National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for retail stores laundries

  1. Net-Zero Energy Retail Store Debuts in Illinois

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Walgreens on November 21 opened a net-zero energy retail store in Evanston, Illinois that it anticipates will generate at least as much energy as it consumes over the course of a year.

  2. Mountain Retail Stores Become Showcase for Solar Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mountain Retail Stores Become Showcase for Solar Energy Local Officials, Business Leaders to Gather for Groundbreaking Ceremony For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., June 7, 1999 — A retail development owner who wants to set an example is helping make possible a new showcase for energy efficient buildings in the Colorado high country. Ground will be broken June 9 on the BigHorn Home Improvement Center in Silverthorne, which will boast a series of "firsts"

  3. Occupant Perceptions and a Health Outcome in Retail Stores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Mingjie; Kim, Yang-Seon; Srebric, Jelena

    2015-11-02

    Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) in commercial buildings, such as retail stores, can affect employee satisfaction, productivity, and health. This study administered an IEQ survey to retail employees and found correlations between measured IEQ parameters and the survey responses. The survey included 611 employees in 14 retail stores located in Pennsylvania (climate zone 5A) and Texas (climate zone 2A). The survey questionnaire featured ratings of different aspects of IEQ, including thermal comfort, lighting and noise level, indoor smells, overall cleanness, and environmental quality. Simultaneously with the survey, on-site physical measurements were taken to collect data of relative humidity levels, air exchange rates, dry bulb temperatures, and contaminant concentrations. This data was analyzed using multinomial logit regression with independent variables being the measured IEQ parameters, employees’ gender, and age. This study found that employee perception of stuffy smells is related to formaldehyde and PM10 concentrations. Furthermore, the survey also asked the employees to report an annual frequency of common colds as a health indicator. The regression analysis showed that the cold frequency statistically correlates with the measured air exchange rates, outdoor temperatures, and indoor PM concentrations. Overall, the air exchange rate is the most influential parameter on the employee perception of the overall environmental quality and self-reported health outcome.

  4. Ennis Laundry Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ennis Laundry Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ennis Laundry Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Ennis Laundry...

  5. Laundry | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Switching your temperature setting from hot to warm can cut a load's energy use in half. Laundry Tips Wash your clothes in cold water using cold-water detergents whenever possible. ...

  6. Healthy Zero Energy Buildings (HZEB) Program - Cross-Sectional Study of Contaminant Levels, Source, Strengths, and Ventilation Rates in Retail Stores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Sidheswaran, Meera; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William

    2014-02-01

    This field study measured ventilation rates and indoor air quality parameters in 21 visits to retail stores in California. The data was collected to guide the development of new, science-based commercial building ventilation rate standards that balance the dual objectives of increasing energy efficiency and maintaining acceptable indoor air quality. Data collection occurred between September 2011 and March 2013. Three types of stores participated in this study: grocery stores, furniture/hardware stores, and apparel stores. Ventilation rates and indoor air contaminant concentrations were measured on a weekday, typically between 9 am and 6 pm. Ventilation rates measured using a tracer gas decay method exceeded the minimum requirement of California’s Title 24 Standard in all but one store. Even though there was adequate ventilation according to Title 24, concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein exceeded the most stringent chronic health guidelines. Other indoor air contaminants measured included carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O{sub 3}), and particulate matter (PM). Concentrations of CO{sub 2} were kept low by adequate ventilation, and were assumed low also because the sampling occurred on a weekday when retail stores were less busy. CO concentrations were also low. The indoor-outdoor ratios of O{sub 3} showed that the first-order loss rate may vary by store trade types and also by ventilation mode (mechanical versus natural). Analysis of fine and ultrafine PM measurements showed that a substantial portion of the particle mass in grocery stores with cooking-related emissions was in particles less than 0.3 μm. Stores without cooking as an indoor source had PM size distributions that were more similar indoors and outdoors. The whole-building emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and PM were estimated from the measured ventilation rates and indoor and outdoor contaminant concentrations. Mass balance models were

  7. Tips: Laundry | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    your machine will generally do a good job of cleaning your clothes. Switching your temperature setting from hot to warm can cut a load's energy use in half. Laundry Tips Wash...

  8. Retail Replacement Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CALiPER Testing » Application Reports » Retail Replacement Lamps Retail Replacement Lamps Annual CALiPER testing of A19, G25, candelabra, night light, MR16/PAR16, PAR20, and PAR30 replacement lamps - purchased directly from store shelves - offers insights on performance trends from year to year. The report findings offer valuable insights for manufacturers and retailers alike. Retail Lamps Study 3 (48 pages, February 2014) Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality

  9. Promising Technology: Ozone Laundry System for Multiload Clothes Washers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These laundry systems use ozone as the chemical cleaning agent. The system generates ozone by electrifying oxygen in the air, and then dissolves the ozone in water.

  10. Retail Unbundling

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    This special report provides a brief summary of the status of retail unbundling programs (also known as "customer choice" programs) for residential natural gas customers in various states,

  11. Energy Savings Week: Standards for Kitchen and Laundry Products Create Big

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savings | Department of Energy Standards for Kitchen and Laundry Products Create Big Savings Energy Savings Week: Standards for Kitchen and Laundry Products Create Big Savings December 17, 2015 - 1:14pm Addthis Energy Savings Week: Standards for Kitchen and Laundry Products Create Big Savings Energy Savings Week: Standards for Kitchen and Laundry Products Create Big Savings Energy Savings Week: Standards for Kitchen and Laundry Products Create Big Savings Energy Savings Week: Standards for

  12. Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercLaundry | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lectrtyUsePercLaundry" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0...

  13. Mercantile (Retail Other Than Mall) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Other Than Mall) Definition Buildings used for the sale and display of goods other than food. Sub Categories retail store; beer, wine, or liquor store; rental center; dealership or...

  14. Hot Showers, Fresh Laundry, Clean Dishes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hot Showers, Fresh Laundry, Clean Dishes Hot Showers, Fresh Laundry, Clean Dishes March 5, 2013 - 11:17am Addthis The GE GeoSpring™ Electric Heat Pump Water Heater is readily integrated into new and existing home designs. Taking up the same footprint as a traditional 50-gallon tank water heater, the Electric Heat Pump Water Heater uses the existing water heater's plumbing and electrical connections. Credit: GE The GE GeoSpring(tm) Electric Heat Pump Water Heater is readily integrated into

  15. Retail Building Guide for Entrance Energy Efficiency Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, J.; Kung, F.

    2012-03-01

    This booklet is based on the findings of an infiltration analysis for supermarkets and large retail buildings without refrigerated cases. It enables retail building managers and engineers to calculate the energy savings potential for vestibule additions for supermarkets; and bay door operation changes in large retail stores without refrigerated cases. Retail managers can use initial estimates to decide whether to engage vendors or contractors of vestibules for pricing or site-specific analyses, or to decide whether to test bay door operation changes in pilot stores, respectively.

  16. CALiPER Special Summary Report: Retail Replacement Lamp Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-04-01

    CALiPER testing has evaluated many products for commercial lighting markets and found some excellent performers. However, many of these are not available on the retail market. This special testing was undertaken to identify and test solid-state lighting (SSL) replacement lamp products that are available to the general public through retail stores and websites.

  17. IKEA's New Store in Colorado to Feature Geothermal System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IKEA, an international home furnishings retailer, broke ground on its future Denver-area store in Centennial, Colorado. The 415,000-square-foot building is scheduled to open in autumn 2011 as the...

  18. Energy Efficiency and Grid Services for C Stores and Supermakets

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Grid Services For C Stores & Supermarkets Presented By John Wallace Emerson Climate Technologies Retail Solutions July 24, 2015 Filename/Presenter-Topic: 7/31/2015 2 Emerson Confidential Retail Solutions Business At-A-Glance Refrigeration HVAC Lighting IAQ Load Management Store Mechanicals Controls Infrastructure Field Services Enterprise Services Turnkey Projects E-Commissioning N-Commissioning Site Administration Alarm Management Smart Dispatch Setpoint Management Food Quality Reports

  19. Price of Motor Gasoline Through Retail Outlets

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    & Stocks by State (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Data Series: Retail Price - Motor Gasoline Retail Price - Regular Gasoline Retail Price - Midgrade Gasoline Retail Price...

  20. Retailer Energy Alliance Subcommittees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the Retailer Energy Alliances Subcommittees: Lighting and Electrical, Restaurant and Food Preparation, Refrigeration, HVAC, and Whole Building Systems.

  1. Storing Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Chupas, Peter; Proffen, Thomas E.

    2010-05-31

    Researchers have been studying mesoporous materials for almost two decades with a view to using them as hosts for small molecules and scaffolds for molding organic compounds into new hybrid materials and nanoparticles. Their use as potential storage systems for large quantities of hydrogen has also been mooted. Such systems that might hold large quantities of hydrogen safely and in a very compact volume would have enormous potential for powering fuel cell vehicles, for instance. A sponge-like form of silicon dioxide, the stuff of sand particles and computer chips, can soak up and store other compounds including hydrogen. Studies carried out at the XOR/BESSRC 11-ID-B beamline at the APS have revealed that the nanoscopic properties of the hydrogenrich compound ammonia borane help it store hydrogen more efficiently than usual. The material may have potential for addressing the storage issues associated with a future hydrogen economy. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  2. Demonstration of Advanced Technologies for Multi-Load Washers in Hospitality and Healthcare -- Ozone Based Laundry Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Brian K.; Parker, Graham B.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Sullivan, Greg; Goetzler, W.; Sutherland, T. A.; Foley, K. J.

    2014-08-14

    The objective of this demonstration project was to evaluate market-ready retrofit technologies for reducing the energy and water use of multi-load washers in healthcare and hospitality facilities. Specifically, this project evaluated laundry wastewater recycling technology in the hospitality sector and ozone laundry technology in both the healthcare and hospitality sectors. This report documents the demonstration of ozone laundry system installations at the Charleston Place Hotel in Charleston, South Carolina, and the Rogerson House assisted living facility in Boston, Massachusetts.

  3. Innovation for Food Retail: The 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grocery Stores | Department of Energy Innovation for Food Retail: The 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores Innovation for Food Retail: The 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores Find the presentation for the June 3, 2015 webinar on the 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores below. The guide shows practical ways for grocery stores to achieve a 50% energy savings over ASHRAE 90.1-2004 and exceeds the requirements of 90.1-2013. Intended for grocery

  4. Inductive energy stores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poberezhskiy, L.P.

    1982-07-01

    Inductive energy stores research is reviewed. Discharge of the store is considered mathematically. Inductance coils are also discussed.

  5. CALiPER Exploratory Study Retail Replacement Lamps – 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-04-02

    In 2010, CALiPER conducted a study on LED replacement lamps found in retail stores. The results were less than satisfactory, and many products were classified as being unlikely to meet consumer expectations. In November 2011, CALiPER purchased a new sample of products for a follow-up study, with the intent of characterizing the progress of this essential market segment.

  6. Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Laundry | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    trcityUseKwhM2Laundry" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.0...

  7. Information for Retailers of Lighting Products | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products U.S. retailers who sell lighting products can use the...

  8. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Beeson, Tracy A.

    2014-02-01

    The CALiPER program first began investigating LED lamps sold at retail stores in 2010, purchasing 33 products from eight retailers and covering six product categories. The findings revealed a fragmented marketplace, with large disparities in performance of different products, accuracy of manufacturer claims, and offerings from different retail outlets. Although there were some good products, looking back many would not be considered viable competitors to other available options, with too little lumen output, not high enough efficacy, or poor color quality. CALiPER took another look in late 2011purchasing 38 products of five different types from nine retailers and the improvement was marked. Performance was up; retailer claims were more accurate; and the price per lumen and price per unit efficacy were down, although the price per product had not changed much. Nonetheless, there was still plenty of room for improvement, with the performance of LED lamps not yet reaching that of well-established classes of conventional lamps (e.g., 75 W incandescent A19 lamps). Since the second retail lamp study was published in early 2012, there has been substantial progress in all aspects of LED lamps available from retailers. To document this progress, CALiPER again purchased a sample of lamps from retail stores 46 products in total, focusing on A19, PAR30, and MR16 lamps but instead of a random sample, sought to select products to answer specific hypotheses about performance. These hypotheses focused on expanding ranges of LED equivalency, the accuracy of lifetime claims, efficacy and price trends, as well as changes to product designs. Among other results, key findings include: There are now very good LED options to compete with 60 W, 75 W, and 100 W incandescent A19 lamps, and 75 W halogen PAR30 lamps. MR16 lamps have shown less progress, but there are now acceptable alternatives to 35 W, 12 V halogen MR16 lamps and 50 W, 120 V halogen MR16 lamps for some applications. Other

  9. Alliance Laundry Systems to DOE General Counsel; Re:Request for Comment on Large Capacity Clothes Washers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Letter from Alliance Laundry Systems, LLC to DOE General Counsel, Re: Your (DOE's) request of 11-30-2010 Regarding Clothes Washer Test Procedure Waivers. ALS believes that grandfathering all units...

  10. Dominion Retail Inc (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dominion Retail Inc (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dominion Retail Inc Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 1-888-216-3718 Website: www.dominionenergy.comen Outage...

  11. Light-storing photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Junying; Pan Feng; Hao Weichang; Ge Qi; Wang Tianmian

    2004-12-06

    Light-storing photocatalyst was prepared by coating light-storing phosphor and TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst in sequence on ceramic. The light-storing photocatalyst can store light irradiation and emit slowly. Consequently, the photocatalyst remains active when the irradiation source is cut off. Rhodamine B (RhB) can be decomposed efficiently by this photocatalyst in the dark after it absorbs light irradiation. This photocatalyst is photoreactive in an outdoor environment or can save energy by supplying irradiation intermittently for the photocatalyst.

  12. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects: Summary status report: Three Mile Island Unit 2. Radioactive waste and laundry shipments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerge, D. H.; Haffner, D. R.

    1988-06-01

    This document summarizes information concerning radioactive waste and laundry shipments from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 2 to radioactive waste disposal sites and to protective clothing decontamination facilities (laundries) since the loss of coolant accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Data were collected from radioactive shipment records, summarized, and placed in a computerized data information retrieval/manipulation system which permits extraction of specific information. This report covers the period of April 9, 1979 through April 19, 1987. Included in this report are: waste disposal site locations, dose rates, curie content, waste description, container type and number, volumes and weights. This information is presented in two major categories: protective clothing (laundry) and radioactive waste. Each of the waste shipment reports is in chronological order.

  13. Waste from grocery stores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lieb, K.

    1993-11-01

    The Community Recycling Center, Inc., (CRC, Champaign, Ill.), last year conducted a two-week audit of waste generated at two area grocery stores. The stores surveyed are part of a 10-store chain. For two of the Kirby Foods Stores, old corrugated containers (OCC) accounted for 39-45% of all waste. The summary drew correlations between the amount of OCC and the sum of food and garbage waste. The study suggested that one can reasonably estimate volumes of waste based on the amount of OCC because most things come in a box. Auditors set up a series of containers to make the collection process straightforward. Every day the containers were taken to local recycling centers and weighed. Approximate waste breakdowns for the two stores were as follows: 45% OCC; 35% food waste; 20% nonrecyclable or noncompostable items; and 10% other.

  14. Effect of increases in energy-related labor forces upon retailing in Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robicheaux, R.A.

    1983-06-01

    The heightened mining employment that will result from increased extraction of coal from Alabama's Warrior Coal Basin will boost retail sales and employment. The Warrior Coal Basin counties (Fayette, Jefferson, Tuscaloosa and Walker) are heavily dependent upon coal mining as a source of employment and wages. Further, since the counties' economies grew increasingly dependent upon coal mining activities throughout the 1970s, it was believed that it would be possible to measure, with some acceptable level of reliability, the impact of the steadily rising mining activity upon the area's retailing sector. Therefore, a small scale econometric model was developed which represents the interrelationships among income, mining and trade employment and retail sales in the four-county Warrior Coal Basin area. The results of two versions of the model are presented. In the first version, area-wide retail sales are treated in the aggregate. In the second version, retail sales are disaggregated into twelve categories (e.g., food, apparel, furniture, etc.). The models were specified using 1960 to 1976 data. The mining employment growth scenario used in this report called for steady increases in mining employment that culminated in an employment level that is 4000 above the baseline employment projections by 1985. Both versions of the model predicted that cumulative real regional income would increase by $1.39 billion over seven years with the added mining employment. The predicted impacts on trade employment and real retail sales varied between the two models, however. The aggregate model predicts the addition of 7500 trade workers and an additional $1.35 billion in real retail sales. The disaggregate model suggests that food stores, automobile dealers, general merchandise stores, gas stations and lumber and building materials retailers would enjoy the greatest positive benefits.

  15. Category:StandAloneRetail | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IN Duke Energy Indiana Inc.png SVStandAloneRetail Ind... 66 KB SVStandAloneRetail Jackson MS Entergy Mississippi Inc.png SVStandAloneRetail Jac... 63 KB SVStandAloneRetail...

  16. Dominion Retail Inc (Maine) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dominion Retail Inc (Maine) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dominion Retail Inc Place: Maine Phone Number: 1-866-366-4357 Website: www.dom.com Outage Hotline: 1-866-366-4357...

  17. ,"New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail ... 4:27:01 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ...

  18. Storing and transporting energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClaine, Andrew W.; Brown, Kenneth

    2010-09-07

    Among other things, hydrogen is released from water at a first location using energy from a first energy source; the released hydrogen is stored in a metal hydride slurry; and the metal hydride slurry is transported to a second location remote from the first location.

  19. The calm before the storm. [Retail wheeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studness, C.M.

    1993-05-15

    The right to refuse retail wheeling requests is one of the cornerstones of a utility's monopoly power. Utilities have fought staunchly to preserve it, most recently in preventing retail wheeling from becoming an important issue in the congressional debate over deregulation; the Energy Policy Act of 1992 steered clear of it. For the present, the prohibition of retail wheeling gives utilities enormous power over the retail electric power market. The ability to refuse retail wheeling requests, of course, prevents retail customers from buying power from third parties. This enables a utility to sell retail customers all the power it can generate, at a price that covers its cost plus an allowed return-even if its price exceeds that of power available in the wholesale market. The denial of retail wheeling thus protects a utility's inefficiencies, whose price is ultimately shouldered onto customers through cost-plus electric rates. Allowing retail wheeling would remove the foundation for much of the current monopoly power that utilities enjoy. Third parties could sell power to a utility's retail customers, since the utility would be required to wheel it. Retail customers would be able to bypass the local distribution utility to buy power from the cheapest source available. Market forces would drive pricing rather than the cost-plus ratemaking process. A utility whose electric rates were above market would have to meet the competitive price or lose sales.

  20. Factors affecting robust retail energy markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelman, T.S.

    1999-04-01

    This paper briefly defines an active retail market, details the factors that influence market activity and their relative importance, compares activity in various retail energy markets to date, and predicts future retail energy market activity. Three primary factors translate into high market activity: supplier margins, translated into potential savings for actively shopping customers; market size; and market barriers. The author surveys activity nationwide and predicts hot spots for the coming year.

  1. Supply Stores | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supply Stores Supply Stores DOE Self Service Supply Stores at Headquarters Operated by: Base Supply Center and the Winston-Salem Industries for the Blind DOE Self-Service Supply Stores Hours of Operation: 9:00 a.m. through 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday DOE Supply Stores Locations Location Phone Fax Forrestal Room GA-171 (202) 554-1451 (202) 554-1452 (202) 554-7074 Germantown Room R-008 (301) 515-9109 (301) 515-9206 (301) 515-8751 The stores provide an Office Supply Product inventory that is

  2. Dominion Retail Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  3. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LBNL-1470E Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Ranjit Bharvirkar, Grayson Heffner and Charles Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environmental Energy ...

  4. ,"Motor Gasoline Sales Through Retail Outlets Prices "

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Motor Gasoline Sales Through Retail Outlets Prices ",60,"Annual",2014,"6301984" ,"Release...

  5. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Commercial"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Elec Coop, Inc","TX","Cooperative",2528,132247,20623,15.594305 "Green Mountain Energy Company","TX","Retail Energy Provider",48809,3782815,310903,8.2188265 ...

  6. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Residential"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Elec Coop, Inc","TX","Cooperative",39180,688117,81287,11.812962 "Green Mountain Energy Company","TX","Retail Energy Provider",283628,3270075,385380.5,11.785066 ...

  7. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Total"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Elec Coop, Inc","TX","Cooperative",41708,820364,101910,12.422534 "Green Mountain Energy Company","TX","Retail Energy Provider",332437,7052890,696283.5,9.8723148 ...

  8. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Retailer Business Model Conclusion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Retailer Business Model Conclusion, Summary of Retailer Insights.

  9. Information for Retailers of Lighting Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products U.S. retailers who sell lighting products can use the information below to help their customers better understand energy-efficient lighting choices. New information will be added as it becomes available. U.S. retailers are welcome to use parts of these materials in their retail displays. In those cases, please do so without the Department of Energy's name, since we will

  10. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) ...

  11. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Delaware) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Delaware) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Delaware References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  12. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Connecticut) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 212-997-8500...

  13. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (District of Columbia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (District of Columbia) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: District of Columbia References:...

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Florida Furnishing Retailer Relies on

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Natural Gas South Florida Furnishing Retailer Relies on Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Florida Furnishing Retailer Relies on Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Florida Furnishing Retailer Relies on Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Florida Furnishing Retailer Relies on Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Florida Furnishing Retailer Relies on

  15. CPL Retail Energy, LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 13151 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a...

  16. Financial Management for Retail Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Budget History April 9, 2015 - FY 2015 (past) FY 2016 (current) FY 2017 - Dec. 31, 2018 ... retail financial calendars 3.1 Program Benchmarking Calls Q1, Q2 Q1 delayed less than a ...

  17. Texas Retail Energy, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 50046 Utility Location Yes Ownership R ISO Ercot Yes ISO NY Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help...

  18. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-02-01

    This is a special CALiPER report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. It follows similar reports published in 2011 and 2012 (products purchased in 2010 and 2011), and is intended as a continuation that identifies long-term trends. For this report, products were selected to investigate specific hypotheses, rather than represent a sample of the increasingly large retail LED market.

  19. Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaOtherRetail Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Other retail Pages using the...

  20. Texas Retail Energy, LLC (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Retail Energy, LLC (Texas) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Texas Retail Energy, LLC Address: 2001 SE 10th St Place: Bentonville, AR Zip: 72712 Phone Number: (479) 204-0845...

