and Operations

  1. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 370, T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, located in Area 4 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 370 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 04-23-01, Atmospheric Test Site T-4. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 370 due to the implementation of the corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from June 25, 2008, through April 2, 2009, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site and Record of Technical Change No. 1.

  2. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

  3. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The purpose of the CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed.

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 557: Spills and Tank Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 557, Spills and Tank Sites, in Areas 1, 3, 6, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 557 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 01-25-02, Fuel Spill • 03-02-02, Area 3 Subdock UST • 06-99-10, Tar Spills • 25-25-18, Train Maintenance Bldg 3901 Spill Site The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to identify and provide the justification and documentation that supports the recommendation for closure of the CAU 557 CASs with no further corrective action. To achieve this, a corrective action investigation (CAI) was conducted from May 5 through November 24, 2008. The CAI activities were performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 557: Spills and Tank Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada.

  5. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 567: Miscellaneous Soil Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 567: Miscellaneous Soil Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 567 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. The corrective actions implemented at CAU 567 were developed based on an evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, the assumed presence of COCs at specific locations, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the CAAs. The CAAs were selected on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. The implemented corrective actions meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The CAAs meet all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site. Based on the implementation of these corrective actions, the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 567. • The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection issue a Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office for closure of CAU 567. • CAU 567 be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  6. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. CAU 105 comprises the following five corrective action sites (CASs): -02-23-04 Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney Closure In Place -02-23-05 Atmospheric Test Site T-2A Closure In Place -02-23-06 Atmospheric Test Site T-2B Clean Closure -02-23-08 Atmospheric Test Site T-2 Closure In Place -02-23-09 Atmospheric Test Site - Turk Closure In Place The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

  7. Environmental Stewardship: How Semiconductor Suppliers Help to Meet Energy-Efficiency Regulations and Voluntary Specifications in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizhen, Li; Fanara, Andrew; Fridley, David; Merriman, Louise; Ju, Jeff

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    meet some of the stringent energy regulations and standards.Help to Meet Energy-Efficiency Regulations and Voluntaryplay in meeting energy-efficiency regulations and voluntary

  8. Exam revision Database Systems Lecture 18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alechina, Natasha

    ,B) and (A,C), fd B C. #12;3 Exam revision Example (coursework 5) · Relation Listing is not in 2NF because1 Exam revision Database Systems Lecture 18 Natasha Alechina Exam revision In This Lecture · Exam format · Main topics · How to revise Exam revision Exam format · Answer three questions out of five

  9. BCBST PDC --EOC Revised 1/2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simaan, Nabil

    BCBST ­ PDC -- EOC Revised 1/2013 Vanderbilt University 89508 January 1, 2014 #12;BCBST ­ PDC -- EOC Revised 1/2013 #12;BCBST ­ PDC -- EOC Revised 1/2013 DENTAL EVIDENCE OF COVERAGE BlueCross Blue ­ PDC -- EOC Revised 1/2013 #12;BCBST ­ PDC -- EOC Revised 1/2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION

  10. anorrectal total reporte: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    markets including finance, energy, healthcare, telecommunications, unknown authors 5 Computer Integrated Revision Total Hip Replacement Surgery: Preliminary Report Computer...

  11. In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) geotechnical report, WSRC-TR-95-0057, Revision 0, Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A geotechnical study has been completed in H-Area for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and the balance of the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The study consisted of subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing, and engineering analyses. The purpose of these investigations is to evaluate the overall stability of the H-Area tanks under static and dynamic conditions. The objectives of the study are to define the site-specific geological conditions at ITP and HTF, obtain engineering properties for the assessment of the stability of the native soils and embankment under static and dynamic loads (i.e., slope stability, liquefaction potential, and potential settlements), and derive properties for soil-structure interaction studies. This document (Volume 4) contains the laboratory test results for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) Geotechnical Report.

  12. In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) geotechnical report, WSRC-TR-95-0057, Revision 0, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, B.E.; Timian, D.A.

    1995-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A geotechnical study has been completed in H-Area for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and the balance of the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The study consisted of subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing, and engineering analyses. The purpose of these investigations is to evaluate the overall stability of the H-Area tanks under static and dynamic conditions. The objectives of the study are to define the site-specific geological conditions at ITP and HTF, obtain engineering properties for the assessment of the stability of the native soils and embankment under static and dynamic loads (i.e., slope stability, liquefaction potential, and potential settlements), and derive properties for soil-structure interaction studies. This document contains the records of cone penetrometer and dilatometer soundings for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) Geotechnical Report, Volume 3.

  13. External Peer Review Team Report for Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marutzky, Sam J.; Andrews, Robert

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The peer review team commends the Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), team for its efforts in using limited data to model the fate of radionuclides in groundwater at Yucca Flat. Recognizing the key uncertainties and related recommendations discussed in Section 6.0 of this report, the peer review team has concluded that U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is ready for a transition to model evaluation studies in the corrective action decision document (CADD)/corrective action plan (CAP) stage. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) clarified the charge to the peer review team in a letter dated October 9, 2014, from Bill R. Wilborn, NNSA/NFO Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity Lead, to Sam J. Marutzky, N-I UGTA Project Manager: “The model and supporting information should be sufficiently complete that the key uncertainties can be adequately identified such that they can be addressed by appropriate model evaluation studies. The model evaluation studies may include data collection and model refinements conducted during the CADD/CAP stage. One major input to identifying ‘key uncertainties’ is the detailed peer review provided by independent qualified peers.” The key uncertainties that the peer review team recognized and potential concerns associated with each are outlined in Section 6.0, along with recommendations corresponding to each uncertainty. The uncertainties, concerns, and recommendations are summarized in Table ES-1. The number associated with each concern refers to the section in this report where the concern is discussed in detail.

  14. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 190, Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (1996, as amended January 2007). Corrective Action Unit 190 is comprised of the following four corrective action sites (CASs): • 11-02-01, Underground Centrifuge • 11-02-02, Drain Lines and Outfall • 11-59-01, Tweezer Facility Septic System • 14-23-01, LTU-6 Test Area The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 190 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from March 21 through June 26, 2007. All CAI activities were conducted as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective process: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. • Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 190 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the data quality objective data needs.

  15. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 234: Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 234, Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills, located in Areas 2, 3, 4, 12, and 15 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit 234 is comprised of the following 12 corrective action sites: •02-09-48, Area 2 Mud Plant #1 •02-09-49, Area 2 Mud Plant #2 •02-99-05, Mud Spill •03-09-02, Mud Dump Trenches •04-44-02, Mud Spill •04-99-02, Mud Spill •12-09-01, Mud Pit •12-09-04, Mud Pit •12-09-08, Mud Pit •12-30-14, Cellar •12-99-07, Mud Dump •15-09-01, Mud Pit The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 234 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 234: Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: •Determine whether contaminants of concern are present. •If contaminants of concern are present, determine their extent. •Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 234 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs.

  16. Clean Coal Technology: Reduction of NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} using gas reburning, sorbent injection, and integrated technologies. Topical report No. 3, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (also referred to as the CCT Program), is a unique government/industry cost-shared effort to develop these advanced coal-based technologies. The CCT Program provides numerous options for addressing a wide range of energy and environmental issues, including acid rain, global climate change, improved energy efficiency, energy security, and environmental qualitiy. It is intended to demonstrate a new generation of full-scale, ``showcase`` facilities built through the United States. Gas Reburning, Sorbent Injection and Integrated Technologies -- the subject of this Topical Report -- are one such set of promising innovative developments. In addition to discussing the technologies involved, this report will describe two specific projects, results to date, and the commercial promise of these processes. The objectives of Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection were to have a 60% reduction in NO{sub x} emissions and a 50% reduction in SO{sub 2} emissions. These objectives have been achieved at the tangentially-fired boiler at the Hennepin site of Illinois Power and at the cyclone-fired boiler operated by City Water, Light and Power in Springfield, Illinois. The other project, Gas Reburning and Low NO{sub x} Burners had the goal of a 70% NO{sub x} reduction from the wall-fired boiler operated by Public Service of Colorado at Denver. In early preliminary testing, this goal was also achieved. Energy and Environmental Research (EER) is now ready to design and install Gas Rebunting and Sorbent Injection systems, and Gas Reburning-Low NO{sub x}, Burner systems for any utility or industrial application. These technologies are offered with performance and emission control guarantees.

  17. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 371: Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 371, Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe, located within Areas 11 and 18 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 371 comprises two corrective action sites (CASs): • 11-23-05, Pin Stripe Contamination Area • 18-45-01, U-18j-2 Crater (Johnnie Boy) The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 371 based on the implementation of corrective actions. The corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls was implemented at both CASs. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from January 8, 2009, through February 16, 2010, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 371: Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides and investigation of other releases (migration in washes and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 371 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the dataset is acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. Radiological doses exceeding the FAL of 25 millirem per year were not found to be present in the surface soil. However, it was assumed that radionuclides are present in subsurface media within the Johnnie Boy crater and the fissure at Pin Stripe. Due to the assumption of radiological dose exceeding the FAL, corrective actions were undertaken that consist of implementing a use restriction and posting warning signs at each site. These use restrictions were recorded in the FFACO database; the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Facility Information Management System; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 371. • A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 371. • Corrective Action Unit 371 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  18. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 546, Injection Well and Surface Releases, at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 546 is comprised of two corrective action sites (CASs): • 06-23-02, U-6a/Russet Testing Area • 09-20-01, Injection Well The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 546. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from May 5 through May 28, 2008, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2008). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: • Determine whether a contaminant of concern is present at a given CAS. • Determine whether sufficient information is available to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives at each CAS. The CAU 546 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Because DQO data needs were met, and corrective actions have been implemented, it has been determined that no further corrective action (based on risk to human receptors) is necessary for the CAU 546 CASs. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective actions are needed for CAU 546 CASs. • No Corrective Action Plan is required. • A Notice of Completion to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 546. • Corrective Action Unit 546 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels established in this document. No analytes were detected at concentrations exceeding final action levels. However, contaminants of concern were presumed to be present in the subsurface soil at CAS 09-20-01. Therefore, the corrective action of close in place was selected as the preferred alternative for this CAS. Potential source material was removed from CAS 06-23-02; therefore, the corrective action of clean closure was selected as the preferred alternative at this CAS.

  19. Addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 452: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 452: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for CASs: • 25-25-09, Spill H940825C (from UST 25-3101-1) • 25-25-14, Spill H940314E (from UST 25-3102-3) • 25-25-15, Spill H941020E (from UST 25-3152-1) These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  20. Addendum 2 to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 454: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 454: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for CASs: • 12-25-08, Spill H950524F (from UST 12-B-1) • 12-25-10, Spill H950919A (from UST 12-COMM-1) These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  1. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, December 1997 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 12-19-01, A12 Fleet Ops Steam Cleaning Efflu. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

  2. Contractor report to the Department of Energy on opportunities for integration of environmental management activities across the complex (predecisional draft). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) program faces significant technical and financial challenges in cleaning up the environmental legacy of nuclear weapons production and research and development, while facing an uncertain future in obtaining the needed funding to perform this work. Many of these requirements, including State and Federal regulations and negotiated agreements, continue to be a significant contributor to EM program costs and schedules. Historically, the sites have managed their programs focusing on their individual site`s needs. While this approach maximized successes at individual sites, it has resulted in a more costly program than if more integration across the DOE system occurred. In July 1996, the DOE Assistant Secretary for EM, Al Alm, chartered a contractor led effort to perform complex-wide integration in support of the ten-year plan process to develop a suite of technically defensible, integrated alternatives to meet the EM mission. This report documents opportunities for waste and nuclear materials management integration activities in six areas: transuranic (TRU) waste, mixed low-level waste (MLLW), low-level waste (LLW), environmental restoration (ER), high-level waste (HLW), and spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The opportunities represent technically defensible solutions which reduce cost, accelerate schedules, and result in no significant increase in risk.

  3. Addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 529: Area 25 Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauss, Mark J

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 529: Area 25 Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications To Remove Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order dated September 2013. The Use Restriction (UR) Removal document was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection on October 16, 2013. The approval of the UR Removal document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the UR Removal document, this addendum consists of: This page that refers the reader to the UR Removal document for additional information The cover, title, and signature pages of the UR Removal document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the UR Removal document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 25-23-17, Contaminated Wash (Parcel H). This UR was established as part of FFACO corrective actions and was based on the presence of total petroleum hydrocarbon diesel-range organics contamination at concentrations greater than the NDEP action level at the time of the initial investigation.

  4. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 357: Mud Pits and Waste Dump, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauss, Mark J

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 357: Mud Pits and Waste Dump, Nevada Test Site, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications To Remove Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order dated September 2013. The Use Restriction Removal document was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection on October 16, 2013. The approval of the UR Removal document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the UR Removal document, this addendum consists of: This page that refers the reader to the UR Removal document for additional information The cover, title, and signature pages of the UR Removal document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the UR Removal document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 04-26-03, Lead Bricks. This UR was established as part of FFACO corrective actions and was based on the presence of lead contamination at concentrations greater than the action level established at the time of the initial investigation.

  5. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 165: Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauss, Mark J

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 165: Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications To Remove Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order dated September 2013. The Use Restriction Removal document was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection on October 16, 2013. The approval of the UR Removal document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the UR Removal document, this addendum consists of: This page that refers the reader to the UR Removal document for additional information The cover, title, and signature pages of the UR Removal document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the UR Removal document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well. This UR was established as part of FFACO corrective actions and was based on the presence of tetrachloroethene contamination at concentrations greater than the action level established at the time of the initial investigation. Although total petroleum hydrocarbon diesel-range organics contamination at concentrations greater than the NDEP action level was present at the site, no hazardous constituents of TPH-DRO exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 9 preliminary remediation goals established at the time of the initial investigation.

  6. Role of word-of-mouth for programs of voluntary vaccination: A game-theoretic approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharyya, Samit; Breban, Romulus

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a model describing the synergetic feedback between word-of-mouth (WoM) and epidemic dynamics controlled by voluntary vaccination. We combine a game-theoretic model for the spread of WoM and a compartmental model describing $SIR$ disease dynamics in the presence of a program of voluntary vaccination. We evaluate and compare two scenarios, depending on what WoM disseminates: (1) vaccine advertising, which may occur whether or not an epidemic is ongoing and (2) epidemic status, notably disease prevalence. Understanding the synergy between the two strategies could be particularly important for organizing voluntary vaccination campaigns. We find that, in the initial phase of an epidemic, vaccination uptake is determined more by vaccine advertising than the epidemic status. As the epidemic progresses, epidemic status become increasingly important for vaccination uptake, considerably accelerating vaccination uptake toward a stable vaccination coverage.

