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Sample records for retinitis pigmentosa rp

  1. Towards isolation of the gene for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dry, K.L.; Aldred, M.A.; Hardwick, L.J.

    1994-09-01

    Until recently the region of interest containing the gene for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP3) was thought to lie between CYBB (Xp21.1) and the proximal end of the deletion in patient BB (JBBprox). This region was thought to span 100-150 kb. Here we present new mapping data to show that the distance between the 5{prime} (most proximal) end of CYBB and JBBprox is only 50 kb. Recently Roux et al. (1994) have described the isolation of a gene within this region but this showed no disease-associated changes. Further evidence from mapping the deletion in patient NF (who suffered from McLead`s syndrome and CGD but not RP) and from linkage analysis of our RP3 families with a new dinucleotide repeat suggests that the gene must extend proximally from JBBprox. In order to extend the region of search we have constructed a YAC contig spanning 800 kb to OTC. We are continuing our search for the RP3 gene using a variety of strategies including exon trapping and cDNA enrichment as well as direct screening of cDNA libraries with subclones from this region.

  2. Molecular genetics of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa: Progress towards cloning the RP3 gene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, R.; Yan, D.; McHenry, C.

    1994-09-01

    Our goal is to identify the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) gene RP3. The location of RP3 is genetically delimited to a region of 1 Mb, distal to DXS140, CYBB and tctex-1-like gene and proximal to the gene OTC. It is currently thought that RP3 is within 40 kb of the proximal deletion breakpoint of a patient BB. However, a more proximal location of the gene, closer to OTC, is not ruled out. We initiated the isolation of the genomic region between DXS140 to OTC in YACs. One of the clones from DXS140 region (55B) is 460 kb and spans about 200 kb at each side of BB patient`s proximal breakpoint. It contains CYBB, tctex-1-like genes and two additional CpG islands. The 55B clone has been covered by cosmid and phage subclones. Another YAC clone from the OTC region (OTCC) spans about 1 Mb and contains at least 5 CpG islands. In situ hybridization performed with OTCC showed its location in Xp21; however, several derivative cosmids map to chromosome 7, indicating that it is a chimeric YAC. No overlap is evident between 55B and OTCC. We have isolated the YAC end-sequences and isolation of clones to close the gap is in progress. Cosmids are being used for screening eye tissue cDNA libraries, mainly from retina. Screening is done by hybridization to replica filters or by cDNA enrichment methods. Several cDNA clones have been isolated and are being characterized. Exon-amplification is also being used with the cosmids and phages. Genetic analysis is being performed to determine RP3 patients from clinically indistinguishable RP2, located in Xp11.23-p11.4, and to reduce the genetic distance of current flanking markers. For this we are analyzing a number of XLRP families with established markers in the region and with new microsatellites.

  3. A recombination outside the BB deletion refines the location of the X-linked retinitis pigmentosa locus RP3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, R.; Bingham, E.; Forsythe, P.; McHenry, C.

    1996-07-01

    Genetic loci for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) have been mapped between Xp11.22 and Xp22.13 (RP2, RP3, RP6, and RP15). The RP3 gene, which is responsible for the predominant form of XLRP in most Caucasian populations, has been localized to Xp21.1 by linkage analysis and the map positions of chromosomal deletions associated with the disease. Previous linkage studies have suggested that RP3 is flanked by the markers DXS1110 (distal) and OTC (proximal). Patient BB was though to have RP because of a lesion at the RP3 locus, in addition to chronic granulomatous disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), mild mental retardation, and the McLeod phenotype. This patient carried a deletion extending {approximately}3 Mb from DMD in Xp21.3 to Xp21.1, with the proximal breakpoint located {approximately}40 kb centromeric to DXS1110. The RP3 gene, therefore, is believed to reside between DXS1110 and the proximal breakpoint of the BB deletion. In order to refine the location of RP3 and to ascertain patients with RP3, we have been analyzing several XLRP families for linkage to Xp markers. Linkage analysis in an American family of 27 individuals demonstrates segregation of XLRP with markers in Xp21.1, consistent with the RP3 subtype. One affected male shows a recombination event proximal to DXS1110. Additional markers within the DXS1110-OTC interval show that the crossover is between two novel polymorphic markers, DXS8349 and M6, both of which are present in BB DNA and lie centromeric to the proximal breakpoint. This recombination places the XLRP mutation in this family outside the BB deletion and redefines the location of RP3. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. New Hope for Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Hope for Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients New Hope for Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients Print Thursday, 04 February 2016 16:26 Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of genetic disorders that affect the retina's ability to respond to light. This inherited disease causes a slow loss of vision, beginning with decreased night vision and loss of peripheral side vision. One of the causes of this disease is the misfolding and aggregation of a protein called opsin found in the retina of the eye. Using

  5. Map refinement of locus RP13 to human chromosome 17p13.3 in a second family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kojis, T.L.; Heinzmann, C.; Ngo, J.T.

    1996-02-01

    In order to elucidate the genetic basis of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) in a large eight-generation family (UCLA-RP09) of British descent, we assessed linkage between the UCLA-RP09 adRP gene and numerous genetic loci, including eight adRP candidate genes, five anonymous adRP-linked DNA loci, and 20 phenotypic markers. Linkage to the UCLA-RP09 disease gene was excluded for all eight candidate genes analyzed, including rhodopsin (RP4) and peripherin/RDS (RP7), for the four adRP loci RP1, RP9, RP10 and RP11, as well as for 17 phenotypic markers. The anonymous DNA marker locus D17S938, linked to adRP locus RP13 on chromosome 17p13.1, yielded a suggestive but not statistically significant positive lod score. Linkage was confirmed between the UCLA-RP09 adRP gene and markers distal to D17S938 in the chromosomal region 17p13.3. A reanalysis of the original RP13 data from a South African adRP family of British descent, in conjunction with our UCLA-RP09 data, suggests that only one adRP locus exists on 17p but that it maps to a more telomeric position, at band 17p13.3, than previously reported. Confirmation of the involvement of RP13 in two presumably unrelated adRP families, both of British descent, suggests that this locus is a distinct adRP gene in a proportion of British, and possibly other, adRP families. 39 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Heterogeneity analysis in 40 X-linked retinitis pigmentosa families

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teague, P.W.; Aldred, M.A.; Dempster, M.; Harrison, C.; Carothers, A.D.; Hardwick, L.J.; Evans, H.J.; Wright, A.F.; Strain, L.; Brock, D.J.H. )

    1994-07-01

    Analysis of genetic heterogeneity in 40 kindreds with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP), with 20 polymorphic markers, showed that significant heterogeneity is present (P=.001) and that 56% of kindreds are of RP3 type and that 26% are of RP2 type. The location of the RP3 locus was found to be 0.4 cM distal to OTC in the Xp21.1 region, and that of the RP2 locus was 6.5 cM proximal to DXS7 in Xp11.2-p11.3. Bayesian probabilities of linkage to RP2, RP3, or to neither locus were calculated. This showed that 20 of 40 kindreds could be assigned to one or the other locus, with a probability >.70 (14 kindreds with RP3 and 6 kindreds with RP2 disease). A further three kindreds were found to be unlinked to either locus, with a probability >.8. The remaining 17 kindreds could not be classified unambiguously. This highlights the difficulty of classifying families in the presence of genetic heterogeneity, where two loci are separated by an estimated 16 cM. 34 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. Fine localization of the locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa on chromosome 17p

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goliath, R.; Janssens, P.; Beighton, P.

    1995-10-01

    The term {open_quotes}retintis pigmentosa{close_quotes} (RP) refers to a group of inherited retinal degenerative disorders. Clinical manifestations include night-blindness, with variable age of onset, followed by constriction of the visual field that may progress to total loss of sight in later life. Previous studies have shown that RP is caused by mutations within different genes and may be inherited as an X-linked recessive (XLRRP), autosomal recessive (ARRP), or autosomal dominant (ADRP) trait. The AD form of this group of conditions has been found to be caused by mutations within the rhodopsin gene in some families and the peripherin/RDS gene in others. In addition, some ADRP families have been found to be linked to anonymous markers on 8cen, 7p, 7q,19q, and, more recently, 17p. The ADRP gene locus on the short arm of chromosome 17 was identified in a large South African family (ADRP-SA) of British origin. The phenotypic expression of the disorder, which has been described elsewhere is consistent in the pedigree with an early onset of disease symptoms. In all affected subjects in the family, onset of symptoms commenced before the age of 10 years. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Localizing multiple X chromosome-linked retinitis pigmentosa loci using multilocus homogeneity tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, J.; Terwilliger, J.D. ); Bhattacharya, S. ); Chen, J.D.; Denton, J.; Donald, J. ); Dubay, C.; Litt, M.; Weleber, R.G. ); Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, P. ); Fishman, G.A.; Wong, F. ); Frey, D.; Maechler, M. )

    1990-01-01

    Multilocus linkage analysis of 62 family pedigrees with X chromosome-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) was undertaken to determine the presence of possible multiple disease loci and to reliability estimate their map location. Multilocus homogeneity tests furnish convincing evidence for the presence of two XLRP loci, the likelihood ratio being 6.4 {times} 10{sup 9}:1 in a favor of two versus a single XLRP locus and gave accurate estimates for their map location. In 60-75% of the families, location of an XLRP gene was estimated at 1 centimorgan distal to OTC, and in 25-40% of the families, an XLRP locus was located halfway between DXS14 (p58-1) and DXZ1 (Xcen), with an estimated recombination fraction of 25% between the two XLRP loci. There is also good evidence for third XLRP locus, midway between DXS28 (C7) and DXS164 (pERT87), supported by a likelihood ratio of 293:1 for three versus two XLRP loci.

  9. ARM - Datastreams - rp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : RP Roll (rotation around the bow-to-stern axis) and Pitch (vertical motion of the bow) for a boat or ship afloat Active Dates 2012.11.02 -...

  10. CRAD, NNSA- Radiation Protection (RP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CRAD for Radiation Protection (RP). Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used to conduct a well-organized and thorough assessment of elements of safety and health programs.

  11. RP-5 RENEWABLE ENERGY PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neil Clifton; Eliza Jane Whitman; Jamal A. Zughbi

    2003-01-30

    This is the second quarterly technical report for the RP-5 Renewable Energy Project. The report summarizes the work progress, effort and activities that took place during the period of October 1, 2002 to December 31, 2002. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Guidelines. This technical report covers all meetings and discussions that were conducted in order to follow up on potential renewable energy technologies that were identified in the previous report; the technologies were analyzed for their feasibility, suitability and cost effectiveness for this project. This report covers the one-day conceptual design kickoff meeting that took place on November 4, 2002. The meeting was held to discuss the practicality and implementation of potential innovative technologies. Following the kickoff meeting, Inland Empire Utilities Agency (IEUA) and CH2M Hill, the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Consultant, held a meeting on December 2, 2002 to discuss the Conceptual Design Report outline and contents in order to clearly present each selected technology along with its evaluation, cost effectiveness and justification. A conference call also took place between the PIER Consultant and IEUA on December 13, 2002, to discuss the overall scope of work for this project. Major project activities in this period include expanded discussions on previous Energy Charrette decisions and recommendations, conceptual design kickoff meeting, conceptual design report, and deciding on the overall project scope of work.

  12. RP Global Spain S A Minicentrales | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RP Global Spain S A Minicentrales Jump to: navigation, search Name: RP Global Spain S.A. (Minicentrales) Place: Madrid, Spain Zip: E - 28036 Product: The Spanish arm of RP Global,...

  13. Genomic analysis of the Xp21 region around the RP3 locus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navia, B.A.; Eisenman, R.E.; Bruns, G.A.

    1994-09-01

    One form of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa has been localized by deletion and linkage analysis to proximal Xp21 near the OTC locus and the proximal breakpoint of the BB deletion. A deletion junction clone, previously isolated from this region, was used to initiate a series of bidirectional walks in a human genomic library in EMBL3A. A phage contig of nearly 70 kb has been cloned and systematically searched for conserved sequences and CA repeats. A number of unique sequences around the breakpoint have been sequenced and analyzed with exon identification programs. An HTF island was identified approximately 35 kb distal to the centromeric breakpoint of the BB deletion and several CA repeat-containing areas were found in the contig. Two YACs that contain the breakpoint and surrounding region were isolated. A phage sublibrary was constructed from one of the YACs and is being used to extend the contig map further centromeric. To isolate transcripts from the region, two rounds of cDNA selection from a combined short insert human retinal and fetal brain library were performed against the pooled phage clones from the contig and against the pooled phage from the YAC derived sublibrary. Among the selected cDNAs, several unique sequences have been identified and are currently being mapped and sequenced.

  14. RP-5 Renewable Energy Efficiency Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neil Clifton; Dave Wall; Jamal Zughbi

    2007-06-30

    This is the final technical report for the RP-5 Renewable Energy Efficiency Project (REEP). The report summarizes, in a comprehensive manner, all the work performed during the award period extending between July 12, 2002 and June 30, 2007. This report has been prepared in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Guidelines and summarizes all of the activities that occurred during the award period. The RP-5 Renewable Energy Efficiency Project, under development by the Inland Empire Utilities Agency (IEUA), is comprised of a series of full-scale demonstration projects that will showcase innovative combinations of primary and secondary generation systems using methane gas derived from local processing of biosolids, dairy manure and other organic material. The goal of the project is to create renewable energy-based generation systems with energy efficiencies 65% or more. The project was constructed at the 15 MGD Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant No. 5 located in the City of Chino in California where the Agency has constructed its new energy-efficient (platinum-LEED rating) headquarters building. Technologies that were featured in the project include internal combustion engines (ICE), absorption chillers, treatment plant secondary effluent cooling systems, heat recovery systems, thermal energy storage (TES), Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) secondary power generation system, the integration of a future fuel cell system, gas cleaning requirements, and other state-of-the-art design combinations. The RP-5 REEP biogas source is coming from three manure digesters which are located within the RP-5 Complex and are joined with the RP-5 REEP through gas conveyance pipelines. Food waste is being injected into the manure digesters for digester gas production enhancement. The RP-5 REEP clearly demonstrates the biogas production and power generation viability, specifically when dealing with renewable and variable heating value (Btu) fuel. The RP-5 REEP was challenged with meeting stringent utility, gas, power, and air quality rules and regulations. Coordination with the Southern California Gas Company (SCGC), Southern California Edison (SCE), and South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) was continuous and extensive. The interconnecting agreement and the permit to construct and operate were major obstacles despite the early start and coordination with the utility companies and regulatory agencies. The RP-5 REEP is part of a unique RP-5 Complex approach where several facilities are tied and connected with each other; where energy and gas can be transferred from one facility to another (see attached RP-5 Complex Ultimate Energy Balance Diagram). The REEP also incorporated new technologies, such as TES and ORC, along with using heat recovery for the platinum-LEED headquarter buildings heating and cooling via efficient absorption chillers. Through the conceptual design phase, numerous innovative technologies were researched and evaluated, with the most proven and efficient selected to be part of the RP-5 REEP.

  15. RP-5 Renewable Energy Efficiency Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neil Clifton; Eliza Jane Whitman; Jamal A. Zughbi

    2003-07-28

    This is the fourth quarterly technical report for the RP-5 Renewable Energy Efficiency Project. The report summarizes the work progress, effort and activities that took place during the period of April 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003. However, IEUA is preparing a Supplemental report that will be mailed to the Department of Energy (DOE) by August 1, 2003, that provides additional information regarding IEUA's plan to expedite certain project activities. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Guidelines. This technical report covers all meetings, discussions, and engineering and design activities that took place to finalize the project scope of work and complete the Request for Proposal (RFP) for the RP-5 Renewable Energy Efficiency Project. IEUA has decided to invite three more consulting engineering firms besides CH2M Hill, the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Consultant, to submit proposals for the design of the energy efficiency project. The proposals are currently in the evaluation phase and a decision is expected by the end of July. IEUA moved to its new headquarters building on June 13, 2003. The central plant is the system that supplies cooling and heating water to the headquarters building, and it primarily consists of equipment listed in the cooperative agreement under ''Chiller and Heater''. The central plant equipment was successfully installed and started. Other activities include gas analysis of three sources of low quality digester gas and foul air which could be used as fuel for an innovative flex microturbine. IEUA is also working with Stirling Energy Systems to determine if the Agency should be a host site for their equipment for testing the engine's operation on digester and natural gas. A matching funds update is also included in the Results and Discussion section, which presents the work effort performed by the PIER Consultant and the associated costs that serve as matching funds for the RP-5 Project during this report period.

  16. RP-5 Renewable Energy Efficiency Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neil Clifton; Eliza Jane Whitman; Jamal A. Zughbi

    2004-01-29

    This is the sixth quarterly technical report for the RP-5 Renewable Energy Efficiency Project. The report summarizes the work progress, effort and activities that took place during the period from October 1, 2003 through December 31, 2003. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Guidelines. In coordination with the DOE, IEUA has revised the original Cooperative Agreement to reflect the actual and current project scope of work. The original Agreement statement of work (SOW) included conceptual and preliminary equipment and systems, which were further evaluated for feasibility and suitability for the project. As a result, some of the equipment was taken out of the project scope. In response to questions from the DOE, IEUA has submitted a summary report on the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) secondary power generation units for availability and suitability for this project and associated safety concerns pointed out by the DOE. IEUA has awarded the consulting engineering contract to Parsons Water and Infrastructure, Inc. to provide the project's design and construction services. The project's pre-design kickoff meeting was held at IEUA's headquarters on December 11, 2003. IEUA has submitted a proposal for a grant offered by California Energy Commission (CEC) which if awarded to IEUA, will add value to this project. IEUA has finalized and signed the agreement with Stirling Energy Systems (SES) to host a 25 kW Stirling Engine at the RP-5 plant site for reliability and performance testing using digester and natural gas. As a result of further evaluation of the flexible microturbine system, IEUA has decided to take it out of the project's scope of work; however, it may be considered in future projects at other locations. IEUA has installed a 60 kW Photovoltaic (PV) power generation system on the roof of the new headquarters building. A matching funds update is also included in the Results and Discussion section. The update presents the work effort performed by CH2M Hill, the PIER Consultant, and the associated costs that serve as matching funds for the RP-5 Renewable Energy Efficiency Project during this report period.

  17. Flexible retinal electrode array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  18. Golden Reading Room: Request for Proposals (RFP) Number DE-RP36-07GO97036 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Request for Proposals (RFP) Number DE-RP36-07GO97036 Golden Reading Room: Request for Proposals (RFP) Number DE-RP36-07GO97036 RFP DE-RP36-07GO97036 -- Management and Operation of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Alliance Prime Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308, through modification 1033

  19. Request for Proposals (RFP) Number DE-RP36-07GO97036: Alliance Prime

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308, through modification 1033 | Department of Energy Request for Proposals (RFP) Number DE-RP36-07GO97036: Alliance Prime Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308, through modification 1033 Request for Proposals (RFP) Number DE-RP36-07GO97036: Alliance Prime Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308, through modification 1033 Request for Proposals (RFP) Number DE-RP36-07GO97036: Alliance Prime Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308, through modification 1033. PDF icon Part I: Amendment of

  20. Alpha Emission Near 100Sn and the Termination of the rp Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alpha Emission Near 100 Sn and the Termination of the rp Process The astrophysical rp-process is thought to reach a termination point in the region of 100 Sn, via the Sn(p,γ)⟶Sb(p,γ)⟶Te(γ,α) cycle, due to changing mass surface above the closed Z=50 shell. By measuring the decay properties of nuclei in this region, information can be provided to determine the actual endpoint for the rp-process, as well as measure single particle states near 100 Sn. We have identified a small alpha branch

  1. Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps Cutler, R.P.; Mansure, A.J...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps Cutler, R.P.; Mansure, A.J. 02 PETROLEUM; FLOW MODELS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; OIL WELLS; PETROLEUM; ROD PUMPS; SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES Sucker...

  2. Microsoft Word - 2015-03-17_FINALRev0_SRNL-RP-2014-01198c

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technical Assessment Team Report March 17, 2015 SRNL-RP-2014-01198 Revision 0 _________________________________________________________________________________ SRNL-RP-2014-01198 Revision 0 March 17, 2015 Page 2 of 277 DISCLAIMER This work was prepared under an agreement with and funded by the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government or its employees, nor any of its contractors, subcontractors or their employees, makes any express or implied: 1. warranty or assumes any legal liability for

  3. Method for Confidence Metric in Optic Disk Location in Retinal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Images Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary To improve accuracy in diagnosis of retinal disease, ORNL researchers...

  4. Microsoft Word - 2015-03-17_FINALRev0_SRNL-RP-2014-01198c

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    'Systematic Evaluations and Discussions for Source Term' section of Appendix E, "Drum Characterization Integrated Summary Report." _________________________________________________________________________________ SRNL-RP-2014-01198 Revision 0 March 17, 2015 Page 34 of 277 4.4 INITIATION OF THE THERMAL RUNAWAY WAS INTERNAL AND NOT CAUSED BY PHENOMENA OUTSIDE DRUM 68660. Key Judgment 2 is that the breach of Drum 68660 was the result of exothermic reactions within the drum. The TAT also

  5. RSAC 6.2 with WinRP 2.0 User Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley Schrader

    2005-09-01

    The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer Program (RSAC-6.2) calculates the consequences of a release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. Using a personal computer, a user can generate a fission product inventory from either reactor operating history or a nuclear criticality accident. RSAC-6.2 models the effects of high-efficiency particulate air filters or other cleanup systems and calculates decay and ingrowth during transport through processes, facilities, and the environment. Doses are calculated for resuspension, inhalation, immersion, ground surface, and ingestion pathways. WinRP 2.0, a windows based overlay to RSAC-6.2, assists users in creating and running RSAC-6.2 input files. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for RSAC-6.2 and WinRP 2.0. Instructions, screens, and examples are provided to guide the user through the functions provided by RSAC-6.2 and WinRP 2.0. These programs are designed for users who are familiar with radiological dose assessment methods.

  6. Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i SRNS-RP-2013-00162

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i SRNS-RP-2013-00162 Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i Table of Contents 1.0 - Purpose p1 2.0 - Executive Summary p1 3.0 - SRS Land Use Overview p5 Assumptions Current Land Use Leases, Transfers and Other Land Use Actions Future Land Use Land Use Issues 4.0 - Land Use Planning and Control for Existing Missions p13 Cleanup, Production and Support Missions Natural and Cultural Resource Management 5.0 - Process for Future Land Use Changes

  7. Question of universality in RP{sup {ital n}{minus}1} and O({ital n}) lattice {sigma} models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niedermayer, F.; Weisz, P.; Shin, D.

    1996-05-01

    We argue that there is no essential violation of universality in the continuum limit of mixed RP{sup {ital n}{minus}1} and O({ital n}) lattice {sigma} models in two dimensions, contrary to opposite claims in the literature. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. Mass Measurements of Very Neutron-Deficient Mo and Tc Isotopes and Their Impact on rp Process Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haettner, E.; Plass, W. R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Eliseev, S.; Herfurth, F.; Hessberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Kluge, H.-J.; Audi, G.; Blaum, K.; Ketter, J.; Fleckenstein, T.; Ketelaer, J.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Mazzocco, M.; Novikov, Yu. N.; Vorobjev, G.

    2011-03-25

    The masses of ten proton-rich nuclides, including the N=Z+1 nuclides {sup 85}Mo and {sup 87}Tc, were measured with the Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP. Compared to the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2003 a systematic shift of the mass surface by up to 1.6 MeV is observed causing significant abundance changes of the ashes of astrophysical x-ray bursts. Surprisingly low {alpha} separation energies for neutron-deficient Mo and Tc are found, making the formation of a ZrNb cycle in the rp process possible. Such a cycle would impose an upper temperature limit for the synthesis of elements beyond Nb in the rp process.

  9. Tri-functional cannula for retinal endovascular surgery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2010-07-27

    A tri-functional cannula combines the functions of tissue Plasminogen Activator (tPA) solution delivery, illumination and venous pressure measurement. The cannula utilizes a tapered hollow-core optical fiber having an inlet for tPA solution, an attached fiber optic splitter configured to receive illumination light from an optical source such and a LED. A window in the cannula transmits the light to and from a central retinal vein. The return light is coupled to an optical detector to measure the pressure within the vein and determine whether an occlusion has been removed.

  10. Automated Tracing of Horizontal Neuron Processes During Retinal Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerekes, Ryan A [ORNL; Martins, Rodrigo [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital; Dyer, Michael A [ORNL; Gleason, Shaun Scott [ORNL; Karakaya, Mahmut [ORNL; Davis, Denise [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

    2011-01-01

    In the developing mammalian retina, horizontal neurons undergo a dramatic reorganization oftheir processes shortly after they migrate to their appropriate laminar position. This is an importantprocess because it is now understood that the apical processes are important for establishing theregular mosaic of horizontal cells in the retina and proper reorganization during lamination isrequired for synaptogenesis with photoreceptors and bipolar neurons. However, this process isdifficult to study because the analysis of horizontal neuron anatomy is labor intensive and time-consuming. In this paper, we present a computational method for automatically tracing the three-dimensional (3-D) dendritic structure of horizontal retinal neurons in two-photon laser scanningmicroscope (TPLSM) imagery. Our method is based on 3-D skeletonization and is thus able topreserve the complex structure of the dendritic arbor of these cells. We demonstrate theeffectiveness of our approach by comparing our tracing results against two sets of semi-automatedtraces over a set of 10 horizontal neurons ranging in age from P1 to P5. We observe an averageagreement level of 81% between our automated trace and the manual traces. This automatedmethod will serve as an important starting point for further refinement and optimization.

  11. Method and system for the diagnosis of disease using retinal image content and an archive of diagnosed human patient data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tobin, Kenneth W; Karnowski, Thomas P; Chaum, Edward

    2013-08-06

    A method for diagnosing diseases having retinal manifestations including retinal pathologies includes the steps of providing a CBIR system including an archive of stored digital retinal photography images and diagnosed patient data corresponding to the retinal photography images, the stored images each indexed in a CBIR database using a plurality of feature vectors, the feature vectors corresponding to distinct descriptive characteristics of the stored images. A query image of the retina of a patient is obtained. Using image processing, regions or structures in the query image are identified. The regions or structures are then described using the plurality of feature vectors. At least one relevant stored image from the archive based on similarity to the regions or structures is retrieved, and an eye disease or a disease having retinal manifestations in the patient is diagnosed based on the diagnosed patient data associated with the relevant stored image(s).

  12. L3:THM.CFD.P5.02 J.N. Shadid, T.M. Smith, R.P. Pawlowski, E. C. Cyr,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 J.N. Shadid, T.M. Smith, R.P. Pawlowski, E. C. Cyr, P.D. Weber SNL Completed: October 31, 2012 CASL-U-2012-0164-000 RANS CFD SIMULATIONS FOR CASL THM USING DREKAR::CFD J. N. Shadid, T. M. Smith, R. P. Pawlowski, E. C. Cyr, and P. D. Weber Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM, 87185 Abstract. This brief report describes work directed towards completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) Level 3 Milestone THM.CFD.P5.02 for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water

  13. Communication: One-photon phase control of cis-trans isomerization in retinal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arango, Carlos A.; Brumer, Paul

    2013-02-21

    We computationally demonstrate the one-photon phase control of retinal isomerization under conditions of low laser intensity. The calculations, utilizing the multiconfigurational time dependent Hartree method, include coupling between the two modes that are active in isomerization and the background molecular vibrational environment. Noting previously unsuccessful computations highlights the significance of this result.

  14. Automated identification of retinal vessels using a multiscale directional contrast quantification (MDCQ) strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhen, Yi; Zhang, Xinyuan; Wang, Ningli E-mail: puj@upmc.edu; Gu, Suicheng; Meng, Xin; Zheng, Bin; Pu, Jiantao E-mail: puj@upmc.edu

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: A novel algorithm is presented to automatically identify the retinal vessels depicted in color fundus photographs. Methods: The proposed algorithm quantifies the contrast of each pixel in retinal images at multiple scales and fuses the resulting consequent contrast images in a progressive manner by leveraging their spatial difference and continuity. The multiscale strategy is to deal with the variety of retinal vessels in width, intensity, resolution, and orientation; and the progressive fusion is to combine consequent images and meanwhile avoid a sudden fusion of image noise and/or artifacts in space. To quantitatively assess the performance of the algorithm, we tested it on three publicly available databases, namely, DRIVE, STARE, and HRF. The agreement between the computer results and the manual delineation in these databases were quantified by computing their overlapping in both area and length (centerline). The measures include sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Results: For the DRIVE database, the sensitivities in identifying vessels in area and length were around 90% and 70%, respectively, the accuracy in pixel classification was around 99%, and the precisions in terms of both area and length were around 94%. For the STARE database, the sensitivities in identifying vessels were around 90% in area and 70% in length, and the accuracy in pixel classification was around 97%. For the HRF database, the sensitivities in identifying vessels were around 92% in area and 83% in length for the healthy subgroup, around 92% in area and 75% in length for the glaucomatous subgroup, around 91% in area and 73% in length for the diabetic retinopathy subgroup. For all three subgroups, the accuracy was around 98%. Conclusions: The experimental results demonstrate that the developed algorithm is capable of identifying retinal vessels depicted in color fundus photographs in a relatively reliable manner.

  15. High-resolution retinal imaging using adaptive optics and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olivier, Scot S.; Werner, John S.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Laut, Sophie P.; Jones, Steven M.

    2010-09-07

    This invention permits retinal images to be acquired at high speed and with unprecedented resolution in three dimensions (4.times.4.times.6 .mu.m). The instrument achieves high lateral resolution by using adaptive optics to correct optical aberrations of the human eye in real time. High axial resolution and high speed are made possible by the use of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. Using this system, we have demonstrated the ability to image microscopic blood vessels and the cone photoreceptor mosaic.

  16. Controlling Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Patch Size Influences Growth Factor Expression

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vargis, Elizabeth A; Peterson, Cristen B; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Retterer, Scott T; Collier, Pat

    2014-01-01

    The spatial organization of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells grown in culture was controlled using micropatterning techniques in order to examine the effect of patch size on cell health and differentiation. Understanding this effect is a critical step in the development of multiplexed high throughput fluidic assays and provides a model for replicating disease states associated with the deterioration of retinal tissue during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Microcontact printing of fibronectin on polystyrene and glass substrates was used to promote cell attachment, forming RPE patches of controlled size and shape. These colonies mimic the effect of atrophy and loss-of-function thatmore » occurs in the retina during degenerative diseases such as AMD. After 72 hours of cell growth, levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an important biomarker of AMD, were measured. Cells were counted and morphological indicators of cell viability and tight junction formation were assessed via fluorescence microscopy. Up to a twofold increase of VEGF expression per cell was measured as colony size decreased, suggesting that the local microenvironment of, and connections between, RPE cells influences growth factor expression leading to the initiation and progression of diseases such as AMD.« less

  17. DOE FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT RP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUSS PETERMAN

    2012-01-01

    The City of Georgetown Utility Systems (GUS) patnered with the private sector, the American Public Power Association (APPA) and Southwestern University to design, construct, test and monitor a solar co-generation system directly connected to the GUS electric distribution system. This report consists of the Primary Technical Report and 3 attachments.

  18. if020rp6.PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The purpose of this report is to inform Idaho management of matters that came to the attention of the Office of Inspector General (OIG) during the audit of Idaho and Lockheed....

  19. filetRpWk4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  20. A novel sandwich hybridization method for selecting cDNAs from large genomic regions: Identification of cDNAs from the cloned genomic DNA spanning the XLRP locus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, D.; McHenry, C.; Fujita, R.

    1994-09-01

    We have developed an efficient hybridization-based cDNA-selection method. A sandwich of three species - single-stranded cDNA, tagged RNA derived from genomic DNA, and biotinylated RNA complementary to the tag - allows specific retention of hybrids on an avidin-matrix. Previously, using model experiments, we demonstrated highly specific and efficient selection of a retinal gene, NRL, from complex mixtures of cDNA clones, using a sub-library from a 5 kb NRL genomic clone. We have now applied this selection strategy to isolate cDNAs from human adult retina and fetal eye libraries, with the {open_quotes}genomic RNA{close_quotes} derived from two YAC clones (OTC-C and 55B) spanning the region of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) locus RP3 at Xp21.1. Effectiveness of the selection-method was monitored by enrichment of TCTEX-1L gene that maps within the 55B YAC. Of the 15 selected cDNA clones that hybridized to the 55B YAC DNA, five appear to the map to specific cosmid clones derived from the 55B YAC. Inserts in these selected cDNA clones range from 0.5 to 2.3 kb in size. Additional clones are now being isolated and characterized. This procedure should be independent of the size or complexity of genomic DNA being used for selection, allow for the isolation of full-length cDNAs, and may have wider application.