  1. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maine) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maine) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Maine Phone Number: 1-800-437-7645 Website:...

  2. ,"New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail ... 4:27:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail ...

  3. The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview of Policy, Practice and Issues The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview of Policy, Practice and ...

  4. Retail wheeling: Is this revolution necessary?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cudahy, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    As of a former state regulator and a once enthusiastic practitioner of public utility law, I find it fascinating to see the latest nostrum to burst on the electric utility scene: retail wheeling. Wheeling became a personal interest in the Texas interconnection fight of the late seventies and may have led to the interconnection and wheeling provision of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). Retail wheeling contemplates that every electric power customer should be given an opportunity to seek out the lowest cost source of power wherever it can be found. As a practical matter, the drums for retail wheeling are presently being beaten by large industrial users, who believe that they have the capability to find low cost sources and to make advantageous commercial arrangements to acquire electricity. Large industrials have long been fighting the utilities for cheaper electricity, frequently using the threat of self-generation and cogeneration.

  5. Iowa Stored Energy Park | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stored Energy Park Jump to: navigation, search Name: Iowa Stored Energy Park Place: Ankeny, Iowa Zip: 50021 Sector: Wind energy Product: Iowa Stored Energy Park is planning a 268MW...

  6. Lighting Up Georgia Convenience Stores

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Thanks to help from the Energy Department, convenience stores across Georgia are saving energy by switching to energy efficient lighting. In the first year alone, participating small businesses have saved over $7,000 after the retrofits and over 54,000 KWh of energy.

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 2010 Top Supermarkets, by Sales 2010 All Commodity Supermarket Wal-Mart Stores 3,001 Kroger Co. 2,460 Safeway, Inc. 1,461 Supervalu, Inc. 1,504 Ahold USA, Inc. (Stop and Shop, Giant) 746 Publix Super Markets, Inc. 1,035 Delhaize America, Inc. (Food Lion) 1,641 H.E. Butt Grocery Co. (HEB) 291 Meijer Inc. 195 Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. (Pathmark) 373 Note(s): Source(s): All commodity volume in this example represents the "annualized range of the estimated retail sales volume of

  8. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Grayson-Collin Elec Coop, Inc TX Cooperative 41,708 820,364 101,910.0 12.42 Green Mountain Energy Company TX Retail Energy Provider 332,437 7,052,890 696,283.5 9.87 Greenbelt ...

  9. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Residential

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... Grayson-Collin Elec Coop, Inc TX Cooperative 39,180 688,117 81,287.0 11.81 Green Mountain Energy Company TX Retail Energy Provider 283,628 3,270,075 385,380.5 11.79 Greenbelt ...

  10. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Commercial

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... 7.13 Grayson-Collin Elec Coop, Inc TX Cooperative 2,528 132,247 20,623.0 15.59 Green Mountain Energy Company TX Retail Energy Provider 48,809 3,782,815 310,903.0 8.22 Greenbelt ...

  11. Financial Management for Retail Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA) – Arlington, VA Partners: -- Deloitte – New York, NY -- Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) – Boston, MA -- Institute for Market Transformation (IMT) – Washington, D.C. -- Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) – Boston, MA

  12. Apparatus for storing hydrogen isotopes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMullen, John W.; Wheeler, Michael G.; Cullingford, Hatice S.; Sherman, Robert H.

    1985-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus for storing isotopes of hydrogen (especially tritium) are provided. The hydrogen gas(es) is (are) stored as hydrides of material (for example uranium) within boreholes in a block of copper. The mass of the block is critically important to the operation, as is the selection of copper, because no cooling pipes are used. Because no cooling pipes are used, there can be no failure due to cooling pipes. And because copper is used instead of stainless steel, a significantly higher temperature can be reached before the eutectic formation of uranium with copper occurs, (the eutectic of uranium with the iron in stainless steel forming at a significantly lower temperature).

  13. Stores Catalog | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stores Catalog The Ames Laboratory storeroom stock is available for withdrawl to all Ames Laboratory personnel. Stock must be used for "Ames Laboratory funded or overhead projects" and may only be charged to a project which is "open" to charges in Costpoint. New employees - - your supervisor will give you a business size card with the project number which you are authorized to charge to and which will allow you to withdraw stock from the storeroom. The catalog lists stock by

  14. Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Chicago Regional Support Office (Purchase Order DE-AP45-97R553188). Funding was provided by the Department of Energy's Office of Power Technologies, Ofiice of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection (1.3 MB) More

  15. Reliant Energy Retail Services, LLC Smart Grid Project | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    deploys new services and market offerings for retail customers in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) region. Reliant is deploying in-home energy displays,...

  16. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Pennsylvania) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pennsylvania) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Pennsylvania References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

  17. Method of monitoring stored nuclear fuel elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borloo, E.; Buergers, W.; Crutzen, S.; Vinche, C.

    1983-05-24

    To monitor a nuclear fuel element or fuel elements located in a store, e.g. a pond in a swimming pool reactor, the store is illuminated ultrasonically using one or more transducers transmitting ultrasonic signals in one or more predetermined directions to obtain an output which, because it depends on the number and relative location of the fuel elements in the store, and the structure of the store itself is distinctive to the fuel elements or elements stored therein. From this distinctive output is derived an identity unique to the stored fuel element or elements and a reference signal indicative of the whole structure when intact, the reference signal and identity being recorded. Subsequent ultrasonic testing of the store and its contents under identical operating conditions produces a signal which is compared to the recorded reference signal and if different therefrom reveals the occurrence of tampering with the store and/or the fuel element or elements.

  18. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings - 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.

    2013-06-01

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-MBBR) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-MBBR is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in retail stores over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-MBBR was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  19. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings - 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, Eric; Leach, Matt; Pless, Shanti

    2013-06-05

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-MBBR) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-MBBR is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in retail stores over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-MBBR was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Retail Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Weimin; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

    2011-09-19

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Retail Buildings is a component of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

  1. Signature-based store checking buffer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sridharan, Vilas; Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    2015-06-02

    A system and method for optimizing redundant output verification, are provided. A hardware-based store fingerprint buffer receives multiple instances of output from multiple instances of computation. The store fingerprint buffer generates a signature from the content included in the multiple instances of output. When a barrier is reached, the store fingerprint buffer uses the signature to verify the content is error-free.

  2. Fuel Cell Store Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Fuel Cell Store, Inc Place: San Diego, California Zip: 92154 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: San Diego-based firm selling fuel cell stacks, components, and hydrogen...

  3. Energy Efficiency and Grid Services for C Stores and Supermakets

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dispatch Setpoint Management Food Quality Reports Energy & Maintenance Reports Demand Response Vertical Markets Supermarket Non-Supermarket Food Retail Refrigerated Transport ...

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 2010 Top Retail Companies, by Sales # Stores % Change over Chain ($billion) 2009 Revenues 2010 2009 Stores Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. 419.0 3.4% 8,970 6.0% The Kroger Co. 82.2 7.1% 3,605 -0.4% Costco 76.3 9.1% 572 1.1% The Home Depot 68.0 2.8% 2,248 0.2% Walgreen Co. 67.4 6.4% 8,046 7.3% Target Corp. 67.4 3.1% 1,750 0.6% CVS Caremark 57.3 3.6% 7,182 2.2% Best Buy 50.3 1.2% 4,172 3.7% Lowes Cos. 48.8 3.4% 1,749 2.3% Sears Holdings 43.3 -1.6% 4,038 2.2% Source(s): 2010 Revenues % Change over Chain

  5. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  6. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  7. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  8. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  9. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  10. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  11. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  12. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  13. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  14. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  15. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  16. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  17. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  18. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  19. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  20. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  1. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  2. The great ``retail wheeling`` illusion, and more productive energy futures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavanagh, R.

    1994-12-31

    This paper sets out the reasons why many environmental and public interest organizations oppose retail wheeling. Cavanagh argues that retail wheeling would destroy incentives for energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy generation--benefits that reduce long-term energy service costs to society as a whole. The current debate over the competitive restructuring of the electric power industry is critical from both economic and environmental perspectives. All attempts to introduce broad-scale retail wheeling in the United States have failed; instead, state regulators are choosing a path that emphasizes competition and choice, but acknowledges fundamental differences between wholesale and retail markets. Given the physical laws governing the movement of power over centrally controlled grids, the choice offered to customers through retail wheeling of electricity is a fiction -- a re-allocation of costs is all that is really possible. Everyone wants to be able to claim the cheapest electricity on the system; unfortunately, there is not enough to go around. By endorsing the fiction of retail wheeling for certain types of customers, regulators would be recasting the retail electricity business as a kind of commodity exchange. That would reward suppliers who could minimize near-term unit costs of electricity while simultaneously destroying incentives for many investments, including cost-effective energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy generation, that reduce long-term energy service costs to society as a whole. This result, which has been analogized unpersuasively to trends in telecommunications and natural gas regulation, is neither desirable nor inevitable. States should go on saying no to retail wheeling in order to be able to create something better: regulatory reforms that align utility and societal interests in pursuing a least-cost energy future. An appendix contains notes on some recent Retail Wheeling Campaigns.

  3. Store-operate-coherence-on-value

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Ohmacht, Martin; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard

    2014-11-18

    A system, method and computer program product for performing various store-operate instructions in a parallel computing environment that includes a plurality of processors and at least one cache memory device. A queue in the system receives, from a processor, a store-operate instruction that specifies under which condition a cache coherence operation is to be invoked. A hardware unit in the system runs the received store-operate instruction. The hardware unit evaluates whether a result of the running the received store-operate instruction satisfies the condition. The hardware unit invokes a cache coherence operation on a cache memory address associated with the received store-operate instruction if the result satisfies the condition. Otherwise, the hardware unit does not invoke the cache coherence operation on the cache memory device.

  4. Laundry | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Don't over-dry your clothes. If your machine has a moisture sensor, use it. Clean the lint ... When shopping for a new clothes dryer, look for one with a moisture sensor that ...

  5. NextEra Retail of Texas LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56620 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This...

  6. Duke Energy Retail Sales, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56502 Utility Location Yes Ownership R Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can...

  7. DOE Publishes Long-Term Testing Investigation of Retail Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released another special report on LED lamps that are available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. CALiPER...

  8. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maryland) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maryland) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Maryland References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form...

  9. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Massachusetts) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Massachusetts Phone Number: 212-997-8500 Website: www.hess.com Twitter: @HessCorporation Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  10. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Rhode Island) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rhode Island) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Rhode Island References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

  11. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (New Hampshire) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: New Hampshire Phone Number: 1-800-437-7645 Website: www.hess.com Twitter: @HessCorporation Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  12. DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a special report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. The report follows similar...

  13. DOE Publishes New CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a special report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. While previous reports in...

  14. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Waste Lot Profile 155.5 for K-1015-A Laundry Pit, East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs, Raymer J.E.

    2008-06-12

    In 1989, the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) National Priorities List. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (DOE 1992), effective January 1, 1992, now governs environmental restoration activities conducted under CERCLA at the ORR. Following signing of the FFA, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the state of Tennessee signed the Oak Ridge Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement on June 18, 2003. The purpose of this agreement is to define a streamlined decision-making process to facilitate the accelerated implementation of cleanup, to resolve ORR milestone issues, and to establish future actions necessary to complete the accelerated cleanup plan by the end of fiscal year 2008. While the FFA continues to serve as the overall regulatory framework for remediation, the Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement supplements existing requirements to streamline the decision-making process. The disposal of the K-1015 Laundry Pit waste will be executed in accordance with the 'Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone, 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOB/ORAH-2161&D2) and the 'Waste Handling Plan for the Consolidated Soil and Waste Sites with Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOE/OR/01-2328&D1). This waste lot consists of a total of approximately 50 cubic yards of waste that will be disposed at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) as non-containerized waste. This material will be sent to the EMWMF in dump trucks. This profile is for the K-1015-A Laundry Pit and includes debris (e.g., concrete, metal rebar, pipe), incidental soil, plastic and wood, and secondary waste (such as plastic sheeting, hay bales and other erosion control materials, wooden pallets

  15. Retail Buildings: Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Retail Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-04-01

    Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in retail spaces are poorly understood.

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Digg Find

  17. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

    2009-01-30

    In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources

  18. Storing data encoded DNA in living organisms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong; Pak C. , Wong; Kwong K. , Foote; Harlan P.

    2006-06-06

    Current technologies allow the generation of artificial DNA molecules and/or the ability to alter the DNA sequences of existing DNA molecules. With a careful coding scheme and arrangement, it is possible to encode important information as an artificial DNA strand and store it in a living host safely and permanently. This inventive technology can be used to identify origins and protect R&D investments. It can also be used in environmental research to track generations of organisms and observe the ecological impact of pollutants. Today, there are microorganisms that can survive under extreme conditions. As well, it is advantageous to consider multicellular organisms as hosts for stored information. These living organisms can provide as memory housing and protection for stored data or information. The present invention provides well for data storage in a living organism wherein at least one DNA sequence is encoded to represent data and incorporated into a living organism.

  19. Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A ...

  20. Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality ...

  1. E85 Retail Business Case: When and Why to Sell E85

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.; Melendez, M.

    2007-12-01

    NREL developed a model to test the investment profitability of adding E85 to retail stations. This report discusses this model and how retailers can make E85 a profitable business venture.

  2. System for handling and storing radioactive waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, J.K.; Lindemann, P.E.

    1982-07-19

    A system and method are claimed for handling and storing spent reactor fuel and other solid radioactive waste, including canisters to contain the elements of solid waste, storage racks to hold a plurality of such canisters, storage bays to store these racks in isolation by means of shielded doors in the bays. This system also includes means for remotely positioning the racks in the bays and an access tunnel within which the remotely operated means is located to position a rack in a selected bay. The modular type of these bays will facilitate the construction of additional bays and access tunnel extension.

  3. System for handling and storing radioactive waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, John K.; Lindemann, Paul E.

    1984-01-01

    A system and method for handling and storing spent reactor fuel and other solid radioactive waste, including canisters to contain the elements of solid waste, storage racks to hold a plurality of such canisters, storage bays to store these racks in isolation by means of shielded doors in the bays. This system also includes means for remotely positioning the racks in the bays and an access tunnel within which the remotely operated means is located to position a rack in a selected bay. The modular type of these bays will facilitate the construction of additional bays and access tunnel extension.

  4. Energy options: Cogen V and retail wheeling alternatives technical conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The Energy Options technical conference proceedings contains 265 papers, of which 17 were selected for the database. The conference was split into two primary topics: cogeneration and retail wheeling. Subtopics under cogeneration included: the state of cogeneration in the United States, case studies in facility ownership, fuels considerations for tomorrow, and plant design considerations for cogeneration systems. Retail wheeling alternatives subtopics included U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission rulings, end-user options for retail wheeling, deregulation issues, and forecasting of electricity generating costs. Papers not selected for the database, while clearly pertinent topics of interest, consisted of viewgraphs which were judged not to have sufficient technical information and coherence without the corresponding presentation. However, some papers which did consist of viewgraphs were included.

  5. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Business Models

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Business models information focused on remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers.

  6. Systems and methods of storing combustion waste products (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: Systems and methods of storing combustion waste products Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Systems and methods of storing combustion waste products In one aspect, ...

  7. Storing Renewable Energy in Chemical Bonds

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Helm, Monte; Bullock, Morris

    2014-06-13

    With nearly 7 billion people, the world's population is demanding more electricity every year. Improved technologies are bringing wind and solar power to our electrical grid. However, wind turbines and solar panels only work when the wind blows or the sun shines. PNNL scientists discuss catalysis approaches for storing and releasing energy on demand.

  8. Storing Renewable Energy in Chemical Bonds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helm, Monte; Bullock, Morris

    2013-03-27

    With nearly 7 billion people, the world's population is demanding more electricity every year. Improved technologies are bringing wind and solar power to our electrical grid. However, wind turbines and solar panels only work when the wind blows or the sun shines. PNNL scientists discuss catalysis approaches for storing and releasing energy on demand.

  9. Canister arrangement for storing radioactive waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lorenzo, Donald K.; Van Cleve, Jr., John E.

    1982-01-01

    The subject invention relates to a canister arrangement for jointly storing high level radioactive chemical waste and metallic waste resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuel elements. A cylindrical steel canister is provided with an elongated centrally disposed billet of the metallic waste and the chemical waste in vitreous form is disposed in the annulus surrounding the billet.

  10. Canister arrangement for storing radioactive waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lorenzo, D.K.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.

    1980-04-23

    The subject invention relates to a canister arrangement for jointly storing high level radioactive chemical waste and metallic waste resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuel elements. A cylindrical steel canister is provided with an elongated centrally disposed billet of the metallic waste and the chemical waste in vitreous form is disposed in the annulus surrounding the billet.

  11. Walmart Experimental Store Performance Stories: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.; Kozubal, E.; Norton, P.

    2010-08-01

    Walmart opened two experimental stores--one in Colorado and one in Texas--in 2005 to serve as test beds for several advanced building systems. Each embodied more than 50 experiments covering materials, water systems, energy systems, and renewable energy production. Walmart worked for three years with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the Colorado Store and Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Texas store to monitor, analyze, and report on their performance. HVAC experiments included waste oil boilers, a microturbine/absorption chiller combined heat and power system, evaporative cooling, and a transpired solar collector. The refrigeration systems integrated a medium-temperature secondary loop, evaporatively cooled condenser, doors on medium-temperature cases, and light-emitting diodes on cases. Experiments in the lighting systems included a redesigned roof for clerestory daylighting and T-5 fluorescent lamps. Three photovoltaic systems for a total of 135 kW and a 50-kW wind turbine are also included. The energy system performance was compared to the measured performance of a prototypical Walmart store and to other benchmarks.

  12. Innovation for Food Retail: The 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The guide shows practical ways for grocery stores to achieve a 50% energy savings over ASHRAE 90.1-2004 and exceeds the requirements of 90.1-2013. Intended for grocery stores ...

  13. Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008

  14. Rack for storing spent nuclear fuel elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Herbert J.; Clark, Philip M.; Gilcrest, James D.

    1978-06-20

    A rack for storing spent nuclear fuel elements in which a plurality of aligned rows of upright enclosures of generally square cross-sectional areas contain vertically disposed fuel elements. The enclosures are fixed at the lower ends thereof to a base. Pockets are formed between confronting walls of adjacent enclosures for receiving high absorption neutron absorbers, such as Boral, cadmium, borated stainless steel and the like for the closer spacing of spent fuel elements.

  15. Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bjorkman, H.K. Jr.

    1983-05-31

    An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means for separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means. 7 figs.

  16. Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bjorkman, Jr., Harry K.

    1983-05-31

    An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means or separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means.

  17. SEP Success Story: Lighting Up Georgia Convenience Stores | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Lighting Up Georgia Convenience Stores SEP Success Story: Lighting Up Georgia Convenience Stores March 28, 2012 - 2:23pm Addthis One of several Georgia convenience stores that improved lighting while saving energy and money. | Courtesy of Outlaw Consulting, Inc. One of several Georgia convenience stores that improved lighting while saving energy and money. | Courtesy of Outlaw Consulting, Inc. Convenience stores across Georgia are saving energy thanks to energy efficient lighting

  18. Bioprocessing of a stored mixed liquid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfram, J.H.; Rogers, R.D.; Finney, R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the development and results of a demonstration for a continuous bioprocess for mixed waste treatment. A key element of the process is an unique microbial strain which tolerates high levels of aromatic solvents and surfactants. This microorganism is the biocatalysis of the continuous flow system designed for the processing of stored liquid scintillation wastes. During the past year a process demonstration has been conducted on commercial formulation of liquid scintillation cocktails (LSC). Based on data obtained from this demonstration, the Ohio EPA granted the Mound Applied Technologies Lab a treatability permit allowing the limited processing of actual mixed waste. Since August 1994, the system has been successfully processing stored, {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} LSC waste. The initial LSC waste fed into the system contained 11% pseudocumene and detectable quantities of plutonium. Another treated waste stream contained pseudocumene and tritium. Data from this initial work shows that the hazardous organic solvent, and pseudocumene have been removed due to processing, leaving the aqueous low level radioactive waste. Results to date have shown that living cells are not affected by the dissolved plutonium and that 95% of the plutonium was sorbed to the biomass. This paper discusses the bioprocess, rates of processing, effluent, and the implications of bioprocessing for mixed waste management.

  19. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS FOR ELECTRIC ENERGY Pursuant to Section 1815 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 The Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force The Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force Members: J. Bruce McDonald, Department of Justice Michael Bardee, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission John H. Seesel, Federal Trade Commission David Meyer, Department of Energy Karen Larsen, Department of Agriculture Report Contributors: Robin Allen -

  20. Method and apparatus for storing hydrogen isotopes. [stored as uranium hydride in a block of copper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMullen, J.W.; Wheeler, M.G.; Cullingford, H.S.; Sherman, R.H.

    1982-08-10

    An improved method and apparatus for storing isotopes of hydrogen (especially tritium) are provided. The hydrogen gas is stored as hydrides of material (for example uranium) within boreholes in a block of copper. The mass of the block is critically important to the operation, as is the selection of copper, because no cooling pipes are used. Because no cooling pipes are used, there can be no failure due to cooling pipes. And because copper is used instead of stainless steel, a significantly higher temperature can be reached before the eutectic formation of uranium with copper occurs, (the eutectic of uranium with the iron in stainless steel forms at a significantly lower temperature).

  1. FGD markets & business in an age of retail wheeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.C.; Dalton, S.M.

    1995-06-01

    This paper discusses (1) the market and technology outlook for flue gas desulfurization ({open_quotes}FGD{close_quotes}) systems, with particular emphasis on wet systems in North America and the implications of retail wheeling of electricity and emission allowances for the utility industry, and (2) implications for the utility industry of architect/engineering ({open_quotes}A/E{close_quotes}) firm tendencies to reduce greatly the FGD vendor`s scope of award. The paper concludes that (1) the FGD market will be modest domestically and robust offshore over the forecast period (5-10 years), although the utility industry`s response to federal and state air toxics rules and retail wheeling may eventually grow the FGD market domestically beyond that created by compliance with Phase II of the Clean Air Act`s Title IV acid rain program alone, (2) new designs are likely to follow trends established in the past few years, but will likely include advanced processes that use higher velocity and smaller space, and possibly multi-pollutant control to remain competitive, and (3) shrinking of the FGD vendor`s scope may have adverse implications for the utility end-user, while retail wheeling may increase third-party ownership of FGD technology

  2. Ceph: An Open Source Object Store Evan Harvey Gustavo Rayos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ceph: An Open Source Object Store Evan Harvey Gustavo Rayos Nick Schuchhardt Mentors: David Bonnie, Chris Hoffman, Dominic Manno LA---UR---15---25907 What is an Object Store? *...