  7. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the April 2000, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 23-56-01, Former Mercury Fire Training Pit. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

  8. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the November 2002, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 03-04-01, Area 3 Change House Septic System • CAS 03-09-04, Mud Pit These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  9. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 554: Area 23 Release Site Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evenson, Grant

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 554, Area 23 Release Site, located in Mercury at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 554 is comprised of one corrective action site (CAS): (1) CAS 23-02-08, USTs 23-115-1, 2, 3/Spill 530-90-002. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 554 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from January 18 through May 5, 2005, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 554: Area 23 Release Site'' (NNSA/NSO, 2004) and Records of Technical Change No. 1 and No. 2. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: (1) Determine whether contaminants of concern are present. (2) If contaminants of concern are present, determine their nature and extent. (3) Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 554 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against preliminary action levels (PALs) established in the CAU 554 CAIP for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) benzo(a)pyrene, dibenz(a,h)anthracene, and trichloroethene (TCE). Specifically: (1) The soil beneath and laterally outward from former underground storage tanks at CAS 23-02-08 contains TPH-diesel-range organics (DRO) above the PAL of 100 milligrams per kilogram, confined vertically from a depth of approximately 400 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs). The contamination is confined to 12.5 ft bgs to the subsurface media and laterally within approximately 100 ft of the release. (2) A single soil sample collected from the depth of 99 to 100 ft bgs demonstrated the presence of TCE at a concentration above the PAL. (3) Two soil samples collected from depths of 198 to 199 ft bgs and 380 to 382 ft bgs demonstrated the presence of benzo(a)pyrene at a concentration above the PAL. (4) Two soil samples collected from depths of 240 to 241 ft bgs and 290 to 291 ft bgs demonstrated the presence of dibenz(a,h)anthracene at a concentration above the PAL. Tier 2 final action levels (FALs) were then calculated for these contaminants. The Tier 2 FALs for TCE, benzo(a)pyrene, and dibenz(a,h)anthracene were calculated based on a limited exposure to subsurface contamination scenario, and the Tier 2 FAL for TPH-DRO was established as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 9 Preliminary Remediation Goal values for the individual hazardous constituents of diesel. The evaluation of TPH-DRO, benzo(a)pyrene, dibenz(a,h)anthracene, and TCE based on the Tier 2 FALs determined that no FALs were exceeded. Therefore, the DQO data needs were met, and it was determined that no corrective action (based on risk to human receptors) is necessary for the site. As a best management practice for the remaining subsurface diesel contamination present at the site, a use restriction was imposed on future site activities that would not allow for future contact of the subsurface contamination. Therefore, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: (1) No further corrective action for CAU 554. (2) No Corrective Action Plan. (3) A Notice of Completion to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 554. (4) Corrective Action Unit 554 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

  10. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY TITLE: A REVISED VAX FARANT SPLOT ROUTINE AND RELATED APPLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY TITLE: A REVISED VAX FARANT SPLOT ROUTINE AND RELATED APPLE #12;A REVISED VAX FARANT SPLOT ROUTINE AND RELATED APPLE II PLOTTING PROGRAM. The purpose of this report is to describe some upgrades made to the VAX 1 SPLOT" routine and the related Apple plotting

  11. Dear Data Managers and Providers: We have not revised the 2000 edition of the Data Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dear Data Managers and Providers: We have not revised the 2000 edition of the Data Management the Data and Metadata Reporting Guidance materials, including the data exchange standard template, under plans on the drawing board for revising all of our quality management documents in the near future

  12. Revised Manuscript May

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-RayReview/Verify3 June 201445Revised

  13. Economic analysis of proposed voluntary energy conservation standard for new residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, S.J.; Roop, J.M.; Callaway, J.W.; Taylor, Z.T.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this document is to present an analysis of the impacts of the proposed voluntary energy conservation standard for the construction of new residential buildings. This analysis examines the impacts of having the proposed residential standard apply immediately and, alternatively, having the proposed standard phased in over a five-year period. It does not address the question of whether realistically the standard would be adopted by states, nor does it weight the improbable impact of states with higher energy efficiency standards modifying their standard to comply with this voluntary standard. 19 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

  14. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 545: Dumps, Waste Disposal Sites, and Buried Radioactive Materials Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 545, Dumps, Waste Disposal Sites, and Buried Radioactive Materials, in Areas 2, 3, 9, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (1996, as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit 545 is comprised of the following eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs): • 02-09-01, Mud Disposal Area • 03-08-03, Mud Disposal Site • 03-17-01, Waste Consolidation Site 3B • 03-23-02, Waste Disposal Site • 03-23-05, Europium Disposal Site • 03-99-14, Radioactive Material Disposal Area • 09-23-02, U-9y Drilling Mud Disposal Crater • 20-19-01, Waste Disposal Site While all eight CASs are addressed in this CADD/CR, sufficient information was available for the following three CASs; therefore, a field investigation was not conducted at these sites: • For CAS 03-08-03, though the potential for subsidence of the craters was judged to be extremely unlikely, the data quality objective (DQO) meeting participants agreed that sufficient information existed about disposal and releases at the site and that a corrective action of close in place with a use restriction is recommended. Sampling in the craters was not considered necessary. • For CAS 03-23-02, there were no potential releases of hazardous or radioactive contaminants identified. Therefore, the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for CAU 545 concluded that: “Sufficient information exists to conclude that this CAS does not exist as originally identified. Therefore, there is no environmental concern associated with CAS 03-23-02.” This CAS is closed with no further action. • For CAS 03-23-05, existing information about the two buried sources and lead pig was considered to be sufficient, and safety concerns existed about the stability of the crater component. Therefore, a corrective action of close in place with a use restriction is recommended, and sampling at the site was not considered necessary. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation to support the recommendation for closure of CAU 545 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from August 20 through November 02, 2007, as set forth in the CAU 545 Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the DQO process: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. • Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 545 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels established in this CADD/CR. The results of the CAI identified no COCs at the five CASs investigated in CAU 545. As a best management practice, repair of the fence enclosing CAS 03-08-03 has been completed. Therefore, the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • Close in place COCs at CASs 03-08-03 and 03-23-05 with use restrictions. • No further corrective action for CAU 545. • No Corrective Action Plan. • Corrective Action Unit 545 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. • A Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 545.

  15. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 372: Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick and Sloop, Christy

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 372, Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters, located within Areas 18 and 20 at the Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 372 comprises four corrective action sites (CASs): • 18-45-02, Little Feller I Surface Crater • 18-45-03, Little Feller II Surface Crater • 20-23-01, U-20k Contamination Area • 20-45-01, U-20L Crater (Cabriolet) The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 372 based on the implementation of the corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls at all CASs. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from November 9, 2009, through December 10, 2010, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 372: Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides and investigation of other releases (migration in washes and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 372 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Investigation results were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A radiological dose FAL was established of 25 millirem per year based on the Remote Work Area exposure scenario (336 hours of annual exposure). Radiological doses exceeding the FAL were found to be present at all four CASs. It is assumed that radionuclide levels present within the Little Feller I and Cabriolet high contamination areas and within the craters at Palanquin and Cabriolet exceed the FAL. It is also assumed that potential source material in the form of lead bricks at Little Feller I and lead-acid batteries at Palanquin and Cabriolet exceed the FAL. Therefore, corrective actions were undertaken that consist of removing potential source material, where present, and implementing a use restriction and posting warning signs at each CAS. These use restrictions were recorded in the FFACO database; the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Facility Information Management System; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 372. • A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 372. • Corrective Action Unit 372 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  16. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 374: Area 20 Schooner Unit Crater, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC 1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 374 comprises five corrective action sites (CASs): • 18-22-05, Drum • 18-22-06, Drums (20) • 18-22-08, Drum • 18-23-01, Danny Boy Contamination Area • 20-45-03, U-20u Crater (Schooner) The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 374 based on the implementation of corrective actions. The corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls was implemented at CASs 18-23-01 and 20-45-03, and a corrective action of removing potential source material (PSM) was conducted at CAS 20-45-03. The other CASs require no further action; however, best management practices of removing PSM and drums at CAS 18-22-06, and removing drums at CAS 18-22-08 were performed. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from May 4 through October 6, 2010, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 374: Area 20 Schooner Unit Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigating the primary release of radionuclides and investigating other releases (migration in washes and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 374 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the dataset is acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. Radiological doses exceeding the FAL of 25 millirem per year were found to be present in the surface soil that was sampled. It is assumed that radionuclide levels present in subsurface media within the craters and ejecta fields (default contamination boundaries) at the Danny Boy and Schooner sites exceed the FAL. It is also assumed that PSM in the form of lead-acid batteries at Schooner exceeds the FAL. Therefore, corrective actions were undertaken that consist of removing PSM, where present, and implementing a use restriction and posting warning signs at the Danny Boy and Schooner sites. These use restrictions were recorded in the FFACO database; the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Facility Information Management System; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 374. • A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 374. • Corrective Action Unit 374 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  17. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Sewage Lagoons and North Disposal Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the September 1998, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the modification of the UR for CAS TA-03-001-TARC Roller Coaster Lagoons. This UR was established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and was based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This reevaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to modify the UR for CAS TA-03-001-TARC to an administrative UR. Administrative URs differ from standard URs in that they do not require onsite postings (i.e., signs) or other physical barriers (e.g., fencing, monuments), and they do not require periodic inspections (see Section 6.2 of the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels [NNSA/NSO, 2006c]). This Administrative UR was based on a “Remote Work Sites” future land use scenario that was used to calculate the FAL. The administrative UR will protect workers from an exposure exceeding that used in the calculation of the FAL (i.e., 336 hours per year). Any proposed activity within these use restricted areas that would potentially cause an exposure exceeding this exposure limit would require approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  18. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the September 1998, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS TA-03-001-TARC Roller Coaster Lagoons • CAS TA-21-001-TARC Roller Coaster N. Disposal Trench These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to modify these URs to administrative URs. Administrative URs differ from standard URs in that they do not require onsite postings (i.e., signs) or other physical barriers (e.g., fencing, monuments), and they do not require periodic inspections (see Section 6.2 of the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels [NNSA/NSO, 2006c]). These Administrative URs were based on a “Remote Work Sites” future land use scenario that was used to calculate the FAL. The administrative UR will protect workers from an exposure exceeding that used in the calculation of the FAL (i.e., 336 hours per year). Any proposed activity within these use restricted areas that would potentially cause an exposure exceeding this exposure limit would require approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  19. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 367: Area 10 Sedan, Ess and Uncle Unit Craters Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 367 comprises four corrective action sites (CASs): • 10-09-03, Mud Pit • 10-45-01, U-10h Crater (Sedan) • 10-45-02, Ess Crater Site • 10-45-03, Uncle Crater Site The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation of the corrective actions and site closure activities implemented at CAU 367. A corrective action of closure in place with use restrictions was completed at each of the three crater CASs (10-45-01, 10-45-02, and 10-45-03); corrective actions were not required at CAS 10-09-03. In addition, a limited soil removal corrective action was conducted at the location of a potential source material release. Based on completion of these correction actions, no additional corrective action is required at CAU 367, and site closure is considered complete. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from February 2010 through March 2011, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 367: Area 10 Sedan, Ess and Uncle Unit Craters, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides, and investigation of non-test or other releases (e.g., migration in washes and potential source material). Based on the proximity of the Uncle, Ess, and Sedan craters, the impact of the Sedan test on the fallout deposited from the two earlier tests, and aerial radiological surveys, the CAU 367 investigation was designed to study the releases from the three crater CASs as one combined release (primary release). Corrective Action Site 10-09-03, Mud Pit, consists of two mud pits identified at CAU 367. The mud pits are considered non-test releases or other releases and were investigated independent of the three crater CASs. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 367 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. For the primary release, radiological doses exceeding the FAL of 25 millirem per year were not found to be present in the surface or shallow subsurface soil outside the default contamination boundary. However, it was assumed that radionuclides are present in subsurface media within each of the three craters (Sedan, Ess, and Uncle) due to prompt injection of radionuclides from the tests. Based on the assumption of radiological dose exceeding the FAL, corrective actions were undertaken that consisted of implementing a use restriction and posting warning signs at each crater CAS. These use restrictions were recorded in the FFACO database; the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Facility Information Management System; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. With regard to other releases, no contaminants of concern were identified at the mud pits or any of the other release locations, with one exception. Potential source material in the form of lead was found at one location. A corrective action of clean closure was implemented at this location, and verification samples indicated that no further action is necessary. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: • A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 367. • Corrective Action Unit 367 should be promoted from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  20. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Kauss

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 539 are located within Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada National Security Site. Corrective Action Unit 539 comprises the following CASs: • 25-99-21, Area 25 Railroad Tracks • 26-99-05, Area 26 Railroad Tracks The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 539 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Reviewed documentation on historical and current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Conducted radiological walkover surveys of railroad tracks in both Areas 25 and 26. • Collected ballast and soil samples and calculated internal dose estimates for radiological releases. • Collected in situ thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements and calculated external dose estimates for radiological releases. • Removed lead bricks as potential source material (PSM) and collected verification samples. • Implemented corrective actions as necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly disposed of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Implemented an FFACO use restriction (UR) for radiological contamination at CAS 25-99-21. The approved UR form and map are provided in Appendix F and will be filed in the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Facility Information Management System; the FFACO database; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. From November 29, 2010, through May 2, 2011, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) to determine COCs for CAU 539. Assessment of the data generated from closure activities revealed the following: • At CAS 26-99-05, the total effective dose for radiological releases did not exceed the FAL of 25 millirem per Industrial Area year. Potential source material in the form of lead bricks was found at three locations. A corrective action of clean closure was implemented at these locations, and verification samples indicated that no further action is necessary. • At CAS 25-99-21, the total effective dose for radiological releases exceeds the FAL of 25 millirem per Industrial Area year. Potential source material in the form of lead bricks was found at eight locations. A corrective action was implemented by removing the lead bricks and soil above FALs at these locations, and verification samples indicated that no further action is necessary. Pieces of debris with high radioactivity were identified as PSM and remain within the CAS boundary. A corrective action of closure in place with a UR was implemented at this CAS because closure activities showed evidence of remaining soil contamination and radioactive PSM. Future land use will be restricted from surface and intrusive activities. Closure activities generated waste streams consisting of industrial solid waste, recyclable materials, low-level radioactive waste, and mixed low-level radioactive waste. Wastes were disposed of in the appropriate onsite landfills. The NNSA/NSO prov

  1. Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reports Reports Individual Permit reports are prepared annually to facilitate public review of activities for the previous year. Contact Environmental Communication & Public...

  2. Proposed Revisions for Regents Policy

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    Amin, S. Massoud

    Proposed Revisions for Regents Policy: Faculty Tenure Arlene Carney Vice Provost for Faculty family friendliness for probationary period #12;Basis for Revisions of Faculty Tenure Policy · Changed definitions of Academic Freedom and Responsibility required changes in the tenure policy. · As more untenured

  3. Brookhaven National Laboratory Number: Revision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Brookhaven National Laboratory Number: Revision: PS-ESH-0057 01 Effective: Page 1 of 9 06 Chris Weilandics Signature on file Department ES&H Approval printed name Signature Date Lori Stiegler Signature on file #12;Number: PS-ESH-0057 Revision: 01 Effective: 06/08/12 Page 2 of 9 The only official

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document/ Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 556: Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with Errata Sheet, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 556, Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, located at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 556 is comprised of four corrective action sites (CASs): • 06-20-04, National Cementers Dry Well • 06-99-09, Birdwell Test Hole • 25-60-03, E-MAD Stormwater Discharge and Piping • 25-64-01, Vehicle Washdown and Drainage Pit The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 556 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities began on February 7 and were completed on June 19, 2008, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 556: Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. • Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 556 data were evaluated based on the data quality assessment process, which demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the data for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against appropriate final action levels (FALs) to identify the COCs for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified COCs at one of the four CASs in CAU 556 that required the completion of a corrective action. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 556 revealed the following: • Corrective Action Sites 06-20-04, 06-99-09, and 25-64-01 do not contain contamination at concentrations exceeding the FALs. • Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination above the FAL was identified in the surface and/or shallow subsurface soils at the outfall and around Catch Basin 2, and in soils contained within the catch basins and the manhole at CAS 25-60-03. A corrective action of close in place with a soil removal action and use restriction (UR) was completed at CAS 25-60-03. The PCB-contaminated soils were removed from the outfall area and around Catch Basin 2, and disposed of at a Nevada Test Site landfill as part of a removal action. The catch basins and the manhole were sealed shut by filling them with grout. The end of the outfall pipe was plugged using grout, covered with soil, and the area was regraded. A UR was applied to the entire stormwater system at CAS 25-60-03, which includes the three catch basins, manhole, and associated piping. No further action is the corrective action for CASs 06-20-04, 06-99-09, and 25-64-01. The liquids in the test holes at CAS 06-99-09 were removed for disposal and the features were filled with grout as a best management practice. The drainage pipe between the vehicle washdown pad and the drainage pit at CAS 25-64-01 was sealed at each end as a best management practice. The corrective actions were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. They were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The corrective actions meet all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential exposure pathways to the contaminated media to an acceptable level at CAU 556. Therefore, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • Maintain a UR for the entire stormwater drainage system (i.e., three catch basins, one manhole, and associated piping) at CAS 25-60-03. • No further corrective action for CAU 556. • A Notice of Completion to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada

  5. Joint Implementation: Lessons from Title IV's Voluntary Compliance Programs1 by Erica Atkeson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ' 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), also known as the Acid Rain Program, is the largest public policy-in participants from entering the Acid Rain Program. The differing response to Title IV's two voluntary programs ..................................................................................... 9 3. The United States Acid Rain Program

  6. The behavioral response to voluntary provision of an environmental public good: Evidence from residential electricity demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotchen, Matthew J.

    residential electricity demand Grant D. Jacobsen a,n , Matthew J. Kotchen b,c , Michael P. Vandenbergh d online 25 February 2012 JEL classification: H41 Q42 G54 Keywords: Green electricity Voluntary environmental protection Carbon offset Renewable energy Moral licensing Residential electricity demand a b s t r

  7. Energy Studies Review Vol. 11, No. 2, 2003 pp131-151 The Voluntary Approach to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of their own accord. Popular new catchphrases, such as the natural step, eco-efficiency and triple bottom lineEnergy Studies Review Vol. 11, No. 2, 2003 pp131-151 The Voluntary Approach to GHG Reduction and professor, respectively, at the Energy and Materials Research Group, School of Resource and Environmental

  8. Using sheep preference, near infrared reflectance and laboratory tests for predicting voluntary intake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Using sheep preference, near infrared reflectance and laboratory tests for predicting voluntary for grinding ; N, NDF, ADF ; in vitro DMD ; and 4 promising second derivatives of the near infrared spectrum in VDMI, gas production methods lose their predictive ability in favour of in sacco methods. Near Infrared

  9. Evaluating voluntary measures with treatment spillovers: the case of coal combustion products partnership - article no. 36

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lange, I. [University of Stirling, Stirling (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voluntary measures have traditionally been evaluated using a similar framework regardless of their structure. The framework assumes that the measure provides partners with a treatment (information, research support, etc.) that will not be transferred to non-partners. In this framework, a voluntary measure is said to be worthwhile if differences are significant between the behavior of partners and non-partners, correcting for the potential endogeneity of becoming a partner. However, voluntary measures take many different forms, some of which are expected to have transfers to non-partners (spillovers). The Coal Combustion Products Partnership (C2P2) is a U.S. voluntary program with a structure that is likely to provide treatment spillovers to non-partners. This paper evaluates C2P2 and tests whether treatment spillovers are affecting non-partners' behavior. Results are consistent with a program that would traditionally be considered unsuccessful, but the consideration of treatment spillovers makes it consistent with a successful program.

  10. Clean Cities Annual Metrics Report 2009 (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Document provides Clean Cities coalition metrics about the use of alternative fuels; the deployment of alternative fuel vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and idle reduction initiatives; fuel economy activities; and programs to reduce vehicle miles driven.

  11. (Revision : 1.5) A REPORT TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Campbell O.

    .1.1 Submontane forest on volcanics and acid metamorphics [1] . . . . . . . . . 14 5.1.2 Submontane forest on karst [2] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 5.2 Lowland and hill rain forest on dry land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 5.2.1 Hill forest on acid volcanics

  12. COMMITTEE FINAL REPORT REVISED SHORTTERM PEAK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002011002CTF #12; CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY AND NATURAL GAS COMMITTEE Robert D was prepared by the California Energy Commission Electricity and Natural Gas Committee as part of 2011, recommends a reduced shortterm forecast for the Pacific Gas and Electric, Southern California Edison

  13. Final Report (Revised July 2004) Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Hawaii 39 Appendices 45 Appendix A: Hydrogen Energy Technologies A-1 Appendix B: Companies Pioneering is exploring innovative ways to develop and use renewable energy derived from solar, wind, and geothermal

  14. ISU Economic Report 51 Revised July 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    interactions has been a major focus of analytical, empirical, and human-subject experimental re- searchers double auction is widely used in experimental research with human subjects, whether market power has any in experiments performed by himself and several other researchers; but so far the number of experiments along

  15. Organic complexant topical report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; and others

    1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reviews the current understanding of hazards associated with the storage of organic complexant salts in Hanford Site high-level waste tanks. Two distinct hazards were evaluated: spontaneous self- accelerating decomposition reactions in the bulk material (bulk runaway) and ignition followed by condensed phase propagation (point source ignition). Results from the bulk runaway assessment showed that bulk runaway is not credible for all tanks except C-106. However, speciation of the organic in C-106 shows that it is almost all in the form of low energy oxalate, and there is little potential for a bulk runaway. Additional testing and evaluation would be necessary to definitely conclude that there is no potential for bulk runaway; therefore, controls are currently required for his tank. Temperature monitoring and controls (water addition and active ventilation) are adequate to prevent bulk runaway in C-106.

  16. Answers to the set revision exercise 1 Answers to the set revision exercise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alechina, Natasha

    to the set revision exercise 5 Answers to the set revision exercise · If A has k elements, how many different1 Answers to the set revision exercise 1 Answers to the set revision exercise · Are A = {1 in which they are listed does not matter. Answers to the set revision exercise 2 Answers to the set

  17. Exam revision Database Systems Lecture 18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alechina, Natasha

    revision Example (coursework 5) · {Film} {Certificate} is a non-trivial functional dependency · {Cinema(A,B,C), candidate keys (A,B) and (A,C), fd B C. #12;Exam revision Example (coursework 5) · Relation ListingExam revision Database Systems Lecture 18 Natasha Alechina #12;Exam revision In This Lecture · Exam

  18. Recent Revisions to PVWATTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marion, B.; Anderberg, M.; Gray-Hann, P.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PVWATTS is an Internet-accessible software program that allows the user to easily calculate the energy production and cost savings for grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems located throughout the United States. To ensure that PVWATTS continues to meet its users' needs, an online survey form was provided to users to identify areas for improvement. The results of the survey were used to prioritize improvements to PVWATTS in FY2005. PVWATTS was revised by changing the PV system specification input for system size from an AC power rating to a nameplate DC power rating; adding an input for an overall DC to AC derate factor; updating the residential electric rates; adding monthly and yearly solar radiation values for the PV array; and simplifying the user interface for Version 2.

  19. Holographic Inflation Revised

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Banks; Willy Fischler

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a major revision of our previous work on the HST model of inflation. We identify the local fluctuations of the metric with fluctuations of the mass and angular momentum of black holes, and show that the consistency conditions in HST for a single trajectory to see more and more of a homogeneous distribution of black holes, imply that the system outside the horizon is undergoing inflation: small systems of equal entropy, are not in causal contact. Homogeneity then requires that the initial trajectory underwent inflation that expanded the black hole radius into our current horizon. The low entropy of the initial state of the universe is explained by the fact that this is the maximal entropy state, which has long lived localized excitations, and which can form structures more complex than black holes. The number of e-folds, reheat temperature of the universe and size of inflationary fluctuations are calculated in terms of a few parameters.

  20. Revised isotopic (40 Ar) age for the lamproite volcano of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Revised isotopic (40 Ar/39 Ar) age for the lamproite volcano of Cabezos Negros, Fortuna Basin (lamproites) of the Fortuna Basin in southeast Spain. This age is significantly older than earlier reported K. Because the volcanic rocks are intercalated in the stratigraphic sequence of the Fortuna Basin directly

  1. ORNL/TM-2000/204 REVISION OF THE MCSAP ALLOCATION FORMULA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORNL/TM-2000/204 REVISION OF THE MCSAP ALLOCATION FORMULA: SUMMARY REPORT Lorena F. Truett Stacy C.........................................................................................6 3.2 Formula Development..............................................................................................................19 APPENDIX A: MCSAP FORMULA WORKGROUP PARTICIPANTS...................A-1 APPENDIX B: FACTORS

  2. Acute Liver Failure After a Late TIPSS Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radeleff, Boris, E-mail: Boris_radeleff@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Sommer, Christof-Matthias; Schawo, Simone; Lopez-Benitez, Ruben [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany); Sauer, Peter [University of Heidelberg, Departments of Internal Medicine IV, Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Infectious Diseases, Intoxications (Germany); Schemmer, Peter [University of Heidelberg, Department of Surgery (Germany); Kauffmann, Guenter W.; Richter, Goetz M. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a rare case of late transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPSS) occlusion due to progressive stent protrusion into the periportal liver parenchyma, which was a result of delayed liver shrinkage 2 years after TIPSS. The initial TIPSS procedure had been carried out in a 52-year-old man as a bridge for liver transplantation because of post-alcoholic liver cirrhosis. We describe the applied TIPSS recanalization and revision technique. Immediately after TIPSS revision acute liver failure developed, which required emergency liver transplantation.

  3. FY-2007 PNNL Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Program Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Patrick A.; Fisher, Julie A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Isern, Nancy G.; Madson, Vernon J.; Meicenheimer, Russell L.; Pugh, Ray; Schneirla, Keri A.; Shockey, Loretta L.; Tinker, Mike R.

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports the results of the FY-2007 PNNL VPP Program Evaluation, which is a self-assessment of the operational and programmatic performance of the Laboratory related to worker safety and health. The report was compiled by a team of worker representatives and safety professionals who evaluated the Laboratory's worker safety and health programs on the basis of DOE-VPP criteria. The principle elements of DOE's VPP program are: Management Leadership, Employee Involvement, Worksite Analysis, Hazard Prevention and Control, and Safety and Health Training.

  4. PNNL FY2005 DOE Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Program Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Patrick A.; Madson, Vernon J.; Isern, Nancy G.; Haney, Janice M.; Fisher, Julie A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Gulley, Susan E.; Reck, John J.; Collins, Drue A.; Tinker, Mike R.; Walker, Landon A.; Wynn, Clifford L.

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports the results of the FY 2005 PNNL VPP Program Evaluation, which is a self-assessment of the operational and programmatic performance of the Laboratory related to worker safety and health. The report was compiled by a team of worker representatives and safety professionals who evaluated the Laboratory's worker safety and health programs on the basis of DOE-VPP criteria. The principle elements of DOE's VPP program are: Management Leadership, Employee Involvement, Worksite Analysis, Hazard Prevention and Control, and Safety and Health Training.

  5. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Fluor Hanford SAS- February 2008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report summarizes the results of the HSS DOE-VPP Team’s evaluation of The Kansas City Plant (KCP during the period of November 10-21, 2008, and provides the Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer with the necessary information to make the final decision regarding the company’s continued participation in DOE-VPP as a Star site.

  6. Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR Voluntary Labeling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This paper presents past and predicted savings for the ENERGY STAR ® labeling program, operated jointly appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subset of ENERGY STAR program activities, focused primarily on labeled products. We present estimates of the energy, dollar and carbon savings achieved

  7. Revision of ASCE 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, T.A.; Murray, R.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Short, S.A. [EQE Engineering Consultants, Inc. (United States)

    1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The original version of ASCE Standard 4, ``Seismic Analysis of Safety-Related Nuclear Structures`` was published in September 1986. It is ASCE policy to update its standards on a five year interval and the Working Group on Seismic Analysis of Safety Related Nuclear Structures was reconvened to formulate the revisions. The goal in updating the standard is to make sure that it is still relevant and that it incorporates the state of the practice in seismic engineering or, in some cases, where it has been demonstrated that state-of-the-art improvements need to be made to standard practice; new improvements are included. The contents of the new standard cover the same areas as the original version, with some additions. The contents are as follows: Input - response spectra and time histories; modeling of structures; analysis of structures; soil-structure interaction; input for subsystem analysis; special structures - buried pipes and conduits, earth-retaining walls, above-ground vertical tanks, raceways, and base-isolated structures; and an appendix providing seismic probabilistic risk assessment and margin assessment.

  8. Revised: June 19. 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    on the utilitys retail sales by State. Reported losses may include electricity unaccounted for by the utility. Direct use is commercial or industrial use of electricity that...

  9. NIST ITL Participation in Voluntary Standards Developing Organizations (Key: Highlighted activities represent areas, which are international in scope.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 NIST ITL Participation in Voluntary Standards Developing Organizations (Key: Highlighted Technical Standards Committee E. Simmon 775 IEC SC3D International Electrotechnical Commission Subcommittee International Electrotechnical Commission Technical Committee 111, Environmental standardization for electrical

  10. DOE-TSPP-3, Use of Voluntary Consensus Standards and Interaction with Standards Development Organizations- August 1, 2000

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This procedure identifies the process by which DOE adopts Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCSs) and provides guidance for the interaction of DOE and contractor employees with Standards Development Organizations (SDOs).

  11. Predictive models of employee voluntary turnover in a North American professional sales force using data-mining analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane-Sellers, Marjorie Laura

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    With the supply of talented employees for the predicted available jobs around the world declining, employee retention and voluntary turnover have jumped to the forefront of HRD practitioners’, as well as senior managers’, ...

  12. Voluntary Protection Program - Congress and VPP | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartmentDepartment(GATE)Action Plan forArticles, reports and

  13. Voluntary Protection Program - Related Links | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartmentDepartment(GATE)Action Plan forArticles, reports and

  14. Voluntary Protection Program On-site Evaluations | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartmentDepartment(GATE)Action Plan forArticles, reportsMay 8,

  15. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review of Wackenhut Services Inc, March

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartmentDepartment(GATE)Action Plan forArticles, reportsMay

  16. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Washington Closure Hanford VPP

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads| DepartmentVictor Kane AboutContractSecurity SiteReport

  17. Voluntary Initiative on Incentives: Toolkit Training Webinar | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report |to 40% Whole-House Energy Savingsfor Nanoscaleof

  18. REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the California Energy Commission staff's revised forecasts for 2012­2022 electricity consumption, peak Electricity, demand, consumption, forecast, weather normalization, peak, natural gas, self generation REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand

  19. REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Commission staff's revised forecasts for 2012­2022 electricity consumption, peak, and natural Electricity, demand, consumption, forecast, weather normalization, peak, natural gas, self generation REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 2: Electricity Demand by Utility

  20. Distributed Belief Revision vs. Belief Revision in a MultiAgent environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    belief revision in a multi­source enviroment (MSBR) [5], we realized that three relevant items are1 Distributed Belief Revision vs. Belief Revision in a Multi­Agent environment: first results propose a distributed architecture for belief revision­ integration, where each element is conceived like

  1. Revising partial pre-orders with partial pre-orders: A unit-based revision framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Weiru

    Revising partial pre-orders with partial pre-orders: A unit-based revision framework Jianbing Ma1, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast BT9 5BN, UK, email: {jma03, w.liu}@qub.ac.uk 2 CRIL-CNRS, UMR 8188@cril.fr Abstract Belief revision studies strategies about how agents revise their belief states when receiving new

  2. 2006 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) Voluntary Labeling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla; Homan, Gregory K.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy, 1996a. Annual Energy Outlook 1996 with ProjectionsEnergy, 1996b. Annual Energy Outlook 1997 with ProjectionsEnergy, 1998b. Annual Energy Outlook 1999 with Projections

  3. 2007 Status Report: Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) VoluntaryLabeling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Marla; Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Homan, Gregory K.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy, 1996a. Annual Energy Outlook 1996 with ProjectionsEnergy, 1996b. Annual Energy Outlook 1997 with ProjectionsEnergy, 1997b. Annual Energy Outlook 1998 with Projections

  4. 2005 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) Voluntary Labeling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy, 1996a. Annual Energy Outlook 1996 with ProjectionsEnergy, 1996b. Annual Energy Outlook 1997 with ProjectionsEnergy, 1997b. Annual Energy Outlook 1998 with Projections

