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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Advanced oil burner for residential heating -- development report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of advanced oil burner concepts has long been a part of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) oil heat research program. Generally, goals of this work include: increased system efficiency, reduced emissions of soot and NO{sub x}, and the practical extension of the firing rate range of current burners to lower input rates. The report describes the results of a project at BNL aimed at the development of air atomized burners. Two concepts are discussed. The first is an air atomizer which uses air supplied at pressures ranging from 10 to 20 psi and requiring the integration of an air compressor in the system. The second, more novel, approach involves the use of a low-pressure air atomizing nozzle which requires only 8-14 inches of water air pressure for fuel atomization. This second approach requires the use of a fan in the burner instead of a compressor although the fan pressure is higher than with conventional, pressure atomized retention head burners. In testing the first concept, high pressure air atomization, a conventional retention head burner was modified to accept the new nozzle. In addition, the burner head was modified to reduce the flow area to maintain roughly 1 inch of water pressure drop across the head at a firing rate of 0.25 gallons of oil per hour. The burner ignited easily and could be operated at low excess air levels without smoke. The major disadvantage of this burner approach is the need for the air compressor as part of the system. In evaluating options, a vane-type compressor was selected although the use of a compressor of this type will lead to increased burner maintenance requirements.

Butcher, T.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW PRESSURE, AIR ATOMIZED OIL BURNER WITH HIGH ATOMIZER AIR FLOW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes technical advances made to the concept of a low pressure, air atomized oil burner for home heating applications. Currently all oil burners on the market are of the pressure atomized, retention head type. These burners have a lower firing rate limit of about 0.5 gallons per hour of oil, due to reliability problems related to small flow passage sizes. High pressure air atomized burners have been shown to be one route to avoid this problem but air compressor cost and reliability have practically eliminated this approach. With the low pressure air atomized burner the air required for atomization can be provided by a fan at 5--8 inches of water pressure. A burner using this concept, termed the Fan-Atomized Burner or FAB has been developed and is currently being commercialized. In the head of the FAB, the combustion air is divided into three parts, much like a conventional retention head burner. This report describes development work on a new concept in which 100% of the air from the fan goes through the atomizer. The primary advantage of this approach is a great simplification of the head design. A nozzle specifically sized for this concept was built and is described in the report. Basic flow pressure tests, cold air velocity profiles, and atomization performance have been measured. A burner head/flame tube has been developed which promotes a torroidal recirculation zone near the nozzle for flame stability. The burner head has been tested in several furnace and boiler applications over the tiring rate range 0.2 to 0.28 gallons per hour. In all cases the burner can operate with very low excess air levels (under 10%) without producing smoke. Flue gas NO{sub x} concentration varied from 42 to 62 ppm at 3% 0{sub 2}. The concept is seen as having significant potential and planned development efforts are discussed.

BUTCHER,T.A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Development of a Low Pressure, Air Atomized Oil Burner with High Atomizer Air Flow: Progress Report FY 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes technical advances made to the concept of a low pressure, air atomized oil burner for home heating applications. Currently all oil burners on the market are of the pressure atomized, retention head type. These burners have a lower firing rate limit of about 0.5 gallons per hour of oil, due to reliability problems related to small flow passage sizes. High pressure air atomized burners have been shown to be one route to avoid this problem but air compressor cost and reliability have practically eliminated this approach. With the low pressure air atomized burner the air required for atomization can be provided by a fan at 5-8 inches of water pressure. A burner using this concept, termed the Fan-Atomized Burner or ''FAB'' has been developed and is currently being commercialized. In the head of the FAB, the combustion air is divided into three parts, much like a conventional retention head burner. This report describes development work on a new concept in which 100% of the air from the fan goes through the atomizer. The primary advantage of this approach is a great simplification of the head design. A nozzle specifically sized for this concept was built and is described in the report. Basic flow pressure tests, cold air velocity profiles, and atomization performance have been measured. A burner head/flame tube has been developed which promotes a toroidal recirculation zone near the nozzle for flame stability. The burner head has been tested in several furnace and boiler applications over the firing rate range 0.2 to 0.28 gallons per hour. In all cases the burner can operate with very low excess air levels (under 10%) without producing smoke. Flue gas NO{sub x} concentration varied from 42 to 62 ppm at 3% O{sub 2}. The concept is seen as having significant potential and planned development efforts are discussed.

Butcher, T.A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Residential oil burners with low input and two stages firing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized, retention head burner. At low firing rates pressure atomizing nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the small internal passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. To overcome the low input limitations of conventional burners, a low pressure air-atomized burner has been developed watch can operate at fining rates as low as 0.25 gallons of oil per hour (10 kW). In addition, the burner can be operated in a high/low fining rate mode. Field tests with this burner have been conducted at a fixed input rate of 0.35 gph (14 kW) with a side-wall vented boiler/water storage tank combination. At the test home, instrumentation was installed to measure fuel and energy flows and record trends in system temperatures. Laboratory efficiency testing with water heaters and boilers has been completed using standard single purpose and combined appliance test procedures. The tests quantify benefits due to low firing rates and other burner features. A two stage oil burner gains a strong advantage in rated efficiency while maintaining capacity for high domestic hot water and space heating loads.

Butcher, T.; Krajewski, R.; Leigh, R. [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Startup burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A startup burner for rapidly heating a catalyst in a reformer, as well as related methods and modules, is disclosed.

Zhao, Jian Lian (Belmont, MA); Northrop, William F. (Ann Arbor, MI); Bosco, Timothy (Dallas, TX); Rizzo, Vincent (Norfolk, MA); Kim, Changsik (Lexington, MA)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

6

Diesel fuel burner for diesel emissions control system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A burner for use in the emissions system of a lean burn internal combustion engine. The burner has a special burner head that enhances atomization of the burner fuel. Its combustion chamber is designed to be submersed in the engine exhaust line so that engine exhaust flows over the outer surface of the combustion chamber, thereby providing efficient heat transfer.

Webb, Cynthia C.; Mathis, Jeffrey A.

2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

7

VARIABLE FIRING RATE OIL BURNER USING PULSE FUEL FLOW CONTROL.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized retention head burner, which has an excellent reputation for reliability and efficiency. In this burner, oil is delivered to a fuel nozzle at pressures from 100 to 150 psi. In addition, to atomizing the fuel, the small, carefully controlled size of the nozzle exit orifice serves to control the burner firing rate. Burners of this type are currently available at firing rates of more than 0.5 gallons-per-hour (70,000 Btu/hr). Nozzles have been made for lower firing rates, but experience has shown that such nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the necessarily small passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. Also, traditionally burners and the nozzles are oversized to exceed the maximum demand. Typically, this is figured as follows. The heating load of the house on the coldest day for the location is considered to define the maximum heat load. The contractor or installer adds to this to provide a safety margin and for future expansion of the house. If the unit is a boiler that provides domestic hot water through the use of a tankless heating coil, the burner capacity is further increased. On the contrary, for a majority of the time, the heating system is satisfying a much smaller load, as only rarely do all these demands add up. Consequently, the average output of the heating system has to be much less than the design capacity and this is accomplished by start and stop cycling operation of the system so that the time-averaged output equals the demand. However, this has been demonstrated to lead to overall efficiencies lower than the steady-state efficiency. Therefore, the two main reasons for the current practice of using oil burners much larger than necessary for space heating are the unavailability of reliable low firing rate oil burners and the desire to assure adequate input rate for short duration, high draw domestic hot water loads. One approach to solve this problem is to develop a burner, which can operate at two firing rates, with the lower rate being significantly lower than 0.5 gallons per hour. This paper describes the initial results of adopting this approach through a pulsed flow nozzle. It has been shown that the concept of flow modulation with a small solenoid valve is feasible. Especially in the second configuration tested, where the Lee valve was integrated with the nozzle, reasonable modulation in flow of the order of 1.7 could be achieved. For this first prototype, the combustion performance is still not quite satisfactory. Improvements in operation, for example by providing a sharp and positive shut-off so that there is no flow under low pressures with consequent poor atomization could lead to better combustion performance. This could be achieved by using nozzles that have shut off or check valves for example. It is recommended that more work in cooperation with the valve manufacturer could produce a technically viable system. Marketability is of course a far more complex problem to be addressed once a technically viable product is available.

KRISHNA,C.R.; BUTCHER,T.A.; KAMATH,B.R.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Front Burner- Issue 15  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 15 addresses the DOE eSCRM Program and Secure Online Shopping.

9

Rotary Burner Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subject technology, the Calcpos Rotary Burner (CRB), is a burner that is proposed to reduce energy consumption and emission levels in comparison to currently available technology. burners are used throughout industry to produce the heat that is required during the refining process. Refineries seek to minimize the use of energy in refining while still meeting EPA regulations for emissions.

Paul Flanagan

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

10

Combustor burner vanelets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present application provides a burner for use with a combustor of a gas turbine engine. The burner may include a center hub, a shroud, a pair of fuel vanes extending from the center hub to the shroud, and a vanelet extending from the center hub and/or the shroud and positioned between the pair of fuel vanes.

Lacy, Benjamin (Greer, SC); Varatharajan, Balachandar (Loveland, OH); Kraemer, Gilbert Otto (Greer, SC); Yilmaz, Ertan (Albany, NY); Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

11

Pulverized coal burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A burner is described having lower emissions and lower unburned fuel losses by implementing a transition zone in a low NO{sub x} burner. The improved burner includes a pulverized fuel transport nozzle surrounded by the transition zone which shields the central oxygen-lean fuel devolatilization zone from the swirling secondary combustion air. The transition zone acts as a buffer between the primary and the secondary air streams to improve the control of near-burner mixing and flame stability by providing limited recirculation regions between primary and secondary air streams. These limited recirculation regions transport evolved NO{sub x} back towards the oxygen-lean fuel pyrolysis zone for reduction to molecular nitrogen. Alternate embodiments include natural gas and fuel oil firing. 8 figs.

Sivy, J.L.; Rodgers, L.W.; Koslosy, J.V.; LaRue, A.D.; Kaufman, K.C.; Sarv, H.

1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

12

Pulverized coal burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A burner having lower emissions and lower unburned fuel losses by implementing a transition zone in a low NO.sub.x burner. The improved burner includes a pulverized fuel transport nozzle surrounded by the transition zone which shields the central oxygen-lean fuel devolatilization zone from the swirling secondary combustion air. The transition zone acts as a buffer between the primary and the secondary air streams to improve the control of near-burner mixing and flame stability by providing limited recirculation regions between primary and secondary air streams. These limited recirculation regions transport evolved NO.sub.x back towards the oxygen-lean fuel pyrolysis zone for reduction to molecular nitrogen. Alternate embodiments include natural gas and fuel oil firing.

Sivy, Jennifer L. (Alliance, OH); Rodgers, Larry W. (Canton, OH); Koslosy, John V. (Akron, OH); LaRue, Albert D. (Uniontown, OH); Kaufman, Keith C. (Canton, OH); Sarv, Hamid (Canton, OH)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Burner control system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A burner control apparatus for use with a furnace installation that has an operating control to produce a request for burner operation, a flame sensor to produce a signal when flame is present in the monitored combustion chamber, and one or more devices for control of ignition and/or fuel flow. The burner control apparatus comprises lockout apparatus for de-energizing the control apparatus, a control device for actuating the ignition and/or fuel control devices, and a timing circuit that provides four successive and partially overlapping timing intervals of precise relation, including a purge timing interval, a pilot ignition interval, and a main fuel ignition interval. The present invention further includes a burner control system which verifies the proper operation of certain sensors in a burner or furnace including particularly the air flow sensor. Additionally, the present system also prevents an attempt to ignite a burner if a condition is detected which indicates that the air flow sensor has been bypassed or wedged in the actuated position.

Cade, P.J.

1981-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

14

CHP Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to engineer, design, fabricate, and field demonstrate a Boiler Burner Energy System Technology (BBEST) that integrates a low-cost, clean burning, gas-fired simple-cycle (unrecuperated) 100 kWe (net) microturbine (SCMT) with a new ultra low-NOx gas-fired burner (ULNB) into one compact Combined Heat and Power (CHP) product that can be retrofit on new and existing industrial and commercial boilers in place of conventional burners. The Scope of Work for this project was segmented into two principal phases: (Phase I) Hardware development, assembly and pre-test and (Phase II) Field installation and demonstration testing. Phase I was divided into five technical tasks (Task 2 to 6). These tasks covered the engineering, design, fabrication, testing and optimization of each key component of the CHP system principally, ULNB, SCMT, assembly BBEST CHP package, and integrated controls. Phase I work culminated with the laboratory testing of the completed BBEST assembly prior to shipment for field installation and demonstration. Phase II consisted of two remaining technical tasks (Task 7 and 8), which focused on the installation, startup, and field verification tests at a pre-selected industrial plant to document performance and attainment of all project objectives. Technical direction and administration was under the management of CMCE, Inc. Altex Technologies Corporation lead the design, assembly and testing of the system. Field demonstration was supported by Leva Energy, the commercialization firm founded by executives at CMCE and Altex. Leva Energy has applied for patent protection on the BBEST process under the trade name of Power Burner and holds the license for the burner currently used in the product. The commercial term Power Burner is used throughout this report to refer to the BBEST technology proposed for this project. The project was co-funded by the California Energy Commission and the Southern California Gas Company (SCG), a division of Sempra Energy. These match funds were provided via concurrent contracts and investments available via CMCE, Altex, and Leva Energy The project attained all its objectives and is considered a success. CMCE secured the support of GI&E from Italy to supply 100 kW Turbec T-100 microturbines for the project. One was purchased by the project’s subcontractor, Altex, and a second spare was purchased by CMCE under this project. The microturbines were then modified to convert from their original recuperated design to a simple cycle configuration. Replacement low-NOx silo combustors were designed and bench tested in order to achieve compliance with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) 2007 emission limits for NOx and CO when in CHP operation. The converted microturbine was then mated with a low NOx burner provided by Altex via an integration section that allowed flow control and heat recovery to minimize combustion blower requirements; manage burner turndown; and recover waste heat. A new fully integrated control system was designed and developed that allowed one-touch system operation in all three available modes of operation: (1) CHP with both microturbine and burner firing for boiler heat input greater than 2 MMBtu/hr; (2) burner head only (BHO) when the microturbine is under service; and (3) microturbine only when boiler heat input requirements fall below 2 MMBtu/hr. This capability resulted in a burner turndown performance of nearly 10/1, a key advantage for this technology over conventional low NOx burners. Key components were then assembled into a cabinet with additional support systems for generator cooling and fuel supply. System checkout and performance tests were performed in the laboratory. The assembled system and its support equipment were then shipped and installed at a host facility where final performance tests were conducted following efforts to secure fabrication, air, and operating permits. The installed power burner is now in commercial operation and has achieved all the performance goals.

Castaldini, Carlo; Darby, Eric

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly technical progress report describes work performed under DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-94MT94011 during the period September 1, 1996 to December 31, 1996 which covers the nineth quarter of the project. The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of a fan powered infrared burner (IR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. The fan powered infrared burner is a technology introduced more recently in the residential and commercial markets. It is a surface combustor that elevates the temperature of the burner head to a radiant condition. A variety of metallic and ceramic materials are used for the burner heads. It has been demonstrated that infrared burners produce low CO and NO{sub x} emissions in a controlled geometric space. As the environmental regulations become more stringent, infrared burners are receiving increasing interests.

Bai, T.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Front Burner - Issue 18 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Front Burner - Issue 18 Front Burner - Issue 18 The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 18 addresses keeping kids safe on the Internet, cyber crime, and DOE Cyber awareness and...

17

Front Burner - Issue 13 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 Front Burner - Issue 13 The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 13 contained a message from the Associate Chief Information Officer (ACIO) for Cybersecurity informing readers...

18

Front Burner - Issue 14 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 Front Burner - Issue 14 The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 14 addresses the 2013 National Cybersecurity Awareness Month (NCSAM) Campaign and Phishing Scams. Cybersecurity...

19

Oil burner nozzle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oil burner nozzle for use with liquid fuels and solid-containing liquid fuels. The nozzle comprises a fuel-carrying pipe, a barrel concentrically disposed about the pipe, and an outer sleeve retaining member for the barrel. An atomizing vapor passes along an axial passageway in the barrel, through a bore in the barrel and then along the outer surface of the front portion of the barrel. The atomizing vapor is directed by the outer sleeve across the path of the fuel as it emerges from the barrel. The fuel is atomized and may then be ignited.

Wright, Donald G. (Rockville Center, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrared burner is a surface combustor that elevates the temperature of the burner head to a radiant condition. Applications of radiant burners includes boilers, air heaters, deep fat fryers, process heaters, and immersion heaters. On reason for the present interest in this type of burner is its low NO{sub x} emissions, which is attributed to the fact that a large proportion of the combustion heat is given out as radiation from the burner surface, which results in relatively low gas temperature in the combustion zone compared to that of a conventional free-flame burner. As a consequence, such burners produce less NO{sub x}, mainly by the so-called prompt-NO mechanism. A porous radiant burner testing facility was built, consisting of spectral radiance as well as flue gas composition measurements. Measurement capabilities were tested using methane; results were consistent with literature.

Bai, Tiejun; Yeboah, Y.D.; Sampath, R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Radial lean direct injection burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

22

Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalyzed combustion offers the advantages of increased fuel efficiency, decreased emissions (both NOx and CO), and an expanded operating range. These performance improvements are related to the ability of the catalyst to stabilize a flame at or within the burner media and to combust fuel at much lower temperatures. This technology has a diverse set of applications in industrial and commercial heating, including boilers for the paper, food and chemical industries. However, wide spread adoption of catalyzed combustion has been limited by the high cost of precious metals needed for the catalyst materials. The primary objective of this project was the development of an innovative catalyzed burner media for commercial and small industrial boiler applications that drastically reduce the unit cost of the catalyzed media without sacrificing the benefits associated with catalyzed combustion. The scope of this program was to identify both the optimum substrate material as well as the best performing catalyst construction to meet or exceed industry standards for durability, cost, energy efficiency, and emissions. It was anticipated that commercial implementation of this technology would result in significant energy savings and reduced emissions. Based on demonstrated achievements, there is a potential to reduce NOx emissions by 40,000 TPY and natural gas consumption by 8.9 TBtu in industries that heavily utilize natural gas for process heating. These industries include food manufacturing, polymer processing, and pulp and paper manufacturing. Initial evaluation of commercial solutions and upcoming EPA regulations suggests that small to midsized boilers in industrial and commercial markets could possibly see the greatest benefit from this technology. While out of scope for the current program, an extension of this technology could also be applied to catalytic oxidation for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Considerable progress has been made over the course of the grant period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

23

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fam powered, infrared, natural gas burners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of a fan powered infrared burner (PIR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. The fan powered infrared burner is a technology introduced more recently in the residential and commercial markets. It is a surface combustor that elevates the temperature of the burner head to a radiant condition. A variety of metallic and ceramic materials are used for the burner heads. It has been demonstrated that infrared burners produce low CO and NO{sub x} emissions in a controlled geometric space. This project consists of both experimental research and numerical analysis. To conduct the experiments, an experimental setup has been developed and installed in the Combustion Laboratory at Clerk Atlanta University (CAU). This setup consists of a commercial deep fat fryer that has been modified to allow in-situ radiation measurements on the surface of the infrared burner via a view port installed on the side wall of the oil vat. Proper instrumentation including fuel/air flow rate measurement, exhaust gas emission measurement, and radiation measurement has been developed. The project is progressing well. The scheduled tasks for this period of time were conducted smoothly. Specifically: 1. Baseline experimental study at CAU has been completed. The data are now under detailed analysis and will be reported in next quarterly report. 2. Theoretical formulation and analysis of the PIR burner performance model are continuing. Preliminary results have been obtained.

Bai, Tiejun

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Development of an air-atomized oil burner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new concept for the design of a residential oil burner is presented involving a low pressure, air atomizing nozzle. Advantages of this approach, relative to conventional, pressure atomized burners include: ability to operate at very low excess air levels without smoke, ability to operate at low (and possibly variable) rates, reduced boiler fouling, and low NO{sub x}. The nozzle used is a low pressure, airblast atomizer which can achieve fuel spray drop sizes similar to conventional nozzles and very good combustion performance with air pressure as low as 5 inches of water (1.24 kPa). A burner head has been developed for this nozzle and combustion test results are presented in a wide variety of equipment including cast iron and steel boilers, warm air furnaces, and water heaters over the firing rate range 0.25 gph to 1.0 gph (10 to 41 kW). Beyond the nozzle and combustion head the burner system must be developed and two approaches have been taken. The first involves a small, brushless DC motor/fan combination which uses high fan speed to achieve air pressures from 7 to 9 inches of water (1.74 to 2.24 kPa). Fuel is delivered to the atomizer at less than 1 psig (6.9 kPa) using a solenoid pump and flow metering orifice. At 0.35 gph (14 kW) the electric power draw of this burner is less than 100 watts. In a second configuration a conventional motor is used with a single stage fan which develops 5 to 6 inches of water pressure (1.24 to 1.50 kPa) at similar firing rates. This burner uses a conventional type fuel pump and metering orifice to deliver fuel. The fuel pump is driven by the fan motor, very much like a conventional burner. This second configuration is seen as more attractive to the heating industry and is now being commercialized. Field tests with this burner have been conducted at 0.35 gph (14 kW) with a side-wall vented boiler/water storage tank combination.

Butcher, T.A.; Celebi, Y.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Burner ignition system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electronic ignition system for a gas burner is battery operated. The battery voltage is applied through a DC-DC chopper to a step-up transformer to charge a capacitor which provides the ignition spark. The step-up transformer has a significant leakage reactance in order to limit current flow from the battery during initial charging of the capacitor. A tank circuit at the input of the transformer returns magnetizing current resulting from the leakage reactance to the primary in succeeding cycles. An SCR in the output circuit is gated through a voltage divider which senses current flow through a flame. Once the flame is sensed, further sparks are precluded. The same flame sensor enables a thermopile driven main valve actuating circuit. A safety valve in series with the main gas valve responds to a control pressure thermostatically applied through a diaphragm. The valve closes after a predetermined delay determined by a time delay orifice if the pilot gas is not ignited.

Carignan, Forest J. (Bedford, MA)

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

26

Criterion for burner design in thermal weed control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A covered infrared burner was designed and constructed so that it could be compared to an open-flame burner. Two covered burners, a high configuration and a low configuration, were constructed. A low configuration covered infrared burner, high...

Gonzalez, Telca Marisa

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

RENEWABLES RESEARCH Boiler Burner Energy System Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RENEWABLES RESEARCH Boiler Burner Energy System Technology (BBEST) for Firetube Boilers PIER Renewables Research September 2010 The Issue Researchers at Altex Technologies Corporation in Sunnyvale, industrial combined heat and power (CHP) boiler burner energy system technology ("BBEST"). Their research

28

Front Burner - Issue 16 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 Front Burner - Issue 16 The Cybersecurity Front Burner Issue No. 16 addresses Malware, the Worst Passwords of 2013, and the Flat Stanley and Stop.Think.Connect. Campaign....

29

Uniform-burning matrix burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Anselmo, Mark (Arvada, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Coleman Two Burner Stove The Coleman Matchlight 2-Burner Propane Stove is especially designed for outdoor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coleman Two Burner Stove The Coleman Matchlight 2-Burner Propane Stove is especially designed-burner propane stove has a high-pressure regulator that ensures a constant flame regardless of weather propane stove has a removable nickel-chrome-plated grate that makes for easy cleaning. The aluminized

Walker, Lawrence R.

31

Low-Emissions Burner Technology using Biomass-Derived Liquid...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emissions Burner Technology using Biomass-Derived Liquid Fuels Low-Emissions Burner Technology using Biomass-Derived Liquid Fuels This factsheet describes a project that developed...

32

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Integrated with Burners for Packaged...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Integrated with Burners for Packaged Boilers Providing Clean, Low-Cost,...

33

SEP Success Story: Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

SEP Success Story: Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste SEP Success Story: Biomass Burner Cogenerates Jobs and Electricity from Lumber Mill Waste...

34

Porous radiant burners having increased radiant output  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Means and methods for enhancing the output of radiant energy from a porous radiant burner by minimizing the scattering and increasing the adsorption, and thus emission of such energy by the use of randomly dispersed ceramic fibers of sub-micron diameter in the fabrication of ceramic fiber matrix burners and for use therein.

Tong, Timothy W. (Tempe, AZ); Sathe, Sanjeev B. (Tempe, AZ); Peck, Robert E. (Tempe, AZ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Reverberatory screen for a radiant burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to porous mat gas fired radiant burner panels utilizing improved reverberatory screens. The purpose of these screens is to boost the overall radiant output of the burner relative to a burner using no screen and the same fuel-air flow rates. In one embodiment, the reverberatory screen is fabricated from ceramic composite material, which can withstand higher operating temperatures than its metallic equivalent. In another embodiment the reverberatory screen is corrugated. The corrugations add stiffness which helps to resist creep and thermally induced distortions due to temperature or thermal expansion coefficient differences. As an added benefit, it has been unexpectedly discovered that the corrugations further increase the radiant efficiency of the burner. In a preferred embodiment, the reverberatory screen is both corrugated and made from ceramic composite material.

Gray, Paul E. (North East, MD)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Silane-propane ignitor/burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A silane propane burner for an underground coal gasification process which is used to ignite the coal and to controllably retract the injection point by cutting the injection pipe. A narrow tube with a burner tip is positioned in the injection pipe through which an oxidant (oxygen or air) is flowed. A charge of silane followed by a supply of fuel, such as propane, is flowed through the tube. The silane spontaneously ignites on contact with oxygen and burns the propane fuel.

Hill, Richard W. (Livermore, CA); Skinner, Dewey F. (Livermore, CA); Thorsness, Charles B. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Silane-propane ignitor/burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A silane propane burner for an underground coal gasification process which is used to ignite the coal and to controllably retract the injection point by cutting the injection pipe. A narrow tube with a burner tip is positioned in the injection pipe through which an oxidant (oxygen or air) is flowed. A charge of silane followed by a supply of fuel, such as propane, is flowed through the tube. The silane spontaneously ignites on contact with oxygen and burns the propane fuel.

Hill, R.W.; Skinner, D.F. Jr.; Thorsness, C.B.

1983-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

38

Burners and combustion apparatus for carbon nanomaterial production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides improved burners, combustion apparatus, and methods for carbon nanomaterial production. The burners of the invention provide sooting flames of fuel and oxidizing gases. The condensable products of combustion produced by the burners of this invention produce carbon nanomaterials including without limitation, soot, fullerenic soot, and fullerenes. The burners of the invention do not require premixing of the fuel and oxidizing gases and are suitable for use with low vapor pressure fuels such as those containing substantial amounts of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The burners of the invention can operate with a hot (e.g., uncooled) burner surface and require little, if any, cooling or other forms of heat sinking. The burners of the invention comprise one or more refractory elements forming the outlet of the burner at which a flame can be established. The burners of the invention provide for improved flame stability, can be employed with a wider range of fuel/oxidizer (e.g., air) ratios and a wider range of gas velocities, and are generally more efficient than burners using water-cooled metal burner plates. The burners of the invention can also be operated to reduce the formation of undesirable soot deposits on the burner and on surfaces downstream of the burner.

Alford, J. Michael (Lakewood, CO); Diener, Michael D. (Denver, CO); Nabity, James (Arvada, CO); Karpuk, Michael (Boulder, CO)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

39

Burners and combustion apparatus for carbon nanomaterial production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides improved burners, combustion apparatus, and methods for carbon nanomaterial production. The burners of the invention provide sooting flames of fuel and oxidizing gases. The condensable products of combustion produced by the burners of this invention produce carbon nanomaterials including without limitation, soot, fullerenic soot, and fullerenes. The burners of the invention do not require premixing of the fuel and oxidizing gases and are suitable for use with low vapor pressure fuels such as those containing substantial amounts of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The burners of the invention can operate with a hot (e.g., uncooled) burner surface and require little, if any, cooling or other forms of heat sinking. The burners of the invention comprise one or more refractory elements forming the outlet of the burner at which a flame can be established. The burners of the invention provide for improved flame stability, can be employed with a wider range of fuel/oxidizer (e.g., air) ratios and a wider range of gas velocities, and are generally more efficient than burners using water-cooled metal burner plates. The burners of the invention can also be operated to reduce the formation of undesirable soot deposits on the burner and on surfaces downstream of the burner.

Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D; Nabity, James; Karpuk, Michael

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

40

Low NO.sub.x burner system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low NO.sub.x burner system for a furnace having spaced apart front and rear walls, comprises a double row of cell burners on each of the front and rear walls. Each cell burner is either of the inverted type with a secondary air nozzle spaced vertically below a coal nozzle, or the non-inverted type where the coal nozzle is below the secondary air port. The inverted and non-inverted cells alternate or are provided in other specified patterns at least in the lower row of cells. A small percentage of the total air can be also provided through the hopper or hopper throat forming the bottom of the furnace, or through the boiler hopper side walls. A shallow angle impeller design also advances the purpose of the invention which is to reduce CO and H.sub.2 S admissions while maintaining low NO.sub.x generation.

Kitto, Jr., John B. (North Canton, OH); Kleisley, Roger J. (Plain Twp., Stark County, OH); LaRue, Albert D. (Summit, OH); Latham, Chris E. (Knox Twp., Columbiana County, OH); Laursen, Thomas A. (Canton, OH)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine has a housing within the casing of the gas turbine engine which housing defines a combustion chamber and at least one fuel burner secured to one end of the housing and extending into the combustion chamber. The other end of the fuel burner is arranged to slidably engage a fuel inlet connector extending radially inwardly from the engine casing so that fuel is supplied, from a source thereof, to the fuel burner. The fuel inlet connector and fuel burner coact to anchor the housing against axial movement relative to the engine casing while allowing relative radial movement between the engine casing and the fuel burner and, at the same time, providing fuel flow to the fuel burner. For dual fuel capability, a fuel injector is provided in said fuel burner with a flexible fuel supply pipe so that the fuel injector and fuel burner form a unitary structure which moves with the fuel burner.

Leto, Anthony (Franklin Lakes, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Refinery burner simulation design architecture summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the architectural design for a high fidelity simulation of a refinery and refinery burner, including demonstrations of impacts to the refinery if errors occur during the refinery process. The refinery burner model and simulation are a part of the capabilities within the Sandia National Laboratories Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE). Three components comprise the simulation: HMIs developed with commercial SCADA software, a PLC controller, and visualization software. All of these components run on different machines. This design, documented after the simulation development, incorporates aspects not traditionally seen in an architectural design, but that were utilized in this particular demonstration development. Key to the success of this model development and presented in this report are the concepts of the multiple aspects of model design and development that must be considered to capture the necessary model representation fidelity of the physical systems.

Pollock, Guylaine M.; McDonald, Michael James; Halbgewachs, Ronald D.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Safety Topic: Bunsen Burners and Hotplates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a medium to medium-high setting of the hot plate to heat most liquids, including water. Do not use the high setting to heat low-boiling liquids. The hot plate surface can reach a maximum temperature of 540 °C · Do.med.cornell.edu/ehs/updates/bunsen_burner_safety.htm #12;Hot Plate Procedures · Use only heat-resistant, borosilicate glassware, and check for cracks

Cohen, Robert E.

44

PULSE DRYING EXPERIMENT AND BURNER CONSTRUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non steady impingement heat transfer is measured. Impingement heating consumes 130 T-BTU/Yr in paper drying, but is only 25% thermally efficient. Pulse impingement is experimentally shown to enhance heat transfer by 2.8, and may deliver thermal efficiencies near 85%. Experimental results uncovered heat transfer deviations from steady theory and from previous investigators, indicating the need for further study and a better theoretical framework. The pulse burner is described, and its roll in pulse impingement is analyzed.

Robert States

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Coal-water mixture fuel burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention represents an improvement over the prior art by providing a rotating cup burner arrangement for use with a coal-water mixture fuel which applies a thin, uniform sheet of fuel onto the inner surface of the rotating cup, inhibits the collection of unburned fuel on the inner surface of the cup, reduces the slurry to a collection of fine particles upon discharge from the rotating cup, and further atomizes the fuel as it enters the combustion chamber by subjecting it to the high shear force of a high velocity air flow. Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide for improved combustion of a coal-water mixture fuel. It is another object of the present invention to provide an arrangement for introducing a coal-water mixture fuel into a combustion chamber in a manner which provides improved flame control and stability, more efficient combustion of the hydrocarbon fuel, and continuous, reliable burner operation. Yet another object of the present invention is to provide for the continuous, sustained combustion of a coal-water mixture fuel without the need for a secondary combustion source such as natural gas or a liquid hydrocarbon fuel. Still another object of the present invention is to provide a burner arrangement capable of accommodating a coal-water mixture fuel having a wide range of rheological and combustion characteristics in providing for its efficient combustion. 7 figs.

Brown, T.D.; Reehl, D.P.; Walbert, G.F.

1985-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

46

Advanced Burners and Combustion Controls for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADVANCED BURNERS AND COMBUSTION CONTROLS FOR INDUSTRIAL HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEMS J.L.FERRI GTE PRODUCTS CORPORATION TOWANDA, PA ABSTRACT When recuperators are installed on indus trial furnaces, burners and ratio control systems must... recuperators by demonstrating their technical and economi cal feasibility in well monitored field installations (1). During the contract, it became evident to GTE that a systems approach (recuperator, burner, and con troIs) is necessary to be accepted...

Ferri, J. L.

47

Simplified configuration for the combustor of an oil burner using a low pressure, high flow air-atomizing nozzle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to clean burning of fuel oil with air. More specifically, to a fuel burning combustion head using a low-pressure, high air flow atomizing nozzle so that there will be a complete combustion of oil resulting in a minimum emission of pollutants. The improved fuel burner uses a low pressure air atomizing nozzle that does not result in the use of additional compressors or the introduction of pressurized gases downstream, nor does it require a complex design. Inventors:

Butcher, Thomas A. (Port Jefferson, NY); Celebi, Yusuf (Middle Island, NY); Fisher, Leonard (Colrain, MA)

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Front Burner Cybersecurity The ACIO for Cybersecurity  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Special Edition of The Front Burner Cybersecurity The ACIO for Cybersecurity Issue No. 13 October 2012 National Cybersecurity Awareness Month October 2012 The Department of Energy...

49

Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For more than two decades, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has developed a range of low cost, in-furnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes ALSTOM's internally developed TFS 2000 firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As of 2004, more than 200 units representing approximately 75,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with ALSTOM low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coals to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coals, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing (retrofit) boiler equipment. If enacted, proposed Clear Skies legislation will, by 2008, require an average, effective, domestic NOx emissions rate of 0.16 lb/MMBtu, which number will be reduced to 0.13 lb/MMBtu by 2018. Such levels represent a 60% and 67% reduction, respectively, from the effective 2000 level of 0.40 lb/MMBtu. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. In light of these needs, ALSTOM, in cooperation with the DOE, is developing an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner which, when integrated with ALSTOM's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems, will provide a means to achieve less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx at less than 3/4 the cost of an SCR with low to no impact on balance of plant issues when firing a high volatile bituminous coal. Such coals can be more economic to fire than subbituminous or Powder River Basin (PRB) coals, but are more problematic from a NOx control standpoint as existing firing system technologies do not provide a means to meet current or anticipated regulations absent the use of an SCR. The DOE/ALSTOM program performed large pilot scale combustion testing in ALSTOM's Industrial Scale Burner Facility (ISBF) at its U.S. Power Plant Laboratories facility in Windsor, Connecticut. During this work, the near-field combustion environment was optimized to maximize NOx reduction while minimizing the impact on unburned carbon in ash, slagging and fouling, corrosion, and flame stability/turn-down under globally reducing conditions. Initially, ALSTOM utilized computational fluid dynamic modeling to evaluate a series of burner and/or near field stoichiometry controls in order to screen promising design concepts in advance of the large pilot scale testing. The third and final test, to be executed, will utilize several variants of the best nozzle tip configuration and compare performance with 3 different coals. The fuels to be tested will cover a wide range of coals commonly fired at US utilities. The completion of this work will provide sufficient data to allow ALSTOM to design, construct, and demonstrate a commercial version of an enhanced combustion low NOx pulverized coal burner. A preliminary cost/performance analysis of the developed enhanced combustion low NOx burner applied to ALSTOM's state-of-the-art TFS 2000 firing system was performed to show that the burner enhancements is a cost effective means to reduce NOx.

Ray Chamberland; Aku Raino; David Towle

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

Turbine Burners: Flameholding in Accelerating Flow W. A. Sirignano1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Turbine Burners: Flameholding in Accelerating Flow W. A. Sirignano1 , D. Dunn-Rankin2 , F. Liu3 B, Irvine Abstract A review of turbine-burner research and some relevant background issues is presented. Previous work on thermal cycle analysis for augmentative combustion in the passages of the turbine

Liu, Feng

51

J.R. Simplot: Burner Upgrade Project Improves Performance and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Company saved energy and money by increasing the efficiency of the steam system in its potato processing plant in Caldwell, Idaho. J.R. Simplot: Burner Upgrade Project Improves...

52

Advanced Petrochemical Process Heating with the Pyrocore Burner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural gas or refinery process gas and designed to take full advantage of the Pyrocore burner's radiant heat transfer characteristics. This will result in a process heater with design and performance attributes that will be attractive to users...ADVANCED PETROCHEMICAL PROCESS HEATING WITH THE PYROCORE BURNER WAYNE V. KRILL ANDREW C. MINDEN LESLIE W. DONALDSON, JR. Vice President Project Engineer Manager, Process Systems Research Alzeta Corporation Alzeta Corporation Gas Research...

Krill, W. V.; Minden, A. C.; Donaldson, L. W. Jr.

53

Advanced burner test reactor preconceptual design report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand, to address nuclear waste management concerns and to promote non-proliferation. Implementation of the GNEP requires development and demonstration of three major technologies: (1) Light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel separations technologies that will recover transuranics to be recycled for fuel but not separate plutonium from other transuranics, thereby providing proliferation-resistance; (2) Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) based on a fast spectrum that transmute the recycled transuranics to produce energy while also reducing the long term radiotoxicity and decay heat loading in the repository; and (3) Fast reactor fuel recycling technologies to recover and refabricate the transuranics for repeated recycling in the fast reactor system. The primary mission of the ABR Program is to demonstrate the transmutation of transuranics recovered from the LWR spent fuel, and hence the benefits of the fuel cycle closure to nuclear waste management. The transmutation, or burning of the transuranics is accomplished by fissioning and this is most effectively done in a fast spectrum. In the thermal spectrum of commercial LWRs, some transuranics capture neutrons and become even heavier transuranics rather than being fissioned. Even with repeated recycling, only about 30% can be transmuted, which is an intrinsic limitation of all thermal spectrum reactors. Only in a fast spectrum can all transuranics be effectively fissioned to eliminate their long-term radiotoxicity and decay heat. The Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) is the first step in demonstrating the transmutation technologies. It directly supports development of a prototype full-scale Advanced Burner Reactor, which would be followed by commercial deployment of ABRs. The primary objectives of the ABTR are: (1) To demonstrate reactor-based transmutation of transuranics as part of an advanced fuel cycle; (2) To qualify the transuranics-containing fuels and advanced structural materials needed for a full-scale ABR; and (3) To support the research, development and demonstration required for certification of an ABR standard design by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The ABTR should also address the following additional objectives: (1) To incorporate and demonstrate innovative design concepts and features that may lead to significant improvements in cost, safety, efficiency, reliability, or other favorable characteristics that could promote public acceptance and future private sector investment in ABRs; (2) To demonstrate improved technologies for safeguards and security; and (3) To support development of the U.S. infrastructure for design, fabrication and construction, testing and deployment of systems, structures and components for the ABRs. Based on these objectives, a pre-conceptual design of a 250 MWt ABTR has been developed; it is documented in this report. In addition to meeting the primary and additional objectives listed above, the lessons learned from fast reactor programs in the U.S. and worldwide and the operating experience of more than a dozen fast reactors around the world, in particular the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II have been incorporated into the design of the ABTR to the extent possible.