  3. Co2 Deep Store Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Deep Store Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Co2 Deep Store Ltd Place: Scotland, United Kingdom Zip: AB11 7LH Sector: Carbon Product: UK based organization focused on the...

  4. November 18, 2010: Antimatter Trapped and Stored | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8, 2010: Antimatter Trapped and Stored November 18, 2010: Antimatter Trapped and Stored November 18, 2010: Antimatter Trapped and Stored November 18, 2010 The Department's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) announces that atoms of antimatter have been trapped and stored for the first time in a magnetic bottle-like device by the ALPHA collaboration, an international team of scientists working at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research near Geneva, Switzerland. Scientists

  5. Sandia Energy - Storing Hydrogen Underground Could Boost Transportatio...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storing Hydrogen Underground Could Boost Transportation, Energy Security Home Infrastructure Security Energy Transportation Energy Facilities Capabilities News News & Events...

  6. Innovative methods for corn stover collecting, handling, storing and transporting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atchison, J. E.; Hettenhaus, J. R.

    2004-04-01

    Investigation of innovative methods for collecting, handling, storing, and transporting corn stover for potential use for production of cellulosic ethanol.

  7. 'Underground battery' could store renewable energy, sequester CO2 |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) 'Underground battery' could store renewable energy, sequester CO2 Wednesday, January 6, 2016 - 2:40pm NNSA Blog This integrated system would store carbon dioxide in an underground reservoir, with concentric rings of horizontal wells confining the pressurized CO2 beneath the caprock. Stored CO2 displaces brine that flows up wells to the surface where it is heated by thermal plants (e.g., solar farms) and reinjected into the reservoir to store

  8. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 1 Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 2 * Briefing: - To schedule interviews, please contact DOE Public Affairs at 202-586-4940 * Terms: - Lumens: Commonly a measure of brightness (technically "luminous flux") - CFL: Compact Fluorescent Lamp: The curly fluorescent bulbs - LED: Light Emitting Diode: more recently emerging

  9. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers This presentation provides helpful background information on the new legislation and the types of energy-efficient lighting available today. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers (2.08 MB) More Documents & Publications Interior Lighting Efficiency for Municipalities Lighting Tip

  10. DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps March 4, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a special report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. The report follows similar reports published in 2011 and 2012. LED replacement lamps are available through many retail outlets, and CALiPER testing offers insights on performance trends from year to year.

  11. Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 Fact 858 February 2, ... highly volatile and often varies substantially throughout any given year. ...

  12. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Reliant Energy Retail Services","Investor-owned",38670...

  13. The next gordian knot for state regulators and electric utilities: The unbundling of retail services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, K.W.

    1995-11-01

    Unbundling of retail electric services will accelerate competitive forces in a way that could radically change the future course of the electric power industry. Although simple in concept, unbundling raises a broad range of complex issues, many of which are fundamental to today`s concepts of regulation and utility management. This article addresses four questions: (1) What is retail unbundling? (2) What role might it play in the future electric power industry? (3) What lessons can be learned from retail unbundling in other regulated industries, specifically the natural gas industry? (4) What are the major issues associated with retail unbundling for electric utilities and state regulators?

  14. Costs of Storing and Transporting Hydrogen | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Costs of Storing and Transporting Hydrogen Costs of Storing and Transporting Hydrogen An analysis was performed to estimate the costs associated with storing and transporting hydrogen. These costs can be added to a hydrogen production cost to determine the total delivered cost of hydrogen. 25106.pdf (1.34 MB) More Documents & Publications Survey of the Economics of Hydrogen Technologies H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis Results -

  15. Design Guide Helps Grocery Stores Cut Energy Use

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grocery stores are responsible for approximately 9% of the total energy consumed by U.S. commercial buildings. To reduce this energy impact, the newly released Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores demonstrates how to cut typical energy use in half, conserving approximately 8 billion Btus of energy per year, per store –equivalent to the amount of energy consumed by 148 homes during the same period.

  16. developing viable solid-state materials to store hydrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... materials to store hydrogen onboard vehicles, leading to more reliable, economic hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles. "Hydrogen, as a transportation fuel, has great potential to ...

  17. Storing the Power of the Sun | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storing the Power of the Sun Storing the Power of the Sun December 22, 2010 - 11:47am Addthis Storing the Power of the Sun John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Yesterday, Secretary Chu announced that a $1.45 billion loan guarantee has been finalized for Abengoa Solar Inc.'s Solana project, the first large-scale solar plant in the United States capable of storing energy it generates. This storage capacity allows Solana to bank energy that would

  18. What is the GE store |GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials, software, and analytics to commercialization, process, and business model best practices. The GE Store allows GE to leapfrog industries, to drive innovation,...

  19. Tips: Laundry | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    screen in the dryer after every load to improve air circulation and prevent fire hazards. ... This will save energy and may prevent a fire. Manufacturers recommend using rigid venting ...

  20. Conditional load and store in a shared memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumrich, Matthias A; Ohmacht, Martin

    2015-02-03

    A method, system and computer program product for implementing load-reserve and store-conditional instructions in a multi-processor computing system. The computing system includes a multitude of processor units and a shared memory cache, and each of the processor units has access to the memory cache. In one embodiment, the method comprises providing the memory cache with a series of reservation registers, and storing in these registers addresses reserved in the memory cache for the processor units as a result of issuing load-reserve requests. In this embodiment, when one of the processor units makes a request to store data in the memory cache using a store-conditional request, the reservation registers are checked to determine if an address in the memory cache is reserved for that processor unit. If an address in the memory cache is reserved for that processor, the data are stored at this address.

  1. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Heffner, Grayson; Sedano, Richard

    2008-05-27

    The Organization of Midwest ISO States (OMS) launched the Midwest Demand Resource Initiative (MWDRI) in 2007 to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) region and develop policies to overcome them. The MWDRI stakeholders decided that a useful initial activity would be to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This additional detail could then be used to assess any"seams issues" affecting coordination and integration of retail DR resources with MISO's wholesale markets. Working with state regulatory agencies, we conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs, dynamic pricing tariffs, and their features in MISO states. Utilities were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g., seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. This report describes the results of this comprehensive survey and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into organized wholesale markets. Survey responses from 37 MISO members and 4 non-members provided information on 141 DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs with a peak load reduction potential of 4,727 MW of retail DR resource. Major findings of this study area:- About 72percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;18percent. Almost 90percent of the DR resources included in this survey are provided by investor-owned utilities. - Approximately, 90percent of the DR resources are available with less than

  2. Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operated in Steady-State Conditions | Department of Energy Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions (42 pages, December 2014) (2.29 MB) More Documents & Publications Report 20.5: Chromaticity Shift Modes

  3. Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Largest Decline since 2008 | Department of Energy 8 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 In the second half of 2014, the national average retail price per gallon of gasoline (all grades) fell from a high of $3.77 in June to a low of $2.63 in December - a difference of $1.14 per gallon. This is the largest price drop since the recession of

  4. Systems and methods of storing combustion waste products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Shen-En; Wang, Peng; Miao, Xiexing; Feng, Qiyan; Zhu, Qianlin

    2016-04-12

    In one aspect, methods of storing one or more combustion waste products are described herein. Combustion waste products stored by a method described herein can include solid combustion waste products such as coal ash and/or gaseous combustion products such as carbon dioxide. In some embodiments, a method of storing carbon dioxide comprises providing a carbon dioxide storage medium comprising porous concrete having a macroporous and microporous pore structure and flowing carbon dioxide captured from a combustion flue gas source into the pore structure of the porous concrete.

  5. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (New York) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: New York References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 22509 This article is a...

  6. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS FOR

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ELECTRIC ENERGY | Department of Energy REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS FOR ELECTRIC ENERGY REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS FOR ELECTRIC ENERGY The enclosed report is submitted to Congress pursuant to section 1815 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Section 1815 of the Act established a five-member Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005)1 was designed to provide a comprehensive

  7. Grocery Store 50% Energy Savings Technical Support Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, M.; Hale, E.; Hirsch, A.; Torcellini, P.

    2009-09-01

    This report documents technical analysis for grocery stores aimed at providing design guidance that achieves whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004.

  8. Method for storing spent nuclear fuel in repositories

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schweitzer, D.G.; Sastre, C.; Winsche, W.

    A method for storing radioactive spent fuel in repositories containing sulfur as the storage medium is disclosed. Sulfur is non-corrosive and not subject to radiation damage. Thus, storage periods of up to 100 years are possible.

  9. Composition and method for storing and releasing hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thorn, David L.; Tumas, William; Ott, Kevin C.; Burrell, Anthony K.

    2010-06-15

    A chemical system for storing and releasing hydrogen utilizes an endothermic reaction that releases hydrogen coupled to an exothermic reaction to drive the process thermodynamically, or an exothermic reaction that releases hydrogen coupled to an endothermic reaction.

  10. Method for storing spent nuclear fuel in repositories

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schweitzer, Donald G.; Sastre, Cesar; Winsche, Warren

    1981-01-01

    A method for storing radioactive spent fuel in repositories containing sulfur as the storage medium is disclosed. Sulfur is non-corrosive and not subject to radiation damage. Thus, storage periods of up to 100 years are possible.

  11. Scalable Object Store v. 1.0.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-23

    SOS is software that stores data values in a set of structured flat files. The data is organized in the files based upon functions specified by the user in order to enable fast insertion and retrieval of data.

  12. Y-12 dietician conducts educational tour of local grocery store...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on making good choices in the grocery store. Lacey recently led a tour of the Oak Ridge Food City where she explained how to read food nutrition labels and explained some of the...

  13. Energy Department Project Captures and Stores One Million Metric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    One Million Metric Tons of Carbon Energy Department Project Captures and Stores One Million Metric Tons of Carbon January 8, 2015 - 11:18am Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 ...

  14. Unbundling the retail gas market: Current activities and guidance for serving residential and small customers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, K.W.; Lemon, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    The restructuring of retail gas services has followed a typical pattern for previously heavily regulated industries: large customers are initially given rights to purchase unbundled services from different entities, with the same rights dispersed over time to smaller customers. For about ten years now industrial customers in most states have been able to {open_quotes}play the market{close_quotes}. Since the passage of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Order 636 in 1992, interest has centered on expanding service unbundling to small retail customers, including residential customers. Importantly, the Order prohibited pipelines from providing bundled sales service. This is not surprising - in the telecommunications industry, for example, the unbundling of wholesale services was a strong stimulant for developing competition in the local exchange market. The push for small-customer service unbundling has derived from the basic but politically attractive idea that all retail customers should directly benefit from competitive forces in the natural gas industry. When one looks at the movement of prices since 1985, it is easy to see that large retail customers have enjoyed more favorable prices than other retail customers. For example, over the period 1985 to 1994 gas prices to industrial customers and electric utilities fell around 23 percent and 36 percent, respectively. In comparison, gas prices to residential customers increased by around 5 percent while gas prices to commercial customers decreased slightly by about 1 percent. This report examines various aspects of unbundling to small retail gas customers, with special emphasis on residential customers.

  15. Impact of residential PV adoption on Retail Electricity Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, DWH; Adlakha, S; Low, SH; De Martini, P; Chandy, KM

    2013-11-01

    The price of electricity supplied from home rooftop photo voltaic (PV) solar cells has fallen below the retail price of grid electricity in some areas. A number of residential households have an economic incentive to install rooftop PV systems and reduce their purchases of electricity from the grid. A significant portion of the costs incurred by utility companies are fixed costs which must be recovered even as consumption falls. Electricity rates must increase in order for utility companies to recover fixed costs from shrinking sales bases. Increasing rates will, in turn, result in even more economic incentives for customers to adopt rooftop PV. In this paper, we model this feedback between PV adoption and electricity rates and study its impact on future PV penetration and net-metering costs. We find that the most important parameter that determines whether this feedback has an effect is the fraction of customers who adopt PV in any year based solely on the money saved by doing so in that year, independent of the uncertainties of future years. These uncertainties include possible changes in rate structures such as the introduction of connection charges, the possibility of PV prices dropping significantly in the future, possible changes in tax incentives, and confidence in the reliability and maintainability of PV. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pressure Systems Stored-Energy Threshold Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulsen, Samuel S.

    2009-08-25

    Federal Regulation 10 CFR 851, which became effective February 2007, brought to light potential weaknesses regarding the Pressure Safety Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The definition of a pressure system in 10 CFR 851 does not contain a limit based upon pressure or any other criteria. Therefore, the need for a method to determine an appropriate risk-based hazard level for pressure safety was identified. The Laboratory has historically used a stored energy of 1000 lbf-ft to define a pressure hazard; however, an analytical basis for this value had not been documented. This document establishes the technical basis by evaluating the use of stored energy as an appropriate criterion to establish a pressure hazard, exploring a suitable risk threshold for pressure hazards, and reviewing the methods used to determine stored energy. The literature review and technical analysis concludes the use of stored energy as a method for determining a potential risk, the 1000 lbf-ft threshold, and the methods used by PNNL to calculate stored energy are all appropriate. Recommendations for further program improvements are also discussed

  17. Air conditioning system with supplemental ice storing and cooling capacity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weng, Kuo-Lianq; Weng, Kuo-Liang

    1998-01-01

    The present air conditioning system with ice storing and cooling capacity can generate and store ice in its pipe assembly or in an ice storage tank particularly equipped for the system, depending on the type of the air conditioning system. The system is characterized in particular in that ice can be produced and stored in the air conditioning system whereby the time of supplying cooled air can be effectively extended with the merit that the operation cycle of the on and off of the compressor can be prolonged, extending the operation lifespan of the compressor in one aspect. In another aspect, ice production and storage in great amount can be performed in an off-peak period of the electrical power consumption and the stored ice can be utilized in the peak period of the power consumption so as to provide supplemental cooling capacity for the compressor of the air conditioning system whereby the shift of peak and off-peak power consumption can be effected with ease. The present air conditioning system can lower the installation expense for an ice-storing air conditioning system and can also be applied to an old conventional air conditioning system.

  18. Meijer Stores E85 Announcement | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Meijer Stores E85 Announcement Meijer Stores E85 Announcement May 11, 2006 - 10:41am Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman It's a pleasure to be in Indiana. Thank you all for coming. I want to congratulate Indiana on the remarkable progress that has been made here in building a network of 28 stations that can dispense E85 in a little more than a year. Once again, the Midwest is showing the rest of the country how to get things done. I'm also pleased the Energy Department

  19. Discharging a superconducting store into an inverting converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrianov, V.V.; Zenkevich, V.B.; Popkov, O.V.; Sergeyenkov, B.N.; Sukhorukov, A.G.

    1983-11-01

    It is possible to invert the energy stored in a superconducting solenoid with both a constant mean value of the inverted power, and a constant mean value of the voltage in the leads of the solenoid, which is equal to the mean value of the opposing voltage (counter emf) of the inverter. The operation of a superconducting inductive store together with a high speed semiconductor switch and a three phase inverter is considered. Graphs show changes in currents and voltages on the compacitor, the current flowing through the superconducting solenoid, the current flowing through the capacitor, and that flowing through the controlled rectified.

  20. Alpha low-level stored waste systems design study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feizollahi, F.; Teheranian, B.; Quapp, W.J.

    1992-08-01

    The Stored Waste System Design Study (SWSDS), commissioned by the Waste Technology Development Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examines relative life-cycle costs associated with three system concepts for processing the alpha low-level waste (alpha-LLW) stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex`s Transuranic Storage Area at the INEL. The three system concepts are incineration/melting; thermal treatment/solidification; and sort, treat, and repackage. The SWSDS identifies system functional and operational requirements and assesses implementability; effectiveness; cost; and demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DT&E) requirements for each of the three concepts.

  1. Alpha low-level stored waste systems design study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feizollahi, F.; Teheranian, B. . Environmental Services Div.); Quapp, W.J. )

    1992-08-01

    The Stored Waste System Design Study (SWSDS), commissioned by the Waste Technology Development Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examines relative life-cycle costs associated with three system concepts for processing the alpha low-level waste (alpha-LLW) stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex's Transuranic Storage Area at the INEL. The three system concepts are incineration/melting; thermal treatment/solidification; and sort, treat, and repackage. The SWSDS identifies system functional and operational requirements and assesses implementability; effectiveness; cost; and demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DT E) requirements for each of the three concepts.

  2. Energy and IAQ Implications of Alternative Minimum Ventilation Rates in California Retail and School Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Fisk, William J.

    2015-01-01

    For a stand-alone retail building, a primary school, and a secondary school in each of the 16 California climate zones, the EnergyPlus building energy simulation model was used to estimate how minimum mechanical ventilation rates (VRs) affect energy use and indoor air concentrations of an indoor-generated contaminant. The modeling indicates large changes in heating energy use, but only moderate changes in total building energy use, as minimum VRs in the retail building are changed. For example, predicted state-wide heating energy consumption in the retail building decreases by more than 50% and total building energy consumption decreases by approximately 10% as the minimum VR decreases from the Title 24 requirement to no mechanical ventilation. The primary and secondary schools have notably higher internal heat gains than in the retail building models, resulting in significantly reduced demand for heating. The school heating energy use was correspondingly less sensitive to changes in the minimum VR. The modeling indicates that minimum VRs influence HVAC energy and total energy use in schools by only a few percent. For both the retail building and the school buildings, minimum VRs substantially affected the predicted annual-average indoor concentrations of an indoor generated contaminant, with larger effects in schools. The shape of the curves relating contaminant concentrations with VRs illustrate the importance of avoiding particularly low VRs.

  3. Structure for Storing Properties of Particles (PoP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, N. R.; Mattoon, C. M.; Beck, B. R.; Summers, N. C.; Brown, D. A.

    2014-06-01

    Some evaluated nuclear databases are critical for applications such as nuclear energy, nuclear medicine, homeland security, and stockpile stewardship. Particle masses, nuclear excitation levels, and other “Properties of Particles” are essential for making evaluated nuclear databases. Currently, these properties are obtained from various databases that are stored in outdated formats. Moreover, the “Properties of Particles” (PoP) structure is being designed that will allow storing all information for one or more particles in a single place, so that each evaluation, simulation, model calculation, etc. can link to the same data. Information provided in PoP will include properties of nuclei, gammas and electrons (along with other particles such as pions, as evaluations extend to higher energies). Presently, PoP includes masses from the Atomic Mass Evaluation version 2003 (AME2003), and level schemes and gamma decays from the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL-3). The data are stored in a hierarchical structure. An example of how PoP stores nuclear masses and energy levels will be presented here.

  4. The political economy of retail wheeling, or how to not re-fight the last war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, A.; Kihm, S.

    1994-04-01

    Disparities in utility rates - observably the result of poor supply-side resource planning - have been small before and will be small once again. Retail wheeling`s promise of short-run gains for a few would, ironically, destroy integrated resource processes in place today that guard against a repeat of yesterday`s planning mistakes. The authors argue that retail wheeling is a troubling answer to a mis-diagnosis of yesterday`s problem. They believe that a variety of other policies offer most of the benefits and few of the risks that retail wheeling poses. These include aggressive wholesale competition, judicious pruning of uneconomic capacity, and serious incorporation of environmental risks into utility planning and regulation.

  5. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer’s underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems.

  6. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-12-31

    This CALiPER report examines the characteristics of a subset of lamps from CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3 in more detail. Specifically, it focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of 14 LED A lamps, as controlled by four different retail-available dimmers.

  7. Characterization of commercial building appliances. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, R.F.; Teagan, P.W.; Dieckmann, J.T.

    1993-08-01

    This study focuses on ``other`` end-uses category. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of energy end-use functions other than HVAC and lighting for commercial buildings, and to identify general avenues and approaches for energy use reduction. Specific energy consuming technologies addressed include non-HVAC and lighting technologies in commercial buildings with significant energy use to warrant detailed analyses. The end-uses include office equipment, refrigeration, water heating, cooking, vending machines, water coolers, laundry equipment and electronics other than office equipment. The building types include offices, retail, restaurants, schools, hospitals, hotels/motels, grocery stores, and warehouses.

  8. Ordering of guarded and unguarded stores for no-sync I/O

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gara, Alan; Ohmacht, Martin

    2013-06-25

    A parallel computing system processes at least one store instruction. A first processor core issues a store instruction. A first queue, associated with the first processor core, stores the store instruction. A second queue, associated with a first local cache memory device of the first processor core, stores the store instruction. The first processor core updates first data in the first local cache memory device according to the store instruction. The third queue, associated with at least one shared cache memory device, stores the store instruction. The first processor core invalidates second data, associated with the store instruction, in the at least one shared cache memory. The first processor core invalidates third data, associated with the store instruction, in other local cache memory devices of other processor cores. The first processor core flushing only the first queue.

  9. The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose slightly to $3.90 a gallon on Monday. That's up 8-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Diesel prices were highest in the New England region, at 4.16 a gallon, down a penny from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Rocky Mountain States at $3.68 a gallon, down 1.7

  10. The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to $3.93 a gallon on Monday. That's up 2 ½ cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Prices increased in all regions across the U.S. The highest prices were found in the New England region, at 4.18 a gallon, up 2.3 cents from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Rocky Mountain States at $3.74 a gallon,

  11. Wind turbine tower for storing hydrogen and energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fingersh, Lee Jay

    2008-12-30

    A wind turbine tower assembly for storing compressed gas such as hydrogen. The tower assembly includes a wind turbine having a rotor, a generator driven by the rotor, and a nacelle housing the generator. The tower assembly includes a foundation and a tubular tower with one end mounted to the foundation and another end attached to the nacelle. The tower includes an in-tower storage configured for storing a pressurized gas and defined at least in part by inner surfaces of the tower wall. In one embodiment, the tower wall is steel and has a circular cross section. The in-tower storage may be defined by first and second end caps welded to the inner surface of the tower wall or by an end cap near the top of the tower and by a sealing element attached to the tower wall adjacent the foundation, with the sealing element abutting the foundation.