  5. 2003 status report savings estimates for the energy star(R) voluntary labeling program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; McWhinney, Marla

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Energy, 2000. Annual Energy Outlook 2001 with Projectionsof Energy, 1999. Annual Energy Outlook 2000 with ProjectionsEnergy, 1996a. Annual Energy Outlook 1996 with Projections

  6. 2002 status report: Savings estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) voluntary labeling program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; McWhinney, Marla; Koomey, Jonathan

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy, 1996a. Annual Energy Outlook 1996 with ProjectionsEnergy, 1996b. Annual Energy Outlook 1997 with ProjectionsEnergy, 1997b. Annual Energy Outlook 1998 with Projections

  7. Savings estimates for the ENERGY STAR (registered trademark) voluntary labeling program: 2001 status report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Mahajan, Akshay; Koomey, Jonathan G.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Energy, 1999. Annual Energy Outlook 2000 with ProjectionsEnergy, 1996a. Annual Energy Outlook 1996 with ProjectionsEnergy, 1996b. Annual Energy Outlook 1997 with Projections

  8. 2007 Status Report: Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) VoluntaryLabeling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Marla; Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Homan, Gregory K.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0035(95/05). Energy Information Administration. May. US DOE,EIA-0383(96). Energy Information Administration. January. US0383(97). Energy Information Administration. December. US

  9. 2005 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) Voluntary Labeling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EIA-0383(2005). Energy Information Administration. http://0035(95/05). Energy Information Administration. May. US DOE,EIA-0383(96). Energy Information Administration. January. US

  10. 2006 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) Voluntary Labeling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla; Homan, Gregory K.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0035(95/05). Energy Information Administration. May. US DOE,EIA-0383(96). Energy Information Administration. January. US0383(97). Energy Information Administration. December. US

  11. 2007 Status Report: Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) VoluntaryLabeling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Marla; Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Homan, Gregory K.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    market (90 percent or more) by 2015. In contrast, high efficiency heating andheating and cooling equipment, including multiple fuel types, technology substitution and program interactions. The market

  12. 2006 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) Voluntary Labeling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla; Homan, Gregory K.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    market (90 percent or more) by 2015. In contrast, high efficiency heating andheating and cooling equipment, including multiple fuel types, technology substitution and program interactions. The market

  13. 2005 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) Voluntary Labeling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Cooling - Furnace (Gas or Oil) - Central Air Conditioner - Air-Source Heat Pump - Geothermaland Cooling - Furnaces (Gas or Oil) - Central Air Conditioners - Air-Source Heat Pumps - Geothermaland Cooling - Furnaces (Gas or Oil) - Central Air Conditioners - Air-Source Heat Pumps - Geothermal

  14. 2006 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) Voluntary Labeling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla; Homan, Gregory K.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Cooling - Furnace (Gas or Oil) - Central Air Conditioner - Air-Source Heat Pump - Geothermaland Cooling (HVAC). The HVAC program covers air-source heat pumps, geothermal

  15. 2007 Status Report: Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) VoluntaryLabeling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Marla; Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Homan, Gregory K.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Cooling - Furnace (Gas or Oil) - Central Air Conditioner - Air-Source Heat Pump - Geothermaland Cooling - Oil Furnace - Gas Furnace - Central Air Conditioner - Air-Source Heat Pump - Geothermaland Cooling (HVAC). The HVAC program covers air-source heat pumps, geothermal

  16. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Emission Factors and

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877SouthwestWisconsin profileDatabase Form914

  17. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Original 1605(b)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877SouthwestWisconsin profileDatabase

  18. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Greenhouse Gases and

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469DecadeOrigin State GlossaryEnergyForest(NAICSGlobal

  19. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - About the 1605(b)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work withJerseyMarkets 19, 4:00Markets914

  20. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Original 1605(b)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work withJerseyMarkets 19,Program Schedule

  1. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Original 1605(b)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work withJerseyMarkets 19,Program

  2. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Section 1605 Text

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work withJerseyMarkets 19,ProgramSection 1605

  3. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - What are Greenhouse

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work withJerseyMarkets 19,ProgramSection

  4. Introduction to Belief Revision Maurice Pagnucco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pagnucco, Maurice

    . Heracleitus of Ephesus (as quoted by Plutarch, On the E at Delphi) The concept of belief revision is

  5. Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (11th Edition)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Kreycik, C.; Friedman, B.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents green power marketing activities and trends in the United States. It presents aggregate green power sales data for all voluntary purchase markets across the United States. It also provides summary data on utility green pricing programs offered in regulated electricity markets and green power marketing activity in competitive electricity markets, as well as green power sold to voluntary purchasers in the form of renewable energy certificates. Key market trends and issues are also discussed.

  6. LBNL-56380 (2004) 2004 Status Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    presents past and predicted savings for the ENERGY STAR ® labeling program, a program operated jointly for a subset of ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy, dollar and carbon savingsLBNL-56380 (2004) 2004 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR ® Voluntary Labeling

  7. LBNL-56380 (2006) 2006 Status Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;1 Introduction This paper presents past and predicted savings for the ENERGY STAR ® labeling program, a program for a subset of ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy, dollar and carbon savingsLBNL-56380 (2006) 2006 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR ® Voluntary Labeling

  8. BELIEF REVISION AND UPDATE a dissertation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Val, Alvaro

    computational problems (chapters 5 and 6). A review of some of the most important proposals on revisionBELIEF REVISION AND UPDATE a dissertation submitted to the department of philosophy. In this study we focus on two of them, revision and update. For each of them, we attempt to ground them

  9. ASYNPLEX, an asynchronous parallel revised simplex algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Julian

    ASYNPLEX, an asynchronous parallel revised simplex algorithm J.A.J. Hall K.I.M. McKinnon February, an asynchronous parallel revised simplex algorithm J. A. J. Hall K. I. M. McKinnon 27th February 1998 Abstract This paper describes ASYNPLEX, an asynchronous variant of the revised simplex method which is suitable

  10. Storage Ring Revised March 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory - Experiment 821

    Chapter 8. Storage Ring Revised March 1994 8.1. Introduction -- 107 -- #12; 108 Storage Ring 8.2. Magnetic Design and Field Calculations 8.2.1. Conceptual Approach #12; Storage Ring 109 #12; 110 Storage Ring 8.2.2. Computer Aided Refined Pole Designs #12; Storage Ring 111 #12; 112 Storage Ring #12

  11. Brookhaven National Laboratory Number: Revision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    NATIONAL LABORATORY LASER CONTROLLED AREA STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE (SOP) This document defines OPERATIONS Operation Maintenance Service Specific Operation (specify) #12;Number: PS-ESH-0083 Revision: 01 the safety management program for the laser system(s) listed below. All American National Standard Institute

  12. Revised 06-2011 Rechargeable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    the Sustainability Office at 573-884-9319. #12;Revised 06-2011 Examples of Recyclable Batteries Lithium Lead Acid Button Lithium Leaking Lead Acid Alkaline Silver (Ag), Lithium (Li), Mercury (Hg) Li Primary Pb Acid AARevised 06-2011 Rechargeable Battery And Cell Phone Recycling Program Guidelines University

  13. Seismic analyses of equipment in 2736-Z complex. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ocoma, E.C.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the structural qualification for the existing equipment when subjected to seismic loading in the Plutonium Storage Complex. It replaces in entirety Revision 0 and reconciles the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) comments on Revision 0. The Complex consists of 2736-Z Building (plutonium storage vault), 2736-ZA Building (vault ventilation equipment building), and 2736-ZB Building (shipping/receiving, repackaging activities). The existing equipment structurally qualified in this report are the metal storage racks for 7 inch and lard cans in room 2 of Building 2736-Z; the cubicles, can holders and pedestals in rooms 1, 3, and 4 of Building 2736-Z; the ventilation duct including exhaust fans/motors, emergency diesel generator, and HEPA filter housing in Building 2736-ZA; the repackaging glovebox in Building 2736-ZB; and the interface duct between Buildings 2736-Z and 2736-ZA.

  14. A Review of Criticality Accidents 2000 Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas P. McLaughlin; Shean P. Monahan; Norman L. Pruvost; Vladimir V. Frolov; Boris G. Ryazanov; Victor I. Sviridov

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Criticality accidents and the characteristics of prompt power excursions are discussed. Sixty accidental power excursions are reviewed. Sufficient detail is provided to enable the reader to understand the physical situation, the chemistry and material flow, and when available the administrative setting leading up to the time of the accident. Information on the power history, energy release, consequences, and causes are also included when available. For those accidents that occurred in process plants, two new sections have been included in this revision. The first is an analysis and summary of the physical and neutronic features of the chain reacting systems. The second is a compilation of observations and lessons learned. Excursions associated with large power reactors are not included in this report.

  15. Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsReduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voluntary agreements for energy efficiency improvement and reduction of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have been a popular policy instrument for the industrial sector in industrialized countries since the 1990s. A number of these national-level voluntary agreement programs are now being modified and strengthened, while additional countries--including some recently industrialized and developing countries--are adopting these type of agreements in an effort to increase the energy efficiency of their industrial sectors.Voluntary agreement programs can be roughly divided into three broad categories: (1) programs that are completely voluntary, (2) programs that use the threat of future regulations or energy/GHG emissions taxes as a motivation for participation, and (3) programs that are implemented in conjunction with an existing energy/GHG emissions tax policy or with strict regulations. A variety of government-provided incentives as well as penalties are associated with these programs. This paper reviews 23 energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programs in 18 countries, including countries in Europe, the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea, and Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) and discusses preliminary lessons learned regarding program design and effectiveness. The paper notes that such agreement programs, in which companies inventory and manage their energy use and GHG emissions to meet specific reduction targets, are an essential first step towards GHG emissions trading programs.

  16. Selection of 3013 containers for field surveillance: LA-14310, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peppers, Larry; Kelly, Elizabeth; McClard, James; Friday, Gary; Venetz, Theodore; Stakebake, Jerry

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the fifth in a series of reports that document the binning, statistical sampling, and sample selection of 3013 containers for field surveillance. 1,2,3,39 Revisions to binning assignments documented in this report are primarily a result of new prompt gamma data. This report also documents changes to the random sample specification resulting from these binning changes and identifies and provides the rationale for the engineering judgment sample items for Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 and 2009. This revision also updates the changes to the previous surveillance sample resulting from changes to the order that specific containers undergo surveillance. This report will continue to be reviewed regularly and revised as needed to meet the requirements of the surveillance program.

  17. Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 481.1C, Strategic Partnerships Projects (formerly known as Work for Others (Non-Department of Energy Funded Work)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The revision will propose reduction in requirements, increased delegation of management responsibilities to program organizations, reduction in data collection and reporting requirements as well as increased use of available real time financial data for reporting activities.

  18. Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 481.1C, Strategic Partnerships Projects (formerly known as Work for Others (Non-Department of Energy Funded Work))

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    The revision will propose reduction in requirements, increased delegation of management responsibilities to program organizations, reduction in data collection and reporting requirements as well as increased use of available real time financial data for reporting activities.

  19. SEA screening of voluntary climate change plans: A story of non-compliant discretion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Křrnřv, Lone, E-mail: lonek@plan.aau.dk; Wejs, Anja

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Screening within Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is the first critical stage involving considerations on whether an assessment is carried out or not. Although legislation and guidance offer practitioners a legal and logical approach to the screening process, it is inevitable that discretionary judgement takes place and will impact on the screening decision. This article examines the results of discretion involved in screening of climate change plans (CCPs) in a Danish context. These years voluntary CCPs are developed as a response to the global and local emergence of both mitigation and adaptation, and the voluntary commitment by the local authorities is an indication of an emerging norm of climate change as an important issue. This article takes its point of departure in the observation that SEA is not undertaken for these voluntary CCPs. The critical analysis of this phenomenon rests upon a documentary study of Danish CCPs, interviews with a lawyer and ministerial key person and informal discussions between researchers, practitioners and lawyers on whether climate change plans are covered by SEA legislation and underlying reasons for the present practice. Based on a critical analysis of mandatory SEA and/or obligation to screen CCPs according to significance criteria, the authors find that 18 out of the 48 CCPs are mandatory to SEA and 9 would require a screening of significance and thereby potentially be followed by a SEA. In practice only one plan was screened and one was environmentally assessed. The legal, democratic and environmental consequences of this SEA practice are critically discussed. Hereunder is the missed opportunity to use the broad environmental scope of SEA to avoid a narrow focus on energy and CO{sub 2} in CCPs, and the question whether this practice in Denmark complies with the EU Directive. -- Highlights: ? It is inevitable that discretionary judgement takes place and will impact on the screening decision. ? The article hereby calls for greater awareness of the discretion and judgement involved in SEA screening. ? Practice seemingly reveals a lack of application of SEA within climate change planning and a lack of explicit screening. ? Absence of SEAs of voluntary plans such as CCPs, have legal consequences, as well as democratic and environmental consequences. ? The vague definition of ‘administrative provision’ seems to impose the lacking SEA.

  20. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL B&W West Valley LLC,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads| DepartmentVictor Kane About UsforVoluntaryProject -

  1. Voluntary Self-Identification of Disability Form CC-305 OMB Control Number 1250-0005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 -Visualizing Brain MetalsVoluntary

  2. Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliability TechnologyRenewalReport Period:Reports

  3. Revised 2/12/2012 Page 1 Getting to Know the Finance Mart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Revised 2/12/2012 Page 1 Getting to Know the Finance Mart o Certified Departmental Financial departmental financial information is published daily in the Finance Mart. These are considered the official, the reporting for that period is final. The Finance Mart reports are static and may not be changed

  4. Clean Air Act. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Air Act, as amended, and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. This Reference Book has been completely revised and is current through February 15, 1994.

  5. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AND SWMU ASSESSMENT REPORT UNIT NUMBER: 450 UNIT NAME: S-710-32 DATE: Original: 01192001 Revised: 122303 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Attic of the C-710 building....

  6. On the Dynamics of Total Preorders: Revising Abstract Interval Orders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Tommie

    of iterated belief revision [5­7]. In the problem of belief set revision, the tpo can be thought of as extraOn the Dynamics of Total Preorders: Revising Abstract Interval Orders Richard Booth1 and Thomas) are often used in belief revision to encode an agent's strategy for revising its belief set in response

  7. January 13, 2012, Technical Qualification Program, Revision...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from recent self-assessments. Chan ed re- ualification eriodicity from 3 to 5 ears. REVISION NO.: 3 DATE: 11112 Subject Matter Expert (SME) (name, org., & phone):...

  8. DUAL EMPLOYMENT REVISED SCHEDULE REQUEST NAME: ____________________________________________________ EMPLID: ______________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    DUAL EMPLOYMENT REVISED SCHEDULE REQUEST NAME: _______________________ DUAL EMPLOYMENT DATES: ____________________ TO ______________________ TIMES: __________________ AM SCHEDULE. IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CLEMSON UNIVERSITY DUAL EMPLOYMENT POLICY, ALL HOURS MISSED WHILE

  9. Oxford Colleges On-line Reports for Tutorials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    OxCORT Oxford Colleges On-line Reports for Tutorials Tutor Role Version 4.5 BSP Training TeamCORT..........................................................................5 Roles in OxCORT..................................................................................5 of Revision Class reports.......................................................8 Report states

  10. REPORT

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to 1 |D I S P U REPORT of the

  11. Towards a practical parallelisation of the revised simplex method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Julian

    Towards a practical parallelisation of the revised simplex method Julian Hall, Edmund Smith parallelisation of the revised simplex method #12;Overview · LP problems and the simplex method · Scope parallelism · (Preliminary) results · Conclusions Towards a practical parallelisation of the revised simplex

  12. NIST ITL Participation in Voluntary Standards Developing Organizations (Key: Highlighted activities represent areas, which are international in scope.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 NIST ITL Participation in Voluntary Standards Developing Organizations (Key: Highlighted Quality and Statistics C.M. Wang 898 ASTM E-21 Color and Appearance A. Aviles 898 BioAPI Consortium Biometric Application Programming Interface (API) Consortium F. Podio 893 HIMSS/IHE Healthcare Information

  13. Clinical Instructor Responsibilities The APTA has detailed voluntary guidelines for clinical instructors. The guidelines are divided into six key

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    Clinical Instructor Responsibilities The APTA has detailed voluntary guidelines for clinical instructors. The guidelines are divided into six key areas: · Clinical competence and legal and ethical and final). Northwestern University expects clinical instructors to: 1. Possess a desire to guide students

  14. Environmental Stewardship: How Semiconductor Suppliers Help toMeet Energy-Efficiency Regulations and Voluntary Specifications inChina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aizhen, Li; Fanara, Andrew; Fridley, David; Merriman, Louise; Ju,Jeff

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recognizing the role that semiconductor suppliers can playin meeting energy-efficiency regulations and voluntary specifications,this paper provides an overview of Chinese policies and implementingbodies; a discussion of current programs, their goals, and effectiveness;and possible steps that can be taken tomeet these energy-efficiencyrequirements while also meeting products' high performance and costgoals.