Chang, Y. I.; Finck, P. J.; Grandy, C.; Cahalan, J.; Deitrich, L.; Dunn, F.; Fallin, D.; Farmer, M.; Fanning, T.; Kim, T.; Krajtl, L.; Lomperski, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Momozaki, Y.; Sienicki, J.; Park, Y.; Tang, Y.; Reed, C.; Tzanos, C; Wiedmeyer, S.; Yang, W.; Chikazawa, Y.; JAEA

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

54

Dual-water mixture fuel burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coal-water mixture (CWM) burner includes a conically shaped rotating cup into which fuel comprised of coal particles suspended in a slurry is introduced via a first, elongated inner tube coupled to a narrow first end portion of the cup. A second, elongated outer tube is coaxially positioned about the first tube and delivers steam to the narrow first end of the cup. The fuel delivery end of the inner first tube is provided with a helical slot on its lateral surface for directing the CWM onto the inner surface of the rotating cup in the form of a uniform, thin sheet which, under the influence of the cup's centrifugal force, flows toward a second, open, expanded end portion of the rotating cup positioned immediately adjacent to a combustion chamber. The steam delivered to the rotating cup wets its inner surface and inhibits the coal within the CWM from adhering to the rotating cup. A primary air source directs a high velocity air flow coaxially about the expanded discharge end of the rotating cup for applying a shear force to the CWM in atomizing the fuel mixture for improved combustion. A secondary air source directs secondary air into the combustion chamber adjacent to the outlet of the rotating cup at a desired pitch angle relative to the fuel mixture/steam flow to promote recirculation of hot combustion gases within the ignition zone for increased flame stability.

Brown, Thomas D. (Finleyville, PA); Reehl, Douglas P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Walbert, Gary F. (Library, PA)

1986-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

55

Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For more than two decades, Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom) has developed a range of low cost, infurnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes Alstom's internally developed TFS 2000{trademark} firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy. As of the date of this report, more than 270 units representing approximately 80,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with Alstom low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coal to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coal, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing boiler equipment. On March 10, 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR). CAIR requires 25 Eastern states to reduce NOx emissions from the power generation sector by 1.7 million tons in 2009 and 2.0 million tons by 2015. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. The overall objective of the work is to develop an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner, which, when integrated with Alstom's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems will provide a means to achieve: Less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a high volatile Eastern or Western bituminous coal, Less than 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a subbituminous coal, NOx reduction costs at least 25% lower than the costs of an SCR, Validation of the NOx control technology developed through large (15 MWt) pilot scale demonstration, and Documentation required for economic evaluation and commercial application. During the project performance period, Alstom performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and large pilot scale combustion testing in its Industrial Scale Burner Facility (ISBF) at its U.S. Power Plant Laboratories facility in Windsor, Connecticut in support of these objectives. The NOx reduction approach was to optimize near-field combustion to ensure that minimum NOx emissions are achieved with minimal impact on unburned carbon in ash, slagging and fouling, corrosion, and flame stability/turn-down. Several iterations of CFD and combustion testing on a Midwest coal led to an optimized design, which was extensively combustion tested on a range of coals. The data from these tests were then used to validate system costs and benefits versus SCR. Three coals were evaluated during the bench-scale and large pilot-scale testing tasks. The three coals ranged from a very reactive subbituminous coal to a moderately reactive Western bituminous coal to a much less reactive Midwest bituminous coal. Bench-scale testing was comprised of standard ASTM properties evaluation, plus more detailed characterization of fuel properties through drop tube furnace testing and thermogravimetric analysis. Bench-scale characterization of the three test coals showed that both NOx emissions and combustion performance are a strong function of coal properties. The more reactive coals evolved more of their fuel bound nitrogen in the substoichiometric main burner zone than less reactive coal, resulting in the potential for lower NOx emissions. From a combustion point of view, the more reactive coals also showed lower carbon in ash and CO values than the less reactive coal at any given main burner zone stoichiometry. According to bench-scale results, the subbituminous coal was found to be the most amenable to both low NOx, and acceptably low combustibles in the flue gas, in an air staged low NOx system. The Midwest bituminous coal, by contrast, was predicted to be the most challenging of the three coals, with the Western bituminous coal predicted to beh

David Towle; Richard Donais; Todd Hellewell; Robert Lewis; Robert Schrecengost

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

Flame quality monitor system for fixed firing rate oil burners  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for determining and indicating the flame quality, or efficiency of the air-fuel ratio, in a fixed firing rate heating unit, such as an oil burning furnace, is provided. When the flame brightness falls outside a preset range, the flame quality, or excess air, has changed to the point that the unit should be serviced. The flame quality indicator output is in the form of lights mounted on the front of the unit. A green light indicates that the flame is about in the same condition as when the burner was last serviced. A red light indicates a flame which is either too rich or too lean, and that servicing of the burner is required. At the end of each firing cycle, the flame quality indicator goes into a hold mode which is in effect during the period that the burner remains off. A yellow or amber light indicates that the burner is in the hold mode. In this mode, the flame quality lights indicate the flame condition immediately before the burner turned off. Thus the unit can be viewed when it is off, and the flame condition at the end of the previous firing cycle can be observed.

Butcher, Thomas A. (Pt. Jefferson, NY); Cerniglia, Philip (Moriches, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

OPTIMIZATION OF COAL PARTICLE FLOW PATTERNS IN LOW NOX BURNERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well understood that the stability of axial diffusion flames is dependent on the mixing behavior of the fuel and combustion air streams. Combustion aerodynamic texts typically describe flame stability and transitions from laminar diffusion flames to fully developed turbulent flames as a function of increasing jet velocity. Turbulent diffusion flame stability is greatly influenced by recirculation eddies that transport hot combustion gases back to the burner nozzle. This recirculation enhances mixing and heats the incoming gas streams. Models describing these recirculation eddies utilize conservation of momentum and mass assumptions. Increasing the mass flow rate of either fuel or combustion air increases both the jet velocity and momentum for a fixed burner configuration. Thus, differentiating between gas velocity and momentum is important when evaluating flame stability under various operating conditions. The research efforts described herein are part of an ongoing project directed at evaluating the effect of flame aerodynamics on NO{sub x} emissions from coal fired burners in a systematic manner. This research includes both experimental and modeling efforts being performed at the University of Arizona in collaboration with Purdue University. The objective of this effort is to develop rational design tools for optimizing low NO{sub x} burners. Experimental studies include both cold-and hot-flow evaluations of the following parameters: primary and secondary inlet air velocity, coal concentration in the primary air, coal particle size distribution and flame holder geometry. Hot-flow experiments will also evaluate the effect of wall temperature on burner performance.

Jost O.L. Wendt; Gregory E. Ogden; Jennifer Sinclair; Stephanus Budilarto

2001-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

58

High Efficiency Burners by Retrofit - A Simple Inexpensive Way to Improve Combustion Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Existing direct fired process heaters and steam boilers can have their efficiencies remarkably improved, and thus cut the fuel bill, by conversion from conventional type natural draft burners to high intensity, "forced draft" type burners...

Rogers, W. T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Slurry burner for mixture of carbonaceous material and water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is intended to overcome the limitations of the prior art by providing a fuel burner particularly adapted for the combustion of carbonaceous material-water slurries which includes a stationary high pressure tip-emulsion atomizer which directs a uniform fuel into a shearing air flow as the carbonaceous material-water slurry is directed into a combustion chamber, inhibits the collection of unburned fuel upon and within the atomizer, reduces the slurry to a collection of fine particles upon discharge into the combustion chamber, and regulates the operating temperature of the burner as well as primary air flow about the burner and into the combustion chamber for improved combustion efficiency, no atomizer plugging and enhanced flame stability.

Nodd, D.G.; Walker, R.J.

1985-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

60

MINIMIZATION OF NO EMISSIONS FROM MULTI-BURNER COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An initial testing campaign was carried out during the summer of 2000 to evaluate the impact of multiburner firing on NOx emissions. Extensive data had been collected during the Fall of 1999 and Spring of 2000 using a single pulverized-coal (PC) burner, and this data collection was funded by a separate Department of Energy program, the Combustion 2000 Low Emission Boiler System (LEBS) project under the direction of DB Riley. This single-burner data was thus available for comparison with NOx emissions obtained while firing three burners at the same overall load and operating conditions. A range of operating conditions were explored that were compatible with single-burner data, and thus the emission trends as a function of air staging, burner swirl and other parameters will be described below. In addition, a number of burner-to-burner operational variations were explored that provided interesing insight on their potential impact on NOx emissions. Some of these variations include: running one burner very fuel rich while running the others fuel lean; varying the swirl of a single burner while holding others constant; increasing the firing rate of a single burner while decreasing the others. In general, the results to date indicated that multiburner firing yielded higher NOx emissions than single burner firing at the same fuel rate and excess air. At very fuel rich burner stoichiometries (SR < 0.75), the difference between multiple and single burners became indistinguishable. This result is consistent with previous single-burner data that showed that at very rich stoichiometries the NOx emissions became independent of burner settings such as air distributions, velocities and burner swirl.

E.G.Eddings; A. Molina; D.W. Pershing; A.F. Sarofim; K.A. Davis; M.P. Heap; T.H. Fletcher; H. Zhang

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Development of quick repairing technique for ceramic burner in hot stove of blast furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Refractories of ceramic burner in hot stoves at Wakayama No. 4 blast furnace were damaged. There are only three hot stoves, so repairing must be done in a short. Therefore, a quick repairing technique for ceramic burners has been developed, and two ceramic burners were repaired in just 48 hours.

Kondo, Atsushi; Doura, Kouji; Nakamura, Hirofumi [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Wakayama (Japan). Wakayama Steel Works

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

62

BURNER DEVELOPMENT AND OPERABILITY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH STEADY FLOWING SYNGAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BURNER DEVELOPMENT AND OPERABILITY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH STEADY FLOWING SYNGAS FIRED COMBUSTORS-Mu¨nchen, Garching, Germany This article addresses the impact of syngas fuel composition on combustor blowout, flash flashback mechanisms are present in swirling flows, and the key thermophysical properties of a syngas

Lieuwen, Timothy C.

63

Fire suppression efficiency screening using a counterflow cylindrical burner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and validation of a counterflow cylindrical burner for fire suppression efficiency screening are described. The stability limits of the burner were mapped using various fuel (propane) and oxidizer (air) flows. The stability envelopes compared favorably with those reported in the literature. The apparatus was characterized using inert gases (argon, helium, and nitrogen), and the relative fire suppression efficiency ranking of these three gases was found to be commensurate with that from cup-burner tests. For liquid suppression experiments, a piezoelectric droplet generator was used to form droplets (<100 {micro}m). Water was used as a representative liquid suppressant to study the feasibility of using such a burner for screening liquid agents. Extinction was facilitated with the addition of water droplets, and the effect of water became more pronounced when its application rate was increased. Suppression experiments using water with and without nitrogen dilution in the oxidizer stream were also performed. Flame extinction due to the combined effect of water and nitrogen dilution was demonstrated.

Yang, J.C.; Donnelly, M.K.; Prive, N.; Grosshandler, W.L.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Study of the Effects of Ambient Conditions Upon the Performance of Fan Powered, Infrared Natural Gas Burners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation was to characterize the operation of a fan-powered, infrared burner (IR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions, develop numerical model to simulate the burner performances, and provide design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance.

Clark Atlanta University

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

65

OPTIMIZATION OF COAL PARTICLE FLOW PATTERNS IN LOW NOX BURNERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed research is directed at evaluating the effect of flame aerodynamics on NO{sub x} emissions from coal fired burners in a systematic manner. This fundamental research includes both experimental and modeling efforts being performed at the University of Arizona in collaboration with Purdue University. The objective of this effort is to develop rational design tools for optimizing low NO{sub x} burners to the kinetic emissions limit (below 0.2 lb./MMBTU). Experimental studies include both cold and hot flow evaluations of the following parameters: flame holder geometry, secondary air swirl, primary and secondary inlet air velocity, coal concentration in the primary air and coal particle size distribution. Hot flow experiments will also evaluate the effect of wall temperature on burner performance. Cold flow studies will be conducted with surrogate particles as well as pulverized coal. The cold flow furnace will be similar in size and geometry to the hot-flow furnace but will be designed to use a laser Doppler velocimeter/phase Doppler particle size analyzer. The results of these studies will be used to predict particle trajectories in the hot-flow furnace as well as to estimate the effect of flame holder geometry on furnace flow field. The hot-flow experiments will be conducted in a novel near-flame down-flow pulverized coal furnace. The furnace will be equipped with externally heated walls. Both reactors will be sized to minimize wall effects on particle flow fields. The cold-flow results will be compared with Fluent computation fluid dynamics model predictions and correlated with the hot-flow results with the overall goal of providing insight for novel low NO{sub x} burner geometry's.

Jost O.L. Wendt; Gregory E. Ogden; Jennifer Sinclair; Stephanus Budilarto

2001-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

66

Downhole burner systems and methods for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas burner assembly for heating a subsurface formation includes an oxidant conduit, a fuel conduit, and a plurality of oxidizers coupled to the oxidant conduit. At least one of the oxidizers includes a mix chamber for mixing fuel from the fuel conduit with oxidant from the oxidant conduit, an igniter, and a shield. The shield includes a plurality of openings in communication with the oxidant conduit. At least one flame stabilizer is coupled to the shield.

Farmayan, Walter Farman (Houston, TX); Giles, Steven Paul (Damon, TX); Brignac, Jr., Joseph Phillip (Katy, TX); Munshi, Abdul Wahid (Houston, TX); Abbasi, Faraz (Sugarland, TX); Clomburg, Lloyd Anthony (Houston, TX); Anderson, Karl Gregory (Missouri City, TX); Tsai, Kuochen (Katy, TX); Siddoway, Mark Alan (Katy, TX)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced burner test Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

POWER Vol. 21, No. 1, JanuaryFebruary 2005 Summary: each test sequence. IV. Blowout Phenomenology A. Piloted Burner In this section, we describe... attachment to nonattachment at...

68

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide burner fuel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tennessee Technological University Collection: Engineering 51 An Atomized Spray Vortex Incinerator for Burning Dilute Siudge* Summary: of the burner gases with the sludge....

69

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide burner reactors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Design 85 (2010) 14881491 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Summary: subcritical advanced burner reactor, Nuclear technology 162 (2008). 9 M. Kotschenreuther,...

70

Drug Retention Times  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user

Center for Human Reliability Studies

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Drug Retention Times  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

Center for Human Reliability Studies

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Experimental and numerical analysis of isothermal turbulent flows in interacting low NOx burners in coal-fired furnaces   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal firing power stations represent the second largest source of global NOx emissions. The current practice of predicting likely exit NOx levels from multi-burner furnaces on the basis of single burner test rig data has been proven inadequate...

Cvoro, Valentina

73

Slurry burner for mixture of carbonaceous material and water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A carbonaceous material-water slurry burner includes a high pressure tip-emulsion atomizer for directing a carbonaceous material-water slurry into a combustion chamber for burning therein without requiring a support fuel or oxygen enrichment of the combustion air. Introduction of the carbonaceous material-water slurry under pressure forces it through a fixed atomizer wherein the slurry is reduced to small droplets by mixing with an atomizing air flow and directed into the combustion chamber. The atomizer includes a swirler located immediately adjacent to where the fuel slurry is introduced into the combustion chamber and which has a single center channel through which the carbonaceous material-water slurry flows into a plurality of diverging channels continuous with the center channel from which the slurry exits the swirler immediately adjacent to an aperture in the combustion chamber. The swirler includes a plurality of slots around its periphery extending the length thereof through which the atomizing air flows and by means of which the atomizing air is deflected so as to exert a maximum shear force upon the carbonaceous material-water slurry as it exits the swirler and enters the combustion chamber. A circulating coolant system or boiler feed water is provided around the periphery of the burner along the length thereof to regulate burner operating temperature, eliminate atomizer plugging, and inhibit the generation of sparklers, thus increasing combustion efficiency. A secondary air source directs heated air into the combustion chamber to promote recirculation of the hot combustion gases within the combustion chamber.

Nodd, Dennis G. (West Mifflin, PA); Walker, Richard J. (Bethel Park, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

REAL TIME FLAME MONITORING OF GASIFIER BURNER AND INJECTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is submitted to the United States Department of Energy in partial fulfillment of the contractual requirements for Phase I of the project titled, ''Real Time Flame Monitoring of Gasifier Burner and Injectors'', under co-operative agreement number DE-FS26-02NT41585. The project is composed of three one-year budget periods. The work in each year is divided into separate Tasks to facilitate project management, orderly completion of all project objectives, budget control, and critical path application of personnel and equipment. This Topical Report presents results of the Task 1 and 2 work. The 2 D optical sensor was developed to monitor selected UV and visible wavelengths to collect accurate flame characterization information regarding mixing, flame shape, and flame rich/lean characteristic. Flame richness, for example, was determined using OH and CH intensity peaks in the 300 to 500 nanometer range of the UV and visible spectrum. The laboratory burner was operated over a wide range of air to fuel ratio conditions from fuel rich to fuel lean. The sooty oxygen enriched air flames were established to test the sensor ability to characterize flame structures with substantial presence of hot solid particles emitting strong ''black body radiation''. The knowledge gained in these experiments will be very important when the sensor is used for gasifier flame analyses. It is expected that the sensor when installed on the Global Energy gasifier will be exposed to complex radiation patterns. The measured energy will be a combination of spectra emitted by the combusting gases, hot solid particulates, and hot walls of the gasifier chamber. The ability to separate flame emissions from the ''black body emissions'' will allow the sensor to accurately determine flame location relative to the gasifier walls and the injectors, as well as to analyze the flame's structure and condition. Ultimately, this information should enable the gasification processes to be monitored and controlled and as a result increase durability and efficiency of the gasifier. To accomplish goals set for Task 2 GTI will utilize the CANMET Coal Gasification Research facility. The Entrained Coal Gasifier Burner Test Stand has been designed and is currently under construction in the CANMET Energy Technology Center (CETC), the research and technology arm of Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). This Gasifier Burner Stand (GBS) is a scaled-down mock-up of a working gasifier combustion system that can provide the flexible platform needed in the second year of the project to test the flame sensor. The GBS will be capable of simulating combustion and gasification processes occurring in commercial gasifiers, such as Texaco, Shell, and Wabash River.

James Servaites; Serguei Zelepouga; David Rue

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Industrial pulverized coal low-NO{sub x} burner. Phase 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arthur D. Little, Inc., jointly with its university partner, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and its industrial partner, Hauck Manufacturing Corporation, is developing a low NO{sub x} pulverized coal burner for use in industrial processes, including those which may require preheated air or oxygen enrichment. The design of the burner specifically addresses the critical performance requirements of industrial systems, namely: high heat release rates, short flames, even heat flux distribution, and high combustion efficiency. The design is applicable to furnaces, industrial boilers, and cement kilns. The development program for this burner includes a feasibility analysis, performance modelling, development of the burner prototype design, and assessment of the economic viability of the burner. The Phase 1 activities covered by this report consisted of three principal tasks: preliminary burner design; fluid flow/combustion modelling and analyses; and market evaluation. The preliminary design activities included the selection of a design coal for the Phase 1 design, preliminary design layout, and preliminary sizing of the burner components. Modelling and analysis were conducted for the coal pyrolysis zone, the rich combustion zone and the lean bumout zone. Both chemical kinetics and one-dimensional coal combustion modelling were performed. The market evaluation included a review of existing industrial coal use, identification of potential near- and long-term markets and an assessment of the optimum burner sizes.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

CFCC radiant burner assessment. Final report, April 1, 1992--July 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to identify methods of improving the performance of gas-fired radiant burners through the use of Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCCs). Methods have been identified to improve the price and performance characteristics of the porous surface burner. Results are described.

Schweizer, S.; Sullivan, J.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Low NOx burner retrofits and enhancements for a 518 MW oil and gas fired boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low NOx oil/gas burners originally supplied to Jacksonville Electric Authority, Northside No. 3 .500 MW unit, were based on a duplex air register design with lobed spray oil atomizers providing additional fuel staging. Although the burners could meet the targeted NOx levels of 0.3 and 0.2 lbs/10{sup 6} BTU on oil and gas respectively. There was insufficient margin on these NOx levels to enable continuous low NOx operation to be achieved. Further burner development was undertaken based on improved aerodynamic control within the burner design to give an approximate 25% improvement in NOx emission reduction thus providing an adequate operating margin. This `RoBTAS` (Round Burner with Tilted Air Supply) burner design based on techniques developed successfully for front wall coal firing applications achieved the required NOx reductions in full scale firing demonstrations on both heavy fuel oil and natural gas firing. The paper describes the development work and the subsequent application of the `RoBTAS` burners to the Northside No. 3 boiler. The burner will also be test fired on Orimulsion fuel and thus the comparison between heavy fuel oil firing and Orimulsion firing under ultra low NOx conditions will be made.

King, J.J. [Jacksonville Electric Authority, FL (United States); Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R. [International Combustion Ltd., Derby (United Kingdom). Rolls-Royce Industrial Power Group

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Full-scale demonstration Low-NO sub x Cell trademark Burner retrofit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Low-NO{sub x} Cell{trademark} Burner operates on the principle of staged combustion. The lower burner of each two-nozzle cell is modified to accommodate all the fuel input previously handled by two nozzles. Secondary air, less than theoretically required for complete combustion, is introduced to the lower burner. The remainder of secondary air is directed to the upper port'' of each cell to complete the combustion process. B W/EPRI have thoroughly tested the LNCB{trademark} at two pilot scales (6 million Btu per hour and 100 million Btu per hour), and tested a single full-scale burner in a utility boiler. Combustion tests at two scales have confirmed NO{sub x} reduction with the low-NO{sub x} cell on the order of 50% relative to the standard cell burner at optimum operating conditions. The technology is now ready for full unit, full-scale demonstration.

Not Available

1992-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

79

Process and apparatus for igniting a burner in an inert atmosphere  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

According to this invention there is provided a process and apparatus for the ignition of a pilot burner in an inert atmosphere without substantially contaminating the inert atmosphere. The process includes the steps of providing a controlled amount of combustion air for a predetermined interval of time to the combustor then substantially simultaneously providing a controlled mixture of fuel and air to the pilot burner and to a flame generator. The controlled mixture of fuel and air to the flame generator is then periodically energized to produce a secondary flame. With the secondary flame the controlled mixture of fuel and air to the pilot burner and the combustion air is ignited to produce a pilot burner flame. The pilot burner flame is then used to ignited a mixture of main fuel and combustion air to produce a main burner flame. The main burner flame then is used to ignite a mixture of process derived fuel and combustion air to produce products of combustion for use as an inert gas in a heat treatment process.

Coolidge, Dennis W. (Katy, TX); Rinker, Franklin G. (Perrysburg, OH)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Low NOx modifications on front-fired pulverized coal fuel burners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burner optimizations and modifications were performed on Public Service of New Hampshire`s Schiller Units 4, 5, and 6. These are Foster-Wheeler 50 MWg pulverized coal and No.6 fuel oil-fired boilers with six burners each. Burner optimizations consisted of fuel flow, primary air, secondary air testing and balancing. Burner modifications consisted of the addition of circumferentially and radially staged flame stabilizers, circumferentially-staged coal spreaders, and modifications to the existing pulverized coal pipe. NO{sub x} emissions on Unit 6 of .41 lb/mmBtu were achieved at optimized burner settings at full load with all burners in service and without the use of overfire air or bias firing. This represented a 50% NO{sub x} reduction from the average pre-modification baseline NO{sub x} emissions of .81 lb/mmBtu prior to the optimizations and burner modification program. NO{sub x} emissions as low as .38 lb/mmBtu were achieved with the use of overfire air. There was essentially no quantifiable change in LOIs (baseline LOIs averaged 40%). Furnace excess O{sub 2} as low as 1.2% was achieved with CO emissions of less than 200 ppm. Total installed costs including the overfire air system were approximately $7/kW.

Owens, B.; Hitchko, M. [Public Service of New Hampshire, Manchester, NH (United States); Broderick, R.G. [RJM Corp., Ridgefield, CT (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

An Energy Analysis of the Catalytic Combustion Burner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Heating technologies for energy efficiency Vol.III-1-3 An Energy Analysis of the Catalytic Combustion Burner Qingshan Dong Postgraduate Shihong. Zhang Ph. D. Professor Zhiyin Duan Postgraduate Qi Zhou... for energy efficiency Vol.III-1-3 Tab. 1 Compositions of natural gas Compositions CH4 C2H6 C3H8 i-C4H10 n-C4H10 CO2 N2 O2 Volume fraction (%) 93.908 0.951 0.198 0.012 0.011 2.657 1.894 0.369 Lower heating value (kJ Nm-3) 35906 64397 93244 122857...

Dong, Q.; Zhang, S.; Duan, Z.; Zhou, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Heat transfer and combustion characteristics of a burner with a rotary regenerative heat exchanger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have developed a Rotary Regenerative Combustion (RRX) System, which is coupled with a compact high efficiency regenerative air heat exchanger and a combustion burner. This system contributes to saving energy of fuel firing industrial furnaces and decreases NO{sub x} emission. This technology can be considered as a solution of greenhouse problem. This paper, discusses a compact high efficiency regenerative air heat exchanger in comparison with the existing types of regenerative burners and reverse firing with high momentum fuel jet (with motive fluid) in the furnace. This burner is compact in size, with high fuel efficiency, low NOx emission, easy to operate, and reliable, based on the results of field tests and commercial operations. The authors can say that the RRX system is a regenerative burner of the second generation.

Hirose, Yasuo; Kaji, Hitoshi; Arai, Norio

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Segmented vs conventional numerals: legibility and long term retention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the environmental chamber. Sub jects The subjects were thirty male students between the ages of 1g and 27 from the Industrial Engineering department at Texas A&M University. Subjects were divided into three groups of 10. Procedure Exposure time and number... December 1971 Ma]or Subject: Industrial Engineering SEGMENTED VS CONVENTIONAL NUMERALS: LEGIBILITY AND LONG TERM RETENTION A Thesis STEVE EDGAR HILL Approved as to style and content by: Elias Chairman of Committee) r. A. W. ortham (Head...

Hill, Steve Edgar

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Development, Application and Performance of Venturi Register L. E. A. Burner System for Firing Oil and Gas Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT, APPLICATION AND PERFORMANCE OF VENTURI REGISTER L. E. A. BURNER SYSTEM FOR FIRING OIL AND GAS FUELS A. D. Cawte CEA Combustion, Inc. Stamford, Connecticut INTRODUCTION The effect of reducing excess air as a means of curtailing..., extensive investigation work was undertaken us ing the water analog model techniques developed by Associated British Combustion for burner design. The development work resulted in the burner design known today as the Venturi Register, LEA (low excess air...

Cawte, A. D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Latest developments and application of DB Riley's low NOx CCV{reg{underscore}sign} burner technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent developments in DB Riley (DBR) low NOx burner technology and the application of this technology in coal fired utility boilers are discussed. Since the promulgation of the Clean Air Act Amendment in 1990, DBR has sold nearly 1,500 Controlled Combustion Venturi (CCV{reg{underscore}sign}) burners on pulverized coal fired utility boilers reducing NOx emissions 50--70% from uncontrolled levels. This technology has been retrofitted on boiler designs ranging in size and type from 50 MW front wall fired boilers to 1,300 MW opposed fired cell type boilers. In DBR's latest version of the CCV{reg{underscore}sign} burner, a second controlled flow air zone was added to enhance NOx control capability. Other developments included improved burner air flow measurement accuracy and several mechanical design upgrades such as new coal spreader designs for 3 year wear life. Test results of the CCV{reg{underscore}sign} dual air zone burner in DBR's 100 million Btu/hr (29 MW) coal burner test facility are presented. In the test program, coals from four utility boiler sites were fired to provide a range of coal properties. A baseline high volatile bituminous coal was also fired to provide a comparison with 1992 test data for the CCV{reg{underscore}sign} single register burner. The tests results showed that the second air zone enhanced NOx reduction capability by an additional 20% over the single register design. Computational fluid dynamic (DFD) modeling results of the CCV{reg{underscore}sign} dual air zone burner are also presented showing near field mixing patterns conducive to low NOx firing. DBR was recently awarded Phase IV of the Low Emission Boiler System (LEBS) program by the US Department of Energy to build a proof of concept facility representing the next major advancement in pulverized coal burning technology. A key part of winning that award were test results of the CCV{reg{underscore}sign} dual air zone burner with advanced air staging and coal reburning in a 100 million Btu/hr (20 MW) U-fired slagging combustor test facility. These results showed NOx emissions of less than 0.2 lb/million Btu (0.086 g/MJ) while converting the coal ash into an inert, non-leachable solid. This results is an 80% reduction in NOx emissions from currently operating U-fired slagging boilers.

Penterson, C.; Ake, T.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Thermionic-cogeneration-burner assessment study. Second quarterly technical progress report, January-March 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance analysis work continued with the completion of the programming of the mathematical model and with the start of a series of parametric analyses. Initial studies predict that approximately 25 to 30% of the heat contained in the flue gas can be passed through the thermionic converters (TEC) and then be converted at 12 to 15% efficiency into electrical power. This results in up to 17 kWe per 1 million Btu/h burner firing rate. This is a 4 to 10 percent energy saving over power produced at the utility. The thermal burner design and construction have been completed, as well as initial testing on the furnace and preheat systems. The following industries are still considered viable options for use of the thermionic cogeneration burner: chlor-alkali, alumina-aluminum, copper refining, steel and gray iron, industries using resistance heating, electrolytic industries and electrochemical industries. Information gathered on these industries is presented.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

An evolution of nozzle design: The low NOx burner experience at the Baldwin Power Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Illinois Power Company (IPC) installed low NO{sub x} burners on Baldwin Unit 3 in the Spring of 1994. Although the NO{sub x} reduction performance of these burners has been outstanding, IPC suffered catastrophic nozzle failure in the first 8 weeks of operation. The nozzles were then modified and later, replaced. Within 1 week of operation, 2 of the new nozzles also failed. This paper traces the development of the original nozzle, the influences-of other nozzle failures on its design, the determination of the cause of the original and subsequent failures, and the current state of the nozzles.

Forney, D.W. [Illinois Power Co., Decatur, IL (United States); Murray, D.G. [Rolls Royce Industrial Power, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Beal, P.R. [Rolls-Royce Industrial Power, Inc., Derby (United Kingdom)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Gas-phase and catalytic combustion in heat-recirculating burners Jeongmin Ahn, Craig Eastwood, Lars Sitzki* and Paul D. Ronney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Gas-phase and catalytic combustion in heat-recirculating burners Jeongmin Ahn, Craig Eastwood title: Extinction limits in excess enthalpy burners To be published in Proceedings of the Combustion-phase and catalytic combustion in heat-recirculating burners Jeongmin Ahn, Craig Eastwood, Lars Sitzki* and Paul D

89

Establishing criteria for the design of a combination parallel and cross-flaming covered burner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

it with the two open flame practices. This evaluation was performed by moving the burners over an area that would monitor the temperatures at specified heights and locations. Temperatures were measured using thermocouples placed at heights 7-mm, 150-mm, and 300...

Stark, Christopher Charles

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

ASU nitrogen sweep gas in hydrogen separation membrane for production of HRSG duct burner fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to the use of low pressure N2 from an air separation unit (ASU) for use as a sweep gas in a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) to increase syngas H2 recovery and make a near-atmospheric pressure (less than or equal to about 25 psia) fuel for supplemental firing in the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) duct burner.

Panuccio, Gregory J.; Raybold, Troy M.; Jamal, Agil; Drnevich, Raymond Francis

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

91

Note LPSC 07-37 The TMSR as Actinide Burner and Thorium Breeder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note LPSC 07-37 The TMSR as Actinide Burner and Thorium Breeder E. Merle-Lucotte, D. Heuer, C. Le actinides. Studies [1] have thus been done on the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor (MSBR) [2] of Oak-Ridge to re fluoride salt LiF- ThF4 with 28%- mole 232 Th. This reflector, corresponding to a fertile blanket

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

92

Measurement and analysis of heating of paper with gas-fired infrared burner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Gas-fired IR heaters produce combustion on the burner surface by ignition of a pre-mixed air and fuel streams. The combustion raises the surface temperature to ranges of 800-1,100°C to emit radiation, mainly in the medium IR range, which has a...

Husain, Abdullah Nadir

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Design and Evaluation of a High Temperature Burner Duct Recuperator System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W) has completed a program to design, construct, install, and field test a ceramic-based high-temperature burner-duct-recuperator (HTBDR) in an industrial setting. The unit was capable of operating in corrosive, high...

Parks, W. P.; DeBellis, C. L.; Kneidel, K.

94

Low NO sub x /SO sub x Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cyclone furnaces operate with high excess air and at high temperature. The heat release during combustion is very high and as a result the boiler volume is much smaller than would be found in a conventional pc-fired system. The Marion Unit 1 boiler, at the level of the cyclone entry, has a small cross-section; about 5-feet in depth and about 20-feet in width. A boiler schematic showing the LNS Burner and relative location of the superheater region and overfire air ports is shown in Figure 1. The LNS Burner's combustion process is fundamentally different from that of the cyclone, and the combustion products are also different. The LNS Burner products enter the boiler as hot, fuel-rich gases. Additional overfire air must be added to complete this combustion step with care taken to avoid the formation of thermal NO{sub x}. If done correctly, S0{sub 2} is controlled and significant NO{sub x} reductions are achieved. Because of the small boiler volume, flow modelling was found to be necessary to insure that adequate mixing of LNS Burner combustion products with air can be accomplished to achieve NO{sub x} emissions goals. Design requirements for the air injection system for the Marion boiler were developed using FLUENT, a commercially available computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. A series of runs were made to obtain a design for final air injection that met the process design goals as closely as possible.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Simulation of Nitrogen Emissions in a Premixed Hydrogen Flame Stabilized on a Low Swirl Burner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of fuels such as pure hydrogen and hydrogen-seeded hydrocarbon mixtures. However, many hydrogen-rich fuels in the context of a laboratory-scale low swirl burner fueled with a lean hydrogen-air mixture at atmospheric of burning lean hydrogen or hydrogen-enriched lean hydrocar- bon fuels (e.g., [2­5]). For these fuels

Bell, John B.

96

CONTROL OF POLLUTANT EMISSIONS IN NATURAL GAS DIFFUSION FLAMES BY USING CASCADE BURNERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this exploratory research project is to control the pollutant emissions of diffusion flames by modifying the air infusion rate into the flame. The modification was achieved by installing a cascade of venturis around the burning gas jet. The basic idea behind this technique is controlling the stoichiometry of the flame through changing the flow dynamics and rates of mixing in the combustion zone with a set of venturis surrounding the flame. A natural gas jet diffusion flame at burner-exit Reynolds number of 5100 was examined with a set of venturis of specific sizes and spacing arrangement. The thermal and composition fields of the baseline and venturi-cascaded flames were numerically simulated using CFD-ACE+, an advanced computational environment software package. The instantaneous chemistry model was used as the reaction model. The concentration of NO was determined through CFD-POST, a post processing utility program for CFD-ACE+. The numerical results showed that, in the near-burner, midflame and far-burner regions, the venturi-cascaded flame had lower temperature by an average of 13%, 19% and 17%, respectively, and lower CO{sub 2} concentration by 35%, 37% and 32%, respectively, than the baseline flame. An opposite trend was noticed for O{sub 2} concentration; the cascaded flame has higher O{sub 2} concentration by 7%, 26% and 44%, in average values, in the near-burner, mid-flame and far-burner regions, respectively, than in the baseline case. The results also showed that, in the near-burner, mid-flame, and far-burner regions, the venturi-cascaded flame has lower NO concentrations by 89%, 70% and 70%, in average values, respectively, compared to the baseline case. The numerical results substantiate that venturi-cascading is a feasible method for controlling the pollutant emissions of a burning gas jet. In addition, the numerical results were useful to understand the thermo-chemical processes involved. The results showed that the prompt-NO mechanism plays an important role besides the conventional thermal-NO mechanism. The computational results of the present study need to be validated experimentally.

Dr. Ala Qubbaj

2001-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Development of a 16-MW sub th coal-water/heavy oil burner for front-wall firing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Canadian program of coal-water fuel (CWF) technology development has included the demonstration of commercial burners for CWF in both coal and oil-designed utility boilers. The demonstrations clearly showed that these burners were prototypes, and were, in fact, modified oil burners that were mismatched to the rheological properties of the CWF. As the demonstrations were proceeding, a simultaneous research program was undertaken in which the basic principles governing atomization and combustion of CWF were studied. Results from the fundamental studies which led to the development of a novel prototype dual fuel CWF/oil burner are described. In the various stages of development, the burner was scaled up from 1.5 MW{sub th} to an industrial scale of 16 MS{sub th} for demonstration in a 20-MW{sub (e)} oil-designed industrial utility boiler and for a single-burner commercial operation in an oil designed package steam boiler. A summary of the burner performance in these demonstrations is also given in this paper.

Thambimuthu, K.V.; Whaley, H. (EMR Canada/CANMET, Ottawa (CA)); Bennet, A.; Jonasson, K.A. (NRC Canada, Ottawa (CA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Low NO sub x /SO sub x Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the LNS Burner as retrofitted to the host cyclone boiler for effective low-cost control of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions while firing a bituminous coal. The LNS Burner employs a simple, innovative combustion process to burn pulverized coal at high temperatures and provides effective, low-cost control of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The coal ash contains sulfur and is removed in the form of molten slag and flyash. Cyclone-fired boiler units are typically older units firing high-sulfur bituminous coals at very high temperatures which results in very high NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions. The addition of conventional emission control equipment, such as wet scrubbers, to these older cyclone units in order to meet current and future environmental regulations is generally not economic. Further, the units are generally not compatible with low sulfur coal switching for S0{sub 2} control or selective catalytic reduction technologies for NO{sub x} control. Because the LNS Burner operates at the same very high temperatures as a typical cyclone boiler and produces a similar slag product, it may offer a viable retrofit option for cyclone boiler emission control. This was confirmed by the Cyclone Boiler Retrofit Feasibility Study carried out by TransAlta and an Operating Committee formed of cyclone boiler owners in 1989. An existing utility cyclone boiler, was then selected for the evaluation of the cost and performance study. It was concluded that the LNS Burner retrofit would be a cost-effective option for control of cyclone boiler emissions. A full-scale demonstration of the LNS Burner retrofit was selected in October 1988 as part of the DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program Round II.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Results of initial operation of the Jupiter Oxygen Corporation oxy-fuel 15 MWth burner test facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jupiter Oxygen Corporation (JOC), in cooperation with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), constructed a 15 MWth oxy-fuel burner test facility with Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPRTM) to test high flame temperature oxy-fuel combustion and advanced carbon capture. Combustion protocols include baseline air firing with natural gas, oxygen and natural gas firing with and without flue gas recirculation, and oxygen and pulverized coal firing with flue gas recirculation. Testing focuses on characterizing burner performance, determining heat transfer characteristics, optimizing CO2 capture, and maximizing heat recovery, with an emphasis on data traceability to address retrofit of existing boilers by directly transforming burner systems to oxy-fuel firing.

Thomas Ochs, Danylo Oryshchyn, Rigel Woodside, Cathy Summers, Brian Patrick, Dietrich Gross, Mark Schoenfield, Thomas Weber and Dan O'Brien

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Latest developments and application of DB Riley`s low NOx CCV{reg_sign} burner technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent developments in DB Riley (DBR) low NO{sub x} burner technology and the application of this technology in coal fired utility boilers are discussed. Since the promulgation of the Clean Air Act Amendment in 1990, DBR has sold nearly 1500 Controlled Combustion Venturi (CCV{reg_sign}) burners on pulverized coal fired utility boilers reducing NOx emissions 50 - 70% from uncontrolled levels. This technology has been retrofitted on boiler designs ranging in size and type from 50 MW front wall fired boilers to 1300 MW opposed fired cell type boilers. In DBR`s latest version of the CCV{reg_sign} burner, a second controlled flow air zone was added to enhance NO{sub x} control capability. Other developments included improved burner air flow measurement accuracy and several mechanical design upgrades such as new coal spreader designs for 3 year wear life. Test results of the CCV{reg_sign} dual air zone burner in DBR`s 100 million Btu/hr (29 MW) coal burner test facility are presented. In the test program, coals from four utility boiler sites were fired to provide a range of coal properties. A baseline high volatile bituminous coal was also fired to provide a comparison with 1992 test data for the CCV{reg_sign} single register burner. The test results showed that the second air zone enhanced NO{sub x} reduction capability by an additional 20% over the single register design. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling results of the CCV{reg_sign} dual air zone burner are also presented showing near field mixing patterns conducive to low NO{sub x} firing.