  12. Methods and apparatus for producing and storing positrons and protons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2010-07-06

    Apparatus for producing and storing positrons may include a trap that defines an interior chamber therein and that contains an electric field and a magnetic field. The trap may further include a source material that includes atoms that, when activated by photon bombardment, become positron emitters to produce positrons. The trap may also include a moderator positioned adjacent the source material. A photon source is positioned adjacent the trap so that photons produced by the photon source bombard the source material to produce the positron emitters. Positrons from the positron emitters and moderated positrons from the moderator are confined within the interior chamber of the trap by the electric and magnetic fields. Apparatus for producing and storing protons are also disclosed.

  13. Wind Turbine Tower for Storing Hydrogen and Energy - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Wind Energy Wind Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Energy Storage Energy Storage Find More Like This Return to Search Wind Turbine Tower for Storing Hydrogen and Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Around the world, there is an increasing demand for satisfying energy requirements in ways that use less or no fossil fuels. These alternatives need to be reliable, cost effective, and environmentally

  14. SIMULATIONS OF THE AGS MMPS STORING ENERGY IN CAPACITOR BANKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MARNERIS,I.; BADEA, V.S.; BONATI, R.; ROSER, T.; SANDBERG, J.

    2007-06-25

    The Brookhaven AGS Main Magnet Power Supply (MMPS) is a thyristor control supply rated at 5500 Amps, +/-9000 Volts. The peak magnet power is 50 MWatts. The power supply is fed from a motor/generator manufactured by Siemens. The generator is 3 phase 7500 Volts rated at 50 MVA. The peak power requirements come from the stored energy in the rotor of the motor/generator. The motor generator is about 45 years old, made by Siemens and it is not clear if companies will be manufacturing similar machines in the future. We are therefore investigating different ways of storing energy for future AGS MMPS operations. This paper will present simulations of a power supply where energy is stored in capacitor banks. Two dc to dc converters will be presented along with the control system of the power section. The switching elements will be IGCT's made by ABB. The simulation program used is called PSIM version 6.1. The average power from the local power authority into the power supply will be kept constant during the pulsing of the magnets at +/-50 MW. The reactive power will also be kept constant below 1.5 MVAR. Waveforms will be presented.

  15. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Description

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The home improvement market includes a range of private-sector entities that currently provide or could offer home energy upgrade services. Most of these entities are remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers; other actors are present in the sector (such as window installers and insulators), but this analysis focuses on these four main categories.

  16. Criteria for Packaging and Storing Uranium-233-Bearing Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3028-2000 July 2000 DOE STANDARD CRITERIA FOR PACKAGING AND STORING URANIUM-233-BEARING MATERIALS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S.

  17. Apparatus and methods for storing and releasing hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heung, Leung K.

    2000-01-01

    A rechargeable device that stores and discharges hydrogen is described. The device stores hydrogen in a solid form and supplies hydrogen as a gas when needed. The solid storage medium may be metal hydride in a ground particle form that avoids the need for compaction or other treatment. Dividers partition a container into separate chambers, each provided with a matrix, formed from an appropriate material like a thermally-conductive aluminum foam, which forms a number of cells. For proper chamber size, the ratio of chamber length to container diameter should be between about 0.5 and 2. Metal hydride particles (or other hydrogen storage medium) may be placed within the cells, which help prevent excessive particle settling. The container is provided with a hydrogen transfer port through which hydrogen gas passes upon either discharging from or charging of the metal hydride particles. A filter may be placed within the port to allow hydrogen to flow but prevent particles from escaping. A heat transferring surface is formed by, for instance, a channel that is thermally coupled with the aluminum foam. Fluid flows through the channel to deliver or remove heat during the respective hydrogen discharging or charging processes.

  18. Apparatus and methods for storing and releasing hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heung, Leung K.

    2001-01-01

    A rechargeable device that stores and discharges hydrogen is described. The device stores hydrogen in a solid form and supplies hydrogen as a gas when needed. The solid storage medium may be metal hydride in a ground particle form that avoids the need for compaction or other treatment. Dividers partition a container into separate chambers, each provided with a matrix, formed from an appropriate material like a thermally-conductive aluminum foam, which forms a number of cells. For proper chamber size, the ratio of chamber length to container diameter should be between about 0.5 and 2. Metal hydride particles (or other hydrogen storage medium) may be placed within the cells, which help prevent excessive particle settling. The container is provided with a hydrogen transfer port through which hydrogen gas passes upon either discharging from or charging of the metal hydride particles. A filter may be placed within the port to allow hydrogen to flow but prevent particles from escaping. A heat transferring surface is formed by, for instance, a channel that is thermally coupled with the aluminum foam. Fluid flows through the channel to deliver or remove heat during the respective hydrogen discharging or charging processes.

  19. A Mixed Nordic Experience: Implementing Competitive Retail Electricity Markets for Household Customers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Ole Jess; Johnsen, Tor Arnt; Lewis, Philip

    2006-11-15

    Although the Nordic countries were among the first to develop competition in the electricity industry, it took a long time to make retail competition work. In Norway and Sweden a considerable number of households are actively using the market but very few households are active in Finland and Denmark. One problem has been institutional barriers involving metering, limited unbundling of distribution and supply, and limited access to reliable information on contracts and prices. (author)

  20. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-05-11

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  1. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-06-24

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  2. Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Sun, Y.; Bush, B.

    2014-08-01

    Both hydrogen and plug-in electric vehicles offer significant social benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We compare retail infrastructure costs on a common basis - cost per mile, assuming fueling service to 10% of all light-duty vehicles in a typical 1.5 million person city in 2025. Our analysis considers three HRS sizes, four distinct types of EVSE and two distinct EVSE scenarios. EVSE station costs, including equipment and installation, are assumed to be 15% less than today's costs. We find that levelized retail capital costs per mile are essentially indistinguishable given the uncertainty and variability around input assumptions. Total fuel costs per mile for battery electric vehicle (BEV) and plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) are, respectively, 21% lower and 13% lower than that for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) under the home-dominant scenario. Including fuel economies and vehicle costs makes FCEVs and BEVs comparable in terms of costs per mile, and PHEVs are about 10% less than FCEVs and BEVs. To account for geographic variability in energy prices and hydrogen delivery costs, we use the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model and confirm the aforementioned estimate of cost per mile, nationally averaged, but see a 15% variability in regional costs of FCEVs and a 5% variability in regional costs for BEVs.

  3. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    9 Number of Stores and Average Sales in the Grocery Industry as of 2007 Store Type Supermarket Convenience Grocery (<$2million) Wholesale Clubs Military Convenience Stores Total Source(s): 0.4 2.2 196.2 963.9 DOE/EERE/Navigant Consulting, Energy Savings Potential and R&D Opportunities for Commercial Refrigeration, Sept. 2009, Table 3-2, p. 27. 145.9 306.6 13.7 18.2 1.2 101.5 Number of Stores US Annual Sales (1,000s) ($ Billions) 35.0 535.4

  4. Response of a store with tunable natural frequencies in compressible cavity flow

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Hunter, Patrick S.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Henfling, John F.

    2015-01-07

    Fluid-structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage were experimentally explored at Mach 0.94 and 1.47 using a generic, aerodynamic store installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of 7. Similar to previous studies using a cylindrical store, the aerodynamic store responded to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionally dependent response to cavity resonance. Moreover, cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas the spanwise response was much more limited.

  5. Thermal Analysis of ZPPR High Pu Content Stored Fuel

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Pope, Chad L.; Andrus, Jason P.

    2014-01-01

    The Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) operated from April 18, 1969, until 1990. ZPPR operated at low power for testing nuclear reactor designs. This paper examines the temperature of Pu content ZPPR fuel while it is in storage. Heat is generated in the fuel due to Pu and Am decay and is a concern for possible cladding damage. Damage to the cladding could lead to fuel hydriding and oxidizing. A series of computer simulations were made to determine the range of temperatures potentially occuring in the ZPPR fuel. The maximum calculated fuel temperature is 292°C (558°F). Conservative assumptions in themore » model intentionally overestimate temperatures. The stored fuel temperatures are dependent on the distribution of fuel in the surrounding storage compartments, the heat generation rate of the fuel, and the orientation of fuel. Direct fuel temperatures could not be measured but storage bin doors, storage sleeve doors, and storage canister temperatures were measured. Comparison of these three temperatures to the calculations indicates that the temperatures calculated with conservative assumptions are, as expected, higher than the actual temperatures. The maximum calculated fuel temperature with the most conservative assumptions is significantly below the fuel failure criterion of 600°C (1,112°F).« less

  6. Temperature environment for 9975 packages stored in KAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W. L.

    2015-09-10

    Plutonium materials are stored in the K Area Complex (KAC) in shipping packages, typically the 9975 shipping package. In order to estimate realistic degradation rates for components within the shipping package (i.e. the fiberboard overpack and O-ring seals), it is necessary to understand actual facility temperatures, which can vary daily and seasonally. Relevant facility temperature data available from several periods throughout its operating history have been reviewed. The annual average temperature within the Crane Maintenance Area has ranged from approximately 70 to 74 °F, although there is significant seasonal variation and lesser variation among different locations within the facility. The long-term average degradation rate for 9975 package components is very close to that expected if the component were to remain continually at the annual average temperature. This result remains valid for a wide range of activation energies (which describes the variation in degradation rate as the temperature changes), if the activation energy remains constant over the seasonal range of component temperatures. It is recommended that component degradation analyses and service life estimates incorporate these results. Specifically, it is proposed that future analyses assume an average facility ambient air temperature of 94 °F. This value is bounding for all packages, and includes margin for several factors such as increased temperatures within the storage arrays, the addition of more packages in the future, and future operational changes.

  7. Sulfur gas emissions from stored flue-gas-desulfurization sludges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, D.F.; Farwell, S.O.

    1980-01-01

    In field studies conducted for the Electric Power Research Institute by the University of Washington (1978) and the University of Idaho (1979), 13 gas samples from sludge storage sites at coal-burning power plants were analyzed by wall-coated open-tube cryogenic capillary-column gas chromatography with a sulfur-selective flame-photometric detector. Hydrogen sulfide, carbonyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, and dimethyl disulfide were identified in varying concentrations and ratios in the emissions from both operating sludge ponds and landfills and from FGD sludge surfaces that had been stored in the open for 3-32 mo or longer. Other sulfur compounds, probably propanethiols, were found in emissions from some sludges. Chemical ''stabilization/fixation'' sulfate-sulfite ratio, sludge water content, and temperature were the most significant variables controlling sulfur gas production. The average sulfur emissions from each of the 13 FGD storage sites ranged from 0.01 to 0.26 g/sq m/yr sulfur.

  8. To Own or Lease Solar: Understanding Commercial Retailers' Decisions to Use Alternative Financing Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, D.; Margolis, R.

    2014-12-01

    This report examines the tradeoffs among financing methods for businesses installing onsite photovoltaics (PV). We present case studies of PV financing strategies used by two large commercial retailers that have deployed substantial U.S. PV capacity: IKEA, which owns its PV, and Staples, which purchases power generated from onsite PV systems through power purchase agreements (PPAs). We also analyze the financial considerations that influence any company's choice of PV financing strategy. Our goal in this report is to clarify the financial and institutional costs and benefits of financing strategies and to inform other companies that are considering launching or expanding similar PV programs.

  9. Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2014" "Alaska" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Golden Valley Elec Assn Inc","Cooperative",1219363,276627,129773,812963,0 2,"Chugach Electric Assn Inc","Cooperative",1134527,513748,563581,57198,0 3,"Anchorage Municipal

  10. Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Retail Buildings (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in retail spaces are poorly understood.

  11. E85 Retail Business Case: When and Why to Sell E85

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    A national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future E85 Retail Business Case: When and Why to Sell E85 C. Johnson and M. Melendez Technical Report NREL/TP-540-41590 December 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 *

  12. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Retail Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Climate Zone Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 108.9 0.1 9.4 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate

  13. #AskEnergy: What's in Store for Wind? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AskEnergy: What's in Store for Wind? #AskEnergy: What's in Store for Wind? December 20, 2012 - 4:20pm Addthis April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs [storify:http://storify.com/ENERGY/askenergy-what-s-in-store-for-wind] Addthis Related Articles We Asked, You Answered: An #EnergyPledge Roundup #AskEnergy: What's in Store for Wind? Join Us Wednesday: #AskEnergy with Secretary Chu & Senator Mark Udall This is our Future: Secretary Chu and Senator

  14. S. 3047: A Bill to amend the antitrust laws in order to preserve and promote wholesale and retail competition in the retail gasoline market. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, September 13, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This bill would amend the antitrust laws in order to preserve and promote wholesale and retail competition in the retail gasoline market. The bill defines limits on the purchases required of a retailer from the producer or refiner and defines the exceptions under which any large integrated refiner can operate any motor fuel service station in the US. The Federal Trade Commission is charged with the enforcement.

  15. Energy Implications of Retrofitting Retail Sector Rooftop Units with Stepped-Speed and Variable-Speed Functionality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studer, D.; Romero, R.; Herrmann, L.; Benne, K.

    2012-04-01

    Commercial retailers understand that retrofitting constant-speed RTU fan motors with stepped- or variable-speed alternatives could save significant energy in most U.S. climate zones. However, they lack supporting data, both real-world and simulation based, on the cost effectiveness and climate zone-specific energy savings associated with this measure. Thus, building managers and engineers have been unable to present a compelling business case for fan motor upgrades to upper management. This study uses whole-building energy simulation to estimate the energy impact of this type of measure so retailers can determine its economic feasibility.

  16. The New Hampshire retail competition pilot program and the role of green marketing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, E.A.; Fang, J.M.

    1997-11-01

    Most states in the US are involved in electric industry restructuring, from considering the pros and cons in regulatory dockets to implementing legislative mandates for full restructuring and retail access for all consumers. Several states and utilities have initiated pilot programs in which multiple suppliers or service providers may compete for business and some utility customers can choose among competing suppliers. The State of New Hampshire has been experimenting with a pilot program, mandated by the State Legislature in 1995 and implemented by the New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission (NHPUC), before it implements full retail access. Green marketing, an attempt to characterize the supplier or service provider as environmentally friendly without referring to the energy resource used to generate electricity, was used by several suppliers or service providers to attract customers. This appeal to environmental consumerism was moderately successful, but it raised a number of consumer protection and public policy issues. This issue brief examines the marketing methods used in New Hampshire and explores what green marketing might mean for the development of renewable energy generation. It also addresses the issues raised and their implications.

  17. Thermal Analysis of ZPPR High Pu Content Stored Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles W. Solbrig; Chad Pope; Jason Andrus

    2014-09-01

    transfer contact resistance between contact surfaces (such as between the fuel and the clamshell), the calculated temperatures are intended to be overestimated. The temperatures of the stored fuel in a particular clamshell are dependent, among other parameters, on the distribution of fuel in the surrounding storage compartments, the heat generation rate of the fuel, and the orientation of fuel in the clamshell (parallel or perpendicular to the door). The distribution of fuel in this analysis was selected to give higher temperatures than actual distributions might give. Due to possible contamination and security concerns, fuel temperatures could not be measured but the bin doors, storage sleeve doors, and clamshell temperatures could be and were measured. The comparison of these three temperatures to the calculations indicates that the temperatures calculated with conservative assumptions are higher than the actual temperatures. This implies that the calculated fuel temperatures are higher than actual also. The maximum calculated fuel temperature with the most conservative assumptions (292 degrees C, (558 degrees F)) is significantly below the no fuel failure criterion of 600 degrees C (1,112 degrees F). Some fuel failures have occurred but these results indicate that the failures are not due to high temperatures encountered in fuel storage.

  18. Storing files in a parallel computing system based on user-specified parser function

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faibish, Sorin; Bent, John M; Tzelnic, Percy; Grider, Gary; Manzanares, Adam; Torres, Aaron

    2014-10-21

    Techniques are provided for storing files in a parallel computing system based on a user-specified parser function. A plurality of files generated by a distributed application in a parallel computing system are stored by obtaining a parser from the distributed application for processing the plurality of files prior to storage; and storing one or more of the plurality of files in one or more storage nodes of the parallel computing system based on the processing by the parser. The plurality of files comprise one or more of a plurality of complete files and a plurality of sub-files. The parser can optionally store only those files that satisfy one or more semantic requirements of the parser. The parser can also extract metadata from one or more of the files and the extracted metadata can be stored with one or more of the plurality of files and used for searching for files.

  19. Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Brown, Charles C.

    2014-12-14

    To date, all three reports in the retail lamps series have focused on basic performance parameters, such as lumen output, efficacy, and color quality. This report goes a step further, examining the photoelectric characteristics (i.e., dimming and flicker) of a subset of lamps from CALiPER Retails Lamps Study 3. Specifically, this report focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of 14 LED A lamps, as controlled by four different retail-available dimmers. The results demonstrate notable variation across the various lamps, but little variation between the four dimmers. Overall, the LED lamps: ~tended to have higher relative light output compared to the incandescent and halogen benchmark at the same dimmer output signal (RMS voltage). The lamps’ dimming curves (i.e., the relationship between control signal and relative light output) ranged from linear to very similar to the square-law curve typical of an incandescent lamp. ~generally exhibited symmetrical behavior—the same dimming curve—when measured proceeding from maximum to minimum or minimum to maximum control signal. ~mostly dimmed below 10% of full light output, with some exceptions for specific lamp and dimmer combinations ~exhibited a range of flicker characteristics, with many comparing favorably to the level typical of a magnetically-ballasted fluorescent lamp through at least a majority of the dimming range. ~ always exceeded the relative (normalized) efficacy over the dimming range of the benchmark lamps, which rapidly decline in efficacy when they are dimmed. This report generally does not attempt to rank the performance of one product compared to another, but instead focuses on the collective performance of the group versus conventional incandescent or halogen lamps, the performance of which is likely to be the baseline for a majority of consumers. Undoubtedly, some LED lamps perform better—or more similar to conventional lamps—than others. Some perform desirably for one

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Retail Buildings (1) Shell Percent Glass 0.4 Window (U-Factor 0.38-0.69 SHGC 0.40-0.44 Wall R-Value (2) 7.6-15.2 c.i. Roof R-Value Attic 30-60 Insulation Above Deck 15-25 c.i. Lighting Average Power Density (W/ft.^2) 1.3 System and Plant Heating Plant Gas Furnace(>225 kBtuh) 80% Combustion Efficiency Cooling Plant Air conditioner (>135-240 kBtuh) 10.8 EER/11.2 IPLV - 11.0 EER/11.5 IPLV Service Hot Water Gas Storage Water Heater (>75kBtuh) 90%

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 2010 Top Chain Restaurants, by Sales Franchised Company-owned Total Chain Stores Stores Stores McDonald's 32.4 4.5% 1,550 Subway (1) 10.6 6.0% 0 Burger King (1,2) 8.6 -4.4% 873 Wendy's (1) 8.3 -0.6% 1,394 Starbucks Coffee (1) 7.6 -9.4% 6,707 Taco Bell 6.9 1.5% 1,245 Dunkin' Donuts (1) 6.0 5.3% 26 Pizza Hut 5.4 8.0% 459 KFC 4.7 -4.1% 780 Sonic 3.6 -5.7% 455 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes figures estimated by Technomic, Inc. 2) Total change in units calculated from data reported in 2010 QSR 50

  2. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics ofCommercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2007-07-03

    To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer's underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems. Key conclusions for policymakers that emerge from our analysis are as follows: {sm_bullet} Rate design is fundamental to the economics of commercial PV. The rate-reduction value of PV for our sample of commercial customers, considering all available retail tariffs, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh, reflecting differences in rate structures, the revenue requirements of the various utilities, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shapes. For the average customer in our sample, differences in rate structure, alone, alter the value of PV by 25% to 75%, depending on the size of the PV system relative to building load. {sm_bullet} TOU-based energy-focused rates can provide substantial value to many PV customers. Retail rates that wrap all or most utility cost recovery needs into time-of-use (TOU)-based volumetric energy rates, and which exclude or limit demand-based charges, provide the most value to PV systems across a wide variety of circumstances. Expanding the availability of such rates will increase the value of many commercial PV systems. {sm_bullet} Offering commercial customers a variety of rate options would be of value to PV. Despite the advantages of energy-focused rates for PV

  3. NREL's Energy Databus storing big energy data | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NREL's Energy Databus storing big energy data Home > Blogs > Graham7781's blog Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 26 June, 2013 - 09:17 campus...

  4. Labyrinth to Store Energy in Basement for Later Use - News Feature...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In winter, the labyrinth will store heat drawn from the computers in the new data center and outside air warmed by the sun beating down on a transpired air collector. Waste Heat ...

  5. Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of Years of CO2 Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geologic capacity exists to permanently store hundreds of years of regional carbon dioxide emissions in nine states stretching from Indiana to New Jersey, according to injection field tests conducted by the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership.

  6. Development of a Bulk-Format System to Harvest, Handle, Store...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a Bulk-Format System to Harvest, Handle, Store, and Deliver High-Tonnage generaprojectabstract1.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of a Bulk-Format System to Harvest,...

  7. GE Store for Technology is Open for Business | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this way. The GE Store is a place where every business can come for technologies, product development and services that no one else can provide. The work of our researchers ties...

  8. Net Metering and Market Feedback Loops: Exploring the Impact of Retail Rate Design on Distributed PV Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darghouth, Naïm R.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Mills, Andrew

    2015-01-13

    The substantial increase in deployment of customer-sited solar photovoltaics (PV) in the United States has been driven by a combination of steeply declining costs, financing innovations, and supportive policies. Among those supportive policies is net metering, which in most states effectively allows customers to receive compensation for distributed PV generation at the full retail electricity price. The current design of retail electricity rates and the presence of net metering have elicited concerns that the possible under-recovery of fixed utility costs from PV system owners may lead to a feedback loop of increasing retail prices that accelerate PV adoption and further rate increases. However, a separate and opposing feedback loop could offset this effect: increased PV deployment may lead to a shift in the timing of peak-period electricity prices that could reduce the bill savings received under net metering where time-varying retail electricity rates are used, thereby dampening further PV adoption. In this paper, we examine the impacts of these two competing feedback dynamics on U.S. distributed PV deployment through 2050 for both residential and commercial customers, across states. Our results indicate that, at the aggregate national level, the two feedback effects nearly offset one another and therefore produce a modest net effect, although their magnitude and direction vary by customer segment and by state. We also model aggregate PV deployment trends under various rate designs and net-metering rules, accounting for feedback dynamics. Our results demonstrate that future adoption of distributed PV is highly sensitive to retail rate structures. Whereas flat, time-invariant rates with net metering lead to higher aggregate national deployment levels than the current mix of rate structures (+5% in 2050), rate structures with higher monthly fixed customer charges or PV compensation at levels lower than the full retail rate can dramatically erode aggregate customer

  9. Should utility incumbents be able to extend their brand name to competitive retail markets? An economic perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abel, J.R.; Clements, M.E.