  15. (Created 5/01; Revised 8/03, 3/07, 4/08, 2/13) UNL Environmental Health and Safety (402) 472-4925 http://ehs.unl.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    the EHS SOP, Respiratory Protection - Voluntary Use of Respiratory Protection Equipment. Pre-Use EHS/illness reports, etc.). Medical Qualification Prior to initial required use of a respirator, an employee must be qualified by a medical professional. At a minimum, medical qualification will consist of completion

  16. risk_policies_accident_std_vist.doc/ac 1 Revised 07.26.13 STUDENT AND VISITOR ACCIDENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    risk_policies_accident_std_vist.doc/ac 1 Revised 07.26.13 STUDENT AND VISITOR ACCIDENT REPORTING: 408-924-1892 Student and Visitor Accident Reporting Guidelines These guidelines provide instructions for reporting and handling accidents or incidents that happen to students and visitors while on the San José

  17. Coal Data Publication Revision Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2Climate, OceanPublication Revision

  18. Revision of DOE Manual 460.2-1

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Practices Manual DOE Writing Team March 2006 TECWG 2 Proposed Revision Timeline Proposed Revision Timeline Complete new draft of Manual 206 Draft Manual provided to Manual Review...

  19. SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND CHARACTERISTICS AT NUCLEAR FACILITY SITES SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND...

  20. Attachment 2: Solicitation for Offers with New and Revised Green...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: Solicitation for Offers with New and Revised Green Lease Text Attachment 2: Solicitation for Offers with New and Revised Green Lease Text Solicitation for Offers Paragraphs with...

  1. After Wordsworth: Global Revisions of the English Poet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergren, Katherine Lillian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Revisions of the English Poet A dissertation submitted inRevisions of the English Poet by Katherine Lillian Bergrenbetween the English poet and his global Anglophone audience,

  2. PG&E Reconductoring Project Biological Assessment (Revised) ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PG&E Reconductoring Project Biological Assessment (Revised) PG&E Reconductoring Project Biological Assessment (Revised) PG&E Reconductoring Project Biological Assessment (1216...

  3. How Hard is it to Revise a Belief Base? Bernhard Nebel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebel, Bernhard

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.4 Cut Revision Scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.5 Safe Revision Schemes 19 4.5 Full Meet Revision Scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 5 Meet Base Revision Schemes 21 5.1 Full Meet Base Revision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 5

  4. COMPUTER SECURITY revision list Subject Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chothia, Tom

    COMPUTER SECURITY revision list Subject Notes AES DES 3-DES CBC Diffie-Hellman Elgaml RSA KeyCrypt Electronic Signatures PGP Access Control Matrix Access Control Lists #12;COMPUTER SECURITY revision list for Linux Confused Deputy Problem MD5 SHA1 SHA2 / SHA256 / SHA512 SHA3 Collision attacks MAC Password

  5. Belief Revision with Unreliable Observations Craig Boutilier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halpern, Joseph Y.

    Belief Revision with Unreliable Observations Craig Boutilier Dept. Computer Science University of British Columbia Vancouver, British Columbia Canada, V6T 1W5 cebly@cs.ubc.ca Nir Friedman ¡£¢ Computer Research in belief revision has been dominated by work that lies firmly within the classic AGM paradigm

  6. Guidelines Graduate Curriculum Revised 07/09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    Guidelines ­ Graduate Curriculum Revised 07/09 2009-2010 Guidelines FOR THE SUBMISSION OF CURRICULAR MATERIALS TO THE GRADUATE COUNCIL The University of Tennessee, Knoxville #12;Guidelines ­ Graduate Curriculum Revised 07/09 Curricular Submission Guidelines on the Web at http://gradschool

  7. The practical revised simplex method Julian Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Julian

    The practical revised simplex method Julian Hall School of Mathematics University of Edinburgh January 25th 2007 The practical revised simplex method #12;Overview #12;Overview Part 1: · The mathematics of linear programming #12;Overview Part 1: · The mathematics of linear programming · The simplex method

  8. REVISED HYDROGEN SULFIDE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REVISED HYDROGEN SULFIDE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY;PREFACE Attached is the "REVISED HYDROGEN SULFIDE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN" that will be used for ODP coring and drilling operations on legs where hydrogen sulfide is likely to be encountered. Prior

  9. NEW SOLAR HOMES PARTNERSHIP REVISED SECONDTHIRD EDITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NEW SOLAR HOMES PARTNERSHIP REVISED SECONDTHIRD EDITION of 15 Attachment 1 ERRATA TO THE NEW SOLAR HOMES PARTNERSHIP COMMITTEE DRAFT GUIDEBOOK The following list of Errata was adopted as part of the proposed revisions to the New Solar Homes Partnership

  10. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand, EndUser Natural Gas Demand, and Energy Efficiency SEPTEMBER 2013 CEC2002013004SDV1REV CALIFORNIA The California Energy Demand 2014 ­ 2024 Revised Forecast, Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand and Methods

  11. USER'S MANUAL Revision 1.0c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Hemmen, J. Leo

    to correct the interference at your own expense. California Best Management Practices RegulationsH8QM3-2 H8QMi-2 USER'S MANUAL Revision 1.0c SUPER ® #12;Manual Revision 1.0c Release Date: November in the United States of America The information in this User's Manual has been carefully reviewed

  12. Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests; Literature Review, Preliminary Methodology Description, and Final Site Selection (Final Revision of Nov. 1997 Report)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, T. A.; Elleson, J.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This preliminary report contains the literature review, a preliminary description of the methodologies that have been chosen for the project and final site selection recommendations for ASHRAE Research Project RP 1004 ~ "Determining Long...

  13. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    -Size Communities: Case Studies 5. Report Date March 1, 2000 Revised September, 2001 6. Performing Organization Code route, highway bypass, economic impacts, case studies 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions and industry trends. The purpose of this study is to identify and understand the various factors that influence

  14. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Clays Using Centrifuge Technology 5. Report Date December 2008; Revised April 2009 6. Performing of characterizing the swelling properties of highly plastic clay using a geotechnical centrifuge. This study consisted of an experimental program involving a series of tests in a small and large centrifuge in which

  15. Savings estimates for the United States Environmental Protection Agency?s ENERGY STAR voluntary product labeling program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Marla Christine

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    revised since 2000: air source heat pumps audio equipmentconditioning, ASHP = air source heat pump, HP = heat pump,HVAC program covers air-source heat pumps (ASHP), boilers (

  16. Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 331.1C Chg 3, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The revision incorporates recommendations from the FY12 National Council on Federal Labor-Management Relation's "Goals-Engagement-Accountability-Results (GEAR)" report and program requirements currently contained in the DOE Supervisory/Non-Supervisory Employee Performance Management and Recognition Desk Reference (Desk Reference) such as the DOE Monetary Awards Scale, as well as program requirements that have been established via memoranda since the Order was revised in October 2010.

  17. Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 331.1C, Chg 3, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    The revision incorporates recommendations from the FY12 National Council on Federal Labor-Management Relation's "Goals-Engagement-Accountability-Results (GEAR)" report and program requirements currently contained in the DOE Supervisory/Non-Supervisory Employee Performance Management and Recognition Desk Reference (Desk Reference) such as the DOE Monetary Awards Scale, as well as program requirements that have been established via memoranda since the Order was revised in October 2010.

  18. The IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, D B; Kim, D C; Surace, J A; Soifer, B T

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IRAS flux densities, redshifts, and infrared luminosities are reported for all sources identified in the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS), a complete flux-limited survey of all extragalactic objects with total 60 micron flux density greater than 5.24 Jy, covering the entire sky surveyed by IRAS at Galactic latitude |b| > 5 degrees. The RBGS includes 629 objects, with a median (mean) sample redshift of 0.0082 (0.0126) and a maximum redshift of 0.0876. The RBGS supersedes the previous two-part IRAS Bright Galaxy Samples, which were compiled before the final ("Pass 3") calibration of the IRAS Level 1 Archive in May 1990. The RBGS also makes use of more accurate and consistent automated methods to measure the flux of objects with extended emission. Basic properties of the RBGS sources are summarized, including estimated total infrared luminosities, as well as updates to cross-identifications with sources from optical galaxy catalogs established using the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED). In addition...

  19. Parallel programming with PCN. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, I.; Tuecke, S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PCN is a system for developing and executing parallel programs. It comprises a high-level programming language, tools for developing and debugging programs in this language, and interfaces to Fortran and Cthat allow the reuse of existing code in multilingual parallel programs. Programs developed using PCN are portable across many different workstations, networks, and parallel computers. This document provides all the information required to develop parallel programs with the PCN programming system. It includes both tutorial and reference material. It also presents the basic concepts that underlie PCN, particularly where these are likely to be unfamiliar to the reader, and provides pointers to other documentation on the PCN language, programming techniques, and tools. PCN is in the public domain. The latest version of both the software and this manual can be obtained by anonymous ftp from Argonne National Laboratory in the directory pub/pcn at info.mcs. ani.gov (cf. Appendix A). This version of this document describes PCN version 2.0, a major revision of the PCN programming system. It supersedes earlier versions of this report.

  20. Evaluations of 1990 PRISM design revisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Tuyle, G.J.; Slovik, G.C.; Chan, B.C.; Aronson, A.L.; Kennett, R.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses of the 1990 version of the PRISM Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) design are presented and discussed. Most of the calculations were performed using BNL computer codes, particularly SSC and MINET. In many cases, independent BNL calculations were compared against analyses presented by General Electric when they submitted the PRISM design revisions for evaluation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The current PRISM design utilizes the metallic fuel developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) which facilitates the passive/``inherent`` shutdown mechanism that acts to shut down reactor power production whenever the system overheats. There are a few vulnerabilities in the passive shutdown, with the most worrisome being the positive feedback from sodium density decreases or sodium voiding. Various postulated unscrammed events were examined by GE and/or BNL, and much of the analysis discussed in this report is focused on this category of events. For the most part, the BNL evaluations confirm the information submitted by General Electric. The principal areas of concern are related to the performance of the ternary metal fuel, and may be resolved as ANL continues with its fuel development and testing program.

  1. Introduction Wikipedia Revision History Applications Conclusions References Mining Wikipedia's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumann, GĂĽnter

    Revision History Revision History Plots Figure: RH plots for articles 2005 (5,714 rev.) and 2007 (11,494 rev.) Mihai Grigore Mining Wikipedia's Article Revision History 5/24 #12;Introduction WikipediaIntroduction Wikipedia Revision History Applications Conclusions References Mining Wikipedia

  2. Belief Revision through Forgetting Conditionals in Conditional Probabilistic Logic Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Weiru

    of probabilistic belief revising, most research focuses on revising a single probabilistic distribution [5, 1, 8, 4Belief Revision through Forgetting Conditionals in Conditional Probabilistic Logic Programs Anbu Yue 1 and Weiru Liu 1 Abstract. In this paper, we present a revision strategy of revis- ing

  3. Semistructured Merge: Rethinking Merge in Revision Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apel, Sven

    Semistructured Merge: Rethinking Merge in Revision Control Systems Sven Apel, Jörg Liebig, Benjamin, Germany ABSTRACT An ongoing problem in revision control systems is how to resolve conflicts in a merge of independently developed revisions. Un- structured revision control systems are purely text-based and solve

  4. Revised GCFR safety program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, A.P.; Boyack, B.E.; Torri, A.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a summary of the recently revised gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) safety program plan. The activities under this plan are organized to support six lines of protection (LOPs) for protection of the public from postulated GCFR accidents. Each LOP provides an independent, sequential, quantifiable risk barrier between the public and the radiological hazards associated with postulated GCFR accidents. To implement a quantitative risk-based approach in identifying the important technology requirements for each LOP, frequency and consequence-limiting goals are allocated to each. To ensure that all necessary tasks are covered to achieve these goals, the program plan is broken into a work breakdown structure (WBS). Finally, the means by which the plan is being implemented are discussed.

  5. Radiological control manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kloepping, R.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP.

  6. Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (2009 Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Sumner, J.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents green power marketing activities and trends in the United States. First, aggregate green power sales data for all voluntary purchase markets across the United States are presented. Next, we summarize data on utility green pricing programs offered in regulated electricity markets; green power marketing activity in competitive electricity markets, as well as green power sold to voluntary purchasers in the form of RECs; and renewable energy sold as greenhouse gas offsets in the United States. Finally, this is followed by a discussion of key market trends and issues. The data presented in this report are based primarily on figures provided to NREL by utilities and independent renewable energy marketers.

  7. Transportation Engineering University of Florida Revised: 2/3/09 Literature Search Strategies and Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Transportation Engineering University of Florida Revised: 2/3/09 Literature Search Strategies information from transportation journals, conferences proceedings, research reports and ongoing researchLink http://springerlink.com/home/main.mpx · Elsevier Transport Connect www.transportconnect.net Note

  8. Revision Date: 04.05.12 1 of 11 ACCOUNTING SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crews, Stephen

    Purpose: The Unit Accounting System (UAS) tracks and maintains investment account information (eRevision Date: 04.05.12 1 of 11 ACCOUNTING SERVICES Unit Accounting System (UAS) Reporting Manual: Users must have a valid ONYEN and obtain a FACS ID by completing the Consolidated Financial Systems

  9. A revision of the genus Mozena Amyot and Serville (Hemiptera:Coreidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossain, Mosharraf

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The genus Mozena Amyot and Serville is revised. A total of 32 species, 13 of which are described as new, are recognized by the author. Two cases of new synonymy are reported. The diagnoses and the descriptions or redescriptions of the 32 species...

  10. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC 1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloop, Christy

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. CAU 569 comprises the following nine corrective action sites (CASs): • 03-23-09, T-3 Contamination Area • 03-23-10, T-3A Contamination Area • 03-23-11, T-3B Contamination Area • 03-23-12, T-3S Contamination Area • 03-23-13, T-3T Contamination Area • 03-23-14, T-3V Contamination Area • 03-23-15, S-3G Contamination Area • 03-23-16, S-3H Contamination Area • 03-23-21, Pike Contamination Area The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 569 based on the implementation of the corrective actions listed in Table ES-2.

  11. Strategic planning in small voluntary sector organisations in Edinburgh : a case study approach to preparing small charities to use strategic planning models and tools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Florence Elvira Hill

    2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is a case study of six organisations and two pilot organisations to investigate the implementation of strategic planning in small charitable organisations in the voluntary sector in Edinburgh. The case studies ...