Penterson, C.; Ake, T. [DB Riley, Inc., Worcester, MA (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Evaluation of Fluid Conduction and Mixing within a Subassembly of the Actinide Burner Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RELAP5-3D code is being considered as a thermal-hydraulic system code to support the development of the sodium-cooled Actinide Burner Test Reactor as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. An evaluation was performed to determine whether the control system could be used to simulate the effects of non-convective mechanisms of heat transport in the fluid, including axial and radial heat conduction and subchannel mixing, that are not currently represented with internal code models. The evaluation also determined the relative importance of axial and radial heat conduction and fluid mixing on peak cladding temperature for a wide range of steady conditions and during a representative loss-of-flow transient. The evaluation was performed using a RELAP5-3D model of a subassembly in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, which was used as a surrogate for the Actinide Burner Test Reactor.

Cliff B. Davis

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Method for reducing NOx during combustion of coal in a burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organically complexed nanocatalyst composition is applied to or mixed with coal prior to or upon introducing the coal into a coal burner in order to catalyze the removal of coal nitrogen from the coal and its conversion into nitrogen gas prior to combustion of the coal. This process leads to reduced NOx production during coal combustion. The nanocatalyst compositions include a nanoparticle catalyst that is made using a dispersing agent that can bond with the catalyst atoms. The dispersing agent forms stable, dispersed, nano-sized catalyst particles. The catalyst composition can be formed as a stable suspension to facilitate storage, transportation and application of the catalyst nanoparticles to a coal material. The catalyst composition can be applied before or after pulverizing the coal material or it may be injected directly into the coal burner together with pulverized coal.

Zhou, Bing (Cranbury, NJ); Parasher, Sukesh (Lawrenceville, NJ); Hare, Jeffrey J. (Provo, UT); Harding, N. Stanley (North Salt Lake, UT); Black, Stephanie E. (Sandy, UT); Johnson, Kenneth R. (Highland, UT)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Low NO sub x /SO sub x Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work on process design was deferred pending a restart of the mainstream project activities. LNS Burner design effort was focussed mainly on the continued development of the slag screen model. Documentation of the LNS Burner thermal model also continued. Balance of plant engineering continued on the P ID's for the fuel preparation building HVAC system, lighter oil, limestone/fuel additive handling system, instrument and service air and fire protection systems. Work began on the preparation of system and sub-system descriptions. Schematic connection and wiring drawings and diagrams for the fuel handling system, flame scanner/igniter system and DCS control modification for the lighter oil pumps and Unit 1 circulating water pumps were completed.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Orimulsion in low NO{sub x} burner based combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential of Orimulsion (a bitumen in water emulsion) as a suitable fuel for power generation boilers has been established subject to full recognition being given to the environmental aspects of its application. An important factor is the control of NO{sub x} emissions from the combustion process. Work on NO{sub x} control when firing Orimulsion has inevitably been based on the techniques utilized for low NO{sub x} fuel oil combustion. This fundamental work has indicated the different performance characteristics of these two fuels when fired in similar low NO{sub x} burner configurations. Nevertheless it has been demonstrated that Orimulsion can achieve similar, and perhaps even improved, low NO{sub x} performance when compared to heavy (No. 6) fuel oil, and can be used with equal flexibility to that of heavy fuel oil in low NO{sub x} combustion systems based on both burner and in furnace staging techniques.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P. [International Combustion Ltd., Derby (United Kingdom). Rolls-Royce Industrial Power Group

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Pollutant Exposures from Natural Gas Cooking Burners: A Simulation-Based Assessment for Southern California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants and they are typically used without venting. The objective of this study is to quantify pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes. A mass balance model was applied to estimate time-dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes and the "exposure concentrations" experienced by individual occupants. The model was applied to estimate nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations for one week each in summer and winter for a representative sample of Southern California homes. The model simulated pollutant emissions from NGCBs, NO{sub 2} and CO entry from outdoors, dilution throughout the home, and removal by ventilation and deposition. Residence characteristics and outdoor concentrations of CO and NO{sub 2} were obtained from available databases. Ventilation rates, occupancy patterns, and burner use were inferred from household characteristics. Proximity to the burner(s) and the benefits of using venting range hoods were also explored. Replicate model executions using independently generated sets of stochastic variable values yielded estimated pollutant concentration distributions with geometric means varying less than 10%. The simulation model estimates that in homes using NGCBs without coincident use of venting range hoods, 62%, 9%, and 53% of occupants are routinely exposed to NO{sub 2}, CO, and HCHO levels that exceed acute health-based standards and guidelines. NGCB use increased the sample median of the highest simulated 1-hr indoor concentrations by 100, 3000, and 20 ppb for NO{sub 2}, CO, and HCHO, respectively. Reducing pollutant exposures from NGCBs should be a public health priority. Simulation results suggest that regular use of even moderately effective venting range hoods would dramatically reduce the percentage of homes in which concentrations exceed health-based standards.

Logue, Jennifer M.; Klepeis, Neil E.; Lobscheid, Agnes B.; Singer, Brett C.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Coal Particle Flow Patterns for O2 Enriched, Low NOx Burners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project involved a systematic investigation examining the effect of near-flame burner aerodynamics on standoff distance and stability of turbulent diffusion flames and the resultant NO{sub x} emissions from actual pulverized coal diffusion flames. Specifically, the scope of the project was to understand how changes in near-flame aerodynamics and transport air oxygen partial pressure can influence flame attachment and coal ignition, two properties essential to proper operation of low NO{sub x} burners. Results from this investigation utilized a new 2M tall, 0.5m in diameter combustor designed to evaluate near-flame combustion aerodynamics in terms of transport air oxygen partial pressure (Po{sub 2}), coal fines content, primary fuel and secondary air velocities, and furnace wall temperature furnish insight into fundamental processes that occur during combustion of pulverized coal in practical systems. Complementary cold flow studies were conducted in a geometrically similar chamber to analyze the detailed motion of the gas and particles using laser Doppler velocimetry. This final technical report summarizes the key findings from our investigation into coal particle flow patterns in burners. Specifically, we focused on the effects of oxygen enrichment, the effect of fines, and the effect of the nozzle velocity ratio on the resulting flow patterns. In the cold flow studies, detailed measurements using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) were made to determine the details of the flow. In the hot flow studies, observations of flame stability and measurements of NO{sub x} were made to determine the effects of the flow patterns on burner operation.

Jennifer Sinclair Curtis

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Evaluation of gas-reburning and low NO sub x burners on a wall fired boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low NO{sub x} burners operate on the principle of delayed mixing between the coal fuel and burner air, so that less NO{sub x} is formed. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel corresponding to the total heat release in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO{sub x} to molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO{sub x} emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at the lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO{sub x}. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO{sub x} emission reductions of 75 percent or more as a result of combing Low NO{sub x} Burners and Gas Reburning on a utility boiler having the design characteristics mentioned above. A Host Site Agreement has been signed by EER and a utility company in the State of Colorado: Public Service Company of Colorado (Cherokee Unit No. 3, 172 MW{sub e}) front wall fired boiler near Denver.

Not Available

1992-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Large eddy simulation of forced ignition of an annular bluff-body burner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The optimization of the ignition process is a crucial issue in the design of many combustion systems. Large eddy simulation (LES) of a conical shaped bluff-body turbulent nonpremixed burner has been performed to study the impact of spark location on ignition success. This burner was experimentally investigated by Ahmed et al. [Combust. Flame 151 (2007) 366-385]. The present work focuses on the case without swirl, for which detailed measurements are available. First, cold-flow measurements of velocities and mixture fractions are compared with their LES counterparts, to assess the prediction capabilities of simulations in terms of flow and turbulent mixing. Time histories of velocities and mixture fractions are recorded at selected spots, to probe the resolved probability density function (pdf) of flow variables, in an attempt to reproduce, from the knowledge of LES-resolved instantaneous flow conditions, the experimentally observed reasons for success or failure of spark ignition. A flammability map is also constructed from the resolved mixture fraction pdf and compared with its experimental counterpart. LES of forced ignition is then performed using flamelet fully detailed tabulated chemistry combined with presumed pdfs. Various scenarios of flame kernel development are analyzed and correlated with typical flow conditions observed in this burner. The correlations between, velocities and mixture fraction values at the sparking time and the success or failure of ignition, are then further discussed and analyzed. (author)

Subramanian, V.; Domingo, P.; Vervisch, L. [CORIA-CNRS and INSA de Rouen, Technopole du Madrillet, BP 8, 76801 Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray (France)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

MINIMIZATION OF NO EMISSIONS FROM MULTI-BURNER COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal continues to be one of the principal energy sources for electric power generation in the United States. One of the biggest environmental challenges involved with coal utilization is the reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) formed during coal combustion. The most economical method of NO{sub x} abatement in coal combustion is through burner modification. Air-staging techniques have been widely used in the development of low-NO{sub x} pulverized coal burners, promoting the conversion of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2} by delaying the mixing in the fuel-rich zone near the burner inlet. Previous studies have looked at the mechanisms of NO{sub x} evolution at relatively low temperatures where primary pyrolysis is dominant, but data published for secondary pyrolysis in the pulverized coal furnace are scarce. In this project, the nitrogen evolution behavior during secondary coal pyrolysis will be explored. The end result will be a complete model of nitrogen evolution and NO{sub x} precursor formation due to primary and secondary pyrolysis.

E.G. Eddings; A. Molina; D.W. Pershing; A.F. Sarofim; K.A. Davis; M.P. Heap; T.H. Fletcher; H. Zhang

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Bottom head assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs.

Fife, A.B.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NO, reduction (70VO) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Depatiment of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was petformed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NO, emission level of 0.73 lb/1 OG Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50Y0. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NO, in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of' natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NO, emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 18%. The performance goal of 70/40 reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18%.

None

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of fan powered infrared (PIR) burner at various barometric pressures (operating altitude) and gas compositions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. In this program, the theoretical basis for the behavior of PIR burners will be established through analysis of the combustion, heat and mass transfer, and other related processes that determine the performance of PIR burners. Based on the results of this study, a burner performance model for radiant output will be developed. The model will be applied to predict the performance of the selected burner and will also be modified and improved through comparison with experimental results. During this period, laboratory facilities that are necessary for conducting this research are completed. The student research assistants have started working in the laboratory. The selection of the test burner has completed. The preparation and instrumentation of this test burner is underway. The theoretical analysis and modeling of the fundamental combustion process of the PIR burner is progressing well. A study of the existing models are being conducted, which will yield specific direction and recommendations for the new model to be developed.

Bai, Tiejun

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A Study of Prevention and Retention Strategies for Successful Urban Secondary High School Hispanic Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A STUDY OF PREVENTION AND RETENTION STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESSFUL URBAN SECONDARY HIGH SCHOOL HISPANIC STUDENTS A Dissertation by ROBERTO IBARRA LOPEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF EDUCATION Approved by: Chair of Committee, Mario S. Torres Committee Members, Virginia Collier Larry Dooley Ben Welch Head of Department, Fredrick M. Nafukho May 2013...

Lopez, Roberto I

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

114

Maneuvering impact boring head  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

Zollinger, W. Thor (Idaho Falls, ID); Reutzel, Edward W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Maneuvering impact boring head  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure. 8 figs.

Zollinger, W.T.; Reutzel, E.W.

1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

116

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, especially NOX. The project involved operating gas reburning technology combined with low NO, burner technology (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired utility boiler. Low NOX burners are designed to create less NOX than conventional burners. However, the NO, control achieved is in the range of 30-60-40, and typically 50%. At the higher NO, reduction levels, CO emissions tend to be higher than acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce the level of NO. in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. When combined, GR and LNBs work in harmony to both minimize NOX emissions and maintain an acceptable level of CO emissions. The demonstration was performed at Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit 3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW. wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal and had a pre GR-LNB baseline NOX emission of 0.73 lb/1 Oe Btu. The target for the project was a reduction of 70 percent in NOX emissions. Project sponsors included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER). EER conducted a comprehensive test demonstration program over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved. Intensive measurements were taken to quantify the reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability, and all factors influencing costs. The results showed that GR-LNB technology achieved excellent emission reductions. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was somewhat less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 180A. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at higher gas heat inputs. The impact on boiler equipment was determined to be very minimal. Toward the end of the testing, the flue gas recirculation (used to enhance gas penetration into the furnace) system was removed and new high pressure gas injectors were installed. Further, the low NOX burners were modified and gave better NO. reduction performance. These modifications resulted in a similar NO, reduction performance (64%) at a reduced level of gas heat input (-13Yo). In addition, the OFA injectors were re-designed to provide for better control of CO emissions. Although not a part of this project, the use of natural gas as the primary fuel with gas reburning was also tested. The gas/gas reburning tests demonstrated a reduction in NOX emissions of 43% (0.30 lb/1 OG Btu reduced to 0.17 lb/1 OG Btu) using 7% gas heat input. Economics are a key issue affecting technology development. Application of GR-LNB requires modifications to existing power plant equipment and as a result, the capital and operating costs depend largely on site-specific factors such as: gas availability at the site, gas to coal delivered price differential, sulfur dioxide removal requirements, windbox pressure, existing burner throat diameters, and reburn zone residence time available. Based on the results of this CCT project, EER expects that most GR-LNB installations will achieve at least 60% NOX control when firing 10-15% gas. The capital cost estimate for installing a GR-LNB system on a 300 MW, unit is approximately $25/kW. plus the cost of a gas pipeline (if required). Operating costs are almost entirely related to the differential cost of the natural gas compared to coal.

None

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Low Emissions Burner Technology for Metal Processing Industry using Byproducts and Biomass Derived Liquid Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research and development efforts produced low-emission burner technology capable of operating on natural gas as well as crude glycerin and/or fatty acids generated in biodiesel plants. The research was conducted in three stages (1) Concept definition leading to the design and development of a small laboratory scale burner, (2) Scale-up to prototype burner design and development, and (3) Technology demonstration with field vefiication. The burner design relies upon the Flow Blurring (FB) fuel injection based on aerodynamically creating two-phase flow near the injector exit. The fuel tube and discharge orifice both of inside diameter D are separated by gap H. For H < 0.25D, the atomizing air bubbles into liquid fuel to create a two-phase flow near the tip of the fuel tube. Pressurized two-phase fuel-air mixture exits through the discharge orifice, which results in expansion and breakup of air bubbles yielding a spray with fine droplets. First, low-emission combustion of diesel, biodiesel and straight VO (soybean oil) was achieved by utilizing FB injector to yield fine sprays for these fuels with significantly different physical properties. Visual images for these baseline experiments conducted with heat release rate (HRR) of about 8 kW illustrate clean blue flames indicating premixed combustion for all three fuels. Radial profiles of the product gas temperature at the combustor exit overlap each other signifying that the combustion efficiency is independent of the fuel. At the combustor exit, the NOx emissions are within the measurement uncertainties, while CO emissions are slightly higher for straight VO as compared to diesel and biodiesel. Considering the large variations in physical and chemical properties of fuels considered, the small differences observed in CO and NOx emissions show promise for fuel-flexible, clean combustion systems. FB injector has proven to be very effective in atomizing fuels with very different physical properties, and it offers a path forward to utilize both fossil and alternative liquid fuels in the same combustion system. In particular, experiments show that straight VO can be cleanly combusted without the need for chemical processing or preheating steps, which can result in significant economic and environmental benefits. Next, low-emission combustion of glycerol/methane was achieved by utilizing FB injector to yield fine droplets of highly viscous glycerol. Heat released from methane combustion further improves glycerol pre-vaporization and thus its clean combustion. Methane addition results in an intensified reaction zone with locally high temperatures near the injector exit. Reduction in methane flow rate elongates the reaction zone, which leads to higher CO emissions and lower NOx emissions. Similarly, higher air to liquid (ALR) mass ratio improves atomization and fuel pre-vaporization and shifts the flame closer to the injector exit. In spite of these internal variations, all fuel mixes of glycerol with methane produced similar CO and NOx emissions at the combustor exit. Results show that FB concept provides low emissions with the flexibility to utilize gaseous and highly viscous liquid fuels, straight VO and glycerol, without preheating or preprocessing the fuels. Following these initial experiments in quartz combustor, we demonstrated that glycerol combustion can be stably sustained in a metal combustor. Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) measurements in glycerol/methane flames resulted in flow-weighted Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) of 35 to 40 ?m, depending upon the methane percentage. This study verified that lab-scale dual-fuel burner using FB injector can successfully atomize and combust glycerol and presumably other highly viscous liquid fuels at relatively low HRR (<10 kW). For industrial applications, a scaled-up glycerol burner design thus seemed feasible.

Agrawal, Ajay; Taylor, Robert

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

118

Evaluation of gas-reburning and low NO sub x burners on a wall fired boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This clean coal technology project will demonstrate a combination of two developed technologies to reduce both NO{sub x} and (to some extent) SO{sub x} emissions: Gas reburning and low NO{sub x} burners. The demonstrations will be conducted on a pre-NSPS utility boiler representative of US boilers that contribute significantly to the inventory of acid rain precursor emissions: a wall fired unit. Low NO{sub x} burners operate on the principle of delayed mixing between the coal fuel and burner air, so that less NO{sub x} is burned. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel corresponding to the total heat release in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO{sub x} to molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO{sub x} emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO{sub x}. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emission reductions of 75 percent or more as a result of combining LNB and GR to a utility boiler having the design characteristics mentioned above. A Host Site Agreement has been signed by EER and a utility company in the State of Colorado: Public Service Company of Colorado (Cherokee Unit No. 3, 172 MW{sub e}) front wall fired boiler near Denver.

Not Available

1991-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

119

Technetium Retention During LAW Vitrification  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNGInternational EnergyCommitteeRenewable1234 OFTechnetium Retention During LAW

120

from the Head  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as well as the many weekly seminars and colloquia, continually ... from the Head ... Meyer Jerison) received the 2009 George David Birkhoff Prize. The prize is ..... Virginia Mashin Scholars ... Alan Legg, Mariana Smit Vega Garcia, Lloyd West.

Sally Goeke

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Development and validation of a combustion model for a fuel cell off-gas burner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development and Validation of a Combustion Model for a Fuel Cell Off-Gas Burner W. Tristan Collins A low-emissions power generator comprising a solid oxide fuel cell coupled to a gas turbine has been developed by Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems. As part... of chemical energy in the fuel to electricity. A prototype commer- cial system developed by Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems Limited (RRFCS), consisting of a combined solid oxide fuel cell and gas turbine (SOFC hybrid) cycle, has the goal of high cycle ef#2...

Collins, William Tristan

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

122

Hot repair of ceramic burner on hot blast stoves at USS/Kobe`s {number_sign}3 blast furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the 1992 reline of the No. 3 blast furnace, three new stoves were constructed. The design of the stoves, equipped with internal ceramic burners, was for providing a hot blast temperature of 2,000 F at a wind rate of 140,000 SCFM. After 3 years the performance had deteriorated so the burners were cleaned. When a second cleaning did not improve the performance of No. 3 blast furnace, it was decided to repair the refractory while still hot. The paper describes the hot repair procedures, taking a stove off for repairs, maintenance heat up during repairs, two stove operation, stove commissioning, repair of a ceramic burner, and wet gas prevention.

Bernarding, T.F.; Chemorov, M.; Shimono, S.; Phillips, G.R.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Combustion characteristics and NOx emissions of two kinds of swirl burners in a 300-MWe wall-fired pulverized-coal utility boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements were performed in a 300-MWe wall-fired pulverized-coal utility boiler. Enhanced ignition-dual register (EI-DR) burners and centrally fuel rich (CFR) swirl coal combustion burners were installed in the bottom row of the furnace during experiments. Local mean concentrations of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2} and NOx gas species, gas temperatures, and char burnout were determined in the region of the two types of burners. For centrally fuel rich swirl coal combustion burners, local mean CO concentrations, gas temperatures and the temperature gradient are higher and mean concentrations of O{sub 2} and NOx along the jet flow direction in the burner region are lower than for the enhanced ignition-dual register burners. Moreover, the mean O{sub 2} concentration is higher and the gas temperature and mean CO concentration are lower in the side wall region. For centrally fuel rich swirl coal combustion burners in the bottom row, the combustion efficiency of the boiler increases from 96.73% to 97.09%, and NOx emission decreases from 411.5 to 355 ppm at 6% O{sub 2} compared to enhanced ignition-dual register burners and the boiler operates stably at 110 MWe without auxiliary fuel oil.

Li, Z.Q.; Jing, J.P.; Chen, Z.C.; Ren, F.; Xu, B.; Wei, H.D.; Ge, Z.H. [Harbin Institute for Technology, Harbin (China). School for Energy Science & Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, September 1--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of fan powered infrared(PIR) burner at various barometric pressures (operating altitude) and gas compositions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. In this program, the theoretical basis for the behavior of PIR burners will be established through analysis of the combustion, heat and mass transfer, and other related processes which determine the performance of PIR burners. Based on the results of this study, a first order model of the performance of the burner, including radiant output will be developed. The model will be applied to predict the performance of the selected burner and modified through comparison with test results. Concurrently, an experimental setup will be devised and built. This experimental rig will be a modified appliance, capable of measuring the heat and combustion product output, as well as providing a means by which the radiant heat output can be measured. The burner will be selected from an existing commercial appliance, a commercial deep fat fryer, and will be of a scale that will be compatible with the laboratory facilities in the Combustion Laboratory at Clark Atlanta University. Theoretical analysis and formulation of the PIR burner performance model has been started and the development of the test facilities and experimental setup has also been initiated. These are described.

Bai, T.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Workforce Retention Work Group | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

skilled workforce retention; health, safety and productivity; and especially preventive health care. Inform and support improvement andor development of wellness, fitness, and...

126

Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

127

Full-scale demonstration Low-NO{sub x} Cell{trademark} Burner retrofit. Quarterly report No. 6, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Low-NO{sub x} Cell{trademark} Burner operates on the principle of staged combustion. The lower burner of each two-nozzle cell is modified to accommodate all the fuel input previously handled by two nozzles. Secondary air, less than theoretically required for complete combustion, is introduced to the lower burner. The remainder of secondary air is directed to the upper ``port`` of each cell to complete the combustion process. B&W/EPRI have thoroughly tested the LNCB{trademark} at two pilot scales (6 million Btu per hour and 100 million Btu per hour), and tested a single full-scale burner in a utility boiler. Combustion tests at two scales have confirmed NO{sub x} reduction with the low-NO{sub x} cell on the order of 50% relative to the standard cell burner at optimum operating conditions. The technology is now ready for full unit, full-scale demonstration.

Not Available

1992-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

128

Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted from Natural Gas Cooking Burners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We developed a physics-based data-supported model to investigate indoor pollutant exposure distributions resulting from use of natural gas cooking appliances across households in California. The model was applied to calculate time-resolved indoor concentrations of CO, NO2 and formaldehyde resulting from cooking burners and entry with outdoor air. Exposure metrics include 1-week average concentrations and frequency of exceeding ambient air quality standards. We present model results for Southern California (SoCal) using two air-exchange scenarios in winter: (1) infiltration-only, and (2) air exchange rate (AER) sampled from lognormal distributions derived from measurements. In roughly 40percent of homes in the SoCal cohort (N=6634) the 1-hour USEPA NO2 standard (190 ?g/m3) was exceeded at least once. The frequency of exceeding this standard was largely independent of AER assumption, and related primarily to building volume, emission rate and amount of burner use. As expected, AER had a more substantial impact on one-week average concentrations.

Lobscheid, Agnes; Singer, Brett C.; Klepeis, Neil E.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Swozzle based burner tube premixer including inlet air conditioner for low emissions combustion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A burner for use in a combustion system of a heavy-duty industrial gas turbine includes a fuel/air premixer having an air inlet, a fuel inlet, and an annular mixing passage. The fuel/air premixer mixes fuel and air into a uniform mixture for injection into a combustor reaction zone. The burner also includes an inlet flow conditioner disposed at the air inlet of the fuel/air premixer for controlling a radial and circumferential distribution of incoming air. The pattern of perforations in the inlet flow conditioner is designed such that a uniform air flow distribution is produced at the swirler inlet annulus in both the radial and circumference directions. The premixer includes a swozzle assembly having a series of preferably air foil shaped turning vanes that impart swirl to the airflow entering via the inlet flow conditioner. Each air foil contains internal fuel flow passages that introduce natural gas fuel into the air stream via fuel metering holes that pass through the walls of the air foil shaped turning vanes. By injecting fuel in this manner, an aerodynamically clean flow field is maintained throughout the premixer. By injecting fuel via two separate passages, the fuel/air mixture strength distribution can be controlled in the radial direction to obtain optimum radial concentration profiles for control of emissions, lean blow outs, and combustion driven dynamic pressure activity as machine and combustor load are varied.

Tuthill, Richard Sterling (Bolton, CT); Bechtel, II, William Theodore (Scotia, NY); Benoit, Jeffrey Arthur (Scotia, NY); Black, Stephen Hugh (Duanesburg, NY); Bland, Robert James (Clifton Park, NY); DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne (Scotia, NY); Meyer, Stefan Martin (Troy, NY); Taura, Joseph Charles (Clifton Park, NY); Battaglioli, John Luigi (Glenville, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Multi-ported, internally recuperated burners for direct flame impingement heating applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A direct flame impingement method and apparatus employing at least one multi-ported, internally recuperated burner. The burner includes an innermost coaxial conduit having a first fluid inlet end and a first fluid outlet end, an outermost coaxial conduit disposed around the innermost coaxial conduit and having a combustion products outlet end proximate the first fluid inlet end of the innermost coaxial conduit and a combustion products inlet end proximate the first fluid outlet end of the innermost coaxial conduit, and a coaxial intermediate conduit disposed between the innermost coaxial conduit and the outermost coaxial conduit, whereby a second fluid annular region is formed between the innermost coaxial conduit and the intermediate coaxial conduit and a combustion products annular region is formed between the intermediate coaxial conduit and the outermost coaxial conduit. The intermediate coaxial conduit has a second fluid inlet end proximate the first fluid inlet end of the innermost coaxial conduit and a second fluid outlet end proximate the combustion products inlet end of the outermost coaxial conduit.

Abbasi, Hamid A. (Naperville, IL); Kurek, Harry (Dyer, IN); Chudnovsky, Yaroslav (Skokie, IL); Lisienko, Vladimir G. (Ekaterinburg, RU); Malikov, German K. (Ekaterinburg, RU)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

131

The impact of conversion to low-NO{sub x} burners on ash characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research initiative focusing on the changes in coal-combustion byproducts that result from the conversion of coal-fired boilers to low-NO{sub x} burners has been implemented at the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER). This paper presents selected results from the first such study, the conversion of East Kentucky Power`s 116 MW, wall-fired unit {number_sign}1 at the John Sherman Cooper Station in Pulaski County, Kentucky. Samples of the coal feedstock and fly ash recovered in several downstream collection vessels were collected prior to and following conversion and extensively analyzed. The results presented in this report include total carbon, petrography, mineralogy, particle size, and leaching characteristics. The major changes noted in the fly-ash properties include an increase in carbon content, a slight increase in particle size, and a decrease in glassy components in the ash following conversion. Those changes induced by the conversion to low-NO{sub x} burners are evaluated in terms of the potential impact on the marketability of the fly ash.

Robi, T.L.; Hower, J.C.; Graham, U.M.; Groppo, J.G.; Rathbone, R.F.; Taulbee, D.N. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Medina, S.S. [East Kentucky Power Cooperative, Winchester, KY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Investigation on Flame Characteristics and Burner Operability Issues of Oxy-Fuel Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxy-fuel combustion has been used previously in a wide range of industrial applications. Oxy- combustion is carried out by burning a hydrocarbon fuel with oxygen instead of air. Flames burning in this configuration achieve higher flame temperatures which present opportunities for significant efficiency improvements and direct capture of CO{sub 2} from the exhaust stream. In an effort to better understand and characterize the fundamental flame characteristics of oxy-fuel combustion this research presents the experimental measurements of flame stability of various oxyfuel flames. Effects of H{sub 2} concentration, fuel composition, exhaust gas recirculation ratio, firing inputs, and burner diameters on the flame stability of these fuels are discussed. Effects of exhaust gas recirculation i.e. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O (steam) acting as diluents on burner operability are also presented. The roles of firing input on flame stability are then analyzed. For this study it was observed that many oxy-flames did not stabilize without exhaust gas recirculation due to their higher burning velocities. In addition, the stability regime of all compositions was observed to decrease as the burner diameter increased. A flashback model is also presented, using the critical velocity gradient g{sub F}) values for CH{sub 4}-O{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} flames. The scaling relation (𝐠{sub F} = 𝐜 𝐒{sub 𝐋}{sup 2}/𝛂) for different burner diameters was obtained for various diameter burners. The report shows that results correlated linearly with a scaling value of c =0.0174. The second part of the study focuses on the experimental measurements of the flow field characteristics of premixed CH{sub 4}/21%O{sub 2}/79%N{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}/38%O{sub 2}/72%CO{sub 2} mixtures at constant firing input of 7.5 kW, constant, equivalence ratio of 0.8, constant swirl number of 0.92 and constant Reynolds Numbers. These measurements were taken in a swirl stabilized combustor at atmospheric pressure. The flow field visualization using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) technique is implemented to make a better understanding of the turbulence characteristics of CH{sub 4}/air and CH{sub 4}/38%O{sub 2}/72%CO{sub 2} combustion. The velocity fluctuations, turbulence intensities and local propagation velocities along the combustion chamber have been determined. The turbulent intensities increase as we move away from the combustor axis. CH{sub 4}-38%O{sub 2}-72%CO{sub 2} flames have low radial velocity and turbulent intensity distributions at different axial distances when compared with CH{sub 4}-Air flames.

Choudhuri, Ahsan

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. The information present in the report provides data that (1) measures the effect of concrete wasteform properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and (2) quantifies the rate of carbonation of concrete materials in a simulated vadose zone repository.

Bovaird, Chase C.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

134

First archeointensity determinations on Maya incense burners from Palenque temples, Mexico: New data to constrain the Mesoamerica secular  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First archeointensity determinations on Maya incense burners from Palenque temples, Mexico: New´sica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Me´xico D.F., Mexico c Instituto Nacional de Antropologia e Historia, Me´xico D.F., Mexico d Institut Charles Gerhardt, Laboratoire des Agre´gats, Interfaces et Mate

Demouchy, Sylvie

135

Simulation of Nitrogen Emissions in a Low Swirl Burner J. B. Bell, M. S. Day, X. Gao, M. J. Lijewski  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulation of Nitrogen Emissions in a Low Swirl Burner J. B. Bell, M. S. Day, X. Gao, M. J nitrogen emissions. The simulation shows how the cellular burn- ing structures characteristic of lean premixed hydrogen combustion lead to enhancements in the NOx emissions from these flames. Analysis

Bell, John B.

136

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of fan powered infrared burner (PIR) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions and develop design guidelines for appliances in containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance. During this period, experimental setup with optical and electronic instrumentation that is necessary for measuring the radiant heat output and the emission gas output of the burner has been established. The radiation measurement instrument, an FTIR, has been purchased and installed in the porous burner experimental system. The radiation measurement capability of the FTIR was tested and found to be satisfactory. A standard blackbody source, made by Graseby Infrared, was employed to calibrate the FTIR. A collection duct for emission gas measurement was fabricated and connected to the existing Horiba gas analyzer. Test runs are being conducted for flue gas analysis. A number of published research papers on modeling of porous burners were reviewed. The physical mechanism and theoretical analysis of the combustion process of the PIR burner was formulated. The numerical modeling, and implementation of a PIR burner code at CAU`s computing facility is in progress.

Bai, T.; Yeboah, Y.D.; Sampath, R.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Reactor pressure vessel vented head  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

Sawabe, James K. (San Jose, CA)

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

138

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly report, April 1, 1996 - June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A porous radiant burner testing facility consisting of a commercial deep-fat fryer, an FTIR based spectral radiance measurement system, a set of flue gas analysis components, and a fuel gas mixing station was constructed. The measurement capabilities of the system were tested using methane and the test results were found to be consistent with the literature. Following the validation of the measurement system, various gas mixtures were tested to study the effect of gas compositions have on burner performance. Results indicated that the emissions vary with fuel gas composition and air/fuel ratio. The maximum radiant efficiency of the burner was obtained close to air/fuel ratio of 1.

Bai, T.; Yeboah, Y.D.; Sampath, R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Mechanical swirler for a low-NO{sub x}, weak-swirl burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a mechanical swirler for generating diverging flow in lean premixed fuel burners. The swirler of the present invention includes a central passage with an entrance for accepting a feed gas, a flow balancing insert that introduces additional pressure drop beyond that occurring in the central passage in the absence of the flow balancing insert, and an exit aligned to direct the feed gas into a combustor. The swirler also has an annular passage about the central passage and including one or more vanes oriented to impart angular momentum to feed gas exiting the annular passage. The diverging flow generated by the swirler stabilizes lean combustion thus allowing for lower production of pollutants, particularly oxides of nitrogen. 16 figs.

Cheng, R.K.; Yegian, D.T.

1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

140

Assessment of Startup Fuel Options for the GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Global Nuclear Energy Program (GNEP) includes a program element for the development and construction of an advanced sodium cooled fast reactor to demonstrate the burning (transmutation) of significant quantities of minor actinides obtained from a separations process and fabricated into a transuranic bearing fuel assembly. To demonstrate and qualify transuranic (TRU) fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype is needed. The ABR would necessarily be started up using conventional metal alloy or oxide (U or U, Pu) fuel. Startup fuel is needed for the ABR for the first 2 to 4 core loads of fuel in the ABR. Following start up, a series of advanced TRU bearing fuel assemblies will be irradiated in qualification lead test assemblies in the ABR. There are multiple options for this startup fuel. This report provides a description of the possible startup fuel options as well as possible fabrication alternatives available to the program in the current domestic and international facilities and infrastructure.

Jon Carmack (062056); Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu (103171); David Alberstein

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis of combustion flames in four-burner impinging entrained-flow gasifier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On a laboratory-scale testing platform of impinging entrained-flow gasifier with four opposed burners, the flame images for diesel combustion and gasification process were measured with a single charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The two-dimensional multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis was employed to investigate the multifractal nature of the flame images. Sound power-law scaling in the annealed average of detrended fluctuations was unveiled when the order $q>0$ and the multifractal feature of flame images were confirmed. Further analyses identified two multifractal parameters, the minimum and maximum singularity $\\alpha_{\\min}$ and $\\alpha_{\\max}$, serving as characteristic parameters of the multifractal flames. These two characteristic multifractal parameters vary with respect to different experimental conditions.

Niu, Miao-Ren; Yan, Zhuo-Yong; Guo, Qing-Hua; Liang, Qin-Feng; Wang, Fu-Chen; Yu, Zun-Hong

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

A Blueprint for GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Startup Fuel Fabrication Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is to identify the requirements and issues associated with design of GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Fuel Facility. The report was prepared in support of providing data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives was to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu) -239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept was proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR was proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu was assumed to be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) was being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. It was estimated that the facility will provide the startup fuel for 10-15 years and would take 3 to 5 years to construct.

S. Khericha

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Residential Refrigerator Recycling Ninth Year Retention Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential Refrigerator Recycling Ninth Year Retention Study Study ID Nos. 546B, 563 Prepared RECYCLING PROGRAMS Study ID Nos. 546B and 563 Prepared for Southern California Edison Rosemead, California

144

Firing microfine coal with a low NOx, RSFC burner in an industrial boiler designed for oil and gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABB Power Plant Laboratories (ABB-PPL) working under a US Department of Energy-Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE-PETC) contract has carried out tests with the Radially Stratified Flame Core (RSFC) burner which was licensed from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who developed and patented the RSFC burner. Tests were carried out in a small industrial boiler, designed for oil and natural gas, located at the Energy and Fuels Research Center of Penn State University who was working as a subcontractor to ABB-PPL. The paper presents results from the long-term testing task in the DOE-PETC program with particular attention being paid to the challenges faced in maintaining high combustion efficiencies while achieving low NOx in a small industrial boiler designed for firing oil or natural gas. The paper will also address the issue of ash management when firing coal in a boiler designed for fuels having essentially no ash.

Thornhock, D.E.; Patel, R.; Borio, R.W. [Combustion Engineering, Inc., Windsor, CT (United States). ABB Power Plant Labs.; Miller, B.G.; Scaroni, A.W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Energy and Fuels Research Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Reactor pressure vessel vented head  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

Sawabe, J.K.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

146

Deuterium Retention in NSTX with Lithium Conditioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High (? 90%) deuterium retention was observed in NSTX gas balance measurements both withand without lithiumization of the carbon plasma facing components. The gas retained in ohmic discharges was measured by comparing the vessel pressure rise after a discharge to that of a gasonly pulse with the pumping valves closed. For neutral beam heated discharges the gas input and gas pumped by the NB cryopanels were tracked. The discharges were followed by outgassing of deuterium that reduced the retention. The relationship between retention and surface chemistry was explored with a new plasma-material interface probe connected to an in-vacuo surface science station that exposed four material samples to the plasma. XPS and TDS analysis showed that the binding of D atoms is fundamentally changed by lithium - in particular atoms are weakly bonded in regions near lithium atoms bound to either oxygen or the carbon matrix.

C.H. Skinner, J.P. Allain, W. Blanchard, H.W. Kugel, R. Maingi, L. Roquemore, V. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

147

MINIMIZATION OF NO EMISSIONS FROM MULTI-BURNER COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reduction of NO{sub x} emission is an important environmental issue in pulverized coal combustion. Final emissions of NO{sub x} are strongly affected by the nitrogen release during devolatilization, which is the first stage of coal combustion. The most cost-effective approach to NO{sub x} reduction is air-staging which can also operate with additional down-stream techniques such as reburning [1]. Air staging promotes the conversion of NO{sub x} precursors (HCN, NH{sub 3}, etc.) to N{sub 2} by delaying the oxygen supply to the greatest extent when those nitrogen species are released during devolatilization. Such a delay gives the primary volatiles a chance to undergo secondary reactions, including tar cracking and soot formation. Secondary reactions of volatiles largely determine the fate of the ultimate NO{sub x} production from pyrolysis, therefore a detailed investigation into the transformation of nitrogen species during secondary reactions and effects of soot on nitrogen release is critical for design and implementation of new pollution control strategies. Current nitrogen models (including the CPD model at BYU) only simulate the nitrogen release during primary pyrolysis, which happens at low temperatures. This project helps to build a nitrogen release model that accounts for secondary reactions and the effects of soot at temperatures relevant to industrial burners.

E.G. Eddings; A. Molina; D.W. Pershing; A.F. Sarofim; K.A. Davis; M.P. Heap; T.H. Fletcher; H. Zhang

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

MINIMIZATION OF NO EMISSIONS FROM MULTI-BURNER COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reduction of NO{sub x} emission is an important environmental issue in pulverized coal combustion. The most cost-effective approach to NO{sub x} reduction is air-staging which can also operate with additional down-stream techniques such as reburning [1]. Air staging promotes the conversion of NO{sub x} precursors (HCN, NH{sub 3}, etc.) to N{sub 2} by delaying the oxygen supply to the greatest extent when those nitrogen species are released during devolatilization. Such a delay gives the primary volatiles a chance to undergo secondary reactions, including tar cracking and soot formation. Secondary reactions of volatiles largely determine the fate of the ultimate NO{sub x} production from pyrolysis, therefore a detailed investigation into the transformation of nitrogen species during secondary reactions and effects of soot on nitrogen release is critical for design and implementation of new pollution control strategies. Current nitrogen models (including the CPD model at BYU) only simulate the nitrogen release during primary pyrolysis, which happens at low temperatures. This project helps to build a nitrogen release model that accounts for secondary reactions and the effects of soot at temperatures relevant to industrial burners.