  1. Retinal instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britton, Charles L; D& #x27; Urso, Brian R; Chaum, Edward; Simpson, John T; Baba, Justin S; Ericson, M. Nance; Warmack, Robert J

    2013-04-23

    In one embodiment, the present invention provides a method of removing scar tissue from an eye that includes inserting a device including an array of micro-rods into an eye, wherein at least one glass micro-rod of the array of glass micro-rods includes a sharp feature; contacting a scar tissue with the array of micro-rods; and removing the array of micro-rods and the scar tissue from the eye. In another embodiment, the present invention provides a medical device for engaging a tissue including and an array of glass micro-rods, wherein at least one glass micro-rod of the array of glass micro-rods includes a sharp feature opposite a base of the array of glass micro-rods that is connected to the cannula, wherein the sharp feature of the at least one micro-rod is angled from a plane that is normal to a face of the base of the array of glass micro-rods.

  2. Honeybee retinal glial cells transform glucose and supply the neurons with metabolic substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsacopoulos, M.; Evequoz-Mercier, V.; Perrottet, P.; Buchner, E.

    1988-11-01

    The retina of the honeybee drone is a nervous tissue in which glial cells and photoreceptor cells (sensory neurons) constitute two distinct metabolic compartments. Retinal slices incubated with 2-deoxy(/sup 3/H)glucose convert this glucose analogue to 2-deoxy(/sup 3/H)glucose 6-phosphate, but this conversion is made only in the glial cells. Hence, glycolysis occurs only in glial cells. In contrast, the neurons consume O/sub 2/ and this consumption is sustained by the hydrolysis of glycogen, which is contained in large amounts in the glia. During photostimulation the increased oxidative metabolism of the neurons is sustained by a higher supply of carbohydrates from the glia. This clear case of metabolic interaction between neurons and glial cells supports Golgi's original hypothesis, proposed nearly 100 years ago, about the nutritive function of glial cells in the nervous system.

  3. Nuclear translocation and overexpression of GAPDH by the hyper-pressure in retinal ganglion cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Choong-Il; Lee, Sung-Ho; Seong, Gong-Je; Kim, Yeon-Hyang; Lee, Mi-Young . E-mail: miyoung@sch.ac.kr

    2006-03-24

    To investigate the effect of hyper-pressure on retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5), RGC-5 cells were exposed to an ambient hydrostatic pressure of 100 mm Hg. Upon treatment, the proliferation of RGC-5 cells was inhibited and neuronal apoptosis was detected by specific apoptosis marker TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling). To probe into the mechanism mediating the apoptosis of RGC-5 cells in 100 mm Hg, protein profile alterations following hyper-pressure treatment were examined using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by MALDI-TOF. Out of the 400 protein spots of RGC-5 cells detected on 2-DE gels, 37 differentially expressed protein spots were further identified using in gel tryptic digestion and mass spectrometry. Among these proteins, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was significantly expressed 10 times more in 100 mm Hg than in normal pressure. The accumulation of GAPDH in the nucleus and its translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus in 100 mm Hg were observed using a microscope. These results suggest that the hyper-pressure-induced apoptosis in RGC-5 cells may be involved with not only the increase of GAPDH expression, but also the accumulation and the translocalization of GAPDH to the nucleus.

  4. Reconstruction 3-dimensional image from 2-dimensional image of status optical coherence tomography (OCT) for analysis of changes in retinal thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arinilhaq,; Widita, Rena [Department of Physics, Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    Optical Coherence Tomography is often used in medical image acquisition to diagnose that change due easy to use and low price. Unfortunately, this type of examination produces a two-dimensional retinal image of the point of acquisition. Therefore, this study developed a method that combines and reconstruct 2-dimensional retinal images into three-dimensional images to display volumetric macular accurately. The system is built with three main stages: data acquisition, data extraction and 3-dimensional reconstruction. At data acquisition step, Optical Coherence Tomography produced six *.jpg images of each patient were further extracted with MATLAB 2010a software into six one-dimensional arrays. The six arrays are combined into a 3-dimensional matrix using a kriging interpolation method with SURFER9 resulting 3-dimensional graphics of macula. Finally, system provides three-dimensional color graphs based on the data distribution normal macula. The reconstruction system which has been designed produces three-dimensional images with size of 481 481 h (retinal thickness) pixels.

  5. Hop/STI1 modulates retinal proliferation and cell death independent of PrP{sup C}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arruda-Carvalho, Maithe; Njaine, Brian; Silveira, Mariana S.; Linden, Rafael; Chiarini, Luciana B. . E-mail: chiarini@biof.ufrj.br

    2007-09-21

    Hop/STI1 is a co-chaperone adaptor protein for Hsp70/Hsp90 complexes. Hop/STI1 is found extracellularly and modulates cell death and differentiation through interaction with the prion protein (PrP{sup C}). Here, we investigated the expression of hop/STI1 and its role upon cell proliferation and cell death in the developing retina. Hop/STI1 is more expressed in developing rat retina than in the mature tissue. Hop/STI1 blocks retinal cell death in the neuroblastic layer (NBL) in a PrP{sup C} dependent manner, but failed to protect ganglion cells against axotomy-induced cell death. An antibody raised against hop/STI1 ({alpha}-STI1) blocked both ganglion cell and NBL cell death independent of PrP{sup C}. cAMP/PKA, ERK, PI3K and PKC signaling pathways were not involved in these effects. Hop/STI1 treatment reduced proliferation, while {alpha}-STI1 increased proliferation in the developing retina, both independent of PrP{sup C}. We conclude that hop/STI1 can modulate both proliferation and cell death in the developing retina independent of PrP{sup C}.

  6. Albendazole inhibits endothelial cell migration, tube formation, vasopermeability, VEGF receptor-2 expression and suppresses retinal neovascularization in ROP model of angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pourgholami, Mohammad H.; Khachigian, Levon M.; Fahmy, Roger G.; Badar, Samina; Wang, Lisa; Chu, Stephanie Wai Ling; Morris, David Lawson

    2010-07-09

    The angiogenic process begins with the cell proliferation and migration into the primary vascular network, and leads to vascularization of previously avascular tissues and organs as well to growth and remodeling of the initially homogeneous capillary plexus to form a new microcirculation. Additionally, an increase in microvascular permeability is a crucial step in angiogenesis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a central role in angiogenesis. We have previously reported that albendazole suppresses VEGF levels and inhibits malignant ascites formation, suggesting a possible effect on angiogenesis. This study was therefore designed to investigate the antiangiogenic effect of albendazole in non-cancerous models of angiogenesis. In vitro, treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with albendazole led to inhibition of tube formation, migration, permeability and down-regulation of the VEGF type 2 receptor (VEGFR-2). In vivo albendazole profoundly inhibited hyperoxia-induced retinal angiogenesis in mice. These results provide new insights into the antiangiogenic effects of albendazole.

  7. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    team makes unique contributions to the first bionic eye June 27, 2013 As part of the multi-institutional Artificial Retina Project, Los Alamos researchers helped develop the first bionic eye. Recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Argus II will help people blinded by the rare hereditary disease retinitis pigmentosa or seniors suffering from severe macular degeneration-diseases that destroy the light-sensing cell in the retina. Los Alamos scientists served as the Advanced

  8. June

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June /newsroom/_assets/images/newsroom-icon.jpg June We are your source for reliable, up-to-date news and information; our scientists and engineers can provide technical insights on our innovations for a secure nation. Schematic of artificial retina system Lab team makes unique contributions to the first bionic eye The Argus II will help people blinded by the rare hereditary disease retinitis pigmentosa or seniors suffering from severe macular degeneration. - 6/27/13 Donivan Porterfield

  9. Lab team makes unique contributions to the first bionic eye

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Team makes unique contributions to the first bionic eye Lab team makes unique contributions to the first bionic eye The Argus II will help people blinded by the rare hereditary disease retinitis pigmentosa or seniors suffering from severe macular degeneration. June 27, 2013 Schematic of artificial retina system Schematic of artificial retina system. Image credit: DOE The Argus II operates by using a miniature camera mounted in eyeglasses that captures images and wirelessly sends the information

  10. DE-RP52-05NA26986

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Core level testing for NSDD Core installations DE-SOL-0008449 Attachment L-2b [Submit in Volume II, TAB 1] Instructions Attachment L-2b: Note: Attachment L-2b is limited to one (1) 8 ½ x 11 page. Experiences provided must be relevant to the work that the team member will be performing under this contract. The Offeror shall explain how the work performed by the experience is relevant to the indicator. Relevance is defined by Indicator as follows: A. Relevance to indicator A. is defined as

  11. DE-RP52-05NA26986

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Indicator Summary Matrix Indicator Experience 1 Experience 2 Experience 3 Experience 4 Experience 5 A. Owned and operated by third parties x x A. Integrating multiple public and private entities x x A. Remote sites that lack infrastructure x x A. Accommodating ongoing site operations x x A. Changing requirements x x A. Cultural and language-related barriers x B. Soliciting and managing foreign subcontracts for construction ensuring quality, safe work is carried out within schedule and budgetary

  12. DE-RP52-05NA26986

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    safe work is carried out within schedule and budgetary constraints x x C. Project management and logistics for simultaneous deployment of design and construction in multiple ...

  13. IDC RP2 & 3 US Industry Standard Cost Estimate Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, James M.; Huelskamp, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has prepared a ROM cost estimate for budgetary planning for the IDC Reengineering Phase 2 & 3 effort, using a commercial software cost estimation tool calibrated to US industry performance parameters. This is not a cost estimate for Sandia to perform the project. This report provides the ROM cost estimate and describes the methodology, assumptions, and cost model details used to create the ROM cost estimate. ROM Cost Estimate Disclaimer Contained herein is a Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost estimate that has been provided to enable initial planning for this proposed project. This ROM cost estimate is submitted to facilitate informal discussions in relation to this project and is NOT intended to commit Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) or its resources. Furthermore, as a Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC), Sandia must be compliant with the Anti-Deficiency Act and operate on a full-cost recovery basis. Therefore, while Sandia, in conjunction with the Sponsor, will use best judgment to execute work and to address the highest risks and most important issues in order to effectively manage within cost constraints, this ROM estimate and any subsequent approved cost estimates are on a 'full-cost recovery' basis. Thus, work can neither commence nor continue unless adequate funding has been accepted and certified by DOE.

  14. DE-RP05-01OR22717

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H-1 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 MODIFICATION AUTHORITY .....................................................................................3 H.2 INCORPORATION OF REPRESENTATIONS, CERTIFICATIONS, AND OTHER STATEMENTS OF OFFEROR ........................................................................................3 H.3 DEFINITIONS

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - NA-RP_Public_Workshop_April-2013.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    metric in preparation for the 2014 White BookNeeds Assessment analysis. - BPA expects to peer review this work with regional interests sometime in 2013early 2014. - BPA will then...

  16. Microsoft Word - 2015-03-17_FINALRev0_SRNL-RP-2014-01198c

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Based on the best estimate of the chemical composition of Drum 68660, no heavier-than-air ... in the drum) supported exothermic chemical reactions leading to a thermal runaway; ...

  17. DE-RP05-08OR23286 SOLICITATION, OFFER AND AWARD 4. TYPE OF SOLICITATIO...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... against the criteria established in the ... The management of the Oak Ridge Reservation's ... and dispose of the low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed low-level ...

  18. Microsoft Word - 2015-03-17_FINALRev0_SRNL-RP-2014-01198c

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... on the floor at the waste face (upstream from the event). ... 2000. Influence of methane enrichment by aeration of ... Modeling for Routine Emissions; 2.15 - Atmospheric ...

  19. Request for Proposals (RFP) Number DE-RP36-07GO97036: Alliance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clause PDF icon Part VII: Section J: List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments: Table of Contents PDF icon Part VII: Section J: List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other ...

  20. Alpha Emission Near 100Sn and the Termination of the rp Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Q ( 109 I) of 3.92 MeV. This result when combined with Q p ( 109 I) and Q ( 108 Te) shows 105 Sb to be 130 keV more bound than the previously reported. This result...

  1. SPEAR3 | A Brighter Source at SSRL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Andrei Terebilo, Jeff Corbett, Peter McIntosh, PJ Boussina, Ed Guerra, Fernando Rafael, Don Martin, Clemens Wermelskirchen, Hesham Khater (SLAC RP), Ray Russ (SLAC RP)....

  2. Assessment of Offshore Wind System Design, Safety, and Operation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... and Constructing Floating Production Systems API RP 2GEOISO ... Qualification for Steel Plates for Offshore Structures API RP 95J Gulf of Mexico Jack-up Operations for ...

  3. HL-217, a new topical anti-angiogenic agent, inhibits retinal vascular leakage and pathogenic subretinal neovascularization in Vldlr{sup ?/?} mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Junghyun; Kim, Chan-Sik; Jo, Kyuhyung; Cho, Yun-Seok; Kim, Hyun-Gyu; Lee, Geun-Hyeog; Lee, Yun Mi; Sohn, Eunjin; Kim, Jin Sook

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: HL-217 is a new synthetic topical anti-angiogenic agent. HL-217 attenuated subretinal neovascularization in Vldlr{sup ?/?} mice. HL-217 blocked the binding of PDGF-BB to PDGFR?. - Abstract: HL-217 is a new synthetic angiogenesis inhibitor. Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) is a vasoactive factor and has been implicated in proliferative retinopathies. In this study, we examined the mechanism of action and efficacy of topical application of HL-217 on subretinal neovascularization in very low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (Vldlr{sup ?/?}) mice. In three-week-old male Vldlr{sup ?/?} mice, HL-217 (1.5 or 3 mg/ml) was administered twice per day for 4 weeks by topical eye drop instillation. Neovascular areas were then measured. We used a protein array to evaluate the expression levels of angiogenic factors. The inhibitory effect of HL-217 on the PDGF-BB/PDGFR? interaction was evaluated in vitro. The neovascular area in the Vldlr{sup ?/?} mice was significantly reduced by HL-217. Additionally, HL-217 decreased the expression levels of PDGF-BB protein and VEGF mRNA. Moreover, HL-217 dose-dependently inhibited the PDGF-BB/PDGFR? interaction (IC{sub 50} = 38.9 0.7 ?M). These results suggest that HL-217 is a potent inhibitor of PDGF-BB. HL-217, when applied topically, is an effective inhibitor of subretinal neovascularization due to its ability to inhibit the pro-angiogenic effects of PDGF-BB.

  4. baepgac_ccdd | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1995) K.R. Benedek, C.E. Benson, and R.P. Wilson (Arthur D. Little, Inc.); J.W. Parkinson ... Modular Power Generation (Sept 1994) R.P. Wilson, Jr., (Arthur D. Little, Inc.), Third ...

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A NATURAL GAS SYSTEMS ANALYSIS MODEL (GSAM) VOLUME I - SUMMARY REPORT VOLUME II - USER'S GUIDE VOLUME IIIA - RP PROGRAMMER'S GUIDE VOLUME IIIB - SRPM PROGRAMMER'S GUIDE VOLUME IIIC - E&P PROGRAMMER'S GUIDE VOLUME IIID - D&I PROGRAMMER'S GUIDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2001-02-01

    This report summarizes work completed on DOE Contract DE-AC21-92MC28138, Development of a Natural Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). The products developed under this project directly support the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in carrying out its natural gas R&D mission. The objective of this research effort has been to create a comprehensive, non-proprietary, microcomputer model of the North American natural gas market. GSAM has been developed to explicitly evaluate components of the natural gas system, including the entire in-place gas resource base, exploration and development technologies, extraction technology and performance parameters, transportation and storage factors, and end-use demand issues. The system has been fully tested and calibrated and has been used for multiple natural gas metrics analyses at NETL in which metric associated with NETL natural gas upstream R&D technologies and strategies under the direction of NETL has been evaluated. NETL's Natural Gas Strategic Plan requires that R&D activities be evaluated for their ability to provide adequate supplies of reasonably priced natural gas. GSAM provides the capability to assess potential and on-going R&D projects using a full fuel cycle, cost-benefit approach. This method yields realistic, market-based assessments of benefits and costs of alternative or related technology advances. GSAM is capable of estimating both technical and commercial successes, quantifying the potential benefits to the market, as well as to other related research. GSAM, therefore, represents an integration of research activities and a method for planning and prioritizing efforts to maximize benefits and minimize costs. Without an analytical tool like GSAM, NETL natural gas upstream R&D activities cannot be appropriately ranked or focused on the most important aspects of natural gas extraction efforts or utilization considerations.

  6. June 2015 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (RP) and fire department personnel recently conducted their annual "Live Burn" training exercises that simulate fires in facilities with chemical and radiological contamination. ...

  7. Savannah River Site "Live Burn" Training Sharpens Skills | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (RP) and fire department personnel recently conducted their annual "Live Burn" training exercises that simulate fires in facilities with chemical and radiological contamination. ...

  8. Section 39

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    during the First ISCCP (a) Regional Experiment (FIRE) and Hawaiian Rainband Project (HaRP) experiments. The FIRE observations carried out over the 4-day period showed the...

  9. EIA-814

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... ,,,"Panama",710,"PM",3205 ,,,"Papua New Guinea",712,"PP",3203 ,,,"Paraguay",715,"PA",3204 ,,,"Peru",720,"PE",3201 ,,,"Philippines",725,"RP",3295 ...

  10. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmological Parameters from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Doriese, W.Bertrand ; Dunner, R. ; Essinger-Hileman, T. more ; Fisher, R.P. ; Oxford U. Princeton U. Princeton U., Astrophys. Sci. Dept. Oxford U. Canadian Inst....

  11. City of Richmond, Indiana (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: City of Richmond Place: Indiana Phone Number: 765-973-7200 Website: rp-l.com Twitter: @richmondpower Facebook: https:www.facebook.compages...

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - Vargis_2014_CNMS Staff Science Highlight...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of age- related macular degeneration. Reference "The effect of retinal pigment epithelial cell patch size on growth factor expression" Elizabeth Vargis a , Cristen B. Peterson c ,...

  13. Method and system for assigning a confidence metric for automated determination of optic disc location

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karnowski, Thomas P.; Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W.; Muthusamy Govindasamy, Vijaya Priya; Chaum, Edward

    2012-07-10

    A method for assigning a confidence metric for automated determination of optic disc location that includes analyzing a retinal image and determining at least two sets of coordinates locating an optic disc in the retinal image. The sets of coordinates can be determined using first and second image analysis techniques that are different from one another. An accuracy parameter can be calculated and compared to a primary risk cut-off value. A high confidence level can be assigned to the retinal image if the accuracy parameter is less than the primary risk cut-off value and a low confidence level can be assigned to the retinal image if the accuracy parameter is greater than the primary risk cut-off value. The primary risk cut-off value being selected to represent an acceptable risk of misdiagnosis of a disease having retinal manifestations by the automated technique.

  14. Amendment 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Page 1 of 1 This Amendment incorporates the following significant changes to solicitation DE-RP36- 07GO97036: I. Section K, Representations and Certifications is deleted and ...

  15. Amendment 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Page 1 of 1 This Amendment incorporates the following significant changes to solicitation DE-RP36- 07GO97036: I. Sections L3(f)(2)(1)-(2) are deleted and replaced as indicated in...

  16. Report2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DC, April 1983.) 8 a) R.P. Reed et al., "The Economic Effects of Fracture in the United States," (Part 1-A Synopsis of the September 30, 1982 Report to NBS by Battelle...

  17. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Retrieval of Ice Water Path Using Thermal Channels Mitchell, D.L. (a), d'Entremont, R.P. (b), Stackhouse, P.W., Jr. (c), and Heymsfield, A.J. (d), Desert Research Institute (a),...

  18. Cambrian Wind Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cambrian Wind Energy Place: London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip: W1U 6RP Sector: Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product: UK wind...

  19. lzi8385.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Section 3.7.2, "Seismic System AnalysisJ' (Reference 2) ... response components were Square Root of the Sum of the ... represented by a single equation: 1 Yz Rp Cj Rpj ...

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - Tritium Design Practice.ppt

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2007 WSRC-RP-92-431, "Tritium Materials Data Base (U)", Nov 20, 1992 DP-MS-84-103, DuPont-WSRC, "Degradation of Elastomers by Tritium Beta Radiation," 1983 Elliot A Clark and ...

  1. Portland HQ Letterhead

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SU-16 Equipment technology and office automation IR-15 Equipment types IR-15 Equipment, electronic communications IR-16 Equipment, excess SU-14-15 Equipment, generation RP-21-23...

  2. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    February 27 through March 3, 2011, Phoenix, Arizona. C.H. Benson, W.J. Waugh, W.H. Albright, G.M. Smith, R.P. Bush PDF icon Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field ...

  3. Professional Papers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C.H. Benson, W.J. Waugh, W.H. Albright, G.M. Smith, R.P. Bush August 1, 2010 Vascular ... Tucson, Arizona. W.J. Waugh, G.M. Smith , P. Mushovic February 1, 2001 Lessons ...

  4. RPT_PERIOD","R_S_NAME","LINE_NUM","PROD_CODE","PROD_NAME","PORT...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    RP",31,820,"UNFINISHED OILS, NAPHTHAS & LIGHTER",5312,"CORPUS CHRIS, TX","TEXAS",3,830,"SPAIN",219,0,0,"CITGO REFG & CHEM INC","CORPUS CHRISTI","TX","TEXAS",3 34000,"CITGO PETRO...

  5. minnis-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P. Minnis and D. F. Young Atmospheric Sciences Division NASA-Langley Research Center ... Version 1.0.0 of the ARM Satellite Data Analysis Program. NASA RP 1366, August, 59 pp

  6. 2015 > Publications > Research > The Energy Materials Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rapid and Efficient Redox Processes within 2D Covalent Organic Framework Thin Films CR DeBlase, K Hernndez-Burgos, KE Silberstein, GG Rodrguez-Calero, RP Bisbey, HD Abrua, ...

  7. Section B: Supplies, Services and Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SECTION B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICECOSTS Request for Proposal DE-RP36-07GO97036 PART I SECTION B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICECOSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS B.1 Service Being ...

  8. TOPDAQ Acquisition Utility Beta version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-01-07

    This TOPDAQ Acquisition Utility uses 5 digital cameras mounted on a vertical pole, maintained in a vertical position using sensors and actuators, to take photographs of an RP-2 or RP-3 module, one camera for each row (4) and one in the center for driving, when the module is at 0 degrees, or facing the eastern horizon. These photographs and other data collected at the same time the pictures are taken are analyzed by the TOPAAPmore » Analysis Utility. The TOPCAT implemented by the TOPDAQ Acquisition Utility and TOPAAP Analysis Utility programs optimizes the alignment of each RP in a module on a parabolic trough solar collector array (SCA) to maximize the amount of solar energy intercepted by the solar receiver. The camera fixture and related hardware are mounted on a pickup truck and driven between rows in a parabolic trough solar power plant. An ultrasonic distance meter is used to maintain the correct distance between the cameras and the RP module. Along with the two leveling actuators, a third actuator is used to maintain a proper relative vertical position between the cameras and the RP module. The TOPDAQ Acquisition Utility facilitates file management by keeping track of which RP module data is being taken and also controls the exposure levels for each camera to maintain a high contract ratio in the photograph even as the available daylight changes throughout the day. The theoretical TOPCAT hardware and software support the current industry standard RP-2 and RP-3 module geometries.« less

  9. Do Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors Reduce the Risk of Symptomatic Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer After Definitive Radiation Therapy? Analysis of a Single-Institution Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hongmei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, P.R. of China (China); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang, Yan; Xu, Ting; Nguyen, Quynh-Nhu; Levy, Lawrence B.; O'Reilly, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gold, Kathryn A. [Department of Thoracic Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Preclinical studies have suggested that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) can mitigate radiation-induced lung injury. We sought here to investigate possible associations between ACEI use and the risk of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) among patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients who received definitive radiation therapy for stages I to III NSCLC between 2004 and 2010 at a single tertiary cancer center. Patients must have received a radiation dose of at least 60 Gy for a single primary lung tumor and have had imaging and dosimetric data available for analysis. RP was quantified according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to assess potential associations between ACEI use and risk of symptomatic RP. Results: Of 413 patients analyzed, 65 were using ACEIs during RT. In univariate analysis, the rate of RP grade ?2 seemed lower in ACEI users than in nonusers (34% vs 46%), but this apparent difference was not statistically significant (P=.06). In multivariate analysis of all patients, ACEI use was not associated with the risk of symptomatic RP (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.66; P=.07) after adjustment for sex, smoking status, mean lung dose (MLD), and concurrent carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy. Subgroup analysis showed that ACEI use did have a protective effect from RP grade ?2 among patients who received a low (?20-Gy) MLD (P<.01) or were male (P=.04). Conclusions: A trend toward reduction in symptomatic RP among patients taking ACEIs during RT for NSCLC was not statistically significant on univariate or multivariate analyses, although certain subgroups may benefit from use (ie, male patients and those receiving low MLD). The evidence at this point is insufficient to establish whether the use of ACEIs does or does not reduce the risk of RP.

  10. Association Between White Blood Cell Count Following Radiation Therapy With Radiation Pneumonitis in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Chad; Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Hongmei [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Xu, Ting; Nguyen, Quynh; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Radiation pneumonitis (RP) is an inflammatory response to radiation therapy (RT). We assessed the association between RP and white blood cell (WBC) count, an established metric of systemic inflammation, after RT for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 366 patients with non-small cell lung cancer who received ?60 Gy as definitive therapy. The primary endpoint was whether WBC count after RT (defined as 2 weeks through 3 months after RT completion) was associated with grade ?3 or grade ?2 RP. Median lung volume receiving ?20 Gy (V{sub 20}) was 31%, and post-RT WBC counts ranged from 1.7 to 21.2 10{sup 3} WBCs/?L. Odds ratios (ORs) associating clinical variables and post-RT WBC counts with RP were calculated via logistic regression. A recursive-partitioning algorithm was used to define optimal post-RT WBC count cut points. Results: Post-RT WBC counts were significantly higher in patients with grade ?3 RP than without (P<.05). Optimal cut points for post-RT WBC count were found to be 7.4 and 8.0 10{sup 3}/?L for grade ?3 and ?2 RP, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed significant associations between post-RT WBC count and grade ?3 (n=46, OR=2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4?4.9, P=.003) and grade ?2 RP (n=164, OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2?3.4, P=.01). This association held in a stepwise multivariate regression. Of note, V{sub 20} was found to be significantly associated with grade ?2 RP (OR=2.2, 95% CI 1.2?3.4, P=.01) and trended toward significance for grade ?3 RP (OR=1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.5, P=.06). Conclusions: Post-RT WBC counts were significantly and independently associated with RP and have potential utility as a diagnostic or predictive marker for this toxicity.

  11. Functional Polymorphisms of Base Excision Repair Genes XRCC1 and APEX1 Predict Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin Ming; Liao Zhongxing; Liu Zhensheng; Wang, Li-E; Gomez, Daniel; Komaki, Ritsuko; Wei Qingyi

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To explore whether functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of base-excision repair genes are predictors of radiation treatment-related pneumonitis (RP), we investigated associations between functional SNPs of ADPRT, APEX1, and XRCC1 and RP development. Methods and Materials: We genotyped SNPs of ADPRT (rs1136410 [V762A]), XRCC1 (rs1799782 [R194W], rs25489 [R280H], and rs25487 [Q399R]), and APEX1 (rs1130409 [D148E]) in 165 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received definitive chemoradiation therapy. Results were assessed by both Logistic and Cox regression models for RP risk. Kaplan-Meier curves were generated for the cumulative RP probability by the genotypes. Results: We found that SNPs of XRCC1 Q399R and APEX1 D148E each had a significant effect on the development of Grade {>=}2 RP (XRCC1: AA vs. GG, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24-0.97; APEX1: GG vs. TT, adjusted HR = 3.61, 95% CI, 1.64-7.93) in an allele-dose response manner (Trend tests: p = 0.040 and 0.001, respectively). The number of the combined protective XRCC1 A and APEX1 T alleles (from 0 to 4) also showed a significant trend of predicting RP risk (p = 0.001). Conclusions: SNPs of the base-excision repair genes may be biomarkers for susceptibility to RP. Larger prospective studies are needed to validate our findings.

  12. EVALUATION OF SPRING OPERATED RELIEF VALVE MAINTENANCE INTERVALS AND EXTENSION OF MAINTENANCE TIMES USING A WEIBULL ANALYSIS WITH MODIFIED BAYESIAN UPDATING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, S.; Gross, R.; Mitchell, E.

    2011-01-18

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) spring operated pressure relief valve (SORV) maintenance intervals were evaluated using an approach provided by the American Petroleum Institute (API RP 581) for risk-based inspection technology (RBI). In addition, the impact of extending the inspection schedule was evaluated using Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS). The API RP 581 approach is characterized as a Weibull analysis with modified Bayesian updating provided by SRS SORV proof testing experience. Initial Weibull parameter estimates were updated as per SRS's historical proof test records contained in the Center for Chemical Process Safety (CCPS) Process Equipment Reliability Database (PERD). The API RP 581 methodology was used to estimate the SORV's probability of failing on demand (PFD), and the annual expected risk. The API RP 581 methodology indicates that the current SRS maintenance plan is conservative. Cost savings may be attained in certain mild service applications that present low PFD and overall risk. Current practices are reviewed and recommendations are made for extending inspection intervals. The paper gives an illustration of the inspection costs versus the associated risks by using API RP 581 Risk Based Inspection (RBI) Technology. A cost effective maintenance frequency balancing both financial risk and inspection cost is demonstrated.

  13. Growth of Ca{sub 2}MnO{sub 4} Ruddlesden-Popper structured thin films using combinatorial substrate epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacotte, M.; David, A.; Pravarthana, D.; Prellier, W.; Grygiel, C.; Rohrer, G. S.; Salvador, P. A.; Velazquez, M.; Kloe, R. de

    2014-12-28

    The local epitaxial growth of pulsed laser deposited Ca{sub 2}MnO{sub 4} films on polycrystalline spark plasma sintered Sr{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} substrates was investigated to determine phase formation and preferred epitaxial orientation relationships (ORs) for isostructural Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) heteroepitaxy, further developing the high-throughput synthetic approach called Combinatorial Substrate Epitaxy (CSE). Both grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction patterns of the film and substrate were indexable as single-phase RP-structured compounds. The optimal growth temperature (between 650?C and 800?C) was found to be 750?C using the maximum value of the average image quality of the backscattered diffraction patterns. Films grew in a grain-over-grain pattern such that each Ca{sub 2}MnO{sub 4} grain had a single OR with the Sr{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} grain on which it grew. Three primary ORs described 47 out of 49 grain pairs that covered nearly all of RP orientation space. The first OR, found for 20 of the 49, was the expected RP unit-cell over RP unit-cell OR, expressed as [100][001]{sub film}||[100][001]{sub sub}. The other two ORs were essentially rotated from the first by 90, with one (observed for 17 of 49 pairs) being rotated about the [100] and the other (observed for 10 of 49 pairs) being rotated about the [110] (and not exactly by 90). These results indicate that only a small number of ORs are needed to describe isostructural RP heteroepitaxy and further demonstrate the potential of CSE in the design and growth of a wide range of complex functional oxides.