  12. Emergency Doses (ED) - Revision 3: A calculator code for environmental dose computations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rittmann, P.D.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The calculator program ED (Emergency Doses) was developed from several HP-41CV calculator programs documented in the report Seven Health Physics Calculator Programs for the HP-41CV, RHO-HS-ST-5P (Rittman 1984). The program was developed to enable estimates of offsite impacts more rapidly and reliably than was possible with the software available for emergency response at that time. The ED - Revision 3, documented in this report, revises the inhalation dose model to match that of ICRP 30, and adds the simple estimates for air concentration downwind from a chemical release. In addition, the method for calculating the Pasquill dispersion parameters was revised to match the GENII code within the limitations of a hand-held calculator (e.g., plume rise and building wake effects are not included). The summary report generator for printed output, which had been present in the code from the original version, was eliminated in Revision 3 to make room for the dispersion model, the chemical release portion, and the methods of looping back to an input menu until there is no further no change. This program runs on the Hewlett-Packard programmable calculators known as the HP-41CV and the HP-41CX. The documentation for ED - Revision 3 includes a guide for users, sample problems, detailed verification tests and results, model descriptions, code description (with program listing), and independent peer review. This software is intended to be used by individuals with some training in the use of air transport models. There are some user inputs that require intelligent application of the model to the actual conditions of the accident. The results calculated using ED - Revision 3 are only correct to the extent allowed by the mathematical models. 9 refs., 36 tabs.

  13. High Level Waste System Plan Revision 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, N.R.; Wells, M.N.; Choi, A.S.; Paul, P.; Wise, F.E.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Revision 9 of the High Level Waste System Plan documents the current operating strategy of the HLW System at SRS to receive, store, treat, and dispose of high-level waste.

  14. New and revised standards for coke production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.A. Kotsyuba; M.I. Alpatov; Y.G. Shapoval [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for new and revised standards for coke production in Ukraine and Russia is outlined. Such standards should address improvements in plant operation, working conditions, environmental protection, energy conservation, fire and explosion safety, and economic indices.

  15. Revised June 27, 2001 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The competencies are grouped into the three primary functions of an environmental health program ­ assessment#12; Revised June 27, 2001 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH COMPETENCY PROJECT: Recommendations for Core Competencies for Local Environmental Health Practitioners American Public Health

  16. G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REPORT AND SWMU REPORT UNIT NUMBER: 374 UNIT NAME: G-337-13 DATE: Original: 011901 Revised: 122303 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: Between columns S 24 and Sa 24 APPROXIMATE...

  17. Time and Attendance Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE O 535.1 establishes the Department's requirements and responsibilities governing time and attendance reporting. The purpose of this revision is to reflect the transition of payroll processing from the Capital Accounting Center to the Defense Finance and Accounting System. Cancels DOE O 3600.1B. Canceled by DOE O 322.1C.

  18. Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1995

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This second quarterly report summarizes the lessons learned for documents completed between October 1 and December 31, 1994. It is based on responses to the revised questionnaire that was provided...

  19. Guide to NRC reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Compiled from requirements in Title 10 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations as codified on December 31, 1993; Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, M.; Shelton, B.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This compilation includes in the first two sections the reporting and recordkeeping requirements applicable to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensees and applicants and to members of the public. It includes those requirements codified in Title 10 of the code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1, on December 31, 1993. It also includes, in a separate section, any of those requirements that were superseded or discontinued between January 1992 and December 1993. Finally, the appendix lists mailing and delivery addresses for NRC Headquarters and Regional Offices mentioned in the compilation. The Office of Information Resources Management staff compiled this listing of reporting and recordkeeping requirements to briefly describe each in a single document primarily to help licensees readily identify the requirements. The compilation is not a substitute for the regulations, and is not intended to impose any new requirements or technical positions. It is part of NRC`s continuing efforts to comply with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 and the Office of Management and Budget regulations that mandate effective and efficient Federal information resources management programs.

  20. Reporting and Investigating Animal Welfare Concerns Policy Approved by UGA IACUC October 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Reporting and Investigating Animal Welfare Concerns Policy Approved by UGA IACUC October 1997 IACUC October 1997 Revised August 2014 next level of responsibility within your department or college

  1. Validating the role of AFVs in voluntary mobile source emission reduction programs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D. J.; Saricks, C. L.

    1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Late in 1997, EPA announced new allowances for voluntary emission control programs. As a result, the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Cities and other metro areas that have made an ongoing commitment to increasing participation by alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) in local fleets have the opportunity to estimate the magnitude and obtain emission reduction credit for following through on that commitment. Unexpectedly large reductions in key ozone precursor emissions in key locations and times of the day can be achieved per vehicle-mile by selecting specific light duty AFV offerings from original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in lieu of their gasoline-fueled counterparts. Additional benefit accrues from the fact that evaporative emissions of non-methane hydrocarbons (generated in the case of CNG, LNG, and LPG by closed fuel-system AFV technology) can be essentially negligible. Upstream emissions from fuel storage and distribution with the airshed of interest are also reduced. This paper provides a justification and outlines a method for including AFVs in the mix of strategies to achieve local and regional improvements in ozone air quality, and for quantifying emission reduction credits. At the time of submission of this paper, the method was still under review by the US EPA Office of Mobile Sources, pending mutually satisfactory resolution of several of its key points. Some of these issues are discussed in the paper.

  2. Technical support document for proposed revision of the model energy code thermal envelope requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the development of the proposed revision of the council of American Building Officials` (CABO) 1993 supplement to the 1992 Model Energy Code (MEC) (referred to as the 1993 MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. The goal of this analysis was to develop revised guidelines based on an objective methodology that determined the most cost-effective (least total life-cycle cost [LCC]) combination of energy conservation measures (ECMs) for residences in different locations. The ECMs with the lowest LCC were used as a basis for proposing revised MEC maximum U{sub o}-value (thermal transmittance) curves in the MEC format. The changes proposed here affect the requirements for ``group R`` residences. The group R residences are detached one- and two-family dwellings (referred to as single-family) and all other residential buildings three stories or less (referred to as multifamily).

  3. Technical support document for proposed revision of the model energy code thermal envelope requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the development of the proposed revision of the council of American Building Officials' (CABO) 1993 supplement to the 1992 Model Energy Code (MEC) (referred to as the 1993 MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. The goal of this analysis was to develop revised guidelines based on an objective methodology that determined the most cost-effective (least total life-cycle cost [LCC]) combination of energy conservation measures (ECMs) for residences in different locations. The ECMs with the lowest LCC were used as a basis for proposing revised MEC maximum U[sub o]-value (thermal transmittance) curves in the MEC format. The changes proposed here affect the requirements for group R'' residences. The group R residences are detached one- and two-family dwellings (referred to as single-family) and all other residential buildings three stories or less (referred to as multifamily).

  4. Standard technical specifications: Babcock and Wilcox Plants. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for Babcock & Wilcox Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved STS.

  5. Evaluation and enhancement of Texas ramp metering strategies, compliance, and alternative enforcement techniques: Go with the flow Houston. Public outreach plan (revised); Interim research report, September 1995--October 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancaster, S.; Fette, B.; Busler, L.; Miller, K.; Messer, C.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the public outreach plan on the implementation of ramp meters along the Katy Freeway in Houston, Generally, ramp metering is neither beloved nor understood by the public. To gain public awareness, acceptance, compliance and continued support, ramp metering operations should be reinforced by a strong, ongoing public information and outreach campaign that communicates the need for and benefits of the program. Because the term `ramp metering` exhibits restrictions on the public, the phrase `Flow Signals` was developed to better describe the benefits of ramp metering; enhanced flow of traffic, fewer bottlenecks, and fewer trip delays. The logo, `Go with the Flow Houston,` and a graphic identity were developed to help communicate the theme throughout the various media where both the primary and secondary messages are intended to reach 15 different audiences. These media will include: a PSA, both static and changeable message signs, a brochure, Internet web site information, letters to specific audience and media relations efforts.

  6. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - appendices. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NRC staff is in need of decommissioning bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2) located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clear structures on the site and to restore the site to a {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined.

  7. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

  8. HLW system plan - revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The projected ability of the Tank Farm to support DWPF startup and continued operation has diminished somewhat since revision 1 of this Plan. The 13 month delay in DWPF startup, which actually helps the Tank Farm condition in the near term, was more than offset by the 9 month delay in ITP startup, the delay in the Evaporator startups and the reduction to Waste Removal funding. This Plan does, however, describe a viable operating strategy for the success of the HLW System and Mission, albeit with less contingency and operating flexibility than in the past. HLWM has focused resources from within the division on five near term programs: The three evaporator restarts, DWPF melter heatup and completion of the ITP outage. The 1H Evaporator was restarted 12/28/93 after a 9 month shutdown for an extensive Conduct of Operations upgrade. The 2F and 2H Evaporators are scheduled to restart 3/94 and 4/94, respectively. The RHLWE startup remains 11/17/97.

  9. Policy on Awards, Endowed Chairs, and Endowed Professorships (1992; Revised 2006; Revised 2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Policy on Awards, Endowed Chairs, and Endowed Professorships (1992; Revised 2006; Revised 2012) I will consider matters pertaining to the appointment and administration of awards, endowed chairs is to be followed except when a selection process is prescribed in the gift agreement connected with an award

  10. DOE-TSPP-3-2013, Using Voluntary Consensus Standards and Interacting With

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002 October5-992-2013, Initiating DOEStandards

  11. DOE-TSPP-8-2013, Converting DOE Technical Standards to Voluntary Consensus

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002 October5-992-2013,of EnergyStandards |

  12. Data Privacy and the Smart Grid: A Voluntary Code of Conduct (VCC) - Draft

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197 This work wasof Energy Modeling Data Collectionfor

  13. Data Privacy and the Smart Grid: A Voluntary Code of Conduct - Notice of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197 This work wasof Energy Modeling Data

  14. December 11 Webinar on Smart Grid Data Privacy: A Voluntary Code of Conduct

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197 This workDayton: ENERGY8 Deaerators inOctober Office|

  15. Reactor pressure vessel. Status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot, B.J.; Hackett, E.M.; Lee, A.D. [and others

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the issues raised as a result of the staffs review of Generic Letter (GL) 92-01, Revision 1, responses and plant-specific reactor pressure vessel (RPV) assessments and the actions taken or work in progress to address these issues. In addition, the report describes actions taken by the staff and the nuclear industry to develop a thermal annealing process for use at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. This process is intended to be used as a means of mitigating the effects of neutron radiation on the fracture toughness of RPV materials. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued GL 92-01, Revision 1, Supplement 1, to obtain information needed to assess compliance with regulatory requirements and licensee commitments regarding RPV integrity. GL 92-01, Revision 1, Supplement 1, was issued as a result of generic issues that were raised in the NRC staff`s reviews of licensee responses to GL 92-01, Revision 1, and plant-specific RPV evaluations. In particular, an integrated review of all data submitted in response to GL 92-01, Revision 1, indicated that licensees may not have considered all relevant data in their RPV assessments. This report is representative of submittals to and evaluations by the staff as of September 30, 1996. An update of this report will be issued at a later date.

  16. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2010, LBNL Report number LBNL-470E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Request for Approval for LBNL to Revise Its Radionuclidefrom EPA Region 9 to R. Pauer, LBNL, documenting approval ofLBNL-470E-2010 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Prepared

  17. Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 350.2B, Use of Management and Operating or Other Facility Management Contractor Employees for Services to DOE in the Washington, D.C., Area

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this revision is to incorporate a more performance based risk management approach into the oversight and management of these assignments. The revision will result in a reduction of DOE requirements, increased delegation of management responsibilities to sponsoring program organizations, elimination of reporting requirements and institutionalizing DOE-wide cost constraints for contractor domestic assignments. Approved 3-20-15.

  18. Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 350.2B, Use of Management and Operating or Other Facility Management Contractor Employees for Services to DOE in the Washington, D.C., Area

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    The objective of this revision is to incorporate a more performance based risk management approach into the oversight and management of these assignments. The revision will result in a reduction of DOE requirements, increased delegation of management responsibilities to sponsoring program organizations, elimination of reporting requirements and institutionalizing DOE-wide cost constraints for contractor domestic assignments. Approved 3-20-15.

  19. Revised FINAL–REPORT NO. 2: INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY SUMMARY AND RESULTS FOR THE ENRICO FERMI ATOMIC POWER PLANT, UNIT 1, NEWPORT, MICHIGAN (DOCKET NO. 50 16; RFTA 10-004) 2018-SR-02-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erika Bailey

    2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant, Unit 1 (Fermi 1) was a fast breeder reactor design that was cooled by sodium and operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. On May 10, 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) granted an operating license, DPR-9, to the Power Reactor Development Company (PRDC), a consortium specifically formed to own and operate a nuclear reactor at the Fermi 1 site. The reactor was designed for a maximum capability of 430 megawatts (MW); however, the maximum reactor power with the first core loading (Core A) was 200 MW. The primary system was filled with sodium in December 1960 and criticality was achieved in August 1963. The reactor was tested at low power during the first couple years of operation. Power ascension testing above 1 MW commenced in December 1965 immediately following the receipt of a high-power operating license. In October 1966 during power ascension, zirconium plates at the bottom of the reactor vessel became loose and blocked sodium coolant flow to some fuel subassemblies. Two subassemblies started to melt and the reactor was manually shut down. No abnormal releases to the environment occurred. Forty-two months later after the cause had been determined, cleanup completed, and the fuel replaced, Fermi 1 was restarted. However, in November 1972, PRDC made the decision to decommission Fermi 1 as the core was approaching its burn-up limit. The fuel and blanket subassemblies were shipped off-site in 1973. Following that, the secondary sodium system was drained and sent off-site. The radioactive primary sodium was stored on-site in storage tanks and 55 gallon (gal) drums until it was shipped off-site in 1984. The initial decommissioning of Fermi 1 was completed in 1975. Effective January 23, 1976, DPR-9 was transferred to the Detroit Edison Company (DTE) as a 'possession only' license (DTE 2010a). This report details the confirmatory activities performed during the second Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) site visit to Fermi 1 in November 2010. The survey was strategically planned during a Unit 2 (Fermi 2) outage to take advantage of decreased radiation levels that were observed and attributed to Fermi 2 from the operating unit during the first site visit. However, during the second visit there were elevated radiation levels observed and attributed to the partially dismantled Fermi 1 reactor vessel and a waste storage box located on the 3rd floor of the Fermi 1 Turbine Building. Confirmatory surveys (unshielded) performed directly in the line of sight of these areas were affected. The objective of the confirmatory survey was to verify that the final radiological conditions were accurately and adequately described in Final Status Survey (FSS) documentation, relative to the established release criteria. This objective was achieved by performing document reviews, as well as independent measurements and sampling. Specifically, documentation of the planning, implementation, and results of the FSS were evaluated; side-by-side FSS measurement and source comparisons were performed; site areas were evaluated relative to appropriate FSS classification; and areas were assessed for residual, undocumented contamination.

  20. Revision of DOE Manual 460.2-1

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    , 2005 TECWG 1 Revision of DOE M 460.2-1, Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual Revision of DOE M 460.2-1, Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual Ella...