    1998-06-01

    As retail competition begins, at least for the short run, there should be policy restrictions on an incumbent utility`s ability to extend its brand to an affiliated marketer. However, a utility-affiliated marketer should be permitted to compete in a newly deregulated market using a generic or self-developed brand name. If extending a brand name from an incumbent utility to an affiliated marketer does in fact create real barriers to entry in the retail market, competition will be crippled in this market and consumers will suffer. More important, deregulation will appear to have failed in the electric power market--a consequence with effects reaching past the electricity industry to other industries considering deregulation as a viable policy choice. However, if real barriers to entry are not erected by this type of brand name extension, the industry may suffer from lower quality products, less service, and reduced innovation if policymakers prohibit brand name extension.

  10. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles Preprint M. Melaina National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. Bremson University of California Davis K. Solo Lexidyne, LLC Presented at the 31st USAEE/IAEE North American Conference Austin, Texas November 4-7, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5600-56898 January 2013 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a

  11. Ammonia reactions with the stored oxygen in a commercial lean NOx trap catalyst

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bartova, Sarka; Mracek, David; Koci, Petr; Marek, Milos; Choi, Jae -Soon

    2014-10-12

    Ammonia is an important intermediate of the NOx reduction in a NOx storage and reduction catalyst (aka lean NOx trap). NH3 formed under rich conditions in the reduced front part of the catalyst is transported by convection downstream to the unregenerated (still oxidized) zone of the catalyst, where it further reacts with the stored oxygen and NOx. In this paper, the kinetics and selectivity of NH3 reactions with the stored oxygen are studied in detail with a commercial Ba-based NOx storage catalyst containing platinum group metals (PGM), Ba and Ce oxides. Furthermore, steady-state NH3 decomposition, NH3 oxidation by O2 andmore » NO, and N2O decomposition are examined in light-off experiments. Periodic lean/rich cycling is measured first with O2 and NH3, and then with NOx + O2 and NH3 to discriminate between the NH3 reactions with the stored oxygen and the stored NOx. The reaction of NH3 with the stored O2 is highly selective towards N2, however a certain amount of NOx and N2O is also formed. The formed NOx by-product is efficiently adsorbed on the NOx storage sites such that the NOx is not detected at the reactor outlet except at high temperatures. The stored NOx reacts with NH3 feed in the next rich phase, contributing to the N2O formation. Water inhibits the reactions of NH3 with the stored oxygen. On the contrary, the presence of CO2 increases the NH3 consumption. Furthermore, CO2 is able to provide additional oxygen for NH3 oxidation, forming –CO in analogy to the reverse water gas shift reaction.« less

  12. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on retail electricity rates and utility financial viability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodmer, E.; Fisher, R.E.; Hemphill, R.C.

    1995-03-01

    Changes in power contract terms for customers of Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office affect electricity rates for consumers of electric power in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. The impacts of electricity rate changes on consumers are studied by measuring impacts on the rates charged by individual utility systems, determining the average rates in regional areas, and conducting a detailed rate analysis of representative utility systems. The primary focus is an evaluation of the way retail electricity rates for Western`s preference customers vary with alternative pricing and power quantity commitment terms under Western`s long-term contracts to sell power (marketing programs). Retail rate impacts are emphasized because changes in the price of electricity are the most direct economic effect on businesses and residences arising from different Western contractual and operational policies. Retail rates are the mechanism by which changes in cost associated with Western`s contract terms are imposed on ultimate consumers, and rate changes determine the dollar level of payments for electric power incurred by the affected consumers. 41 figs., 9 tabs.

  13. In-situ fault detection apparatus and method for an encased energy storing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagen, Ronald A.; Comte, Christophe; Knudson, Orlin B.; Rosenthal, Brian; Rouillard, Jean

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting a breach in an electrically insulating surface of an electrically conductive power system enclosure within which a number of series connected energy storing devices are disposed. The energy storing devices disposed in the enclosure are connected to a series power connection. A detector is coupled to the series connection and detects a change of state in a test signal derived from the series connected energy storing devices. The detector detects a breach in the insulating layer of the enclosure by detecting a state change in the test signal from a nominal state to a non-nominal state. A voltage detector detects a state change of the test signals from a nominal state, represented by a voltage of a selected end energy storing device, to a non-nominal state, represented by a voltage that substantially exceeds the voltage of the selected opposing end energy storing device. Alternatively, the detector may comprise a signal generator that produces the test signal as a time-varying or modulated test signal and injects the test signal into the series connection. The detector detects the state change of the time-varying or modulated test signal from a nominal state, represented by a signal substantially equivalent to the test signal, to a non-nominal state, representative by an absence of the test signal.

  14. High-Efficiency Retrofit Lessons for Retail from a SuperTarget: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langner, R.; Deru, M.; Hirsch, A.; Williams, S.

    2013-02-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory partnered with Target under the Commercial Building Program to design and implement a retrofit of a SuperTarget in Thornton, CO. The result was a retrofit design that predicted 37% energy savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004, and 29% compared to existing (pre-retrofit) store consumption. The largest savings came from energy efficient lighting, energy efficient cooling systems, improved refrigeration, and better control of plug loads.

  15. Technical Support Document: The Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Retail Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Bing; Jarnagin, Ronald E.; Winiarski, David W.; Jiang, Wei; McBride, Merle F.; Crall, C.

    2006-09-30

    The Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Retail Buildings (AEDG-SR) was developed by a partnership of organizations, including the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA), the United States Green Buildings Council (USGBC), and the Department of Energy (DOE). The guide is intended to offer recommendations to achieve 30% energy savings and thus to encourage steady progress towards net-zero energy buildings. The baseline level energy use was set at buildings built at the turn of the millennium, which are assumed to be based on ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (refer to as the ?Standard? in this report). ASHRAE and its partners are engaged in the development of a series of guides for small commercial buildings, with the AEDG-SR being the second in the series. Previously the partnership developed the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Office Buildings: Achieving 30% Energy Savings Over ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999, which was published in late 2004. The technical support document prepared by PNNL details how the energy analysis performed in support of the Guide and documents development of recommendation criteria.

  16. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Energy Benchmarks for Existing Retail Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Miami 1A 0.5 0.7 23.0 25.2 14.3 16.1 Houston 2A 11.6 12.4 16.2 18.9 14.6 16.9 Phoenix 2B 8.3 10.2 17.2 21.3 14.2 17.5 Atlanta 3A 24.9 26.2 9.2 11.2 15.1 17.4 Los Angeles 3B 6.9 7.7 3.3 3.9 13.4 14.1 Las Vegas 3B 15.4 17.9 11.6 14.8 12.7 16.9 San Francisco 3C 22.4 22.5 0.7 1.0 10.6 12.1 Baltimore 4A 43.0 46.9 6.2 7.9 13.3 16.2 Albuquerque 4B 30.2 33.8 5.3

  17. Influence of store dimensions and auxiliary volume configuration on the performance of medium-sized solar combisystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundh, Magdalena; Zass, Katrin; Wilhelms, Claudius; Vajen, Klaus; Jordan, Ulrike

    2010-07-15

    To increase the fractional energy savings achieved with solar thermal combisystems the store volume may be increased. Installation of large stores in single-family houses is, however, often limited by space constraints. In this article the influence of the store dimensions, as well as internal and external auxiliary volume configurations, are investigated for large solar water stores by annual dynamic TRNSYS simulations. The results show that store sizes up to 4 m{sup 3} may be used in solar heating systems with 30 m{sup 2} collector area. It is further shown that well-insulated stores are rather insensitive to the geometry. Stores deviating from the conventional dimensions still yield high fractional energy savings. Furthermore, the simulations show that the performance of an internal auxiliary volume configuration in most cases exceeds that of a solution with an external auxiliary unit. The practical limitations of very thin auxiliary volumes must, however, be further investigated. (author)

  18. An assessment of the viability of storing FFTF sodium in tank cars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, M.W.; Burke, T.M.

    1995-01-27

    Current FFTF Transition Project plans call for construction of a Sodium Storage Facility to store the plant sodium until it is processed either as product or waste. This report evaluates an alternative concept which would store the sodium in rail tank cars. It is concluded that utilizing a simple facility for offloading the FFTF sodium to standard industrial tank cars is not technically viable. Mitigation of potential radioactive sodium spills requires that the offload facility incorporate many of the features of the sodium storage facility. With these mitigation features incorporated, there is no significant cost or schedule advantage for the option of storing the FFTF sodium in tank cars when compared to the currently planned SSF. In addition, it is believed that the tank car option results in higher risk to project success because of unknowns associated with technical, regulatory, and public perception issues. It is therefore recommended that the project proceed with definitive design of the SSF.

  19. Y-12 dietician conducts educational tour of local grocery store | Y-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Security Complex dietician conducts ... Y-12 dietician conducts educational tour of local grocery store Posted: March 5, 2014 - 10:56am Amy Hinkel, left,compares nutrition labels on yogurt containers with her mom Vicki. Amy Hinkel, left, compares nutrition labels on yogurt containers with her mom Vicki as LiveWise dietician Karen Lacey educates Y-12 employees and their families on making good choices in the grocery store. Lacey recently led a tour of the Oak Ridge Food City where

  20. Energy Department Project Captures and Stores more than One Million Metric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tons of CO2 | Department of Energy Project Captures and Stores more than One Million Metric Tons of CO2 Energy Department Project Captures and Stores more than One Million Metric Tons of CO2 June 26, 2014 - 11:30am Addthis Aerial view of Air Products’ existing steam methane reforming facility at Port Arthur, Texas, with new carbon-capture units and central co-gen and CO2 product compressor. | Photo courtesy of Air Products and Chemicals Inc. Aerial view of Air Products' existing steam

  1. Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Domestic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oil | Department of Energy Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Domestic Oil Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Domestic Oil May 10, 2013 - 11:38am Addthis Learn more about how the Office of Fossil Energy's carbon capture, utilization and storage program is benefiting the economy and the environment. Christopher A. Smith Christopher A. Smith Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy What does this project do? More than 90% of the CO2 at the

  2. Hypoxic remodelling of Ca{sup 2+} stores does not alter human cardiac myofibroblast invasion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riches, K.; Hettiarachchi, N.T.; Porter, K.E.; Peers, C.

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Bradykinin promotes migration and proliferation of myofibroblasts. {yields} Such activity is Ca{sup 2+}-dependent and occurs under hypoxic conditions. {yields} Hypoxia increased myofibroblast Ca{sup 2+} stores but not influx evoked by bradykinin. {yields} Myofibroblast migration and proliferation was unaffected by hypoxia. -- Abstract: Cardiac fibroblasts are the most abundant cell type in the heart, and play a key role in the maintenance and repair of the myocardium following damage such as myocardial infarction by transforming into a cardiac myofibroblast (CMF) phenotype. Repair occurs through controlled proliferation and migration, which are Ca{sup 2+} dependent processes, and often requires the cells to operate within a hypoxic environment. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce infarct size through the promotion of bradykinin (BK) stability. Although CMF express BK receptors, their activity under the reduced O{sub 2} conditions that occur following infarct are entirely unexplored. Using Fura-2 microfluorimetry on primary human CMF, we found that hypoxia significantly increased the mobilisation of Ca{sup 2+} from intracellular stores in response to BK whilst capacitative Ca{sup 2+} entry (CCE) remained unchanged. The enhanced store mobilisation was due to a striking increase in CMF intracellular Ca{sup 2+}-store content under hypoxic conditions. However, BK-induced CMF migration or proliferation was not affected following hypoxic exposure, suggesting that Ca{sup 2+} influx rather than mobilisation is of primary importance in CMF migration and proliferation.

  3. Energy Department Project Captures and Stores One Million Metric Tons of Carbon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of President Obama’s all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Department of Energy announced today that its Illinois Basin-Decatur Project successfully captured and stored one million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) and injected it into a deep saline formation.

  4. Software Library for Storing and Retrieving Mesh and Results of Finite Element

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-07-07

    EXOII is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code transfer. An EXOII data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface (API).

  5. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Preprint

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles Preprint M. Melaina National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. Bremson University of California Davis K. Solo Lexidyne, LLC Presented at the 31st USAEE/IAEE North American Conference Austin, Texas November 4-7, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5600-56898

  6. Solar Trough Organic Rankine Electricity System (STORES) Stage 1: Power Plant Optimization and Economics; November 2000 -- May 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabhu, E.

    2006-03-01

    Report regarding a Stage 1 Study to further develop the concept of the Solar Trough Organic Rankine Cycle Electricity Systems (STORES).

  7. Storing files in a parallel computing system using list-based index to identify replica files

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faibish, Sorin; Bent, John M.; Tzelnic, Percy; Zhang, Zhenhua; Grider, Gary

    2015-07-21

    Improved techniques are provided for storing files in a parallel computing system using a list-based index to identify file replicas. A file and at least one replica of the file are stored in one or more storage nodes of the parallel computing system. An index for the file comprises at least one list comprising a pointer to a storage location of the file and a storage location of the at least one replica of the file. The file comprises one or more of a complete file and one or more sub-files. The index may also comprise a checksum value for one or more of the file and the replica(s) of the file. The checksum value can be evaluated to validate the file and/or the file replica(s). A query can be processed using the list.

  8. Storing and managing information artifacts collected by information analysts using a computing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pike, William A; Riensche, Roderick M; Best, Daniel M; Roberts, Ian E; Whyatt, Marie V; Hart, Michelle L; Carr, Norman J; Thomas, James J

    2012-09-18

    Systems and computer-implemented processes for storage and management of information artifacts collected by information analysts using a computing device. The processes and systems can capture a sequence of interactive operation elements that are performed by the information analyst, who is collecting an information artifact from at least one of the plurality of software applications. The information artifact can then be stored together with the interactive operation elements as a snippet on a memory device, which is operably connected to the processor. The snippet comprises a view from an analysis application, data contained in the view, and the sequence of interactive operation elements stored as a provenance representation comprising operation element class, timestamp, and data object attributes for each interactive operation element in the sequence.

  9. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of transuranic wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical and chemical characterization data for transuranic radioactive wastes and transuranic radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program (PSPI). Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 139 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 39,380{sup 3} corresponding to a total mass of approximately 19,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats Plant generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

  10. Modeling predicts which counties could store more carbon in soil by growing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bioenergy crops | Argonne National Laboratory Modeling predicts which counties could store more carbon in soil by growing bioenergy crops By Katie Elyce Jones * July 13, 2016 Tweet EmailPrint To help stakeholders in government and business make smart decisions about the best types of land and local climates for planting bioenergy crops, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory are using computational modeling to predict which counties could see

  11. Hydrogen Gas Generation Model for Fuel Based Remote Handled TRU Waste Stored at INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soli T. Khericha; Rajiv N. Bhatt; Kevin Liekhus

    2003-02-01

    The Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) initiated efforts to calculate the hydrogen gas generation in remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) containers in order to evaluate continued storage of unvented RH-TRU containers in vaults and to identify any potential problems during retrieval and aboveground storage. A computer code is developed to calculate the hydrogen concentration in the stored RH-TRU waste drums for known configuration, waste matrix, and radionuclide inventories as a function of time.

  12. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Bremson, J.; Solo, K.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of retail stations can be a significant barrier to the adoption of alternative fuel light-duty vehicles in household markets. This is especially the case during early market growth when retail stations are likely to be sparse and when vehicles are dedicated in the sense that they can only be fuelled with a new alternative fuel. For some bi-fuel vehicles, which can also fuel with conventional gasoline or diesel, limited availability will not necessarily limit vehicle sales but can limit fuel use. The impact of limited availability on vehicle purchase decisions is largely a function of geographic coverage and consumer perception. In this paper we review previous attempts to quantify the value of availability and present results from two studies that rely upon distinct methodologies. The first study relies upon stated preference data from a discrete choice survey and the second relies upon a station clustering algorithm and a rational actor value of time framework. Results from the two studies provide an estimate of the discrepancy between stated preference cost penalties and a lower bound on potential revealed cost penalties.

  13. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M. W.; Heath, G.; Sandor, D.; Steward, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Warner, E.; Webster, K. W.

    2013-04-01

    Achieving the Department of Energy target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 depends on transportation-related strategies combining technology innovation, market adoption, and changes in consumer behavior. This study examines expanding low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure to achieve deep GHG emissions reductions, with an emphasis on fuel production facilities and retail components serving light-duty vehicles. Three distinct low-carbon fuel supply scenarios are examined: Portfolio: Successful deployment of a range of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies; Combustion: Market dominance by hybridized internal combustion engine vehicles fueled by advanced biofuels and natural gas; Electrification: Market dominance by electric drive vehicles in the LDV sector, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles, that are fueled by low-carbon electricity and hydrogen. A range of possible low-carbon fuel demand outcomes are explored in terms of the scale and scope of infrastructure expansion requirements and evaluated based on fuel costs, energy resource utilization, fuel production infrastructure expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion for LDVs. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored transportation-related strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence.

  14. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics ofCustomer-Sited PV: A Study of Commercial Installations inCalifornia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2007-06-01

    We analyze the impact of retail rate design on the economics of grid-connected commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems in California. The analysis is based on 15-minute interval building load and PV production data for 24 commercial PV installations in California, spanning a diverse set of building load shapes and geographic locations. We derive the annual bill savings per kWh generated for each PV system, under each of 21 distinct retail rates currently offered by the five largest utilities in California. We identify and explain variation in the value of bill savings attributable to differences in the structure of demand and energy charges across rates, as well as variation attributable to other factors, such as the size of the PV system relative to building load, the specific shape of the PV production profile, and the customer load profile. We also identify the optimal rate for each customer, among those rates offered as alternatives to one another, and show how the decision is driven in large measure by the size of the PV system relative to building load. The findings reported here may be of value to regulators and utilities responsible for designing retail rates, as well as to customers and PV retailers who have a need to estimate the prospective bill savings of PV systems.

  15. SIMULATION RESULTS OF RUNNING THE AGS MMPS, BY STORING ENERGY IN CAPACITOR BANKS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MARNERIS, I.

    2006-09-01

    The Brookhaven AGS is a strong focusing accelerator which is used to accelerate protons and various heavy ion species to equivalent maximum proton energy of 29 GeV. The AGS Main Magnet Power Supply (MMPS) is a thyristor control supply rated at 5500 Amps, +/-go00 Volts. The peak magnet power is 49.5 Mwatts. The power supply is fed from a motor/generator manufactured by Siemens. The motor is rated at 9 MW, input voltage 3 phase 13.8 KV 60 Hz. The generator is rated at 50 MVA its output voltage is 3 phase 7500 Volts. Thus the peak power requirements come from the stored energy in the rotor of the motor/generator. The rotor changes speed by about +/-2.5% of its nominal speed of 1200 Revolutions per Minute. The reason the power supply is powered by the Generator is that the local power company (LIPA) can not sustain power swings of +/- 50 MW in 0.5 sec if the power supply were to be interfaced directly with the AC lines. The Motor Generator is about 45 years old and Siemens is not manufacturing similar machines in the future. As a result we are looking at different ways of storing energy and being able to utilize it for our application. This paper will present simulations of a power supply where energy is stored in capacitor banks. The simulation program used is called PSIM Version 6.1. The control system of the power supply will also be presented. The average power from LIPA into the power supply will be kept constant during the pulsing of the magnets at +/-50 MW. The reactive power will also be kept constant below 1.5 MVAR. Waveforms will be presented.

  16. Apparatus for storing high magnetic fields having reduced mechanical forces and reduced magnetic pollution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, M.L.; Mueller, F.M.; Smith, J.L.

    1991-04-09

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of storing extremely high magnetic fields for the purpose of energy storage or for other uses, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements and the magnetic field pollution produced at locations away from the configuration are both significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by currently proposed techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency. 15 figures.

  17. Apparatus for storing high magnetic fields having reduced mechanical forces and reduced magnetic pollution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L.; Mueller, Fred M.; Smith, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of storing extremely high magnetic fields for the purpose of energy storage or for other uses, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements and the magnetic field pollution produced at locations away from the configuration are both significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by currently proposed techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency.

  18. Strategies to Save 50% Site Energy in Grocery and General Merchandise Stores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Strategies to Save 50% Site Energy in Grocery and General Merchandise Stores Adam Hirsch, Elaine Hale, and Matthew Leach Presented at the ACEEE Summer Study 2010 Pacific Grove, California August 15-20, 2010 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-48197 March 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a

  19. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide: Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Grocery Stores (Revised) (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendron, B.

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed the Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) to provide specific methodologies, information, and guidance to help energy managers and other stakeholders successfully plan and execute energy efficiency improvements. Detailed technical discussion is fairly limited in these guides. Instead, we emphasize actionable information, practical methodologies, diverse case studies, and unbiased evaluations of the most promising retrofit measures for each building type. A series of AERGs is under development, addressing key segments of the commercial building stock. Grocery stores were selected as one of the highest priority sectors, because they represent one of the most energy-intensive market segments.

  20. Nuclear wastes: as they build up, so does the dispute over storing them

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuziak, S.M.; Havemann, J.

    1980-12-20

    Congress has been unable to resolve the policy issues of high-level radioactive wastes sought by both the environmentalists and the nuclear industry. Defense programs continue to generate these wastes, which are stored at sites in South Carolina, Idaho, and Washington and at a former commercial reprocessing site in New York. Neither the House bill (HR 8378) which sought to include defense wastes in public policy nor the Senate bill (S 2189) which authorized Federally-built away from reactor vaults for commercial wastes proved acceptable. The accumulation of spent fuel is the major commercial disposal problem. States may form regional agreements to handle the disposal of low-level wastes. (DCK)

  1. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium Box Retail -- 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, E. T.; Macumber, D. L.; Long, N. L.; Griffith, B. T.; Benne, K. S.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini, P. A.