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Can Be Used Safely to Boost Residual Disease in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feddock, Jonathan; Arnold, Susanne M.; Department of Medical Oncology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky ; Shelton, Brent J.; Sinha, Partha; Conrad, Gary; Chen, Li; Rinehart, John; McGarry, Ronald C.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a prospective, single-institution study evaluating the feasibility of conventional chemoradiation (CRT) followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) as a means of dose escalation for patients with stage II-III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with residual disease. Methods and Materials: Patients without metastatic disease and with radiologic evidence of limited residual disease (?5 cm) within the site of the primary tumor and good or complete nodal responses after standard CRT to a target dose of 60 Gy were considered eligible. The SBRT boost was done to achieve a total combined dose biological equivalent dose >100 Gy to the residual primary tumor, consisting of 10 Gy 2 fractions (20 Gy total) for peripheral tumors, and 6.5 Gy 3 fractions (19.5 Gy total) for medial tumors using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0813 definitions. The primary endpoint was the development of grade ?3 radiation pneumonitis (RP). Results: After a median follow-up of 13 months, 4 patients developed acute grade 3 RP, and 1 (2.9%) developed late and persistent grade 3 RP. No patients developed grade 4 or 5 RP. Mean lung dose, V2.5, V5, V10, and V20 values were calculated for the SBRT boost, and none were found to significantly predict for RP. Only advancing age (P=.0147), previous smoking status (P=.0505), and high CRT mean lung dose (P=.0295) were significantly associated with RP development. At the time of analysis, the actuarial local control rate at the primary tumor site was 82.9%, with only 6 patients demonstrating recurrence. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based SBRT for dose escalation of limited residual NSCLC after definitive CRT was feasible and did not increase the risk for toxicity above that for standard radiation therapy.

  15. Control of linear modes in cylindrical resistive magnetohydrodynamics with a resistive wall, plasma rotation, and complex gain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, D. P.; Finn, J. M.

    2014-10-15

    Feedback stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in a tokamak is studied in a cylindrical model with a resistive wall, plasma resistivity, viscosity, and toroidal rotation. The control is based on a linear combination of the normal and tangential components of the magnetic field just inside the resistive wall. The feedback includes complex gain, for both the normal and for the tangential components, and it is known that the imaginary part of the feedback for the former is equivalent to plasma rotation [J. M. Finn and L. Chacon, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1866 (2004)]. The work includes (1) analysis with a reduced resistive MHD model for a tokamak with finite ? and with stepfunction current density and pressure profiles, and (2) computations with a full compressible visco-resistive MHD model with smooth decreasing profiles of current density and pressure. The equilibria are stable for ??=?0 and the marginal stability values ?{sub rp,rw}?rp,iw} rp,iw} because rotation suppresses the diffusion of flux from the plasma out through the wall and, more surprisingly, (b) rotation or imaginary gain with normal sensors destabilizes above ?{sub rp,iw} because it prevents the feedback flux from entering the plasma through the resistive wall to form a virtual wall. A method of using complex gain G{sub i} to optimize in the presence of rotation in this regime with ??>??{sub rp,iw} is presented. The effect of imaginary gain with tangential sensors is more complicated but essentially destabilizes above and below ?{sub rp,iw}.

  16. ATM Polymorphisms Predict Severe Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Huihua; Liao, Zhongxing; Liu, Zhensheng; Xu, Ting; Wang, Qiming; Liu, Hongliang; Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel; Wang, Li-E; Wei, Qingyi

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene mediates detection and repair of DNA damage. We investigated associations between ATM polymorphisms and severe radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: We genotyped 3 potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ATM (rs1801516 [D1853N/5557G>A], rs189037 [-111G>A] and rs228590) in 362 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who received definitive (chemo)radiation therapy. The cumulative severe RP probabilities by genotypes were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. The associations between severe RP risk and genotypes were assessed by both logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazard model with time to event considered. Results: Of 362 patients (72.4% of non-Hispanic whites), 56 (15.5%) experienced grade ≥3 RP. Patients carrying ATM rs189037 AG/GG or rs228590 TT/CT genotypes or rs189037G/rs228590T/rs1801516G (G-T-G) haplotype had a lower risk of severe RP (rs189037: GG/AG vs AA, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.83, P=.009; rs228590: TT/CT vs CC, HR=0.57, 95% CI, 0.33-0.97, P=.036; haplotype: G-T-G vs A-C-G, HR=0.52, 95% CI, 0.35-0.79, P=.002). Such positive findings remained in non-Hispanic whites. Conclusions: ATM polymorphisms may serve as biomarkers for susceptibility to severe RP in non-Hispanic whites. Large prospective studies are required to confirm our findings.

  17. Functional Promoter Variant rs2868371 of HSPB1 Is Associated With Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis After Chemoradiation for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, Qingsong; Department of Radiation Oncology and Lung Cancer Center, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin ; Wei, Qingyi; Xu, Ting; Yuan, Xianglin; Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis; Levy, Lawrence B.; Liu, Zhensheng; Gomez, Daniel R.; Zhuang, Yan; Wang, Li-E.; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To date, no biomarkers have been found to predict, before treatment, which patients will develop radiation pneumonitis (RP), a potentially fatal toxicity, after chemoradiation for lung cancer. We investigated potential associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in HSPB1 and risk of RP after chemoradiation for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Subjects were patients with NSCLC treated with chemoradiation at 1 institution. The training data set comprised 146 patients treated from 1999 to July 2004; the validation data set was 125 patients treated from August 2004 to March 2010. We genotyped 2 functional SNPs of HSPB1 (rs2868370 and rs2868371) from all patients. We used Kaplan-Meier analysis to assess the risk of grade ≥2 or ≥3 RP in both data sets and a parametric log-logistic survival model to evaluate the association of HSPB1 genotypes with that risk. Results: Grade ≥3 RP was experienced by 13% of those with CG/GG and 29% of those with CC genotype of HSPB1 rs2868371 in the training data set (P=.028); corresponding rates in the validation data set were 2% CG/GG and 14% CC (P=.02). Univariate and multivariate analysis confirmed the association of CC of HSPB1 rs2868371 with higher risk of grade ≥3 RP than CG/GG after adjustment for sex, age, performance status, and lung mean dose. This association was validated both in the validation data set and with Harrell's C statistic. Conclusions: The CC genotype of HSPB1 rs2868371 was associated with severe RP after chemoradiation for NSCLC.

  18. Meters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and RP-1 Agreement and Guide For Use and Utilization of the RadEye B20-ER Survey Meters The Rad Eye B20-ER is a pancake GM detector capable of measuring low levels of Alpha, Beta, and Gamma radiation. User authorization under this agreement is for use of the RadEye B20-ER radiation survey instrument for Process Knowledge surveys and user informational purposes only. These instruments cannot be used for official surveys. An RP-1 RCT must be contacted for official surveys or item release surveys.

  19. Association study of schizophrenia and IL-2 receptor {beta} chain gene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimgaonkar, V.L.; Yang, Z.W.; Zhang, X.R.; Brar, J.S.

    1995-10-09

    A case-control association study was conducted in Caucasian patients with schizophrenia (DSM-III-R, n = 42) and unaffected controls (n = 47) matched for ethnicity and area of residence. Serum interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) concentrations, as well as a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in the IL-2RP chain gene, were examined in both groups. No significant differences in IL-2R concentrations or in the distribution of the polymorphism were noted. This study does not support an association between schizophrenia and the IL-2RP gene locus, contrary to the suggestive evidence from linkage analysis in multicase families. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. Scale-Up Maturation Plan for Digestion of Graphite Fuel Pebbles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scale-Up Maturation Plan for Digestion of Graphite Fuel Pebbles Official Use Only Pre-decisional Draft R. A. Pierce K. M. Fox June 2014 SRNL-RP-2014-00464, Revision 0 SRNL-RP-2014-00464 Revision 0 -- Official Use Only -- ii DISCLAIMER This work was prepared under an agreement with and funded by the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government or its employees, nor any of its contractors, subcontractors or their employees, makes any express or implied: 1. warranty or assumes any legal liability

  1. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Doebler, A.A. Shihab- Eldin, L.J. Jardine, J.K. Tuli and A.B. Buyrn, Table of Isotopes 7th ... T.V. Ragland, R.P. Scharenberg, F. Turkot, R.B. Willmann and C.L. Wilson, Phys. Rev. ...

  2. International Oil and Gas Exploration and Development

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1993-01-01

    Presents country level data on oil reserves, oil production, active drilling rigs, seismic crews, wells drilled, oil reserve additions, and oil reserve to production ratios (R/P ratios) for about 85 countries, where available, from 1970 through 1991. World and regional summaries are given in both tabular and graphical form.

  3. Technical bases for precipitate hydrolysis process operating parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.J.

    1992-10-05

    This report provides the experimental data and rationale in support of the operating parameters for precipitate hydrolysis specified in WSRC-RP-92737. The report is divided into two sections, the first dealing with lab-scale precipitate hydrolysis experimentation while the second part addresses large-scale runs conducted to demonstrate the revised operating parameters in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF).

  4. SAND79-1508

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... GO TO 1 * MR - MODCNR.L) + L IFCMR.LE.M)GO TO ee MPI - + 1 "RPI -MR + 1 TR - FR("Pl) FRCMP1) - FRCI'IRP1) FRC"RP1) - TR TI - FIC"Pl) FIC"Pl) - FICI'IRP1) FIC "'RPt) - TI a. ...

  5. Quantitative and Qualitative Determination of Polysulfide Species in the Electrolyte of a Lithium-Sulfur Battery using HPLC ESI/MS with One-Step Derivatization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Dong; Qu, Deyu; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Xiqian; Lee, Hung-Sui; Qu, Deyang

    2015-01-29

    The polysulfide species dissolved in aprotic solvents can be separated and analyzed by reverse phase (RP) high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in tandem with electrospray-mass spectroscopy. The relative distribution of polysulfide species in the electrolyte recovered from Li-S batteries is quantitatively and reliably determined for the first time.

  6. Baseline Risk Assessment for the F-Area Burning/Rubble Pits and Rubble Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E.

    1996-03-01

    This document provides an overview of the Savannah River Site (SRS) and a description of the F-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (BRPs) and Rubble Pit (RP) unit. It also describes the objectives and scope of the baseline risk assessment (BRA).

  7. Beam optics and the pp2pp experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pile P. H.; Guryn, W.; Lee, J.H.; Tepikian, S.; Yip, K.

    2012-05-20

    The newly installed forward detector system at the STAR experiment at RHIC measures small angle elastic and inelastic scattering of polarized protons on polarized protons. The detector system makes use of a pair of Roman Pot (RP) detectors, instrumented with silicon detectors, and located on either side of the STAR intersection region downstream of the DX and D0 dipoles and quadrupole triplets. The parallel to point optics is designed so that scattering angles are determined from position measurements at the RP's with small error. The RP setup allows measurement of position and angle for a subset of the scattered protons. With this position/angle correlations at the RP's can be compared with optics model predictions to get a measure of the accuracy of the quadrupole triplet current settings. The current in each quadrupole in the triplets is comprised of sums and differences of up to six power supplies and an overall 1% error in the triplet field strengths results in a 4% error in four-momentum transfer squared. This technique is also useful to check the polarity of the skew elements located in each quadrupole triplet. Results of the analysis will be presented.

  8. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps","Cutler, R.P.; Mansure, A.J.","1999-01-14T05:00:00Z",3261,,"SAND99-0093C","AC04-94AL85000","TRN: AH200112%%456","Conference",,,"Conference:...

  9. S

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    iew o f P RP2 b ut c an't b e h elped MWR3C w ill b e s lightly l ower t han M WR HPU RPH PL moved moved Sensor P lacement O 3 D eck n itrogen C O2 Compressed G as F orward L...

  10. Biocompatible implants and methods of making and attaching the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rowley, Adrian P; Laude, Lucien D; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D; Lotfi, Atoosa; Markland, Jr., Francis S

    2014-10-07

    The invention provides a biocompatible silicone implant that can be securely affixed to living tissue through interaction with integral membrane proteins (integrins). A silicone article containing a laser-activated surface is utilized to make the implant. One example is an implantable prosthesis to treat blindness caused by outer retinal degenerative diseases. The device bypasses damaged photoreceptors and electrically stimulates the undamaged neurons of the retina. Electrical stimulation is achieved using a silicone microelectrode array (MEA). A safe, protein adhesive is used in attaching the MEA to the retinal surface and assist in alleviating focal pressure effects. Methods of making and attaching such implants are also provided.

  11. Incorporating Single-nucleotide Polymorphisms Into the Lyman Model to Improve Prediction of Radiation Pneumonitis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, Susan L., E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li Minghuan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China); Xu Ting; Gomez, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Yuan Xianglin [Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)] [Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Yu Jinming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China); Liu Zhensheng; Yin Ming; Guan Xiaoxiang; Wang Lie; Wei Qingyi [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Martel, Mary [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes associated with DNA repair, cell cycle, transforming growth factor-{beta}, tumor necrosis factor and receptor, folic acid metabolism, and angiogenesis can significantly improve the fit of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation pneumonitis (RP) risk among patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Sixteen SNPs from 10 different genes (XRCC1, XRCC3, APEX1, MDM2, TGF{beta}, TNF{alpha}, TNFR, MTHFR, MTRR, and VEGF) were genotyped in 141 NSCLC patients treated with definitive radiation therapy, with or without chemotherapy. The LKB model was used to estimate the risk of severe (grade {>=}3) RP as a function of mean lung dose (MLD), with SNPs and patient smoking status incorporated into the model as dose-modifying factors. Multivariate analyses were performed by adding significant factors to the MLD model in a forward stepwise procedure, with significance assessed using the likelihood-ratio test. Bootstrap analyses were used to assess the reproducibility of results under variations in the data. Results: Five SNPs were selected for inclusion in the multivariate NTCP model based on MLD alone. SNPs associated with an increased risk of severe RP were in genes for TGF{beta}, VEGF, TNF{alpha}, XRCC1 and APEX1. With smoking status included in the multivariate model, the SNPs significantly associated with increased risk of RP were in genes for TGF{beta}, VEGF, and XRCC3. Bootstrap analyses selected a median of 4 SNPs per model fit, with the 6 genes listed above selected most often. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that SNPs can significantly improve the predictive ability of the Lyman MLD model. With a small number of SNPs, it was possible to distinguish cohorts with >50% risk vs <10% risk of RP when they were exposed to high MLDs.

  12. Modeling radiation pneumonitis risk with clinical, dosimetric, and spatial parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hope, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; El Naqa, Issam; Alaly, James R.; Vicic, Milos; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Deasy, Joseph O. . E-mail: jdeasy@radonc.wustl.edu

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the clinical, dosimetric, and spatial parameters that correlate with radiation pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with high-dose radiation for non-small-cell lung cancer with three-dimensional treatment planning were reviewed for clinical information and radiation pneumonitis (Rp) events. Three-dimensional treatment plans for 219 eligible patients were recovered. Treatment plan information, including parameters defining tumor position and dose-volume parameters, was extracted from non-heterogeneity-corrected dose distributions. Correlation to RP events was assessed by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (R). Mathematical models were generated that correlate with RP. Results: Of 219 patients, 52 required treatment for RP (median interval, 142 days). Tumor location was the most highly correlated parameter on univariate analysis (R = 0.24). Multiple dose-volume parameters were correlated with RP. Models most frequently selected by bootstrap resampling included tumor position, maximum dose, and D{sub 35} (minimum dose to the 35% volume receiving the highest doses) (R 0.28). The most frequently selected two- or three-parameter models outperformed commonly used metrics, including V{sub 2} (fractional volume of normal lung receiving >20 Gy) and mean lung dose (R = 0.18). Conclusions: Inferior tumor position was highly correlated with pneumonitis events within our population. Models that account for inferior tumor position and dosimetric information, including both high- and low-dose regions (D{sub 35}, International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements maximum dose), risk-stratify patients more accurately than any single dosimetric or clinical parameter.

  13. Infrared retina

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krishna, Sanjay; Hayat, Majeed M.; Tyo, J. Scott; Jang, Woo-Yong

    2011-12-06

    Exemplary embodiments provide an infrared (IR) retinal system and method for making and using the IR retinal system. The IR retinal system can include adaptive sensor elements, whose properties including, e.g., spectral response, signal-to-noise ratio, polarization, or amplitude can be tailored at pixel level by changing the applied bias voltage across the detector. "Color" imagery can be obtained from the IR retinal system by using a single focal plane array. The IR sensor elements can be spectrally, spatially and temporally adaptive using quantum-confined transitions in nanoscale quantum dots. The IR sensor elements can be used as building blocks of an infrared retina, similar to cones of human retina, and can be designed to work in the long-wave infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from about 8 .mu.m to about 12 .mu.m as well as the mid-wave portion ranging from about 3 .mu.m to about 5 .mu.m.

  14. Predicting Pneumonitis Risk: A Dosimetric Alternative to Mean Lung Dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, Susan L.; Mohan, Radhe; Liengsawangwong, Raweewan; Martel, Mary K.; Liao Zhongxing

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the association between mean lung dose (MLD) and risk of severe (grade {>=}3) radiation pneumonitis (RP) depends on the dose distribution pattern to normal lung among patients receiving 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Three cohorts treated with different beam arrangements were identified. One cohort (2-field boost [2FB]) received 2 parallel-opposed (anteroposterior-posteroanterior) fields per fraction initially, followed by a sequential boost delivered using 2 oblique beams. The other 2 cohorts received 3 or 4 straight fields (3FS and 4FS, respectively), ie, all fields were irradiated every day. The incidence of severe RP was plotted against MLD in each cohort, and data were analyzed using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. Results: The incidence of grade {>=}3 RP rose more steeply as a function of MLD in the 2FB cohort (N=120) than in the 4FS cohort (N=138), with an intermediate slope for the 3FS group (N=99). The estimated volume parameter from the LKB model was n=0.41 (95% confidence interval, 0.15-1.0) and led to a significant improvement in fit (P=.05) compared to a fit with volume parameter fixed at n=1 (the MLD model). Unlike the MLD model, the LKB model with n=0.41 provided a consistent description of the risk of severe RP in all three cohorts (2FB, 3FS, 4FS) simultaneously. Conclusions: When predicting risk of grade {>=}3 RP, the mean lung dose does not adequately take into account the effects of high doses. Instead, the effective dose, computed from the LKB model using volume parameter n=0.41, may provide a better dosimetric parameter for predicting RP risk. If confirmed, these findings support the conclusion that for the same MLD, high doses to small lung volumes ('a lot to a little') are worse than low doses to large volumes ('a little to a lot').

  15. J/ψ production and suppression in high-energy proton-nucleus collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Yan -Qing; Venugopalan, Raju; Zhang, Hong -Fei

    2015-10-02

    In this study, we apply a color glass condensate+nonrelativistic QCD (CGC+NRQCD) framework to compute J/ψ production in deuteron-nucleus collisions at RHIC and proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC. Our results match smoothly at high p⊥ to a next-to-leading order perturbative QCD+NRQCD computation. Excellent agreement is obtained for p⊥ spectra at the RHIC and LHC for central and forward rapidities, as well as for the normalized ratio RpA of these results to spectra in proton-proton collisions. In particular, we observe that the RpA data are strongly bounded by our computations of the same for each of the individual NRQCD channels; this resultmore » provides strong evidence that our description is robust against uncertainties in initial conditions and hadronization mechanisms.« less

  16. TOPCAT Analysis Utility Beta version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-04-28

    This program optimizes the alignment of each reflector panel (mirror), on a parabolic trough solar collector array (SCA) to maximize the amount of solar energy intercepted by the solar receiver. This program analyzes data acquired by the TOPDAQ Acquisition Utility program. For each module on an SCA, the program compares the location of the image of the receiver in the reflector panels with its theoretical location. Based on the difference between the theoretical and actual image locations, reflector panel misalignment and corrective mirror mount adjustments are determined. Using the information in the digital images and other data acquired from the TOPDAQ Acquisition Utility, the program is able to determine the relative positions of the camera fixture between modules and align all of the mirrors on an SCA to the receiver. This program currently optimizes the alignment of a Reflector Panel (RP) 2 or RP 3 trough module only.

  17. TOPCAT Analysis Utility Beta version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-04-28

    This program optimizes the alignment of each reflector panel (mirror), on a parabolic trough solar collector array (SCA) to maximize the amount of solar energy intercepted by the solar receiver. This program analyzes data acquired by the TOPDAQ Acquisition Utility program. For each module on an SCA, the program compares the location of the image of the receiver in the reflector panels with its theoretical location. Based on the difference between the theoretical and actualmore » image locations, reflector panel misalignment and corrective mirror mount adjustments are determined. Using the information in the digital images and other data acquired from the TOPDAQ Acquisition Utility, the program is able to determine the relative positions of the camera fixture between modules and align all of the mirrors on an SCA to the receiver. This program currently optimizes the alignment of a Reflector Panel (RP) 2 or RP 3 trough module only.« less

  18. Inductive crystal field control in layered metal oxides with correlated electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balachandran, P. V.; Cammarata, A.; Rondinelli, J. M.; Nelson-Cheeseman, B. B.; Bhattacharya, A.

    2014-07-01

    We show that the NiO{sub 6} crystal field energies can be tailored indirectly via heterovalent A cation ordering in layered (La,A)NiO{sub 4} RuddlesdenPopper (RP) oxides, where A = Sr, Ca, or Ba, using density functional calculations. We leverage as a driving force the electrostatic interactions between charged [LaO]{sup 1+} and neutral [AO]{sup 0} planes to inductively tune the NiO bond distortions, without intentional doping or epitaxial strain, altering the correlated d-orbital energies. We use this strategy to design cation ordered LaCaNiO{sub 4} and LaBaNiO{sub 4} with distortions favoring enhanced Ni e{sub g} orbital polarization, and find local electronic structure signatures analogous to those in RP La-cuprates, i.e., parent phases of the high-temperature superconducting oxides.

  19. International Journal of Clean Coal and Energy, 2012, 1, 1-11

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal of Clean Coal and Energy, 2012, 1, 1-11 Published Online March 2012 (http://www.SciRP.org/journal/ijcce) Efficient Theoretical Screening of Solid Sorbents for CO 2 Capture Applications * Yuhua Duan, David Luebke, Henry Pennline National Energy Technology Laboratory, United States Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, USA Email: yuhua.duan@netl.doe.gov Received February 25, 2012; revised March 10, 2012; accepted March 28, 2012 ABSTRACT By combining thermodynamic database mining with first

  20. RFP: Management and Operation of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy RFP: Management and Operation of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory RFP: Management and Operation of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Request for Proposals (RFP) Number DE-RP36-07GO97036: Management and Operation of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. PDF icon Solicitation, Offer and Award (SF-33) PDF icon Section B: Supplies, Services and Costs PDF icon Section C: Description, Specifications and Work Statements PDF icon Section D - G: Section D,

  1. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Possible Impact of Homogeneous Freezing Nucleation on in Situ Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Mishra, S., DOE - SunShot Initiative, AAAS S&T Policy Fellow Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mitchell DL, S Mishra, and RP Lawson. 2011. Cirrus Clouds and Climate Engineering: New Findings on Ice Nucleation and Theoretical

  2. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How Aerosols Affect Cloud Properties in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Jackson RC, GM McFarquhar, AV Korolev, ME Earle, PS Liu, RP Lawson, S Brooks, M Wolde, A Laskin, and M Freer. 2012. "The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase

  3. Prospective Study Evaluating Postoperative Radiotherapy Plus 2-Year Androgen Suppression for Post-Radical Prostatectomy Patients With Pathologic T3 Disease and/or Positive Surgical Margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)], E-mail: choo.c@mayo.edu; Danjoux, Cyril; Gardner, Sandra; Morton, Gerard; Szumacher, Ewa; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Cheung, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Pearse, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a combined approach of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) plus 2-year androgen suppression (AS) for patients with pathologic T3 disease (pT3) and/or positive surgical margins (PSM) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods and Materials: A total of 78 patients with pT3 and/or PSM after RP were treated with RT plus 2-year AS, as per a pilot, prospective study. Androgen suppression started within 1 month after the completion of RT and consisted of nilutamide for 4 weeks and buserelin acetate depot subcutaneously every 2 months for 2 years. Relapse-free rate, including freedom from prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse, was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression analysis was performed to evaluate prognostic factors for relapse. Prostate-specific antigen relapse was defined as a PSA rise above 0.2 ng/mL, with two consecutive increases over a minimum of 3 months. Results: The median age was 61 years at the time of RP. The median interval between RP and postoperative RT was 4.2 months. Forty-nine patients had undetectable PSA (<0.2 ng/mL), and 29 had persistently detectable postoperative PSA at the time of the protocol treatment. Median follow-up from RT was 6.4 years. Relapse-free rates at 5 and 7 years were 94.4% and 86.3%, respectively. Survival rates were 96% at 5 years and 93.1% at 7 years. On Cox regression analysis, persistently detectable postoperative PSA and pT3b-T4 were significant predictors for relapse. Conclusion: The combined treatment of postoperative RT plus 2-year AS yielded encouraging results for patients with pT3 and/or PSM and warrants a confirmatory study.

  4. Saving Adam With Pediatric Cancer Research | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Administration "Live Burn" Training Sharpens Skills Tuesday, June 30, 2015 - 1:47pm Live Burn training As part of the training that equips them to ensure safe operations, Savannah River Site radiological protection (RP) and fire department personnel recently conducted their annual "Live Burn" training exercises that simulate fires in facilities with chemical and radiological contamination. The Live Burn exercise took place at the Martinez-Columbia County Fire

  5. Microsoft Word - Document1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of exotic nuclei and understanding of the rp-process Abstract: New phenomena, such as nuclear halo, inversion of nuclear shells and exotic decay modes have been discovered in nuclei removed from the valley of stability. Understanding of these phenomena requires development of new theoretical approaches. Detailed experimental data on the structure of exotic nuclei is crucial for this development. Exotic nuclei also play an important role in understanding of explosive nucleosynthesis

  6. Comparisons Of Two- And Three-Dimensional Convection In Type I X-Ray Bursts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zingale, M.; Malone, C. M.; Nonaka, A.; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.

    2015-07-01

    We perform the first detailed three-dimensional simulation of low Mach number convection preceding runaway thermonuclear ignition in a mixed H/He X-ray burst. Our simulations include a moderate-sized, approximate network that captures hydrogen and helium burning up through rp-process breakout. We look at the difference between two- and three-dimensional convective fields, including the details of the turbulent convection.

  7. Physician Beliefs and Practices for Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Ohri, Nitin; Teti, Kristopher G.; Foley, Kathleen A.; Keith, Scott W.; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Lallas, Costas D.; Dicker, Adam P.; Hoffman-Censits, Jean; Pizzi, Laura T.; Gomella, Leonard G.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Despite results of randomized trials that support adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer with adverse pathologic features (APF), many clinicians favor selective use of salvage RT. This survey was conducted to evaluate the beliefs and practices of radiation oncologists (RO) and urologists (U) regarding RT after RP. Methods and Materials: We designed a Web-based survey of post-RP RT beliefs and policies. Survey invitations were e-mailed to a list of 926 RO and 591 U. APF were defined as extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, or positive surgical margin. Differences between U and RO in adjuvant RT recommendations were evaluated by comparative statistics. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors predictive of adjuvant RT recommendation. Results: Analyzable surveys were completed by 218 RO and 92 U (overallresponse rate, 20%). Adjuvant RT was recommended based on APF by 68% of respondents (78% RO, 44% U, p <0.001). U were less likely than RO to agree that adjuvant RT improves survival and/or biochemical control (p < 0.0001). PSA thresholds for salvage RT were higher among U than RO (p < 0.001). Predicted rates of erectile dysfunction due to RT were higher among U than RO (p <0.001). On multivariate analysis, respondent specialty was the only predictor of adjuvant RT recommendations. Conclusions: U are less likely than RO to recommend adjuvant RT. Future research efforts should focus on defining the toxicities of post-RP RT and on identifying the subgroups of patients who will benefit from adjuvant vs. selective salvage RT.

  8. U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site APR 0 6 2015 15-0RP-0009 S.E. Hudson, Chair Hanford Advisory Board Enviroissues Hanford Project Office 713 Jadwin Avenue, Suite 3 Richland, Washington 99352 Mr. Hudson: HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD, CONSENSUS ADVICE #282, TANK FARM VAPORS The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office and Office of River Protection (ORP) thank you for your February 5, 2015, letter transmitting the Hanford Advisory Board 's (Board) Consensus Advice #282, Tank Farm Vapors. DOE remains

  9. Part III - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    52-07NA27344 PART III - SECTION J APPENDIX E SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN Name of Contractor: Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC Address: 1658 Holmes Street, Livermore, CA 94550 Solicitation Number: DE-RP52-06NA27344 Item/Service: Management and Operation of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and associated activities Amount of Contract for FY2008: Estimated: $1,638,400,000 Period of Contract Performance: October 1, 2007 to September 30, 2014 This individual Small Business

  10. Structure of a Specialized Acyl Carrier Protein Essential for Lipid A Biosynthesis with Very Long-chain Fatty Acids in Open and Closed Conformations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramelot, Theresa A.; Rossi, Paolo M.; Forouhar, Farhad; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Yang, Yunhuang; Ni, Shuisong; Unser, Sarah; Lew, Scott; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas; Everett, John K.; Prestegard, James H.; Hunt, John F.; Montelione, Gaetano; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2012-09-18

    The solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures and backbone (15)N dynamics of the specialized acyl carrier protein (ACP), RpAcpXL, from Rhodopseudomonas palustris, in both the apo form and holo form modified by covalent attachment of 4'-phosphopantetheine at S37, are virtually identical, monomeric, and correspond to the closed conformation. The structures have an extra ?-helix compared to the archetypical ACP from Escherichia coli, which has four helices, resulting in a larger opening to the hydrophobic cavity. Chemical shift differences between apo- and holo-RpAcpXL indicated some differences in the hinge region between ?2 and ?3 and in the hydrophobic cavity environment, but corresponding changes in nuclear Overhauser effect cross-peak patterns were not detected. In contrast to the NMR structures, apo-RpAcpXL was observed in an open conformation in crystals that diffracted to 2.0 resolution, which resulted from movement of ?3. On the basis of the crystal structure, the predicted biological assembly is a homodimer. Although the possible biological significance of dimerization is unknown, there is potential that the resulting large shared hydrophobic cavity could accommodate the very long-chain fatty acid (28-30 carbons) that this specialized ACP is known to synthesize and transfer to lipid A. These structures are the first representatives of the AcpXL family and the first to indicate that dimerization may be important for the function of these specialized ACPs.

  11. Kinetics of Oxygen Surface Exchange on Epitaxial Ruddlesden Popper Phases and Correlations to First-Principles Descriptors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Yueh-Lin; Wang, Xiao Renshaw; Lee, Ho Nyung; Morgan, Dane; Yang, Shao-horn

    2016-01-01

    Through alignment of theoretical modeling with experimental measurements of oxygen surface-exchange kinetics on (001)-oriented La2 xSrxMO4+ (M = Co, Ni, Cu) thin films, we demonstrate here the capability of the theoretical bulk O 2p-band centers to correlate with oxygen surface-exchange kinetics of the Ruddlesden Popper oxide (RP214) (001)-oriented thin films. In addition, we demonstrate that the bulk O 2p-band centers can also correlate with the experimental activation energies for bulk oxygen transport and oxygen surface exchange of both the RP214 and the perovskite polycrystalline materials reported in the literature, indicating the effectiveness of the bulk O 2p-band centers in describing the associated energetics and kinetics. We propose that the opposite slopes of the bulk O 2p-band center correlations between the RP214 and the perovskite materials are due to the intrinsic mechanistic differences of their oxygen surface-exchange kinetics bulk anionic transport.

  12. Kinetics of oxygen surface exchange on epitaxial Ruddlesden–Popper phases and correlations to first-principles descriptors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Yueh -Lin; Wang, Xiao Renshaw; Lee, Ho Nyung; Morgan, Dane; Shao-Horn, Yang; Lee, Dongkyu

    2015-12-17

    Through alignment of theoretical modeling with experimental measurements of oxygen surface-exchange kinetics on (001)-oriented La2–xSrxMO4+δ (M = Co, Ni, Cu) thin films, we demonstrate here the capability of the theoretical bulk O 2p-band centers to correlate with oxygen surface-exchange kinetics of the Ruddlesden–Popper oxide (RP214) (001)-oriented thin films. In addition, we demonstrate that the bulk O 2p-band centers can also correlate with the experimental activation energies for bulk oxygen transport and oxygen surface exchange of both the RP214 and the perovskite polycrystalline materials reported in the literature, indicating the effectiveness of the bulk O 2p-band centers in describing the associatedmore » energetics and kinetics. Here, we propose that the opposite slopes of the bulk O 2p-band center correlations between the RP214 and the perovskite materials are due to the intrinsic mechanistic differences of their oxygen surface-exchange kinetics bulk anionic transport.« less

  13. Adhesion and Wetting of Soft Nanoparticles on Textured Surfaces: Transition between Wenzel and CassieBaxter States

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cao, Zhen; Stevens, Mark J.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Dobrynin, Andrey V.