E.G. Eddings; A. Molina; D.W. Pershing; A.F. Sarofim; K.A. Davis; M.P. Heap; T.H. Fletcher; H. Zhang

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Oxy-Combustion Burner and Integrated Pollutant Removal Research and Development Test Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high flame temperature oxy-combustion test facility consisting of a 5 MWe equivalent test boiler facility and 20 KWe equivalent IPR® was constructed at the Hammond, Indiana manufacturing site. The test facility was operated natural gas and coal fuels and parametric studies were performed to determine the optimal performance conditions and generated the necessary technical data required to demonstrate the technologies are viable for technical and economic scale-up. Flame temperatures between 4930-6120F were achieved with high flame temperature oxy-natural gas combustion depending on whether additional recirculated flue gases are added to balance the heat transfer. For high flame temperature oxy-coal combustion, flame temperatures in excess of 4500F were achieved and demonstrated to be consistent with computational fluid dynamic modeling of the burner system. The project demonstrated feasibility and effectiveness of the Jupiter Oxygen high flame temperature oxy-combustion process with Integrated Pollutant Removal process for CCS and CCUS. With these technologies total parasitic power requirements for both oxygen production and carbon capture currently are in the range of 20% of the gross power output. The Jupiter Oxygen high flame temperature oxy-combustion process has been demonstrated at a Technology Readiness Level of 6 and is ready for commencement of a demonstration project.

Mark Schoenfield; Manny Menendez; Thomas Ochs; Rigel Woodside; Danylo Oryshchyn

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

150

Role Profile Head of School  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Role Profile Head of School Purpose of the Role The Head of School is accountable for:- · The provision of academic leadership, developing and delivering School objectives for, in particular, teaching, · The effective governance and management of the School and all of its resources. Context of the Role

Edinburgh, University of

151

High temperature ceramic composition for hydrogen retention  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ceramic coating for H retention in fuel elements is described. The coating has relatively low thermal neutron cross section, is not readily reduced by H at 1500 deg F, is adherent to the fuel element base metal, and is stable at reactor operating temperatures. (JRD)

Webb, R.W.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC - FE Dkt...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC - FE Dkt. No. - 15-33-LNG Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC - FE Dkt. No. - 15-33-LNG The Office of...

153

Recruiting, Retention & Advancement Recruiting: Searching for Excellence and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Recruiting, Retention & Advancement Recruiting: Searching for Excellence and Diversity: A Workshop for Faculty Search Committee Chairs Retention: Enhancing Department Climate: A Chair's Role Advancement: Senior women meetings #12;Recruiting 3-part workshops for chairs of hiring committees Based

Sheridan, Jennifer

154

Low NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cyclone furnaces operate with high excess air and at high temperature. The heat release during combustion is very high and as a result the boiler volume is much smaller than would be found in a conventional pc-fired system. The Marion Unit 1 boiler, at the level of the cyclone entry, has a small cross-section; about 5-feet in depth and about 20-feet in width. A boiler schematic showing the LNS Burner and relative location of the superheater region and overfire air ports is shown in Figure 1. The LNS Burner`s combustion process is fundamentally different from that of the cyclone, and the combustion products are also different. The LNS Burner products enter the boiler as hot, fuel-rich gases. Additional overfire air must be added to complete this combustion step with care taken to avoid the formation of thermal NO{sub x}. If done correctly, S0{sub 2} is controlled and significant NO{sub x} reductions are achieved. Because of the small boiler volume, flow modelling was found to be necessary to insure that adequate mixing of LNS Burner combustion products with air can be accomplished to achieve NO{sub x} emissions goals. Design requirements for the air injection system for the Marion boiler were developed using FLUENT, a commercially available computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. A series of runs were made to obtain a design for final air injection that met the process design goals as closely as possible.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

West Virginia University -Main Campus Student Retention and Graduation Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Virginia University - Main Campus Student Retention and Graduation Rates First-Time, Full ---------------------------------------------------------------------Continuation Rates and Cumulative Graduation Rates

Mohaghegh, Shahab

156

PRELIMINARY DATA CALL REPORT ADVANCED BURNER REACTOR START UP FUEL FABRICATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives is to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu) -239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept has been proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR is proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu will be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) is being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. This report is provided in response to ‘Data Call’ for the construction of startup fuel fabrication facility. It is anticipated that the facility will provide the startup fuel for 10-15 years and will take to 3 to 5 years to construct.

S. T. Khericha

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

D. E. Shropshire

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Oil burners: Crude oil, atomization, and combustion efficiency. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning fuel properties and boiler operations techniques to make maximum use of heavy crude oil, shale oil, and low grade fuels to reduce energy costs in boiler firing. Fuel properties pertain to chemical constituents, viscosity, desulfurization, and processing methods to upgrade the fuels. Operating techniques include atomization, dual-fuel burners, emission characteristics, and cost factors. Combustion efficiency is examined and some citations report on additives or processing techniques to improve the efficiency. The citations also report on studies of health effects in the use of synfuels, mostly as coal liquids to replace oil. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Heater head for stirling engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A monolithic heater head assembly which augments cast fins with ceramic inserts which narrow the flow of combustion gas and obtains high thermal effectiveness with the assembly including an improved flange design which gives greater durability and reduced conduction loss.

Corey, John A. (R.D. #2, Box 101 E, North Troy, NY 12182)

1985-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

160

Small (5 million Btu/h) and large (300 million Btu/h) thermal test rigs for coal and coal slurry burner development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NEI International Combustion Ltd. of Derby, England, now operates two thermal test rigs for the development of burners capable of handling coal-water slurries (CWS). A general description of the large rig and its capacity was given. Also, the necessary conversions of the equipment to handle CWS were described. Information on the properties of the CWS was included. This consisted of chemical analysis of the parent coal and the slurry, sieve analysis of a dry sample, and viscosity versus temperature data of the CWS. The process of design development of the burner was outlined. Ten illustrations were presented, including schematic diagrams of equipment and graphs of data.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R.; Hufton, P.F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Evaluation of Gas Reburning & Low NOx Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler Performance and Economics Report Gas Reburning-Low NOx Burner System Cherokee Station Unit 3 Public Service Company of Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NOX reduction (70%) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was performed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado Bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NOX emission level of 0.73 lb/106 Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50%. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NOX in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NOX emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. Toward the end of the program, a Second Generation gas injection system was installed. Higher injector gas pressures were used that eliminated the need for flue gas recirculation as used in the first generation design. The Second Generation GR resulted in similar NOX reduction performance as that for the First Generation. With an improvement in the LNB performance in combination with the new gas injection system , the reburn gas could be reduced to 12.5% of the total boiler heat input to achieve al 64?40 reduction in NO, emissions. In addition, the OFA injectors were modified to provide for better mixing to lower CO emissions.

None

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Use of freeze-casting in advanced burner reactor fuel design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will detail the modeling of a fast reactor with fuel pins created using a freeze-casting process. Freeze-casting is a method of creating an inert scaffold within a fuel pin. The scaffold is created using a directional solidification process and results in open porosity for emplacement of fuel, with pores ranging in size from 300 microns to 500 microns in diameter. These pores allow multiple fuel types and enrichments to be loaded into one fuel pin. Also, each pore could be filled with varying amounts of fuel to allow for the specific volume of fission gases created by that fuel type. Currently fast reactors, including advanced burner reactors (ABR's), are not economically feasible due to the high cost of operating the reactors and of reprocessing the fuel. However, if the fuel could be very precisely placed, such as within a freeze-cast scaffold, this could increase fuel performance and result in a valid design with a much lower cost per megawatt. In addition to competitive costs, freeze-cast fuel would also allow for selective breeding or burning of actinides within specific locations in fast reactors. For example, fast flux peak locations could be utilized on a minute scale to target specific actinides for transmutation. Freeze-cast fuel is extremely flexible and has great potential in a variety of applications. This paper performs initial modeling of freeze-cast fuel, with the generic fast reactor parameters for this model based on EBR-II. The core has an assumed power of 62.5 MWt. The neutronics code used was Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) transport code. Uniform pore sizes were used in increments of 100 microns. Two different freeze-cast scaffold materials were used: ceramic (MgO-ZrO{sub 2}) and steel (SS316L). Separate models were needed for each material because the freeze-cast ceramic and metal scaffolds have different structural characteristics and overall porosities. Basic criticality results were compiled for the various models. Preliminary results show that criticality is achievable with freeze-cast fuel pins despite the significant amount of inert fuel matrix. Freeze casting is a promising method to achieve very precise fuel placement within fuel pins. (authors)

Lang, A. L.; Yablinsky, C. A.; Allen, T. R. [Dept. of Engineering Physics, Univ. of Wisconsin Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Burger, J.; Hunger, P. M.; Wegst, U. G. K. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, 8000 Cummings Hall, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

DURABILITY OF VERY LOW CAPACITY PRESSURE ATOMIZED FUEL NOZZLES USED WITH LOW FIRING RATE RESIDENTIAL OIL BURNERS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), working for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), has conducted a preliminary evaluation of the potential of very low fuel input capacity Simplex type pressure atomizing nozzles for use with oil burners designed for residential boilers, furnaces and water heaters. These nozzles under suitable conditions can be sufficiently reliable to enable new heating system designs. This would allow for the design of heating appliances that match the smaller load demands of energy efficient homes built with modern components and architectural systems designed to minimize energy use. When heating systems are installed with excessive capacity, oversized by three to four times the load, the result is a loss of up to ten percent as compared to the rated appliance efficiency. The use of low capacity nozzles in systems designed to closely match the load can thereby result in significant energy savings. BNL investigated the limitations of low flow rate nozzles and designed long-term experiments to see if ways could be determined that would be beneficial to long-term operation at low input capacities without failures. In order to maximize the potential for success the best possible industry practices available were employed. Low flow rate nozzles primarily fail by blockage or partial blockage of internal fuel flow passages inside the nozzle. To prevent any contaminants from entering the nozzle BNL investigated the geometry and critical dimensions and the current sate of the art of fuel filter design. Based on this investigation it was concluded that the best available filters should be more than capable of filtering contaminants from the fuel prior to entering the oil burner itself. This position was indeed validated based on the long-term trials conducted under this study no evidence resulted to change our position. It is highly recommended that these filters rated at 10 microns and with large filter capacity (surface area), should be used with all oil burner installations. The other possible failure mode had been attributed to fuel degradation and this became the main focus of the evaluation. The degradation of fuel usually occurs faster under higher temperature conditions. To preclude this as much as possible controls that provided for a post-purge of combustion airflow after burner shut down were selected. This provided a short period of time where the burner's combustion air blower continues to operate after the flame has gone out. This tends to cool the nozzle and in turn the fuel inside the small flow pathways inside the nozzle components. This study concludes that the use of low capacity nozzles is possible but only when the temperature and thermal mass environment of the combustion chamber result in a relatively ''cool'' condition. This was accomplished in one long-term experiment that essentially operated for a full heating season equivalent with no evidence of nozzle plugging or failure. The nozzle body surface temperature was kept at or below 150 F during the duration of the trial. On the other hand, a second system was studied that ended in a partial nozzle blockage and a system failure. In this ''hot environment'' system the nozzle body temperature reached 210 F. This occurred at close to a full heating season equivalent, yet it still would have resulted in a no-heat complaint by the homeowner.

MCDONALD,R.J.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Preliminary core design studies for the advanced burner reactor over a wide range of conversion ratios.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A consistent set of designs for 1000 MWt commercial-scale sodium-cooled Advance Burner Reactors (ABR) have been developed for both metal and oxide-fueled cores with conversion ratios from breakeven (CR=1.0) to fertile-free (CR=0.0). These designs are expected to satisfy thermal and irradiation damage limits based on the currently available data. The very low conversion ratio designs require fuel that is beyond the current fuel database, which is anticipated to be qualified by and for the Advanced Burned Test Reactor. Safety and kinetic parameters were calculated, but a safety analysis was not performed. Development of these designs was required to achieve the primary goal of this study, which was to generate representative fuel cycle mass flows for system studies of ABRs as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). There are slight variations with conversion ratio but the basic ABR configuration consists of 144 fuel assemblies and between 9 and 22 primary control assemblies for both the metal and oxide-fueled cores. Preliminary design studies indicated that it is feasible to design the ABR to accommodate a wide range of conversion ratio by employing different assembly designs and including sufficient control assemblies to accommodate the large reactivity swing at low conversion ratios. The assemblies are designed to fit within the same geometry, but the size and number of fuel pins within each assembly are significantly different in order to achieve the target conversion ratio while still satisfying thermal limits. Current irradiation experience would allow for a conversion ratio of somewhat below 0.75. The fuel qualification for the first ABR should expand this experience to allow for much lower conversion ratios and higher bunrups. The current designs were based on assumptions about the performance of high and very high enrichment fuel, which results in significant uncertainty about the details of the designs. However, the basic fuel cycle performance trends such as conversion ratio and mass flow parameters are less sensitive to these parameters and the current results should provide a good basis for static and dynamic system analysis. The conversion ratio is fundamentally a ratio of the macroscopic cross section of U-238 capture to that of TRU fission. Since the microscopic cross sections only change moderately with fuel design and isotopic concentration for the fast reactor, a specific conversion ratio requires a specific enrichment. The approximate average charge enrichment (TRU/HM) is 14%, 21%, 33%, 56%, and 100% for conversion ratios of 1.0, 0.75, 0.50, 0.25, and 0.0 for the metal-fueled cores. The approximate average charge enrichment is 17%, 25%, 38%, 60%, and 100% for conversion ratios of 1.0, 0.75, 0.50, 0.25, and 0.0 for the oxide-fueled core. For the split batch cores, the maximum enrichment will be somewhat higher. For both the metal and oxide-fueled cores, the reactivity feedback coefficients and kinetics parameters seem reasonable. The maximum single control assembly reactivity faults may be too large for the low conversion ratio designs. The average reactivity of the primary control assemblies was increased, which may cause the maximum reactivity of the central control assembly to be excessive. The values of the reactivity coefficients and kinetics parameters show that some values appear to improve significantly at lower conversion ratios while others appear far less favorable. Detailed safety analysis is required to determine if these designs have adequate safety margins or if appropriate design modifications are required. Detailed system analysis data has been generated for both metal and oxide-fueled core designs over the entire range of potential burner reactors. Additional data has been calculated for a few alternative fuel cycles. The systems data has been summarized in this report and the detailed data will be provided to the systems analysis team so that static and dynamic system analyses can be performed.

Hoffman, E. A.; Yang, W. S.; Hill, R. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

165

Heater head for Stirling engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a heater head for a Stirling engine comprising: a housing for enclosing the heater head with gas at a substantial elevated pressure; insulator means attached to the housing for insulating the heater head; inlet means attached to a regenerator in the housing for admission of relatively high pressure working fluid from the regenerator of a Stirling engine; a first annular heating wall in the housing attached to the inlet means for heating the working fluid; and, a second annular heating wall in the housing concentric with the first heating wall but of lesser diameters so that an annular space is formed between the first heating wall and the second heating wall for heating working fluid; and a third heating wall in the housing concentric with and smaller in diameter than the second heating wall forming the condensing area of a heat pipe between the second heating wall and the third heating wall.

White, M.A.; Emigh, S.G.

1987-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

166

Low NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers. Quarterly technical progress report, June--September 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the LNS Burner as retrofitted to the host cyclone boiler for effective low-cost control of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions while firing a bituminous coal. The LNS Burner employs a simple, innovative combustion process to burn pulverized coal at high temperatures and provides effective, low-cost control of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The coal ash contains sulfur and is removed in the form of molten slag and flyash. Cyclone-fired boiler units are typically older units firing high-sulfur bituminous coals at very high temperatures which results in very high NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions. The addition of conventional emission control equipment, such as wet scrubbers, to these older cyclone units in order to meet current and future environmental regulations is generally not economic. Further, the units are generally not compatible with low sulfur coal switching for S0{sub 2} control or selective catalytic reduction technologies for NO{sub x} control. Because the LNS Burner operates at the same very high temperatures as a typical cyclone boiler and produces a similar slag product, it may offer a viable retrofit option for cyclone boiler emission control. This was confirmed by the Cyclone Boiler Retrofit Feasibility Study carried out by TransAlta and an Operating Committee formed of cyclone boiler owners in 1989. An existing utility cyclone boiler, was then selected for the evaluation of the cost and performance study. It was concluded that the LNS Burner retrofit would be a cost-effective option for control of cyclone boiler emissions. A full-scale demonstration of the LNS Burner retrofit was selected in October 1988 as part of the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program Round II.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms - FY13  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

Snyder, Michelle MV; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Lapierre, Robert; Dage, Denomy C.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Waste Forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how waste form performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of waste form aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of waste form aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the waste forms come in contact with groundwater. The information presented in the report provides data that 1) quantify radionuclide retention within concrete waste form materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG); 2) measure the effect of concrete waste form properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and 3) quantify the stability of uranium-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Retention of Halogens in Waste Glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In spite of their potential roles as melting rate accelerators and foam breakers, halogens are generally viewed as troublesome components for glass processing. Of five halogens, F, Cl, Br, I, and At, all but At may occur in nuclear waste. A nuclear waste feed may contain up to 10 g of F, 4 g of Cl, and ?100 mg of Br and I per kg of glass. The main concern is halogen volatility, producing hazardous fumes and particulates, and the radioactive iodine 129 isotope of 1.7x10^7-year half life. Because F and Cl are soluble in oxide glasses and tend to precipitate on cooling, they can be retained in the waste glass in the form of dissolved constituents or as dispersed crystalline inclusions. This report compiles known halogen-retention data in both high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) glasses. Because of its radioactivity, the main focus is on I. Available data on F and Cl were compiled for comparison. Though Br is present in nuclear wastes, it is usually ignored; no data on Br retention were found.

Hrma, Pavel R.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Energy Conversion for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors/Advanced Burner Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An optimized supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle power converter has been developed for the 100 MWe (250 MWt) Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) eliminating the potential for sodium-water reactions and achieving a small power converter and turbine generator building. Cycle and plant efficiencies of 39.1 and 38.3 %, respectively, are calculated for the ABTR core outlet temperature of 510 deg. C. The ABTR S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle will incorporate Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger{sup TM} units in the Na-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchangers, high and low temperature recuperators, and cooler. A new sodium test facility is being completed to investigate the potential for transient plugging of narrow sodium channels typical of a Na-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchanger under postulated off-normal or accident conditions. (authors)

Sienicki, James J.; Moisseytsev, Anton; Cho, Dae H.; Momozaki, Yoichi; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.; Haglund, Robert C.; Reed, Claude B.; Farmer, Mitchell T. [Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Oil burners: Crude oil, atomization, and combustion efficiency. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning fuel properties and boiler operations techniques to make maximum use of heavy crude oil, shale oil, and low grade fuels to reduce energy costs in boiler firing. Fuel properties pertain to chemical constituents, viscosity, desulfurization, and processing methods to upgrade the fuels. Operating techniques include atomization, dual-fuel burners, emission characteristics, and cost factors. Combustion efficiency is examined and some citations report on additives or processing techniques to improve the efficiency. The citations also report on studies of health effects in the use of synfuels, mostly as coal liquids to replace oil. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Oil burners: Crude oil, atomization, and combustion efficiency. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning fuel properties and boiler operations techniques to make maximum use of heavy crude oil, shale oil, and low grade fuels to reduce energy costs in boiler firing. Fuel properties pertain to chemical constituents, viscosity, desulfurization, and processing methods to upgrade the fuels. Operating techniques include atomization, dual-fuel burners, emission characteristics, and cost factors. Combustion efficiency is examined and some citations report on additives or processing techniques to improve the efficiency. The citations also report on studies of health effects in the use of synfuels, mostly as coal liquids to replace oil. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

DEVELOPMENT OF SELF-TUNING RESIDENTIAL OIL/BURNER - OXYGEN SENSOR ASSESSMENT AND EARLY PROTOTYPE SYSTEM OPERATING EXPERIENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first topical report dealing with a new project leading towards the development of a self-tuning residential oil burner. It was initiated under the Statement of Work for the Oil Heat Research and Development Program, for Fiscal Year 1997 as defined in the Combustion Equipment Technology Program, under the management of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In part, this work is based on research reported by BNL in 1990, suggesting various options for developing control strategies in oil heat technology leading to the enhanced efficiency of oil-fired heating systems. BNL has been addressing these concepts in order of priority and technology readiness. The research described in this report is part of an ongoing project and additional work is planned for the future assuming adequate program funding is made available.

MCDONALD,R.J.; BUTCHER,T.A.; KRAJEWSKI,R.F.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Pressure testing of torispherical heads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two vessels fabricated from SA516-70 steel with 6% knuckle radius torispherical heads were tested under internal pressure to failure. The D/t ratios of Vessel 1 and Vessel 2 were 238 and 185 respectively. The calculated maximum allowable working pressures of Vessel 1 and 2 heads using the ASME Section 8, Div. 1 rules and measured dimensions were 85 and 110 psi, respectively. Vessel 1 failed at a nozzle weld in the cylindrical shell at 700 psi pressure. Neither buckling nor any other objectionable deformation of the head was observed at a theoretical double-elastic-slope collapse pressure of 241 and a calculated buckling pressure of 270 psi. Buckles were observed developing slowly after 600 psi pressure, and a total of 22 buckles were observed after the test, having the maximum amplitude of 0.15 inch. Vessel 2 failed at the edge of the longitudinal weld of the cylindrical shell at 1,080 psi pressure. Neither buckling nor any other objectionable deformation of the head was observed up to the final pressure, which exceeded the theoretical double-elastic-slope collapse and calculated buckling pressures of 274 psi and 342 psi, respectively.

Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.; Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Analyzing pulse from head motions in video  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We extract heart rate and beat lengths from videos by measuring subtle head oscillations that accompany the cardiac cycle. Our method tracks features on the head, temporally filters their trajectories and performs principal ...

Balakrishnan, Guha

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Volatile Species Retention During Metallic Fuel Casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Bases on these results it is very probably that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

Randall S. Fielding; Douglas L. Proter

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

207-A retention basins system design description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 242-A Evaporator is a waste treatment facility designed to reduce liquid waste volumes currently stored in the Hanford Area double shell Waste Storage Tanks. The evaporator uses evaporative concentration to achieve this volume reduction, returning the concentrated slurry to the double-shell tanks for storage. The process effluent is transferred to various retention/treatment facilities for eventual release to the environment. The process utilizes an evaporator vessel and various supporting systems for heating, evaporating, and condensing low-heat-generating liquid waste produced it the Hanford Site. The process reduces the total volume of the liquid waste requiring storage in a double shell tank, making it more manageable for current storage as well as for future treatment and disposal. The main components of the 242-A Evaporator are the Reboiler, Vapor-Liquid Separator, Recirculation Pump and Pump Loop, Slurry System, Condenser System, Steam Jet Vacuum System, Condensate Collection Tank, and Ion Exchange System.

Wahlquist, R.A.

1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

178

In-Vessel Retention Technology Development and Use for Advanced PWR Designs in the USA and Korea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-Vessel Retention (IVR) of molten core debris by means of external reactor vessel flooding is a cornerstone of severe accident management for Westinghouse's AP600 (advanced passive light water reactor) design. The case for its effectiveness (made in previous work by the PI) has been thoroughly documented, reviewed as part of the licensing certification, and accepted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. A successful IVR would terminate a severe accident, passively, with the core in a stable, coolable configuration (within the lower head), thus avoiding the largely uncertain accident evolution with the molten debris on the containment floor. This passive plant design has been upgraded by Westinghouse to the AP1000, a 1000 MWe plant very similar to the AP600. The severe accident management approach is very similar too, including In-Vessel Retention as the cornerstone feature, and initial evaluations indicated that this would be feasible at the higher power as well. A similar strategy is adopted in Korea for the APR1400 plant. The overall goal of this project is to provide experimental data and develop the necessary basic understanding so as to allow the robust extension of the AP600 In-Vessel Retention strategy for severe accident management to higher power reactors, and in particular, to the AP1000 advanced passive design.

T.G. Theofanous; S.J. Oh; J.H. Scobel

2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

179

In-vessel coolability and retention of a core melt. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficacy of external flooding of a reactor vessel as a severe accident management strategy is assessed for an AP600-like reactor design. The overall approach is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM), and the assessment includes consideration of bounding scenarios and sensitivity studies, as well as arbitrary parametric evaluations that allow the delineation of the failure boundaries. Quantification of the input parameters is carried out for an AP600-like design, and the results of the assessment demonstrate that lower head failure is physically unreasonable. Use of this conclusion for any specific application is subject to verifying the required reliability of the depressurization and cavity-flooding systems, and to showing the appropriateness (in relation to the database presented here, or by further testing as necessary) of the thermal insulation design and of the external surface properties of the lower head, including any applicable coatings. The AP600 is particularly favorable to in-vessel retention. Some ideas to enhance the assessment basis as well as performance in this respect, for applications to larger and/or higher power density reactors are also provided.

Theofanous, T.G.; Liu, C.; Additon, S.; Angelini, S.; Kymaelaeinen, O.; Salmassi, T. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Risk Studies and Safety

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

In-vessel coolability and retention of a core melt. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficacy of external flooding of a reactor vessel as a severe accident management strategy is assessed for an AP600-like reactor design. The overall approach is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM), and the assessment includes consideration of bounding scenarios and sensitivity studies, as well as arbitrary parametric evaluations that allow the delineation of the failure boundaries. Quantification of the input parameters is carried out for an AP600-like design, and the results of the assessment demonstrate that lower head failure is physically unreasonable. Use of this conclusion for any specific application is subject to verifying the required reliability of the depressurization and cavity-flooding systems, and to showing the appropriateness (in relation to the database presented here, or by further testing as necessary) of the thermal insulation design and of the external surface properties of the lower head, including any applicable coatings. The AP600 is particularly favorable to in-vessel retention. Some ideas to enhance the assessment basis as well as performance in this respect, for applications to larger and/or higher power density reactors are also provided.

Theofanous, T.G.; Liu, C.; Additon, S.; Angelini, S.; Kymaelaeinen, O.; Salmassi, T. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Risk Studies and Safety

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced in-vessel retention Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

L. (2008). Advances in modelling hysteretic water retention curve... COMPACTED CLAYEY SOILS: MODELLING THE WATER RETENTION BEHAVIOUR Della Vecchia, G. (dellavecchia......

182

Low NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work on process design was deferred pending a restart of the mainstream project activities. LNS Burner design effort was focussed mainly on the continued development of the slag screen model. Documentation of the LNS Burner thermal model also continued. Balance of plant engineering continued on the P&ID`s for the fuel preparation building HVAC system, lighter oil, limestone/fuel additive handling system, instrument and service air and fire protection systems. Work began on the preparation of system and sub-system descriptions. Schematic connection and wiring drawings and diagrams for the fuel handling system, flame scanner/igniter system and DCS control modification for the lighter oil pumps and Unit 1 circulating water pumps were completed.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Operational results of a low NO{sub x} burner retrofit on a 780 net MW{sub e} PC-fired utility boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to comply with state and federal clean air regulations while maintaining operational flexibility and control. This objective was accomplished with the installation of DRB-XCL{reg_sign} burners with a separated overfire air system. The DRB-XCL{reg_sign} burners can consistently achieve 0.5 lbs/10{sup 6} Btu NO{sub x} or less. Even lower NO{sub x} levels can be achieved with the new equipment. However, increased carbon levels affecting stack opacity prevent long-term operation at this level with the existing scrubbing equipment. Final test results indicated that the project goals were met with some exceeded. The results of this project pointed out the numerous interactions of all of the interrelated complex systems in today`s state-of-the-art power plants. The increase in unburned carbon levels affected the wet scrubber and impacted stack plume color. Being one indicator of inefficiency, this item is currently being reviewed to take advantage of further improving operating efficiency. Mechanical reliability of the Babcock & Wilcox DRB-XCL{reg_sign} burner has been good and it is estimated that long-term maintenance costs will be low. Close cooperation between Ohio Edison and B&W contributed positively to the success of this project.

Bryk, S.A.; Cioffi, P.L.; Tucker, T.J. [Babcock & Wilcox, Barberton, OH (United States); Mellody, J.G. [Ohio Edison Co., Akron, OH (United States); Hooks, M.E. [Pennsylvania Power Co., Shippingport, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Evaluation of gas-reburning and low NO{sub x} burners on a wall fired boiler. Technical progress report No. 5, October 1--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low NO{sub x} burners operate on the principle of delayed mixing between the coal fuel and burner air, so that less NO{sub x} is formed. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel corresponding to the total heat release in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO{sub x} to molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO{sub x} emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at the lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO{sub x}. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO{sub x} emission reductions of 75 percent or more as a result of combing Low NO{sub x} Burners and Gas Reburning on a utility boiler having the design characteristics mentioned above. A Host Site Agreement has been signed by EER and a utility company in the State of Colorado: Public Service Company of Colorado (Cherokee Unit No. 3, 172 MW{sub e}) front wall fired boiler near Denver.

Not Available

1992-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Formation and retention of methane in coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Reactor Pressure Vessel Head Packaging & Disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Head replacements have come to the forefront due to erosion/corrosion and wastage problems resulting from the susceptibility of the RPV Head alloy steel material to water/boric acid corrosion from reactor coolant leakage through the various RPV Head penetrations. A case in point is the recent Davis-Besse RPV Head project, where detailed inspections in early 2002 revealed significant wastage of head material adjacent to one of the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) nozzles. In lieu of making ASME weld repairs to the damaged head, Davis-Besse made the decision to replace the RPV Head. The decision was made on the basis that the required weld repair would be too extensive and almost impractical. This paper presents the packaging, transport, and disposal considerations for the damaged Davis-Besse RPV Head. It addresses the requirements necessary to meet Davis Besse needs, as well as the regulatory criteria, for shipping and burial of the head. It focuses on the radiological characterization, shipping/disposal package design, site preparation and packaging, and the transportation and emergency response plans that were developed for the Davis-Besse RPV Head project.

Wheeler, D. M.; Posivak, E.; Freitag, A.; Geddes, B.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

187

Initial test results of the limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) demonstration project. Report for September 1984-April 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses SO/sub 2/ removal efficiency and low-NOx burner performance obtained during short term tests, as well as the impact of LIMB ash on electrostatic precipitator (ESP) performance at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station. Project goals are to demonstrate 50% or more SO/sub 2/ removal at a Ca/S molar stoichiometry of 2.0 and NOx emissions of less than 0.5 lb/million Btu while maintaining boiler operability and reliability. The tests, conducted before September 1987, indicated that 55-60% SO/sub 2/ removal and NOx emissions on the order of 0.48 lb/million Btu are achievable. The increased dust loading of a high-resistivity ash typically limited continuous operation to 2-6 hr. The paper discusses how the LIMB ash gave rise to back corona which, in turn, increased stack opacity to regulated levels. The extension of the project to include humidification of the flue gas is also described as a way to minimize these effects.

Nolan, P.S.; Hendriks, R.V.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Bubble retention in synthetic sludge: Testing of alternative gas retention apparatus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several of the underground storage tanks currently used to store waste at Hanford have been placed on the Flammable Gas Watch List, because the waste is either known or suspected to generate, store, and episodically release flammable gases. The objective of this experimental study is to develop a method to measure gas bubble retention in simulated tank waste and in diluted simulant. The method and apparatus should (1) allow for reasonably rapid experiments, (2) minimize sample disturbance, and (3) provide realistic bubble nucleation and growth. The scope of this experimental study is to build an apparatus for measuring gas retention in simulated waste and to design the apparatus to be compatible with future testing on actual waste. The approach employed for creating bubbles in sludge involves dissolving a soluble gas into the supernatant liquid at an elevated pressure, recirculating the liquid containing the dissolved gas through the sludge, then reducing the pressure to allow bubbles to nucleate and grow. Results have been obtained for ammonia as the soluble gas and SY1-SIM-91A, a chemically representative simulated tank waste. In addition, proof-of-principle experiments were conducted with both ammonia and CO{sub 2} as soluble gases and sludge composed of 90-micron glass beads. Results are described.

Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

HeadLock : wide-range head pose estimation for low resolution video  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focuses on data mining technologies to extract head pose information from low resolution video recordings. Head pose, as an approximation of gaze direction, is a key indicator of human behavior and interaction. ...

DeCamp, Philip (Philip James)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Evaluation of gas reburning and low NO{sub x} burners on a wall-fired boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of Gas Reburning (GR) and Low NO{sub x}, Burners (LNB) has been completed at Public Service Company of Colorado`s Cherokee Station Unit 3. The goal of the demonstration, which was carried out in a US DOE Clean Coal Technology Round 3 Program, was to reduce NO{sub x} emissions by 70%. The reduction was to be achieved from the pre-project level, prior to LNB retrofit. The GR system was supplied by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) and the LNBs were supplied by the Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation. The project was carried out in three phases in which EER designed the GR system and obtained necessary permits (Phase 1), constructed the system and completed start-up tasks (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both Optimization Tests and a Long-Term Demonstration (Phase 3). As directed by the cooperative agreement, environmental monitoring was conducted in each phase. Measurements were taken by plant personnel and an EER Field Testing Team and were divided into two types. ``Compliance Monitoring`` was conducted by plant personnel to satisfy requirements of regulatory agencies, while ``Supplemental Monitoring`` was conducted by EER personnel to develop a database of environmental impacts of the technology and to ensure environmental acceptability of the project. This document presents environmental monitoring data obtained during the Long-Term Testing period, April 27, 1993 to January 27, 1995. During this period, ten months of testing of the GR-LNB system was followed by a modification into a ``second-generation`` GR-LNB system, which was evaluated for six months. Compliance Monitoring was conducted primarily in two areas, air emissions and aqueous discharges.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Evaluation of gas reburning and low NO{sub x} burners on a wall-fired boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of Gas Reburning (GR) and Low NO{sub x} Burners (LNB) has been completed at Public Service Company of Colorado`s Cherokee Station Unit 3. The goal of the demonstration was to reduce NO{sub x} emissions by 70%. The reduction was to be achieved from the pre-project level prior to LNB retrofit. The GR system was supplied by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) and the LNBs were supplied by the Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation. The project was carried out in three phases in which EER designed the GR system and obtained necessary permits (Phase 1), constructed the system and completed start-up tasks (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both Optimization Tests and a Long-Term Demonstration (Phase 3). As directed by the Cooperative Agreement, environmental monitoring was conducted in each phase. Measurements were taken by plant personnel and an EER Field Testing Team and were divided into two types. ``Compliance Monitoring`` was conducted by plant personnel to satisfy requirements of regulatory agencies, while ``Supplemental Monitoring`` was conducted by EER personnel to develop a database of environmental impacts of the technology and to ensure environmental acceptability of the project. This document presents environmental monitoring data obtained during the Optimization Testing period, November 11, 1992 to April 23, 1993. Compliance Monitoring was conducted primarily in two areas, air emissions and aqueous discharges. The unit is required to meet an SO{sub 2} limit of 1.2 lb/MBtu and an opacity limit of 20 percent (6 minute average). Therefore, the plant monitors flue gas SO{sub 2} and opacity continuously and submits Excess Emissions Reports to the Colorado Air Pollution Control Division on a quarterly basis. Discharge limits for the aqueous effluent from the plant and monitoring requirements are specified by a permit issued by the Colorado Water Quality Control Division.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Development of self-tuning residential oil-burner. Oxygen sensor assessment and early prototype system operating experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first topical report dealing with a new project leading towards the development of a self-tuning residential oil burner. It was initiated under the Statement of Work for the Oil Heat Research and Development Program, for Fiscal Year 1997 as defined in the Combustion Equipment Technology Program, under the management of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In part, this work is based on research reported by BNL in 1990, suggesting various options for developing control strategies in oil heat technology leading to the enhanced efficiency of oil-fired heating systems. BNL has been addressing these concepts in order of priority and technology readiness. The research described in this report is part of an ongoing project and additional work is planned for the future assuming adequate program funding is made available. BNL has continued to investigate all types of sensor technologies associated with combustion systems including all forms of oxygen measurement techniques. In these studies the development of zirconium oxide oxygen sensors has been considered over the last decade. The development of these sensors for the automotive industry has allowed for cost reductions based on quantity of production that might not have occurred otherwise. This report relates BNL`s experience in testing various zirconium oxide sensors, and the results of tests intended to provide evaluation of the various designs with regard to performance in oil-fired systems. These tests included accuracy when installed on oil-fired heating appliances and response time in cyclic operating mode. An evaluation based on performance criteria and cost factors was performed. Cost factors in the oil heat industry are one of the most critical issues in introducing new technology.

McDonald, R.J.; Butcher, T.A.; Krajewski, R.F.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Head of Safety 020 7679 1948  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Head of Safety Paul Stirk 020 7679 1948 (Internal 41948) p.stirk@ucl.ac.uk Deputy Head of Safety & Biological Safety Advisor Jillian Deans 020 7679 1814 (Internal 41814) j.deans@ucl.ac.uk Safety Training Manager Kuen Yip Porter 020 7679 1299 (Internal 41299) k.yip-porter@ucl.ac.uk Safety Advisors Rhona Brown

Guillas, Serge

194

Achieving New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Emission Standards Through Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to demonstrate the use of an Integrated Combustion Optimization System to achieve NO{sub X} emission levels in the range of 0.15 to 0.22 lb/MMBtu while simultaneously enabling increased power output. The project plan consisted of the integration of low-NO{sub X} burners and advanced overfire air technology with various process measurement and control devices on the Holcomb Station Unit 1 boiler. The plan included the use of sophisticated neural networks or other artificial intelligence technologies and complex software to optimize several operating parameters, including NO{sub X} emissions, boiler efficiency, and CO emissions. The program was set up in three phases. In Phase I, the boiler was equipped with sensors that can be used to monitor furnace conditions and coal flow to permit improvements in boiler operation. In Phase II, the boiler was equipped with burner modifications designed to reduce NO{sub X} emissions and automated coal flow dampers to permit on-line fuel balancing. In Phase III, the boiler was to be equipped with an overfire air system to permit deep reductions in NO{sub X} emissions. Integration of the overfire air system with the improvements made in Phases I and II would permit optimization of boiler performance, output, and emissions. This report summarizes the overall results from Phases I and II of the project. A significant amount of data was collected from the combustion sensors, coal flow monitoring equipment, and other existing boiler instrumentation to monitor performance of the burner modifications and the coal flow balancing equipment.

Wayne Penrod

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL RADIATIVELY/CONDUCTIVELY STABILIZED BURNER FOR SIGNIFICANT REDUCTION OF NOx EMISSIONS AND FOR ADVANCING THE MODELING AND UNDERSTANDING OF PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION AND EMISSIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the proposed study was the study and analysis of, and design recommendations for, a novel radiatively-conductively stabilized combustion (RCSC) process for pulverized coal, which, based on our prior studies with both fluid fuels and pulverized coal, holds a high promise to reduce NO{sub x} production significantly. We have primarily engaged in continuing and improving our process modeling and analysis, obtained a large amount of quantitative information about the effects of the major parameters on NO{sub x} production, conducted an extensive exergy analysis of the process, evaluated the practicalities of employing the Radiatively-Conductively Stabilized Combustor (RCSC) to large power and heat plants, and improved the experimental facility. Prior experimental work has proven the feasibility of the combustor, but slagging during coal combustion was observed and should be dealt with. The primary outcomes and conclusions from the study are: (1) we developed a model and computer program that represents the pulverized coal combustion in the RCSC, (2) the model predicts that NO{sub x} emissions can be reduced by a number of methods, detailed in the report. (3) the exergy analysis points out at least a couple of possible ways to improve the exergetic efficiency in this combustor: increasing the effectiveness of thermal feedback, and adjusting the combustor mixture exit location, (4) because of the low coal flow rates necessitated in this study to obtain complete combustion in the burner, the size of a burner operating under the considered conditions would have to be up to an order of magnitude, larger than comparable commercial burners, but different flow configurations of the RCSC can yield higher feed rates and smaller dimensions, and should be investigated. Related to this contract, eleven papers were published in journals and conference proceedings, and ten invited presentations were given at university and research institutions, as well as at the Gordon Conference on Modern Development in Thermodynamics. The results obtained are very encouraging for the development of the RCSC as a commercial burner for significant reduction of NO{sub x} emissions, and highly warrants further study and development.

Noam Lior; Stuart W. Churchill

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC- FE Dkt No. 15-14-NG  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On January 23, 2015, Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC (together, “Bear Head LNG”), filed an application for long-term, multi-contract authorization to engage in imports from,...

197

Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC FE Docket No. 15-14-NG  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On January 23, 2015, Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC (together, “Bear Head LNG”), filed an application for long-term, multi-contract authorization to engage in imports from,...

198

DOE Head Contracting Authority (HCA) and Procurement Director...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE Head Contracting Authority (HCA) and Procurement Director (PD) Directory DOE Head Contracting Authority (HCA) and Procurement Director (PD) Directory HCA and PD List Sept 23...

199

INTERNAL POSTING - Head of Technology Transfer, Patents & Publications...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INTERNAL POSTING - Head of Technology Transfer, Patents & Publications Department: Best Practices Supervisor(s): John Delooper Staff: AM 7 Requisition Number: 1400936 The Head of...