    2008-09-01

    This report provides recommendations that architects, designers, contractors, developers, owners, and lessees of medium box retail buildings can use to achieve whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004. The recommendations are given by climate zone and address building envelope, fenestration, lighting systems, HVAC systems, building automation and controls, outside air treatment, service water heating, plug loads, and photovoltaic systems. The report presents several paths to 50% savings, which correspond to different levels of integrated design. These are recommendations only, and are not part of a code or standard. The recommendations are not exhaustive, but we do try to emphasize the benefits of integrated building design, that is, a design approach that analyzes a building as a whole system, rather than as a disconnected collection of individually engineered subsystems.

  2. EIS-0277: Management of Certain Plutonium Residues and Scrub Alloy Stored at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the potential alternatives and impacts associated with a proposal to process certain plutonium residues and all of the scrub alloy currently stored at Rocky Flats. While ongoing...

  3. Cloud object store for archive storage of high performance computing data using decoupling middleware

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin; Grider, Gary

    2015-06-30

    Cloud object storage is enabled for archived data, such as checkpoints and results, of high performance computing applications using a middleware process. A plurality of archived files, such as checkpoint files and results, generated by a plurality of processes in a parallel computing system are stored by obtaining the plurality of archived files from the parallel computing system; converting the plurality of archived files to objects using a log structured file system middleware process; and providing the objects for storage in a cloud object storage system. The plurality of processes may run, for example, on a plurality of compute nodes. The log structured file system middleware process may be embodied, for example, as a Parallel Log-Structured File System (PLFS). The log structured file system middleware process optionally executes on a burst buffer node.

  4. Cloud object store for checkpoints of high performance computing applications using decoupling middleware

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin; Grider, Gary

    2016-04-19

    Cloud object storage is enabled for checkpoints of high performance computing applications using a middleware process. A plurality of files, such as checkpoint files, generated by a plurality of processes in a parallel computing system are stored by obtaining said plurality of files from said parallel computing system; converting said plurality of files to objects using a log structured file system middleware process; and providing said objects for storage in a cloud object storage system. The plurality of processes may run, for example, on a plurality of compute nodes. The log structured file system middleware process may be embodied, for example, as a Parallel Log-Structured File System (PLFS). The log structured file system middleware process optionally executes on a burst buffer node.

  5. A survey of routing techniques in store-and-forward and wormhole interconnects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holman, David Michael; Lee, David S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of algorithms for directing messages through networks of varying topology. These are commonly referred to as routing algorithms in the literature that is presented. In addition to providing background on networking terminology and router basics, the paper explains the issues of deadlock and livelock as they apply to routing. After this, there is a discussion of routing algorithms for both store-and-forward and wormhole-switched networks. The paper covers both algorithms that do and do not adapt to conditions in the network. Techniques targeting structured as well as irregular topologies are discussed. Following this, strategies for routing in the presence of faulty nodes and links in the network are described.

  6. Store operation with conditional push of a tag value to a queue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard

    2015-07-28

    According to one embodiment, a method for a store operation with a conditional push of a tag value to a queue is provided. The method includes configuring a queue that is accessible by an application, setting a value at an address in a memory device including a memory and a controller, receiving a request for an operation using the value at the address and performing the operation. The method also includes the controller writing a result of the operation to the address, thus changing the value at the address, the controller determining if the result of the operation meets a condition and the controller pushing a tag value to the queue based on the condition being met, where the tag value in the queue indicates to the application that the condition is met.

  7. HybridStore: A Cost-Efficient, High-Performance Storage System Combining SSDs and HDDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Youngjae; Gupta, Aayush; Urgaonkar, Bhuvan; Piotr, Berman; Sivasubramaniam, Anand

    2011-01-01

    Unlike the use of DRAM for caching or buffering, certain idiosyncrasies of NAND Flash-based solid-state drives (SSDs) make their integration into existing systems non-trivial. Flash memory suffers from limits on its reliability, is an order of magnitude more expensive than the magnetic hard disk drives (HDDs), and can sometimes be as slow as the HDD (due to excessive garbage collection (GC) induced by high intensity of random writes). Given these trade-offs between HDDs and SSDs in terms of cost, performance, and lifetime, the current consensus among several storage experts is to view SSDs not as a replacement for HDD but rather as a complementary device within the high-performance storage hierarchy. We design and evaluate such a hybrid system called HybridStore to provide: (a) HybridPlan: improved capacity planning technique to administrators with the overall goal of operating within cost-budgets and (b) HybridDyn: improved performance/lifetime guarantees during episodes of deviations from expected workloads through two novel mechanisms: write-regulation and fragmentation busting. As an illustrative example of HybridStore s ef cacy, HybridPlan is able to nd the most cost-effective storage con guration for a large scale workload of Microsoft Research and suggest one MLC SSD with ten 7.2K RPM HDDs instead of fourteen 7.2K RPM HDDs only. HybridDyn is able to reduce the average response time for an enterprise scale random-write dominant workload by about 71% as compared to a HDD-based system.

  8. Energy Savings Week: Standards for Kitchen and Laundry Products...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... of Bethany Sparn, NREL 25545 Energy-Efficient Home Appliances Can Save You Money FACT: Consumers are saving more than 62 billion a year as a result of the Energy Department's ...

  9. Control of Plasma-Stored Energy for Burn Control using DIII-D In-Vessel Coils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawryluk, R. J.; Eidietis, N. W.; Grierson, B. A.; Hyatt, A. W.; Koleman, E.; Logan, N. C.; Nazikian, R.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Wolf, S.

    2014-09-01

    A new approach has been experimentally demonstrated to control the stored energy by applying a non-axisymmetric magnetic field using the DIII-D in-vessel coils to modify the energy confinement time. In future burning plasma experiments as well as magnetic fusion energy power plants, various concepts have been proposed to control the fusion power. The fusion power in a power plant operating at high gain can be related to the plasma-stored energy and hence, is a strong function of the energy confinement time. Thus, an actuator, that modifies the confinement time, can be used to adjust the fusion power. In relatively low collisionality DIII-D discharges, the application of non-axisymmetric magnetic fields results in a decrease in confinement time and density pumpout. Gas puffing was used to compensate the density pumpout in the pedestal while control of the stored energy was demonstrated by the application of non-axisymmetric fields.

  10. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pine Bluff Arsenal, Pine Bluff, Arkansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ensminger, J.T.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.D.; Morrisey, J.A.; Staub, W.P.; Boston, C.R.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Leibsch, E.; Rickert, L.W.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1991-09-01

    The Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) near Pine Bluff, Arkansas, is one of eight continental United States (CONUS) Army installations where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at PBA consists of approximately 12%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts). The purpose of this report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at PBA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those on which the FPEIS is based. New population data were used to compute fatalities using the same computation methods and values for all other parameters as in the FPEIS. Results indicate that all alternatives are indistinguishable when the potential health impacts to the PBA community are considered. However, risks from on-site disposal are in all cases equal to or less than risks from other alternatives. Furthermore, no unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at PBA have been identified.

  11. Hot Cell Liners Category of Transuranic Waste Stored Below Ground within Area G

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Robert Wesley; Hargis, Kenneth Marshall

    2014-09-01

    A large wildfire called the Las Conchas Fire burned large areas near Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2011 and heightened public concern and news media attention over transuranic (TRU) waste stored at LANL’s Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G waste management facility. The removal of TRU waste from Area G had been placed at a lower priority in budget decisions for environmental cleanup at LANL because TRU waste removal is not included in the March 2005 Compliance Order on Consent (Reference 1) that is the primary regulatory driver for environmental cleanup at LANL. The Consent Order is an agreement between LANL and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) that contains specific requirements and schedules for cleaning up historical contamination at the LANL site. After the Las Conchas Fire, discussions were held by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with the NMED on accelerating TRU waste removal from LANL and disposing it at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report summarizes available information on the origin, configuration, and composition of the waste containers within the Hot Cell Liners category; their physical and radiological characteristics; the results of the radioassays; and the justification to reclassify the five containers as LLW rather than TRU waste.

  12. Stored Guthrie cards as DNA [open quotes]Banks[close quotes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEwen, J.E.; Reilly, P.R. )

    1994-07-01

    Recently there has been much discussion about the possibility of using dried blood spots on Guthrie cards as a source of DNA for research or testing purposes. The collections of Guthrie cards stored by state newborn-screening laboratories can thus be viewed as inchoate [open quotes]DNA banks[close quotes]. This has generated concern among some persons who are interested in preserving the privacy of medical records. This study examines the policies of state newborn-screening laboratories in the United States, regarding their retention of Guthrie cards and the degree to which they permit the sharing of those cards with various third parties. The authors found that although most laboratories retain their cards, if at all, for only a short time, a growing number plan to keep them for an extended period-and, in several cases, indefinitely. They also found that although most laboratories would decline to release individually identifiable blood spots from the cards to third parties without a written release or other explicit authorization, a large number would at least consider sharing anonymous cards for research purposes. 10 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. Thermal management system and method for a solid-state energy storing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rouillard, Roger; Domroese, Michael K.; Gauthier, Michel; Hoffman, Joseph A.; Lindeman, David D.; Noel, Joseph-Robert-Gaetan; Radewald, Vern E.; Ranger, Michel; Rouillard, Jean; Shiota, Toshimi; St-Germain, Philippe; Sudano, Anthony; Trice, Jennifer L.; Turgeon, Thomas A.

    2000-01-01

    An improved electrochemical energy storing device includes a number of thin-film electrochemical cells which are maintained in a state of compression through use of an internal or an external pressure apparatus. A thermal conductor, which is connected to at least one of the positive or negative contacts of each electrochemical cell, conducts current into and out of the electrochemical cells and also conducts thermal energy between the electrochemical cells and thermally conductive material disposed on a wall structure adjacent the conductors. The wall structure includes electrically resistive material, such as an anodized coating or a thin film of plastic. The thermal conductors are fabricated to include a spring mechanism which expands and contacts to maintain mechanical contact between the electrochemical cells and the thermally conductive material in the presence of relative movement between the electrochemical cells and the wall structure. An active cooling apparatus may be employed external to a hermetically sealed housing containing the electrochemical cells to enhance the transfer of thermal energy into and out of the electrochemical cells. An integrated interconnect board may be disposed within the housing onto which a number of electrical and electro-mechanical components are mounted. Heat generated by the components is conducted from the interconnect board to the housing using the thermal conductors.

  14. MATERIAL PROPERTIES OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING OXIDES STORED IN STAINLESS STEEL CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessinger, G.; Almond, P.; Bridges, N.; Bronikowski, M.; Crowder, M.; Duffey, J.; Livingston, R.; Mcelwee, M.; Missimer, D.; Scogin, J.; Summer, M.; Jurgensen, A.

    2010-02-01

    The destructive examination (DE) of 3013 containers after storage is part of the Surveillance and Monitoring Program based on the Department of Energy's standard for long-term storage of Pu (DOE-STD-3013). The stored, Pu-bearing materials may contain alkali halide contamination that varies from trace amounts of salt to about 50 weight percent, with smaller fractions of other compounds and oxides. These materials were characterized prior to packaging, and surveillance characterizations are conducted to determine the behavior of the materials during long term storage. The surveillance characterization results are generally in agreement with the pre-surveillance data. The predominant phases identified by X-ray diffraction are in agreement with the expected phase assemblages of the as-received materials. The measured densities are in reasonable agreement with the expected densities of materials containing the fraction of salts and actinide oxide specified by the pre-surveillance data. The radiochemical results are generally in good agreement with the pre-surveillance data for mixtures containing 'weapons grade' Pu (nominally 94% {sup 239}Pu and 6% {sup 240}Pu); however, the ICP-MS results from the present investigation generally produce lower concentrations of Pu than the pre-surveillance analyses. For mixtures containing 'fuel grade' Pu (nominally 81-93% {sup 239}Pu and 7-19% {sup 240}Pu), the ICP-MS results from the present investigation appear to be in better agreement with the pre-surveillance data than the radiochemistry results.

  15. Spectral Modeling of Residual Stress and Stored Elastic Strain Energy in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donegan, Sean; Rolett, Anthony

    2013-12-31

    Solutions to the thermoelastic problem are important for characterizing the response under temperature change of refractory systems. This work extends a spectral fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique to analyze the thermoelastic behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), with the intent of probing the local origins of failure in TBCs. The thermoelastic FFT (teFFT) approach allows for the characterization of local thermal residual stress and strain fields, which constitute the origins of failure in TBC systems. A technique based on statistical extreme value theory known as peaks-over-threshold (POT) is developed to quantify the extreme values ("hot spots") of stored elastic strain energy (i.e., elastic energy density, or EED). The resolution dependence of the teFFT method is assessed through a sensitivity study of the extreme values in EED. The sensitivity study is performed both for the local (point-by-point) #12;eld distributions as well as the grain scale #12;eld distributions. A convergence behavior to a particular distribution shape is demonstrated for the local #12;elds. The grain scale fields are shown to exhibit a possible convergence to a maximum level of EED. To apply the teFFT method to TBC systems, 3D synthetic microstructures are created to approximate actual TBC microstructures. The morphology of the grains in each constituent layer as well as the texture is controlled. A variety of TBC materials, including industry standard materials and potential future materials, are analyzed using the teFFT. The resulting hot spots are quantified using the POT approach. A correlation between hot spots in EED and interface rumpling between constituent layers is demonstrated, particularly for the interface between the bond coat (BC) and the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer.

  16. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.O.; Miller, R.L.; Patton, T.G.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Tolbert, V.R.; Feldman, D.L.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Morrissey, J.; Rickert, L.W.; Staub, W.P.; West, D.C.

    1993-02-01

    The Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) near Hermiston, Oregon, is one of eight US Army installations in the continental United States where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored, and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at UMDA consists of 11.6%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts), using a method based on five measures of risk for potential human health and ecosystem/environmental effects; the effectiveness and adequacy of emergency preparedness capabilities also played a key role in the FPEIS selection methodology. In some instances, the FPEIS included generic data and assumptions that were developed to allow a consistent comparison of potential impacts among programmatic alternatives and did not include detailed conditions at each of the eight installations. The purpose of this Phase 1 report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at UMDA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those included in the FPEIS. Specifically, this Phase 1 report is intended to either confirm or reject the validity of on-site disposal for the UMDA stockpile. Using the same computation methods as in the FPEIS, new population data were used to compute potential fatalities from hypothetical disposal accidents. Results indicate that onsite disposal is clearly preferable to either continued storage at UMDA or transportation of the UMDA stockpile to another depot for disposal.

  17. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Miller, R.L.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Tolbert, V.R.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Rickert, L.W.; Rogers, G.O.; Staub, W.P.

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of this Phase I report is to examined the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at Anniston Army Depot (ANAD) in light of more detailed and more recent data than those included in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EPEIS). Two principal issues are addressed: (1) whether or not the new data would result in identification of on-site disposal at ANAD as the environmentally preferred alternative (using the same selection method and data analysis tools as in the FPEIS), and (2) whether or not the new data indicate the presence of significant environmental resources that could be affected by on-site disposal at ANAD. In addition, a status report is presented on the maturity of the disposal technology (and now it could affect on-site disposal at ANAD). Inclusion of these more recent data into the FPEIS decision method resulted in confirmation of on-site disposal for ANAD. No unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at ANAD have been identified. A review of the technology status identified four principal technology developments that have occurred since publication of the FPEIS and should be of value in the implementation of on-site disposal at ANAD: the disposal of nonlethal agent at Pine Bluff Arsenal, located near Pine Bluff, Arkansas; construction and testing of facilities for disposal of stored lethal agent at Johnston Atoll, located about 1300 km (800 miles) southwest of Hawaii in the Pacific Ocean; lethal agent disposal tests at the chemical agent pilot plant operations at Tooele Army Depot, located near Salt Lake City, Utah; and equipment advances. 18 references, 13 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. Ammonia reactions with the stored oxygen in a commercial lean NOx trap catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartova, Sarka; Mracek, David; Koci, Petr; Marek, Milos; Choi, Jae -Soon

    2014-10-12

    Ammonia is an important intermediate of the NOx reduction in a NOx storage and reduction catalyst (aka lean NOx trap). NH3 formed under rich conditions in the reduced front part of the catalyst is transported by convection downstream to the unregenerated (still oxidized) zone of the catalyst, where it further reacts with the stored oxygen and NOx. In this paper, the kinetics and selectivity of NH3 reactions with the stored oxygen are studied in detail with a commercial Ba-based NOx storage catalyst containing platinum group metals (PGM), Ba and Ce oxides. Furthermore, steady-state NH3 decomposition, NH3 oxidation by O2 and NO, and N2O decomposition are examined in light-off experiments. Periodic lean/rich cycling is measured first with O2 and NH3, and then with NOx + O2 and NH3 to discriminate between the NH3 reactions with the stored oxygen and the stored NOx. The reaction of NH3 with the stored O2 is highly selective towards N2, however a certain amount of NOx and N2O is also formed. The formed NOx by-product is efficiently adsorbed on the NOx storage sites such that the NOx is not detected at the reactor outlet except at high temperatures. The stored NOx reacts with NH3 feed in the next rich phase, contributing to the N2O formation. Water inhibits the reactions of NH3 with the stored oxygen. On the contrary, the presence of CO2 increases the NH3 consumption. Furthermore, CO2 is able to provide additional oxygen for NH3 oxidation, forming –CO in analogy to the reverse water gas shift reaction.

  19. Stress and Diffusion in Stored Pu ZPPR Fuel from Alpha Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles W. Solbrig; Chad L. Pope; Jason P. Andrus

    2014-07-01

    ZPPR (Zero Power Physics Reactor) is a research reactor that has been used to investigate breeder reactor fuel designs. The reactor has been dismantled but its fuel is still stored there. Of concern are its plutonium containing metal fuel elements which are enclosed in stainless steel cladding with gas space filled with helium–argon gas and welded air tight. The fuel elements which are 5.08 cm by 0.508 cm up to 20.32 cm long (2 in × 0.2 in × 8 in) were manufactured in 1968. A few of these fuel elements have failed releasing contamination raising concern about the general state of the large number of other fuel elements. Inspection of the large number of fuel elements could lead to contamination release so analytical studies have been conducted to estimate the probability of failed fuel elements. This paper investigates the possible fuel failures due to generation of helium in the metal fuel from the decay of Pu and its possible damage to the fuel cladding from metal fuel expansion or from diffusion of helium into the fuel gas space. This paper (1) calculates the initial gas loading in a fuel element and its internal free volume after it has been brought into the atmosphere at ZPPR, (2) shows that the amount of helium generated by decay of Pu over 46 years since manufacture is significantly greater than this initial loading, (3) determines the amount of fuel swelling if the helium stays fixed in the fuel plate and estimates the amount of helium which diffuses out of the fuel plate into the fuel plenum assuming the helium does not remain fixed in the fuel plate but can diffuse to the plenum and possibly through the cladding. Since the literature is not clear as to which possibility occurs, as with Schroedinger’s cat, both possibilities are analyzed. The paper concludes that (1) if the gas generated is fixed in the fuel, then the fuel swelling it can cause would not cause any fuel failure and (2) if the helium does diffuse out of the fuel (in accordance

  20. Hydrogen Gas Generation Model for Fuel-Based Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Stored at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khericha, S.; Bhatt, R.; Liekhus, K.

    2003-01-14

    The Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) initiated efforts to calculate the hydrogen gas generation in remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) containers in order to evaluate continued storage of unvented RH-TRU containers in vaults and to identify any potential problems during retrieval and aboveground storage. A computer code is developed to calculate the hydrogen concentration in the stored RH-TRU waste drums for known configuration, waste matrix, and radionuclide inventories as a function of time.

  1. Risk Assessment and Monitoring of Stored CO2 in Organic Rocks Under Non-Equilibrium Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malhotra, Vivak

    2014-06-30

    The USA is embarking upon tackling the serious environmental challenges posed to the world by greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO2). The dimension of the problem is daunting. In fact, according to the Energy Information Agency, nearly 6 billion metric tons of CO2 were produced in the USA in 2007 with coal-burning power plants contributing about 2 billion metric tons. To mitigate the concerns associated with CO2 emission, geological sequestration holds promise. Among the potential geological storage sites, unmineable coal seams and shale formations in particular show promise because of the probability of methane recovery while sequestering the CO2. However. the success of large-scale sequestration of CO2 in coal and shale would hinge on a thorough understanding of CO2's interactions with host reservoirs. An important parameter for successful storage of CO2 reservoirs would be whether the pressurized CO2 would remain invariant in coal and shale formations under reasonable internal and/or external perturbations. Recent research has brought to the fore the potential of induced seismicity, which may result in caprock compromise. Therefore, to evaluate the potential risks involved in sequestering CO2 in Illinois bituminous coal seams and shale, we studied: (i) the mechanical behavior of Murphysboro (Illinois) and Houchin Creek (Illinois) coals, (ii) thermodynamic behavior of Illinois bituminous coal at - 100oC ≤ T ≤ 300oC, (iii) how high pressure CO2 (up to 20.7 MPa) modifies the viscosity of the host, (iv) the rate of emission of CO2 from Illinois bituminous coal and shale cores if the cores, which were pressurized with high pressure (≤ 20.7 MPa) CO2, were exposed to an atmospheric pressure, simulating the development of leakage pathways, (v) whether there are any fractions of CO2 stored in these hosts which are resistance to emission by simply exposing the cores to atmospheric pressure, and (vi) how compressive shockwaves applied to the coal and shale

  2. Overview of geologic storage of natural gas with an emphasis on assessing the feasibility of storing hydrogen.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lord, Anna Snider

    2009-09-01

    In many regions across the nation geologic formations are currently being used to store natural gas underground. Storage options are dictated by the regional geology and the operational need. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in understanding theses various geologic storage options, the advantages and disadvantages, in the hopes of developing an underground facility for the storage of hydrogen as a low cost storage option, as part of the hydrogen delivery infrastructure. Currently, depleted gas/oil reservoirs, aquifers, and salt caverns are the three main types of underground natural gas storage in use today. The other storage options available currently and in the near future, such as abandoned coal mines, lined hard rock caverns, and refrigerated mined caverns, will become more popular as the demand for natural gas storage grows, especially in regions were depleted reservoirs, aquifers, and salt deposits are not available. The storage of hydrogen within the same type of facilities, currently used for natural gas, may add new operational challenges to the existing cavern storage industry, such as the loss of hydrogen through chemical reactions and the occurrence of hydrogen embrittlement. Currently there are only three locations worldwide, two of which are in the United States, which store hydrogen. All three sites store hydrogen within salt caverns.