    2015-01-16

    We use a combination of the molecular dynamics simulations and scaling analysis to study interactions between gel-like nanoparticles and substrates covered with rectangular shape posts. Our simulations have shown that nanoparticle in contact with substrate undergo first order transition between Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter state which location depends on nanoparticle shear modulus, the strength of nanoparticle-substrate interactions, height of the substrate posts and nanoparticle size, Rp. There is a range of system parameters where these two states coexist such that the average indentation ? produced by substrate posts changes monotonically with nanoparticle shear modulus, Gp. We have developed a scaling modelmorethat describes deformation of nanoparticle in contact with patterned substrate. In the framework of this model the effect of the patterned substrate can be taken into account by introducing an effective work of adhesion, Weff, which describes the first order transition between Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter states. There are two different shape deformation regimes for nanoparticles with shear modulus Gp and surface tension ?p. Shape of small nanoparticles with size Rp p 3/2Gp-1 Weff-1/2 is controlled by capillary forces while deformation of large nanoparticles, Rp > ?p 3/2Gp-1 Weff-1/2less

  14. Recovery of Navy distillate fuel from reclaimed product. Volume II. Literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.

    1984-11-01

    In an effort to assist the Navy to better utilize its waste hydrocarbons, NIPER, with support from the US Department of Energy, is conducting research designed to ultimately develop a practical technique for converting Reclaimed Product (RP) into specification Naval Distillate Fuel (F-76). This first phase of the project was focused on reviewing the literature and available information from equipment manufacturers. The literature survey has been carefully culled for methodology applicable to the conversion of RP into diesel fuel suitable for Navy use. Based upon the results of this study, a second phase has been developed and outlined in which experiments will be performed to determine the most practical recycling technologies. It is realized that the final selection of one particular technology may be site-specific due to vast differences in RP volume and available facilities. A final phase, if funded, would involve full-scale testing of one of the recommended techniques at a refueling depot. The Phase I investigations are published in two volumes. Volume 1, Technical Discussion, includes the narrative and Appendices I and II. Appendix III, a detailed Literature Review, includes both a narrative portion and an annotated bibliography containing about 800 references and abstracts. This appendix, because of its volume, has been published separately as Volume 2.

  15. Status of spray-dryer flue-gas desulfurization. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ireland, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    Utility interest and commitment to spray drying for SO/sub 2/ and particulate control has increased dramatically in response to vendor claims (lower costs, dry wastes, lower energy requirements, and simplicity) and newly promulgated federal emission regulations that allow lower SO/sub 2/ removal requirements (70%) for low-sulfur coals. Unfortunately, limited data are available from which to evaluate vendor claims prior to commercial commitment or to improve the cost and reliability of this potentially important flue gas desulfurization (FGD) option. Accordingly, EPRI is conducting a pilot-scale project (RP1870) to provide a systematic evaluation of the technology unconstrained by specific vendor designs, operating philosophy, or commercial limitation. It will result in guidelines for system design and optimization in order to ensure reliable utility operation at minimum cost. This final report (TPS 80-741) contains a review of the design practices for the full-scale systems ordered and a discussion of the important spray-drying FGD process variables. Other EPRI work in this area includes a cost study with the Tennessee Valley Authority (RP1180-7) and a spray-dryer waste solids characterization (RP1870-2). The EPA has published a similar status document, which, in addition to spray drying, also covers dry injection and burning coal-alkali mixtures. However, the EPA document is not as detailed on either the design of full-scale systems or the technical issues.

  16. Adhesion and Wetting of Soft Nanoparticles on Textured Surfaces: Transition between Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter States

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cao, Zhen; Stevens, Mark J.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Dobrynin, Andrey V.

    2015-01-16

    We use a combination of the molecular dynamics simulations and scaling analysis to study interactions between gel-like nanoparticles and substrates covered with rectangular shape posts. Our simulations have shown that nanoparticle in contact with substrate undergo first order transition between Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter state which location depends on nanoparticle shear modulus, the strength of nanoparticle-substrate interactions, height of the substrate posts and nanoparticle size, Rp. There is a range of system parameters where these two states coexist such that the average indentation δ produced by substrate posts changes monotonically with nanoparticle shear modulus, Gp. We have developed a scaling modelmore » that describes deformation of nanoparticle in contact with patterned substrate. In the framework of this model the effect of the patterned substrate can be taken into account by introducing an effective work of adhesion, Weff, which describes the first order transition between Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter states. There are two different shape deformation regimes for nanoparticles with shear modulus Gp and surface tension γp. Shape of small nanoparticles with size Rp < γp 3/2Gp-1 Weff-1/2 is controlled by capillary forces while deformation of large nanoparticles, Rp > γp 3/2Gp-1 Weff-1/2« less

  17. Application of organosilicon pre-sic polymer technology to optimize rapid prototyping of ceramic components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, C.K.; Zank, G. [Dow Corning Corporation, Midland, MI (United States); Ghosh, A. [Philips Display Components Co., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Developments of applications of advanced ceramics e.g., SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, CMCs need to be on a faster track than what the current processing technologies can afford. Rapid reduction in time to market of new and complex products can be achieved by using Rapid Prototyping and Manufacturing Technologies (RP&M) e.g., 3D-printing, selective laser sintering, stereolithography etc. These technologies will help advanced ceramics meet the performance challenges at an affordable price with reliable manufacturing technologies. The key variables of the RP&M technologies for ceramics are the nature of the polymer carrier and/or the binder, and the powder. Selection and/or the production of a proper class of polymer carrier/binder, understanding their impact on the processing of ceramics such as polymer-powder interaction, speed of hardening the green body in a controlled manner, ability to retain shape during forming and consolidation, delivering desirable properties at the end, are crucial to develop the low cost, high quality ceramic products. Organosilicon pre-SiC polymer technology route to advanced ceramics is currently being commercialized by Dow Corning. Methods to use this class of polymer as a processing aid in developing potentially better RP&M technologies to make better ceramics have been proposed in this work.

  18. Quantum Monte Carlo for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Monte Carlo for the Electronic Structure of Atoms and Molecules Brian Austin Lester Group, U.C. Berkeley BES Requirements Workshop Rockville, MD February 9, 2010 Outline  Applying QMC to diverse chemical systems  Select systems with high interest and impact  Phenol: bond dissociation energy  Retinal: excitation energy  Algorithmic details  Parallel Strategy  Wave function evaluation O-H Bond Dissociation Energy of Phenol  Ph-OH Ph-O * + H * (36 valence electrons)

  19. Effective delivery of recombinant proteins to rod photoreceptors via lipid nanovesicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asteriti, Sabrina; Dal Cortivo, Giuditta; Pontelli, Valeria; Cangiano, Lorenzo; Buffelli, Mario; Dell’Orco, Daniele

    2015-06-12

    The potential of liposomes to deliver functional proteins in retinal photoreceptors and modulate their physiological response was investigated by two experimental approaches. First, we treated isolated mouse retinas with liposomes encapsulating either recoverin, an important endogenous protein operating in visual phototransduction, or antibodies against recoverin. We then intravitrally injected in vivo liposomes encapsulating either rhodamin B or recoverin and we investigated the distribution in retina sections by confocal microscopy. The content of liposomes was found to be released in higher amount in the photoreceptor layer than in the other regions of the retina and the functional effects of the release were in line with the current model of phototransduction. Our study sets the basis for quantitative investigations aimed at assessing the potential of intraocular protein delivery via biocompatible nanovesicles, with promising implications for the treatment of retinal diseases affecting the photoreceptor layer. - Highlights: • Recombinant proteins encapsulated in nano-sized liposomes injected intravitreally reach retinal photoreceptors. • The phototransduction cascade in rods is modulated by the liposome content. • Mathematical modeling predicts the alteration of the photoresponses following liposome fusion.

  20. PHLUX: Photographic Flux Tools for Solar Glare and Flux

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-02

    A web-based tool to a) analytically and empirically quantify glare from reflected light and determine the potential impact (e.g., temporary flash blindness, retinal burn), and b) produce flux maps for central receivers. The tool accepts RAW digital photographs of the glare source (for hazard assessment) or the receiver (for flux mapping), as well as a photograph of the sun for intensity and size scaling. For glare hazard assessment, the tool determines the retinal irradiance (W/cm2)more » and subtended source angle for an observer and plots the glare source on a hazard spectrum (i.e., low-potential for flash blindness impact, potential for flash blindness impact, retinal burn). For flux mapping, the tool provides a colored map of the receiver scaled by incident solar flux (W/m2) and unwraps the physical dimensions of the receiver while accounting for the perspective of the photographer (e.g., for a flux map of a cylindrical receiver, the horizontal axis denotes receiver angle in degrees and the vertical axis denotes vertical position in meters; for a flat panel receiver, the horizontal axis denotes horizontal position in meters and the vertical axis denotes vertical position in meters). The flux mapping capability also allows the user to specify transects along which the program plots incident solar flux on the receiver.« less

  1. Aeroelastic Modeling of Offshore Turbines and Support Structures in Hurricane-Prone Regions (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damiani, R.

    2014-03-01

    US offshore wind turbines (OWTs) will likely have to contend with hurricanes and the associated loading conditions. Current industry standards do not account for these design load cases (DLCs), thus a new approach is required to guarantee that the OWTs achieve an appropriate level of reliability. In this study, a sequentially coupled aero-hydro-servo-elastic modeling technique was used to address two design approaches: 1.) The ABS (American Bureau of Shipping) approach; and 2.) The Hazard Curve or API (American Petroleum Institute) approach. The former employs IEC partial load factors (PSFs) and 100-yr return-period (RP) metocean events. The latter allows setting PSFs and RP to a prescribed level of system reliability. The 500-yr RP robustness check (appearing in [2] and [3] upcoming editions) is a good indicator of the target reliability for L2 structures. CAE tools such as NREL's FAST and Bentley's' SACS (offshore analysis and design software) can be efficiently coupled to simulate system loads under hurricane DLCs. For this task, we augmented the latest FAST version (v. 8) to include tower aerodynamic drag that cannot be ignored in hurricane DLCs. In this project, a 6 MW turbine was simulated on a typical 4-legged jacket for a mid-Atlantic site. FAST-calculated tower base loads were fed to SACS at the interface level (transition piece); SACS added hydrodynamic and wind loads on the exposed substructure, and calculated mudline overturning moments, and member and joint utilization. Results show that CAE tools can be effectively used to compare design approaches for the design of OWTs in hurricane regions and to achieve a well-balanced design, where reliability levels and costs are optimized.

  2. Genomic Prostate Cancer Classifier Predicts Biochemical Failure and Metastases in Patients After Postoperative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Den, Robert B.; Feng, Felix Y.; Showalter, Timothy N.; Mishra, Mark V.; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Lallas, Costas D.; Gomella, Leonard G.; Kelly, W. Kevin; Birbe, Ruth C.; McCue, Peter A.; Ghadessi, Mercedeh; Yousefi, Kasra; Davicioni, Elai; Knudsen, Karen E.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: Totest the hypothesis that a genomic classifier (GC) would predict biochemical failure (BF) and distant metastasis (DM) in men receiving radiation therapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods and Materials: Among patients who underwent post-RP RT, 139 were identified for pT3 or positive margin, who did not receive neoadjuvant hormones and had paraffin-embedded specimens. Ribonucleic acid was extracted from the highest Gleason grade focus and applied to a high-density-oligonucleotide microarray. Receiver operating characteristic, calibration, cumulative incidence, and Cox regression analyses were performed to assess GC performance for predicting BF and DM after post-RP RT in comparison with clinical nomograms. Results: Thearea under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the Stephenson model was 0.70 for both BF and DM, with addition of GC significantly improving area under the receiver operating characteristic curve to 0.78 and 0.80, respectively. Stratified by GC risk groups, 8-year cumulative incidence was 21%, 48%, and 81% for BF (P<.0001) and for DM was 0, 12%, and 17% (P=.032) for low, intermediate, and high GC, respectively. In multivariable analysis, patients with high GC had a hazard ratio of 8.1 and 14.3 for BF and DM. In patients with intermediate or high GC, those irradiated with undetectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA ?0.2ng/mL) had median BF survival of >8years, compared with <4years for patients with detectable PSA (>0.2ng/mL) before initiation of RT. At 8years, the DM cumulative incidence for patients with high GC and RT with undetectable PSA was 3%, compared with 23% with detectable PSA (P=.03). No outcome differences were observed for low GC between the treatment groups. Conclusion: The GC predicted BF and metastasis after post-RP irradiation. Patients withlower GC risk may benefit from delayed RT, as opposed to those with higher GC; however, this needs prospective validation. Genomic-based models may be useful forimproved decision-making for treatment of high-risk prostate cancer.

  3. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data from Saharan Dust Storm Reveal Model Deficiencies Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Slingo, A., T.P. Ackerman, R.P. Allan, E.I. Kassianov, S.A. McFarlane, G.J. Robinson, J.C. Barnard, M.A. Miller, J.E. Harries, J.E. Russell , S. Dewitte, 2006: Observations of the impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the Earth's radiation budget. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L24817,

  4. River Corridor Closure Contract Section J, Attachment J-10

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 A000 1 SECTION J, ATTACHMENT J-10 RCC SUBCONTRACTS EXISTING AT TIME OF SOLICITATION The following subcontracts are/were available for assignment to the Contractor at the time Solicitation No. DE-RP06-04RL14655 was issued: End Date Current Value Description Supplier 02/28/05 $ 5,994,091 100 B/C AREA PIPELINES RCI ENVIRONMENTAL, INC. 10/31/06 $ 1,324,615 100-BC BURIAL GROUNDS AND REMAINING SITES FEDERAL ENGINEERS & CONSTRUCTORS 12/31/05 $ 3,400,000 116-N-1 CRIB

  5. AS&T Selected Publications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AS&T Selected Publications AS&T Selected Publications Waugh, W.J., E.P. Glenn, P.H. Charley, B. Maxwell, and M.K. O'Neill. 2011. Helping Mother Earth Heal: Diné College and Enhanced Natural Attenuation Research at U.S. Department of Energy Uranium Processing Sites on Navajo Land. In: Burger, J. (ed.) Stakeholders and Scientists: Achieving Implementable Solutions to Energy and Environmental Issues. Springer, New York, New York. Benson, C.H., W.J. Waugh, W.H. Albright, and R.P. Bush,

  6. Smokes and obscurants: A health and environmental effects data base assessment: A first-order, environmental screening and ranking of Army smokes and obscurants: Phase 1 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, J.H.; Martins, S.A.; Cederwall, P.L.; Gratt, L.B.

    1985-03-01

    An initial environmental screening and ranking is provided for each Army smoke and obscurant (S and O) depending on smoke type and smoke-generating device. This was done according to the magnitude of the impact area, the characteristic environmental concentration, the relative inhalation toxicity, the relative toxicity when ingested by animals, the aquatic toxicity, the environmental mobility when freshly deposited, and the ultimate mobility and fate in the environment. The major smoke types considered were various forms of white phosphorus (WP), red phosphorus (RP), hexachloroethane-derived smokes (HC), fog oil (SGF-2), diesel fuel smokes (DF), and some infrared obscuring agents (IR).

  7. l UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -_ ._ i,;PA.il--l-( ---.~ .-.---.-- .-.-_ L.. ,' 3:. /,y. ; .' ( * ' . bABDFUWW.64 iii4 ! .' - , _ ., - \ *Q@e Menwmzdzkm /-5*-i .-, ? r' / .j CJ ' 7, l UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT TO : FROM : SUBJECT: Reautor Materiala Brash, Bew York DATE : Au-t 2 % 1950 B.S. Pearson, Chief, Admbidratios Serviwr/ w ' Branch, Pittsburgh W fJ3lUAL~FBR~lFICATES MATDl!ALS,-3 @ * l . - -- E&red ia Copy lo. laf &8tewial Tramfor Cerfiiioatu Nor, 303-Z 353-2, 71bds 958-2 and %pZ eoverhg 6hipnsnt6 of sirc~ni\rp~

  8. International Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Engineering (M&C 2013) Sun Valley, Idaho, USA, May 5-9, 2013, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2013) THE DATA TRANSFER KIT: A GEOMETRIC RENDEZVOUS-BASED TOOL FOR MULTIPHYSICS DATA TRANSFER S.R. Slattery and P.P.H. Wilson Department of Engineering Physics University of Wisconsin - Madison 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 sslattery@wisc.edu; wilsonp@engr.wisc.edu R.P. Pawlowski Sandia National Laboratories ∗ P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185

  9. Stress corrosion of alloys 600 and 690 in acidic sulfate solutions at elevated temperatures. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, J.F.

    1983-10-01

    EPRI project RP 1171-1 demonstrated that alloy 600 was susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in sulfate environments during constant extension rate testing. The current project has extended that investigation to determine the influence of alloy grain size, sensitization, solution pH and temperature. Stress corrosion in very dilute sulfate solutions and the susceptibility of alloy 690 have also been studied. Data have been obtained chiefly by constant extension rate testing using tensile specimens, and by the constant displacement testing of C-rings.

  10. Workshop on the origin of the heavy elements: Astrophysical models and experimental challenges, Santa Fe, New Mexico, September 3-4, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. Haight; John L. Ullmann; Daniel D. Strottman; Paul E. Koehler; Franz Kaeppeler

    2000-01-01

    This Workshop was held on September 3--4, 1999, following the 10th International Symposium on Capture Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy. Presentations were made by 14 speakers, 6 from the US and 8 from other countries on topics relevant to s-, r- and rp-process nucleosynthesis. Laboratory experiments, both present and planned, and astrophysical observations were represented as were astrophysical models. Approximately 50 scientists participated in this Workshop. These Proceedings consist of copies of vu-graphs presented at the Workshop. For further information, the interested readers are referred to the authors.

  11. Network Markup Language Base Schema version 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GFD-R-P.206 NML-WG nml-wg@ogf.org Jeroen van der Ham, UvA (editor) Freek Dijkstra, SURFsara Roman Łapacz, PSNC Jason Zurawski, Internet2 May 2013 Network Markup Language Base Schema version 1 Status of This Document Grid Final Draft (GFD), Proposed Recommendation (R-P). Copyright Notice Copyright c Open Grid Forum (2008-2013). Some Rights Reserved. Distribution is unlim- ited. Abstract This document describes a set of normative schemas which allow the description of computer network topologies.

  12. 14655 Section A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SOLICITATION, OFFER AND AWARD 1. THIS CONTRACT IS A RATED ORDER RATING PAGE OF PAGES UNDER DPAS (15 CFR 700) > 1 2. CONTRACT NO. 3. SOLICITATION NO. 4. TYPE OF SOLICITATION 5. DATE ISSUED 6. REQUISITION/PURCHASE NUMBER DE-AC06-05RL14655 DE-RP06-04RL14655 July 22, 2004 06-05RL14655.000 [ ] SEALED BID (IFB) [X] NEGOTIATED (RFP) 7. ISSUED BY CODE 8. ADDRESS OFFER TO (If other than Item 7) U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Same as Block 7 Procurement Services Division ATTN:

  13. M-10-33

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy M&O Contract 2008-2013, Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC M&O Contract 2008-2013, Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 M&O Contract 2008-2013, between the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC and the U.S. Department Of Energy. Part I, Section B, Supplies and Services and Price/Costs. PDF icon nrel_contract_20120201195321_435108.pdf More Documents & Publications Request for Proposals (RFP) Number DE-RP36-07GO97036: Alliance Prime

  14. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of 06934566 .l\ ~ ~ ~~9 u.s. Department of Energy Hanford Site OEC 2 8 2004 04-0RP-O78 Mr. Todd Martin, Chair Hanford Advisory Board 1933 Jadwin Avenue, Suite 135 Rich1and, Washington 99352 Dear Mr. Martin: HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD (HAB) CONSENSUS ADVICE #167 -STOP WORK AUTHORITY Reference: HAB letter from T. Martin to P. Golan and J. Shaw, DOE-HQ; K. Klein, RL; R. Schepens, ORP; L. Hoffman, Ecology; and R. Kreizeneeck, EPA, "Stop Work Authority," dated November 5, 2004. This letter

  15. Optional Form 307

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTRACT AWARD PAGE OF PAGES 1. CONTRACT NUMBER 2. EFFECTIVE DATE 3. SOLICITATION NUMBER 4. REQUISITION/PROJECT NUMBER DE-AC27-10RV15051 11/20/09 DE-RP27-09RV15051 27-10RV15051.000 5. ISSUED BY CODE 6. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 5) CODE U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy EM Consolidated Business Center Office of River Protection 250 East Fifth Street, Suite 500 P.O. Box 450, MSIN H6-60 Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 Richland, WA 99352 7. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR CODE

  16. Measurement of the Neutron Radius of 208Pb Through Parity-Violation in Electron Scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abrahamyan, Sergey; Albataineh, Hisham; Aniol, Konrad; Armstrong, David; Armstrong, Whitney; Averett, Todd; Babineau, Benjamin; Barbieri, A.; Bellini, Vincenzo; Beminiwattha, Rakitha; et al

    2012-03-15

    We report the first measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry APV in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from 208Pb. APV is sensitive to the radius of the neutron distribution (Rn). The result APV = 0.656 ± 0.060 (stat) ± 0.013 (syst) corresponds to a difference between the radii of the neutron and proton distributions Rn-Rp = 0.33-0.18+0.16 fm and provides the first electroweak observation of the neutron skin which is expected in a heavy, neutron-rich nucleus.

  17. icenes2011_poster_shumlak_v1_mac.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sheared Flow Stabilized Z-Pinch U. Shumlak, J. Chadney, R.P. Golingo, D.J. Den Hartog, M.C. Hughes, S.D. Knecht, B.A. Nelson, W. Lowrie, R.J. Oberto, M.P. Ross, J.L. Rohrbach, and G.V. Vogman Aerospace & Energetics Research Program University of Washington, Seattle, USA 15 th Int'l Conf. on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems 15 - 19 May 2011 ZaP Personnel Graduate Students Joshua Chadney Sean Knecht Michal Hughes Jacob Rohrbach Michael Ross Undergraduate Students Rachel Oberto Gautam Shah Genia

  18. Water-Balance Cover Performance

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    0 Conference, March 7-10, 2010, Phoenix, AZ Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Soil and Groundwater at the Monument Valley, Arizona, DOE Legacy Waste Site-10281 W.J. Waugh, D.E. Miller, S.A. Morris, and L.R. Sheader S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO E.P. Glenn, D. Moore, and K.C. Carroll University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ L. Benally and M. Roanhorse Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ R.P. Bush U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, CO ABSTRACT The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the

  19. MASS MEASUREMENT OF {sup 45}Cr AND ITS IMPACT ON THE Ca-Sc CYCLE IN X-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, X. L.; Xu, H. S.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Zhang, Y. H.; Tu, X. L.; Zhou, X. H.; He, J. J.; Sun, Y.; Wang, M.; Yuan, Y. J.; Xia, J. W.; Yang, J. C.; Jia, G. B.; Hu, Z. G.; Ma, X. W.; Mao, R. S.; Schatz, H.; Blaum, K.; Sun, B. H.; Audi, G.; and others

    2013-03-20

    Masses of neutron-deficient {sup 58}Ni projectile fragments have been measured at the HIRFL-CSR facility in Lanzhou, China employing the isochronous mass spectrometry technique. Masses of a series of short-lived T{sub z} = -3/2 nuclides including the {sup 45}Cr nucleus have been measured with a relative uncertainty of about 10{sup -6}-10{sup -7}. The new {sup 45}Cr mass turned out to be essential for modeling the astrophysical rp-process. In particular, we find that the formation of the predicted Ca-Sc cycle in X-ray bursts can be excluded.

  20. HIGS2: The Next Generation Compton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HIGS2: The Next Generation Compton γ-ray Source M.W Ahmed 1 , A.E. Champagne 2 , C.R. Howell 3 , W.M. Snow 4 , R.P. Springer 5 and Y. Wu 6 31 August 2012 This document provides a prospectus of research opportunities created by an intensity upgrade to the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS) at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL). The current maximum gamma-ray intensity on target at the HIGS is more than 10 8 γ/s in the energy range between 9 and 12 MeV. An increase of total

  1. U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    f ~ U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site MAY 27 2004 04-0RP-O39 Mr. Todd Martin, Chair Hanford Advisory Board 1933 Jadwin Avenue, Suite 135 Richland, Washington 99352 Dear Mr. Martin: HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD (HAB) ADVICE #156 -SITE TECHNOLOGY COORDINATION GROUP Reference: HAB letter from T. Martin, HAB to R. Schepens, ORP Manager, and K. Klein, RL Manager, "Site Technology Coordination Group," dated April 2, 2004. This letter is in response to HAB Consensus Advice #156, requesting the

  2. Version_0and1_Matrix_of_Requirements_by_Function_06Mar07 AND approved by FERC and Corps responsibility.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Reliability Standards Matrix of Requirements by Responsible Entities Standard Number Requirement Number Implementation Date Text of Requirement Violation Risk Factors BA DP GO GOP IA LSE PA PSE RC RP RRO RSG TO TOP TP TSP NERC_Net BAL-001-0 R1. 4/1/2005 Each Balancing Authority shall operate such that, on a rolling 12-month basis, the average of the clock-minute averages of the Balancing Authority's Area Control Error (ACE) divided by 10B (B is the clock-minute average of the Balancing

  3. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-13-044 Idaho EC B3-6.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    10-2008 CONCLUDING MATERIAL Review Activity: Preparing Activity: DOE Operations Offices Field Offices DOE-HS-11 NA NNSA Service Center HS CH OH Project Number: EM ID GFO FSC 6910-0069 NE NV SC OR RL OAK SR RP National Laboratories Area Offices BNL Pantex Site Office LLNL Ashtabula Area Office LANL Carlsbad Area Office PNNL Columbus Area Office Sandia Fernald Area Office FNL Los Alamos Area Office West Valley Area Office Kirtland Area Office Pinellas Area Office Kansas City Area Office Miamisburg

  4. Microsoft Word - SRP on Application of Engineering and Technical Requirements to DOE Nuclear Facilities_Projects_CNS_Draft Fina

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    J-B-1 SECTION J APPENDIX B SPECIAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTION ACCOUNT AGREEMENT

    C-1 SECTION J APPENDIX C SMALL BUSINESS, VETERAN-OWNED SMALL BUSINESS, SERVICE DISABLED VETERAN-OWNED SMALL BUSINESS, HUB-ZONE SMALL BUSINESS, SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS, AND WOMAN-OWNED SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-C-2 Page Blank DE-RP28-08RW11003 July 24, 2008 Use or disclosure of data contained on this sheet is Volume I subject to the restriction on the title page of this

  5. Slide 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    To replace these boxes with images open the slide master Length scale Atom-Probe Tomographic Measurement of Trapped Hydrogen Isotopes R. Karnesky (Sandia) N. Teslich, M. Kumar (Lawrence Livermore) TFG 2014 1 Local-Electrode Atom-Probe (LEAP) Tomography 2008-Mar-03 Photo courtesy of R.P. Koll First atomic imaging Site-Specific Samples and Hydrogen Isotope Sensitivity 4 Ga Ga ScO Fe Sc, ScH, ScD, ScHD, ScD 2 Hydrogen Segregates to Traps and Atom Probe can Image It 5 1.E-12 1.E-11 1.E-10 1.E-09

  6. Management and Operating Contract for the Los Alamos National Laboratory, NNSA contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACT FOR THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT No. DE-AC52-06NA25396 DECEMBER 21, 2005 1943 Today Blank Page Blank Page Request for Proposal No. DE-RP52-05NA25396 LANS Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.doc Section B - H, Page 2 Part I - The Schedule Sections B through H TABLE OF CONTENTS STANDARD FORM 33 SOLICITATION, OFFER AND AWARD....................................... 1 Section B - SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS

  7. AwardWinnersByCategoryProject

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Category Project Name Team Member Group Change Agents Gold Award Nominated by Mary Neu Re-Sourcing! Pj Martinez DSESH-STO Dave Seagraves RP-SVS Laurie Tomlinson B-DO Star - Change Agents Award Nominated by Elizabeth Joseph Catalysts for Improved Chemical Management Monica Andersen BPS-DO James Corey Larkin OPS-SIO Cheryl Lucas OS-DO Dina Siegel OSH-ISH Jon Tapia PS-3 Environmental Management Systems Gold Award Nominated by Stephen Glick Leading LANL's Legacy Lead to LANSCE Fredric Bolton

  8. Epidemiological-environmental study of diesel bus garage workers: acute effects of NO/sub 2/ and respirable particulate on the respiratory system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamble, J.; Jones, W.; Minshall, S.

    1987-02-01

    Personal samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) and respirable particulate (RP) were collected over the shift on 232 workers in four diesel bus garages. Response was assessed by an acute respiratory questionnaire and before and after shift spirometry. Measures of exposure to NO/sub 2/ and RP were associated with work-related symptoms of cough; itching, burning, or watering eyes; difficult or labored breathing; chest tightness; and wheeze. The prevalence of burning eyes, headaches, difficult or labored breathing, nausea, and wheeze experienced at work were higher in the diesel bus garage workers than in a comparison population of battery workers, while the prevalence of headaches was reduced. Mean reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), peak flow, and flows at 50 and 75% of FVC were not obviously different from zero. There was no detectable association of exposure to NO/sub 2/ or respirable particulate and acute reductions in pulmonary function. Workers who often had respiratory work-related symptoms generally had a slightly greater mean acute reduction in FEV1 and FEF50 than did those who did not have these symptoms, but these differences were not statistically significant.

  9. An epidemiological study of salt miners in diesel and nondiesel mines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamble, J.; Jones, W.; Hudak, J.

    1983-01-01

    A cross-sectional study of 5 NaCl mines and 259 miners addressed the following questions: 1) Is there an association of increased respiratory symptoms, radiographic findings, and reduced pulmonary function with exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and/or respirable particulate (RP) among these miners. 2) Is there increased morbidity of these miners compared to other working populations. Personal samples of NO2 and respirable particulate for jobs in each mine were used to estimate cumulative exposure. NO2 is used as a surrogate measure of diesel exposure. Cough was associated with age and smoking, dyspnea with age; neither symptom was associated with exposure (years worked, estimated cumulative NO2 or RP exposure). Phlegm was associated with age, smoking, and exposure. Reduced pulmonary function (FVC, FEV1, peak, flow, FEF50, FEF75) showed no association with exposure. There was one case of small rounded and one case of small irregular opacities; pneumoconiosis was not analyzed further. Compared to underground coal miners, above ground coal miners, potash miners, and nonmining workers, the study population after adjustment for age and smoking generally showed no increased prevalence of cough, phlegm, dyspnea, or obstruction (FEV1/FVC less than 0.7). Obstruction in younger salt miners and phlegm in older salt miners was elevated compared to nonmining workers. Mean predicted pulmonary function was reduced 2-4% for FEV1 and FVC, 7-13% for FEF50, and 18-22% for FEF75 below all comparison populations.