200

Laboratory Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Laboratory Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower Turbine Laboratory Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower Turbine Laboratory Demonstration of a New...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND CLB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain-diet diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. The manure could be used as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in an existing coal suspension fired combustion systems. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Reburn is a process where a small percentage of fuel called reburn fuel is injected above the NO{sub x} producing, conventional coal fired burners in order to reduce NO{sub x}. The manure could also be used as reburn fuel for reducing NO{sub x} in coal fired plants. An alternate approach of using animal waste is to adopt the gasification process using a fixed bed gasifier and then use the gases for firing in gas turbine combustors. In this report, the cattle manure is referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) and chicken manure as litter biomass (LB). The report generates data on FB and LB fuel characteristics. Co-firing, reburn, and gasification tests of coal, FB, LB, coal: FB blends, and coal: LB blends and modeling on cofiring, reburn systems and economics of use of FB and LB have also been conducted. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, lower in heat content, higher in moisture, and higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution) compared to coal. Small-scale cofiring experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} emissions will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when used in a reburning process. Computer simulations for coal: LB blends were performed by modifying an existing computer code to include the drying and phosphorus (P) oxidation models. The gasification studies revealed that there is bed agglomeration in the case of chicken litter biomass due to its higher alkaline oxide content in the ash. Finally, the results of the economic analysis show that considerable fuel cost savings can be achieved with the use of biomass. In the case of higher ash and moisture biomass, the fuel cost savings is reduced.

Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thein; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan; Senthil Arumugam; Kevin Heflin

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

202

Emissions characteristics of modern oil heating equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last 10 years there have been some very interesting developments in oil heating. These include higher static pressure burners, air atomizing nozzles, low firing rate nozzles, low heat loss combustion chambers and condensing boilers and furnaces. The current data base on the emissions characteristics of oil-fired residential heating equipment is based primarily on data taken in the 1970's. The objective of the work described in this report is to evaluate the effects of recent developments in oil-fired equipment on emissions. Detailed emissions measurements have been made on a number of currently available residential oil burners and whole systems selected to represent recent development trends. Some additional data was taken with equipment which is in the prototype stage. These units are a prevaporizing burner and a retention head burner modified with an air atomizing nozzle. Measurements include No{sub x}, smoke numbers, CO, gas phase hydrocarbon emissions and particulate mass emission rates. Emissions of smoke, CO and hydrocarbons were found to be significantly greater under cyclic operation for all burners tested. Generally, particulate emission rates were found to be 3 to 4 times greater in cyclic operation than in steady state. Air atomized burners were found to be capable of operation at much lower excess air levels than pressure atomized burners without producing significant amounts of smoke. As burner performance is improved, either through air atomization or prevaporization of the fuel, there appears to be a general trend towards producing CO at lower smoke levels as excess air is decreased. The criteria of adjusting burners for trace smoke may need to be abandoned for advanced burners and replaced with an adjustment for specific excess air levels. 17 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

Krajewski, R.; Celebi, Y.; Coughlan, R.; Butcher, T.; McDonald, R.J.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

PARTICULATE CHARACTERIZATION AND ULTRA LOW-NOx BURNER FOR THE CONTROL OF NO{sub x} AND PM{sub 2.5} FOR COAL FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the serious challenge facing coal-fired electric utilities with regards to curbing their NO{sub x} and fine particulate emissions, Babcock and Wilcox and McDermott Technology, Inc. conducted a project entitled, ''Particulate Characterization and Ultra Low-NO{sub x} Burner for the Control of NO{sub x} and PM{sub 2.5} for Coal Fired Boilers.'' The project included pilot-scale demonstration and characterization of technologies for removal of NO{sub x} and primary PM{sub 2.5} emissions. Burner development and PM{sub 2.5} characterization efforts were based on utilizing innovative concepts in combination with sound scientific and fundamental engineering principles and a state-of-the-art test facility. Approximately 1540 metric tonnes (1700 tons) of high-volatile Ohio bituminous coal were fired. Particulate sampling for PM{sub 2.5} emissions characterization was conducted in conjunction with burner testing. Based on modeling recommendations, a prototype ultra low-NO{sub x} burner was fabricated and tested at 100 million Btu/hr in the Babcock and Wilcox Clean Environment Development Facility. Firing the unstaged burner with a high-volatile bituminous Pittsburgh 8 coal at 100 million Btu/hr and 17% excess air achieved a NO{sub x} goal of 0.20 lb NO{sub 2}/million Btu with a fly ash loss on ignition (LOI) of 3.19% and burner pressure drop of 4.7 in H{sub 2}O for staged combustion. With the burner stoichiometry set at 0.88 and the overall combustion stoichiometry at 1.17, average NO{sub x} and LOI values were 0.14 lb NO{sub 2}/million Btu and 4.64% respectively. The burner was also tested with a high-volatile Mahoning 7 coal. Based on the results of this work, commercial demonstration is being pursued. Size classified fly ash samples representative of commercial low-NO{sub x} and ultra low-NO{sub x} combustion of Pittsburgh 8 coal were collected at the inlet and outlet of an ESP. The mass of size classified fly ash at the ESP outlet was sufficient to evaluate the particle size distribution, but was of insufficient size to permit reliable chemical analysis. The size classified fly ash from the inlet of the ESP was used for detailed chemical analyses. Chemical analyses of the fly ash samples from the ESP outlet using a high volume sampler were performed for comparison to the size classified results at the inlet. For all test conditions the particulate removal efficiency of the ESP exceeded 99.3% and emissions were less than the NSPS limits of {approx}48 mg/dscm. With constant combustion conditions, the removal efficiency of the ESP increased as the ESP voltage and Specific Collection Area (SCA) increased. The associated decrease in particle emissions occurred in size fractions both larger and smaller than 2.5 microns. For constant ESP voltage and SCA, the removal efficiency for the ultra low-NO{sub x} combustion ash (99.4-99.6%) was only slightly less than for the low-NO{sub x} combustion ash (99.7%). The decrease in removal efficiency was accompanied by a decrease in ESP current. The emission of PM{sub 2.5} from the ESP did not change significantly as a result of the change in combustion conditions. Most of the increase in emissions was in the size fraction greater than 2.5 microns, indicating particle re-entrainment. These results may be specific to the coal tested in this program. In general, the concentration of inorganic elements and trace species in the fly ash at the ESP inlet was dependent on the particle size fraction. The smallest particles tended to have higher concentrations of inorganic elements/trace species than larger particles. The concentration of most elements by particle size range was independent of combustion condition and the concentration of soluble ions in the fly ash showed little change with combustion condition when evaluated on a carbon free basis.

Ralph Bailey; Hamid Sarv; Jim Warchol; Debi Yurchison

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

Experimental and numerical study of the accuracy of flame-speed measurements for methane/air combustion in a slot burner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measuring the velocities of premixed laminar flames with precision remains a controversial issue in the combustion community. This paper studies the accuracy of such measurements in two-dimensional slot burners and shows that while methane/air flame speeds can be measured with reasonable accuracy, the method may lack precision for other mixtures such as hydrogen/air. Curvature at the flame tip, strain on the flame sides and local quenching at the flame base can modify local flame speeds and require corrections which are studied using two-dimensional DNS. Numerical simulations also provide stretch, displacement and consumption flame speeds along the flame front. For methane/air flames, DNS show that the local stretch remains small so that the local consumption speed is very close to the unstretched premixed flame speed. The only correction needed to correctly predict flame speeds in this case is due to the finite aspect ratio of the slot used to inject the premixed gases which induces a flow acceleration in the measurement region (this correction can be evaluated from velocity measurement in the slot section or from an analytical solution). The method is applied to methane/air flames with and without water addition and results are compared to experimental data found in the literature. The paper then discusses the limitations of the slot-burner method to measure flame speeds for other mixtures and shows that it is not well adapted to mixtures with a Lewis number far from unity, such as hydrogen/air flames. (author)

Selle, L.; Ferret, B. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT, Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, Toulouse (France); Poinsot, T. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT, Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, Toulouse (France); CERFACS, Toulouse (France)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Epistemological resources 1 Running Head: EPISTEMOLOGICAL RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Epistemological resources 1 Running Head: EPISTEMOLOGICAL RESOURCES Epistemological resources University Maryland, College Park Trisha Kagey Montgomery County Public Schools #12;Epistemological resources are better understood as made up of finer-grained cognitive resources whose activation depends sensitively

Elby, Andy

206

TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training the head was safely removed and stored and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training, the head was safely removed and stored; and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

SPATIAL TRANSFORMATIONS 1 Running head: Spatial transformations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPATIAL TRANSFORMATIONS 1 Running head: Spatial transformations Multiple Systems for Spatial Imagery: Transformations of Objects and Bodies Jeffrey M. Zacks* and Barbara Tversky * Washington COGNITION & COMPUTATION #12;SPATIAL TRANSFORMATIONS 2 Abstract Problem-solving often requires imagining

Zacks, Jeffrey M.

209

Predicting Student Retention and Academic Success at New Mexico Tech  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting Student Retention and Academic Success at New Mexico Tech by Julie Luna Submitted Research and Statistics Option New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology Socorro, New Mexico August at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. Joe Franklin of the Information Services Department

Borchers, Brian

210

Retention of ferrite in AluminiumAlloyed TRIPassisted steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Retention of ­ferrite in Aluminium­Alloyed TRIP­assisted steels Young Joo Choi1, Dong­Woo Suh1 of excess ­ferrite in the microstructure observed at ambient temperature. These provided valuable information for comparison against kinetic simulations which prove that the excess ferrite cannot

Cambridge, University of

211

Faculty Retention and Gender Adrienne Kertzer and Jenny Godley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Faculty Retention and Gender Adrienne Kertzer and Jenny Godley Advisory Committee on the Status, and home faculty; by year, rank, and total number of faculty members across the 1 E-mail Adrienne Kertzer, and total number of faculty members in the home faculty.3 In January 2013, Jenny Godley, Department

Calgary, University of

212

PLASTICIZER RETENTION IN PVC GEOMEMBRANES T. D. Stark1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PLASTICIZER RETENTION IN PVC GEOMEMBRANES T. D. Stark1 , H. Choi2 , and P. W. Diebel3 1, Ontario, Canada, N1R 5T6; PH (519)623-1630; email: PDiebel@cgtower.com ABSTRACT: Plasticizers are used to make PVC flexible so it can be used as a geomembrane for containment purposes. Plasticizers can migrate

213

Evolutionary Computing for Detection of Retentive Structures in Coastal Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,robillia,poty,fonlupt}@lil.univ-littoral.fr, Abstract-- The demography of anchovy fishes in the Gulf of Biscay seems to be related to the presence of so- called "retentive" hydrodynamical structures, that keep fish eggs and larvae in a favorable environment be used to decide fishing quotas or bans for the sake of preserving the natural resource. We propose two

Fernandez, Thomas

214

Electro-optic voltage sensor head  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers.

Crawford, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davidson, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Woods, Gregory K. (Cornelius, OR)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Electro-optic voltage sensor head  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers. 6 figs.

Crawford, T.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Woods, G.K.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

216

Soil Water Retention Measurements Using a Combined Tensiometer-Coiled Time Domain Reflectometry Probe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Water Retention Measurements Using a Combined Tensiometer-Coiled Time Domain Reflectometry al., 1975; Arya et al.,that can be used to determine soil water retention curves in both 1975; Royer of a standard tensiometer. The combined tensiometer-coiled TDR probe was con- of soil water retention curves

Wildenschild, Dorthe

217

Most Workers Who Suffer Head Injuries- Were Not Wearing Head Protection  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A survey by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) of accidents and injuries noted that most workers who suffered impact injuries to the head were not wearing head protection. In addition, the same survey showed that the majority of workers were injured while performing their normal jobs at their regular worksites.

218

Training and Certification of Lock Operators IMTS Heads-up Paper Heads-up Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training and Certification of Lock Operators IMTS Heads-up Paper 1 Heads-up Paper Training called "Training and Certification of Lock and Dam Operators." Interested individuals can send ideas of the Training and Certification program. Examples of what will be in those draft documents are as follows

US Army Corps of Engineers

219

CO-FIRING COAL, FEEDLOT, AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND LFB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. In this project a co-firing technology is proposed which would use manure that cannot be used for fertilizer, for power generation. Since the animal manure has economic uses as both a fertilizer and as a fuel, it is properly referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) for cow manure, or litter biomass (LB) for chicken manure. The biomass will be used a as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in existing coal fired combustion devices. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Therefore, it is the goal of the current research to develop an animal biomass cofiring technology. A cofiring technology is being developed by performing: (1) studies on fundamental fuel characteristics, (2) small scale boiler burner experiments, (3) gasifier experiments, (4) computer simulations, and (5) an economic analysis. The fundamental fuel studies reveal that biomass is not as high a quality fuel as coal. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, higher in moisture, higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution), and lower in heat content than coal. Additionally, experiments indicate that the biomass fuels have higher gas content, release gases more readily than coal, and less homogeneous. Small-scale boiler experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} pollutant emissions produced will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. This is a surprising result as the levels of N are higher in the biomass fuel than in coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when used in a reburning process to reduce NO{sub x} emissions. Since crushing costs of biomass fuels may be prohibitive, stoker firing may be cost effective; in order simulate such a firing, future work will investigate the performance of a gasifier when fired with larger sized coal and biomass. It will be a fixed bed gasifier, and will evaluate blends, coal, and biomass. Computer simulations were performed using the PCGC-2 code supplied by BYU and modified by A&M with three mixture fractions for handling animal based biomass fuels in order to include an improved moisture model for handling wet fuels and phosphorus oxidation. Finally the results of the economic analysis show that considerable savings can be achieved with the use of biomass. In the case of higher ash and moisture biomass, the fuel cost savings will be reduced, due to increased transportation costs. A spreadsheet program was created to analyze the fuel savings for a variety of different moisture levels, ash levels, and power plant operating parameters.

Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thien; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Sensor for Individual Burner Control of Coal Firing Rate, Fuel-Air Ratio and Coal Fineness Correlation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate, cost-efficient monitoring instrumentation has long been considered essential to the operation of power plants. Nonetheless, for the monitoring of coal flow, such instrumentation has been sorely lacking and technically difficult to achieve. With more than half of the electrical power in the United States currently supplied by coal, energy generated by this resource is critical to the US economy. The demand for improvement in this area has only increased as a result of the following two situations: First, deregulation has produced a heightened demand for both reduced electrical cost and improved grid connectivity. Second, environmental concerns have simultaneously resulted in a need for both increased efficiency and reduced carbon and NOx emissions. A potential approach to addressing both these needs would be improvement in the area of combustion control. This would result in a better heat rate, reduced unburned carbon in ash, and reduced NOx emissions. However, before feedback control can be implemented, the ability to monitor coal flow to the burners in real-time must be established. While there are several ''commercially available'' products for real-time coal flow measurement, power plant personnel are highly skeptical about the accuracy and longevity of these systems in their current state of development. In fact, following several demonstration projects of in-situ coal flow measurement systems in full scale utility boilers, it became obvious that there were still many unknown influences on these instruments during field applications. Due to the operational environment of the power plant, it has been difficult if not impossible to sort out what parameters could be influencing the various probe technologies. Additionally, it has been recognized for some time that little is known regarding the performance of coal flow splitters, even where rifflers are employed. Often the coal flow distribution from these splitters remains mal-distributed. There have been mixed results in the field using variable orifices in coal pipes. Development of other coal flow control devices has been limited. An underlying difficulty that, to date, has hindered the development of an accurate instrument for coal flow measurements is the fact that coal flow is characterized by irregular temporal and spatial variation. However, despite the inherent complexity of the dynamic system, the system is in fact deterministic. Therefore, in principle, the coal flow can be deduced from the dynamics it exhibits. Nonetheless, the interactions are highly nonlinear, rendering standard signal processing approaches, which rely on techniques such as frequency decomposition, to be of little value. Foster-Miller, Inc. has developed a methodology that relates the complex variation in such systems to the information of interest. This technology will be described in detail in Section 2. A second concern regarding the current measurement systems is installation, which can be labor-intensive and cost-prohibitive. A process that does not require the pulverizer to be taken off line would be highly desirable. Most microwave and electrostatic methods require drilling up to 20 holes in the pipe, all with a high degree of precision so as to produce a proper alignment of the probes. At least one electrostatic method requires a special spool piece to be fitted into each existing coal pipe. Overall, these procedures are both difficult and very expensive. An alternative approach is pursued here, namely the development of an instrument that relies on an acoustic signal captured by way of a commercial accelerometer. The installation of this type of sensor is both simpler and less invasive than other techniques. An accelerometer installed in a pipe wall need not penetrate through the wall, which means that the system may be able to remain on line during the installation. Further, due to the fact that the Dynamical Instruments technology, unlike other systems, does not rely on uniformity of the air or coal profile, the installation location need not be on a long, straight run

R. Demler

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Dual, rotating stripper rubber drilling head  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a drilling head for a well bore through which a tool string of varying outside diameter is run, the drilling head sealing against fluid flow past the tool string to divert such fluid through a side outlet port, said drilling head including a housing having an axial passageway through which the tool string is run and a bearing assembly to facilitate rotation of the tool string within the axial passageway, the improved drilling head comprising: first and second stripper rubbers rotatably mounted within the drilling head housing in seating contact with the tool string, said stripper rubbers having substantially identical inner diameters through which the tool string extends, said first stripper rubber formed of an abrasive resistant material to divert fluid flow from the axial passageway of the housing to the side outlet port and said second stripper rubber formed on a sealingly resilient material which maintains sealing contact with the tool string extending there through preventing fluid flow past said tool string; said first stripper rubber being corrected to clamping means associated with the bearing assembly through a first drive ring such that said first stripper rubber rotates with the tool string; and said second stripper rubber is rotatably connected to said clamping means associated with the bearing assembly through a second drive ring, said first and second drive rings coaxially mounted within the housing whereby said first stripper rubber is positioned axially below said second stripper rubber in sealing contact with the tool string.

Bailey, T.F.; Campbell, J.E.

1993-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

222

Rotating head for rotary drilling rigs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A rotating head is claimed for a rotary drilling rig which is to be secured to the top of a well pipe having an inner rotating portion with an opening therethrough which permits passage of drill pipe, pipe joints, and Kelly tools; the rotating portion has an annular drive rubber formed integrally with the top portion thereof. A rotating head drive bushing having an opening with a cross-sectional shape generally conforming to the cross-section of the Kelly tool to permit only sliding motion therebetween is provided with helical external ridges which produce a disengagable gripping action with the opening in the drive rubber at the top of the rotating portion of the rotating head. The rotating portion has a conventional stripper rubber at the bottom thereof and is mounted with a double roller bearing to provide low friction motion with respect to the fixed portion of the head. The double roller bearing is lubricated with a viscous lubricating material and paddles are provided between the sets of rollers of the double roller bearing for distributing the viscous lubricating material and in particular propel it onto the upper set of bearings; the upper body portion of the rotating head is readily detachable from the lower sleeve portion which is normally welded to the well conductor pipe.

Adams, J.R.

1983-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

223

Average Soil Water Retention Curves Measured by Neutron Radiography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water retention curves are essential for understanding the hydrologic behavior of partially-saturated porous media and modeling flow transport processes within the vadose zone. In this paper we report direct measurements of the main drying and wetting branches of the average water retention function obtained using 2-dimensional neutron radiography. Flint sand columns were saturated with water and then drained under quasi-equilibrium conditions using a hanging water column setup. Digital images (2048 x 2048 pixels) of the transmitted flux of neutrons were acquired at each imposed matric potential (~10-15 matric potential values per experiment) at the NCNR BT-2 neutron imaging beam line. Volumetric water contents were calculated on a pixel by pixel basis using Beer-Lambert s law after taking into account beam hardening and geometric corrections. To remove scattering effects at high water contents the volumetric water contents were normalized (to give relative saturations) by dividing the drying and wetting sequences of images by the images obtained at saturation and satiation, respectively. The resulting pixel values were then averaged and combined with information on the imposed basal matric potentials to give average water retention curves. The average relative saturations obtained by neutron radiography showed an approximate one-to-one relationship with the average values measured volumetrically using the hanging water column setup. There were no significant differences (at p < 0.05) between the parameters of the van Genuchten equation fitted to the average neutron radiography data and those estimated from replicated hanging water column data. Our results indicate that neutron imaging is a very effective tool for quantifying the average water retention curve.

Cheng, Chu-Lin [ORNL; Perfect, Edmund [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kang, Misun [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Horita, Juske [Texas Tech University (TTU); Hussey, Dan [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Applicability of RELAP5-3D for Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of a Sodium-Cooled Actinide Burner Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Actinide Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) is envisioned as a sodium-cooled, fast reactor that will burn the actinides generated in light water reactors to reduce nuclear waste and ease proliferation concerns. The RELAP5-3D computer code is being considered as the thermal-hydraulic system code to support the development of the ABTR. An evaluation was performed to determine the applicability of RELAP5-3D for the analysis of a sodium-cooled fast reactor. The applicability evaluation consisted of several steps, including identifying the important transients and phenomena expected in the ABTR, identifying the models and correlations that affect the code’s calculation of the important phenomena, and evaluating the applicability of the important models and correlations for calculating the important phenomena expected in the ABTR. The applicability evaluation identified code improvements and additional models needed to simulate the ABTR. The accuracy of the calculated thermodynamic and transport properties for sodium was also evaluated.

C. B. Davis

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Evaluation of gas-reburning and low NO{sub x} burners on a wall fired boiler. Technical progress report number 17, October 1--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this CCT project is to evaluate the use of Gas Reburning and Low NO{sub x} Burners (GR-LNB) for NO{sub x} emission control from a wall fired boiler. Low NO{sub x} burners are designed to delay the mixing of the coal fuel with combustion air to minimize the NO{sub x} formation. With GR, about 80--85% of the coal fuel is fired in the main combustion zone. The balance of the fuel is added downstream as natural gas to create a slightly fuel rich environment in which NO{sub x} is converted to N{sub 2}. The combustion process is completed by over fire air addition. SO{sub x} emissions are reduced to the extent that natural gas replaces sulfur-containing coal. The level of NO{sub x} reduction achievable with 15--20% natural gas is on the order of 50--60%. Thus the emission reduction target of the combination of these two developed technologies is about 70%. This project is being conducted in three phases at the host site, a 172 MW wall fired boiler of Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo), Cherokee Unit 3 in Denver, Colorado: Phase 1--Design and Permitting; Phase 2--Construction and Start-up; and Phase 3--Operation, Data Collection, Reporting and Disposition. Phase 3 activities during this reporting period involved initiation of the second generation gas reburning parametric testing. This technology utilizes enhanced natural gas and overfire air injectors with elimination of the flue gas recirculation system. The objective is to demonstrate NO{sub x} reductions similar to that of long term testing but with a reduced capital cost requirement through elimination of the FGR system.

NONE

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

226

Compact organic vapor jet printing print head  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A first device is provided. The first device includes a print head, and a first gas source hermetically sealed to the print head. The print header further includes a first layer comprising a plurality of apertures, each aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns. A second layer is bonded to the first layer. The second layer includes a first via in fluid communication with the first gas source and at least one of the apertures. The second layer is made of an insulating material.

Forrest, Stephen R; McGraw, Gregory

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

227

A Decentralized Public Key Infrastructure with Identity Retention Conner Fromknecht (conner@mit.edu), Dragos Velicanu (velicanu@mit.edu),  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provided by cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin and Namecoin to build a PKI that ensures identity retention

228

Chapter 3.5: Freshman Undergraduate Retention1 Improve retention and graduation rates for all first-year engineering undergraduate students,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 3.5: Freshman Undergraduate Retention1 Objective Improve retention and graduation rates graduation rate for transfer student. Strategies 1. Develop a program that continuously improves the delivery pass/fail efforts, either continue or adopt best practices form project for long-term implementation. 2

229

VICE CHANCELLOR Signature of Head of School  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VICE CHANCELLOR Signature of Head of School Date (dd/mm/yy) Following is a report on the professional and consultative work of my School/section over the twelve months of (year) School/Section One. Yes No (Nil Return) Total number of staff within School/Section at year end who are eligible to engage

Tobar, Michael

230

The Head-Neck Sensory Motor System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Head-Neck Sensory Motor System Edited by Alain Berthoz Laboratoire de Physiologie, sideslip, and thrust) determine its loca- tion in space, and rotations (yaw, pitch, and roll) change its, no functional significance can be attributed to this multiple sampling. Oculomotor System of Calliphora

231

Judith Sheine Professor and Department Head  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Environmental Design, Department of Architecture Chair, 2002- present Professor, 2002 - present; AssociateJudith Sheine Professor and Department Head Department of Architecture School of Architecture) 346-3626 e-mail: jesheine@uoregon.edu Education 1979 Princeton University, School of Architecture

232

Probability Primer 1 Running head: PROBABILITY PRIMER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provides the opportunity to draw upon work in computer science, engineering, mathematics, and statisticsProbability Primer 1 Running head: PROBABILITY PRIMER A Primer on Probabilistic Inference Thomas L. Griffiths Department of Psychology University of California, Berkeley Alan Yuille Department of Statistics

Yuille, Alan L.

233

Department Heads Meeting D. MacFarlane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department Heads Meeting D. MacFarlane March 21, 2013 #12;Snowmass working groups Snowmass web-7 at SLAC Energy Frontier All Hands: » April 3-6 at Brookhaven (web site) » June 30-July 3 at U. Washington a world leading cosmic frontier program » Cosmology, cosmic ray, dark matter & dark energy emphasis

Wechsler, Risa H.

234

The retention time of inorganic mercury in the brain — A systematic review of the evidence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reports from human case studies indicate a half-life for inorganic mercury in the brain in the order of years—contradicting older radioisotope studies that estimated half-lives in the order of weeks to months in duration. This study systematically reviews available evidence on the retention time of inorganic mercury in humans and primates to better understand this conflicting evidence. A broad search strategy was used to capture 16,539 abstracts on the Pubmed database. Abstracts were screened to include only study types containing relevant information. 131 studies of interest were identified. Only 1 primate study made a numeric estimate for the half-life of inorganic mercury (227–540 days). Eighteen human mercury poisoning cases were followed up long term including autopsy. Brain inorganic mercury concentrations at death were consistent with a half-life of several years or longer. 5 radionucleotide studies were found, one of which estimated head half-life (21 days). This estimate has sometimes been misinterpreted to be equivalent to brain half-life—which ignores several confounding factors including limited radioactive half-life and radioactive decay from surrounding tissues including circulating blood. No autopsy cohort study estimated a half-life for inorganic mercury, although some noted bioaccumulation of brain mercury with age. Modelling studies provided some extreme estimates (69 days vs 22 years). Estimates from modelling studies appear sensitive to model assumptions, however predications based on a long half-life (27.4 years) are consistent with autopsy findings. In summary, shorter estimates of half-life are not supported by evidence from animal studies, human case studies, or modelling studies based on appropriate assumptions. Evidence from such studies point to a half-life of inorganic mercury in human brains of several years to several decades. This finding carries important implications for pharmcokinetic modelling of mercury and potentially for the regulatory toxicology of mercury.

Rooney, James P.K., E-mail: jrooney@rcsi.ie

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

3D head anthropometric analysis Reyes Enciso*ab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a current three-dimensional image-based face modeling technique using a plaster head model. We will also. In this paper we acquired and validated 3-dimensional images of a plaster head using structured-light image

Shahabi, Cyrus

236

Gas cushion control of OVJP print head position  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An OVJP apparatus and method for applying organic vapor or other flowable material to a substrate using a printing head mechanism in which the print head spacing from the substrate is controllable using a cushion of air or other gas applied between the print head and substrate. The print head is mounted for translational movement towards and away from the substrate and is biased toward the substrate by springs or other means. A gas cushion feed assembly supplies a gas under pressure between the print head and substrate which opposes the biasing of the print head toward the substrate so as to form a space between the print head and substrate. By controlling the pressure of gas supplied, the print head separation from the substrate can be precisely controlled.

Forrest, Stephen R

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

237

A 3-D display head-set for personalized computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis covers the design and implementation of a binocular display head-set akin to Dr . Ivan E. Sutherland's head-mounted display, but using several new technologies and new techniques in computer graphics: small ...

Callahan, Mark A

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

1 INTRODUCTION High-head storage hydropower plants operate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INTRODUCTION High-head storage hydropower plants operate their turbines during periods of high Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland ABSTRACT: High-head storage hydropower plants

Floreano, Dario

239

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the Head Injury...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on the Head Injury to a Miner at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico - August 25, 2004 Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the Head Injury to a Miner at...

240

Workforce Retention Work Group Status Overview - July 2012 | Department of  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject isNovember 07,Energy Workforce Retention Work Group Status

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Automatic Tissue Classification for the Human Head from Multispectral MRI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Automatic Tissue Classification for the Human Head from Multispectral MRI Tolga Tasdizen, David for classifying multispectral MR scans of the human head into nine tissue classes. User initialization is adopted. #12;Chapter 1 Introduction Classification of head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data

Utah, University of

242

Oculomotor Responses to Active Head Movements in Darkness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information on head rotation from the vestibular system to the saccade-generating mechanism in the brain stem482 Oculomotor Responses to Active Head Movements in Darkness Formulation and Testing Sistemistica, Universitŕ di Pavia, Pavia, Italy Passive head rotation in darkness produces vestibular nystagmus

Ramat, Stefano

243

PASSIVE CONTROL OF PARTICLE DISPERSION IN A PARTICLE-LADEN CIRCULAR JET USING ELLIPTIC CO-ANNULAR FLOW: A MEANS FOR IMPROVING UTILIZATION AND EMISSION REDUCTIONS IN PULVERIZED COAL BURNER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A passive control technology utilizing elliptic co-flow to control the particle flinging and particle dispersion in a particle (coal)-laden flow was investigated using experimental and numerical techniques. Preferential concentration of particles occurs in particle-laden jets used in pulverized coal burner and causes uncontrollable NO{sub x} formation due to inhomogeneous local stoichiometry. This particular project was aimed at characterizing the near-field flow behavior of elliptic coaxial jets. The knowledge gained from the project will serve as the basis of further investigation on fluid-particle interactions in an asymmetric coaxial jet flow-field and thus is important to improve the design of pulverized coal burners where non-homogeneity of particle concentration causes increased NO{sub x} formation.

Ahsan R. Choudhuri

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate direct containment heating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A light water nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate the extent of direct containment heating of the reactor containment building. The structure includes a retention chamber for retaining molten core material away from the upper regions of the reactor containment building when a severe accident causes the bottom of the pressure vessel of the reactor to fail and discharge such molten material under high pressure through the reactor cavity into the retention chamber. In combination with the melt-retention chamber there is provided a passageway that includes molten core droplet deflector vanes and has gas vent means in its upper surface, which means are operable to deflect molten core droplets into the retention chamber while allowing high pressure steam and gases to be vented into the upper regions of the containment building. A plurality of platforms are mounted within the passageway and the melt-retention structure to direct the flow of molten core material and help retain it within the melt-retention chamber. In addition, ribs are mounted at spaced positions on the floor of the melt-retention chamber, and grid means are positioned at the entrance side of the retention chamber. The grid means develop gas back pressure that helps separate the molten core droplets from discharged high pressure steam and gases, thereby forcing the steam and gases to vent into the upper regions of the reactor containment building.

Tutu, Narinder K. (Manorville, NY); Ginsberg, Theodore (East Setauket, NY); Klages, John R. (Mattituck, NY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

E-Print Network 3.0 - age-dependent skeletal retention Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Riparian Forest Soil Jodi B. Lyons... of nutrients movingfrom the upland areas to aquatic eco- systems (Lowrance, 1991). Nutrient retention varies... is considered to be generally...

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis retention behaviour Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Delage (eds) 2008, Ecole des Ponts ParisTech, Champs-sur-Marne Summary: COMPACTED CLAYEY SOILS: MODELLING THE WATER RETENTION BEHAVIOUR Della Vecchia, G. (dellavecchia......

247

E-Print Network 3.0 - adopted hydraulic retention Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

curve for compacted clayey soils Different variables may adopted... COMPACTED CLAYEY SOILS: MODELLING THE WATER RETENTION BEHAVIOUR Della Vecchia, G. (dellavecchia......

248

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional retentive features Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R. - Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Kansas Collection: Chemistry 8 Records Management USER GUIDE | II Summary: retention periods. In addition to the common...

249

Surface treatment of magnetic recording heads  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Surface modification of magnetic recording heads using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition is disclosed. This method may be carried out using a vacuum arc deposition system with a metallic or carbon cathode. By operating a plasma gun in a long-pulse mode and biasing the substrate holder with short pulses of a high negative voltage, direct ion implantation, recoil implantation, and surface deposition are combined to modify the near-surface regions of the head or substrate in processing times which may be less than 5 min. The modified regions are atomically mixed into the substrate. This surface modification improves the surface smoothness and hardness and enhances the tribological characteristics under conditions of contact-start-stop and continuous sliding. These results are obtained while maintaining original tolerances. 15 figs.

Komvopoulos, K.; Brown, I.G.; Wei, B.; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Bhatia, S.C.

1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

250

Head erosion with emittance growth in PWFA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Head erosion is one of the limiting factors in plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). We present a study of head erosion with emittance growth in field-ionized plasma from the PWFA experiments performed at the FACET user facility at SLAC. At FACET, a 20.3 GeV bunch with 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} electrons is optimized in beam transverse size and combined with a high density lithium plasma for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiments. A target foil is inserted upstream of the plasma source to increase the bunch emittance through multiple scattering. Its effect on beamplasma interaction is observed with an energy spectrometer after a vertical bend magnet. Results from the first experiments show that increasing the emittance has suppressed vapor field-ionization and plasma wakefields excitation. Plans for the future are presented.

Li, S. Z.; Adli, E.; England, R. J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M. D.; Walz, D. R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W.; Vafaei, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States) and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States) and University of Oslo, Oslo, N-0316 (Norway) and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

251

EA-1472: Commercial Demonstration fo the Low Nox Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) Integration System Emission Reduction Technology, Holcolm Station, Sunflower Electric Power Corporation Finnety County, Kansas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), to analyze the potential impacts of the commercial application of the Low-NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) integration system to achieve nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions reduction at Sunflower’s Holcomb Unit No. 1 (Holcomb Station), located near Garden City, in Finney County, Kansas. The Holcomb Station would be modified in three distinct phases to demonstrate the synergistic effect of layering NOx control technologies.

252

Margin for In-Vessel Retention in the APR1400 - VESTA and SCDAP/RELAP5-3D Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If cooling is inadequate during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the lower head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with such plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. For example, the enhanced safety of the Westinghouse Advanced 600 MWe pressurized water reactor (PWR) (AP600), which relied upon external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) for in-vessel retention (IVR), resulted in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) approving the design without requiring certain conventional features common to existing light water reactors (LWRs). IVR of core melt is therefore a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced LWRs. However, it is not clear that currently proposed ERVC without additional enhancements could provide sufficient heat removal for higher-power reactors (up to 1500 MWe). Hence, a three-year, United States (U.S.) -Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) project was initiated in which the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Seoul National University (SNU), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) explored options, such as enhanced ERVC performance and an enhanced in-vessel core catcher (IVCC), that have the potential to ensure that IVR is feasible for higher power reactors.

Joy Rempe; D. Knudson

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Evaluation of gas-reburning and low NO{sub x} burners on a wall fired boiler. Progress report, January 1--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this Clean Coal Technology project is to evaluate the use of Gas Reburning and Low NO{sub x} Burners (GR-LNB) for NO{sub x} emission control from a wall fired boiler. This project is being conducted in three phases at the host site, a 172 MW{sub e} wall fired boiler of Public Service Company of Colorado, Cherokee Unit 3 in Denver, Colorado: Phase I, design and permitting has been completed on June 30, 1992; Phase II, construction and start-up has been completed on September 1991; and Phase III, operation, data collection, reporting and disposition. Phase III activities during this reporting period involved the following: compilation, analysis and assembly of the final report and initiation of restoration activities; restoration of the gas reburning system involving removal of the flue gas recirculation system (permanent Second Generation Gas Reburning); and participants meeting and reburning workshop. Long term testing of the equipment demonstrated an average NO{sub x} reduction of 65% using 18% gas heat input. After removing the flue gas recirculation system, (Second Generation GR), an average NO{sub x} of 64% was achieved using 13% gas heat input. The project goal of 70% reduction was achieved, but no on an average basis due to the load requirements of the utility.

NONE

1996-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Comprehensive report to Congress: Clean Coal Technology program: Evaluation of gas reburning and low-NO sub x burners on a wall-fired boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report briefly describes the Gas Reburning and Low-NO{sub x} Burners technology which is a low-cost technology that can be applied in both retrofit and new applications. This demonstration will be conducted on a utility boiler in Colorado at Cherokee Station {number sign}3; however, the technology is applicable to industrial boilers and other combustion systems. Although this technology is primarily a NO{sub x} reduction technology, some reductions in other emissions will take place. Since 15--20% of the coal is replaced with natural gas, SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions are reduced commensurately. Also the lower carbon-to-hydrogen ratio of natural gas compared to coal reduces CO{sub 2} emissions. The formation of NO{sub x} is controlled by several factors: (1) the amount of nitrogen that is chemically bound in the fuel; (2) the flame temperature; (3) the residence time that combustion products remain at very high temperatures; and (4) the amount of excess oxygen available, especially at the hottest parts of the flame. Decreasing any of these parameters, tends to reduce NO{sub x} formation. 6 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

UNC Tomorrow Phase II Campus Response Faculty and Staff Recruitment and Retention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 UNC Tomorrow Phase II Campus Response Faculty and Staff Recruitment and Retention Submitted to/Tenure Track Faculty Hires 2009-2017 #12; 4 The projected demand for faculty and EPA and SPA staff create a range of implications for recruitment and retention in academic and non- academic units. The most

256

PPPL-3311, Preprint: August 1998, UC-420, 423 Modeling of Tritium Retention in TFTR*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - PPPL-3311, Preprint: August 1998, UC-420, 423 Modeling of Tritium Retention in TFTR* C Fusion Test Reactor tritium retention experience is reviewed and the data related to models of plasma surface interactions. Over 3.5 years of TFTR DT operations, approximately 51% of the tritium injected

257

Use of rare earth elements as external markers for mean retention time measurements in ruminants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Use of rare earth elements as external markers for mean retention time measurements -- The present review deals with the utilisation of rare earth (RE) elements as particulate markers for ruminant earth / retention time / feedstuff / methodology / ruminant Résumé -- Utilisation des terres rares comme

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

258

Retention of Butt-End Aluminum Leg Bands by Wild Turkeys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note Retention of Butt-End Aluminum Leg Bands by Wild Turkeys MATTHEW J. BUTLER,1,2 Department wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo intermedia) captured in Texas and Kansas, USA, 2000­2009. We examined 187 recaptured or harvested radiotagged wild turkeys to determine band retention and modeled band

Butler, Matthew J.

259

A LANDSCAPE SCALE EVALUATION OF PHOSPHORUS RETENTION IN WETLANDS OF THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

217 A LANDSCAPE SCALE EVALUATION OF PHOSPHORUS RETENTION IN WETLANDS OF THE LAPLATTE RIVER BASIN approach to examine phosphorus retention in wetlands of the LaPlatte River basin (13,723 ha), Vermont information system. Most wetland variables had significant (p

Wang, Deane

260

Oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation treatment to enhance data retention of tungsten nanocrystal nonvolatile memory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data retention characteristics of tungsten nanocrystal (W-NC) memory devices using an oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treatment are investigated. With an increase of oxygen PIII bias voltage and treatment time, the capacitance–voltage hysteresis memory window is increased but the data retention characteristics become degraded. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that this poor data retention is a result of plasma damage on the tunneling oxide layer, which can be prevented by lowering the bias voltage to 7?kV. In addition, by using the elevated temperature retention measurement technique, the effective charge trapping level of the WO{sub 3} film surrounding the W-NCs can be extracted. This measurement reveals that a higher oxygen PIII bias voltage and treatment time induces more shallow traps within the WO{sub 3} film, degrading the retention behavior of the W-NC memory.