  3. Thermal performance of a buried nuclear waste storage container storing a hybrid mix of PWR and BWR spent fuel rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, G.L.

    1988-09-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will design, model, and test nuclear waste packages for use at the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. One such package would store lightly packed spent fuel rods from both pressurized and boiling water reactors. The storage container provides the primary containment of the nuclear waste and the spent fuel rod cladding provides secondary containment. A series of transient conduction and radiation heat transfer analyses was run to determine for the first 1000 yr of storage if the temperature of the tuff at the borehole wall ever falls below 97{degree}C and whether the cladding of the stored spent fuel ever exceeds 350{degree}C. Limiting the borehole to temperatures of 97{degree}C or greater helps minimize corrosion by assuring that no condensed water collects on the container. The 350{degree}C cladding limit minimizes the possibility of creep-related failure in the spent fuel rod cladding. For a series of packages stored in a 8 x 30 m borehole grid where each package contains 10-yr-old spent fuel rods generating 4.74 kW or more, the borehole wall stays above 97{degree}C for the full 1000-yr analysis period.

  4. DOE Announces Webinars on an Energy Design Guide for Grocery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and build other retail stores-including food service and convenience stores-with specialty ... update on recent efforts to develop an industry definition for zero energy buildings. ...

  5. jcpenney retail renovation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Zhang, Jian; Ruiz, Kathleen A.; Wilburn, Matthew S.

    2011-06-30

    JC Penney is a partner with the DOE's Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) program, working with PNNL to explore energy design measures (EDMs) that may be applied to their building portfolio. A site in Colonial Heights, VA was chosen for a retrofit project; computer modeling predicts 45% improved energy performance compared to baseline operations. This case study reviews EDMs that were selected and their performance as of June 2011.

  6. Retail Power Marketer

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... 0 6 All other costs 0 7 Approval Expires: 05312017 SCHEDULE 6. PART B. DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS Schedule 6. Part B. Energy and Demand Savings -- Demand Response ANNUAL ...

  7. Building a Parallel Cloud Storage System using OpenStacks Swift Object Store and Transformative Parallel I/O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, Andrew J.; Lora, Kaleb D.; Martinez, Esteban; Shorter, Martel L.

    2012-07-30

    Our project consists of bleeding-edge research into replacing the traditional storage archives with a parallel, cloud-based storage solution. It used OpenStack's Swift Object Store cloud software. It's Benchmarked Swift for write speed and scalability. Our project is unique because Swift is typically used for reads and we are mostly concerned with write speeds. Cloud Storage is a viable archive solution because: (1) Container management for larger parallel archives might ease the migration workload; (2) Many tools that are written for cloud storage could be utilized for local archive; and (3) Current large cloud storage practices in industry could be utilized to manage a scalable archive solution.

  8. Effects of magnetic non-linearities on a stored proton beam and their implications for superconducting storage rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornacchia, M.; Evans, L.

    1985-06-01

    A nonlinear lens may be used to study the effect of high-order multipolar field imperfections on a stored proton beam. Such a nonlinear lens is particulary suitable to simulate field imperfections of the types encountered in coil dominated superconducting magnets. We have studied experimentally at the SPS the effect of high order (5th and 8th) single isolated resonances driven by the nonlinear lens. The width of these resonances is of the order one expects to be caused by field errors in superconducting magnets of the SSC type. The experiment shows that, in absence of tune modulation, these resonances are harmless. Slow crossings of the resonance, on the other hand, have destructive effects on the beam, much more so than fast crossings caused by synchrotron oscillations. In the design of future storage rings, sources of low-frequency tune modulation should be avoided as a way to reduce the harmful effects of high order multipolar field imperfection.

  9. The GE Store

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... scale computer systems that manage mass volumes of data. ... to drive more efficient, cost effective and high quality ... to enable the consistent production of high quality parts. ...

  10. Storing and Retrieving Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage/Handling Storage/Handling Records Management Procedures for Storage, Transfer & Retrieval of Records from the Washington National Records Center (WNRC) or Legacy Management Business Center RETIREMENT OF RECORDS: 1. The Program Office originates the Records Transmittal and Receipt Form SF-135 (PDF, 107KB), and sends it to IM-23 at doerm@hq.doe.gov for approval. 2. IM-23 reviews the SF-135 for completeness/correctness and coordinates with the originating office by email if more

  11. Review of consequences of uranium hydride formation in N-Reactor fuel elements stored in the K-Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, J.W.

    1994-09-28

    The 105-K Basins on the Hanford site are used to store uranium fuel elements and assemblies irradiated in and discharged from N Reactor. The storage cylinders in KW Basin are known to have some broken N reactor fuel elements in which the exposed uranium is slowly reacting chemically with water in the cylinder. The products of these reactions are uranium oxide, hydrogen, and potentially some uranium hydride. The purpose of this report is to document the results f the latest review of potential, but highly unlikely accidents postulated to occur as closed cylinders containing N reactor fuel assemblies are opened under water in the KW basin and as a fuel assembly is raised from the basin in a shipping cask for transportation to the 327 Building for examination as part of the SNF Characterization Program. The postulated accidents reviews in this report are considered to bound all potential releases of radioactivity and hydrogen. These postulated accidents are: (1) opening and refill of a cylinder containing significant amounts of hydrogen and uranium hydride; and (2) draining of the single element can be used to keep the fuel element submerged in water after the cask containing the can and element is lifted from the KW Basin. Analysis shows the release of radioactivity to the site boundary is significantly less than that allowed by the K Basin Safety Evaluation. Analysis further shows there would be no damage to the K Basin structure nor would there be injury to personnel for credible events.

  12. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pine Bluff Arsenal, Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Final phase 1, Environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ensminger, J.T.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.D.; Morrisey, J.A.; Staub, W.P.; Boston, C.R.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Leibsch, E.; Rickert, L.W.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1991-09-01

    The Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) near Pine Bluff, Arkansas, is one of eight continental United States (CONUS) Army installations where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at PBA consists of approximately 12%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts). The purpose of this report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at PBA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those on which the FPEIS is based. New population data were used to compute fatalities using the same computation methods and values for all other parameters as in the FPEIS. Results indicate that all alternatives are indistinguishable when the potential health impacts to the PBA community are considered. However, risks from on-site disposal are in all cases equal to or less than risks from other alternatives. Furthermore, no unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at PBA have been identified.

  13. Tritium Packages and 17th RH Canister Categories of Transuranic Waste Stored Below Ground within Area G

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hargis, Kenneth Marshall

    2015-03-01

    A large wildfire called the Las Conchas Fire burned large areas near Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2011 and heightened public concern and news media attention over transuranic (TRU) waste stored at LANL’s Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G waste management facility. The removal of TRU waste from Area G had been placed at a lower priority in budget decisions for environmental cleanup at LANL because TRU waste removal is not included in the March 2005 Compliance Order on Consent (Reference 1) that is the primary regulatory driver for environmental cleanup at LANL. The Consent Order is a settlement agreement between LANL and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) that contains specific requirements and schedules for cleaning up historical contamination at the LANL site. After the Las Conchas Fire, discussions were held by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with the NMED on accelerating TRU waste removal from LANL and disposing it at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report summarizes available information on the origin, configuration, and composition of the waste containers within the Tritium Packages and 17th RH Canister categories; their physical and radiological characteristics; the results of the radioassays; and potential issues in retrieval and processing of the waste containers.

  14. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pueblo Depot Activity, Colorado. Final, Phase 1: Environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry, J.W.; Blasing, T.J.; Ensminger, J.T.; Johnson, R.O.; Schexnayder, S.M.; Shor, J.T.; Staub, W.P.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1995-04-01

    Under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the US Army proposes to dispose of lethal chemical agents and munitions stored at eight existing Army installations in the continental United States. In 1988, the US Army issued the final programmatic environmental impact statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP. The FPEIS and the subsequent Record of Decision (ROD) identified an on-site disposal process as the preferred method for destruction of the stockpile. That is, the FPEIS determined the environmentally preferred alternative to be on-site disposal in high-temperature incinerators, while the ROD selected this alternative for implementation as the preferred method for destruction of the stockpile. In this Phase I report, the overall CSDP decision regarding disposal of the PUDA Stockpile is subjected to further analyses, and its validity at PUDA is reviewed with newer, more detailed data than those providing the basis for the conclusions in the FPEIS. The findings of this Phase I report will be factored into the scope of a site-specific environmental impact statement to be prepared for the destruction of the PUDA stockpile. The focus of this Phase I report is on those data identified as having the potential to alter the Army`s previous decision regarding disposal of the PUDA stockpile; however, several other factors beyond the scope of this Phase I report must also be acknowledged to have the potential to change or modify the Army`s decisions regarding PUDA.

  15. Sorbent Testing for the Solidification of Unidentified Rocky Flats Laboratory Waste Stored at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickford, J.; Kimmitt, R.

    2007-07-01

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) evaluated various commercially available sorbents to solidify unidentified laboratory liquids from Rocky Flats that are stored at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The liquids are a collection of laboratory wastes that were generated from various experiments and routine analytical laboratory activities carried out at Rocky Flats. The liquids are in bottles discovered inside of buried waste drums being exhumed from the subsurface disposal area at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) by the contractor, CH2M Hill Washington International (CWI). Free liquids are unacceptable at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and some of these liquids cannot be returned to the retrieval pit. Stabilization of the liquids into a solid mass will allow these materials to be sent to an appropriate disposal location. The selected sorbent or sorbent combinations should produce a stabilized mass that is capable of withstanding conditions similar to those experienced during storage, shipping, and burial. The final wasteform should release less than 1% liquid by volume per the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The absence or presence of free liquid in the solidified waste-forms was detected when tested by SW-846, Method 9095B, Paint Filter Free Liquids, and the amount of liquid released from the wasteform was determined by SW-846, Method 9096, Liquid Release Test. Reactivity testing was also conducted on the solidified laboratory liquids. (authors)

  16. Modeled microgravity suppressed invasion and migration of human glioblastoma U87 cells through downregulating store-operated calcium entry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Zi-xuan; Rao, Wei; Wang, Huan; Wang, Nan-ding; Si, Jing-Wen; Zhao, Jiao; Li, Jun-chang; Wang, Zong-ren

    2015-02-13

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor and is characterized with robust invasion and migration potential resulting in poor prognosis. Previous investigations have demonstrated that modeled microgravity (MMG) could decline the cell proliferation and attenuate the metastasis potential in several cell lines. In this study, we studied the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials of glioblastoma in human glioblastoma U87 cells. We found that MMG stimulation significantly attenuated the invasion and migration potentials, decreased thapsigargin (TG) induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and downregulated the expression of Orai1 in U87 cells. Inhibition of SOCE by 2-APB or stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) downregulation both mimicked the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Furthermore, upregulation of Orai1 significantly weakened the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Therefore, these findings indicated that MMG stimulation inhibited the invasion and migration potentials of U87 cells by downregulating the expression of Orai1 and sequentially decreasing the SOCE, suggesting that MMG might be a new potential therapeutic strategy in glioblastoma treatment in the future. - Highlights: • Modeled microgravity (MMG) suppressed migration and invasion in U87 cells. • MMG downregulated the SOCE and the expression of Orai1. • SOCE inhibition mimicked the effects of MMG on migration and invasion potentials. • Restoration of SOCE diminished the effects of MMG on migration and invasion.

  17. EIS-0081: Long-Term Management of Liquid High-Level Radioactive Waste Stored at Western New York Nuclear Service Center, West Valley, New York

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action prepared this environmental impact statement to analyze the environmental and socioeconomic impacts resulting from the Department’s proposed action to construct and operate facilities necessary to solidify the liquid high-level wastes currently stored in underground tanks at West Valley, New York.

  18. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon. Final Phase 1 environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.O.; Miller, R.L.; Patton, T.G.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Tolbert, V.R.; Feldman, D.L.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Morrissey, J.; Rickert, L.W.; Staub, W.P.; West, D.C.

    1993-02-01

    The Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) near Hermiston, Oregon, is one of eight US Army installations in the continental United States where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored, and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at UMDA consists of 11.6%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts), using a method based on five measures of risk for potential human health and ecosystem/environmental effects; the effectiveness and adequacy of emergency preparedness capabilities also played a key role in the FPEIS selection methodology. In some instances, the FPEIS included generic data and assumptions that were developed to allow a consistent comparison of potential impacts among programmatic alternatives and did not include detailed conditions at each of the eight installations. The purpose of this Phase 1 report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at UMDA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those included in the FPEIS. Specifically, this Phase 1 report is intended to either confirm or reject the validity of on-site disposal for the UMDA stockpile. Using the same computation methods as in the FPEIS, new population data were used to compute potential fatalities from hypothetical disposal accidents. Results indicate that onsite disposal is clearly preferable to either continued storage at UMDA or transportation of the UMDA stockpile to another depot for disposal.

  19. Have You Found Any Energy-Efficient Bargains? | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Elizabeth shared her retail adventures in the clearance section of a store where she ... Prices vary, but if you can find them on the clearance aisle of your local retailer you ...

  20. Handbook for Handling, Storing, and Dispensing E85 and Other Ethanol-Gasoline Blends (Brochure), Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    DOE/GO-102016-4854 February 2016 Handbook for Handling, Storing, and Dispensing E85 and Other Ethanol-Gasoline Blends Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or

  1. Retail Prices for Regular Gasoline

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    159 2.150 2.149 2.193 2.237 2.223 1990-2016 East Coast (PADD1) 2.100 2.066 2.075 2.126 2.172 2.173 1992-2016 New England (PADD 1A) 2.168 2.125 2.104 2.166 2.201 2.202 1993-2016 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 2.172 2.144 2.143 2.187 2.220 2.225 1993-2016 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 2.025 1.991 2.016 2.068 2.128 2.125 1993-2016 Midwest (PADD 2) 2.075 2.115 2.121 2.171 2.227 2.180 1992-2016 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 1.944 1.928 1.938 1.964 2.009 2.005 1992-2016 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) 2.252 2.226 2.214 2.229

  2. Retail Sales Allocation Tool (RSAT)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  3. Commercial Sector Financing Needs and Opportunities | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    buildings such as offices, malls, hotels, and retail stores, along with nonprofit facilities (private nonprofit hospitals, schools, higher education, YMCAs, museums, etc.). ...

  4. Xcel Energy - Residential Lighting Discount Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in stores. Discounts do not apply to ENERGY STAR qualified fixtures, fans or lamps. Free Lighting Demonstrations Focus on Energy provides free lighting demonstrations at retail...

  5. A user`s guide to LUGSAN II. A computer program to calculate and archive lug and sway brace loads for aircraft-carried stores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, W.N.

    1998-03-01

    LUG and Sway brace ANalysis (LUGSAN) II is an analysis and database computer program that is designed to calculate store lug and sway brace loads for aircraft captive carriage. LUGSAN II combines the rigid body dynamics code, SWAY85, with a Macintosh Hypercard database to function both as an analysis and archival system. This report describes the LUGSAN II application program, which operates on the Macintosh System (Hypercard 2.2 or later) and includes function descriptions, layout examples, and sample sessions. Although this report is primarily a user`s manual, a brief overview of the LUGSAN II computer code is included with suggested resources for programmers.

  6. Performance Spec. for Fuel Drying and Canister Inerting System for PWR Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assemblies Stored within Shipping Port Spent Fuel Canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-03-14

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and basic design requirements imposed on the fuel drying and canister inerting system for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies (BFAs) stored within Shippingport spent fuel (SSFCs) canisters (fuel drying and canister inerting system). This fuel drying and canister inerting system is a component of the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Spent Nuclear Fuels Project at the Hanford Site. The fuel drying and canister inerting system provides for removing water and establishing an inert environment for Shippingport PWR Core 2 BFAs stored within SSFCs. A policy established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) states that new SNF facilities (this is interpreted to include structures, systems and components) shall achieve nuclear safety equivalence to comparable U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed facilities. This will be accomplished in part by applying appropriate NRC requirements for comparable NRC-licensed facilities to the fuel drying and canister inerting system, in addition to applicable DOE regulations and orders.

  7. License Amendment Request for Storing Exelon Sister Nuclear Stations Class B/C LLRW in the LaSalle Station Interim Radwaste Storage Facility - 13620

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azar, Miguel; Gardner, Donald A.; Taylor, Edward R.

    2013-07-01

    Exelon Nuclear (Exelon) designed and constructed an Interim Radwaste Storage Facility (IRSF) in the mid-1980's at LaSalle County Nuclear Station (LaSalle). The facility was designed to store low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) on an interim basis, i.e., up to five years. The primary reason for the IRSF was to offset lack of disposal in case existing disposal facilities, such as the Southeast Compact's Barnwell Disposal Facility in Barnwell, South Carolina, ceased accepting radioactive waste from utilities not in the Southeast Compact. Approximately ninety percent of the Radwaste projected to be stored in the LaSalle IRSF in that period of time was Class A, with the balance being Class B/C waste. On July 1, 2008 the Barnwell Disposal Facility in the Southeast Compact closed its doors to out of- compact Radwaste, which precluded LaSalle from shipping Class B/C Radwaste to an outside disposal facility. Class A waste generated by LaSalle is still able to be disposed at the 'Envirocare of Utah LLRW Disposal Complex' in Clive, Utah. Thus the need for utilizing the LaSalle IRSF for storing Class B/C Radwaste for an extended period, perhaps life-of-plant or more became apparent. Additionally, other Exelon Midwest nuclear stations located in Illinois that did not build an IRSF heretofore also needed extended Radwaste storage. In early 2009, Exelon made a decision to forward Radwaste from the Byron Nuclear Station (Byron), Braidwood Nuclear Station (Braidwood), and Clinton Nuclear Station (Clinton) to LaSalle's IRSF. As only Class B/C Radwaste would need to be forwarded to LaSalle, the original volumetric capacity of the LaSalle IRSF was capable of handling the small number of additional expected shipments annually from the Exelon sister nuclear stations in Illinois. Forwarding Class B/C Radwaste from the Exelon sister nuclear stations in Illinois to LaSalle would require an amendment to the LaSalle Station operating license. Exelon submitted the License Amendment Request

  8. Evaluation of Shear Strength Threshold of Concern for Retrieval of Interim-Stored K-Basin Sludge in the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Yasuo; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-11-01

    K-Basin sludge will be recovered into the Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSCs) and will be stored in the T Plant for interim storage (at least 10 years). Long-term sludge storage tests conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show that high uranium content K Basin sludge can self-cement and form a strong sludge with a bulk shear strength of up to 65 kPa. Some of this sludge has "paste" and "chunks" with shear strengths of approximately 3~5 kPa and 380 ~ 770 kPa, respectively. High uranium content sludge samples subjected to hydrothermal testing (e.g., 185°C, 10 h) have been observed to form agglomerates with a shear strength up to 170 kPa. After interim storage at T Plant, the sludge in the STSCs will be mobilized by water jets impinging the sludge. The objective of the evaluation was to determine the range of sludge shear strength for which there is high confidence that a water-jet retrieval system can mobilize stored K-Basin sludge from STSCs. The shear strength at which the sludge can be retrieved is defined as the "shear strength threshold of concern." If the sludge shear strength is greater than the value of the shear strength threshold of concern, a water-jet retrieval system will be unlikely to mobilize the sludge up to the container’s walls. The shear strength threshold of concern can be compared with the range of possible shear strengths of K-Basin stored sludge to determine if the current post interim-storage, water-jet retrieval method is adequate. Fourteen effective cleaning radius (ECR) models were reviewed, and their validity was examined by applying them to Hanford 241-SY-101 and 241-AZ-101 Tanks to reproduce the measured ECR produced by the mixer pumps. The validation test identified that the Powell-3 and Crowe-2 ECR models are more accurate than other ECR models reviewed. These ECR models were used to address a question as to whether the effective cleaning radius of a water jet is sufficient or if it can be readily expanded

  9. Development of a Bulk-Format System to Harvest, Handle, Store, and Deliver High-Tonnage Low-Moisture Switchgrass Feedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Womac, Alvin; Groothuis, Mitch; Westover, Tyler; Phanphanich, Manunya; Webb, Erin; Sokhansanj, Shahab; Turhollow, Anthony

    2013-09-24

    This project evaluates and compares comprehensive feedstock logistics systems (FLS), where a FLS is defined to comprehensively span from biomass material standing in a field to conveyance of a uniform, industrial-milled product into the throat of a biomass conversion facility (BCF). Elements of the bulk-format FLS evaluated in this project include: field-standing switchgrass dry chopped into bulk format on the farm, hauled (either loose or bulk compacted) to storage, stored with confining overburden in a protective facility, reclaimed and conveyed to bulk-format discharge, bulk compacted into an ejector trailer, and conveyed as bulk flow into the BCF. In this FLS evaluation, bulk storage bins served as a controlled and sensored proxy for large commercial stacks protected from moisture with a membrane cover.

  10. How to Store Energy Fast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustyn, Veronica; Ko, Jesse; Rauda, Iris

    2013-07-18

    Representing the Molecularly Engineered Energy Materials (MEEM), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE energy. The mission of MEEM, using inexpensive custom-designed molecular building blocks, aims to create revolutionary new materials with self-assembled multi-scale architectures that will enable high performing energy generation and storage applications.

  11. Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Niemann, Michael U.; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K.

    2012-04-10

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  12. Chain Stores and Franchises Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is a list of equipment categories for which incentives are available, with short descriptions of some eligible technologies. Interested parties should see the program web site for incentive...

  13. Stored program digital process controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stephenson, Dwight L.

    1977-01-04

    A digital process control function generator wherein a timing clock, in conjunction with programmable read only memories controls variables in a process with respect to time.