  10. Measurement of prompt D-meson production in p–Pb collisions at sNN=5.02TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; et al

    2014-12-04

    The pT-differential production cross sections of the prompt charmed mesons D⁰, D⁺, D*⁺, and D⁺s and their charge conjugate in the rapidity interval −0.96 < ycms < 0.04 were measured in p−Pb collisions at a center-of-mass energy √sNN = 5.02  TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC. The nuclear modification factor RpPb, quantifying the D-meson yield in p−Pb collisions relative to the yield in pp collisions scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions, is compatible within the 15%–20% uncertainties with unity in the transverse momentum interval 1 < pT < 24  GeV/c. No significant difference among the RpPb of themore » four D-meson species is observed. The results are described within uncertainties by theoretical calculations that include initial-state effects. The measurement adds experimental evidence that the modification of the momentum spectrum of D mesons observed in Pb-Pb collisions with respect to pp collisions is due to strong final-state effects induced by hot partonic matter.« less

  11. Electrochemical characteristics of samaria-doped ceria infiltrated strontium-doped LaMnO3 cathodes with varied thickness for yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong Ding; Mingyang Gonga; Chunchuan Xu; Nicholas Baxter; Yihong Li; John Zondlo; Kirk Gerdes; Xingbo Liu

    2010-11-09

    Samaria-doped ceria (SDC) infiltrated into strontium-doped LaMnO3 (LSM) cathodes with varied cathode thickness on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were investigated via symmetrical cell, half cell, and full cell configurations. The results of the symmetrical cells showed that the interfacial polarization resistance (RP) decreased with increasing electrode thickness up to?30#2;m, and further increases in the thickness of the cathode did not cause significant variation of electrode performance. At 800 ?C, the minimum RP was around 0.05#2;cm2. The impedance spectra indicated that three main electrochemical processes existed, possibly corresponding to the oxygen ion incorporation, surface diffusion of oxygen species and oxygen adsorption and dissociation. The DC polarization on the half cells and characterization of the full cells also demonstrated a similar correlation between the electrode performance and the electrode thickness. The peak power densities of the single cells with the 10, 30, and 50-#2;m thick electrodes were 0.63, 1.16 and 1.11Wcm?2, respectively. The exchange current densities under moderate polarization are calculated and possible rate-determining steps are discussed.

  12. Fastcast: Integration and application of rapid prototyping and computational simulation to investment casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D.; Atwood, C.L.

    1996-09-01

    The emergence of several rapid prototyping and manufacturing (RP and M) technologies is having a dramatic impact on investment casting. While the most successful of the rapid prototyping technologies are almost a decade old, relatively recent process advances in their application have produced some remarkable success in utilizing their products as patterns for investment castings. Sandia National Laboratories has been developed highly coupled experimental and computational capabilities to examine the investment casting process with the intention of reducing the amount of time required to manufacture castings, and to increase the quality of the finished product. This presentation will begin with process aspects of RP and M pattern production and handling, shell fabrication, burnout, and casting. The emphasis will be on how the use of Stereolithography (SL) or Selective Laser Sintered (SLS) patterns differs from more traditional wax pattern processes. Aspects of computational simulation to couple design, thermal analysis, and mold filling will be discussed. Integration of these topics is probably the greatest challenge to the use of concurrent engineering principles with investment casting. Sandia has conducted several experiments aimed at calibrating computer codes and providing data for input into these simulations. Studies involving materials as diverse as stainless steel and gold have been conducted to determine liquid metal behavior in molds via real time radiography. The application of these experiments to predictive simulations will be described.

  13. The Crystal Structure of the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase from Human Rhinovirus: A Dual Function Target for Common Cold Antiviral Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Robert A.; Maegley, Karen A.; Yu, Xiu; Ferre, RoseAnn; Lingardo, Laura K.; Diehl, Wade; Parge, Hans E.; Dragovich, Peter S.; Fuhrman, Shella A.

    2010-11-16

    Human rhinoviruses (HRV), the predominant members of the Picornaviridae family of positive-strand RNA viruses, are the major causative agents of the common cold. Given the lack of effective treatments for rhinoviral infections, virally encoded proteins have become attractive therapeutic targets. The HRV genome encodes an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) denoted 3D{sup pol}, which is responsible for replicating the viral genome and for synthesizing a protein primer used in the replication. Here the crystal structures for three viral serotypes (1B, 14, and 16) of HRV 3D{sup pol} have been determined. The three structures are very similar to one another, and to the closely related poliovirus (PV) 3D{sup pol} enzyme. Because the reported PV crystal structure shows significant disorder, HRV 3D{sup pol} provides the first complete view of a picornaviral RdRp. The folding topology of HRV 3D{sup pol} also resembles that of RdRps from hepatitis C virus (HCV) and rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) despite very low sequence homology.

  14. Efficiently evaluate complex pressure relief systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, R.K.; Walker, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    This article will present the steps necessary to perform a comprehensive analysis of complex pressure relief systems. The goal is not to discuss detailed calculations for proper valve sizing and selection, but rather to analyze and verify existing system configurations. Sizing and selection have been covered in detail by the American Petroleum Institute (API) RP 520, API RP 521, various AIChE Design Institute for Emergency Relief Systems (DIERS) publications, and other sources. In their work with industry, the authors have noticed a tendency for some engineers to proceed with detailed calculations without first preparing an overall strategy and implementation plan to make sure that the calculations yield the desired results. They have seen detailed pressure relief system analyses costing hundreds of thousands of dollars which, for any number of reasons, are incorrect. The old adage GIGO (garbage in/garbage out) certainly applies to pressure relief system analysis. They will address the thought processes and actions necessary to correctly and efficiently evaluate complex pressure relief systems.

  15. Salvage/Adjuvant Brachytherapy After Ophthalmic Artery Chemosurgery for Intraocular Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, Jasmine H.; Barker, Christopher A.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; McCormick, Beryl; Segal, Kira; Cohen, Gil; Gobin, Y. Pierre; Marr, Brian P.; Brodie, Scott E.; Dunkel, Ira J.; Abramson, David H.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of brachytherapy after ophthalmic artery chemosurgery (OAC) for retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: This was a single-arm, retrospective study of 15 eyes in 15 patients treated with OAC followed by brachytherapy at (blinded institution) between May 1, 2006, and December 31, 2012, with a median 19 months' follow-up from plaque insertion. Outcome measurements included patient and ocular survival, visual function, and retinal toxicity measured by electroretinogram (ERG). Results: Brachytherapy was used as adjuvant treatment in 2 eyes and as salvage therapy in 13 eyes of which 12 had localized vitreous seeding. No patients developed metastasis or died of retinoblastoma. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of ocular survival was 79.4% (95% confidence interval 48.7%-92.8%) at 18 months. Three eyes were enucleated, and an additional 6 eyes developed out-of-target volume recurrences, which were controlled with additional treatments. Patients with an ocular complication had a mean interval between last OAC and plaque of 2.5 months (SD 2.3 months), which was statistically less (P=.045) than patients without ocular complication who had a mean interval between last OAC and plaque of 6.5 months (SD 4.4 months). ERG responses from pre- versus postplaque were unchanged or improved in more than half the eyes. Conclusions: Brachytherapy following OAC is effective, even in the presence of vitreous seeding; the majority of eyes maintained stable or improved retinal function following treatment, as assessed by ERG.

  16. International oil and gas exploration and development: 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This report starts where the previous quarterly publication ended. This first publication of a new annual series contains most of the same data as the quarterly report, plus some new material, through 1991. It also presents historical data covering a longer period of time than the previous quarterly report. Country-level data on oil reserves, oil production, active drilling rigs, seismic crews, wells drilled, oil reserve additions, and oil reserve-to-production rations (R/P ratios) are listed for about 85 countries, where available, from 1970 through 1991. World and regional summaries are given in both tabular and graphical form. The most popular table in the previous quarterly report, a listing of new discoveries, continues in this annual report as Appendix A.

  17. Logging while tripping cuts time to run gamma ray

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-10

    A new logging tool, sent down the drillstring before a pipe trip out of the hole, logs the well as the pipe is pulled from the hole, cutting the total time required for open hole logging on some wells. This logging while tripping (LWT) technology allows an operator to run a gamma ray and neutron log more quickly than with standard wire line equipment. The drill pipe conveys the logging tools up the well as the pipe is tripped out, and the logging data are stored in the tool`s memory. A transparent logging collar, which meets API 7 and RP7G requirements, holds the tools in the drillstring without interfering with the logging measurements.

  18. Methods and systems for rapid prototyping of high density circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Palmer, Jeremy A.; Davis, Donald W.; Chavez, Bart D.; Gallegos, Phillip L.; Wicker, Ryan B.; Medina, Francisco R.

    2008-09-02

    A preferred embodiment provides, for example, a system and method of integrating fluid media dispensing technology such as direct-write (DW) technologies with rapid prototyping (RP) technologies such as stereolithography (SL) to provide increased micro-fabrication and micro-stereolithography. A preferred embodiment of the present invention also provides, for example, a system and method for Rapid Prototyping High Density Circuit (RPHDC) manufacturing of solderless connectors and pilot devices with terminal geometries that are compatible with DW mechanisms and reduce contact resistance where the electrical system is encapsulated within structural members and manual electrical connections are eliminated in favor of automated DW traces. A preferred embodiment further provides, for example, a method of rapid prototyping comprising: fabricating a part layer using stereolithography and depositing thermally curable media onto the part layer using a fluid dispensing apparatus.

  19. Temporal variability of the trade wind inversion: Measured with a boundary layer vertical profiler. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grindinger, C.M.

    1992-05-01

    This study uses Hawaiian Rainband Project (HaRP) data, from the summer of 1991, to show a boundary layer wind profiler can be used to measure the trade wind inversion. An algorithm has been developed for the profiler that objectively measures the depth of the moist oceanic boundary layer. The Hilo inversion, measured by radiosonde, is highly correlated with the moist oceanic boundary layer measured by the profiler at Paradise Park. The inversion height on windward Hawaii is typically 2253 + or - 514 m. The inversion height varies not only on a daily basis, but on less than an hourly basis. It has a diurnal, as well as a three to four day cycle. There appears to be no consistent relationship between inversion height and precipitation. Currently, this profiler is capable of making high frequency (12 minute) measurements of the inversion base variation, as well as other features.

  20. FACT SHEET U.S. Department of Energy ARM Mobile Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    t a * r - m * - HarmI cf r * f f - -* f * * - s - g pf -*L n sf af * L - t f w * - p L f * arm a f f f L - - - * * - * f - * - f f* i- -L arm m f f f * HamfI f -* - f * - - * - * f * - R - *L - - - - - L f f * * t * f f L amf L * * f - RPP * - f L amfRL * * f * * f - - o RP P c -* * - * f f * f *L * f - * -* - *L - -*L - * * *L amf * * f -* a- - * f f * * f * - -* - * amf - f * - f f - - fM b * * f - f L amf * - f f - - ff * - - f s - - - * * f f ff f -- - *L - * * * f f f f -M* f * ff - * - * *

  1. Ganglion dynamics of Supercritical CO2 in heterogeneous media

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ganglion dynamics of Supercritical CO2 in heterogeneous media SAND2015-2548C \ 1.E+01 Mobile 1.E+00 Trapped £ 1.E-01 1.E-02 1.0E-05 1.0E-04 1.0E-03 1.0E-02 Pore diameter (2rp) (m) 1.0 1.E+00 0.9 0.8 0.7 1.E-01 / / 1.E-02 £ 40 0.3 0.2 Ganglion size (cm) 0.1 0.0 1.E-03 1.E-04 1.E-03 1.E-02 Water Flow Velocity (Vw°) (m/s) Trapping efficiency Injectivity Permeability or porosity Research Team Y Wang, MJ Martinez & K Chojnicki Objectives of Research - Develop observationaNy-constrained models

  2. Thermoelectric properties of nano-meso-micro β-MnO₂ powders as a function of electrical resistance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hedden, Morgan; Francis, Nick; Haraldsen, Jason T.; Ahmed, Towfiq; Constantin, Costel

    2015-07-15

    Particle sizes of manganese oxide (β-MnO₂) powders were modified by using a mortar and pestle ground method for period of times that varied between 15–60 min. Particle size versus ground time clearly shows the existence of a size-induced regime transition (i.e., regime I and II). Thermoelectric properties of β-MnO₂ powders as a function of electrical resistance in the range of RP = 10 - 80Ω were measured. Based on the data presented, we propose a model for the β-MnO₂ system in which nanometer-scale MnO₂ crystallites bond together through weak van der Waals forces to form larger conglomerates that span inmore » size from nanometer to micrometer scale.« less

  3. Mass measurements near the Z = N line with JYFLTRAP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kankainen, Anu; Collaboration: JYFLTRAP Collaboration

    2011-11-30

    Masses of nuclides involved in astrophysical rp and {nu}p processes have to be known precisely in order to model these processes reliably. Mass excesses for 90 ground state and 8 isomeric states of neutron-deficient nuclides have been determined with a precision of better than 10 keV with the JYFLTRAP double Penning trap mass spectrometer at the Ion-Guide Isotope Separator On-Line facility in Jyvaeskylae. Highlights of the measurements related to nuclear astrophysics are given. Some of the measured isomers, such as {sup 53}Co{sup m}, {sup 90}Tc{sup m}, and {sup 95}Pd{sup m}, and implications for the excitation energy of the 21{sup +} isomer in {sup 94}Ag are briefly discussed.

  4. (U) Feynman-Y calculations using PARTISN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2015-08-31

    A prescription for computing the Feynman Y as a function of coincidence gate width using a deterministic multigroup neutron transport code has been published and the results compared favorably with measurements of the BeRP ball. In this paper, we report on our project to implement the method and reproduce the results. There are several clarifications and corrections of the published prescription. We show results using two multigroup cross section libraries compared with measurements and with Monte Carlo results. Deterministic simulations of the mean count rates compare very favorably with previously published Monte Carlo results, and deterministic simulations of the Feynman Y asymptote compare somewhat favorably. In Feynman beta plots, the deterministic simulations reached the asymptotic value much sooner than did a fit to the measured data.

  5. U

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Toi' tiie Atomic Enei-KV Commission 7"^^ ~^ o - PPR V o l . U B No. 1 . 9 * ^ PUBLICLY F^LlASAlLB)ecia8Sification Officer_^.JJ;j^i<^. FOmWTION OF THE JO-TSAR SLK1EOT 9 4 , ^ ^ ' ^ cfocument consist, nf FROM DEUTEROM BOIvroARDMEOT OF U23g ( 1 4 -^U)agesaPa r!) f No. rp..._of _ ^ - j _ *^ ^'g^res J.i7. Kennedy, M.L. Perlraan, E. Segre and A.C. \7ahl '^^^^'-^'^ Spr>f$?. _ ' ^ Abstract v ^ I t has been shown by bombardment with deuterons of a sample of U238^ g r e a t l y depleted i n

  6. Decoupling of the PI3K pathway via mutation necessitates combinatorial treatment in HER2+ breast cancer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Korkola, James E.; Collisson, Eric A.; Heiser, Laura; Oates, Chris; Bayani, Nora; Itani, Sleiman; Esch, Amanda; Thompson, Wallace; Griffith, Obi L.; Wang, Nicholas J.; et al

    2015-07-16

    We report here on experimental and theoretical efforts to determine how best to combine drugs that inhibit HER2 and AKT in HER2+ breast cancers. We accomplished this by measuring cellular and molecular responses to lapatinib and the AKT inhibitors (AKTi) GSK690693 and GSK2141795 in a panel of 22 HER2+ breast cancer cell lines carrying wild type or mutant PIK3CA. We observed that combinations of lapatinib plus AKTi were synergistic in HER2/PIK3CAmut cell lines but not in HER2+/PIK3CAwt cell lines. We measured changes in phospho-protein levels in 15 cell lines after treatment with lapatinib, AKTi or lapatinib + AKTi to shedmore » light on the underlying signaling dynamics. This revealed that p-S6RP levels were less well attenuated by lapatinib in HER2+/PIK3CAmut cells compared to HER2+/PIK3CAwt cells and that lapatinib + AKTi reduced p-S6RP levels to those achieved in HER2+/PIK3CAwt cells with lapatinib alone. We also found that that compensatory up-regulation of p-HER3 and p-HER2 is blunted in PIK3CAmut cells following lapatinib + AKTi treatment. Responses of HER2+ SKBR3 cells transfected with lentiviruses carrying control or PIK3CAmut sequences were similar to those observed in HER2+/PIK3CAmut cell lines but not in HER2+/PIK3CAwt cell lines. We used a nonlinear ordinary differential equation model to support the idea that PIK3CA mutations act as downstream activators of AKT that blunt lapatinib inhibition of downstream AKT signaling and that the effects of PIK3CA mutations can be countered by combining lapatinib with an AKTi. This combination does not confer substantial benefit beyond lapatinib in HER2+/PIK3CAwt cells.« less

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Radiological Placement of Central Venous Port via the Subclavian Vein: A Retrospective Analysis of 500 Cases at a Single Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakamoto, Noriaki Arai, Yasuaki Takeuchi, Yoshito Takahashi, Masahide Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the technical success rate and adverse events (AEs) associated with ultrasound (US)-guided radiological placement (RP) of a central venous port (CVP) via the subclavian vein (SCV). Between April 2006 and May 2007, a total of 500 US-guided RPs of a CVP via the SCV were scheduled in 486 cancer patients (mean age {+-} SD, 54.1 {+-} 18.1 years) at our institute. Referring to the interventional radiology report database and patients' records, technical success rate and AEs relevant to CVP placement were evaluated retrospectively. The technical success rate was 98.6% (493/500). AEs occurred in 26 cases (5.2%) during follow-up (range, 1-1080 days; mean {+-} SD, 304.0 {+-} 292.1 days). AEs within 24 h postprocedure occurred in five patients: pneumothorax (n = 2), arterial puncture (n = 1), hematoma formation at the pocket site (n = 2), and catheter tip migration into the internal mammary vein (n = 1). There were seven early AEs: hematoma formation at the pocket site (n = 2), fibrin sheath formation around the indwelling catheter (n = 2), and catheter-related infections (n = 3). There were 13 delayed AEs: catheter-related infections (n = 7), catheter detachments (n = 3), catheter occlusion (n = 1), symptomatic thrombus in the SCV (n = 1), and catheter migration (n = 1). No major AEs, such as procedure-related death, air embolism, or events requiring surgical intervention, were observed. In conclusion, US-guided RP of a CVP via the SCV is highly appropriate, based on its high technical success rate and the limited number of AEs.

  8. Decoupling of the PI3K pathway via mutation necessitates combinatorial treatment in HER2+ breast cancer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Korkola, James E.; Collisson, Eric A.; Heiser, Laura; Oates, Chris; Bayani, Nora; Itani, Sleiman; Esch, Amanda; Thompson, Wallace; Griffith, Obi L.; Wang, Nicholas J.; et al

    2015-07-16

    We report here on experimental and theoretical efforts to determine how best to combine drugs that inhibit HER2 and AKT in HER2+ breast cancers. We accomplished this by measuring cellular and molecular responses to lapatinib and the AKT inhibitors (AKTi) GSK690693 and GSK2141795 in a panel of 22 HER2+ breast cancer cell lines carrying wild type or mutant PIK3CA. We observed that combinations of lapatinib plus AKTi were synergistic in HER2/PIK3CAmut cell lines but not in HER2+/PIK3CAwt cell lines. We measured changes in phospho-protein levels in 15 cell lines after treatment with lapatinib, AKTi or lapatinib + AKTi to shedmore »light on the underlying signaling dynamics. This revealed that p-S6RP levels were less well attenuated by lapatinib in HER2+/PIK3CAmut cells compared to HER2+/PIK3CAwt cells and that lapatinib + AKTi reduced p-S6RP levels to those achieved in HER2+/PIK3CAwt cells with lapatinib alone. We also found that that compensatory up-regulation of p-HER3 and p-HER2 is blunted in PIK3CAmut cells following lapatinib + AKTi treatment. Responses of HER2+ SKBR3 cells transfected with lentiviruses carrying control or PIK3CAmut sequences were similar to those observed in HER2+/PIK3CAmut cell lines but not in HER2+/PIK3CAwt cell lines. We used a nonlinear ordinary differential equation model to support the idea that PIK3CA mutations act as downstream activators of AKT that blunt lapatinib inhibition of downstream AKT signaling and that the effects of PIK3CA mutations can be countered by combining lapatinib with an AKTi. This combination does not confer substantial benefit beyond lapatinib in HER2+/PIK3CAwt cells.« less

  9. Weak charge form factor and radius of 208Pb through parity violation in electron scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Ahmed, Z.; Jen, C. -M.; Rakhman, A.; Souder, P. A.; Dalton, M. M.; Liyanage, N.; Paschke, K. D.; Saenboonruang, K.; Silwal, R.; et al

    2012-03-26

    We use distorted wave electron scattering calculations to extract the weak charge form factor FW(more » $$\\bar{q}$$), the weak charge radius RW, and the point neutron radius Rn, of 208Pb from the PREX parity violating asymmetry measurement. The form factor is the Fourier transform of the weak charge density at the average momentum transfer $$\\bar{q}$$ = 0.475 fm-1. We find FW($$\\bar{q}$$) = 0.204 ± 0.028(exp) ± 0.001(model). We use the Helm model to infer the weak radius from FW($$\\bar{q}$$). We find RW = 5.826 ± 0.181(exp) ± 0.027(model) fm. Here the exp error includes PREX statistical and systematic errors, while the model error describes the uncertainty in RW from uncertainties in the surface thickness σ of the weak charge density. The weak radius is larger than the charge radius, implying a 'weak charge skin' where the surface region is relatively enriched in weak charges compared to (electromagnetic) charges. We extract the point neutron radius Rn = 5.751 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026(model) ± 0.005(strange) fm, from RW. Here there is only a very small error (strange) from possible strange quark contributions. We find Rn to be slightly smaller than RW because of the nucleon's size. As a result, we find a neutron skin thickness of Rn-Rp = 0.302 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026 (model) ± 0.005 (strange) fm, where Rp is the point proton radius.« less

  10. Iodine 125 Brachytherapy With Vitrectomy and Silicone Oil in the Treatment of Uveal Melanoma: 1-to-1 Matched Case-Control Series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCannel, Tara A. McCannel, Colin A.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We initially reported the radiation-attenuating effect of silicone oil 1000 centistokes for iodine 125. The purpose of this report was to compare the clinical outcomes in case patients who had iodine 125 brachytherapy with vitrectomy and silicone oil 1000 centistokes with the outcomes in matched control patients who underwent brachytherapy alone. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with uveal melanoma who were treated with iodine 125 plaque brachytherapy and vitrectomy with silicone oil with minimum 1-year follow-up were included. Control patients who underwent brachytherapy alone were matched for tumor size, location, and sex. Baseline patient and tumor characteristics and tumor response to radiation, final visual acuity, macular status, central macular thickness by ocular coherence tomography (OCT), cataract progression, and metastasis at last follow-up visit were compared. Surgical complications were also determined. Results: Twenty case patients met the inclusion criteria. The average follow-up time was 22.1 months in case patients and 19.4 months in control patients. The final logMAR vision was 0.81 in case patients and 1.1 in control patients (P=.071); 8 case patients and 16 control patients had abnormal macular findings (P=.011); and the average central macular thickness by OCT was 293.2 μm in case patients and 408.5 μm in control patients (P=.016). Eleven case patients (55%) and 1 control patient (5%) had required cataract surgery at last follow-up (P=.002). Four patients in the case group and 1 patient in the control group experienced metastasis (P=.18). Among the cases, intraoperative retinal tear occurred in 3 patients; total serous retinal detachment and macular hole developed in 1 case patient each. There was no case of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, treatment failure, or local tumor dissemination in case patients or control patients. Conclusions: With up to 3 years of clinical follow-up, silicone oil during brachytherapy for the treatment of uveal melanoma resulted in fewer abnormal maculas, lower central macular thickness on OCT, and a trend toward better final visual acuity in comparison with matched control patients who underwent brachytherapy alone.

  11. Automatic Microaneurysm Detection and Characterization Through Digital Color Fundus Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martins, Charles; Veras, Rodrigo; Ramalho, Geraldo; Medeiros, Fatima; Ushizima, Daniela

    2008-08-29

    Ocular fundus images can provide information about retinal, ophthalmic, and even systemic diseases such as diabetes. Microaneurysms (MAs) are the earliest sign of Diabetic Retinopathy, a frequently observed complication in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Robust detection of MAs in digital color fundus images is critical in the development of automated screening systems for this kind of disease. Automatic grading of these images is being considered by health boards so that the human grading task is reduced. In this paper we describe segmentation and the feature extraction methods for candidate MAs detection.We show that the candidate MAs detected with the methodology have been successfully classified by a MLP neural network (correct classification of 84percent).

  12. The Dept. of Energy Artificial Retina project

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01

    LLNL has assisted in the development of the first long-term retinal prosthesis - called an artificial retina - that can function for years inside the harsh biological environment of the eye. This work has been done in collaboration with four national laboratories (Argonne, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge and Sandia), four universities (the California Institute of Technology, the Doheny Eye Institute at USC, North Carolina State University and the University of California, Santa Cruz), an industrial partner (Second Sight® Medical Products Inc. of Sylmar, Calif.) and the U.S. Department of Energy. With this device, application-specific integrated circuits transform digital images from a camera into electric signals in the eye that the brain uses to create a visual image. In clinical trials, patients with vision loss were able to successfully identify objects, increase mobility and detect movement using the artificial retina.

  13. Electrode array for neural stimulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Okandan, Murat; Stein, David J.; Yang, Pin; Cesarano, III, Joseph; Dellinger, Jennifer

    2011-08-16

    An electrode array for neural stimulation is disclosed which has particular applications for use in a retinal prosthesis. The electrode array can be formed as a hermetically-sealed two-part ceramic package which includes an electronic circuit such as a demultiplexer circuit encapsulated therein. A relatively large number (up to 1000 or more) of individually-addressable electrodes are provided on a curved surface of a ceramic base portion the electrode array, while a much smaller number of electrical connections are provided on a ceramic lid of the electrode array. The base and lid can be attached using a metal-to-metal seal formed by laser brazing. Electrical connections to the electrode array can be provided by a flexible ribbon cable which can also be used to secure the electrode array in place.

  14. Micromachined electrode array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2007-12-11

    An electrode array is disclosed which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array, in certain embodiments, can include a plurality of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. In other embodiments of the electrode array, the electrodes can be fixed to the substrate. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, and can include electrode tips having an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis.

  15. Vessel network detection using contour evolution and color components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ushizima, Daniela; Medeiros, Fatima; Cuadros, Jorge; Martins, Charles

    2011-06-22

    Automated retinal screening relies on vasculature segmentation before the identification of other anatomical structures of the retina. Vasculature extraction can also be input to image quality ranking, neovascularization detection and image registration, among other applications. There is an extensive literature related to this problem, often excluding the inherent heterogeneity of ophthalmic clinical images. The contribution of this paper relies on an algorithm using front propagation to segment the vessel network. The algorithm includes a penalty in the wait queue on the fast marching heap to minimize leakage of the evolving interface. The method requires no manual labeling, a minimum number of parameters and it is capable of segmenting color ocular fundus images in real scenarios, where multi-ethnicity and brightness variations are parts of the problem.

  16. Structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin, two snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory proteins that target cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels: implications for movement of the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Brown, R. Lane; Fujimoto, Zui; Morita, Takashi; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2008-10-01

    The structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin suggest that both proteins bind to cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels in a manner in which the concave surface occludes the pore entrance. Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels play pivotal roles in sensory transduction by retinal photoreceptors and olfactory neurons. The elapid snake toxins pseudechetoxin (PsTx) and pseudecin (Pdc) are the only known protein blockers of CNG channels. These toxins belong to a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) family containing an N-terminal pathogenesis-related proteins of group 1 (PR-1) domain and a C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD). PsTx and Pdc are highly homologous proteins, but their blocking affinities on CNG channels are different: PsTx blocks both the olfactory and retinal channels with ∼15–30-fold higher affinity than Pdc. To gain further insights into their structure and function, the crystal structures of PsTx, Pdc and Zn{sup 2+}-bound Pdc were determined. The structures revealed that most of the amino-acid-residue differences between PsTx and Pdc are located around the concave surface formed between the PR-1 domain and the CRD, suggesting that the concave surface is functionally important for CNG-channel binding and inhibition. A structural comparison in the presence and absence of Zn{sup 2+} ion demonstrated that the concave surface can open and close owing to movement of the CRD upon Zn{sup 2+} binding. The data suggest that PsTx and Pdc occlude the pore entrance and that the dynamic motion of the concave surface facilitates interaction with the CNG channels.

  17. REPORT on the TRUCK BRAKE LINING WORKSHOP and FLEET OPERATORS' SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, P.J.

    2003-02-03

    The report summarizes what transpired during brake linings-related workshop held at the Fall 2003 meeting of the Technology and Maintenance Council (TMC) in Charlotte, NC. The title of the workshop was ''Developing a Useful Friction Material Rating System''. It was organized by a team consisting of Peter Blau (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), Jim Britell (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration), and Jim Lawrence (Motor and Equipment Manufacturers Association). The workshop was held under the auspices of TMC Task Force S6 (Chassis), chaired by Joseph Stianche (Sanderson Farms, Inc.). Six invited speakers during the morning session provided varied perspectives on testing and rating aftermarket automotive and truck brake linings. They were: James R. Clark, Chief Engineer, Foundation Brakes and Wheel Equipment, Dana Corporation, Spicer Heavy Axle and Brake Division; Charles W. Greening, Jr, President, Greening Test Labs; Tim Duncan, General Manager, Link Testing Services;Dennis J. McNichol, President, Dennis NationaLease; Jim Fajerski, Business Manager, OE Sales and Applications Engineering, Federal Mogul Corporation; and Peter J. Blau, Senior Materials Development Engineer, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The afternoon break-out sessions addressed nine questions concerning such issues as: ''Should the federal government regulate aftermarket lining quality?''; ''How many operators use RP 628, and if so, what's good or bad about it?''; and ''Would there be any value to you of a vocation-specific rating system?'' The opinions of each discussion group, consisting of 7-9 participants, were reported and consolidated in summary findings on each question. Some questions produced a greater degree of agreement than others. In general, the industry seems eager for more information that would allow those who are responsible for maintaining truck brakes to make better, more informed choices on aftermarket linings. A written fleet operator survey was also conducted during the TMC meeting. Twenty-one responses were received, spanning fleet sizes between 12 and 170,000 vehicles. Responses are summarized in a series of tables separated into responses from small (100 or fewer powered vehicles), medium (101-1000 vehicles), and large fleets (>1000 vehicles). The vast majority of fleets do their own brake maintenance, relying primarily on experience and lining manufactures to select aftermarket linings. At least half of the responders are familiar to some extent with TMC Recommended Practice 628 on brake linings, but most do not use this source of test data as the sole criterion to select linings. Significant shortfalls in the applicability of TMC RP 628 to certain types of brake systems were noted.

  18. Analysis of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Samples: Integrated Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britt, Phillip F

    2015-03-01

    Analysis of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Samples: Integrated Summary Report. Summaries of conclusions, analytical processes, and analytical results. Analysis of samples taken from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico in support of the WIPP Technical Assessment Team (TAT) activities to determine to the extent feasible the mechanisms and chemical reactions that may have resulted in the breach of at least one waste drum and release of waste material in WIPP Panel 7 Room 7 on February 14, 2014. This report integrates and summarizes the results contained in three separate reports, described below, and draws conclusions based on those results. Chemical and Radiochemical Analyses of WIPP Samples R-15 C5 SWB and R16 C-4 Lip; PNNL-24003, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, December 2014 Analysis of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Underground and MgO Samples by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); SRNL-STI-2014-00617; Savannah River National Laboratory, December 2014 Report for WIPP UG Sample #3, R15C5 (9/3/14); LLNL-TR-667015; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, January 2015 This report is also contained in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Technical Assessment Team Report; SRNL-RP-2015-01198; Savannah River National Laboratory, March 17, 2015, as Appendix C: Analysis Integrated Summary Report.

  19. Ab Initio Nuclear Structure and Reaction Calculations for Rare Isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draayer, Jerry P.

    2014-09-28

    We have developed a novel ab initio symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM), which has opened the intermediate-mass region for ab initio investigations, thereby providing an opportunity for first-principle symmetry-guided applications to nuclear structure and reactions for nuclear isotopes from the lightest p-shell systems to intermediate-mass nuclei. This includes short-lived proton-rich nuclei on the path of X-ray burst nucleosynthesis and rare neutron-rich isotopes to be produced by the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). We have provided ab initio descriptions of high accuracy for low-lying (including collectivity-driven) states of isotopes of Li, He, Be, C, O, Ne, Mg, Al, and Si, and studied related strong- and weak-interaction driven reactions that are important, in astrophysics, for further understanding stellar evolution, X-ray bursts and triggering of s, p, and rp processes, and in applied physics, for electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments as well as for fusion ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  20. Pool daily fuel scheduling. Volume 1: technical manual. Final Report, February 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, C.K.; Mikolinnas, T.A.; Reppen, N.D.; Ringlee, R.J.; Wollenberg, B.F.