  1. Research Report Long lasting effects of rearing by an ethanol-consuming dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    Research Report Long lasting effects of rearing by an ethanol-consuming dam on voluntary ethanol rats as subjects, we examined effects of exposure during weaning to a dam consuming ethanol on adolescents' later affinity for ethanol. In a preliminary experiment, we offered rat pups a choice between 8

  2. Research Report Effects of ethanol consumption by adult female rats on subsequent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    Research Report Effects of ethanol consumption by adult female rats on subsequent consumption January 2004 Abstract We used a two-bottle choice test to measure voluntary ethanol consumption by adolescent rats that had lived with ethanol-consuming or water-consuming adult conspecifics. We found

  3. Exploiting hyper-sparsity in the revised simplex method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Julian

    Exploiting hyper-sparsity in the revised simplex method J.A.J. Hall K.I.M. McKinnon December 1999-sparsity in the revised simplex method J. A. J. Hall K. I. M. McKinnon 29 th December 1999 Abstract The revised simplex of the components of the revised simplex method shows them to be inefficient when applied to problems which exhibit

  4. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, D.A. [ed.] [ed.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Fosmire, C.J.; Fowler, R.A. [and others] [and others

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This eighth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Chapters 4 and 6 in Hanford Site-related NEPA documents. Chapter 4 (Affected Environment) includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, historical, archaeological and cultural resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. The following sections were updated in this revision: climate and meteorology; ecology (threatened and endangered species section only); historical; archaeological and cultural resources; and all of chapter 6. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

  5. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E. [ed.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A. [and others

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This sixth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors; Chapter 5.0 has been significantly updated from the fifth revision. It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions; The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be utilized directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

  6. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E. [ed.] ed.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A. [and others] and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This seventh revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, environmental monitoring, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors. Chapter 5.0 was not updated from the sixth revision (1994). It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE Orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

  7. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization, Revision 15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Burk, Kenneth W.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.; Woody, Dave M.

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

  8. More Opportunities for Success with the GRE revised General Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Dipankar

    More Opportunities for Success with the GRE® revised General Test University of Memphis 10/27/11 Michelle Hampton Global Client Relations ETS-Princeton, NJ #12;The GRE® revised General Test Better by DesignTM What we will cover today · Overview of the GRE® revised General Test ­ Content and Structure

  9. Firstorder belief revision Samir Chopra and Eric Martin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chopra, Samir

    . The theories that are the target of the revisions could easily be propositional, modal S 5 , firstFirst­order belief revision Samir Chopra and Eric Martin School of Computer Science and Engineering present a model for first­order belief revision that is character­ ized by an underlying relevance

  10. Revising Specifications with CTL Properties using Bounded Model Checking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finger, Marcelo

    Revising Specifications with CTL Properties using Bounded Model Checking No Author Given that inconsistencies arise between the formal specification and some desired property. Belief Revision deals. In this paper, we propose the use of belief revision techniques in order to deal with inconsistencies in formal

  11. Theory Revision in Equation Discovery Ljupco Todorovski and Saso Dzeroski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dzeroski, Saso

    . Section 5 presents the experiments with revising the earth-science equation model. The last sectionTheory Revision in Equation Discovery Ljupco Todorovski and Saso Dzeroski Department of Intelligent than from an initial hypothesis in the space of equations. On the other hand, theory revision systems

  12. Revising by an Inconsistent Set of Formulas James Delgrande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgrande, James P.

    Revising by an Inconsistent Set of Formulas James Delgrande School of Computing Science Simon Fraser University Burnaby, B.C. V5A 1S6 Canada jim@cs.sfu.ca Abstract This paper presents an approach to belief revision in which revision is a function from a belief state and a finite set of formulas to a new

  13. A General Model for Epistemic State Revision using Plausibility Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Weiru

    A General Model for Epistemic State Revision using Plausibility Measures Jianbing Ma 1 and Weiru Liu1 Abstract. In this paper, we present a general revision model on epistemic states based on plausibility measures proposed by Fried- man and Halpern. We propose our revision strategy and give some

  14. A Conditional Logic for Iterated Belief Revision Laura Giordano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giordano, Laura

    A Conditional Logic for Iterated Belief Revision Laura Giordano DSTA ­ Universitâ?? a del Piemonte Abstract. In this paper we propose a conditional logic IBC to rep­ resent iterated belief revision. We define an iterated belief revision system by strengthening the postulates proposed by Darwiche and Pearl

  15. Revising Beliefs on the Basis of Evidence James P. Delgrande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgrande, James P.

    Fraser University Burnaby, B.C., Canada V5A 1S6 jim@cs.sfu.ca Abstract Approaches to belief revision mostRevising Beliefs on the Basis of Evidence James P. Delgrande School of Computing Science Simon is not categorical. In revision, one may circumvent this fact by assuming that, in some fashion or other, an agent

  16. Workshop on Revisions to SE 2004 Mark Ardis David Budgen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ardis, Mark

    Workshop on Revisions to SE 2004 Mark Ardis David Budgen Stevens Institute of Technology University-day workshop on needed revisions to Software Engineering 2004: Curriculum Guidelines for Undergraduate Degree Programs in Software Engineering (SE 2004). A brief overview of the current guidelines and their revision

  17. Properties of Iterated Multiple Belief Revision Dongmo Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Dongmo

    in the community of belief revision[2][5][9][10][13][17]. The major concern in the research is the reducibilityProperties of Iterated Multiple Belief Revision Dongmo Zhang School of Computing and Information investigate the properties of iterated multiple belief revision. We examine several typical assumptions

  18. Iterated Belief Revision and Conditional Logic Laura Giordano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torino, UniversitĂ  di

    /01/2001; 17:22; p.1 #12; 2 well known Triviality Result [5], that claims that no signi#12;cant belief revisionIterated Belief Revision and Conditional Logic Laura Giordano DSTA - Universit#18;a del Piemonte a conditional logic called IBC to represent iterated belief revision systems. We propose a set of postulates

  19. Reasoning about Plan Revision in Agent Programs Natasha Alechina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Michael

    and executing a plan a b p Plan(a;b) Natasha Alechina Reasoning about plan revision TIME 2012 5 / 46 #12;WhatReasoning about Plan Revision in Agent Programs Natasha Alechina University of Nottingham, UK TIME 2012, Leicester 14 September 2012 Natasha Alechina Reasoning about plan revision TIME 2012 1 / 46 #12

  20. On the Revision of Probabilistic Belief States Craig Boutilier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutilier, Craig

    ) and the author's 5, 7] proposal for minimal conditional (MC) revision. Spohn's model imposes additional structureOn the Revision of Probabilistic Belief States Craig Boutilier Department of Computer Science two approaches to the revision of probability functions. We assume that a probabilistic state

  1. Parallel matrix inversion for the revised simplex method -A study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Julian

    Parallel matrix inversion for the revised simplex method - A study Julian Hall School of Mathematics University of Edinburgh June 15th 2006 Parallel matrix inversion for the revised simplex method - a study #12;Overview · Nature of the challenge of matrix inversion for the revised simplex method #12

  2. Parallel revised simplex for primal block angular LP problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Julian

    Parallel revised simplex for primal block angular LP problems Julian Hall and Edmund Smith School) problems and their identification Computational components of the revised simplex method Exploiting parallelism via BALP structure Results Observations J. A. J. Hall and E. Smith Parallel revised simplex

  3. The practical revised simplex method (Part 2) Julian Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Julian

    The practical revised simplex method (Part 2) Julian Hall School of Mathematics University of Edinburgh January 25th 2007 The practical revised simplex method #12;Overview (Part 2) · Practical implementation of the revised simplex method Representation of B-1 #12;Overview (Part 2) · Practical

  4. Parallel matrix inversion for the revised simplex method -A study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Julian

    Parallel matrix inversion for the revised simplex method - A study Julian Hall School of Mathematics University of Edinburgh June 15th 2006 Parallel matrix inversion for the revised simplex method - a study #12;Overview · Nature of the challenge of matrix inversion for the revised simplex method

  5. Update procedures for the parallel revised simplex method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Julian

    Update procedures for the parallel revised simplex method J. A. J. Hall and K. I. M. McKinnon 30th #12;Update procedures for the parallel revised simplex method J. A. J. Hall K. I. M. McKinnon 30th September 1992 Abstract In the parallel revised simplex method proposed by Hall et al. in 8], the inversion

  6. Technical support document: Survey data used in revising the energy conservation requirements in the manufactured home construction and safety standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, A.D.; Conner, C.C.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents data used in the development of revised energy conservation standards for manufactured housing. The approach used in developing the proposed standard revision is a cost-benefit analysis in which the costs of energy conservation measures (ECM) are balanced against the benefits of energy savings. The analysis used to develop the recommendations for revision of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) energy conservation standards for manufactured housing requires information on specific ECMs. This technical support document contains the data from two of the three surveys that were used primarily to characterize the available ECMs and their associated costs. The analyses of these data are provided in separate reports. 5 refs.

  7. Innovations in Voluntary Renewable Energy Procurement: Methods for Expanding Access and Lowering Cost for Communities, Governments, and Businesses (Technical Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; McLaren, J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide explores five innovative options for voluntarily procuring renewable energy generation or systems.

  8. Reduce Your Company's Energy Costs and Carbon Emissions with DOE Tools and Resources (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-page overview fact sheet that describes the Industrial Technologies Program's Save Energy Now initiative and voluntary pledge program.

  9. Deemed Export Control Revised 12/2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wei

    Deemed Export Control Revised 12/2010 Northwestern University - The International Office 630.northwestern.edu/international - intscholars@northwestern.edu The Export Administration Regulations (EAR) and the International Traffic in Arms States-even by an employer-is deemed to be an export to the person's country or countries of nationality

  10. Publication 424-031 Revised 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    MINNEAPOLIS MN 55440 T.A. SEEDS T.A. SEEDS PO BOX 300 AVIS PA 17721 VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 2003Publication 424-031 Revised 2003 #12;Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University

  11. Publication 452-125 Revised 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Publication 452-125 Revised 2013 Virginia Tech Soil Testing Laboratory Routine (soil pH, P, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Mn, Cu, Fe, B, and estimated CEC) $10.00 $16.00 Organic Matter ­ Determines percentage to "Treasurer, Virginia Tech." COST PER SAMPLE IN-STATE OUT-OF-STATESOIL TESTS DESIRED AND FEES SOIL INFORMATION

  12. Revised 26 January2011 LCLS Access Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    1 Revised 26 January2011 LCLS Access Policy Introduction and Goals As a national user facility, LCLS aims to attract diverse users and to enable a broad set of impor- tant science that takes advantage of its unique capabilities. With these aims in mind, LCLS has been designed to include six

  13. Revised October 2013 DISSERTATION RESEARCH TRAVEL AWARD -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Silvia

    Revised October 2013 DISSERTATION RESEARCH TRAVEL AWARD - INTERNATIONAL Application for Academic Year 2014-2015 These Graduate School Dissertation Research Travel Awards provide funding for Ph.D. students to travel outside the United States in order to conduct pre-dissertation or dissertation research

  14. Revised October 2013 DISSERTATION RESEARCH TRAVEL AWARD -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Silvia

    Revised October 2013 DISSERTATION RESEARCH TRAVEL AWARD - DOMESTIC Application for Academic Year 2014-2015 These Graduate School Dissertation Research Travel Awards provide funding for Ph.D. students to travel within the United States in order to conduct pre-dissertation or dissertation research. Award

  15. Revised 4/9/13 Columbia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    Revised 4/9/13 Columbia University Research Financial Operations Studebaker Building 615 West 131st Giscombe Anita Accountant University-Wide (212) 854-1062 adg9@columbia.edu 499P Hamdan Tamara Director University-Wide (212) 854-1071 jk2740@columbia.edu 457 Lee-Johnson Seran Project Manager I CUMC (212) 851

  16. Revised May 2008 Wildlife/Danger Tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Revised May 2008 Wildlife/Danger Tree Assessor's Course Workbook Forest Harvesting and Silviculture: Ministry of Forests and Range Ministry of Environment #12;#12;Wildlife/Danger Tree Assessor's Course Workbook: Forest Harvesting and Silviculture Module May 2008 iii DANGEROUS TREE ASSESSMENT IN BRITISH

  17. 1 Revised November 2013 Mentor Request Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    1 Revised November 2013 Mentor Request Form What is it? · The University of Winnipeg Student Mentor of Winnipeg student or recent graduate (mentors). · Mentees ask their mentor all sorts of questions about. Mentors do their best to answer questions and provide support to their mentee. Mentors help mentees

  18. USER'S MANUAL Revision 1.1b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maccabe, Barney

    Best Management Practices Regulations for Perchlorate Materials: This Perchlorate warning applies onlySUPER ® X7DB3 USER'S MANUAL Revision 1.1b #12;Unless you request and receive written permission in this User's Manual has been carefully reviewed and is believed to be accurate. The vendor assumes

  19. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 9/10)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    ingestion is 0.04 mCi. Waste Disposal EHS procedures for disposal of hazardous and/or radioactive wastesSafe Operating Procedure (Revised 9/10) SAFETY PROTOCOL: I-125://ehs.unl.edu/) Use of radioactive materials requires a safety protocol be submitted to the UNL Radiation Safety

  20. Revised 5/14 Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    Revised 5/14 Computer Science The Computer Science Minor is primarily designed for students background in computer science to complement their major beyond the requirements of their major department. To receive a minor in computer science, students must complete a minimum of six courses with the following

  1. Revised 4/12 Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    Revised 4/12 Computer Science The Computer Science Minor is primarily designed for students background in computer science to complement their major beyond the requirements of their major department. To receive a minor in computer science, students must complete a minimum of six courses with the following

  2. Application Note (A9) Revision: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnsen, Sönke

    measurements of light falling onto a flat surface. Such studies vary from solar UV exposure limitsApplication Note (A9) Revision: A AUGUST 1995 OPTRONIC LABORATORIES, INC. 4632 36TH STREET Orlando on the wavelength of light so the bluer wavelengths are scattered more strongly than redder. This leads

  3. California Energy Commission REVISED DRAFT REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Energy Commission REVISED DRAFT REGULATIONS AUGUST, 2011 CEC-400-2010-004-SD2 Nonresidential Building Energy Use Disclosure Program Draft Regulations Title 20, Division 2, Chapter 4 of the California Energy Commission is releasing draft regulations for implementing Assembly Bill (AB) 1103 (Saldańa

  4. (Revised May 25, 2012) Interference of Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    (Revised May 25, 2012) Interference of Light WARNING: Use the laser SAFELY. Do not look directly) To observe the interference patterns for laser light passing through a single narrow slit, through two. (2) To determine by graphical techniques the wavelength of the laser light based on the observed

  5. Revised: June 14, 2013 UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Revised: June 14, 2013 UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN University Travel Warning Destination Liability/College/Business Unit: Destination: Travel Start Date: Travel End Date: I understand that the University of Michigan the Regents of the University of Michigan, ("University"), and all of its employees and agents from any claim

  6. Revised January 2014 Doctoral Dissertation Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stormo, Gary

    Revised January 2014 Doctoral Dissertation Guide #12;Table of Contents Overview of dissertation process 3 Minimal requirements for dissertations 4 Preliminary paperwork 5 How to fill out the Title to Graduate form 5 What to include in a dissertation 6 How to format a dissertation 7 How to format a title

  7. EM 8783 Revised March 2013 Strategies for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    such as deficit irrigation and conservation tillage, and installing more efficient irrigation systems. Sprinkler and drip irrigation systems are more efficient than furrow irrigation. Some of these strategies entailEM 8783 · Revised March 2013 Strategies for Efficient Irrigation Water Use C.C. Shock, B.M. Shock

  8. OPTIMIZATION TOPICS LIST Revised April 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    1 OPTIMIZATION TOPICS LIST Revised April 2012 For Fall 2012 and Spring 2013 we will adopt. Bertsimas and J. Tsitsiklis, Introduction to Linear Optimization, Athena Scientific, 1997 2. M. C. Ferris, O and mixed integer models · Existence of optimal solutions, optimality conditions · Branch and bound methods

  9. Revised: May 2011 Fraud Prevention Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    Revised: May 2011 Fraud Prevention Policy #12;Fraud Prevention Policy March 2011 1 Contents Page 1. Introduction 2 2. Basis of the Policy 3 3. Purpose and Definitions 3 4. Management and Staff Responsibilities 4 5. Adherence to University Regulations, Policies and Procedures 4 6. Code of Conduct on Commercial

  10. Small Town Energy Program (STEP) Final Report revised

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Charles (Chuck) T. [Chuck

    2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    University Park, Maryland (“UP”) is a small town of 2,540 residents, 919 homes, 2 churches, 1 school, 1 town hall, and 1 breakthrough community energy efficiency initiative: the Small Town Energy Program (“STEP”). STEP was developed with a mission to “create a model community energy transformation program that serves as a roadmap for other small towns across the U.S.” STEP first launched in January 2011 in UP and expanded in July 2012 to the neighboring communities of Hyattsville, Riverdale Park, and College Heights Estates, MD. STEP, which concluded in July 2013, was generously supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The STEP model was designed for replication in other resource-constrained small towns similar to University Park - a sector largely neglected to date in federal and state energy efficiency programs. STEP provided a full suite of activities for replication, including: energy audits and retrofits for residential buildings, financial incentives, a community-based social marketing backbone and local community delivery partners. STEP also included the highly innovative use of an “Energy Coach” who worked one-on-one with clients throughout the program. Please see www.smalltownenergy.org for more information. In less than three years, STEP achieved the following results in University Park: • 30% of community households participated voluntarily in STEP; • 25% of homes received a Home Performance with ENERGY STAR assessment; • 16% of households made energy efficiency improvements to their home; • 64% of households proceeded with an upgrade after their assessment; • 9 Full Time Equivalent jobs were created or retained, and 39 contractors worked on STEP over the course of the project. Estimated Energy Savings - Program Totals kWh Electricity 204,407 Therms Natural Gas 24,800 Gallons of Oil 2,581 Total Estimated MMBTU Saved (Source Energy) 5,474 Total Estimated Annual Energy Cost Savings $61,343 STEP clients who had a home energy upgrade invested on average $4,500, resulting in a 13% reduction in annual energy use and utility bill savings of $325. Rebates and incentives covered 40%-50% of retrofit cost, resulting in an average simple payback of about 7 years. STEP has created a handbook in which are assembled all the key elements that went into the design and delivery of STEP. The target audiences for the handbook include interested citizens, elected officials and municipal staff who want to establish and run their own efficiency program within a small community or neighborhood, using elements, materials and lessons from STEP.