Wang, Jer-Chyi, E-mail: jcwang@mail.cgu.edu.tw; Chang, Wei-Cheng; Lai, Chao-Sung, E-mail: cslai@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kweishan 333, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chang, Li-Chun [Department of Material Engineering and Center for Thin Film Technologies and Applications, Ming Chi University of Technology, Taishan 24301, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Ai, Chi-Fong; Tsai, Wen-Fa [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Longtan 325, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Integrated head package for top mounted nuclear instrumentation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear reactor such as a pressurized water reactor has an integrated head package providing structural support and increasing shielding leading toward the vessel head. A reactor vessel head engages the reactor vessel, and a control rod guide mechanism over the vessel head raises and lowers control rods in certain of the thimble tubes, traversing penetrations in the reactor vessel head, and being coupled to the control rods. An instrumentation tube structure includes instrumentation tubes with sensors movable into certain thimble tubes disposed in the fuel assemblies. Couplings for the sensors also traverse penetrations in the reactor vessel head. A shroud is attached over the reactor vessel head and encloses the control rod guide mechanism and at least a portion of the instrumentation tubes when retracted. The shroud forms a structural element of sufficient strength to support the vessel head, the control rod guide mechanism and the instrumentation tube structure, and includes radiation shielding material for limiting passage of radiation from retracted instrumentation tubes. The shroud is thicker at the bottom adjacent the vessel head, where the more irradiated lower ends of retracted sensors reside. The vessel head, shroud and contents thus can be removed from the reactor as a unit and rested safely and securely on a support.

Malandra, Louis J. (McKeesport, PA); Hornak, Leonard P. (Forest Hills, PA); Meuschke, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Estimating IMU heading error from SAR images.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Angular orientation errors of the real antenna for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) will manifest as undesired illumination gradients in SAR images. These gradients can be measured, and the pointing error can be calculated. This can be done for single images, but done more robustly using multi-image methods. Several methods are provided in this report. The pointing error can then be fed back to the navigation Kalman filter to correct for problematic heading (yaw) error drift. This can mitigate the need for uncomfortable and undesired IMU alignment maneuvers such as S-turns.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Onderwerpscodes Chemie -Farmacie / Subject headings Chemistry -Pharmacy, 2009, April1 Rubrieken Chemie -Farmacie: Subject headings Chemistry -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemie 07 Inorganic chemistry 11.14 - 08 Organische chemie 08 Organic chemistry 12.11 - 10 Didactics and priciples of chemistry 14.03 - 16 Vervolgwerken - Annuals 16 Book series and annuals 14Onderwerpscodes Chemie - Farmacie / Subject headings Chemistry - Pharmacy, 2009, April1 Rubrieken

Galis, Frietson

264

Understory plant communities of boreal mixedwood forests in western Canada: Natural patterns and response to variable-retention harvesting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and response to variable-retention harvesting S. Ellen Macdonald *, Treena E. Fenniak Department of Renewable, mixedwood, conifer) in Alberta, Canada, before and for 2 years following variable-retention harvesting conditions. Variable-retention harvesting had little effect on understory cover, richness, or diversity

Macdonald, Ellen

265

antigenic polar heads: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stenger; Robert L. Modlin; Ian A. Wilson; Steven A. Porcelli; Michael B. Brenner 1999-01-01 11 Head: Vacancy Quality & Standards Mathematics Websites Summary: : Dr Sarah...

266

Council on Environmental Quality - Memorandum for Heads of Federal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Memorandum: Council on Environmental Quality - Memorandum for Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Abstract This...

267

Dr. Jim Wright Acting Head, Division of Radiation Oncology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dr. Jim Wright Acting Head, Division of Radiation Oncology Associate Professor Department outstanding contributions to the care and treatment of cancer patients through research. Dr. Jim Wright has

Haykin, Simon

268

Light water reactor lower head failure analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Closure head for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A closure head for a nuclear reactor includes a stationary outer ring integral with the reactor vessel with a first rotatable plug disposed within the stationary outer ring and supported from the stationary outer ring by a bearing assembly. A sealing system is associated with the bearing assembly to seal the annulus defined between the first rotatable plug and the stationary outer ring. The sealing system comprises tubular seal elements disposed in the annulus with load springs contacting the tubular seal elements so as to force the tubular seal elements against the annulus in a manner to seal the annulus. The sealing system also comprises a sealing fluid which is pumped through the annulus and over the tubular seal elements causing the load springs to compress thereby reducing the friction between the tubular seal elements and the rotatable components while maintaining a gas-tight seal therebetween.

Wade, Elman E. (South Huntingdon, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Retention of Hydrogen Isotopes in Neutron Irradiated Tungsten  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate the effects of neutron irradiation on hydrogen isotope retention in tungsten, disk-type specimens of pure tungsten were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor in Oak Ridge National Laboratory followed by exposure to high flux deuterium (D) plasma in Idaho National Laboratory. The results obtained for low dose n-irradiated specimens (0.025 dpa for tungsten) are reviewed in this paper. Irradiation at coolant temperature of the reactor (around 50 degrees C) resulted in the formation of strong trapping sites for D atoms. The concentrations of D in n-irradiated specimens were ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 mol% after exposure to D plasma at 200 and 500 degrees C and significantly higher than those in non-irradiated specimens because of D-trapping by radiation defects. Deep penetration of D up to a depth of 50-100 µm was observed at 500 degrees C. Release of D in subsequent thermal desorption measurements continued up to 900 degrees C. These results were compared with the behaviour of D in ion-irradiated tungsten, and distinctive features of n-irradiation were discussed.

Yuji Hatano; Masashi Shimada; Yasuhisa Oya; Guoping Cao; Makoto Kobayashi; Masanori Hara; Brad J. Merrill; Kenji Okuno; Mikhail A. Sokolov; Yutai Katoh

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Increased intrapulmonary retention of radiolabeled neutrophils in early oxygen toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sequential lung injuries, such as oxygen toxicity followed by septicemia, are common during the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). As these forms of vascular injury may be mediated in part by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), aberrant interactions between PMN and previously injured pulmonary endothelium are of both theoretical interest and clinical importance. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that early oxygen toxicity at a dose that injuries pulmonary endothelium relatively selectively alters intrapulmonary neutrophil kinetics. Unanesthetized rats breathing 1.0 atmospheres oxygen for 36 h showed ultrastructural endothelial damage but no edema, injury, or neutrophilic inflammation by histologic criteria. However, in these oxygen-toxic animals, whereas initial accumulation of radiolabeled PMN in lungs was normal, washout of PMN was abnormal at 120 min after infusion, at which point the pulmonary retention of radiolabeled PMN in the lungs of oxygen-treated animals was significantly higher than in control animals (139% of control, p less than 0.0096). Features of our methodology, including avoidance of osmotic stress and use of paired control animals, appear to have greatly enhanced the sensitivity of radiolabeled neutrophils for detecting a subtle abnormality of neutrophil-endothelial interactions. Our studies in the oxygen toxicity model provide the first demonstration in vivo of abnormal intrapulmonary neutrophil kinetics in early oxygen toxicity prior to the onset of histologic evidence of lung injury or inflammation.

Rinaldo, J.E.; English, D.; Levine, J.; Stiller, R.; Henson, J.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Formation and retention of methane in coal. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Topic Models to Interpret MeSH MEDLINE's Medical Subject Headings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://ii.nlm.nih.gov/mti.shtml #12;MeSH heading Major MeSH heading Major qualifier MeSH-qualifier combination Humans Brain metabolism Brain (metabolism) Table 1. Most frequent MeSH headings, major MeSH headings, major qualifiers and MeTopic Models to Interpret MeSH ­ MEDLINE's Medical Subject Headings David Newman12 , Sarvnaz Karimi

Newman, David

274

Mobile Museum Tours 1 RUNNING HEAD: MOBILE MUSEUM TOURS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mobile Museum Tours 1 RUNNING HEAD: MOBILE MUSEUM TOURS Using mobile technologies for multimedia MUSEUM TOURS Abstract Mobile technology was used to deliver learner-centred experiences to visitors: Across generations and cultures, Banff : Canada (2006)" #12;Mobile Museum Tours 2 RUNNING HEAD: MOBILE

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

275

Poverty and Productivity in Female-Headed Households in Zimbabwe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A household survey conducted in rural Zimbabwe in 2001 is used to compare the position of de facto and de jure female-headed households to those with a male head. These households are characterised by different forms of poverty that impinge...

Horrell, Sara; Krishnan, Pramila

276

SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AND HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY FOR DIFFERENT AREAS IN INDIA IN SELECTED STATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AND HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY FOR DIFFERENT AREAS IN INDIA systems require knowledge of the relationships between soil moisture content (), soil water pressure (h) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K). This study involved field and laboratory determination of soil

Kumar, C.P.

277

CHEMICAL TRACER RETENTION IN POROUS MEDIA Submitted to the Department of Petroleum Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

* CHEMICAL TRACER RETENTION IN POROUS MEDIA A Report Submitted to the Department of Petroleum Engineering of Stanford University in Fulfillment of the Requirement for the Degree of Master of Science

Stanford University

278

An Analysis of Texas Superintendents' Bilingual/ESL Teacher Recruitment and Retention Practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

year prior to the AAEE report, the Urban Teacher Collaborative Bilingual/ESL Teacher Recruitment/Retention 4 had already determined that bilingual educators were in very high demand, as were ESL teachers (The Urban Teacher Collaborative, 2000... organizations/conferences. Bilingual/ESL Teacher Recruitment/Retention 13 Several other questions related to recruitment were included on the survey. Response to a question related to in-district/in-state recruitment indicated that 53.4% (N=285...

Lara-Alecio, Rafael; Galloway, Martha; Irby, Beverly J.; Brown, Genevieve

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

279

Retention of passive integrated transponder tags in largemouth bass brood fish  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags were injected into 22 largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) brood fish to determine the retention rate of the tags, the effect on spawning success, and the utility of the tags as a means of individual fish identification. Fish were evaluated 12, 17, and 24 months after implantation. All tags were retained and all tagged fish were recognized. Tag injection and retention had no discernible effect on spawning success.

Harvey, W.D.; Campbell, D.L. (Texas Parks and Wildlife Dept., Austin (USA))

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Design of a dual stage actuator tape head with high-bandwidth track following capability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the voice coil motor (VCM). A leaf spring on top of thespring Slot Air bearing surface Read/write elements (in slot) Bracket (b) Servo head Read head Write head Voice coil

Raeymaekers, Bart; Graham, Matthew R.; Callafon, Raymond A.; Talke, Frank E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

High energy activation data library (HEAD-2009)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proton activation data library for 682 nuclides from 1 H to 210Po in the energy range from 150 MeV up to 1 GeV was developed. To calculate proton activation data, the MCNPX 2.6.0 and CASCADE/INPE codes were chosen. Different intranuclear cascade, preequilibrium, and equilibrium nuclear reaction models and their combinations were used. The optimum calculation models have been chosen on the basis of statistical correlations for calculated and experimental proton data taken from the EXFOR library of experimental nuclear data. All the data are written in ENDF-6 format. The library is called HEPAD-2008 (High-Energy Proton Activation Data). A revision of IEAF-2005 neutron activation data library has been performed. A set of nuclides for which the cross-section data can be (and were) updated using more modern and improved models is specified, and the corresponding calculations have been made in the present work. The new version of the library is called IEAF-2009. The HEPAD-2008 and IEAF-2009 are merged to the final HEAD-2009 library.

Mashnik, Stepan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korovin, Yury A [NON LANL; Natalenko, Anatoly A [NON LANL; Konobeyev, Alexander Yu [NON LANL; Stankovskiy, A Yu [NON LANL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Effect of graded hypoxia on retention of technetium-99m-nitroheterocycle in perfused rat heart  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of graded hypoxia on the retention of a {sup 99m}Tc-labeled nitroimidazole. Rat hearts were perfused retrogradely with Krebs-Henseleit buffer at 37{degrees}C and paced at 5 Hz. After a 20-min stabilization period, coronary flow was maintained at 8 ml/min/g wet wt and the hearts were perfused with media equilibrated with gas mixtures containing 5% CO{sub 2} and various levels of O{sub 2}, from 544 to 29 Torr. Technetium-99m-O(PnAO-1-(2-nitroimidazole)), BMS-181321, was infused for 20 min into a side port of the aortic cannula. Perfusion continued for an additional 40 min to allow for compound clearance. Each decrease of perfusate PO{sub 2} brought about an increase in the retention of BMS-181321, resulting in a good correlation between its retention and perfusate PO{sub 2} (r=0.97). Myocardial oxygen consumption was independent of oxygen delivery when the perfusate oxygen pressure was greater than 350 Torr. Below this value, oxygen consumption declined markedly as influent PO{sub 2}. A good correlation was obtained between retention of the nitroheterocycle and the cytosolic lactate/pyruvate ratio (r=0.98). When glucose was omitted from the perfusate (PO{sub 2}=27 Torr), retention of the nitroheterocycle was increased by about 25% as compared to hearts perfused in the presence of this substrate. These results indicate that myocardial retention of BMS-181321 is coupled to the level of tissue oxygenation and that hypoxic retention may be affected by substrate input. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Rumsey, W.L.; Patel, B.; Linder, K.E. [Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Research Inst., Princeton, NJ (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Theoretical collapse pressures for two pressurized torispherical heads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to determine the pressures at which real torispherical heads fail upon a single application of pressure, two heads were pressurized in recent Praxair tests, and displacements and strains were recorded at various locations. In this paper, theoretical results for the two test heads are presented in the form of curves of pressure versus crown deflections, using the available geometry and material parameters. From these curves, limit and collapse pressures are calculated, using procedures permitted by the ASME B and PV Code Section 8/Div.2. These pressures are shown to vary widely, depending on the method and model used to calculate them. The effect of no stress relief on the behavior of the Praxair test heads is also evaluated and found to be of no significance for neither the objectives of the tests nor the objectives of this paper. The results of this paper are submitted as an enhancement to the experimental results recorded during the Praxair tests.

Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States); Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave April 16, 2010 - 4:47pm Addthis A California company will harness the Mojave Desert sunshine to create the world's largest solar...

285

Zeroth-order inversion of transient head observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-frequency, asymptotic solution for transient head,appropriate for a medium containing smoothly varying heterogeneity,provides a basis for efficient inverse modeling. The semi analyticsolution is trajectory based, akin to ray methods used in modeling wavepropagation, and may be constructed by post processing the output of anumerical simulator. For high frequencies, the amplitude sensitivities,the relationship between changes in flow properties and changes in headampliude, are dominated by the phase term which may be computed directlyfrom the output of the simulator. Thus, transient head waveforms may beinverted with little more computation than is required to invert arrivaltimes. An applicatino to synthetic head values indicates that thetechnique can be used to improve the fit to waveforms. An application totransient head data from the Migration experiment in Switzerland revealsa narrow, high conductivity pathway within a 0.5 m thick zone offracturing.

Vasco, D.W.

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Multi-atlas segmentation in head and neck CT scans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate automating the task of segmenting structures in head and neck CT scans, to minimize time spent on manual contouring of structures of interest. We focus on the brainstem and left and right parotids. To generate ...

Arbisser, Amelia M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Metastasis of genitourinary tumors to the head and neck region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· D. Rogers · C. Head · C. Bennett Received: 14 SeptemberO. Ogunyemi · A. Rojas · C. Bennett David GeVen School ofLos Angeles, CA, USA C. Bennett Department of Urology,

Ogunyemi, Ore; Rojas, A.; Hematpour, K.; Rogers, D.; Head, C.; Bennett, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

arsenic affects head: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 430 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

289

acute head injury: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 336 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

290

active head lice: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 251 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

291

affects head kidney: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 344 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

292

advanced inoperable head: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 208 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

293

acute severe head: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 252 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

294

adult human head: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 350 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

295

Multiresponse multilayer vadose zone model calibration using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation and field water retention data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and field water retention data Thomas Wöhling1,2 and Jasper A. Vrugt3,4,5 Received 4 March 2010; revised 14

Vrugt, Jasper A.

296

MODELING SHALLOW GROUNDWATER TABLE CONTRIBUTION TO SOIL WATER RETENTION IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE OF A CALCAREOUS SOIL OF SOUTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MODELING SHALLOW GROUNDWATER TABLE CONTRIBUTION TO SOIL WATER RETENTION IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE...................................................................................................................................13 CHAPTER 1 GENERAL INTRODUCTION.............................................................................................................................15 Shallow Groundwater Capillarity

Migliaccio, Kati White

297

Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC- FE Dkt. No.- 15-33-LNG  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an application filed on February 25, 2015, by Bear Head LNG, requesting long-term multi-contract authority as further described in their...

298

Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition from normal high-flow operation to natural circulation. Low-flow coolant events are the most difficult to design for because they involve the most complex thermal-hydraulic behavior induced by the dominance of thermal-buoyancy forces acting on the coolants. Such behavior can cause multiple-component flow interaction phenomena, which are not adequately understood or appreciated by reactor designers as to their impact on reactor performance and safety. Since the early 1990s, when DOE canceled the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program, little has been done experimentally to further understand the importance of the complex thermal-buoyancy phenomena and their impact on reactor design or to improve the ability of three-dimensional (3-D) transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and structures codes to model the phenomena. An improved experimental data base and the associated improved validated codes would provide needed design tools to the reactor community. The improved codes would also facilitate scale-up from small-scale testing to prototype size and would facilitate comparing performance of one reactor/component design with another. The codes would also have relevance to the design and safety of water-cooled reactors. To accomplish the preceding, it is proposed to establish a national GNEP-LMR research and development center at Argonne having as its foundation state-of-art science-based infrastructure consisting of: (a) thermal-hydraulic experimental capabilities for conducting both water and sodium testing of individual reactor components and complete reactor in-vessel models and (b) a computational modeling development and validation capability that is strongly interfaced with the experimental facilities. The proposed center would greatly advance capabilities for reactor development by establishing the validity of high-fidelity (i.e., close to first principles) models and tools. Such tools could be used directly for reactor design or for qualifying/tuning of lower-fidelity models, which now require costly experimental qualification for each different type of design

Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Retention system and method for the blades of a rotary machine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A retention system and method for the blades of a rotary machine for preventing forward or aft axial movement of the rotor blades includes a circumferential hub slot formed about a circumference of the machine hub. The rotor blades have machined therein a blade retention slot which is aligned with the circumferential hub slot when the blades are received in correspondingly shaped openings in the hub. At least one ring segment is secured in the blade retention slots and the circumferential hub slot to retain the blades from axial movement. A key assembly is used to secure the ring segments in the aligned slots via a hook portion receiving the ring segments and a threaded portion that is driven radially outwardly by a nut. A cap may be provided to provide a redundant back-up load path for the centrifugal loads on the key. Alternatively, the key assembly may be formed in the blade dovetail.

Pedersen, Poul D. (Cincinnati, OH); Glynn, Christopher C. (Hamilton, OH); Walker, Roger C. (Piedmont, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Chapter 17 Eye-head Gaze shifts Oxford Handbook on Eye Movements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Chapter 17 Eye-head Gaze shifts Oxford Handbook on Eye Movements "The Neural Basis of Gaze Shifts" 1. Kinematics of eye-head gaze shifts a. Terminology for describing eye-head gaze shifts b. Variability in eye and head motion during gaze shifts c. Gaze shifts in complex environments d. Bottom

Corneil, Brian D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

SAYA's head-eye coordination system Correspondence of image-width and angle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAYA's head-eye coordination system Correspondence of image-width and angle 335 - 359 [deg] 0 - 25 - 25 [deg] is input, head and eyes move to right side. b) If the angle within 335 - 359 [deg] is input, head and eyes move to left side. SAYA's head-eye coordination system Correspondence of image

Beimel, Amos

302

Competing retention pathways of uranium upon reaction with Fe(II)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biogeochemical retention processes, including adsorption, reductive precipitation, and incorporation into host minerals, are important in contaminant transport, remediation, and geologic deposition of uranium. Recent work has shown that U can become incorporated into iron (hydr)oxide minerals, with a key pathway arising from Fe(II)-induced transformation of ferrihydrite, (Fe(OH)3•nH2O) to goethite (?-FeO(OH)); this is a possible U retention mechanism in soils and sediments. Several key questions, however, remain unanswered regarding U incorporation into iron (hydr)oxides and this pathway’s contribution to U retention, including: (i) the competitiveness of U incorporation versus reduction to U(IV) and subsequent precipitation of UO2; (ii) the oxidation state of incorporated U; (iii) the effects of uranyl aqueous speciation on U incorporation; and, (iv) the mechanism of U incorporation. Here we use a series of batch reactions conducted at pH ~7, [U(VI)] from 1 to 170 ?M, [Fe(II)] from 0 to 3 mM, and [Ca] at 0 or 4 mM) coupled with spectroscopic examination of reaction products of Fe(II)-induced ferrihydrite transformation to address these outstanding questions. Uranium retention pathways were identified and quantified using extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, x-ray powder diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Analysis of EXAFS spectra showed that 14 to 89% of total U was incorporated into goethite, upon reaction with Fe(II) and ferrihydrite. Uranium incorporation was a particularly dominant retention pathway at U concentrations ? 50 ?M when either uranyl-carbonato or calcium-uranyl-carbonato complexes were dominant, accounting for 64 to 89% of total U. With increasing U(VI) and Fe(II) concentrations, U(VI) reduction to U(IV) became more prevalent, but U incorporation remained a functioning retention pathway. These findings highlight the potential importance of U(V) incorporation within iron oxides as a retention process of U across a wide range of biogeochemical environments and the sensitivity of uranium retention processes to operative (bio)geochemical conditions.

Massey, Michael S.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Jones, Morris; Ilton, Eugene S.; Cerrato, Jose M.; Bargar, John R.; Fendorf, Scott

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Integrated head package cable carrier for a nuclear power plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cabling arrangement is provided for a nuclear reactor located within a containment. Structure inside the containment is characterized by a wall having a near side surrounding the reactor vessel defining a cavity, an operating deck outside the cavity, a sub-space below the deck and on a far side of the wall spaced from the near side, and an operating area above the deck. The arrangement includes a movable frame supporting a plurality of cables extending through the frame, each connectable at a first end to a head package on the reactor vessel and each having a second end located in the sub-space. The frame is movable, with the cables, between a first position during normal operation of the reactor when the cables are connected to the head package, located outside the sub-space proximate the head package, and a second position during refueling when the cables are disconnected from the head package, located in the sub-space. In a preferred embodiment, the frame straddles the top of the wall in a substantially horizontal orientation in the first position, pivots about an end distal from the head package to a substantially vertically oriented intermediate position, and is guided, while remaining about vertically oriented, along a track in the sub-space to the second position.

Meuschke, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA); Trombola, Daniel M. (Murrysville, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Remote controlled ISI devices for RPV bottom head  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bottom head of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of the boiling water reactor (BWR) is one of the areas on which it is very difficult to perform an inservice inspection (ISI). Welds in a bottom head central disk and a drain nozzle are required to be inspected, but its accessibility is restricted by a RPV skirt, a thermal insulation, control rod drive housings and incore monitor housings. Therefore, the remote mechanized scanners are necessary to access and examine the welds. Two kinds of new device were developed to accomplish this inspection. The bottom head central disk weld inspection device has a parallel link mechanism scanning arm with a combined-transducer module to get as much as wide scanning area between control rod drive housings. The device is driven along the weld by moving on the separable track which is set temporally on the bottom head insulation. The drain nozzle weld inspection device has a horseshoe shaped gear mechanism to drive a combined-transducer module. The device is set up on to the drain nozzle using an insertion handle. Both devices have an emergency retrieval mechanism to withdraw the devices in case of power loss accident. Those devices were demonstrated by a mock-up test to be applicable to the inspection of the RPV bottom head.

Shiga, S. [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Mori, H. [Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Japan); Kobayashi, K. Sasaki, T. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Yokohama (Japan)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Uptake and retention kinetics of para-fluorine-18-fluorobenzylguanidine in isolated rat heart  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Para-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzylguanidine ([{sup 18}F]PFBG) is a newly developed tracer for imaging myocardial sympathetic neuronal innervation. This study investigated the uptake and retention mechanisms of [{sup 18}F]PFBG in perfused, isolated rat heart. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Berry, C.R.; Garg, P.K.; Zalutsky, M.R. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)]|[Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AT RD 838 OF I. G. N. P. STAGE -II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

soil physical properties are those which govern the transport and storage of energy, momentum and mass1 SOIL MOISTURE RETENTION CHARACTERISTICS AT RD 838 OF I. G. N. P. STAGE - II C. P. Kumar* Sanjay knowledge of the relationships between soil moisture content (), soil water pressure (h) and unsaturated

Kumar, C.P.

307

A mathematical model for variation in water-retention curves among sandy soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activity in soil varies with water content, soil texture and structure, temperature, energy and nutrientA mathematical model for variation in water-retention curves among sandy soils H.W. HUNT1 *, A@nrel.colostate.edu Abstract: Equations were developed to predict soil matric potential as a function of soil water content

Wall, Diana

308

Finance Program Retention for FALL 2014 Instructions for Transcript Review Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finance Program ­ Retention for FALL 2014 Instructions for Transcript Review Form College of Business at Northern Illinois University The Department of Finance Transcript Review Form should in the finance core). All NIU students are eligible to declare a major in Finance; however, students must meet

Kostic, Milivoje M.

309

Ca RETENTION IN YOUNG PULLETS AND LAYING HENS FED A Ca47 LABELLED DIET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ca RETENTION IN YOUNG PULLETS AND LAYING HENS FED A Ca47 LABELLED DIET OF DIFFERENT Ca LEVELS K levels of dietary calcium. A basal diet poor in calcium but otherwise optimal was supplemented with CaC03 and Na2HP04 as seen below : #12;CaCO, supplement of the diet was replaced by Ca&dquo; labelled Calcium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

310

Endoplasmic reticulum retention is a common defect associated with tyrosinase-negative albinism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Endoplasmic reticulum retention is a common defect associated with tyrosinase-negative albinism, March 16, 2000 (received for review February 17, 2000) Tyrosinase is a melanocyte-specific enzyme albino substitution TYR(T373K), and the temperature-sensitive tyrosinase TYR(R402Q) Tyr(H402A) found

Hebert, Daniel N.

311

Influence of plasticizer molecular weight on plasticizer retention in PVC geomembranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROOFS Influence of plasticizer molecular weight on plasticizer retention in PVC geomembranes T. D, accepted 31 October 2004 ABSTRACT: Plasticizers are used to make PVC flexible so it can be used as a geomembrane. Plasticizers can migrate from PVC geomembranes over time because of contact with air, liquid, and

312

Influence of addition order and contact time on thorium (IV) retention by hematite in the presence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Influence of addition order and contact time on thorium (IV) retention by hematite.reiller@cea.fr The influence of addition order and contact time in the system hematite (-Fe2O3) ­ humic acid (HA) ­ thorium (IV) was studied in batch experiments. Thorium (IV) is considered here as a chemical analogue of other actinides

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

313

Mesh Width Influences Prey Retention in Spider Orb Webs Todd A. Blackledge & Jacquelyn M. Zevenbergen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mesh Width Influences Prey Retention in Spider Orb Webs Todd A. Blackledge & Jacquelyn M. Zevenbergen Department of Biology, The University of Akron, Akron, OH, USA Introduction Orb webs depend upon threads, the sticky spirals of orb webs perform two important functions during prey cap- ture. First

Blackledge, Todd

314

Recent Advances on Hydrogenic Retention in ITER's Plasma-Facing Materials: BE, C, W.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Management of tritium inventory remains one of the grand challenges in the development of fusion energy and the choice of plasma-facing materials is a key factor for in-vessel tritium retention. The Atomic and Molecular Data Unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency organized a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the overall topic of tritium inventory in fusion reactors during the period 2001-2006. This dealt with hydrogenic retention in ITER's plasma-facing materials, Be, C, W, and in compounds (mixed materials) of these elements as well as tritium removal techniques. The results of the CRP are summarized in this article together with recommendations for ITER. Basic parameters of diffusivity, solubility and trapping in Be, C and W are reviewed. For Be, the development of open porosity can account for transient hydrogenic pumping but long term retention will be dominated by codeposition. Codeposition is also the dominant retention mechanism for carbon and remains a serious concern for both Be and C containing layers. Hydrogenic trapping in unirradiated tungsten is low but will increase with ion and neutron damage. Mixed materials will be formed in a tokamak and these can also retain significant amounts of hydrogen isotopes. Oxidative and photon-based techniques for detritiation of plasma-facing components are described.

Skinner, C H; Alimov, Kh; Bekris, N; Causey, R A; Clark, R.E.H.; Coad, J P; Davis, J W; Doerner, R P; Mayer, M; Pisarev, A; Roth, J; Tanabe, T

2008-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

315

Digestibility and energy retention by young rabbits fed different levels of intake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note Digestibility and energy retention by young rabbits fed different levels of intake Fernando in digestibility cages, were fed a standard diet at four levels of intake: ad libitum (AL), 60, 40 and 10 % of the AL intake. Digestibility of dietary dry matter, organic matter, crude protein, ether extract and ash

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

316

Experimental study of head loss and filtration for LOCA debris  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of controlled experiments were conducted to obtain head loss and filtration characteristics of debris beds formed of NUKON{trademark} fibrous fragments, and obtain data to validate the semi-theoretical head loss model developed in NUREG/CR-6224. A thermally insulated closed-loop test set-up was used to conduct experiments using beds formed of fibers only and fibers intermixed with particulate debris. A total of three particulate mixes were used to simulate the particulate debris. The head loss data were obtained for theoretical fiber bed thicknesses of 0.125 inches to 4.0 inches; approach velocities of 0.15 to 1.5 ft/s; temperatures of 75 F and 125 F; and sludge-to-fiber nominal concentration ratios of 0 to 60. Concentration measurements obtained during the first flushing cycle were used to estimate the filtration efficiencies of the debris beds. For test conditions where the beds are fairly uniform, the head loss data were predictable within an acceptable accuracy range by the semi-theoretical model. The model was equally applicable for both pure fiber beds and the mixed beds. Typically the model over-predicted the head losses for very thin beds and for thin beds at high sludge-to-fiber mass ratios. This is attributable to the non-uniformity of such debris beds. In this range the correlation can be interpreted to provide upper bound estimates of head loss. This is pertinent for loss of coolant accidents in boiling water reactors.

Rao, D.V.; Souto, F.J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

An improved dosimetric model of the head and brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Br). Other radionuclides considered may deposit in bone withm the head region (cranium or the spinal skeleton) (is'I, 2P, ssP, tssRe, 'ssRe, 'ssSm, "7~Sb, ssSr, s Sr, "nY, ss~Tc, tsiCs, ss"Ra), or m the thyroid fss~ Tc, and all iodme radionuclides... tagged to them (i. e. , radiopharmaceuticals). Nevertheless, studies of the small-scale dosimetry of the bram, and more generally, the organs of the head (brain, eyes thyroid, skull, skin), have not kept pace with the current advances in nuclear...

Bouchet, Lionel Gerard

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Strong-Sludge Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms in Clay Simulants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site has 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) and 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. The mission of the Department of Energy's River Protection Project is to retrieve and treat the Hanford tank waste for disposal and close the tank farms. A key aspect of the mission is to retrieve and transfer waste from the SSTs, which are at greater risk for leaking, into DSTs for interim storage until the waste is transferred to and treated in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. There is, however, limited space in the existing DSTs to accept waste transfers from the SSTs, and approaches to overcoming the limited DST space will benefit the overall mission. The purpose of this study is to summarize and analyze the key previous experiment that forms the basis for the relaxed controls and to summarize progress and results on new experiments focused on understanding the conditions that result in low gas retention. The previous large-scale test used about 50 m3 of sediment, which would be unwieldy for doing multiple parametric experiments. Accordingly, experiments began with smaller-scale tests to determine whether the desired mechanisms can be studied without the difficulty of conducting very large experiments. The most significant results from the current experiments are that progressively lower gas retention occurs in tests with progressively deeper sediment layers and that the method of gas generation also affects the maximum retention. Based on the results of this study, it is plausible that relatively low gas retention could occur in sufficiently deep tank waste in DSTs. The current studies and previous work, however, have not explored how gas retention and release will behave when two or more layers with different properties are present.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Probert, Samuel G.; Owen, Antionette T.; Brockman, Fred J.

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

319

In-vessel Retention Strategy for High Power Reactors - K-INERI Final Report (includes SBLB Test Results for Task 3 on External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) Boiling Data and CHF Enhancement Correlations)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). If there were inadequate cooling during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the vessel head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with these plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. For example, the enhanced safety of the Westinghouse Advanced 600 MWe PWR (AP600), which relied upon External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) for IVR, resulted in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) approving the design without requiring certain conventional features common to existing LWRs. However, it is not clear that currently proposed external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) without additional enhancements could provide sufficient heat removal for higher-power reactors (up to 1500 MWe). Hence, a collaborative, three-year, U.S. - Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) project was completed in which the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Seoul National University (SNU), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) investigated the performance of ERVC and an in-vessel core catcher (IVCC) to determine if IVR is feasible for reactors up to 1500 MWe.

F. B. Cheung; J. Yang; M. B. Dizon; J. Rempe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Head-Tail Modes for Strong Space Charge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Head-tail modes are described here for the space charge tune shift significantly exceeding the synchrotron tune. General equation for the modes is derived. Spatial shapes of the modes, their frequencies, and coherent growth rates are explored. The Landau damping rates are also found. Suppression of the transverse mode coupling instability by the space charge is explained.

Burov, Alexey

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Simultaneous multi-headed imager geometry calibration method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for calibrating multi-headed high sensitivity and high spatial resolution dynamic imaging systems, especially those useful in the acquisition of tomographic images of small animals. The method of the present invention comprises: simultaneously calibrating two or more detectors to the same coordinate system; and functionally correcting for unwanted detector movement due to gantry flexing.

Tran, Vi-Hoa (Newport News, VA); Meikle, Steven Richard (Penshurst, AU); Smith, Mark Frederick (Yorktown, VA)

2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

322

EARLY HEAD START Effects of Fathers, Neighborhoods and Family Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

randomly assigned - 1,513 to Early Head Start - 1,488 to other child care program #12;Highlights of the EHS disorder and aggression ­ Depression ­ Alcoholism and other drug abuse · Parental history of relationship Expulsion Lost Job Arrested Substance Abuse % No % Yes #12;Father Antisocial Behavior · 86.1% Low Risk (

323

Computational Modeling of Brain Dynamics during Repetitive Head Motions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Modeling of Brain Dynamics during Repetitive Head Motions Igor Szczyrba School motions in traumatic scenarios that are as- sociated with severe brain injuries. Our results are based on the linear Kelvin-Voigt brain injury model, which treats the brain matter as a viscoelastic solid, and on our

Burtscher, Martin

324

Beam Head Erosion in Self-Ionized Plasma Wakefield Accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the recent plasma wakefield accelerator experiments at SLAC, the energy of the particles in the tail of the 42 GeV electron beam were doubled in less than one meter [1]. Simulations suggest that the acceleration length was limited by a new phenomenon--beam head erosion in self-ionized plasmas. In vacuum, a particle beam expands transversely in a distance given by {beta}*. In the blowout regime of a plasma wakefield [2], the majority of the beam is focused by the ion channel, while the beam head slowly spreads since it takes a finite time for the ion channel to form. It is observed that in self-ionized plasmas, the head spreading is exacerbated compared to that in pre-ionized plasmas, causing the ionization front to move backward (erode). A simple theoretical model is used to estimate the upper limit of the erosion rate for a bi-gaussian beam by assuming free expansion of the beam head before the ionization front. Comparison with simulations suggests that half this maximum value can serve as an estimate for the erosion rate. Critical parameters to the erosion rate are discussed.

Berry, M.K.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Kirby, N.A.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

325

Brief Communications Optic Flow Stimuli Update Anterodorsal Thalamus Head  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

orientation in the yaw plane relative to environmental landmark cues. Head movements provoke optic field flow)istheonlyknownprojectionofheaddirectioninformationtoentorhinalgridcellsandhippocampalplacecells,yawplaneoptic flow signals likely influence representations in this spatial reference coordinate system to the body, independently of the ani- mal's ongoing behavior and of its spatial location. The HD cell system

Arleo, Angelo

326

UNITED STATES: NOAA Head Vows to Protect Marine Re-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flshmg Off U. West Coas Saury Flshing f U.. to Be R duced Sharply Resume Canned-Tuna Sales to U.S. 1971 for FISh Culture Flshery Aid Mlssion to VISit 'Thlrd World' ·'ev; ·'lchlro Head Stresses 'Systematiza- tion

327

PPA Department Heads Initial Impressions and SLAC Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PPA Department Heads Initial Impressions and SLAC Challenges James Tarpinian ES&H Director January 19, 2012 #12;2 Agenda · Initial impressions · 2011 Performance · ES&H focus areas and initiatives for 2012 ES&H Director Chief Safety Officer #12;3 Initial impressions Evolutionary change

Wechsler, Risa H.

328

New Director Heads Actuarial Science Program - Department of ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Mathematics x Purdue University x West Lafayette, Indiana. Summer 2001 ... information as well as the current (new) plan of study. ... Allen Weitsman, Associate Head. Lawrence Brown .... Professor J. J. Price was the featured speaker in Purdue's “Focus on Teaching” ..... Virginia Mashin Scholarship ($2,500).

Sally

2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

329

Running Head: TESTOSTERONE AND POWER Testosterone and power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Running Head: TESTOSTERONE AND POWER Testosterone and power Steven J. Stanton and Oliver C. Schultheiss University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA To appear in: K. Dowding (Ed.), Encyclopedia of power-647-9440, email: stantons@umich.edu #12;Testosterone and power 2 Across many studies in humans, two functional

Schultheiss, Oliver C.

330

HIGH RESOLUTION, MRI-BASED, SEGMENTED, COMPUTERIZED HEAD PHANTOM.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was created from 124 transverse MRI images of a healthy normal. The transverse T2 slices, recorded in a 256x. Internal volumes compare favorably to those described in the ICRP Reference Man. Conclusion and improved. We have developed a voxel based head phantom by manually drawing contours on 124 transverse MRI

Duncan, James S.

331

IMAGINED TRANSFORMATIONS 1 Running head: IMAGINED TRANSFORMATION OF BODIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMAGINED TRANSFORMATIONS 1 Running head: IMAGINED TRANSFORMATION OF BODIES Imagined Transformations TRANSFORMATIONS 2 Abstract A number of spatial reasoning problems can be solved by performing an imagined transformation of one's egocentric perspective. A series of experiments were carried out to characterize

Zacks, Jeffrey M.

332

Ms. Maushumi, Head Mistress Babul Sarkar, Vice President  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ms. Maushumi, Head Mistress Babul Sarkar, Vice President Char Domdoama Primary School Vill: Char Razzaq-Shamsun Best Teacher Award and Abdul Awal Sarkar Best Student Awards in Char Domdoma Primary School Dear Ms. Maushumi and Mr. Sarkar, My proposal for the introduction of one teaching and three

Nahar, Sultana Nurun

333

THE RECONSTRUCTION OF GROUNDWATER PARAMETERS FROM HEAD DATA IN AN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ancillary data is fundamental to the process of modelling a groundwater system. In an unconfined aquifer of the unconfined groundwater parameters as the unique minimum of a convex functional. 1. Introduction It is commonTHE RECONSTRUCTION OF GROUNDWATER PARAMETERS FROM HEAD DATA IN AN UNCONFINED AQUIFER IAN KNOWLES

Knowles, Ian W.