    1981-02-01

    The results and efforts of research and development of methods for daily fuel scheduling performed under EPRI Project RP 1048-5 by Power Technologies, Inc. (PTI) are reported in three volumes: Technical Manual, Programming Manual, and Program Listings. Daily fuel scheduling involves the scheduling and dispatching of generating facilities to meet all system loads and operating requirements for periods ranging from a day to a week. Daily fuel scheduling and computer requirements are defined. The scheduling problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) optimization problem in which the total system operating cost is minimized. A potentially practical scheduling procedure, based on a combination of search and MILP approaches, was proposed; these two approaches were investigated, coded in FORTRAN and tested individually. This volume of the report (Volume 1) is the Technical Manual and contains the main body of the report, which includes descriptions and results for two approaches to the daily fuel scheduling problem: Search Approach and Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) Approach. Prototype computer programs on these approaches have been coded in FORTRAN for testing and evaluation purposes using PTI in-house PRIME time-sharing computer.

  1. Pool daily fuel scheduling. Volume 3: Program listings. Final report, February 1981. [START; MASTER; THCC; HYDR; PSTO; NFLA; LMTF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, C.K.; Mikolinnas, T.A.

    1981-02-01

    The results and efforts of research and development of methods for daily fuel scheduling performed under EPRI Project RP 1048-5 by Power Technologies, Inc. (PTI) are reported in three volumes: Technical Manual; Programming Manual and Program Listing. Daily fuel scheduling involves the scheduling and dispatching of generating facilities to meet all system loads and operating requirements for periods ranging from a day to a week. Daily fuel scheduling and computer requirements are defined. The scheduling problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) optimization problem in which the total system operating cost is minimized. A potentially practical scheduling procedure, based on a combination of search and MILP approaches, was proposed; these two approaches were investigated, coded in FORTRAN and tested individually. Tests using the New York Power Pool system show that the search approach may produce potential savings for fuel scheduling approaches. Additional efforts are needed to make the MILP approach practical. Finally, a number of special scheduling problems have been identified and recommended for future work. This volume of the report (Volume 3) gives the FORTRAN listings of the programs, which had been developed during the course of this project. In the programs, there may be certain statements and functions which could be specific to the PRIME computer system. Comments on them are provided.

  2. Pool daily fuel scheduling. Volume 2: programming manual. Final report, February 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, C.K.; Mikolinnas, T.A.

    1981-02-01

    The results and efforts of research and development of methods for daily fuel scheduling performed under EPRI Project RP 1048-5 by Power Technologies, Inc. (PTI) are reported in three volumes: Technical Manual; Programming Manual and Program Listings. Daily fuel scheduling involves the scheduling and dispatching of generating facilities to meet all system loads and operating requirements for periods ranging from a day to a week. Daily fuel scheduling and computer requirements are defined. The scheduling problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) optimization problem in which the total system operating cost is minimized. A potentially practical scheduling procedure, based on a combination of search and MILP approaches, was proposed; these two approaches were investigated, coded in FORTRAN and tested individually. Tests using the New York Power Pool system show that the search approach may produce potential savings for fuel scheduling approaches. Additional efforts are needed to make the MILP approach practical. Finally, a number of special scheduling problems have been identified and recommended for future work. This volume of the report (Volume 2) is the Programming Manual which describes the organization and structure of the programs. Layout and function of data files, sample outputs and test data are also presented. Program organization and data for the search and MILP approaches are given. Preliminary test results, system data descriptions and sample outputs for the search approach are included in the appendices.

  3. A formalized approach to cycle chemistry improvement in fossil fuel power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimmer, J.P.; Dooley, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    The overall cost impact of cycle chemistry problems in fossil plants is typically hidden within the statistics of component forced outages, efficiency losses and premature end of useful component life. Corrosion of components in US utility steam generating plants is responsible for an estimated 50% of forced outages and over three billion dollars a year in additional operating and maintenance costs. These problems are usually the direct result of repeat incidents of impurity ingress, corrosion, and/or corrosion product generation transport, and deposition on heat transfer and power generation process equipment surfaces. The only way to prevent repeat incidents of cycle chemistry corrosion and/or deposition-influenced equipment problems is to implement a formalized cycle chemistry improvement program that addresses the root-causes of these problems. This paper describes such a program being implemented at twelve (12) utilities under EPRI research project RP2712-11, {open_quotes}Cycle Chemistry Improvement Program.{close_quotes} Interim utility results, after almost three years of project participation, have demonstrated substantial reductions in availability/performance losses and water treatment costs due to applications of state-of-the-art cycle chemistry, monitoring equipment and/or process control systems.

  4. An integrated top-down and bottom-up strategy for characterization protein isoforms and modifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Si; Tolic, Nikola; Tian, Zhixin; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2011-04-15

    Bottom-up and top-down strategies are two commonly used methods for mass spectrometry (MS) based protein identification; each method has its own advantages and disadvantages. In this chapter, we describe an integrated top-down and bottom-up approach facilitated by concurrent liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis and fraction collection for comprehensive high-throughput intact protein profiling. The approach employs a high resolution reversed phase (RP) LC separation coupled with LC eluent fraction collection and concurrent on-line MS with a high field (12 Tesla) Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Protein elusion profiles and tentative modified protein identification are made using detected intact protein mass in conjunction with bottom-up protein identifications from the enzymatic digestion and analysis of corresponding LC fractions. Specific proteins of biological interest are incorporated into a target ion list for subsequent off-line gas-phase fragmentation that uses an aliquot of the original collected LC fraction, an aliquot of which was also used for bottom-up analysis.

  5. Evaluation of Automated Model Calibration Techniques for Residential Building Energy Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    and Ben Polly, Joseph Robertson; Polly, Ben; Collis, Jon

    2013-09-01

    This simulation study adapts and applies the general framework described in BESTEST-EX (Judkoff et al 2010) for self-testing residential building energy model calibration methods. BEopt/DOE-2.2 is used to evaluate four mathematical calibration methods in the context of monthly, daily, and hourly synthetic utility data for a 1960's-era existing home in a cooling-dominated climate. The home's model inputs are assigned probability distributions representing uncertainty ranges, random selections are made from the uncertainty ranges to define "explicit" input values, and synthetic utility billing data are generated using the explicit input values. The four calibration methods evaluated in this study are: an ASHRAE 1051-RP-based approach (Reddy and Maor 2006), a simplified simulated annealing optimization approach, a regression metamodeling optimization approach, and a simple output ratio calibration approach. The calibration methods are evaluated for monthly, daily, and hourly cases; various retrofit measures are applied to the calibrated models and the methods are evaluated based on the accuracy of predicted savings, computational cost, repeatability, automation, and ease of implementation.

  6. Soft rot decay capabilities and interactions of fungi and bacteria from fumigated utility poles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.J.K.; Worrall, J.J. . Coll. of Environmental Science and Forestry)

    1992-11-01

    The objectives were to (1) identify microfungi and bacterial associates isolated from fumigated southern pine poles from EPRI project RP 1471-72, (2) study the soft-rot capabilities of predominant fungi, and (3) study interactions among microorganisms in relation to wood decay. Methods for identification followed standard techniques using morphological and physiological criteria. Soft-rot by microfungi alone and with bacteria was determined as weight loss and anatomical examination of wood blocks using light microscopy and limited electron microscopy. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was the predominant bacterium. Twenty-one species of microfungi were identified including four new species. A book entitled IDENTIFICATION MANUAL FOR FUNGI FROM UTILITY POLES IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES was published. An improved soft-rot test was devised. Fifty-one of 84 species (60%) of microfungi from poles tested were soft-rot positive; that is much greater than previously reported. Three types of anatomical damage of wood of pine or birch caused by soft-rot fungi were described. Interaction tests showed that, in some cases, there was a strong synergism between bacteria and fungi in causing weight loss, but results were inconsistent. Although soft rot is often most apparent under conditions of very high moisture, intermediate moisture levels appear to be optimal, as with basidiomycete decayers.

  7. Soft rot decay capabilities and interactions of fungi and bacteria from fumigated utility poles. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.J.K.; Worrall, J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The objectives were to (1) identify microfungi and bacterial associates isolated from fumigated southern pine poles from EPRI project RP 1471-72, (2) study the soft-rot capabilities of predominant fungi, and (3) study interactions among microorganisms in relation to wood decay. Methods for identification followed standard techniques using morphological and physiological criteria. Soft-rot by microfungi alone and with bacteria was determined as weight loss and anatomical examination of wood blocks using light microscopy and limited electron microscopy. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was the predominant bacterium. Twenty-one species of microfungi were identified including four new species. A book entitled IDENTIFICATION MANUAL FOR FUNGI FROM UTILITY POLES IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES was published. An improved soft-rot test was devised. Fifty-one of 84 species (60%) of microfungi from poles tested were soft-rot positive; that is much greater than previously reported. Three types of anatomical damage of wood of pine or birch caused by soft-rot fungi were described. Interaction tests showed that, in some cases, there was a strong synergism between bacteria and fungi in causing weight loss, but results were inconsistent. Although soft rot is often most apparent under conditions of very high moisture, intermediate moisture levels appear to be optimal, as with basidiomycete decayers.

  8. BP Oil Company`s approach to the analysis of process plant buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fryman, C.E. [BP Oil Co., Cleveland, OH (United States). HSE Dept.

    1996-11-01

    Explosions occurring in petroleum refineries and chemical plants have caused fatalities in occupied buildings. For the 5-year period from 1989 through 1994, there were four major incidents. All of these incidents caused multiple fatalities to people working in process buildings, and all of these incidents resulted in very large losses, exceeding $100 million dollars for most of the incidents. The OSHA Process Safety Management (PSM) regulation requires sites to address facility siting when conducting process hazards and analyses. This requirement applies to all occupied buildings in a facility, not just control rooms. OSHA has issued several citations for failure to comply with this PSM requirement, and some companies have disputed the validity of some of these citations. The US industry experienced some difficulties deciding on the proper methodology to use in meeting this regulatory requirement. To address these industry concerns, the American Petroleum Institute (API) and the Chemical Manufacturers Association (CMA) developed guidance that was published in June 1995, RP-752, Management of Hazards Associated with the Location of Process Plant Buildings.

  9. New guidelines should enhance coiled tubing well control security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sas-Jaworsky, A. II

    1997-12-01

    The use of coiled tubing (CT) technology in well servicing operations has expanded dramatically in recent years, becoming a staple of remedial and workover programs. The advantages of CT services are numerous and well defined. As a result, the capabilities of this continuous-length tube technology have been exploited in applications such as high-pressure CT (HPCT), pushing the performance envelope into critical operations. In recent years, the mechanical capability and limitations of CT equipment components have become further defined, enhancing the safe working conditions of the prescribed operations. However, safety in coiled tubing operations is not only the product of equipment design, but of proper planning and identification of potential hazards. The following article highlights safety guidelines related to CT well control stack components as published in API RP 5C7, Recommended Practice for Coiled Tubing Operations in Oil and Gas Well Services (Dec. 1, 1996). API standards are published to facilitate the broad availability of proven engineering and operating practices, and are not intended to obviate the need for applying sound engineering judgment regarding when and where these standards should be utilized. Therefore, these standards should be considered the minimum safety requirements for well service operations, both onshore and offshore. These recommended practice guidelines have been prepared to reflect use by both operators and contract personnel.

  10. Methods and systems for integrating fluid dispensing technology with stereolithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Medina, Francisco; Wicker, Ryan; Palmer, Jeremy A.; Davis, Don W.; Chavez, Bart D.; Gallegos, Phillip L.

    2010-02-09

    An integrated system and method of integrating fluid dispensing technologies (e.g., direct-write (DW)) with rapid prototyping (RP) technologies (e.g., stereolithography (SL)) without part registration comprising: an SL apparatus and a fluid dispensing apparatus further comprising a translation mechanism adapted to translate the fluid dispensing apparatus along the Z-, Y- and Z-axes. The fluid dispensing apparatus comprises: a pressurized fluid container; a valve mechanism adapted to control the flow of fluid from the pressurized fluid container; and a dispensing nozzle adapted to deposit the fluid in a desired location. To aid in calibration, the integrated system includes a laser sensor and a mechanical switch. The method further comprises building a second part layer on top of the fluid deposits and optionally accommodating multi-layered circuitry by incorporating a connector trace. Thus, the present invention is capable of efficiently building single and multi-material SL fabricated parts embedded with complex three-dimensional circuitry using DW.

  11. Native SrTiO3 (001) surface layer from resonant Ti L2,3 reflectance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valvidares, Manuel; Huijben, Mark; Yu, Pu; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Kortright, Jeffrey

    2010-11-03

    We quantitatively model resonant Ti L2,3 reflectivity Rs,p(q, hn) from several SrTiO3 (001) single crystals having different initial surface preparations and stored in ambient conditions before and between measurements. All samples exhibit unexpected 300 K Rs(hn) - Rp(hn) anisotropy corresponding to weak linear dichroism and tetragonal distortion of the TiO6 octahedra indicating a surface layer with properties different from cubic SrTiO3. Oscillations in Rs(q) confirm a ubiquitous surface layer 2-3 nm thick that evolves over a range of time scales. Resonant optical constant spectra derived from Rs,p(hn) assuming a uniform sample are refined using a single surface layer to fit measured Rs(q). Differences in surface layer and bulk optical properties indicate that the surface is significantly depleted in Sr and enriched in Ti and O. While consistent with the tendency of SrTiO3 surfaces toward non-stoichiometry, this layer does not conform simply to existing models for the near surface region and apparently forms via room temperature surface reactions with the ambient. This new quantitative spectral modeling approach is generally applicable and has potential to study near-surface properties of a variety of systems with unique chemical and electronic sensitivities.

  12. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Final report, volume II: Project performance and economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    This publication discusses the demonstration of the LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5 to 1. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North America (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Public Design Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics is to consolidate, for public use, the technical efficiency and economy of the LIFAC Process. The report has been prepared pursuant to the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-90PC90548 between LIFAC NA and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. TANK 18-F AND 19-F TANK FILL GROUT SCALE UP TEST SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2012-01-03

    High-level waste (HLW) tanks 18-F and 19-F have been isolated from FTF facilities. To complete operational closure the tanks will be filled with grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways to residual waste, (3) entombing waste removal equipment, (4) discouraging future intrusion, and (5) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to control speciation and solubility of select radionuclides. This report documents the results of a four cubic yard bulk fill scale up test on the grout formulation recommended for filling Tanks 18-F and 19-F. Details of the scale up test are provided in a Test Plan. The work was authorized under a Technical Task Request (TTR), HLE-TTR-2011-008, and was performed according to Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00587. The bulk fill scale up test described in this report was intended to demonstrate proportioning, mixing, and transportation, of material produced in a full scale ready mix concrete batch plant. In addition, the material produced for the scale up test was characterized with respect to fresh properties, thermal properties, and compressive strength as a function of curing time.

  14. Rapid prototyping: A paradigm shift in investment casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwood, C.L.; Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D.; Pardo, B.T.

    1996-09-01

    The quest for fabricating complex metal parts rapidly and with minimal cost has brought rapid prototyping (RP) processes to the forefront of the investment casting industry. Relatively recent advances in DTM Corporation`s selective laser sintering (SLS) and 3D Systems stereolithography (SL) processes have had a significant impact on the overall quality of patterns produced using these rapid prototyping processes. Sandia National Laboratories uses patterns generated from rapid prototyping processes to reduce the cycle time and cost of fabricating prototype and small lot production parts in support of a program called FASTCAST. The SLS process is used to fabricate patterns from materials such as investment casting wax, polycarbonate, and a new material called TrueForm PM{trademark}. With the timely introduction of each of these materials, the quality of patterns fabricated has improved. The development and implementation of SL QuickCast{trademark} software has enabled this process to produce highly accurate patterns for use in investment casting. This paper focuses on the successes with these new pattern materials and the infrastructure required to cast rapid prototyping patterns successfully. In addition, a brief overview of other applications of rapid prototyping at Sandia will be discussed.

  15. Evaluation of Automated Model Calibration Techniques for Residential Building Energy Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, J.; Polly, B.; Collis, J.

    2013-09-01

    This simulation study adapts and applies the general framework described in BESTEST-EX (Judkoff et al 2010) for self-testing residential building energy model calibration methods. BEopt/DOE-2.2 is used to evaluate four mathematical calibration methods in the context of monthly, daily, and hourly synthetic utility data for a 1960's-era existing home in a cooling-dominated climate. The home's model inputs are assigned probability distributions representing uncertainty ranges, random selections are made from the uncertainty ranges to define 'explicit' input values, and synthetic utility billing data are generated using the explicit input values. The four calibration methods evaluated in this study are: an ASHRAE 1051-RP-based approach (Reddy and Maor 2006), a simplified simulated annealing optimization approach, a regression metamodeling optimization approach, and a simple output ratio calibration approach. The calibration methods are evaluated for monthly, daily, and hourly cases; various retrofit measures are applied to the calibrated models and the methods are evaluated based on the accuracy of predicted savings, computational cost, repeatability, automation, and ease of implementation.

  16. The Use of a Beryllium Hopkinson Bar to Characterize In-Axis and Cross-Axis Accelerometer Response in Shock Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.

    1999-01-01

    The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments have been studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Laboratory. A beryllium Hopkinson bar capability with diameters of 0.75 in. and 2.0 in has been developed to extend our understanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer, in two mechanical configurations, in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. The in-axis performance of the piezoresistive accelerometer determined from measurements with a beryllium Hopkinson bar and a certified laser doppler vibrometer as the reference measurement is presented. The cross-axis performance of the accelerometer subjected to static compression on a beryllium cylinder, static strain on a steel beam, dynamic strain on a steel beam (ISA-RP 37.2, Paragraph 6.6), and compressive shocks in a split beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration is also presented. The performance of the accelerometer in a combined in-axis and cross-axis shock environment is shown for one configuration. Finally, a failure analysis conducted in cooperation with ENDEVCO gives a cause for the occasional unexplained failures that have occurred in some applications.

  17. Temperature- and frequency-dependent dielectric properties of organic–inorganic hybrid compound: (C{sub 6}H{sub 9}N{sub 2}){sub 2}(Hg{sub 0.75}Cd{sub 0.25})Cl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elwej, R. Hamdi, M.; Hannachi, N.; Hlel, F.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We have synthesized a new hybrid compound of composition (C6H9N2)2(Hg0.75Cd0.25)Cl4. • The Ac conductivity of the title material was studied as a function of frequency and temperature. • The dielectric data have been analyzed in modulus formalism using KWW. - Abstract: The bis-2-amino-4-picolinium tetrachloromercurate-cadmate compound (C{sub 6}H{sub 9}N{sub 2}){sub 2}(Hg{sub 0.75}Cd{sub 0.25})Cl{sub 4} was prepared by hydrothermal method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The electrical properties of the compound were studied using impedance spectroscopy in the frequency and temperature range of 200 Hz–5 MHz and 308–403 K, respectively. The equivalent circuit is modeled by a combination of a parallel Rp//CPE circuit to explain the impedance results. The dielectric data were analyzed using complex electrical modulus M* at various temperatures. The activation energy responsible for the relaxation calculated from the modulus spectra is found to be almost the same as the value obtained from the temperature variation of dc conductivity. The electrical modulus and its scaling behavior are also investigated.

  18. HVDC-AC system interaction from AC harmonics. Volume 1. Harmonic impedance calculations. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breuer, G D; Chow, J H; Lindh, C B; Miller, N W; Numrich, F H; Price, W W; Turner, A E; Whitney, R R

    1982-09-01

    Improved methods are needed to characterize ac system harmonic behavior for ac filter design for HVDC systems. The purpose of this General Electric Company RP1138 research is to evaluate the present filter design practice and to investigate methods for calculating system harmonic impedances. An overview of ac filter design for HVDC systems and a survey of literature related to filter design have been performed. Two methods for calculating system harmonic impedances have been investigated. In the measurement method, an instrumentation system for measuring system voltage and current has been assembled. Different schemes of using the measurements to calculate system harmonic impedances have been studied. In the analytical method, a procedure to include various operating conditions has been proposed. Computer programs for both methods have been prepared, and the results of the measurement and analytical methods analyzed. A conclusion of the project is that the measurement and analytical methods both provided reasonable results. There are correlations between the measured and analytical results for most harmonics, although there are discrepancies between the assumptions used in the two methods. A sensitivity approach has been proposed to further correlate the results. From the results of the analysis, it is recommended that both methods should be tested further. For the measurement method, more testing should be done to cover different system operating conditions. In the analytical method, more detailed models for representing system components should be studied. In addition, alternative statistical and sensitivity approaches should be attempted.

  19. Nuclear Data Sheets for A=31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ouellet, Christian; Singh, Balraj

    2013-02-15

    Nuclear spectroscopic information for the known nuclides of mass 31 (F, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, Ar) has been evaluated. A useful source of many of the Adopted Levels for {sup 31}P and {sup 31}S is presented in Endt's evaluations (1998En04,1990En08,1978En02,1973EnVA), however all the adopted properties of levels and gamma rays have been re-evaluated in this work. The data sets for reactions and decays, including all available gammaray data, are based mostly on the original literature. The 31Mg nuclide is a prime candidate for the study of island-of-inversion as its ground state and first excited state can only be explained by intruder orbitals in a deformed shell-model approach. {sup 31}S is of importance in astrophysics rp-process as a possible bottleneck nuclide. There are no data available for excited states in {sup 31}F, {sup 31}Ne and {sup 31}Ar. No gamma transitions are known in {sup 31}Cl. For {sup 31}Na, only one excited state is known. The radioactive decay characteristics of {sup 31}F and {sup 31}Ne isotopes have not yet been investigated. The {sup 31}S and {sup 31}Mg nuclei are currently being pursued intensively by various experimental groups, including recent work by Nuclear Astrophysics group at McMaster, the results of which will soon become available.

  20. Implementation of two-equation soot flamelet models for laminar diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbonell, D.; Oliva, A.; Perez-Segarra, C.D.

    2009-03-15

    The two-equation soot model proposed by Leung et al. [K.M. Leung, R.P. Lindstedt, W.P. Jones, Combust. Flame 87 (1991) 289-305] has been derived in the mixture fraction space. The model has been implemented using both Interactive and Non-Interactive flamelet strategies. An Extended Enthalpy Defect Flamelet Model (E-EDFM) which uses a flamelet library obtained neglecting the soot formation is proposed as a Non-Interactive method. The Lagrangian Flamelet Model (LFM) is used to represent the Interactive models. This model uses direct values of soot mass fraction from flamelet calculations. An Extended version (E-LFM) of this model is also suggested in which soot mass fraction reaction rates are used from flamelet calculations. Results presented in this work show that the E-EDFM predict acceptable results. However, it overpredicts the soot volume fraction due to the inability of this model to couple the soot and gas-phase mechanisms. It has been demonstrated that the LFM is not able to predict accurately the soot volume fraction. On the other hand, the extended version proposed here has been shown to be very accurate. The different flamelet mathematical formulations have been tested and compared using well verified reference calculations obtained solving the set of the Full Transport Equations (FTE) in the physical space. (author)

  1. Identification and quantification analysis of nonlinear dynamics properties of combustion instability in a diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Li-Ping Ding, Shun-Liang; Song, En-Zhe; Ma, Xiu-Zhen; Litak, Grzegorz

    2015-01-15

    The cycling combustion instabilities in a diesel engine have been analyzed based on chaos theory. The objective was to investigate the dynamical characteristics of combustion in diesel engine. In this study, experiments were performed under the entire operating range of a diesel engine (the engine speed was changed from 600 to 1400 rpm and the engine load rate was from 0% to 100%), and acquired real-time series of in-cylinder combustion pressure using a piezoelectric transducer installed on the cylinder head. Several methods were applied to identify and quantitatively analyze the combustion process complexity in the diesel engine including delay-coordinate embedding, recurrence plot (RP), Recurrence Quantification Analysis, correlation dimension (CD), and the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) estimation. The results show that the combustion process exhibits some determinism. If LLE is positive, then the combustion system has a fractal dimension and CD is no more than 1.6 and within the diesel engine operating range. We have concluded that the combustion system of diesel engine is a low-dimensional chaotic system and the maximum values of CD and LLE occur at the lowest engine speed and load. This means that combustion system is more complex and sensitive to initial conditions and that poor combustion quality leads to the decrease of fuel economy and the increase of exhaust emissions.

  2. MIC evaluation and testing for the Yucca Mountain repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, J.M.; Rivera, A.; Lain, T.; Jones, D.A.

    1997-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is engaged in a suitability study for a potential deep geological repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the containment and storage of high-level nuclear waste. There is growing awareness that biotic factors could affect the integrity of the repository directly through microbially induced corrosion (MIC) of waste package (WP) materials and other repository elements. A program to determine the degree that microorganisms, especially bacteria, influence the corrosion of waste package materials has therefore been undertaken. These studies include testing candidate waste package materials for their susceptibility to MIC, and also seek to determine rates of biocorrosion under varying environmental conditions, as well as predict rates of waste package corrosion over the long term. Previous characterization of bacterial isolates derived from YM geologic material showed that many possessed biochemical activities associated with MIC, 2. Various Yucca Mountain microbes demonstrated the abilities to oxidize iron, reduce sulfate to sulfide, produce acids, and generate exopolysaccharides (or `slime`). Table 1 summarizes previously characterized YM organisms and their associated relevant activities. A subset of the characterized YM bacteria were spread on WP alloy coupons in systems designed to collect polarization resistance (Rp) data for corrosion rate calculations, and to determine cathodic and anodic potentiodynamic polarization to assess corrosion mechanisms. Coupons inoculated with bacteria were compared to those that remained sterile, to determine the bacterial contribution to overall corrosion rates.

  3. Exposure to As, Cd and Pb-mixture impairs myelin and axon development in rat brain, optic nerve and retina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rai, Nagendra Kumar; Ashok, Anushruti; Rai, Asit; Tripathi, Sachin; Nagar, Geet Kumar; Mitra, Kalyan; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic (As), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are the major metal contaminants of ground water in India. We have reported the toxic effect of their mixture (metal mixture, MM), at human relevant doses, on developing rat astrocytes. Astrocyte damage has been shown to be associated with myelin disintegration in CNS. We, therefore, hypothesized that the MM would perturb myelinating white matter in cerebral cortex, optic nerve (O.N.) and retina. We observed modulation in the levels of myelin and axon proteins, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein, 2?-, 3?-cyclic-nucleotide-3?-phosphodiesterase, myelin-associated glycoprotein and neurofilament (NF) in the brain of developing rats. Dose and time-dependent synergistic toxic effect was noted. The MBP- and NF-immunolabeling, as well as luxol-fast blue (LFB) staining demonstrated a reduction in the area of intact myelin-fiber, and an increase in vacuolated axons, especially in the corpus-callosum. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of O.N. revealed a reduction in myelin thickness and axon-density. The immunolabeling with MBP, NF, and LFB staining in O.N. supported the TEM data. The hematoxylin and eosin staining of retina displayed a decrease in the thickness of nerve-fiber, plexiform-layer, and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) count. Investigating the mechanism revealed a loss in glutamine synthetase activity in the cerebral cortex and O.N., and a fall in the brain derived neurotrophic factor in retina. An enhanced apoptosis in MBP, NF and Brn3b-containing cells justified the diminution in myelinating axons in CNS. Our findings for the first time indicate white matter damage by MM, which may have significance in neurodevelopmental-pediatrics, neurotoxicology and retinal-cell biology. - Highlights: As, Cd and Pb-mixture, at human relevant dose, demyelinate developing rat CNS. The attenuation in myelin and axon is synergistic. The optic nerve and brain demonstrate reduced glutamine synthetase. The retina exhibits diminished neurotrophin levels and cellular differentiation. The toxic effect is apoptotic.

  4. Mechanical and photo-fragmentation processes for nanonization of melanin to improve its efficacy in protecting cells from reactive oxygen species stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Sih-Min; Liu, Jhong-Han; Hsu, Hsiang-Wei; Lin, Hoang-Yan; Chen, Szu-yuan

    2015-02-14

    It has been well established ex vivo that melanin has the ability of scavenging free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), besides other functions. Therefore, we propose to utilize nanonized melanin as medication against acute oxidative stress. For this purpose, we developed and characterized two techniques based on mechanical stir and photo-fragmentation using femtosecond laser pulses, respectively, for disintegration of suspended melanin powder to produce nanometer-sized and water-dispersible melanin. This resolves a major obstacle in the medical and industrial applications of melanin. The viabilities of cultured retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells exposed to exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress and treated with various conditions of melanin and irradiation were compared. It was found that melanin could be nanonized very effectively with the techniques, and nanonized melanin exhibited a much stronger effect than unprocessed melanin on raising the viability of cultured RPE cells under acute ROS stress. The effect was even more prominent without simultaneous light irradiation, promising for effective in vivo application to the whole body.

  5. Evaluation of glare at the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, C. K.; Sims, C. A.; Christian, J. M.

    2015-06-05

    The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (ISEGS), located on I-15 about 40 miles (60 km) south of Las Vegas, NV, consists of three power towers 459 ft (140 m) tall and over 170,000 reflective heliostats with a rated capacity of 390 MW. In addition, reports of glare from the plant have been submitted by pilots and air traffic controllers and recorded by the Aviation Safety Reporting System and the California Energy Commission since 2013. Aerial and ground-based surveys of the glare were conducted in April, 2014, to identify the cause and to quantify the irradiance and potential ocular impacts of the glare. Results showed that the intense glare viewed from the airspace above ISEGS was caused by heliostats in standby mode that were aimed to the side of the receiver. Evaluation of the glare showed that the retinal irradiance and subtended source angle of the glare from the heliostats in standby were sufficient to cause significant ocular impact (potential for after-image) up to a distance of ~6 miles (10 km), but the values were below the threshold for permanent eye damage. Glare from the receivers had a low potential for after-image at all ground-based monitoring locations outside of the site boundaries. A Letter to Airmen has been issued by the Federal Aviation Administration to notify pilots of the potential glare hazards. Additional measures to mitigate the potential impacts of glare from ISGES are also presented and discussed.

  6. Identification and characterization of proliferative retinopathy-related long noncoding RNAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Rong-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Qun; Yao, Jin; Shen, Yi; Chen, Sai-Nan; Yang, Hong; Jiang, Qin; Yan, Biao

    2015-09-25

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is a serious complication of retinal detachment and vitreoretinal surgery, which can lead to severe vision reduction. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play critical roles in many biological processes and disease development. We attempted to determine the role of lncRNAs in the setting of PVR. Microarray analysis revealed that 78 lncRNAs were abnormally expressed in the epiretinal membranes (ERMs) of PVR patients, including 48 up-regulated and 30 down-regulated lncRNA transcripts. We subsequently focus on one lncRNA, MALAT1, and investigated its expression pattern in the biofluid of PVR patients. MALAT1 was significantly up-regulated in the cellular and plasma fraction of peripheral blood in PVR patients. MALAT1 expression was obviously reduced after PVR operation. In vitro experiments revealed the role of MALAT1 in regulating RPE proliferation and migration, which is critical for ERMs formation. This study suggests that lncRNAs are the potential regulators of PVR pathology. MALAT1 is a potential prognostic indicator and a target for the diagnosis and gene therapy for PVR diseases. - Highlights: • 78 lncRNAs are differentially expressed between PVR-ERMs and secondary ERMs. • MALAT1 level is elevated in the ERMs of PVR patients. • Circulating MALAT1 level is up-regulated in PVR patients. • MALAT1 knockdown regulates RPE proliferation and migration.

  7. Evaluation of glare at the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ho, C. K.; Sims, C. A.; Christian, J. M.