  11. Revised Final Report on Project “Micro-Misted Plasmas”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overzet, Lawrence J. [UT Dallas] [UT Dallas; Goeckner, Matthew J. [UT Dallas] [UT Dallas

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The key subject of this program was an examination of droplet evaporation kinetics in conjunction with plasma characteristics. Specifically, we undertook a careful investigation of the physical interactions between microscopic droplets of evaporating liquids and low pressure environments (including plasmas) by both experiment and simulation.

  12. Report No. 3391 Revised To: Executive Committee of Faculty Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodić, Aleksandar

    #12;2 MIE 407 and MIE 408 "Nuclear Reactor Theory and Design" and "Thermal and Machine Design of Nuclear Power Reactors" ­ CHE566 The AU distribution will be changed for the courses MIE463 "Integrated

  13. Revision of the MCSAP Allocation Formula: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truett, L.F.; Davis, S.C.; Hu, P.S.

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1982, Congress authorized the Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program (MCSAP), a Federal grant-in-aid program to improve commercial motor carrier safety. MCSAP was reauthorized in 1986, 1991, and 1998. In June 1997, in anticipation of and preparation for reauthorization, a MCSAP Formula Workgroup convened to analyze requirements for a new allocation formula and to develop the formula. Because of provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21), a major change in approach was to consider including performance (i.e., safety improvements) in the formula. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) actively participated in the Workgroup activities, provided technical assistance in evaluating factors and conducting scenario analyses, prepared regulatory language for the Federal Register Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM), analyzed NPRM comments and recommended responses to the comments, assisted with preparation of the Federal Register Final Rule, developed the final spreadsheet, and prepared an informational brochure on MCSAP for use by the States. The allocation of MCSAP funds for FY2001 will use the new formula.

  14. Microsoft Word - DOE HBU Demo - Revised Test Plan Report - Rev...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Development, and Demonstration RTN Removable Top Nozzle RX Recrystallized SCC Stress Corrosion Cracking SE Safety Evaluation SET Separate Effects Test SNF Spent Nuclear Fuel SSC...

  15. Engineered Barrier System performance requirements systems study report. Revision 02

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balady, M.A.

    1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the current design concept for the Engineered Barrier System (EBS), in concert with the current understanding of the geologic setting to assess whether enhancements to the required performance of the EBS are necessary. The performance assessment calculations are performed by coupling the EBS with the geologic setting based on the models (some of which were updated for this study) and assumptions used for the 1995 Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The need for enhancements is determined by comparing the performance assessment results against the EBS related performance requirements. Subsystem quantitative performance requirements related to the EBS include the requirement to allow no more than 1% of the waste packages (WPs) to fail before 1,000 years after permanent closure of the repository, as well as a requirement to control the release rate of radionuclides from the EBS. The EBS performance enhancements considered included additional engineered components as well as evaluating additional performance available from existing design features but for which no performance credit is currently being taken.

  16. Report No. 3360 Revised To: Executive Committee of Faculty Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodić, Aleksandar

    Applied Mechanics and Design Biomedical Engineering Energy and Environmental Engineering Human Factors of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering ­ Renaming of Fields The following 9 fields in MIE were originally approved by the OCGS on July 24, 2008: Applied Mechanics, Robotics and Materials Engineering Biomedical

  17. Chemistry and Materials Science progress report, FY 1994. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thrust areas of the weapons-supporting research include surface science, fundamentals of the physics and processing of metals, energetic materials, etc. The laboratory directed R and D include director`s initiatives, individual projects, and transactinium science studies.

  18. HNF-53665 Revision 0 Steelhead Redd Monitoring Report for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal HeatonHEP/NERSC/ASCRJuneSave the date forfi5665

  19. Microsoft Word - Envera Final Report - 121010 VCR Revised 031511.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHot electron dynamics in807ENVERA VARIABLE COMPRESSION

  20. Policy Flash 2015 Revision to the Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS September 9, 2013NewsOutreachPage UnderPaul16 Policy Flash 2013-16 AttachedDOE

  1. Technical support document for proposed 1994 revision of the MEC thermal envelope requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the development of the proposed revision of the Council of American Building Officials` (CABO) 1994 supplement to the 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for maximum component U{sub 0}-value. The 1994 amendments to the 1993 MEC were established in last year`s code change cycle and did not change the envelope requirements. The research underlying the proposed MEC revision was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Standards program. The goal of this research was to develop revised guidelines based on an objective methodology that determines the most cost-effective (least total cost) combination of energy conservation measures (ECMs) (insulation levels and window types) for residential buildings. This least-cost set of ECMs was used as a basis for proposing revised MEC maximum U{sub 0}-values (thermal transmittances). ECMs include window types (for example, double-pane vinyl) and insulation levels (for example, R-19) for ceilings, walls, and floors.

  2. CRITICALITY HAZOP EFFICIENTLY EVALUATING HAZARDS OF NEW OR REVISED CRITICALITY SAFETY EVALUATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARSON DM

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 'Criticality HazOp' technique, as developed at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), has allowed for efficiencies enabling shortening of the time necessary to complete new or revised criticality safety evaluation reports (CSERs). For example, in the last half of 2007 at PFP, CSER revisions undergoing the 'Criticality HazOp' process were completed at a higher rate than previously achievable. The efficiencies gained through use of the 'Criticality HazOp' process come from the preliminary narrowing of potential scenarios for the Criticality analyst to fully evaluate in preparation of the new or revised CSER, and from the use of a systematized 'Criticality HazOp' group assessment of the relevant conditions to show which few parameter/condition/deviation combinations actually require analytical effort. The 'Criticality HazOp' has not only provided efficiencies of time, but has brought to criticality safety evaluation revisions the benefits of a structured hazard evaluation method and the enhanced insight that may be gained from direct involvement of a team in the process. In addition, involved personnel have gained a higher degree of confidence and understanding of the resulting CSER product.

  3. Vault Safety and Inventory System users manual, PRIME 2350. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downey, N.J.

    1994-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This revision is issued to request review of the attached document: VSIS User Manual, PRIME 2350, which provides user information for the operation of the VSIS (Vault Safety and Inventory System). It describes operational aspects of Prime 2350 minicomputer and vault data acquisition equipment. It also describes the User`s Main Menu and menu functions, including REPORTS. Also, system procedures for the Prime 2350 minicomputer are covered.

  4. Guidance document for revision of DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kudera, D.E.; McMurtrey, C.D.; Meagher, B.G.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides guidance for the revision of DOE Order 5820.2A, ``Radioactive Waste Management.`` Technical Working Groups have been established and are responsible for writing the revised order. The Technical Working Groups will use this document as a reference for polices and procedures that have been established for the revision process. The overall intent of this guidance is to outline how the order will be revised and how the revision process will be managed. In addition, this document outlines technical issues considered for inclusion by a Department of Energy Steering Committee.

  5. Technology status in support of refined technical baseline for the Spent Nuclear Fuel project. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puigh, R.J.; Toffer, H.; Heard, F.J.; Irvin, J.J.; Cooper, T.D.

    1995-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) has undertaken technology acquisition activities focused on supporting the technical basis for the removal of the N Reactor fuel from the K Basins to an interim storage facility. The purpose of these technology acquisition activities has been to identify technology issues impacting design or safety approval, to establish the strategy for obtaining the necessary information through either existing project activities, or the assignment of new work. A set of specific path options has been identified for each major action proposed for placing the N Reactor fuel into a ``stabilized`` form for interim storage as part of this refined technical basis. This report summarizes the status of technology information acquisition as it relates to key decisions impacting the selection of specific path options. The following specific categories were chosen to characterize and partition the technology information status: hydride issues and ignition, corrosion, hydrogen generation, drying and conditioning, thermal performance, criticality and materials accountability, canister/fuel particulate behavior, and MCO integrity. This report represents a preliminary assessment of the technology information supporting the SNFP. As our understanding of the N Reactor fuel performance develops the technology information supporting the SNFP will be updated and documented in later revisions to this report. Revision 1 represents the incorporation of peer review comments into the original document. The substantive evolution in our understanding of the technical status for the SNFP (except section 3) since July 1995 have not been incorporated into this revision.

  6. Quality Assurance Policy, Revision 1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Site Environmental Reports Portsmouth| DepartmentQA CorporateDepartment ofU.S.EnergyNOT

  7. Data Privacy and the Smart Grid: A Voluntary Code of Conduct...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    In addition, in February 2012, the White House released the report, Consumer Data Privacy in a Networked World: A Framework for Protecting Privacy and Promoting...

  8. Accident Report Form Victim's Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Accident Report Form Date: Victim's Name: Address: Classification: Program Area: Activity: Brief Description of Accident: Body Fluid Spill: Action Taken by DRS Employee: Witness Name: Witness Address:____________________________________ DOB: Intramurals Front Back Revision - 2011 **Location of Accident** URC North Gymnasium URC South

  9. High level waste tank farm setpoint document. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony, J.A. III

    1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Revision 1 modifies Attachment I of this Technical Report as a result of a meeting which was held Friday, January 27, 1994 between Maintenance, Work Control, and Engineering to discuss report contents. Upon completion of the meeting, the Flow Chart was edited accordingly. Attachment 2 is modified for clerical reasons. Setpoints for nuclear safety-related instrumentation are required for actions determined by the design authorization basis. Minimum requirements need to be established for assuring that setpoints are established and held within specified limits. This document establishes the controlling methodology for changing setpoints of all classifications. The instrumentation under consideration involve the transfer, storage, and volume reduction of radioactive liquid waste in the F- and H-Area High-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Fanns. The setpoint document (Appendix 2) will encompass the PROCESS AREA listed in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (DSTSA-200-10 Sup 18) which includes the diversion box HDB-8 facility. In addition to the PROCESS AREAS listed in the SAR, Building 299-H and the Effluent Transfer Facility (ETF) are also included in the scope.

  10. Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 201 , Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 201 , Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for graduate assistants of the University of Oklahoma, providing greater access to contracted dentists offering additional cost savings

  11. Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 2011, Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 2011, Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for graduate assistants of the University of Oklahoma, providing greater access to contracted dentists offering additional cost savings

  12. Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 2012, Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 2012, Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for graduate assistants of the University of Oklahoma, providing greater access to contracted dentists offering additional cost savings

  13. Coal within a revised energy perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darmstadter, J. [Resources for the Future (RFF), Washington, DC (United States)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The author considers the use of coal within a revised energy perspective, focusing on the factors that will drive which fuels are used to generate electricity going forward. He looks at the world markets for fossil fuels and the difficulties of predicting oil and natural gas supply and prices, as demonstrated by the variability in projections from one year to another in the EIA's Annual Energy Outlook. 4 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G M; Bertoldo, N A; Blake, R G; Campbell, C G; Grayson, A R; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R; Jones, H E

    2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. LLNL prepares the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that environmental monitoring work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 458.1, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies.

  15. Defense Waste Processing Facility wasteform and canister description: Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, R.G.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the reference wasteform and canister for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The principal changes include revised feed and glass product compositions, an estimate of glass product characteristics as a function of time after the start of vitrification, and additional data on glass leaching performance. The feed and glass product composition data are identical to that described in the DWPF Basic Data Report, Revision 90/91. The DWPF facility is located at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, SC, and it is scheduled for construction completion during December 1989. The wasteform is borosilicate glass containing approximately 28 wt % sludge oxides, with the balance consisting of glass-forming chemicals, primarily glass frit. Borosilicate glass was chosen because of its stability toward reaction with potential repository groundwaters, its relatively high ability to incorporate nuclides found in the sludge into the solid matrix, and its reasonably low melting temperature. The glass frit contains approximately 71% SiO/sub 2/, 12% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 10% Na/sub 2/O. Tests to quantify the stability of DWPF waste glass have been performed under a wide variety of conditions, including simulations of potential repository environments. Based on these tests, DWPF waste glass should easily meet repository criteria. The canister is filled with about 3700 lb of glass which occupies 85% of the free canister volume. The filled canister will generate approximately 690 watts when filled with oxides from 5-year-old sludge and precipitate from 15-year-old supernate. The radionuclide activity of the canister is about 233,000 curies, with an estimated radiation level of 5600 rad/hour at the canister surface. 14 figs., 28 tabs.

  16. Supporting documentation for the 1997 revision to the DOE Insulation Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, T.K.

    1997-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Insulation Fact Sheet has been revised to reflect developments in energy conservation technology and the insulation market. A nationwide insulation cost survey was made by polling insulation contractors and builders, and the results are reported here. These costs, along with regional weather data, regional fuel costs, and fuel-specific system efficiencies were used to produce recommended insulation levels for new and existing houses. This report contains all of the methodology, algorithms, assumptions, references, and data resources that were used to produce the 1997 DOE Insulation Fact Sheet.

  17. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G M; Blake, R G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Coty, J; Folks, K; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K

    2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. Specifically, in conformance with DOE Order 450.1A, Attachment 1, paragraph 1(b)(5), environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring also serves to demonstrate compliance with permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality. (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work. (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until its cancellation in January 2003, DOE Order 5400.1 required the preparation of an environmental monitoring plan. Neither DOE Order 450.1A nor the ISO 14001 standard are as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, in that neither expressly requires an EMP. However, LLNL continues to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that this work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, and DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 450.1A, DOE Order 5400.5, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies. (See LLNL [1992] and LLNL [2008] for information about LLNL's CERCLA activities).

  18. Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1996

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Welcome to the newly-revised Quarterly Report of Lessons Learned in the NEPA process. In response to reader suggestions, we have expanded the scope of the report to provide a wider variety of NEPArelated information, and enhanced the format for better clarity and overall readability.

  19. Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    how Federal departments and agencies should consider the effects of greenhouse gas emissions and climate change in their National Environmental Policy Act reviews. The revised...

  20. CEQ Issues Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    revised draft guidance on consideration of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the effects of climate change in National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) reviews on December 18,...