334

Managing Fusarium Head Blight in Virginia Small Grains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Breeder, Dept. of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech. cgriffey@vt.edu C.J. LIN Vice@vt.edu WADE THOMASON Extension Grains Specialist, Dept. of Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia TechManaging Fusarium Head Blight in Virginia Small Grains MELISSA KELLER Graduate Student, Dept

Liskiewicz, Maciej

335

Recto Running Head 1 Available Potential Energy and Exergy in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) remains the main framework for studying the atmospheric and oceanic energy cycles. Because the APE energy cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Classical view of the ocean energy cycleRecto Running Head 1 Available Potential Energy and Exergy in Stratified Fluids R´emi Tailleux

Tailleux, Remi

336

A Discussion of SY-101 Crust Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The flammable gas hazard in Hanford waste tanks was made an issue by the behavior of double-shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 (SY-101). Shortly after SY-101 was filled in 1980, the waste level began rising periodically, due to the generation and retention of gases within the slurry, and then suddenly dropping as the gases were released. An intensive study of the tank's behavior revealed that these episodic releases posed a safety hazard because the released gas was flammable, and, in some cases, the volume of gas released was sufficient to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL) in the tank headspace (Allemann et al. 1993). A mixer pump was installed in SY-101 in late 1993 to prevent gases from building up in the settled solids layer, and the large episodic gas releases have since ceased (Allemann et al. 1994; Stewart et al. 1994; Brewster et al. 1995). However, the surface level of SY-101 has been increasing since at least 1995, and in recent months the level growth has shown significant and unexpected acceleration. Based on a number of observations and measurements, including data from the void fraction instrument (VFI), we have concluded that the level growth is caused largely by increased gas retention in the floating crust. In September 1998, the crust contained between about 21 and 43% void based on VFI measurements (Stewart et al. 1998). Accordingly, it is important to understand the dominant mechanisms of gas retention, why the gas retention is increasing, and whether the accelerating level increase will continue, diminish or even reverse. It is expected that the retained gas in the crust is flammable, with hydrogen as a major constituent. This gas inventory would pose a flammable gas hazard if it were to release suddenly. In May 1997, the mechanisms of bubble retention and release from crust material were the subject of a workshop. The evaluation of the crust and potential hazards assumed a more typical void of roughly 15% gas. It could be similar to percolati on in single-shell tank (SST) waste forms. The much higher void being currently observed in SY-101 represents essentially a new crust configuration, and the mechanisms for sudden gas release need to be evaluated. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the situation of gas bubbles in crust based on the previous work on gas bubble retention, migration, and release in simulants and actual waste. We have also conducted some visual observations of bubble migration through simulated crusts to help understand the interaction of the various mechanisms.

SD Rassat; PA Gauglitz; SM Caley; LA Mahoney; DP Mendoza

1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

337

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced head-and-neck squamous Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

this costlet... -based approach have been reported for various clinical sites, including brain (Vineberg, 1999), head-and-neck... for a specific head-and-neck case, and compare...

338

Geostatistical inference of hydraulic conductivity and dispersivities from hydraulic heads and tracer data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geostatistical inference of hydraulic conductivity and dispersivities from hydraulic heads; accepted 25 April 2006; published 10 August 2006. [1] In groundwater, hydraulic heads and solute arrival times depend primarily on the hydraulic conductivity field and hydraulic boundary conditions. The spread

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

339

A representation of changing heading direction in human cortical areas pVIP and CSv  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Running title: Changing heading direction in the human brain Keywords: egomotion; f1 A representation of changing heading direction in human cortical in the environment, we continually change direction. Much work has examined how the brain

Royal Holloway, University of London

340

Dr. Martin Wolf, Ph. D Head of Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and oxygenation of the brain and muscle. Since 2002 he heads the Biomedical Optics Research LaboratoryDr. Martin Wolf, Ph. D Head of Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory Clinic of Neonatology

Zanibbi, Richard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

E-Print Network 3.0 - actin-bound myosin heads Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of actin-bound myosin heads in spin-labeled myofibrils in the presence of the ATP analogs AMPPNP (5... -Si have demonstrated that actin-bound myosin heads are...

342

June 8, 2006 15.8 ASSISTANT DEPARTMENT HEAD/DIVISION DIRECTOR ADDENDUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

June 8, 2006 15.8 ASSISTANT DEPARTMENT HEAD/DIVISION DIRECTOR ADDENDUM THIS ASSISTANT DEPARTMENT HEAD / DIVISION DIRECTOR ADDENDUM, hereinafter the "Addendum," is entered into by Colorado School

343

Effects of Globally Waste Disturbing Activities on Gas Generation, Retention, and Release in Hanford Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various operations are authorized in Hanford single- and double-shell tanks that disturb all or a large fraction of the waste. These globally waste-disturbing activities have the potential to release a large fraction of the retained flammable gas and to affect future gas generation, retention, and release behavior. This report presents analyses of the expected flammable gas release mechanisms and the potential release rates and volumes resulting from these activities. The background of the flammable gas safety issue at Hanford is summarized, as is the current understanding of gas generation, retention, and release phenomena. Considerations for gas monitoring and assessment of the potential for changes in tank classification and steady-state flammability are given.

Stewart, Charles W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Huckaby, James L.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Wells, Beric E.

2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

344

Rayleigh-Taylor Instability within Sediment Layers Due to Gas Retention: Preliminary Theory and Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Hanford underground waste storage tanks, a typical waste configuration is settled beds of waste particles beneath liquid layers. The settled beds are typically composed of layers, and these layers can have different physical and chemical properties. One postulated configuration within the settled bed is a less-dense layer beneath a more-dense layer. The different densities can be a result of different gas retention in the layers or different degrees of settling and compaction in the layers. This configuration can experience a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability where the less dense lower layer rises into the upper layer. Previous studies of gas retention and release have not considered potential buoyant motion within a settle bed of solids. The purpose of this report is to provide a review of RT instabilities, discuss predictions of RT behavior for sediment layers, and summarize preliminary experimental observations of RT instabilities in simulant experiments.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Rassat, Scot D.

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

345

Retention sleeve for a thermal medium carrying tube in a gas turbine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Multiple tubes are connected to steam supply and spent cooling steam return manifolds for supplying cooling steam to buckets and returning spent cooling steam from the buckets to the manifolds, respectively. The tubes are prevented from axial movement in one direction by flanges engaging end faces of the spacer between the first and second-stage wheels. Retention sleeves are disposed about cantilevered ends of the tubes. One end of the retention sleeve engages an enlarged flange on the tube, while an opposite end is spaced axially from an end face of the adjoining wheel, forming a gap, enabling thermal expansion of the tubes and limiting axial displacement of the tube in the opposite direction.

Lathrop, Norman Douglas (Ballston Lake, NY); Czachor, Robert Paul (Cincinnati, OH)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Study of liquid retention in fixed-bed reactors with upward flow of gas and liquid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature survey of the measurement techniques for the determination of liquid retention in cocurrent upward gas and liquid flow in fixed-bed reactors is presented. A number of these techniques were used in this work in columns of different diameters (Dc = 0.05 m, 0.10 m, and 0.15 m). Porous alumina particles of two different diameters (dp = 0.002 m and 0.0028 m) with both nonfoaming (water, cyclohexane, heptane, and propanol) and foaming liquids (kerosene, LCO, and diesel fuel) have been investigated. The gas used was either air or N[sub 2]. The methods investigated include volumetry, gravimetry, gammametry, and determination of residence-time distribution by tracer technique. A simple correlation for the prediction of total gas and liquid retention for bubble and pulsed flow is proposed and verified.

Yang, X.L.; Euzen, J.P. (Inst. Francais du Petrole, Vernaison (France)); Wild, G. (Lab. des Sciences du Genie Chimique, Nancy (France))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 51, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2004 2129 Influence of Head Tissue Conductivity in Forward  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 51, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2004 2129 Influence of Head Tissue Conductivity in Forward and Inverse Magnetoencephalographic Simulations Using Realistic Head Abstract--The influence of head tissue conductivity on mag- netoencephalography (MEG) was investigated

Utah, University of

348

Model 923-B Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder Adaptor Adjustment Features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model 923-B Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder Adaptor Adjustment Features Dorsal/Ventral dial.352.3139 Toll Free: 1.877.352.3275 ^^ci&ion Q)e&i^n^^^r ^esea/H^/i Model 923-B Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder 923B-1/07 #12;MODEL 923-B MOUSE GAS ANESTHESIA HEAD HOLDER The KOPF Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder

Kleinfeld, David

349

Recruitment and retention initiatives for African American and Hispanic teachers in selected school districts in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION INITIATIVES FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN AND HISPANIC TEACHERS IN SELECTED SCHOOL DISTRICTS IN TEXAS A Dissertation by ANITA JANE PERRY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... IN SELECTED SCHOOL DISTRICTS IN TEXAS A Dissertation by ANITA JANE PERRY Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved as to style and content by...

Perry, Anita Jane

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

350

Heterosis and Heterosis Retention for Reproductive and Maternal Traits in Nellore-Angus Crossbred Cows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HETEROSIS AND HETEROSIS RETENTION FOR REPRODUCTIVE AND MATERNAL TRAITS IN NELLORE-ANGUS CROSSBRED COWS A Dissertation by MOHAMMAD DIYA TALAL HAMED OBEIDAT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... Subject: Animal Breeding Copyright 2013 Mohammad Diya Talal Hamed Obeidat ii ABSTRACT Calving rate, weaning rate, birth weight, weaning weight, and ADG from 1997 to 2011 were investigated in Angus, Nellore, F1 Nellore-Angus, first generation 3...

Obeidat, Mohammad Diya Talal Hamed

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

351

Professional School Psychology Programs' Recruitment and Retention of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

graduate students of color. American Psychologist, 61, 143-156. Sanders, J. B., Wilson, M., & Jones, J. (2010). Generating Markets: Recruitment for programs and program faculty, encouraging diversity. Trainers Forum, 29 (2),32-35. Solomon, David J... PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAMS? RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF CULTURALLY AND LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE STUDENTS Major: Mathematics April 2011 Submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Research Texas A&M University...

Smith, Leann

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

352

USE OF GCLS TO CONTROL LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOMEMBRANE DEFECTS UNDER HIGH HYDRAULIC HEADS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USE OF GCLS TO CONTROL LEAKAGE THROUGH GEOMEMBRANE DEFECTS UNDER HIGH HYDRAULIC HEADS Christine T liners under conditions representative of dams (i.e., high hydraulic heads). Specifically, the objective of interface contact, hydraulic head, and GCL hydration procedures on the leakage rate were considered

Zornberg, Jorge G.

353

Modeling Attractor Deformation in the Rodent Head-Direction JEREMY P. GOODRIDGE1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Attractor Deformation in the Rodent Head-Direction System JEREMY P. GOODRIDGE1 AND DAVID S attractor deformation in the rodent head-direction system. J Neurophysiol 83: 3402­3410, 2000. We present a model of the head-direction circuit in the rat that improves on earlier models in several respects

Touretzky, David S.

354

Volume Currents in Forward and Inverse Magnetoencephalographic Simulations Using Realistic Head Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume Currents in Forward and Inverse Magnetoencephalographic Simulations Using Realistic Head of magnetoencephalographic MEG forward or in- verse simulations in realistic head models. We verify the accu- racy of our, in an inhomoge- neous, nonspherical realistic head model, the magnetic field normal to the MEG detector due

Utah, University of

355

NEURAL MODELS OF HEAD-DIRECTION CELLS PETER ZEIDMAN JOHN A. BULLINARIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have seen that navigation requires knowledge of heading, and that HD cells in the brain actNEURAL MODELS OF HEAD-DIRECTION CELLS PETER ZEIDMAN JOHN A. BULLINARIA School of Computer Science background of Head Direction Cells, and existing models of them, we introduce an improved neural model

Bullinaria, John

356

Double-ring network model of the head-direction system Xiaohui Xie,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Double-ring network model of the head-direction system Xiaohui Xie,1, * Richard H. R. Hahnloser,1,2 and H. Sebastian Seung1,2 1 Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute 2002; published 9 October 2002 In the head-direction system, the orientation of an animal's head

Xie, Xiaohui Sunney

357

Volume Currents in Forward and Inverse MEG Simulations Using Realistic Head Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume Currents in Forward and Inverse MEG Simulations Using Realistic Head Models Robert Van of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) forward or inverse sim­ ulations in realistic head models. We verify the accuracy, in an inhomogeneous, non­spherical realistic head model, the magnetic field normal to the MEG detector due to volume

Utah, University of

358

June 8, 2006 15.7 ACTING OR INTERIM DEPARTMENT HEAD/DIVISION DIRECTOR ADDENDUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

June 8, 2006 15.7 ACTING OR INTERIM DEPARTMENT HEAD/DIVISION DIRECTOR ADDENDUM THIS ACTING OR INTERIM DEPARTMENT HEAD / DIVISION DIRECTOR ADDENDUM, hereinafter the "Addendum," is entered as a temporary or short-term replacement for his or her Department Head/Division Director, who is temporarily

359

Describing the readiness for retention of students of color at state and land-grant colleges of agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are not done in this area considering the fiscal impacts on priorities such as retention. Although respondents indicated satisfaction with the college of agriculture to meet the academic needs of students, departmental administrators and faculty were still...

Harris, Danielle Alexander

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

360

Investigation of the use of nanofluids to enhance the In-Vessel Retention capabilities of Advanced Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanofluids at very low concentrations experimentally exhibit a substantial increase in Critical Heat Flux (CHF) compared to water. The use of a nanofluid in the In-Vessel Retention (IVR) severe accident management strategy, ...

Hannink, Ryan Christopher

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Investigation of downward facing critical heat flux with water-based nanofluids for In-Vessel Retention applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In-Vessel Retention ("IVR") is a severe accident management strategy that is power limiting to the Westinghouse AP1000 due to critical heat flux ("CHF") at the outer surface of the reactor vessel. Increasing the CHF level ...

DeWitt, Gregory L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

The effect of stone retention walls on soil productivity and crop performance on selected hillside farms in southern Honduras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF STONE RETENTION WALLS ON SOIL PRODUCTIVITY AND CROP PERFORMANCE ON SELECTED HILLSIDE FARMS IN SOUTHERN HONDURAS A Thesis by MARC ELLERY THOMPSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject Soil Science THE EFFECT OF STONE RETENTION WALLS ON SOIL PRODUCTIVITY AND CROP PERFORMANCE ON SELECTED HILLSIDE FARMS IN SOUTHERN HONDURAS A Thesis by MARC...

Thompson, Marc Ellery

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Exhibit 1C Patent Rights Retention by the Seller ITER UT-B Contracts Div Page 1 of 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exhibit 1C ­ Patent Rights ­ Retention by the Seller ­ ITER UT-B Contracts Div March 2007 Page 1 of 5 ex1c-ITER-mar07.doc Exhibit 1C ­ ITER Ref: DEAR 952.227-11 PATENT RIGHTS - RETENTION BY THE SELLER is or may be patentable or otherwise protectable under title 35 of the United States Code, or any novel

Pennycook, Steve

364

Heatup of the TMI-2 lower head during core relocation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis has been carried out to assess the potential of a melting attack upon the reactor vessel lower head and incore instrument nozzle penetration weldments during the TMI core relocation event at 224 minutes. Calculations were performed to determine the potential for molten corium to undergo breakup into droplets which freeze and form a debris bed versus impinging upon the lower head as one or more coherent streams. The effects of thermal-hydraulic interactions between corium streams and water inside the lower plenum, the effects of the core support assembly structure upon the corium, and the consequences of corium relocation by way of the core former region were examined. 19 refs., 24 figs.

Wang, S.K.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Integrated hydraulic cooler and return rail in camless cylinder head  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An engine assembly may include a cylinder head defining an engine coolant reservoir, a pressurized fluid supply, a valve actuation assembly, and a hydraulic fluid reservoir. The valve actuation assembly may be in fluid communication with the pressurized fluid supply and may include a valve member displaceable by a force applied by the pressurized fluid supply. The hydraulic fluid reservoir may be in fluid communication with the valve actuation assembly and in a heat exchange relation to the engine coolant reservoir.

Marriott, Craig D. (Clawson, MI); Neal, Timothy L. (Ortonville, MI); Swain, Jeff L. (Flushing, MI); Raimao, Miguel A. (Colorado Springs, CO)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

366

Development of Power-head based Fan Airflow Station  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

related to the measured fan speed. Actually the measured fan speed is assumed to equal the motor synchronous speed, which is proportional to the VFD frequency. Theoretically it is not true. The difference between the synchronous speed and motor speed... the basic theory, experiment and results of the power-head based airflow station. Theory Figure 1 shows variable speed fan connection schematic. VFD is normally installed on the motor to adjust the motor speed by modulating frequency. Typically...

Wang, G.; Liu, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Owls Head, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County, Vermont:OttawaCounty, IndianaOwls Head, Maine:

368

Reactor pressure vessel head vents and methods of using the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Internal head vents are usable in nuclear reactors and include piping inside of the reactor pressure vessel with a vent in the reactor upper head. Piping extends downward from the upper head and passes outside of the reactor to permit the gas to escape or be forcibly vented outside of the reactor without external piping on the upper head. The piping may include upper and lowers section that removably mate where the upper head joins to the reactor pressure vessel. The removable mating may include a compressible bellows and corresponding funnel. The piping is fabricated of nuclear-reactor-safe materials, including carbon steel, stainless steel, and/or a Ni--Cr--Fe alloy. Methods install an internal head vent in a nuclear reactor by securing piping to an internal surface of an upper head of the nuclear reactor and/or securing piping to an internal surface of a reactor pressure vessel.

Gels, John L; Keck, David J; Deaver, Gerald A

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

369

SUMMARY OF FY11 SULFATE RETENTION STUDIES FOR DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of studies related to the incorporation of sulfate in high level waste (HLW) borosilicate glass produced at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). A group of simulated HLW glasses produced for earlier sulfate retention studies was selected for full chemical composition measurements to determine whether there is any clear link between composition and sulfate retention over the compositional region evaluated. In addition, the viscosity of several glasses was measured to support future efforts in modeling sulfate solubility as a function of predicted viscosity. The intent of these studies was to develop a better understanding of sulfate retention in borosilicate HLW glass to allow for higher loadings of sulfate containing waste. Based on the results of these and other studies, the ability to improve sulfate solubility in DWPF borosilicate glasses lies in reducing the connectivity of the glass network structure. This can be achieved, as an example, by increasing the concentration of alkali species in the glass. However, this must be balanced with other effects of reduced network connectivity, such as reduced viscosity, potentially lower chemical durability, and in the case of higher sodium and aluminum concentrations, the propensity for nepheline crystallization. Future DWPF processing is likely to target higher waste loadings and higher sludge sodium concentrations, meaning that alkali concentrations in the glass will already be relatively high. It is therefore unlikely that there will be the ability to target significantly higher total alkali concentrations in the glass solely to support increased sulfate solubility without the increased alkali concentration causing failure of other Product Composition Control System (PCCS) constraints, such as low viscosity and durability. No individual components were found to provide a significant improvement in sulfate retention (i.e., an increase of the magnitude necessary to have a dramatic impact on blending, washing, or waste loading strategies for DWPF) for the glasses studied here. In general, the concentrations of those species that significantly improve sulfate solubility in a borosilicate glass must be added in relatively large concentrations (e.g., 13 to 38 wt % or more of the frit) in order to have a substantial impact. For DWPF, these concentrations would constitute too large of a portion of the frit to be practical. Therefore, it is unlikely that specific additives may be introduced into the DWPF glass via the frit to significantly improve sulfate solubility. The results presented here continue to show that sulfate solubility or retention is a function of individual glass compositions, rather than a property of a broad glass composition region. It would therefore be inappropriate to set a single sulfate concentration limit for a range of DWPF glass compositions. Sulfate concentration limits should continue to be identified and implemented for each sludge batch. The current PCCS limit is 0.4 wt % SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in glass, although frit development efforts have led to an increased limit of 0.6 wt % for recent sludge batches. Slightly higher limits (perhaps 0.7-0.8 wt %) may be possible for future sludge batches. An opportunity for allowing a higher sulfate concentration limit at DWPF may lay lie in improving the laboratory experiments used to set this limit. That is, there are several differences between the crucible-scale testing currently used to define a limit for DWPF operation and the actual conditions within the DWPF melter. In particular, no allowance is currently made for sulfur partitioning (volatility versus retention) during melter processing as the sulfate limit is set for a specific sludge batch. A better understanding of the partitioning of sulfur in a bubbled melter operating with a cold cap as well as the impacts of sulfur on the off-gas system may allow a higher sulfate concentration limit to be established for the melter feed. This approach would have to be taken carefully to ensure that a

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

370

Soil Water Retention and Relative Permeability for Full Range of Saturation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Common conceptual models for unsaturated flow often rely on the oversimplified representation of medium pores as a bundle of cylindrical capillaries and assume that the matric potential is attributed to capillary forces only. The adsorptive surface forces are ignored. It is often assumed that aqueous flow is negligible when a soil is near or at the residual water content. These models are successful at high and medium water contents but often give poor results at low water contents. These models do not apply to conditions at which water content is less than the residual water content. We extend the lower bound of existing water-retention functions and conductivity models from residual water content to the oven-dry condition (i.e., zero water content) by defining a state-dependent, residual-water content for a soil drier than a critical value. Furthermore, a hydraulic conductivity model for smooth uniform spheres was modified by introducing a correction factor to describe the film flow-induced hydraulic conductivity for natural porous media. The total unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is the sum of those due to capillary and film flow. The extended retention and conductivity models were verified with six datasets from the literature. Results show that, when the soil is at high and intermediate water content, there is no difference between the un-extended and the extended models; when the soil is at low water content, the un-extended models overestimate the water content but under-estimate the conductivity while the extended models match the retention and conductivity measurements well.

Zhang, Z. F.

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

371

Joint production and economic retention quantity decisions in capacitated production systems serving multiple market segments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 44 VITA : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 46 viii LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 Sensitivity of the economic retention quantity with respect to the lost sales penalty when r1 = 100, p = 50, h = 12:5, E[X1...] = E[X2] = E[X3] = 100, C1 = C2 = C2 = 100 : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 36 2 Sensitivity of the optimal-produce up-to level with respect to the lost sales penalty when r1 = 100, p = 50, r2 = 40, h = 12:5, E[X1] = E[X2] = E[X3] = 100, C1 = C2 = C2 = 100...

Katariya, Abhilasha Prakash

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Extreme high-head portables provide more pumping options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three years ago, Godwin Pumps, one of the largest manufacturers of portable pumps, introduced its Extreme Duty High Lift (HL) series of pumps and more mines are finding unique applications for these pumps. The Extreme HL series is a range single-stage Dri-Prime pumps with heads up to 600 feet and flows up to 5,000 gallons per minute. The American Coal Co.'s Galatia mine, an underground longwall mine in southern Illinois, used an HL 160 to replace a multiple-staged centrifugal pump. It provided Galatia with 1,500 gpm at 465 ft. 3 photos.

Fiscor, S.

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

MHK Projects/Brough Head Wave Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAK Technologies Jump to:BW2 Tidal < MHKBluemillBrough Head

374

Bay Head, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine:Barbers Point Housing,Illinois:County is30.1805306°,Harbor Islands,Head,

375

Nags Head, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3Informationof Energy Calculator29 Jump to:NaRecNags Head, North

376

MFRSR Head Refurbishment, Data Logger Upgrade and Calibration Improvements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L. Wood,3,MarchMFRC BloodMFRSR Head

377

RETENTION AND CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF URANIUM IN A WETLAND ON THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium speciation and retention mechanism onto Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments was studied using batch (ad)sorption experiments, sequential extraction desorption tests and U L{sub 3}-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy of contaminated wetland sediments. U was highly retained by the SRS wetland sediments. In contrast to other similar but much lower natural organic matter (NOM) sediments, significant sorption of U onto the SRS sediments was observed at pH <4 and pH >8. Sequential extraction tests indicated that the U(VI) species were primarily associated with the acid soluble fraction (weak acetic acid extractable) and NOM fraction (Na-pyrophosphate extractable). Uranium L3- edge XANES spectra of the U-retained sediments were nearly identical to that of uranyl acetate. The primary oxidation state of U in these sediments was as U(VI), and there was little evidence that the high sorptive capacity of the sediments could be ascribed to abiotic or biotic reduction to the less soluble U(IV) species. The molecular mechanism responsible for the high U retention in the SRS wetland sediments is likely related to the chemical bonding of U to organic carbon.

Li, D.; CHANG, H.: SEAMAN, J.; Jaffe, P.; Groos, P.; Jiang, D.; Chen, N.; Lin, J.; Arthur, Z.; Scheckel, K.; Kaplan, D.

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

378

Radionuclide Retention Mechanisms in Secondary Waste-Form Testing: Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate candidate stabilization technologies that have the potential to successfully treat liquid secondary waste stream effluents produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). WRPS is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF, a multi-waste, treatment-and-storage unit that has been permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid waste generated during operation of the WTP. The STU will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary waste expected to be produced by WTP. This report on radionuclide retention mechanisms describes the testing and characterization results that improve understanding of radionuclide retention mechanisms, especially for pertechnetate, {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} in four different waste forms: Cast Stone, DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer, encapsulated fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) product, and Ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramic. These data and results will be used to fill existing data gaps on the candidate technologies to support a decision-making process that will identify a subset of the candidate waste forms that are most promising and should undergo further performance testing.

Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Yang, Jungseok; Engelhard, Mark H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Parker, Kent E.; Wang, Guohui; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

379

Supplement 23, Part 6, Section B. Subject Headings: J-Z, Parasite-Subject Headings and Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the Department over other products not mentioned. SUBJECT HEADINGS 583 Japan Kagei, N., 1973, Snake, v. 5 (1-2), 141-150 macroscopic endoparasites of snakes recorded in Japan Japan Kamiya, H.; et al., 19 73, Japan. J. Vet. Re- search, v. 21 (3), 51... African Med. J., v. 55 (il), 402 [Letter] amoebic liver abscess in patients presenting with jaundice or raised serum bilirubin, suggestions for management Jaundice Hirsch, R. P., 1979, Internat. J. Parasitol., v. 9 (5), 395-399 Histomonas...

Hood, Martha W.; Hanfman, Deborah T.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Kirby, Margie D.; Zidar, Judith A.; Shaw, Judith H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Heading Lock Maneuver Testing of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years, Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (UAV) research and development at Bandung Institute of Technology in Indonesia has achieved the testing stage in the field. This testing was still being classified as the early testing, since some of the preliminary tests were carried out in the scale of the laboratory. The paper would discuss the laboratory test and several tests that were done in the field. Discussions were stressed in the procedure and the aim that will be achieved, along with several early results. The testing was carried out in the lake with the area around 8300 Ha and the maximum depth of 50 meters. The location of the testing was chosen with consideration of minimizing the effect of the current and the wave, as well as the location that was not too far from the Laboratory. The type of testing that will be discussed in paper was Heading Lock Maneuver Testing. The vehicle was tested to move with a certain cruising speed, afterwards it was commanded by an arbitrarily selected heading directio...

Muljowidodo, K

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

In search of a new governing failure criterion for torispherical heads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The failure criterion that governs the present design rules of formed heads in Section 8/Div. 2 of the ASME B and PV Code limits crown displacement upon a single application of pressure, and it does so by means of a calculated collapse pressure. One problem with the rules is that they require greater head thicknesses than those of Section 8/Div. 1. Another problem is that recent test data taken for two formed heads have shown no signs of head displacements or deformations that could have rendered the heads unserviceable at pressures substantially higher than the calculated collapse pressures. Any link between the calculated collapse pressures and the failures of the test heads could not be established. The main thesis proposed in the paper is that such a link does not exist for torispherical heads in general. The reason for this is investigated theoretically and attributed to the geometric strengthening of heads, as they deform. It is recommended that the reasons for limiting displacements or deformations for a single application of pressure be reviewed and, if needed, a new failure criterion defined, or other failure modes, such as tensile plastic instability (burst), be considered. The latter mode is described and options for its evaluation are presented in this paper. The protection of torispherical heads against the failure modes of low-cycle fatigue and incremental plastic growth upon cyclic loading, which are controlled by shakedown, is not covered in this paper but is left to future investigations.

Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States); Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceleration head injury Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 2 Clinical Management of Traumatic Brain Injury Summary: -10% of patients with closed head injury (CHI) Cervical collar...

383

E-Print Network 3.0 - abusive head trauma Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 28 Motor Dysfunction III: Concussion, Acquired Brain Summary: injury -encephalitis -head trauma, birth trauma Factors leading to the...

384

Real World Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Unit Real World Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower Unit 69dhydrogreenhydrodemonstration12.ppt More Documents & Publications Laboratory Demonstration of a New...

385

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute head trauma Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Biochemistry, University of Mississippi Collection: Biology and Medicine 2 CURRICULUM VITAE MARTIN A. SCHREIBER, MD Summary: with Severe Blunt Head Injury. Journal of...

386

Treating radiation-induced trismus in head and neck cancer;Exercise intervention and risk structures.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Abstract The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate the incidence of trismus in head and neck cancer (HNC) and to assess the treatment… (more)

Pauli, Nina

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Imaging system for cardiac planar imaging using a dedicated dual-head gamma camera  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cardiac imaging system employing dual gamma imaging heads co-registered with one another to provide two dynamic simultaneous views of the heart sector of a patient torso. A first gamma imaging head is positioned in a first orientation with respect to the heart sector and a second gamma imaging head is positioned in a second orientation with respect to the heart sector. An adjustment arrangement is capable of adjusting the distance between the separate imaging heads and the angle between the heads. With the angle between the imaging heads set to 180 degrees and operating in a range of 140-159 keV and at a rate of up to 500kHz, the imaging heads are co-registered to produce simultaneous dynamic recording of two stereotactic views of the heart. The use of co-registered imaging heads maximizes the uniformity of detection sensitivity of blood flow in and around the heart over the whole heart volume and minimizes radiation absorption effects. A normalization/image fusion technique is implemented pixel-by-corresponding pixel to increase signal for any cardiac region viewed in two images obtained from the two opposed detector heads for the same time bin. The imaging system is capable of producing enhanced first pass studies, bloodpool studies including planar, gated and non-gated EKG studies, planar EKG perfusion studies, and planar hot spot imaging.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Morgantown, VA); Umeno, Marc M. (Woodinville, WA)

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

388

Plant and microbial controls on nitrogen retention and loss in a Humid Tropical Forest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Humid tropical forests are generally characterized by the lack of nitrogen (N) limitation to net primary productivity, yet paradoxically have high potential for N loss. We conducted an intensive field experiment with {sup 15}NH{sub 4} and {sup 15}NO{sub 3} additions to highly weathered tropical forest soils to determine the relative importance of N retention and loss mechanisms. Over half of all the NH{sub 4}{sup +} produced from gross mineralization was rapidly converted to NO{sub 3}{sup -} during the process of gross nitrification. During the first 24 h plant roots took up 28 % of the N mineralized, dominantly as NH{sub 4}{sup +}, and were a greater sink for N than soil microbial biomass. Soil microbes were not a significant sink for added {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} or {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup -} during the first 24 hr, and only for {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} after 7 d. Patterns of microbial community composition, as determined by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis, were weakly, but significantly correlated with nitrification and denitrification to N{sub 2}O. Rates of dissimilatory NO{sub 3}{sup -} reduction to NH{sub 4}{sup +} (DNRA) were high in this forest, accounting for up to 25 % of gross mineralization and 35 % of gross nitrification. DNRA was a major sink for NO{sub 3}{sup -} which may have contributed to the lower rates of N{sub 2}O and leaching losses. Despite considerable N conservation via DNRA and plant NH{sub 4}{sup +} uptake, the fate of approximately 45% of the NO{sub 3}{sup -} produced and 22% of the NH{sub 4}{sup +} produced were not measured in our fluxes, suggesting that other important pathways for N retention and loss (e.g., denitrification to N{sub 2}) are important in this system. The high proportion of mineralized N that was rapidly nitrified and the fates of that NO{sub 3}{sup -} highlight the key role of gross nitrification as a proximate control on N retention and loss in humid tropical forest soils. Furthermore, our results demonstrate the importance of the coupling between DNRA and plant uptake of NH{sub 4}{sup +} as a potential N conserving mechanism within tropical forests.

Templer, P.; Silver, W.; Pett-Ridge, J.; DeAngelis, K.M.; Firestone, M.K.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Bailer for top head drive rotary well drills  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A bailer mounted to the derrick of a top head drive well drilling rig is described. The bailer includes a winch line drum mounted by a bracket to the derrick. A positive displacement hydraulic motor mounts one end of the drum and receives fluid under pressure from the existing hydraulic pressure supply. Valving is provided to allow reverse operation of the motor so equipment can either be raised or lowered relative to the derrick. The hydraulic delivery line to the motor includes a one way restrictor that will allow relatively free passage of fluid to the motor in a driving or lifting mode but will reverse flow of fluid from the motor, thereby affording a braking effect for lowering a load at a selected rate.

Bartholomew, L.

1980-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

390

Japan`s refiner/marketers headed for major shakeout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Japan`s downstream oil industry is in a state of crisis and headed for a major shakeout. The major catalyst for this was a dramatic deregulation step during April 1996 that allowed refined petroleum product imports by non-refiners. The move, together with a sharp drop in refining margins, falling retail gasoline prices, and a service station sector on the brink of collapse, are all leading to massive changes in the way the country`s refiners and marketers do business. This paper reviews the collapse of corporate profits during this period of deregulation; the development of a new price system geared toward bringing the prices of gasoline, fuel oil, and kerosene into line with each other to offset the fall in gasoline prices; and industry restructuring including mergers, acquisitions, and marketing consolidation. The paper then makes predictions on the outcome of these changes on the Japanese oil industry.

NONE

1996-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

391

Tribo-chemistry at the head/disk interface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tribo-chemical studies at the head/disk interface (HDI) were conducted on hydrogenated (CH{sub x}), nitrogenated (CN{sub x}), and cathodic-arc amorphous hard carbon disk samples coated with perfluoropolyether ZDOL and X1P/ZDOL lubricant. The studies involved drag tests with uncoated and carbon-coated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiC sliders and thermal desorption experiments in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) tribochamber followed with a surface chemistry analysis by X-ray Photo Emission Electron Microscopy (X-PEEM) and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The friction and catalytic decomposition mechanisms of ZDOL are described, as well as the tribo-chemical performance of cathodic-arc carbon overcoats coated with ZDOL, and data demonstrating the chemical alteration of the lubricant and carbon overcoat are also presented.

Bhatia, C.S. [SSD/IBM, San Jose, CA (United States)] [SSD/IBM, San Jose, CA (United States); Fong, W.; Chen, C.Y.; Wei, J.; Bogy, D.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Computer Mechanics Lab.] [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Computer Mechanics Lab.; Anders, S.; Stammler, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Stoehr, J. [IBM Research Div., San Jose, CA (United States)] [IBM Research Div., San Jose, CA (United States)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Ensemble smoother assimilation of hydraulic head and return flow data to estimate hydraulic conductivity distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ensemble smoother assimilation of hydraulic head and return flow data to estimate hydraulic and data measurements, an ensemble smoother (ES) to provide enhanced estimates of aquifer hydraulic conductivity (K) through assimilation of hydraulic head (H) and groundwater return flow volume (RFV

Bau, Domenico A.

393

The Point Spread Function of the Human Head and its Implications for Transcranial Current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Point Spread Function of the Human Head and its Implications for Transcranial Current distribution in the head resulting from the application of scalp currents. Derivation of forward models has represented a major effort in brain stimulation research, with model complexity ranging from spherical shells

Parra, Lucas C.

394

Nuclear Engineering and Design 189 (1999) 757 Lower head integrity under steam explosion loads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Engineering and Design 189 (1999) 7­57 Lower head integrity under steam explosion loads T Engineering, Building 208, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass A6enue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA Received 24 August 1998; accepted 24 November 1998 Abstract Lower head integrity under steam explosion

Yuen, Walter W.

395

Head tilt during driving DANIEL C. ZIKOVITZ and LAURENCE R. HARRIS *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Head tilt during driving DANIEL C. ZIKOVITZ ² and LAURENCE R. HARRIS² * Departments of ² Biology and Psychology, York University, Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3, Canada Keywords: Driving behaviour; Head tilt; Vision with the visually-available estimate of the curvature of the road (r 2 = 0.86) but not with the centripetal force (r

Harris, Laurence R.

396

Journees Automates Cellulaires 2008 (Uz`es), pp. 54-64 SOFIC ONE HEAD MACHINES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journ´ees Automates Cellulaires 2008 (Uz`es), pp. 54-64 SOFIC ONE HEAD MACHINES A. GAJARDO-dimensional Turing machines with only one head is adopted. A subshift is associated to each Turing machine, and its properties are studied. The subshift consists in the set of sequences of symbols that the machine reads

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

397

Running head: Eye-tracking in chimpanzees and humans 1 Research Article9  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Running head: Eye-tracking in chimpanzees and humans 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Research Article915 16 fkanou@pri.kyoto-u.ac.jp17 +81-80-6902-501318 19 #12;Running head: Eye-tracking in chimpanzees and humans 2 Abstract20 Previous studies comparing eye movements between humans and their closest relatives

Takada, Shoji

398

Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans Amelia M. Arbisser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans by Amelia M. Arbisser B.S., Computer Science of Engineering Thesis Committee #12;2 #12;Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans by Amelia M, we employ an atlas of labeled training images. We register each of these images to the unlabeled

Golland, Polina

399

INTERNAL PROJECT INFORMATION NOTE 10/08 Title: CCF Harvesting Method Development: Harvester Head  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERNAL PROJECT INFORMATION NOTE 10/08 Title: CCF Harvesting Method Development: Harvester Head PROJECT INFORMATION NOTE 10/08 Ref 1200A/56/07 CCF Harvesting Method Development: Harvester Head Visibility SUMMARY The use of Continuous Cover Forestry (CCF) can lead to situations where a dense

400

Influence of pH on Phosphorus Retention in Oxidized Lake Sediments O. G. Olila* and K. R. Reddy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of pH on Phosphorus Retention in Oxidized Lake Sediments O. G. Olila* and K. R. Reddy-soluble P concentration (WSP) and P sorption by suspended sediments in shallow eutrophic lakes. Labora- tory sediment suspensions from two subtropical lakes (Lake Apopka and Lake Okeechobee, Florida). The P sorption

Florida, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Enhancement of water retention in the membrane electrode assembly for direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to achieve the neat-methanol operation is to passively transport the water produced at the cathode throughEnhancement of water retention in the membrane electrode assembly for direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol Q.X. Wu, T.S. Zhao*, R. Chen, W.W. Yang Department of Mechanical Engineering

Zhao, Tianshou

402

ISU Policy Library All of this information can be found Under the ISU Policy Library --File retention.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ISU Policy Library All of this information can be found Under the ISU Policy Library -- File retention. http://records.policy.iastate.edu/ Here are a few links we pulled out for you to get you started: · Personnel Files -- http://records.policy.iastate.edu/view.php?id=151 · Accounting Transactions

Chen, Tsing-Chang "Mike"

403

Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochem. Eng. Aspects 289 (2006) 254255 Erratum to "Retention of mineral colloids in unsaturated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochem. Eng. Aspects 289 (2006) 254­255 Erratum Erratum to "Retention. Physicochem. Eng. Aspects 256 (2005) 207­216) Gang Chen, Markus Flury Department of Crop and Soil Sciences.colsurfa.2006.06.029 #12;G. Chen, M. Flury / Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochem. Eng. Aspects 289 (2006) 254

Flury, Markus

404

Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochem. Eng. Aspects 256 (2005) 207216 Retention of mineral colloids in unsaturated porous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochem. Eng. Aspects 256 (2005) 207­216 Retention of mineral colloids theory, where removal of col- loidal particles from the fluid phase is governed by physico- chemical transport is also subject to physical constraint, i.e., colloid physical entrap- ment in pore throats

Flury, Markus

405

RETENTION OF IRB RECORDS AND OTHER DOCUMENTS All IRB files and documents that relate to the protection of human research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

site. The IRB File Manager and eIRB support staff are available to scan paper documents as needed into Paperhost. The File Manager and all the Board Specialists have access to documents kept on the Paperhost web1 RETENTION OF IRB RECORDS AND OTHER DOCUMENTS 04/18/2011 All IRB files and documents that relate

406

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 41, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 1996 I073 Combinedl Head and Eye Tracking System for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

range of head motion, mainly low-frequency, yaw rotation. An integrated eye-head tracking system and Eye Tracking System for Dynamilc Testing of the Vestibular System Robert S. Allison,* Moshe Eizenman, and Bob S. K. Cheung Abstruct- We present a comlbined head-eye tracking system suitable for use with free

Allison, Robert

407

Quantum phase estimation using a multi-headed cat state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It was recently shown that an entangled coherent state, which is a superposition of two different coherent states, can surpass the performance of N00N state in estimating an unknown phase-shift. This may hint at further enhancement in phase estimation by incorporating more component states in the superposition of resource state. We here study a four-headed cat state (4HCS), a superposition of four different coherent states, and propose its application to quantum phase estimation. We first investigate how the 4HCS is more nonclassical than a 2HCS in view of some nonclassical measures including sub-Poissonian statistics, negativity of Wigner distribution, and entanglement potential. We then demonstrate the enhanced performance in phase estimation by employing an entangled state via the 4HCS, which can surpass that of the 2HCS particularly in the regime of small average photon number. Moreover, we show that an entangled state modified from the 4HCS can further enhance the phase estimation even in the regime of large average photon number under a photon-loss channel. Our investigation further extends to incorporate an increasingly large number of component states in the resource superposition state and clearly show its merit in phase estimation.