    2015-06-05

    The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (ISEGS), located on I-15 about 40 miles (60 km) south of Las Vegas, NV, consists of three power towers 459 ft (140 m) tall and over 170,000 reflective heliostats with a rated capacity of 390 MW. In addition, reports of glare from the plant have been submitted by pilots and air traffic controllers and recorded by the Aviation Safety Reporting System and the California Energy Commission since 2013. Aerial and ground-based surveys of the glare were conducted in April, 2014, to identify the cause and to quantify the irradiance and potential ocular impacts ofmore » the glare. Results showed that the intense glare viewed from the airspace above ISEGS was caused by heliostats in standby mode that were aimed to the side of the receiver. Evaluation of the glare showed that the retinal irradiance and subtended source angle of the glare from the heliostats in standby were sufficient to cause significant ocular impact (potential for after-image) up to a distance of ~6 miles (10 km), but the values were below the threshold for permanent eye damage. Glare from the receivers had a low potential for after-image at all ground-based monitoring locations outside of the site boundaries. A Letter to Airmen has been issued by the Federal Aviation Administration to notify pilots of the potential glare hazards. Additional measures to mitigate the potential impacts of glare from ISGES are also presented and discussed.« less

  8. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M.; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jrg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valrie

    2015-06-27

    A new batch preparation method is presented for high-density micrometre-sized crystals of the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin for use in time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free-electron laser using a liquid jet. Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.

  9. Science and Technology Review October/November 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-08-21

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Award-Winning Collaborations Provide Solutions--Commentary by Steven D. Liedle; (2) Light-Speed Spectral Analysis of a Laser Pulse--An optical device inspects and stops potentially damaging laser pulses; (3) Capturing Waveforms in a Quadrillionth of a Second--The femtoscope, a time microscope, improves the temporal resolution and dynamic range of conventional recording instruments; (4) Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy in the Palm of Your Hand--A miniature gamma-ray spectrometer provides increased resolution at a reduced cost; (5) Building Fusion Targets with Precision Robotics--A robotic system assembles tiny fusion targets with nanometer precision; (6) ROSE: Making Compiler Technology More Accessible--An open-source software infrastructure makes powerful compiler techniques available to all programmers; (7) Restoring Sight to the Blind with an Artificial Retina--A retinal prosthesis could restore vision to people suffering from eye diseases; (8) Eradicating the Aftermath of War--A remotely operated system precisely locates buried land mines; (9) Compact Alignment for Diagnostic Laser Beams--A smaller, less expensive device aligns diagnostic laser beams onto targets; and (10) Securing Radiological Sources in Africa--Livermore and other national laboratories are helping African countries secure their nuclear materials.

  10. Conformational Changes in Guanylate Cyclase-Activating Protein 1 Induced by Ca2+ and N-Terminal Fatty Acid Acylation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orban, T.; Bereta, G; Miyagi, M; Wang, B; Chance, M; Sousa, M; Palczewski, K

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal Ca{sup 2+} sensors (NCS) are high-affinity Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins critical for regulating a vast range of physiological processes. Guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) are members of the NCS family responsible for activating retinal guanylate cyclases (GCs) at low Ca{sup 2+} concentrations, triggering synthesis of cGMP and recovery of photoreceptor cells to the dark-adapted state. Here we use amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange and radiolytic labeling, and molecular dynamics simulations to study conformational changes induced by Ca{sup 2+} and modulated by the N-terminal myristoyl group. Our data on the conformational dynamics of GCAP1 in solution suggest that Ca{sup 2+} stabilizes the protein but induces relatively small changes in the domain structure; however, loss of Ca{sup 2+} mediates a significant global relaxation and movement of N- and C-terminal domains. This model and the previously described calcium-myristoyl switch proposed for recoverin indicate significant diversity in conformational changes among these highly homologous NCS proteins with distinct functions.

  11. Determination of Reportable Radionuclides for DWPF Sludge Batch 3 (Macrobatch 4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C

    2005-05-01

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that ''The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115''. As part of the strategy to meet WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, IAEA Safeguards Reporting for HLW, requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from High Level Waste Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the previous contents of Tank 40 (Sludge Batch 2) and the sludge that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge from Tank 51 and Tank 40 defines Macrobatch 4 (also referred to as Sludge Batch 3). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities and determines the radionuclide activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Task Technical Request HLW/DWPF/TTR-03-0005, Revision 1 entitled Sludge Batch 3 SRTC Shielded Cells Testing. Specifically, this report details results from performing, in part, Subtask 3 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 6 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Technical Task and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), WSRC-RP-2003-00249, Rev. 1 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), WSRC-RP-2004-00262. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for Sludge Batch 3 (Macro Batch 4), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy's (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes excluded from the projection calculations.

  12. Stability of CIGS Solar Cells and Component Materials Evaluated by a Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Test Method: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pern, F. J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    A step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) method was employed for the first time to evaluate the stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells and device component materials in four Al-framed test structures encapsulated with an edge sealant and three kinds of backsheet or moisture barrier film for moisture ingress control. The SSADT exposure used a 15oC and then a 15% relative humidity (RH) increment step, beginning from 40oC/40%RH (T/RH = 40/40) to 85oC/70%RH (85/70) as of the moment. The voluminous data acquired and processed as of total DH = 3956 h with 85/70 = 704 h produced the following results. The best CIGS solar cells in sample Set-1 with a moisture-permeable TPT backsheet showed essentially identical I-V degradation trend regardless of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer thickness ranging from standard 0.12 ?m to 0.50 ?m on the cells. No clear 'stepwise' feature in the I-V parameter degradation curves corresponding to the SSADT T/RH/time profile was observed. Irregularity in I-V performance degradation pattern was observed with some cells showing early degradation at low T/RH < 55/55 and some showing large Voc, FF, and efficiency degradation due to increased series Rs (ohm-cm2) at T/RH ? 70/70. Results of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS) analysis indicate degradation of the CIGS solar cells corresponded to increased series resistance Rs (ohm) and degraded parallel (minority carrier diffusion/recombination) resistance Rp, capacitance C, overall time constant Rp*C, and 'capacitor quality' factor (CPE-P), which were related to the cells? p-n junction properties. Heating at 85/70 appeared to benefit the CIGS solar cells as indicated by the largely recovered CPE-P factor. Device component materials, Mo on soda lime glass (Mo/SLG), bilayer ZnO (BZO), AlNi grid contact, and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG in test structures with TPT showed notable to significant degradation at T/RH ? 70/70. At T/RH = 85/70, substantial blistering of BZO layers on CIGS cell pieces was observed that was not seen on BZO/glass, and a CdS/CIGS sample displayed a small darkening and then flaking feature. Additionally, standard AlNi grid contact was less stable than thin Ni grid contact at T/RH ? 70/70. The edge sealant and moisture-blocking films were effective to block moisture ingress, as evidenced by the good stability of most CIGS solar cells and device components at T/RH = 85/70 for 704 h, and by preservation of the initial blue color on the RH indicator strips. The SSADT experiment is ongoing to be completed at T/RH = 85/85.

  13. REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES IN DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.; Bannochie, C.

    2011-12-20

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that the waste producer 'shall report the curie inventory of radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115.' As part of the strategy to meet WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type all radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and contribute greater than 0.01 percent of the total curie inventory from the time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial list of radionuclides to be reported is based on the design-basis glass identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report. However, it is required that the list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that meet the 'greater than 0.01% of the curie inventory' criterion. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, and U-238; and Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete list of reportable radionuclides must also include these sets of U and Pu isotopes - and the U and Pu isotopic mass distributions must be identified. The DWPF receives HLW sludge slurry from Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 40. For Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), the waste in Tank 40 contained a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) material transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. This sludge blend is also referred to as Macrobatch 8. Laboratory analyses of a Tank 40 sludge sample were performed to quantify the concentrations of pertinent radionuclides in the SB7a waste. Subsequently, radiological decay and in-growth were calculated over the time period from 2015 to 3115. This provided a basis for characterizing the radionuclide content of SB7a over time and for identifying the 'reportable radionuclides.' Details of the characterization methodology and the analytical results are the focus of this report. This work was performed at the request of the Waste Solidification Engineering Department of Savannah River Remediation, initiated via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0031. A minor revision in the reporting requirements was requested via a subsequent email communication. The work was conducted in accordance with the protocols identified in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan SRNL-RP-2010-01218 and Analytical Study Plan SRNL-RP-2010-01219. All of the raw data related to this scope have been recorded in laboratory notebook SRNL-NB-2011-00061. The overall goal of this task was to characterize the radionuclide content of the SB7a waste sufficiently to meet the WAPS and DWPF reporting requirements. The specific objectives were: (1) Quantify the current concentrations of all radionuclides impacting (or potentially-impacting) the total curie content between calendar years 2011 and 3115. Also quantify the current concentrations of other radionuclides specifically requested in the TTR or required by the WAPS. (2) Calculate future concentrations of decayed and in-grown radionuclides impacting the total curie content between calendar years 2015 and 3115; (3) Identify as 'reportable' all radionuclides contributing {ge} 0.01% of the total curie content from 2015 to 3115 and having half-lives {ge} 10 years.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Fuel-Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion Mode in a Multi-Cylinder, Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Kukwon; Curran, Scott; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Sluder, Scott; Parks, II, James E; Wagner, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to provide the combustion and emission characteristics resulting from fuel-reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) combustion mode utilizing dual-fuel approach in a light-duty, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In-cylinder fuel blending using port fuel injection of gasoline before intake valve opening (IVO) and early-cycle, direct injection of diesel fuel was used as the charge preparation and fuel blending strategy. In order to achieve the desired auto-ignition quality through the stratification of the fuel-air equivalence ratio ( ), blends of commercially available gasoline and diesel fuel were used. Engine experiments were performed at an engine speed of 2300rpm and an engine load of 4.3bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). It was found that significant reduction in both nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was realized successfully through the RCCI combustion mode even without applying exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). However, high carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions were observed. The low combustion gas temperature during the expansion and exhaust processes seemed to be the dominant source of high CO emissions in the RCCI combustion mode. The high HC emissions during the RCCI combustion mode could be due to the increased combustion quenching layer thickness as well as the -stratification at the periphery of the combustion chamber. The slightly higher brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of the RCCI combustion mode was observed than the other combustion modes, such as the conventional diesel combustion (CDC) mode, and single-fuel, premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion mode. The parametric study of the RCCI combustion mode revealed that the combustion phasing and/or the peak cylinder pressure rise rate of the RCCI combustion mode could be controlled by several physical parameters premixed ratio (rp), intake swirl intensity, and start of injection (SOI) timing of directly injected fuel unlike other low temperature combustion (LTC) strategies.

  15. Guidelines for control and prevention of fly ash erosion in fossil fired power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drennen, J.F.; Kratina, P.

    1994-02-01

    Boiler tube failures (BTF`s) due to fly ash erosion are one of the leading single causes of availability loss in fossil boilers. The damage, which can be very localized, has led to expensive and lengthy forced outages. As part of an overall BTF reduction program, EPRI has documented the available solutions being applied for fly ash erosion. Unfortunately, most of these are regarded as temporary fixes that do not provide long term solutions. A technique applied in Canadian and Australian utilities has provided long term solutions on the order of ten years. This technique has been demonstrated now at two US utilities under an EPRI sponsored project, (RP2711-2). The result of the project is a guideline that outlines, step-by-step, activities for stepping up and running an erosion control program at a utility boiler. The heart of the program is the cold air velocity test (CAVT), done in the convective pass at ambient conditions. With the fans running, one or more two-man teams measure gas flows entering and/or leaving pendants and banks. These data and a boiler assessment are used to identify operating conditions conducive to fly ash erosion. Flow control screens are then selected and installed to redistribute fly ash, reduce gas velocities and produce acceptable erosion rates. The result should be long term relief from boiler tube failures caused by fly ash erosion. The program cost is estimated to be $300--$400/MW depending on unit design, operating characteristics and extent of fly ash erosion.

  16. RSP Tooling Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-11-20

    RSP Tooling{trademark} is a spray forming technology tailored for producing molds and dies. The approach combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing in a single step. The general concept involves converting a mold design described by a CAD file to a tooling master using a suitable rapid prototyping (RP) technology such as stereolithography. A pattern transfer is made to a castable ceramic, typically alumina or fused silica (Figure 1). This is followed by spray forming a thick deposit of a tooling alloy on the pattern to capture the desired shape, surface texture, and detail. The resultant metal block is cooled to room temperature and separated from the pattern. The deposit's exterior walls are machined square, allowing it to be used as an insert in a standard mold base. The overall turnaround time for tooling is about 3 to 5 days, starting with a master. Molds and dies produced in this way have been used in high volume production runs in plastic injection molding and die casting. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Grupo Vitro has been established to evaluate the feasibility of using RSP Tooling technology for producing molds and dies of interest to Vitro. This report summarizes results from Phase I of this agreement, and describes work scope and budget for Phase I1 activities. The main objective in Phase I was to demonstrate the feasibility of applying the Rapid Solidification Process (RSP) Tooling method to produce molds for the manufacture of glass and other components of interest to Vitro. This objective was successfully achieved.

  17. Pipeline in-service relocation engineering manual. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    When pipeline relocation is necessary, it is a common practice for pipeline operators to move the line while it contains gas or liquid product under pressure in order to avoid taking the line out of service. Reasons for this practice include lowering to accommodate a new crossing, raising for repair or recoating, or moving to avoid encroachment. Such operations increase the longitudinal stresses in the relocated section of pipeline. Usually, this has not caused significant problems. However, at least four pipeline failures have been associated with the movement of pipelines over the years. On October 22, 1991, the DOT Office of Pipeline Safety issued an `Alert Notice` to US pipeline operators urging them to conduct analyses prior to moving a pipeline, regardless of whether the line is in service during the operation or not; to determine the extent to which a pipeline may be safely moved, considering the material toughness as a factor; and specific procedures for the operation. The notice resulted from recommendations by the National Transportation Safety Board following their investigation of the North Blenheim failure. This document in intended to be a reasonably comprehensive manual for engineering a safe relocation of an operating pipeline in service. The major elements of the desired guidelines were perceived to already exist in various industry guidelines, standards, proceedings, and research reports. Those sources were compiled, compared and distilled into recommendations for designing a safe line relocation. This manual supplements existing guidelines such as API RP-1117 rather than superseding them; indeed, the user of this document would benefit by referring to them as well. Observance of recommendations made herein should satisfy the nominal requirements and concerns of regulators. However, this document could not possibly address every conceivable situation which might arise in line relocation, nor is it a substitute for independent engineering judgement.

  18. A 1.9 Crystal Structure of the HDV Ribozyme Precleavage Suggests both Lewis Acid and General Acid Mechanisms Contribute to Phosphodiester Cleavage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jui-Hui; Yajima, Rieko; Chadalavada, Durga M.; Chase, Elaine; Bevilacqua, Philip C.; Golden, Barbara L.

    2010-11-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and HDV-like ribozymes are self-cleaving RNAs found throughout all kingdoms of life. These RNAs fold into a double-nested pseudoknot structure and cleave RNA, yielding 2{prime},3{prime}-cyclic phosphate and 5{prime}-hydroxyl termini. The active site nucleotide C75 has a pK{sub a} shifted >2 pH units toward neutrality and has been implicated as a general acid/base in the cleavage reaction. An active site Mg{sup 2+} ion that helps activate the 2{prime}-hydroxyl for nucleophilic attack has been characterized biochemically; however, this ion has not been visualized in any previous structures. To create a snapshot of the ribozyme in a state poised for catalysis, we have crystallized and determined the structure of the HDV ribozyme bound to an inhibitor RNA containing a deoxynucleotide at the cleavage site. This structure includes the wild-type C75 nucleotide and Mg{sup 2+} ions, both of which are required for maximal ribozyme activity. This structure suggests that the position of C75 does not change during the cleavage reaction. A partially hydrated Mg{sup 2+} ion is also found within the active site where it interacts with a newly resolved G {center_dot} U reverse wobble. Although the inhibitor exhibits crystallographic disorder, we modeled the ribozyme-substrate complex using the conformation of the inhibitor strand observed in the hammerhead ribozyme. This model suggests that the pro-RP oxygen of the scissile phosphate and the 2{prime}-hydroxyl nucleophile are inner-sphere ligands to the active site Mg{sup 2+} ion. Thus, the HDV ribozyme may use a combination of metal ion Lewis acid and nucleobase general acid strategies to effect RNA cleavage.

  19. Genetic and Pharmacological Inhibition of PDK1 in Cancer Cells: Characterization of a Selective Allosteric Kinase Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagashima, Kumiko; Shumway, Stuart D.; Sathyanarayanan, Sriram; Chen, Albert H.; Dolinski, Brian; Xu, Youyuan; Keilhack, Heike; Nguyen, Thi; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Li, Lixia; Lutterbach, Bart A.; Chi, An; Paweletz, Cloud; Allison, Timothy; Yan, Youwei; Munshi, Sanjeev K.; Klippel, Anke; Kraus, Manfred; Bobkova, Ekaterina V.; Deshmukh, Sujal; Xu, Zangwei; Mueller, Uwe; Szewczak, Alexander A.; Pan, Bo-Sheng; Richon, Victoria; Pollock, Roy; Blume-Jensen, Peter; Northrup, Alan; Andersen, Jannik N.

    2013-11-20

    Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) is a critical activator of multiple prosurvival and oncogenic protein kinases and has garnered considerable interest as an oncology drug target. Despite progress characterizing PDK1 as a therapeutic target, pharmacological support is lacking due to the prevalence of nonspecific inhibitors. Here, we benchmark literature and newly developed inhibitors and conduct parallel genetic and pharmacological queries into PDK1 function in cancer cells. Through kinase selectivity profiling and x-ray crystallographic studies, we identify an exquisitely selective PDK1 inhibitor (compound 7) that uniquely binds to the inactive kinase conformation (DFG-out). In contrast to compounds 1-5, which are classical ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors (DFG-in), compound 7 specifically inhibits cellular PDK1 T-loop phosphorylation (Ser-241), supporting its unique binding mode. Interfering with PDK1 activity has minimal antiproliferative effect on cells growing as plastic-attached monolayer cultures (i.e. standard tissue culture conditions) despite reduced phosphorylation of AKT, RSK, and S6RP. However, selective PDK1 inhibition impairs anchorage-independent growth, invasion, and cancer cell migration. Compound 7 inhibits colony formation in a subset of cancer cell lines (four of 10) and primary xenograft tumor lines (nine of 57). RNAi-mediated knockdown corroborates the PDK1 dependence in cell lines and identifies candidate biomarkers of drug response. In summary, our profiling studies define a uniquely selective and cell-potent PDK1 inhibitor, and the convergence of genetic and pharmacological phenotypes supports a role of PDK1 in tumorigenesis in the context of three-dimensional in vitro culture systems.

  20. SU-E-T-570: Management of Radiation Oncology Patients with Cochlear Implant and Other Bionic Devices in the Brain and Head and Neck Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, F.Q; Chen, Z; Nath, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the current status of clinical usage of cochlear implant (CI) and other bionic devices (BD) in the brain and head and neck regions (BH and N) and their management in patients during radiotherapy to ensure patient health and safety as well as optimum radiation delivery. Methods: Literature review was performed with both CIs and radiotherapy and their variants as keywords in PubMed, INSPEC and other sources. The focus was on CIs during radiotherapy, but it also included other BDs in BHȦN, such as auditory brainstem implant, bionic retinal implant, and hearing aids, among others. Results: Interactions between CIs and radiation may cause CIs malfunction. The presence of CIs may also cause suboptimum dose distribution if a treatment plan was not well designed. A few studies were performed for the hearing functions of CIs under irradiations of 4 MV and 6 MV x-rays. However, x-rays with higher energies (10 to 18 MV) broadly used in radiotherapy have not been explored. These higher energetic beams are more damaging to electronics due to strong penetrating power and also due to neutrons generated in the treatment process. Modern CIs are designed with more and more complicated integrated circuits, which may be more susceptible to radiation damage and malfunction. Therefore, careful management is important for safety and treatment outcomes. Conclusion: Although AAPM TG-34, TG-63, and TG-203 (update of TG-34, not published yet) reports may be referenced for management of CIs and other BDs in the brain and H and N regions, a site- and device-specified guideline should be developed for CIs and other BDs. Additional evaluation of CI functions under clinically relevant set-ups should also be performed to provide clinicians with better knowledge in clinical decision making.

  1. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnhoorn, Sander [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Uittenboogaard, Lieneke M. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Jaarsma, Dick [Erasmus Univ. Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Neuroscience.; Vermeij, Wilbert P. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Tresini, Maria [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Weymaere, Michael [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Menoni, Herv [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Brandt, Renata M. C. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; de Waard, Monique C. [VU Univ. Medical Center, Amsterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Intensive Care.; Botter, Sander M. [Uniklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Sarker, Altaf H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Division.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; Cooper, Priscilla K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Division.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics.; van der Pluijm, Ingrid [Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (The Netherlands). Dept. of Genetics and Dept. of Vascular Surgery.; Niedernhofer, Laura J. [The Scripps Research Institute, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-10-09

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg-/- mouse model whichin a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic backgrounddisplays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 45 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.

  2. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barnhoorn, Sander; Uittenboogaard, Lieneke M.; Jaarsma, Dick; Vermeij, Wilbert P.; Tresini, Maria; Weymaere, Michael; Menoni, Hervé; Brandt, Renata M. C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Botter, Sander M.; et al

    2014-10-09

    As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS), or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional) Xpg-/- mouse model which—in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background—displays manymore » progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4–5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities) and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.« less

  3. Using Clinical Data, Hypothesis Generation Tools and PubMed Trends to Discover the Association between Diabetic Retinopathy and Antihypertensive Drugs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senter, Katherine G; Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Patton, Robert M; Chaum, Ed

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of blindness and common complication of diabetes. Many diabetic patients take antihypertensive drugs to prevent cardiovascular problems, but these drugs may have unintended consequences on eyesight. Six common classes of antihypertensive drug are angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, alpha blockers, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), -blockers, calcium channel blockers, and diuretics. Analysis of medical history data might indicate which of these drugs provide safe blood pressure control, and a literature review is often used to guide such analyses. Beyond manual reading of relevant publications, we sought to identify quantitative trends in literature from the biomedical database PubMed to compare with quantitative trends in the clinical data. By recording and analyzing PubMed search results, we found wide variation in the prevalence of each antihypertensive drug in DR literature. Drug classes developed more recently such as ACE inhibitors and ARBs were most prevalent. We also identified instances of change-over-time in publication patterns. We then compared these literature trends to a dataset of 500 diabetic patients from the UT Hamilton Eye Institute. Data for each patient included class of antihypertensive drug, presence and severity of DR. Graphical comparison revealed that older drug classes such as diuretics, calcium channel blockers, and -blockers were much more prevalent in the clinical data than in the DR and antihypertensive literature. Finally, quantitative analysis of the dataset revealed that patients taking -blockers were statistically more likely to have DR than patients taking other medications, controlling for presence of hypertension and year of diabetes onset. This finding was concerning given the prevalence of -blockers in the clinical data. We determined that clinical use of -blockers should be minimized in diabetic patients to prevent retinal damage.

  4. SU-D-18A-04: Quantifying the Ability of Tumor Tracking to Spare Normal Tissue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, A; Buzurovic, I; Hurwitz, M; Williams, C; Lewis, J; Mishra, P; Seco, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumor tracking allows for smaller tissue volumes to be treated, potentially reducing normal tissue damage. However, tumor tracking is a more complex treatment and has little benefit in some scenarios. Here we quantify the benefit of tumor tracking for a range of patients by estimating the dose of radiation to organs at risk and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for both standard and tracking treatment plans. This comparison is performed using both patient 4DCT data and extended Cardiac-Torso (XCAT) digital phantoms. Methods: We use 4DCT data for 10 patients. Additionally, we generate digital phantoms with motion derived from measured patient long tumor trajectories to compare standard and tracking treatment plans. The standard treatment is based on the average intensity projection (AIP) of 4DCT images taken over a breath cycle. The tracking treatment is based on doses calculated on images representing the anatomy at each time point. It is assumed that there are no errors in tracking the target. The NTCP values are calculated based on RTOG guidelines. Results: The mean reduction in the mean dose delivered was 5.5% to the lungs (from 7.3 Gy to 6.9 Gy) and 4.0% to the heart (from 12.5 Gy to 12.0 Gy). The mean reduction in the max dose delivered was 13% to the spinal cord (from 27.6 Gy to 24.0 Gy), 2.5% to the carina (from 31.7 Gy to 30.9 Gy), and 15% to the esophagus (from 69.6 Gy to 58.9 Gy). The mean reduction in the probability of 2nd degree radiation pneumonitis (RP) was 8.7% (3.1% to 2.8%) and the mean reduction in the effective volume was 6.8% (10.8% to 10.2%). Conclusions: Tumor tracking has the potential to reduce irradiation of organs at risk, and consequentially reduce the normal tissue complication probability. The benefits vary based on the clinical scenario. This study is supported by Varian Medical Systems, Inc.

  5. Technical Review Report for the Model 9977 Safety Analysis Report for Packaging Addendum 1 Justification for DNDO Contents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, M H

    2008-12-17

    The Model 9977 Package is currently certified for Content Envelope C.1, {sup 238}Pu Heat Sources, either in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG), or in Food-Pack Can configurations, under Certificate of Compliance (CoC) Certificate Number 9977 and Package Identification Number USA/9977/B(M)F-96 (DOE). Addendum 1, Justification for DNDO Contents,--the Submittal--supplements Revision 2 of the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging for the Model 9977 Package. The Submittal adds five new contents to the Model 9977 Package, Content Envelopes, AC.1 through AC.5. The Content Envelopes are neptunium metal, the beryllium-reflected plutonium ball (BeRP Ball), plutonium/uranium metal, plutonium/uranium metal with enhanced wt% {sup 240}Pu (to 50 wt%), and uranium metal. The last three Content Envelopes are stabilized to DOE-STD-3013. These Content Envelopes will be shipped to the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), where they will reside, and, hence, to off-site locations in support of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). The new certificate will apply to a limited number of Model 9977 Packages. At the same time, the Submittal requests an extension of the periodic maintenance requirements from one (1) year to up to five (5) years using Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) temperature-monitoring systems to measure the ambient storage temperature in order to ensure that the temperature of the Viton{reg_sign} O-rings for the 6-inch Containment Vessel (6CV) remain less than 200 F. The RFIDs have been developed by Argonne National Laboratory. An on-going surveillance program at the K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS) facility at the Savannah River Site, and an on-going examination of Viton{reg_sign} O-rings from mock Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide the technical justification for the extension of the periodic maintenance interval. Where extended periodic maintenance is desired, the decay heat rate for the Model 9977 Package is limited to 15 watts.

  6. Method of orbit sums in the theory of modular vector invariants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepanov, S A

    2006-12-31

    Let F be a field, V a finite-dimensional F-vector space, G{<=}GL{sub F}(V) a finite group, and V{sup m}=V+...+V the m-fold direct sum with the diagonal action of G. The group G acts naturally on the symmetric graded algebra A{sub m}=F[V{sup m}] as a group of non-degenerate linear transformations of the variables. Let A{sub m}{sup G} be the subalgebra of invariants of the polynomial algebra A{sub m} with respect to G. A classical result of Noether [1] says that if charF=0, then A{sub m}{sup G} is generated as an F-algebra by homogeneous polynomials of degree at most |G|, no matter how large m can be. On the other hand, it was proved by Richman [2], [3] that this result does not hold when the characteristic of F is positive and divides the order |G| of G. Let p, p>2, be a prime number, F=F{sub p} a finite field of p elements, V a linear F{sub p}-vector space of dimension n, and H{<=}GL{sub F{sub p}}(V) a cyclic group of order p generated by a matrix {gamma} of a certain special form. In this paper we describe explicitly (Theorem 1) one complete set of generators of A{sub m}{sup H}. After that, for an arbitrary complete set of generators of this algebra we find a lower bound for the highest degree of the generating elements of this algebra. This is a significant extension of the corresponding result of Campbell and Hughes [4] for the particular case of n=2. As a consequence we show (Theorem 3) that if m>n and G{>=}H is an arbitrary finite group, then each complete set of generators of A{sub m}{sup G} contains an element of degree at least 2(m-n+2r)(p-1)/r, where r=r(H) is a positive integer dependent on the structure of the generating matrix {gamma} of the group H. This result refines considerably the earlier lower bound obtained by Richman [3].

  7. Define and Quantify the Physics of Air Flow, Pressure Drop and Aerosol Collection in Nuclear Grade HEPA Filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Murray E.

    2015-02-23

    Objective: Develop a set of peer-review and verified analytical methods to adjust HEPA filter performance to different flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. Experimental testing will measure HEPA filter flow rate, pressure drop and efficiency to verify the analytical approach. Nuclear facilities utilize HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters to purify air flow for workspace ventilation. However, the ASME AG-1 technical standard (Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment) does not adequately describe air flow measurement units for HEPA filter systems. Specifically, the AG-1 standard does not differentiate between volumetric air flow in ACFM (actual cubic feet per minute)compared to mass flow measured in SCFM (standard cubic feet per minute). More importantly, the AG-1 standard has an overall deficiency for using HEPA filter devices at different air flow rates, temperatures, and altitudes. Technical Approach: The collection efficiency and pressure drops of 18 different HEPA filters will be measured over a range of flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. The experimental results will be compared to analytical scoping calculations. Three manufacturers have allocated six HEPA filters each for this effort. The 18 filters will be tested at two different flow rates, two different temperatures and two different altitudes. The 36 total tests will be conducted at two different facilities: the ATI Test facilities (Baltimore MD) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos NM). The Radiation Protection RP-SVS group at Los Alamos has an aerosol wind tunnel that was originally designed to evaluate small air samplers. In 2010, modifications were started to convert the wind tunnel for HEPA filter testing. (Extensive changes were necessary for the required aerosol generators, HEPA test fixtures, temperature control devices and measurement capabilities.) To this date, none of these modification activities have been funded through a specific DOE or NNSA program. This is expected to require six months of time, after receipt of funding. Benefits: US DOE facilities that use HEPA filters will benefit from access to the new operational measurement methods. Uncertainty and guesswork will be removed from HEPA filter operations.

  8. TANK 50 BATCH 0 SALTSTONE FORMULATION CONFIRMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.

    2006-06-05

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel were requested to confirm the Tank 50 Batch 0 grout formulation per Technical Task Request, SSF-TTR-2006-0001 (task 1 of 2) [1]. Earlier Batch 0 formulation testing used a Tank 50 sample collected in September 2005 and is described elsewhere [2]. The current testing was performed using a sample of Tank 50 waste collected in May 2006. This work was performed according to the Technical Task and Quality Assurance Plan (TT/QAP), WSRC-RP-2006-00594 [3]. The salt solution collected from Tank 50 in May 2006 contained approximately 3 weight percent more solids than the sample collected in September 2005. The insoluble solids took longer to settle in the new sample which was interpreted as indicating finer particles in the current sample. The saltstone formulation developed for the September 2005 Tank 50 Batch 0 sample was confirmed for the May 2006 sample with one minor exception. Saltstone prepared with the Tank 50 sample collected in May 2006 required 1.5 times more Daratard 17 set retarding admixture than the saltstone prepared with the September In addition, a sample prepared with lower shear mixing (stirring with a spatula) had a higher plastic viscosity (57 cP) than samples made with higher shear mixing in a blender (23cP). The static gel times of the saltstone slurries made with low shear mixing were also shorter ({approx}32 minutes) than those for comparable samples made in the blender ({approx}47 minutes). The addition of the various waste streams (ETP, HEU-HCAN, and GPE-HCAN) to Tank 50 from September 2005 to May 2006 has increased the amount of set retarder, Daratard 17, required for processing saltstone slurries through the Saltstone facility. If these streams are continued to be added to Tank 50, the quantity of admixtures required to maintain the same processing conditions for the Saltstone facility will probably change and additional testing is recommended to reconfirm the Tank 50 Saltstone formulation.

  9. Integrated Cost and Schedule using Monte Carlo Simulation of a CPM Model - 12419

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulett, David T.; Nosbisch, Michael R.