Su-Yong Lee; Chang-Woo Lee; Hyunchul Nha; Dagomir Kaszlikowski

2015-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

408

Upgrade Boilers with Energy-Efficient Burners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This revised ITP steam tip sheet on upgrading boilers provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Flex-flame burner and combustion method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combustion method and apparatus which produce a hybrid flame for heating metals and metal alloys, which hybrid flame has the characteristic of having an oxidant-lean portion proximate the metal or metal alloy and having an oxidant-rich portion disposed above the oxidant lean portion. This hybrid flame is produced by introducing fuel and primary combustion oxidant into the furnace chamber containing the metal or metal alloy in a substoichiometric ratio to produce a fuel-rich flame and by introducing a secondary combustion oxidant into the furnace chamber above the fuel-rich flame in a manner whereby mixing of the secondary combustion oxidant with the fuel-rich flame is delayed for a portion of the length of the flame.

Soupos, Vasilios (Chicago, IL); Zelepouga, Serguei (Hoffman Estates, IL); Rue, David M. (Chicago, IL); Abbasi, Hamid A. (Naperville, IL)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

410

FRONT BURNER - ISSUE 19 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstruction Management14,2 - In theJulyDepartmentTO: Ex

411

FRONT BURNER - Issue 20 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstruction Management14,2 - In theJulyDepartmentTO: ExIssue

412

Cybersecurity Front Burner | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site |Documents Available for Download January

413

Gas retention and release behavior in Hanford single-shell waste tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the current understanding of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford single-shell waste tanks based on theory, experimental results, and observations of tank behavior. The single-shell tanks likely to pose a flammable gas hazard are listed and described, and photographs of core extrusions and the waste surface are included. The credible mechanisms for significant flammable gas releases are described, and release volumes and rates are quantified as much as possible. The only mechanism demonstrably capable of producing large ({approximately}100 m{sup 3}) spontaneous gas releases is the buoyant displacement, which occurs only in tanks with a relatively deep layer of supernatant liquid. Only the double-shell tanks currently satisfy this condition. All release mechanisms believed plausible in single-shell tanks have been investigated, and none have the potential for large spontaneous gas releases. Only small spontaneous gas releases of several cubic meters are likely by these mechanisms. The reasons several other postulated gas release mechanisms are implausible or incredible are also given.

Stewart, C.W.; Brewster, M.E.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Meyer, P.A.; Recknagle, K.P.; Reid, H.C.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Preliminary Study of Strong-Sludge Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms in Clay Simulants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site has 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) and 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. The mission of the Department of Energy’s River Protection Project is to retrieve and treat the Hanford tank waste for disposal and close the tank farms. A key aspect of the mission is to retrieve and transfer waste from the SSTs, which are at greater risk for leaking, into DSTs for interim storage until the waste is transferred to and treated in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. There is, however, limited space in the existing DSTs to accept waste transfers from the SSTs, and approaches to overcoming the limited DST space will benefit the overall mission. The purpose of this study is to summarize and analyze the key previous experiment that forms the basis for the relaxed controls and to summarize initial progress and results on new experiments focused on understanding the conditions that result in low gas retention. The work is ongoing; this report provides a summary of the initial findings. The previous large-scale test used about 50 m3 of sediment, which would be unwieldy for doing multiple parametric experiments. Accordingly, experiments will begin with smaller-scale tests to determine whether the desired mechanisms can be studied without the difficulty of conducting very large experiments.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Probert, Samuel G.; Owen, Antionette T.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

415

Evaluation of heterosis and heterosis retention in Bos taurus-Bos indicus crossbred cattle for productivity traits in cows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

appreciation and gratitude to my committee chair, Dr. Sanders, and my committee members, Dr. Herring and Dr. Speed, who gave me support, guidance, and answers to my many questions from the moment I came to Texas A&M University. I would also like to thank my... of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2005 Major Subject: Animal Breeding EVALUATION OF HETEROSIS AND HETEROSIS RETENTION IN BOS TAURUS -BOS INDICUS...

Meuchel, Meredith Christine

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Head-mounted and Multi-surface Displays Support Emergency Medical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, emergency environments with high demands on cognition and communication [11]. Operating rooms and hospital such as putting in central lines to improving crisis response in trained medical teams [6]. Information technology with their own culture and norms. Medical training also emphasizes knowledge retention and educational practices

Klemmer, Scott

417

Application of the cumulative risk model in predicting school readiness in Head Start children  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

outcomes. This study built on this literature by investigating how child, parent, and family risk factors predicted school readiness in Head Start children using two statistical models. Specific aims of this study included identifying 1) to what degree...

Rodriguez-Escobar, Olga Lydia

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Shakedown and stress range of torispherical heads under cyclic internal pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two effects on shakedown of torispherical heads are addressed in this paper: (1) changing geometry, and (2) initial pressurization, such as by a hydro (or proof) test. Shakedown and the cycled stress intensity range are calculated for two head geometries, having diameter-to-thickness ratios of 238 and 192. The calculations are carried out following two approaches: (1) using a nonlinear, elastic-plastic algorithm that accounts for changes in geometry, and (2) using elastic stresses in the undeformed geometry, which is the commonly used approach. The results show that, when the two geometries are subjected to the same initial and cyclic pressures, shakedown is achieved by the first approach but not by the second. Since real heads do benefit from geometry changes, and since most design codes require hydro (or proof) tests before operation, the first approach is recommended for the design of torispherical heads.

Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Running head: COGNITIVE ROBOTICS AND EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Computational Modeling/Cognitive Robotics Compliments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Running head: COGNITIVE ROBOTICS AND EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Computational Modeling/Cognitive;Cognitive Robotics and Experimental Psychology 2 Abstract This position paper explores the possible contributions to the science of psychology from insights obtained by building and experimenting with cognitive

Memphis, University of

420

An analytical study of rail grinding optimization for rail-head fatigue defect prevention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and increased train traffic on the remaining routes. These changes in railroad industry practice have caused an increase in the rate of occurrence of rail head fatigue defects, one potential cause of train derailment. The primary form of maintenance employed...

Jones, Scott Laurence

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The dynamics of the human head during natural activities that require clear vision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current understanding of the dynamics of the human head, and the demands placed on its control and stability systems, is based largely on the results of experiments conducted in artificial settings, such as when subjects ...

Bates, Warren (Warren W.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Viewpoint-Invariant Learning and Detection of Human Heads M. Weber W. Einhauser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Viewpoint-Invariant Learning and Detection of Human Heads M. Weber W. Einh¨auser California on histograms of feature detectors to address the same prob- lem. Burl, Leung, Weber and Perona [1] additionally

Perona, Pietro

423

Artificial gravity : changing the intensity of coriolis cross-coupled stimulus with head-angle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Artificial Gravity (AG) created by high-speed rotation is a promising method for preventing the serious deconditioning associated with prolonged exposure to weightlessness. Unfortunately, head-movements in a rotating ...

Adenot, Sophie, 1982-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Running head: GEOTHERMAL POWER PRODUCTION 1 Geothermal Power Production for Emmonak, Alaska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

January 2009. This paper researches the possibility of using geothermal energy as an alternative energy Energy Investment cost .................................................... 40 Geothermal use in AlaskaRunning head: GEOTHERMAL POWER PRODUCTION 1 Geothermal Power Production for Emmonak, Alaska Anthony

Scheel, David

425

TO: Deans, Directors and Department Heads FROM: Charles Eaton, Interim Controller and Director of Accounting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TO: Deans, Directors and Department Heads FROM: Charles Eaton, Interim Controller and Director in the current fiscal year. Purchase Requisitions: Purchases under $10,000 (Includes Corporate Express) June 11

Holsinger, Kent

426

Physical and Numerical Space Running Head: Biases in Physical and Numerical Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical and Numerical Space 1 Running Head: Biases in Physical and Numerical Space Elementary school children's attentional biases in physical and numerical space Tilbe Göksun: April 30, 2012 #12; Physical and Numerical Space 2 Abstract Numbers

Chatterjee, Anjan

427

anne-sylvie catherin head: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 313 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

428

advanced non-nasopharyngeal head: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and ecological analyses. In A. Kirlik (Ed Gray, Wayne 205 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

429

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced head-and-neck cancer Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cancer Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced head-and-neck cancer Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Patient geometry-driven...

430

Does UV disinfection compromise sutures? An evaluation of tissue response and suture retention in salmon surgically implanted with transmitters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can be used as a tool to disinfect surgery tools used for implanting transmitters into fish. However, the use of UVR could possibly degrade monofilament suture material used to close surgical incisions. This research examined the effect of UVR on monofilament sutures to determine if they were compromised and negatively influenced tag and suture retention, incision openness, or tissue reaction. Eighty juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were surgically implanted with an acoustic transmitter and a passive integrated transponder. The incision was closed with a single stitch of either a suture exposed to 20 doses of UV radiation (5 minute duration per dose) or a new, sterile suture. Fish were then held for 28 d and examined under a microscope at day 7, 14, 21 and 28 for incision openness, ulceration, redness, and the presence of water mold. There was no significant difference between treatments for incision openness, redness, ulceration or the presence of water mold on any examination day. On day 28 post-surgery, there were no lost sutures; however, 2 fish lost their transmitters (one from each treatment). The results of this study do not show any differences in negative influences such as tissue response, suture retention or tag retention between a new sterile suture and a suture disinfected with UVR.

Walker, Ricardo W.; Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.; Eppard, M. B.; Cooke, Steven J.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Swimming speed and stamina in head started Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys Kempi)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SWIMMING SPEED AND STAMINA IN HEAD STARTED KEMP'S RIDLEY SEA TURTLES (LEPIDOCHELYS KEMPI) A Thesis by ERICH KURT STABENAU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER QF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences SWIMMING SPEED AND STAMINA IN HEAD STARTED KEMP'S RIDLEY SEA TURTLES (LEPIDOCHELYS KEMPI) A Thesis by ERICH KURT STABENAU Approved as to style and content by: Andre M...

Stabenau, Erich Kurt

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Effects of Parent Expectations and Involvement on the School Readiness of Children in Head Start  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF PARENT EXPECTATIONS AND INVOLVEMENT ON THE SCHOOL READINESS OF CHILDREN IN HEAD START A Dissertation by KRYSTAL TISHA? COOK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of children enrolled in Head Start. The study examined how these iv parent variables were related to children?s school readiness, and differences between ethnic groups, gender groups, and level of risk. The study tested a model whereby the effect...

Cook, Krystal Tisha'

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

433

EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRITICAL HEAT FLUX WITH ALUMINA-WATER NANOFLUIDS IN DOWNWARD-FACING CHANNELS FOR IN-VESSEL RETENTION APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Critical Heat Flux (CHF) of water with dispersed alumina nanoparticles was measured for the geometry and flow conditions relevant to the In-Vessel Retention (IVR) situation which can occur during core melting sequences ...

Park, R.J.

434

Exhibit 1C Patent Rights-Retention by the Seller (Short Form) UT-B Contracts Div Page 1 of 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exhibit 1C ­ Patent Rights-Retention by the Seller (Short Form) UT-B Contracts Div Mar 2001 Page 1 of 3 ex1C-mar01format2005 Exhibit 1C Ref: DEAR 952.227-11 PATENT RIGHTS - RETENTION BY THE SELLER be patentable or otherwise protectable under title 35 of the United States Code, or any novel variety of plant

Pennycook, Steve

435

Data evaluation technical memorandum on the K-1407C Retention Basin at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The K-1407-C Retention Basin was a surface impoundment at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The basin was used primarily for storing potassium hydroxide scrubber sludge generated at the K-25 Site. In addition, from 1960 to 1973, metal hydroxide sludges that were removed from the K-1407-B Holding Pond were discharged to the K-1407-C Retention Basin. The sludge in the K-1407-B Pond contained discharge from the K-1420 Decontamination and Uranium Recovery, the K-1501 Steam Plant, the K-1413 Laboratory, and the K-1401 Maintenance Building. Radioactive material is also present in the K-1407-C Retention Basin, probably the result of cleaning and decontamination activities at some of the aforementioned facilities. The discharge of waste materials to K-1407-C was discontinued before November of 1988, and all sludge was removed from the retention basin. Some of the sludge was stored, and the remainder was fixed in concrete. This report is specific to the K-1407-C Retention Basin and includes information pertinent to the evaluation of soil contamination. The focus of this evaluation is the effectiveness of the Phase 1 investigation of the K-1407-C Retention Basin to define site conditions adequately to support decisions regarding appropriate closure alternatives. This includes the physical characterization of the site area and the characterization of the nature and extent of contamination at the site in relation to risk characterization and statistical evaluation.

Beal, D.; Bock, J.; Hatmaker, T.; Zolyniak, J.; Goddard, P. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)); Kucsmas, D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Data evaluation technical memorandum on the K-1407C Retention Basin at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The K-1407-C Retention Basin was a surface impoundment at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The basin was used primarily for storing potassium hydroxide scrubber sludge generated at the K-25 Site. In addition, from 1960 to 1973, metal hydroxide sludges that were removed from the K-1407-B Holding Pond were discharged to the K-1407-C Retention Basin. The sludge in the K-1407-B Pond contained discharge from the K-1420 Decontamination and Uranium Recovery, the K-1501 Steam Plant, the K-1413 Laboratory, and the K-1401 Maintenance Building. Radioactive material is also present in the K-1407-C Retention Basin, probably the result of cleaning and decontamination activities at some of the aforementioned facilities. The discharge of waste materials to K-1407-C was discontinued before November of 1988, and all sludge was removed from the retention basin. Some of the sludge was stored, and the remainder was fixed in concrete. This report is specific to the K-1407-C Retention Basin and includes information pertinent to the evaluation of soil contamination. The focus of this evaluation is the effectiveness of the Phase 1 investigation of the K-1407-C Retention Basin to define site conditions adequately to support decisions regarding appropriate closure alternatives. This includes the physical characterization of the site area and the characterization of the nature and extent of contamination at the site in relation to risk characterization and statistical evaluation.

Beal, D.; Bock, J.; Hatmaker, T.; Zolyniak, J.; Goddard, P. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Kucsmas, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Comparison of Deuterium Retention for Ion-irradiated and Neutron-irradiated Tungsten  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of D retention for Fe{sup 2+}-irradiated tungsten with a damage of 0.025-3 dpa was compared with that for neutron-irradiated tungsten with 0.025 dpa. The D{sub 2} thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) spectra for Fe{sup 2+}-irradiated tungsten consisted of two desorption stages at 450 and 550 K, while that for neutron-irradiated tungsten was composed of three stages and an addition desorption stage was found at 750 K. The desorption rate of the major desorption stage at 550K increased as the displacement damage increased due to Fe{sup 2+} irradiation increasing. In addition, the first desorption stage at 450K was found only for damaged samples. Therefore, the second stage would be based on intrinsic defects or vacancy produced by Fe{sup 2+} irradiation, and the first stage should be the accumulation of D in mono-vacancy and the activation energy would be relatively reduced, where the dislocation loop and vacancy is produced. The third one was found only for neutron irradiation, showing the D trapping by a void or vacancy cluster, and the diffusion effect is also contributed to by the high full-width at half-maximum of the TDS spectrum. Therefore, it can be said that the D{sub 2} TDS spectra for Fe{sup 2+}-irradiated tungsten cannot represent that for the neutron-irradiated one, indicating that the deuterium trapping and desorption mechanism for neutron-irradiated tungsten is different from that for the ion-irradiated one.

Yasuhisa Oya; Masashi Shimada; Makoto Kobayashi; Takuji Oda; Masanori Hara; Hideo Watanabe; Yuji Hatano; Pattrick Calderoni; Kenji Okuno

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Pretreatment Nomogram to Predict the Risk of Acute Urinary Retention After I-125 Prostate Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Acute urinary retention (AUR) after iodine-125 (I-125) prostate brachytherapy negatively influences long-term quality of life and therefore should be prevented. We aimed to develop a nomogram to preoperatively predict the risk of AUR. Methods: Using the preoperative data of 714 consecutive patients who underwent I-125 prostate brachytherapy between 2005 and 2008 at our department, we modeled the probability of AUR. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess the predictive ability of a set of pretreatment predictors and the additional value of a new risk factor (the extent of prostate protrusion into the bladder). The performance of the final model was assessed with calibration and discrimination measures. Results: Of the 714 patients, 57 patients (8.0%) developed AUR after implantation. Multivariate analysis showed that the combination of prostate volume, IPSS score, neoadjuvant hormonal treatment and the extent of prostate protrusion contribute to the prediction of AUR. The discriminative value (receiver operator characteristic area, ROC) of the basic model (including prostate volume, International Prostate Symptom Score, and neoadjuvant hormonal treatment) to predict the development of AUR was 0.70. The addition of prostate protrusion significantly increased the discriminative power of the model (ROC 0.82). Calibration of this final model was good. The nomogram showed that among patients with a low sum score (<18 points), the risk of AUR was only 0%-5%. However, in patients with a high sum score (>35 points), the risk of AUR was more than 20%. Conclusion: This nomogram is a useful tool for physicians to predict the risk of AUR after I-125 prostate brachytherapy. The nomogram can aid in individualized treatment decision-making and patient counseling.

Roeloffzen, Ellen M., E-mail: e.m.a.roeloffzen@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Vulpen, Marco van; Battermann, Jan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Roermund, Joep G. van [Department of Urology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Saibishkumar, Elantholi P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Monninkhof, Evelyn M. [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Retention of Anionic Species on Granite: Influence of Granite Composition - 12129  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technetium (Tc-99, T{sub 1/2} = 2.1.10{sup 5} yrs) and selenium (Se-79, T{sub 1/2} = 6.5.10{sup 4} yrs) belong among fission products, being produced by fission of nuclear fuel. Both elements can significantly contribute to risk due to their complicated chemistry, long life times, high mobility and prevailing anionic character. Therefore, knowledge of migration behaviour under different conditions can significantly improve input into performance and safety assessment models. Granite is considered as a potential host rock for deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in many countries. Granitic rocks consist usually of quartz, feldspar, plagioclase (main components), mica, chlorite, kaolinite (minor components). The main feature of the rock is advection governed transport in fractures, complemented with diffusion process from fracture towards undisturbed rock matrix. The presented work is focused on interaction of anionic species (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) with granitic rock. Furthermore, the importance of mineral composition on sorption of anionic species was also studied. The batch sorption experiments were conducted on the crushed granite from Bohemian Massive. Five fractions with defined grain size were used for static batch method. Mineral composition of each granitic fraction was evaluated using X-ray diffraction. The results showed differences in composition of granitic fractions, even though originating from one homogenized material. Sorption experiments showed influence of granite composition on adsorption of both TcO4{sup -} and SeO3{sup 2-} on granitic rock. Generally, Se(IV) showed higher retention than Tc(VII). Se(VI) was not almost sorbed at all. Fe containing minerals are pronounced as a selective Se and Tc sorbent, being reduced on their surface. As micas in granite are usually enriched in Fe, increased sorption of anionic species onto mica enriched fractions can be explained by this reason. On the other hand, fractions enriched in feldspar did not show increased sorption affinity to Tc and Se. (authors)

Videnska, Katerina [Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Havlova, Vaclava [Nuclear Research Institute Rez, Rez, 25068 (Czech Republic)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Accelerated Life Structural Benchmark Testing for a Stirling Convertor Heater Head  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For proposed long-duration NASA Space Science missions, the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Infinia Corporation, and NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a high-efficiency, 110-watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110). A structurally significant limit state for the SRG110 heater head component is creep deformation induced at high material temperature and low stress level. Conventional investigations of creep behavior adequately rely on experimental results from uniaxial creep specimens, and a wealth of creep data is available for the Inconel 718 material of construction. However, the specified atypical thin heater head material is fine-grained with a heat treatment that limits precipitate growth, and little creep property data for this microstructure is available in the literature. In addition, the geometry and loading conditions apply a multiaxial stress state on the component, far from the conditions of uniaxial testing. For these reasons, an extensive experimental investigation is ongoing to aid in accurately assessing the durability of the SRG110 heater head. This investigation supplements uniaxial creep testing with pneumatic testing of heater head-like pressure vessels at design temperature with stress levels ranging from approximately the design stress to several times that. This paper presents experimental results, post-test microstructural analyses, and conclusions for four higher-stress, accelerated life tests. Analysts are using these results to calibrate deterministic and probabilistic analytical creep models of the SRG110 heater head.

Krause, David L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135 (United States); Kantzos, Pete T. [Ohio Aerospace Institute, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Internal strain regulates the nucleotide binding site of the kinesin leading head  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the presence of ATP, kinesin proceeds along the protofilament of microtubule by alternated binding of two motor domains on the tubulin binding sites. Since the processivity of kinesin is much higher than other motor proteins, it has been speculated that there exists a mechanism for allosteric regulation between the two monomers. Recent experiments suggest that ATP binding to the leading head domain in kinesin is regulated by the rearward strain built on the neck-linker. We test this hypothesis by explicitly modeling a $C_{\\alpha}$-based kinesin structure whose both motor domains are bound on the tubulin binding sites. The equilibrium structures of kinesin on the microtubule show disordered and ordered neck-linker configurations for the leading and the trailing head, respectively. The comparison of the structures between the two heads shows that several native contacts present at the nucleotide binding site in the leading head are less intact than those in the binding site of the rear head. The network of n...

Hyeon, Changbong; 10.1073/pnas.0610939104

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Head/tail Breaks for Visualization of City Structure and Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The things surrounding us vary dramatically, which implies that there are far more small things than large ones, e.g., far more small cities than large ones in the world. This dramatic variation is often referred to as fractal or scaling. To better reveal the fractal or scaling structure, a new classification scheme, namely head/tail breaks, has been developed to recursively derive different classes or hierarchical levels. The head/tail breaks works as such: divide things into a few large ones in the head (those above the average) and many small ones (those below the average) in the tail, and recursively continue the dividing process for the large ones (or the head) until the notion of far more small things than large ones has been violated. This paper attempts to argue that head/tail breaks can be a powerful visualization tool for illustrating structure and dynamics of natural cities. Natural cities refer to naturally or objectively defined human settlements based on a meaningful cutoff averaged from a massi...

Jiang, Bin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Evaluation of preharvest chemical dessication and module storage of grain sorghum head chop when fed to cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVALUATION OF PHEHARVEST CHEMICAL DESSICATION AND MODULE STORAGE OF GRAIN SORGHUM HEAD CHOP WHEN FED TO CATTLE A Thesis by WALTER LOUIS DAVIS Approved as to style and content bye Chairman of Committee Head of D rtment Member ~c'p Jft ~Is... ~it 8 & ~ Member December 1979 i242841 ABS TRAC T Evaluation of Preharvest Chemical Dessication and Module Storage of Grain Sorghum Head Chop When Fed to Cattle. (December 1979) Walter Louis Davis, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman...

Davis, Walter Louis

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Results of Large-Scale Testing on Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Retention and Release  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in tanks at the Hanford Site. The waste treatment process in the pretreatment facility will mix both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries in large process tanks. Process vessels mixing non-Newtonian slurries will use pulse jet mixers (PJMs), air sparging, and recirculation pumps. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the process streams to prevent surface foaming, but may also increase gas holdup and retention within the slurry. The work described in this report addresses gas retention and release in simulants with AFA through testing and analytical studies. Gas holdup and release tests were conducted in a 1/4-scale replica of the lag storage vessel operated in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Applied Process Engineering Laboratory using a kaolin/bentonite clay and AZ-101 HLW chemical simulant with non-Newtonian rheological properties representative of actual waste slurries. Additional tests were performed in a small-scale mixing vessel in the PNNL Physical Sciences Building using liquids and slurries representing major components of typical WTP waste streams. Analytical studies were directed at discovering how the effect of AFA might depend on gas composition and predicting the effect of AFA on gas retention and release in the full-scale plant, including the effects of mass transfer to the sparge air. The work at PNNL was part of a larger program that included tests conducted at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that is being reported separately. SRNL conducted gas holdup tests in a small-scale mixing vessel using the AZ-101 high-level waste (HLW) chemical simulant to investigate the effects of different AFAs, their components, and of adding noble metals. Full-scale, single-sparger mass transfer tests were also conducted at SRNL in water and AZ-101 HLW simulant to provide data for PNNL’s WTP gas retention and release modeling.

Stewart, Charles W.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Arm, Stuart T.; Butcher, Mark G.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Park, Walter R.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Su, Yin-Fong; Wend, Christopher F.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Cooley, Scott K.; Hurley, David E.; Johnson, Christian D.; Reid, Larry D.; Smith, Harry D.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

2008-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

445

May 21, 2012, Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Focus Group Work Force Retention Work Group Charter  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopment AccidentEnergyBioenergy16-11 HSSWork Force Retention

446

A study to determine the most effective actuation valve and water distribution head combination for emergency showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for corrosion and wear. Pressure test to determine strength. (5) Remove shower head and dismantle. Clean scale and rust, from the head inlet and from the slots or orifices in the baffle plate. (6) Reassemble. (7) Open OSBY valve and replace seal..., and orifice sprinkler water distribution heads to determine which valve/head combination produced the greatest flow rate at varying static water pressures. Flow rates were measured at static pressures of 20, 30. 40, 50, and 60 pounds per square inch gauge...

Presswood, James Columbus

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Evaluating the Impact of Head Rotation Amplification on Virtual Reality Training Effectiveness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Virtual reality (VR) systems have been proposed for use in numerous training scenarios, such as room clearing, which require the trainee to maintain spatial awareness. But many VR training systems lack a fully surrounding display, requiring trainees to use a combination of physical and virtual turns to view the environment, thus decreasing spatial awareness. One solution to this problem is to amplify head rotations, such that smaller physical turns are mapped to larger virtual turns, allowing trainees to view the surrounding environment with head movements alone. For example, in a multi-monitor system covering only a 90-degree field of regard, head rotations could be amplified four times to allow the user to see the entire 360-degree surrounding environment. This solution is attractive because it can be used with lower-cost VR systems and does not require virtual turning. However, the effects of amplified head rotations on spatial awareness and training transfer are not well understood. We hypothesized that small amounts of amplification might be tolerable, but that larger amplifications might cause trainees to become disoriented and to have decreased task performance and training transfer. In this paper, we will present our findings from an experiment designed to investigate these hypotheses. The experiment placed users in a virtual warehouse and asked them to move from room to room, counting objects placed around them in space. We varied the amount of amplification applied during these trials, and also varied the type of display used (head-mounted display or CAVE). We measured task performance and spatial awareness. We then assessed training transfer in an assessment environment with a fully surrounding display and no amplification. The results of this study will inform VR training system developers about the potential negative effects of using head rotation amplification and contribute to more effective VR training system design.

Ragan, Eric D [ORNL] [ORNL; Bowman, Doug A [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Scerbo, Siroberto [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Bacim, Felipe [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine's crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages.

Boggs, David Lee (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Baraszu, Daniel James (Plymouth, MI); Foulkes, David Mark (Erfstadt, DE); Gomes, Enio Goyannes (Ann Arbor, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine`s crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages. 4 figs.

Boggs, D.L.; Baraszu, D.J.; Foulkes, D.M.; Gomes, E.G.

1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

450

Methods for characterizing magnetic footprints of perpendicular magnetic recording writer heads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the magnetic footprints, along with some of its dynamic features in recording process, of perpendicular magnetic recording writer heads have been characterized by using three different techniques. Those techniques are the spin-stand stationary footprint technique, the spin-stand dynamic footprint technique, and the coherent writing technique combined with magnetic force microscope imaging method. The characteristics of those techniques have been compared to one another. It was found experimentally that the spin-stand stationary method could not precisely catch some peculiar recording dynamics of the write heads in certain conditions. The advantages and disadvantages among all those techniques are also examined and discussed in detail.

Li, Shaoping, E-mail: shaoping.li@wdc.com; Lin, Ed; George, Zach; Terrill, Dave; Mendez, H.; Santucci, J.; Yie, Derek [Western Digital Corp., 44100 Osgood Road, Fremont, California 94539 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

451

The nerve supply to the major organs and tissues of the caprine head  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. be r ) 111 ABST!'!ACT The !?erve Supply to the '. !ajor Cvr?gans Tissues of the Capiine Head. (!Iay 1969) Michael Edward 1'atum, B. S. , D. y. i!. , Texas . ?L 0 1I '. Jniversity Dir' cted by: Dr. John H. I?Iilliff Dissections were performed... of the American Veterinary 11edical A. ', woe i at ion . " Determining the course and distribution of the cra- n'al nerves in the head reg!on often presents a problem for the studcn. of veterinary aratomy. This is especial- ly true in ruminant dissections...

Tatum, Michael Edward

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Environmental measurement-while-drilling-gamma ray spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system technology demonstration plan for use at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling-Gamma Ray Spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides the capability of producing real-time environmental and drillbit data during drilling operations. This demonstration plan presents information on the EMWD-GRS technology, demonstration design, Cs-137 contamination at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin, responsibilities of demonstration participants, and the policies and procedures for the demonstration to be conducted at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin. The EMWD-GRS technology demonstration will consist of continuously monitoring for gamma-radiation contamination while drilling two horizontal boreholes below the backfilled retention basin. These boreholes will pass near previously sampled vertical borehole locations where concentrations of contaminant levels are known. Contaminant levels continuously recorded by the EMWD-GRS system during drilling will be compared to contaminant levels previously determined through quantitative laboratory analysis of soil samples.

Williams, C.V.; Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gruebel, R.D. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

A SMALL PORTABLE DETECTOR HEAD USING MIS-CONTACTED CdTe FOR X-RAY SPECTROMETRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

339 A SMALL PORTABLE DETECTOR HEAD USING MIS-CONTACTED CdTe FOR X-RAY SPECTROMETRY P. EICHINGER for semiconductor radiation detectors is discussed. A versatile head consisting of a 2 mm thick, 10 mm diameter CdTe and its applica- tion to CdTe and CdS has already been published [2, 3], but because of the many

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

454

Influence of tissue conductivity anisotropy on EEG/MEG field and return current computation in a realistic head model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

brain using potential differences and/or magnetic fluxes measured non- invasively directly from the head in a realistic head model: A simulation and visualization study using high-resolution finite element modeling C 3493, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA c Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Utah, University of

455

POLICIES AND PROCESSES FOR THE APPROVAL OF OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR Departmental Head Advisor Approved Petitions and Forms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advisor Approved Petitions and Forms The College of Agricultural Sciences distributes approval for the following Office of the Registrar petitions and forms to the departmental head advisors, only. Please note that some forms contain sections requiring college head advisor approval, and some have time limitations

Tullos, Desiree

456

Head-Loss Calculations Question: Gudwanwadi, of population 400, is to be served by a piped water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Head-Loss Calculations Question: Gudwanwadi, of population 400, is to be served by a piped water away from a tank which is about 20m above Gudwanwadi. The supply comes in a pipe with cross-section 20 sq.cm. The head-loss in this pipe is roughly 2m per km. per meter/sec of velocity of water through

Sohoni, Milind

457

Modeling of an eye-imaging system for optimizing illumination schemes in an eye-tracked head-mounted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of an eye-imaging system for optimizing illumination schemes in an eye-tracked head While the augmentation of head-mounted displays (HMDs) with eye-tracking (ET) capabilities adds of illumination schemes in an ET-HMD system, we present a simulated eye illumination and imaging system, which

Hua, Hong

458

Melodic cues to meter 1 Running Head: MELODIC CUES TO METER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Melodic cues to meter 1 Running Head: MELODIC CUES TO METER The Role of Melodic and Temporal Cues in Perceiving Musical Meter Erin E. Hannon Cornell University Joel S. Snyder Cornell University Tuomas Eerola-569-4326 Tel: 905-828-5415 E-mail: eeh5@cornell.edu #12;Melodic cues to meter 2 Abstract A number of different

Ahmad, Sajjad

459

Heatup of the TMI-2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) lower head during core relocation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to current perceptions of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident, corium largely relocated into the reactor vessel lower head at {approximately}224 min into the accident. Defueling examinations have revealed that the corium relocated from the molten core region to the lower head predominantly by way of drainage through the core former region (CFR) located between the vertical baffle plates immediately surrounding the fuel assemblies and the core barrel. An analysis has been carried out to assess the heatup of the reactor vessel lower head during the core relocation event, particularly the potential for a melting attack on the lower head wall and the in-core instrument nozzle penetration weldments. The analysis employed the THIRMAL computer code developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to predict the breakup and quenching or corium jets under film boiling conditions as well as the size distributions and quenching of the resultant molten droplets. The transient heatup and ablation of the vessel wall and penetration weldments due to impinging corium jets was calculated using the MISTI computer code.

Wang, S.K.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W. (Argonne National Laboratory, IL (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Independent Component Analysis For EEG Source Localization In Realistic Head Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Independent Component Analysis For EEG Source Localization In Realistic Head Models Leonid Zhukov Abstract-- A pervasive problem in neuroscience is determining which regions of the brain are active, given within the brain from electroencephalo- graphic (EEG) recordings is an ill-posed problem. Specifi- cally

Utah, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "retention head burner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Independent Component Analysis For EEG Source Localization In Realistic Head Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Independent Component Analysis For EEG Source Localization In Realistic Head Models Leonid Zhukov Abstract--- A pervasive problem in neuroscience is determining which regions of the brain are active, given within the brain from electroencephalo­ graphic (EEG) recordings is an ill­posed problem. Specifi­ cally

Utah, University of

462

Effective scattering coefficient of the cerebral spinal fluid in adult head models for diffuse optical imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

correct radiative transport equation (RTE); however, it is commonly assumed that scattering lengths must. Boas An efficient computation of the time-dependent forward solution for photon transport in a head of the brain. The diffusion approximation to photon transport is much faster to simulate than the physically

463

SAFETY RESPONSIBILITIES Vice Chancellors, Deans, Directors, and Department Heads shall implement the safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAFETY RESPONSIBILITIES Vice Chancellors, Deans, Directors, and Department Heads shall implement the safety program in their areas of administrative responsibility and are responsible for the safety for the safety of the personnel under their supervision and will: · Train employees in the safe use of equipment

464

OSU Council of Head Advisors Spring 2006 OSU Advisor-Advisee Responsibilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OSU Council of Head Advisors ­ Spring 2006 OSU Advisor-Advisee Responsibilities As an advisee, you accurate and truthful information when being advised. Initiate a purposeful relationship with your advisor during advising sessions. Your advisor should: Develop a purposeful relationship with and be an advocate

Escher, Christine

465

Mind Perception and Objectification 1 Running Head: Mind Perception and Objectification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mind Perception and Objectification 1 Running Head: Mind Perception and Objectification More than a Body: Mind Perception and the Nature of Objectification Kurt Gray1, Joshua Knobe2, Mark Sheskin2, Paul@umd.edu #12;Mind Perception and Objectification 2 Abstract According to models of objectification, viewing

Knobe, Joshua

466

J Comp Physiol A (1988) 163:151-165 Mechanosensory control of compensatory head roll  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

load of the two wings elicits a transient head roll partly compensating a banked attitude (Figs. 4-6). The majority of campaniform sensilla at the wing base seems suitable to measure wing load. 5. Steady roll change of the flight attitude, for example by turbulence (Hengstenberg et al. 1986). Yaw turns are ulti

467

Late-to Post-Cretaceous Inversion of the British Isles Tectonic Stylolites at Flamborough Head  

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not much is known about younger inversion events in the UK. Industrial: A lot of the oil and gas traps. Geology 36(11), 839-842. Koehn, D., Renard, F., Toussaint, R., Passchier, C.W. (2007) Growth of stylolite at Flamborough Head, U.K. Journal of Structural Geology 16, 97-107. Application procedure and deadlines

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M.K. Johnson et al. 1 Running Head: COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE OF MEMORY  

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M.K. Johnson et al. 1 Running Head: COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE OF MEMORY In Press. In R. F. Belli (Ed on Motivation, Vol. 58. The Cognitive Neuroscience of True and False Memories Marcia K. Johnson, Carol L. Raye, Karen J. Mitchell, & Elizabeth Ankudowich Yale University Send correspondence to: Marcia K. Johnson

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Prediction Error and Event Boundaries 1 Running Head: PREDICTION ERROR AND EVENT BOUNDARIES  

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Prediction Error and Event Boundaries 1 Running Head: PREDICTION ERROR AND EVENT BOUNDARIES A computational model of event segmentation from perceptual prediction. Jeremy R. Reynolds, Jeffrey M. Zacks, and Todd S. Braver Washington University Manuscript #12;Prediction Error and Event Boundaries 2 People tend

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J. Mol. Biol. (1976) 108, 139-150 Head to Tail Polymerization of Actin  

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J. Mol. Biol. (1976) 108, 139-150 Head to Tail Polymerization of Actin ALBRECHTWEGNER Department actin monomers to solutions of polymeric actin. The incoqooration and release of subunits can be explained by a polymerization mechanism in which the filaments grow at one end and shorten simultaneously

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UNITED INDIA INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED REGISTERED & HEAD OFFICE: 24, WHITES ROAD, CHENNAI-600014  

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UNITED INDIA INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED REGISTERED & HEAD OFFICE: 24, WHITES ROAD, CHENNAI-600014 HEALTH INSURANCE POLICY ­ GROUP 1 WHEREAS the insured designated in the Schedule hereto has by a proposal to be incorporated herein has applied to UNITED INDIA INSURANCE COMPANY LTD. (hereinafter called the COMPANY

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To: Officers, Deans, Department Heads, and Department Administrators From: Diane Devlin, Purchasing Director  

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To: Officers, Deans, Department Heads, and Department Administrators From: Diane Devlin, Purchasing BY THE PURCHASING OFFICE NO LATER THAN FRIDAY, MAY 16, 2014. Certain commodity items may require longer lead times for such items should be received by the purchasing office no later than MONDAY, MAY 5, 2014. ITEMS OR SERVICES

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Running Head: PHENOMENOLOGY OF FEELINGS 1 Toward a Phenomenology of Feelings  

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Running Head: PHENOMENOLOGY OF FEELINGS 1 Toward a Phenomenology of Feelings Christopher L. Heavey 455030, Las Vegas, NV 89154- 5030. E-mail: chris.heavey@unlv.edu #12;PHENOMENOLOGY OF FEELINGS 2 Abstract present a preliminary phenomenology of feelings. We begin by observing that often feelings do occur

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474

Measurements on 5:1 Scale Abrasive Water Jet Cutting Head Models  

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nozzle orifice s Isentropic (e.g. in w.jet.s) w.jet Water jet water Water Superscripts: * Symbol for non, an achievable accuracy also mentioned by Hashish in [7]. Improving the AWJ cutting process in a way that parts with precise accuracy of motion, a precisely manufactured tool (cutting head) and optimally set machining

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CASING-HEADING PHENOMENON IN GAS-LIFTED WELL AS A LIMIT CYCLE OF A  

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, France CSTJF, TOTAL Exploration-Production, Pau, France Abstract: Oil well instabilities cause production losses. One of these instabilities, referred to as the "casing-heading" is an oscillatory: Process Control, Dynamic Systems, Limit Cycles, Switching System, Gas-Lifted Well. 1. INTRODUCTION

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PHENOLOGY AND BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD PARASITISM B.A., University of Colorado, 2003  

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PHENOLOGY AND BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD PARASITISM by TY TUFF B.A., University of Colorado, 2003 A thesis submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of the University of Colorado in partial, to evaluate the impact of parasitism on two local hosts in the Colorado Front Range: the primary host

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Professor Veronica HoPe Hailey Dean & Head of the School of Management  

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Professor Veronica HoPe Hailey Dean & Head of the School of Management In attendance V eronica's research focuses on the link between Business Strategy, HR Strategy and Change Management. She is particularly interested in the relationship between organisational change and individual transition. She

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Making the abstract concrete 1 Running head: VISUALIZING MATHEMATICAL SOLUTION PROCEDURES  

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Making the abstract concrete 1 Running head: VISUALIZING MATHEMATICAL SOLUTION PROCEDURES Making the Abstract Concrete: Visualizing Mathematical Solution Procedures Katharina Scheiter University of Tuebingen) (2006) 9-25" DOI : 10.1016/j.chb.2005.01.009 #12;Making the abstract concrete 2 Abstract This article

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