    2012-07-01

    This discussion of the recommended practice (RP) 57R-09 of AACE International defines the integrated analysis of schedule and cost risk to estimate the appropriate level of cost and schedule contingency reserve on projects. The main contribution of this RP is to include the impact of schedule risk on cost risk and hence on the need for cost contingency reserves. Additional benefits include the prioritizing of the risks to cost, some of which are risks to schedule, so that risk mitigation may be conducted in a cost-effective way, scatter diagrams of time-cost pairs for developing joint targets of time and cost, and probabilistic cash flow which shows cash flow at different levels of certainty. Integrating cost and schedule risk into one analysis based on the project schedule loaded with costed resources from the cost estimate provides both: (1) more accurate cost estimates than if the schedule risk were ignored or incorporated only partially, and (2) illustrates the importance of schedule risk to cost risk when the durations of activities using labor-type (time-dependent) resources are risky. Many activities such as detailed engineering, construction or software development are mainly conducted by people who need to be paid even if their work takes longer than scheduled. Level-of-effort resources, such as the project management team, are extreme examples of time-dependent resources, since if the project duration exceeds its planned duration the cost of these resources will increase over their budgeted amount. The integrated cost-schedule risk analysis is based on: - A high quality CPM schedule with logic tight enough so that it will provide the correct dates and critical paths during simulation automatically without manual intervention. - A contingency-free estimate of project costs that is loaded on the activities of the schedule. - Resolves inconsistencies between cost estimate and schedule that often creep into those documents as project execution proceeds. - Good-quality risk data that are usually collected in risk interviews of the project team, management and others knowledgeable in the risk of the project. The risks from the risk register are used as the basis of the risk data in the risk driver method. The risk driver method is based in the fundamental principle that identifiable risks drive overall cost and schedule risk. - A Monte Carlo simulation software program that can simulate schedule risk, burn WM2012 rate risk and time-independent resource risk. The results include the standard histograms and cumulative distributions of possible cost and time results for the project. However, by simulating both cost and time simultaneously we can collect the cost-time pairs of results and hence show the scatter diagram ('football chart') that indicates the joint probability of finishing on time and on budget. Also, we can derive the probabilistic cash flow for comparison with the time-phased project budget. Finally the risks to schedule completion and to cost can be prioritized, say at the P-80 level of confidence, to help focus the risk mitigation efforts. If the cost and schedule estimates including contingency reserves are not acceptable to the project stakeholders the project team should conduct risk mitigation workshops and studies, deciding which risk mitigation actions to take, and re-run the Monte Carlo simulation to determine the possible improvement to the project's objectives. Finally, it is recommended that the contingency reserves of cost and of time, calculated at a level that represents an acceptable degree of certainty and uncertainty for the project stakeholders, be added as a resource-loaded activity to the project schedule for strategic planning purposes. The risk analysis described in this paper is correct only for the current plan, represented by the schedule. The project contingency reserve of time and cost that are the main results of this analysis apply if that plan is to be followed. Of course project managers have the option of re-planning and re-scheduling in the face of new facts, in part by m

  10. Determination Of Reportable Radionuclides For DWPF Sludge Batch 7B (Macrobatch 9)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C. L.; DiPrete, D. P.

    2013-08-22

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that “The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115”. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2011-0004; Rev. 0 entitled Sludge Batch 7b Qualification Studies. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask II, Item 2 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 6 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00247, Rev. 0 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), SRNL-RP-2011-00248, Rev. 0. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB7b (MB9), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy’s (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes were excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, 27 radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB7b as specified by WAPS 1.2. The WCP and WQR require that all of the radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB7b, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100-year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to the list of reportable radionuclides in order to meet WAPS 1.6. All of the Pu isotopes (Pu-238, -239, -240, -241, and -242) and other U isotopes (U-233, -234, and -238) identified in WAPS 1.6 were already determined to be reportable according to WAPS 1.2 This brings the total number of reportable radionuclides for SB7b to 29. The radionuclide measurements made for SB7b are similar to those performed in the previous SB7a MB8 work. Some method development/refinement occurred during the conduct of these measurements, leading to lower detection limits and more accurate measurement of some isotopes than was previously possible. Improvement in the analytical measurements will likely continue, and this in turn should lead to improved detection limit values for some radionuclides and actual measurements for still others.

  11. DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7B (MACROBATCH 9)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C. L.; Diprete, D. P.

    2014-05-01

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that “The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115”. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu- 242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2011-0004; Rev. 0 entitled Sludge Batch 7b Qualification Studies. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask II, Item 2 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 6 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00247, Rev. 0 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), SRNL-RP-2011-00248, Rev. 0. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB7b (MB9), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy’s (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U- 235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes were excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, 27 radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB7b as specified by WAPS 1.2. The WCP and WQR require that all of the radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB7b, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100- year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to the list of reportable radionuclides in order to meet WAPS 1.6. All of the Pu isotopes (Pu-238, -239, -240, -241, and -242) and other U isotopes (U-233, -234, and -238) identified in WAPS 1.6 were already determined to be reportable according to WAPS 1.2 This brings the total number of reportable radionuclides for SB7b to 29. The radionuclide measurements made for SB7b are similar to those performed in the previous SB7a MB8 work. Some method development/refinement occurred during the conduct of these measurements, leading to lower detection limits and more accurate measurement of some isotopes than was previously possible. Improvement in the analytical measurements will likely continue, and this in turn should lead to improved detection limit values for some radionuclides and actual measurements for still others.

  12. Oxygen Transport Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bandopadhyay

    2008-08-30

    The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the small polaron conduction mechanism. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to develop strategies to detect and characterize vacancy creation, dopant segregations and defect association in the oxygen conducting membrane material. The pO{sub 2} and temperature dependence of the conductivity, non-stoichiometry and thermal-expansion behavior of compositions with increasing complexity of substitution on the perovskite A and B sites were studied. Studies with the perovskite structure show anomalous behavior at low oxygen partial pressures (<10{sup -5} atm). The anomalies are due to non-equilibrium effects and can be avoided by using very strict criteria for the attainment of equilibrium. The slowness of the oxygen equilibration kinetics arises from two different mechanisms. In the first, a two phase region occurs between an oxygen vacancy ordered phase such as brownmillerite SrFeO{sub 2.5} and perovskite SrFeO{sub 3-x}. The slow kinetics is associated with crossing the two phase region. The width of the miscibility gap decreases with increasing temperature and consequently the effect is less pronounced at higher temperature. The preferred kinetic pathway to reduction of perovskite ferrites when the vacancy concentration corresponds to the formation of significant concentrations of Fe{sup 2+} is via the formation of a Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phases as clearly observed in the case of La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3-x} where LaSrFeO{sub 4} is found together with Fe. In more complex compositions, such as LSFTO, iron or iron rich phases are observed locally with no evidence for the presence of discrete RP phase. Fracture strength of tubular perovskite membranes was determined in air and in reducing atmospheric conditions. The strength of the membrane decreased with temperature and severity of reducing conditions although the strength distribution (Weibull parameter, m) was relatively unaltered. Surface and volume dominated the fracture origins and the overall fracture was purely transgranular. The dual phase membranes have been evaluated for structural properties. An increasing crack growth resistance was observed for the membranes heat-treated at 1000 C in air and N{sub 2} with increasing crack length. The combined effect of thermal and elastic mismatch stresses on the crack path was studied and the fracture behavior of the dual phase composite at the test conditions was analyzed. Ceramic/metal (C/M) seals are needed to form a leak-tight interface between the OTM and a nickel-base super alloy. It was concluded that Ni-based brazing alloys provided the best option in terms of brazing temperature and final operating conditions after analyzing several possible brazing systems. A mechanical testing procedure has been developed. This model was tested with model ceramic/metal systems but it is expected to be useful for testing concentric perovskite/metal seals.

  13. Targeting CD9 produces stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects predominantly in activated endothelial cells during angiogenesis: A novel antiangiogenic therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamisasanuki, Taro; Department of Ophthalmology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 ; Tokushige, Saori; Terasaki, Hiroto; Department of Ophthalmology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 ; Khai, Ngin Cin; Wang, Yuqing; Sakamoto, Taiji; Kosai, Ken-ichiro

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} CD9 plays stimulus-independent roles in angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. {yields} Targeting CD9 expression is effective in an angiogenic disease model. {yields} Targeting CD9 expression predominantly affects activated endothelial cells. {yields} CD9 is involved in endothelial cell proliferation, but not survival. {yields} CD9 is part of angiogenic machinery in endothelial cells during angiogenesis. -- Abstract: The precise roles of tetraspanin CD9 are unclear. Here we show that CD9 plays a stimulus-independent role in angiogenesis and that inhibiting CD9 expression or function is a potential antiangiogenic therapy. Knocking down CD9 expression significantly inhibited in vitro endothelial cell migration and invasion induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Injecting CD9-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA-CD9) markedly inhibited HGF- or VEGF-induced subconjunctival angiogenesis in vivo. Both results revealed potent and stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects of targeting CD9. Furthermore, intravitreous injections of siRNA-CD9 or anti-CD9 antibodies were therapeutically effective for laser-induced retinal and choroidal neovascularization in mice, a representative ocular angiogenic disease model. In terms of the mechanism, growth factor receptor and downstream signaling activation were not affected, whereas abnormal localization of integrins and membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase was observed during angiogenesis, by knocking down CD9 expression. Notably, knocking down CD9 expression did not induce death and mildly inhibited proliferation of quiescent endothelial cells under conditions without an angiogenic stimulus. Thus, CD9 does not directly affect growth factor-induced signal transduction, which is required in angiogenesis and normal vasculature, but is part of the angiogenesis machinery in endothelial cells during angiogenesis. In conclusion, targeting CD9 produced stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects predominantly in activated endothelial cells during angiogenesis, and appears to be an effective and safe antiangiogenic approach. These results shed light on the biological roles of CD9 and may lead to novel antiangiogenic therapies.

  14. In Vitro Phototoxicity and Hazard Identification of Nano-scale Titanium Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, Kristen; Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina ; Degn, Laura L.; Mundy, William R.; Zucker, Robert M.; Dreher, Kevin; Zhao, Baozhong; National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing ; Roberts, Joan E.; Fordham University, New York, New York ; and others

    2012-01-15

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO{sub 2}) catalyze reactions under UV radiation and are hypothesized to cause phototoxicity. A human-derived line of retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) was treated with six samples of nano-TiO{sub 2} and exposed to UVA radiation. The TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were independently characterized to have mean primary particle sizes and crystal structures of 22 nm anatase/rutile, 25 nm anatase, 31 nm anatase/rutile, 59 nm anatase/rutile, 142 nm anatase, and 214 nm rutile. Particles were suspended in cell culture media, sonicated, and assessed for stability and aggregation by dynamic light scattering. Cells were treated with 0, 0.3, 1, 3, 10, 30, or 100 ?g/ml nano-TiO{sub 2} in media for 24 hrs and then exposed to UVA (2 hrs, 7.53 J/cm{sup 2}) or kept in the dark. Viability was assessed 24 hrs after the end of UVA exposure by microscopy with a live/dead assay (calcein-AM/propidium iodide). Exposure to higher concentrations of nano-TiO{sub 2} with UVA lowered cell viability. The 25 nm anatase and 31 nm anatase/rutile were the most phototoxic (LC{sub 50} with UVA < 5 ?g/ml), while the 142 nm anatase and 214 nm rutile were the least phototoxic. An acellular assay ranked TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles for their UVA photocatalytic reactivities. The particles were found to be capable of generating thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) under UVA. Flow cytometry showed that nano-TiO{sub 2} combined with UVA decreased cell viability and increased the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, measured by Mitosox). LC{sub 50} values under UVA were correlated with TBARS reactivity, particle size, and surface area. -- Highlights: ? Nano-TiO{sub 2} enters cells within 24 hours ? Nano-TiO{sub 2} causes dose-dependent cytotoxicity greatly enhanced by UVA radiation ? Treatment with nano-TiO{sub 2} and UVA produces reactive oxygen species ? Phototoxicity is correlated with particle size, surface area, and TBARS reactivity.

  15. Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Analytical Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sams, Terry L.

    2013-08-15

    Long Abstract. Full Text. The purpose of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Analytical Evaluation (DSGRE-AE) is to evaluate the postulated hypothesis that a hydrogen GRE may occur in Hanford tanks containing waste sludges at levels greater than previously experienced. There is a need to understand gas retention and release hazards in sludge beds which are 200 -300 inches deep. These sludge beds are deeper than historical Hanford sludge waste beds, and are created when waste is retrieved from older single-shell tanks (SST) and transferred to newer double-shell tanks (DST).Retrieval of waste from SSTs reduces the risk to the environment from leakage or potential leakage of waste into the ground from these tanks. However, the possibility of an energetic event (flammable gas accident) in the retrieval receiver DST is worse than slow leakage. Lines of inquiry, therefore, are (1) can sludge waste be stored safely in deep beds; (2) can gas release events (GRE) be prevented by periodically degassing the sludge (e.g., mixer pump); or (3) does the retrieval strategy need to be altered to limit sludge bed height by retrieving into additional DSTs? The scope of this effort is to provide expert advice on whether or not to move forward with the generation of deep beds of sludge through retrieval of C-Farm tanks. Evaluation of possible mitigation methods (e.g., using mixer pumps to release gas, retrieving into an additional DST) are being evaluated by a second team and are not discussed in this report. While available data and engineering judgment indicate that increased gas retention (retained gas fraction) in DST sludge at depths resulting from the completion of SST 241-C Tank Farm retrievals is not expected and, even if gas releases were to occur, they would be small and local, a positive USQ was declared (Occurrence Report EM-RP--WRPS-TANKFARM-2012-0014, "Potential Exists for a Large Spontaneous Gas Release Event in Deep Settled Waste Sludge"). The purpose of this technical report is to (1) present and discuss current understandings of gas retention and release mechanisms for deep sludge in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex waste storage tanks; and (2) to identify viable methods/criteria for demonstrating safety relative to deep sludge gas release events (DSGRE) in the near term to support the Hanford C-Farm retrieval mission. A secondary purpose is to identify viable methods/criteria for demonstrating safety relative to DSGREs in the longer term to support the mission to retrieve waste from the Hanford Tank Farms and deliver it to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The potential DSGRE issue resulted in the declaration of a positive Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ). C-Farm retrievals are currently proceeding under a Justification for Continued Operation (JCO) that only allows tanks 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106 sludge levels of 192 inches and 195 inches, respectively. C-Farm retrievals need deeper sludge levels (approximately 310 inches in 241-AN-101 and approximately 250 inches in 241-AN-106). This effort is to provide analytical data and justification to continue retrievals in a safe and efficient manner.

  16. Design and Integrate Improved Systems for Nuclear Facility Ventilation and Exhaust Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Murray E.

    2014-04-15

    Objective: The objective of this R&D project would complete the development of three new systems and integrate them into a single experimental effort. However, each of the three systems has stand-alone applicability across the DOE complex. At US DOE nuclear facilities, indoor air is filtered and ventilated for human occupancy, and exhaust air to the outdoor environment must be regulated and monitored. At least three technical standards address these functions, and the Los Alamos National Laboratory would complete an experimental facility to answer at least three questions: (1) Can the drag coefficient of a new Los Alamos air mixer be reduced for better operation in nuclear facility exhaust stacks? (2) Is it possible to verify the accuracy of a new dilution method for HEPA filter test facilities? (3) Is there a performance-based air flow metric (volumetric flow or mass flow) for operating HEPA filters? In summary, the three new systems are: a mixer, a diluter and a performance-based metric, respectively. The results of this project would be applicable to at least four technical standards: ANSI N13.1 Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities; ASTM F1471 Standard Test Method for Air Cleaning Performance of a High-Efficiency Particulate Air Filter System, ASME N511: In-Service Testing of Nuclear Air Treatment, Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systems, and ASME AG-1: Code On Nuclear Air And Gas Treatment. All of the three proposed new systems must be combined into a single experimental device (i.e. to develop a new function of the Los Alamos aerosol wind tunnel). Technical Approach: The Radiation Protection RP-SVS group at Los Alamos has an aerosol wind tunnel that was originally (2006) designed to evaluate small air samplers (cf. US EPA 40 CFR 53.42). In 2009, the tunnel was modified for exhaust stack verifications per the ANSI N13.1 standard. In 2010, modifications were started on the wind tunnel for testing HEPA filters (cf. ASTM F1471 and ASME N511). This project involves three systems that were developed for testing the 24*24*11 (inch) HEPA filters (i.e. the already mentioned mixer, diluter and metric). Prototypes of the mixer and the diluter have been built and individually tested on a preliminary basis. However, the third system (the HEPA metric method) has not been tested, since that requires complete operability of the aerosol wind tunnel device. (The experimental wind tunnel has test aerosol injection, control and measurement capabilities, and can be heated for temperature dependent measurements.) Benefits: US DOE facilities that use HEPA filters and/or require exhaust stacks from their nuclear facility buildings will benefit from access to the new hardware (mixer and diluter) and performance-based metric (for HEPA filter air flow).

  17. ISOLOK VALVE ACCEPTANCE TESTING FOR DWPF SME SAMPLING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

    2011-12-05

    Evaluation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. Of the opportunities, a focus area related to optimizing the equipment and efficiency of the sample turnaround time for DWPF Analytical Laboratory was identified. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated the possibility of using an Isolok{reg_sign} sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard{reg_sign} valve for taking process samples. Previous viability testing was conducted with favorable results using the Isolok sampler and reported in SRNL-STI-2010-00749 (1). This task has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time and decrease CPC cycle time. This report summarizes the results from acceptance testing which was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 (2) and which was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-RP-2011-00145 (3). The Isolok to be tested is the same model which was tested, qualified, and installed in the Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) sample system. RW-0333P QA requirements apply to this task. This task was to qualify the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) sampling process. The Hydragard, which is the current baseline sampling method, was used for comparison to the Isolok sampling data. The Isolok sampler is an air powered grab sampler used to 'pull' a sample volume from a process line. The operation of the sampler is shown in Figure 1. The image on the left shows the Isolok's spool extended into the process line and the image on the right shows the sampler retracted and then dispensing the liquid into the sampling container. To determine tank homogeneity, a Coliwasa sampler was used to grab samples at a high and low location within the mixing tank. Data from the two locations were compared to determine if the contents of the tank were well mixed. The Coliwasa sampler is a tube with a stopper at the bottom and is designed to obtain grab samples from specific locations within the drum contents. A position paper (4) was issued to address the prototypic flow loop issues and simulant selections. A statistically designed plan (5) was issued to address the total number of samples each sampler needed to pull, to provide the random order in which samples were pulled and to group samples for elemental analysis. The TTR required that the Isolok sampler perform as well as the Hydragard sampler during these tests to ensure the acceptability of the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF sampling cells. Procedure No.L9.4-5015 was used to document the sample parameters and process steps. Completed procedures are located in R&D Engineering job folder 23269.

  18. Tanks 18 And 19-F Structural Flowable Grout Fill Material Evaluation And Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.

    2013-04-23

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: 1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non-compressible material; 2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; 3) reduce contaminant mobility by a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and 4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: 1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). 2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. 3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix design. 4) Prepare samples for hydraulic property measurements for comparison to the values in the F and H- Tank Farm Performance Assessments (PAs). 5) Identify a grout mix for the Tanks 18-F and 19-F Grout Procurement Specification [Forty, 2011 a, b, c]. Results for two flowable zero bleed structural fill concepts containing 3/8 inch gravel (70070 Series and LP#8 Series) and a sand only mix (SO Series) are provided in this report. Tank Farm Engineering and SRNL Project Management selected the 70070 mix as the base case for inclusion in Revision 0 of the Tanks 18-F and 19-F grout procurement specification [Forty 2011 a] and requested admixture recommendations and property confirmation for this formulation [Forty, 2011 b]. Lower cementitious paste mixes were formulated because the 70070 mix is over designed with respect to strength and generates more heat from hydration reactions than is desirable for mass pour application. Work was also initiated on a modification of the recommended mix which included shrinkage compensation to mitigate fast pathways caused by shrinkage cracking and poor physical bonding to the tank and ancillary equipment. Testing of this option was postponed to FY12. Mix, LP#8-16 is recommended for inclusion in the specification for furnishing and delivering tank closure grout for Tanks 18-F and 19-F [Forty, 2011 c]. A shrinkage compensating variation of this mix, LP#16C, has not been fully developed and characterized at this time.

  19. TANKS 18 AND 19-F STRUCTURAL FLOWABLE GROUT FILL MATERIAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-11-01

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: (1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non compressible material; (2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; (3) reduce contaminant mobility by (a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and (b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and (4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). (2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. (3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix design. (4) Prepare samples for hydraulic property measurements for comparison to the values in the F and H- Tank Farm Performance Assessments (PAs). (5) Identify a grout mix for the Tanks 18-F and 19-F Grout Procurement Specification [Forty, 2011 a, b, c]. Results for two flowable zero bleed structural fill concepts containing 3/8 inch gravel (70070 Series and LP-8 Series) and a sand only mix (SO Series) are provided in this report. Tank Farm Engineering and SRNL Project Management selected the 70070 mix as the base case for inclusion in Revision 0 of the Tanks 18-F and 19-F grout procurement specification [Forty 2011 a] and requested admixture recommendations and property confirmation for this formulation [Forty, 2011 b]. Lower cementitious paste mixes were formulated because the 70070 mix is over designed with respect to strength and generates more heat from hydration reactions than is desirable for mass pour application. Work was also initiated on a modification of the recommended mix which included shrinkage compensation to mitigate fast pathways caused by shrinkage cracking and poor physical bonding to the tank and ancillary equipment. Testing of this option was postponed to FY12.

  20. TANKS 18 AND 19-F EQUIPMENT GROUT FILL MATERIAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-12-15

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) intends to remove Tanks 18-F and 19-F at the Savannah River Site (SRS) from service. The high-level waste (HLW) tanks have been isolated from the F-area Tank Farm (FTF) facilities and will be filled with cementitious grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the empty volumes in the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways from the surface to residual waste on the bottom of the tanks, (3) providing an intruder barrier, and (4) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to limit solubility of residual radionuclides. Bulk waste and heel waste removal equipment will remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F when the tanks are closed. This equipment includes: mixer pumps, transfer pumps, transfer jets, equipment support masts, sampling masts and dip tube assemblies. The current Tank 18-F and 19-F closure strategy is to grout the internal void spaces in this equipment to eliminate fast vertical pathways and slow water infiltration to the residual material on the tank floor. This report documents the results of laboratory testing performed to identify a grout formulation for filling the abandoned equipment in Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The objective of this work was to formulate a flowable grout for filling internal voids of equipment that will remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F during the final closures. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, Tank Farm Closure Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The scope for this task is provided in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00587. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Prepare and evaluate the SRR cooling coil grout identified in WSRC-STI-2008-00298 per the TTR for this work. The cooling coil grout is a mixture of BASF MasterFlow{reg_sign} 816 cable grout (67.67 wt. %), Grade 100 ground granulated blast furnace slag (7.52 wt. %) and water (24.81 wt. %); (2) Identify equipment grout placement and performance properties; (3) Design up to 2 additional grout systems for filling the Tank 18-F and Tank 19-F equipment; (4) Prepare samples of candidate grouts and measure fresh properties, thermal properties and cured properties; (5) Recommend a grout for the Tier 1A equipment fill mock up - ADMP 4 foot high mock up, 1 inch and 2 inch pipes; (6) Support procurement of materials for the Tier 1A equipment fill mock up test; (7) Prepare samples of the recommended grout for hydraulic property measurements which can be used for comparison to values used in the F- Tank Farm Performance Assessment (PA); and (8) Document equipment fill grout data and recommendations in a report.

  1. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting in Leavenworth, KS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Michael; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Curry, Ku'uipo

    2011-05-06

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a commercial parking lot lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Technology GATEWAY Demonstration Program. The parking lot is for customers and employees of a Walmart Supercenter in Leavenworth, Kansas and this installation represents the first use of the LED Parking Lot Performance Specification developed by the DOE’s Commercial Building Energy Alliance. The application is a parking lot covering more than a half million square feet, lighted primarily by light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Metal halide wall packs were installed along the building facade. This site is new construction, so the installed baseline(s) were hypothetical designs. It was acknowledged early on that deviating from Walmart’s typical design would reduce the illuminance on the site. Walmart primarily uses 1000W pulse-start metal halide (PMH) lamps. In order to provide a comparison between both typical design and a design using conventional luminaires providing a lower illuminance, a 400W PMH design was also considered. As mentioned already, the illuminance would be reduced by shifting from the PMH system to the LED system. The Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) provides recommended minimum illuminance values for parking lots. All designs exceeded the recommended illuminance values in IES RP-20, some by a wider margin than others. Energy savings from installing the LED system compared to the different PMH systems varied. Compared to the 1000W PMH system, the LED system would save 63 percent of the energy. However, this corresponds to a 68 percent reduction in illuminance as well. In comparison to the 400W PMH system, the LED system would save 44 percent of the energy and provide similar minimum illuminance values at the time of relamping. The LED system cost more than either of the PMH systems when comparing initial costs. However, when the life-cycle costs from energy and maintenance were factored into the scenario, the LED system had lower costs at the end of a 10-year analysis period. The LED system had a 6.1 year payback compared to the 1000W PMH system and a 7.5 year payback versus the 400W PMH system. The costs reflect high initial cost for the LED luminaire, plus more luminaires and (subsequently) more poles for the LED system. The other major issue affecting cost effectiveness was that Leavenworth, Kansas has very low electricity costs. The melded rate for this site was $0.056 per kWh for electricity. However, if the national electricity rate of $0.1022/kWh was used the payback would change to between four and five years for the LED system. This demonstration met the GATEWAY requirements of saving energy, matching or improving illumination, and being cost effective. The project also demonstrated that the Commercial Building Energy Alliance (CBEA) specification works in practice. Walmart appreciated having an entire site lighted by LEDs to gain more experience with the technology. Walmart is reviewing the results of the demonstration as they consider their entire real estate portfolio.

  2. Project Title: Nuclear Astrophysics Data from Radioactive Beam Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan A. Chen

    2008-03-27

    The scientific aims of this project have been the evaluation and dissemination of key nuclear reactions in nuclear astrophysics, with a focus on ones to be studied at new radioactive beam facilities worldwide. These aims were maintained during the entire funding period from 2003 - 2006. In the following, a summary of the reactions evaluated during this period is provided. Year 1 (2003-04): {sup 21}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 22}Mg and {sup 18}Ne({alpha},p){sup 21}Na - The importance of the {sup 21}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 22}Mg and the {sup 18}Ne({alpha},p){sup 21}Na reactions in models of exploding stars has been well documented: the first is connected to the production of the radioisotope {sup 22}Na in nova nucleosynthesis, while the second is a key bridge between the Hot-CNO cycles and the rp-process in X-ray bursts. By the end of Summer 2004, our group had updated these reaction rates to include all published data up to September 2004, and cast the reaction rates into standard analytical and tabular formats with the assistance of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's computational infrastructure for reaction rates. Since September 2004, ongoing experiments on these two reactions have been completed, with our group's participation in both: {sup 21}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 22}Mg at the TRIUMF-ISAC laboratory (DRAGON collaboration), and 18Ne({alpha},p){sup 21}Na at Argonne National Laboratory (collaboration with Ernst Rehm, Argonne). The data from the former was subsequently published and included in our evaluation. Publication from the latter still awaits independent confirmation of the experimental results. Year 2 (2004-05): The 25Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si and {sup 13}N(p,{gamma})14O reactions - For Year 2, we worked on evaluations of the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si and {sup 13}N(p,{gamma}){sup 14}O reactions, in accordance with our proposed deliverables and following similar standard procedures to those used in Year 1. The {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si reaction is a key uncertainty in the understanding the origin of galactic {sup 26}Al, a target radioisotope for gamma ray astronomy; the {sup 13}N(p,{gamma}){sup 14}O reaction in turn is the trigger reaction for the transition into the Hot-CNO cycles in novae and X-ray bursts. A graduate student of mine, who has been supported part-time by this grant, completed the evaluation of the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si reaction as part of his plans to measure this reaction at TRIUMF for his Ph.D. thesis project. I also hired a part-time undergraduate student for the 2004-05 academic year to assist with the evaluations, including that of the {sup 13}N(p,{gamma}){sup 14}O reaction. Year 3 (2005-06): The {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti and {sup 26}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 27}Si reactions - This year's progress was closely coupled to new results coming from our collaboration on the DRAGON spectrometer team at TRIUMF. The {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti and {sup 26}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 27}Si reactions were both measured, and significant modifications to their respective reaction rates were required. Both are required input toward predicting the respective amounts of Titanium-44 and Aluminum-26 produced in our galaxy, in supernovae, massive stars, and nova explosions. The {sup 26}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 27}Si reaction rate was successfully completed. The {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti reaction in particular served as the Ph.D. thesis for Christian Ouellet, and therefore the evaluation of this rate fell naturally within his thesis project. Christian successfully defended his thesis in 2007 and is now working for me on the McMaster DOE-funded Nuclear Data Project. In light of the recent data from his thesis, Christian is now putting the final touches on this evaluation, and will disseminate it through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory reaction rate database.

  3. Heat Transfer in Complex Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehrdad Massoudi

    2012-01-01

    Amongst the most important constitutive relations in Mechanics, when characterizing the behavior of complex materials, one can identify the stress tensor T, the heat flux vector q (related to heat conduction) and the radiant heating (related to the radiation term in the energy equation). Of course, the expression 'complex materials' is not new. In fact, at least since the publication of the paper by Rivlin & Ericksen (1955), who discussed fluids of complexity (Truesdell & Noll, 1992), to the recently published books (Deshpande et al., 2010), the term complex fluids refers in general to fluid-like materials whose response, namely the stress tensor, is 'non-linear' in some fashion. This non-linearity can manifest itself in variety of forms such as memory effects, yield stress, creep or relaxation, normal-stress differences, etc. The emphasis in this chapter, while focusing on the constitutive modeling of complex fluids, is on granular materials (such as coal) and non-linear fluids (such as coal-slurries). One of the main areas of interest in energy related processes, such as power plants, atomization, alternative fuels, etc., is the use of slurries, specifically coal-water or coal-oil slurries, as the primary fuel. Some studies indicate that the viscosity of coal-water mixtures depends not only on the volume fraction of solids, and the mean size and the size distribution of the coal, but also on the shear rate, since the slurry behaves as shear-rate dependent fluid. There are also studies which indicate that preheating the fuel results in better performance, and as a result of such heating, the viscosity changes. Constitutive modeling of these non-linear fluids, commonly referred to as non-Newtonian fluids, has received much attention. Most of the naturally occurring and synthetic fluids are non-linear fluids, for example, polymer melts, suspensions, blood, coal-water slurries, drilling fluids, mud, etc. It should be noted that sometimes these fluids show Newtonian (linear) behavior for a given range of parameters or geometries; there are many empirical or semi-empirical constitutive equations suggested for these fluids. There have also been many non-linear constitutive relations which have been derived based on the techniques of continuum mechanics. The non-linearities oftentimes appear due to higher gradient terms or time derivatives. When thermal and or chemical effects are also important, the (coupled) momentum and energy equations can give rise to a variety of interesting problems, such as instability, for example the phenomenon of double-diffusive convection in a fluid layer. In Conclusion, we have studied the flow of a compressible (density gradient type) non-linear fluid down an inclined plane, subject to radiation boundary condition. The heat transfer is also considered where a source term, similar to the Arrhenius type reaction, is included. The non-dimensional forms of the equations are solved numerically and the competing effects of conduction, dissipation, heat generation and radiation are discussed. It is observed that the velocity increases rapidly in the region near the inclined surface and is slower in the region near the free surface. Since R{sub 7} is a measure of the heat generation due to chemical reaction, when the reaction is frozen (R{sub 7}=0.0) the temperature distributions would depend only on R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}, representing the effects of the pressure force developed in the material due to the distribution, R{sub 3} and R{sub 4} viscous dissipation, R{sub 5} the normal stress coefficient, R{sub 6} the measure of the emissivity of the particles to the thermal conductivity, etc. When the flow is not frozen (RP{sub 7} > 0) the temperature inside the flow domain is much higher than those at the inclined and free surfaces. As a result, heat is transferred away from the flow toward both the inclined surface and the free surface with a rate that increases as R{sub 7} increases. For a given temperature, an increase in {zeta} implies that the activation energy is smaller and thus, the reaction ra