  14. Mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uniporter is critical for store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry-dependent breast cancer cell migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Shihao; Wang, Xubu; Shen, Qiang; Yang, Xinyi; Yu, Changhui; Cai, Chunqing; Cai, Guoshuai; Meng, Xiaojing; Zou, Fei

    2015-02-27

    Metastasis of cancer cells is a complicated multistep process requiring extensive and continuous cytosolic calcium modulation. Mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uniporter (MCU), a regulator of mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uptake, has been implicated in energy metabolism and various cellular signaling processes. However, whether MCU contributes to cancer cell migration has not been established. Here we examined the expression of MCU mRNA in the Oncomine database and found that MCU is correlated to metastasis and invasive breast cancer. MCU inhibition by ruthenium red (RuR) or MCU silencing by siRNA abolished serum-induced migration in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and reduced serum- or thapsigargin (TG)-induced store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE). Serum-induced migrations in MDA-MB-231 cells were blocked by SOCE inhibitors. Our results demonstrate that MCU plays a critical role in breast cancer cell migration by regulating SOCE. - Highlights: • MCU is correlated to metastasis and invasive breast cancer. • MCU inhibition abolished serum-induced migration in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and reduced serum- or TG-induced SOCE. • Serum-induced migrations in MDA-MB-231 cells were blocked by SOCE inhibitors. • MCU plays a critical role in MDA-MB-231 cell migration by regulating SOCE.

  15. Rate and peak concentrations of off-gas emissions in stored wood pellets sensitivities to temperature, relative humidity, and headspace volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuang, Xingya; Shankar, T.J.; Bi, X.T.; Lim, C. Jim; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Melin, Staffan

    2009-08-01

    Wood pellets emit CO, CO2, CH4 and other volatiles during storage. Increased concentration of these gases in a sealed storage causes depletion of concentration of oxygen. The storage environment becomes toxic to those who operate in and around these storages. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of temperature, moisture and storage headspace on emissions from wood pellets in an enclosed space. Twelve 10-liter plastic containers were used to study the effects of headspace ratio (25%, 50%, and 75% of container volume) and temperatures (10-50oC). Another eight containers were set in uncontrolled storage relative humidity and temperature. Concentrations of CO2, CO and CH4 were measured by a gas chromatography (GC). The results showed that emissions of CO2, CO and CH4 from stored wood pellets are most sensitive to storage temperature. Higher peak emission factors are associated with higher temperatures. Increased headspace volume ratio increases peak off-gas emissions because of the availability of oxygen for pellet decomposition. Increased relative humidity in the enclosed container increases the rate of off-gas emissions of CO2, CO and CH4 and oxygen depletion.

  16. Design and experimental testing of the performance of an outdoor LiBr/H{sub 2}O solar thermal absorption cooling system with a cold store

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agyenim, Francis; Knight, Ian; Rhodes, Michael

    2010-05-15

    A domestic-scale prototype experimental solar cooling system has been developed based on a LiBr/H{sub 2}O absorption system and tested during the 2007 summer and autumn months in Cardiff University, UK. The system consisted of a 12 m{sup 2} vacuum tube solar collector, a 4.5 kW LiBr/H{sub 2}O absorption chiller, a 1000 l cold storage tank and a 6 kW fan coil. The system performance, as well as the performances of the individual components in the system, were evaluated based on the physical measurements of the daily solar radiation, ambient temperature, inlet and outlet fluid temperatures, mass flow rates and electrical consumption by component. The average coefficient of thermal performance (COP) of the system was 0.58, based on the thermal cooling power output per unit of available thermal solar energy from the 12 m{sup 2} Thermomax DF100 vacuum tube collector on a hot sunny day with average peak insolation of 800 W/m{sup 2} (between 11 and 13.30 h) and ambient temperature of 24 C. The system produced an electrical COP of 3.6. Experimental results prove the feasibility of the new concept of cold store at this scale, with chilled water temperatures as low as 7.4 C, demonstrating its potential use in cooling domestic scale buildings. (author)

  17. Regulation of store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry activity by cell cycle dependent up-regulation of Orai2 in brain capillary endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kito, Hiroaki; Yamamura, Hisao; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hideto; Ohya, Susumu; Asai, Kiyofumi; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2015-04-10

    Store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) via Orai1 and STIM1 complex is supposed to have obligatory roles in the regulation of cellular functions of vascular endothelial cells, while little is known about the contribution of Orai2. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analyses indicated the expression of Orai2 and STIM2, in addition to Orai1 and STIM1 in bovine brain capillary endothelial cell line, t-BBEC117. During the exponential growth of t-BBEC117, the knockdown of Orai1 and STIM1 significantly reduced the SOCE activity, whereas Orai2 and STIM2 siRNAs had no effect. To examine whether endogenous SOCE activity contributes to the regulation of cell cycle progression, t-BBEC117 were synchronized using double thymidine blockage. At the G2/M phase, Ca{sup 2+} influx via SOCE was decreased and Orai2 expression was increased compared to the G0/G1 phase. When Orai2 was knocked down at the G2/M phase, the decrease in SOCE was removed, and cell proliferation was partly attenuated. Taken together, Orai1 significantly contributes to cell proliferation via the functional expression, which is presumably independent of the cell cycle phases. In construct, Orai2 is specifically up-regulated during the G2/M phase, negatively modulates the SOCE activity, and may contribute to the regulation of cell cycle progression in brain capillary endothelial cells. - Highlights: • Orai1 is essential for SOCE activity in brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs). • Cell cycle independent expression of Orai1 regulated SOCE and cell proliferation. • Orai2 was up-regulated only at G2/M phase and this consequently reduced SOCE. • Orai2 as well as Orai1 is a key player controlling SOCE and proliferation in BCECs.

  18. Initial performance assessment of the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste stored at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, R.P.

    1993-12-01

    This performance assessment characterized plausible treatment options conceived by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for its spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste and then modeled the performance of the resulting waste forms in two hypothetical, deep, geologic repositories: one in bedded salt and the other in granite. The results of the performance assessment are intended to help guide INEL in its study of how to prepare wastes and spent fuel for eventual permanent disposal. This assessment was part of the Waste Management Technology Development Program designed to help the US Department of Energy develop and demonstrate the capability to dispose of its nuclear waste, as mandated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The waste forms comprised about 700 metric tons of initial heavy metal (or equivalent units) stored at the INEL: graphite spent fuel, experimental low enriched and highly enriched spent fuel, and high-level waste generated during reprocessing of some spent fuel. Five different waste treatment options were studied; in the analysis, the options and resulting waste forms were analyzed separately and in combination as five waste disposal groups. When the waste forms were studied in combination, the repository was assumed to also contain vitrified high-level waste from three DOE sites for a common basis of comparison and to simulate the impact of the INEL waste forms on a moderate-sized repository, The performance of the waste form was assessed within the context of a whole disposal system, using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, 40 CFR 191, promulgated in 1985. Though the waste form behavior depended upon the repository type, all current and proposed waste forms provided acceptable behavior in the salt and granite repositories.

  19. Final Report Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores in California. Predicted indoor air quality and energy consumption using a matrix of ventilation scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Mendell, Mark J.; Sohn, Michael D.; Dutton, Spencer M.; Berkeley, Pam M.; Spears, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Through mass-balance modeling of various ventilation scenarios that might satisfy the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Procedure, we estimate indoor concentrations of contaminants of concern (COCs) in California “big box” stores, compare estimates to available thresholds, and for selected scenarios estimate differences in energy consumption. Findings are intended to inform decisions on adding performance-based approaches to ventilation rate (VR) standards for commercial buildings. Using multi-zone mass-balance models and available contaminant source rates, we estimated concentrations of 34 COCs for multiple ventilation scenarios: VRmin (0.04 cfm/ft2 ), VRmax (0.24 cfm/ft2 ), and VRmid (0.14 cfm/ft2 ). We compared COC concentrations with available health, olfactory, and irritant thresholds. We estimated building energy consumption at different VRs using a previously developed EnergyPlus model. VRmax did control all contaminants adequately, but VRmin did not, and VRmid did so only marginally. Air cleaning and local ventilation near strong sources both showed promise. Higher VRs increased indoor concentrations of outdoor air pollutants. Lowering VRs in big box stores in California from VRmax to VRmid would reduce total energy use by an estimated 6.6% and energy costs by 2.5%. Reducing the required VRs in California’s big box stores could reduce energy use and costs, but poses challenges for health and comfort of occupants. Source removal, air cleaning, and local ventilation may be needed at reduced VRs, and even at current recommended VRs. Also, alternative ventilation strategies taking climate and season into account in ventilation schedules may provide greater energy cost savings than constant ventilation rates, while improving IAQ.

  20. Boston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    246 2.203 2.183 2.231 2.265 2.271 2003-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.246 2.203 2.183 2.231 2.265 2.271 2003-2016 Regular 2.138 2.092 2.064 2.130 2.160 2.163 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.138 2.092 2.064 2.130 2.160 2.163 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.388 2.357 2.355 2.356 2.404 2.411 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.388 2.357 2.355 2.356 2.404 2.411 2003-2016 Premium 2.585 2.553 2.548 2.555 2.597 2.618 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.585 2.553 2.548 2.555 2.597 2.618

  1. California Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    778 2.733 2.695 2.755 2.763 2.762 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.778 2.733 2.695 2.755 2.763 2.762 1995-2016 Regular 2.725 2.681 2.643 2.702 2.709 2.706 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.725 2.681 2.643 2.702 2.709 2.706 1995-2016 Midgrade 2.851 2.802 2.764 2.826 2.835 2.837 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.851 2.802 2.764 2.826 2.835 2.837 1995-2016 Premium 2.958 2.914 2.870 2.933 2.946 2.953 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.958 2.914 2.870 2.933 2.946 2.953 1995-2016 Diesel (On-Highway)

  2. Chicago Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    350 2.442 2.380 2.479 2.556 2.437 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.350 2.442 2.380 2.479 2.556 2.437 2000-2016 Regular 2.224 2.317 2.257 2.356 2.433 2.313 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.224 2.317 2.257 2.356 2.433 2.313 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.564 2.646 2.582 2.682 2.753 2.639 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.564 2.646 2.582 2.682 2.753 2.639 2000-2016 Premium 2.896 2.989 2.916 3.016 3.093 2.979 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.896 2.989 2.916 3.016 3.093 2.979 2000

  3. Cleveland Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    78 2.204 2.284 2.239 2.352 2.204 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.178 2.204 2.284 2.239 2.352 2.204 2003-2016 Regular 2.051 2.075 2.158 2.111 2.227 2.077 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.051 2.075 2.158 2.111 2.227 2.077 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.338 2.368 2.447 2.411 2.510 2.353 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.338 2.368 2.447 2.411 2.510 2.353 2003-2016 Premium 2.644 2.675 2.742 2.701 2.808 2.679 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.644 2.675 2.742 2.701 2.808 2.679 2003

  4. Colorado Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    218 2.179 2.167 2.211 2.290 2.290 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.218 2.179 2.167 2.211 2.290 2.290 2000-2016 Regular 2.115 2.076 2.064 2.106 2.186 2.186 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.115 2.076 2.064 2.106 2.186 2.186 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.374 2.336 2.324 2.370 2.445 2.450 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.374 2.336 2.324 2.370 2.445 2.450 2000-2016 Premium 2.631 2.588 2.577 2.625 2.703 2.706 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.631 2.588 2.577 2.625 2.703 2.706 2000

  5. Denver Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    93 2.156 2.150 2.180 2.278 2.268 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.193 2.156 2.150 2.180 2.278 2.268 2000-2016 Regular 2.082 2.047 2.039 2.069 2.168 2.157 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.082 2.047 2.039 2.069 2.168 2.157 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.365 2.323 2.321 2.355 2.443 2.438 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.365 2.323 2.321 2.355 2.443 2.438 2000-2016 Premium 2.624 2.578 2.580 2.608 2.706 2.703 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.624 2.578 2.580 2.608 2.706 2.703 2000

  6. Florida Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    169 2.144 2.199 2.238 2.323 2.340 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.169 2.144 2.199 2.238 2.323 2.340 2003-2016 Regular 2.014 1.989 2.044 2.082 2.171 2.189 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.014 1.989 2.044 2.082 2.171 2.189 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.301 2.278 2.333 2.374 2.460 2.457 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.301 2.278 2.333 2.374 2.460 2.457 2003-2016 Premium 2.579 2.550 2.607 2.646 2.718 2.743 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.579 2.550 2.607 2.646 2.718 2.743

  7. 2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Industrial

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial (Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4B) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) 3 Phases Renewables CA Power Marketer 36 77,724 4,536.3 5.84 City of Cerritos - (CA) CA Municipal 8 12,150 902.7 7.43 City of Corona - (CA) CA Municipal 6 41,096 3,462.1 8.42 Constellation NewEnergy, Inc CA Power Marketer 42 2,181,766 137,745.7 6.31 Direct Energy Business CA Power Marketer 29 259,685 16,873.9 6.50 EDF Industrial

  8. 2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Transportation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Transportation (Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4B) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) Northern California Power Agny CA Political Subdivision 1 370,555 19,963.0 5.39 Constellation Energy Services, Inc. CT Power Marketer 1 25,227 1,811.7 7.18 Constellation NewEnergy, Inc CT Power Marketer 1 5,612 446.3 7.95 NextEra Energy Services, LLC CT Power Marketer 1 78,948 6,712.4 8.50 Direct Energy Business Marketing, LLC

  9. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Transportation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Transportation (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) City of North Little Rock - (AR) AR Municipal 1 345 40.0 11.59 Entergy Arkansas Inc AR Investor Owned 1 86 8.9 10.35 City & County of San Francisco CA Municipal 1 102,338 5,378.0 5.26 City of Pasadena - (CA) CA Municipal 1 9,562 1,346.2 14.08 City of Santa Clara - (CA) CA Municipal 1 20,969 2,049.9

  10. Retail Prices for Gasoline, All Grades

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. 2.835 3.576 3.680 3.575 3.437 2.520 1993-2015 East Coast (PADD1) 2.824 3.587 3.695 3.599 3.470 2.483 1993-2015 New England (PADD 1A) ...

  11. Retail Prices for Regular Gasoline - Conventional Areas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    105 2.091 2.087 2.096 2.136 2.187 1990-2016 East Coast (PADD1) 2.095 2.081 2.048 2.069 2.118 2.173 1992-2016 New England (PADD 1A) 2.206 2.181 2.156 2.141 2.192 2.239 1993-2016 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 2.259 2.224 2.198 2.204 2.246 2.290 1993-2016 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 2.036 2.030 1.993 2.021 2.073 2.132 1993-2016 Midwest (PADD 2) 2.069 2.066 2.100 2.109 2.159 2.211 1992-2016 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 1.980 1.947 1.928 1.939 1.965 2.018 1992-2016 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) 2.264 2.252 2.226 2.214

  12. Retail Prices for Regular Gasoline - Reformulated Areas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    44 2.302 2.281 2.262 2.312 2.341 1994-2016 East Coast (PADD1) 2.162 2.130 2.097 2.086 2.138 2.171 1994-2016 New England (PADD 1A) 2.209 2.165 2.117 2.095 2.160 2.192 1994-2016 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 2.165 2.139 2.110 2.105 2.150 2.176 1994-2016 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 2.009 1.980 1.965 1.959 2.011 2.080 1994-2016 Midwest (PADD 2) 2.132 2.132 2.210 2.198 2.250 2.329 1994-2016 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 1.980 1.936 1.928 1.937 1.963 1.980 1994-2016 West Coast (PADD 5) 2.734 2.668 2.621 2.581 2.636

  13. ,"San Francisco Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...132016" ,"Excel File Name:","petprignddcusy05sfw.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavpetpetprignddcusy05sfw.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ...

  14. ,"Los Angeles Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...132016" ,"Excel File Name:","petprignddcusy05law.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavpetpetprignddcusy05law.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ...

  15. Retail Prices for Gasoline, All Grades

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    267 2.256 2.256 2.299 2.341 2.329 1993-2016 East Coast (PADD1) 2.244 2.210 2.221 2.270 2.314 2.314 1993-2016 New England (PADD 1A) 2.279 2.237 2.219 2.270 2.305 2.309 1993-2016 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 2.310 2.283 2.283 2.326 2.357 2.361 1993-2016 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 2.184 2.149 2.175 2.227 2.284 2.281 1993-2016 Midwest (PADD 2) 2.164 2.204 2.208 2.259 2.313 2.269 1993-2016 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 2.054 2.038 2.052 2.076 2.118 2.113 1993-2016 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) 2.340 2.314 2.301 2.314

  16. Houston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    040 2.060 2.021 2.059 2.100 2.109 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.040 2.060 2.021 2.059 2.100 2.109 2000-2016 Regular 1.911 1.930 1.891 1.931 1.968 1.977 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.911 1.930 1.891 1.931 1.968 1.977 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.200 2.221 2.176 2.213 2.254 2.265 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.200 2.221 2.176 2.213 2.254 2.265 2000-2016 Premium 2.467 2.489 2.456 2.487 2.540 2.550 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.467 2.489 2.456 2.487 2.540 2.550

  17. Los Angeles Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    763 2.718 2.671 2.771 2.788 2.792 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.763 2.718 2.671 2.771 2.788 2.792 2000-2016 Regular 2.714 2.668 2.622 2.722 2.739 2.739 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.714 2.668 2.622 2.722 2.739 2.739 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.818 2.774 2.726 2.827 2.844 2.852 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.818 2.774 2.726 2.827 2.844 2.852 2000-2016 Premium 2.918 2.874 2.826 2.927 2.943 2.959 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.918 2.874 2.826 2.927 2.943 2.959

  18. Massachusetts Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    251 2.204 2.184 2.234 2.268 2.267 2003-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.251 2.204 2.184 2.234 2.268 2.267 2003-2016 Regular 2.144 2.093 2.065 2.132 2.161 2.158 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.144 2.093 2.065 2.132 2.161 2.158 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.383 2.350 2.352 2.356 2.403 2.402 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.383 2.350 2.352 2.356 2.403 2.402 2003-2016 Premium 2.570 2.533 2.531 2.543 2.587 2.597 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.570 2.533 2.531 2.543 2.587 2.597

  19. Miami Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    490 2.473 2.446 2.474 2.547 2.527 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.490 2.473 2.446 2.474 2.547 2.527 2003-2016 Regular 2.324 2.310 2.277 2.308 2.380 2.360 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.324 2.310 2.277 2.308 2.380 2.360 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.631 2.608 2.581 2.597 2.668 2.648 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.631 2.608 2.581 2.597 2.668 2.648 2003-2016 Premium 2.927 2.907 2.895 2.923 3.001 2.980 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.927 2.907 2.895 2.923 3.001 2.980 2003

  20. Minnesota Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    102 2.140 2.191 2.267 2.324 2.277 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.102 2.140 2.191 2.267 2.324 2.277 2000-2016 Regular 2.039 2.079 2.130 2.207 2.264 2.217 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.039 2.079 2.130 2.207 2.264 2.217 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.178 2.216 2.266 2.343 2.400 2.350 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.178 2.216 2.266 2.343 2.400 2.350 2000-2016 Premium 2.421 2.453 2.501 2.572 2.626 2.579 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.421 2.453 2.501 2.572 2.626 2.579

  1. New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    419 2.384 2.374 2.380 2.399 2.405 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.340 2.313 2.304 2.320 2.358 2.359 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.487 2.445 2.434 2.433 2.434 2.444 2000-2016 Regular 2.296 2.262 2.253 2.260 2.279 2.284 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.232 2.204 2.195 2.212 2.252 2.251 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.355 2.315 2.304 2.303 2.303 2.313 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.559 2.521 2.506 2.509 2.527 2.536 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.453 2.424 2.413 2.418 2.461 2.465

  2. Ohio Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    205 2.249 2.186 2.264 2.277 2.260 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.205 2.249 2.186 2.264 2.277 2.260 2003-2016 Regular 2.089 2.132 2.070 2.147 2.160 2.143 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.089 2.132 2.070 2.147 2.160 2.143 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.351 2.397 2.334 2.414 2.424 2.405 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.351 2.397 2.334 2.414 2.424 2.405 2003-2016 Premium 2.631 2.677 2.613 2.694 2.705 2.692 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.631 2.677 2.613 2.694 2.705 2.692 2003

  3. PADD 4 Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    340 2.314 2.301 2.314 2.347 2.352 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.340 2.314 2.301 2.314 2.347 2.352 1994-2016 Regular 2.252 2.226 2.214 2.229 2.263 2.267 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.252 2.226 2.214 2.229 2.263 2.267 1992-2016 Midgrade 2.451 2.427 2.410 2.415 2.443 2.450 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.451 2.427 2.410 2.415 2.443 2.450 1994-2016 Premium 2.666 2.640 2.626 2.637 2.667 2.676 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.666 2.640 2.626 2.637 2.667 2.676 1994-2016 Diesel (On-Highway)

  4. PADD 5 Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    677 2.635 2.596 2.637 2.656 2.660 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.553 2.526 2.492 2.493 2.529 2.539 1995-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.727 2.680 2.639 2.696 2.707 2.709 1995-2016 Regular 2.614 2.573 2.534 2.573 2.592 2.594 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.490 2.462 2.428 2.430 2.467 2.473 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.668 2.621 2.581 2.636 2.647 2.647 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.785 2.741 2.702 2.747 2.766 2.773 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.688 2.660 2.626 2.626 2.670 2.685

  5. San Francisco Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    843 2.797 2.762 2.811 2.809 2.802 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.843 2.797 2.762 2.811 2.809 2.802 2000-2016 Regular 2.784 2.745 2.710 2.758 2.752 2.743 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.784 2.745 2.710 2.758 2.752 2.743 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.930 2.864 2.829 2.880 2.886 2.884 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.930 2.864 2.829 2.880 2.886 2.884 2000-2016 Premium 3.035 2.980 2.944 2.991 3.007 3.002 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 3.035 2.980 2.944 2.991 3.007 3.002

  6. Seattle Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    662 2.639 2.619 2.622 2.646 2.662 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.662 2.639 2.619 2.622 2.646 2.662 2003-2016 Regular 2.607 2.584 2.565 2.566 2.591 2.608 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.607 2.584 2.565 2.566 2.591 2.608 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.777 2.749 2.728 2.734 2.757 2.765 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.777 2.749 2.728 2.734 2.757 2.765 2003-2016 Premium 2.891 2.865 2.844 2.854 2.877 2.893 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.891 2.865 2.844 2.854 2.877 2.893

  7. Texas Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    063 2.049 2.057 2.081 2.113 2.117 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.075 2.055 2.065 2.088 2.130 2.119 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.045 2.039 2.046 2.071 2.088 2.115 2000-2016 Regular 1.959 1.944 1.953 1.978 2.013 2.016 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 1.974 1.954 1.963 1.988 2.035 2.023 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.936 1.928 1.937 1.963 1.980 2.005 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.223 2.209 2.217 2.230 2.258 2.264 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.243 2.219 2.235 2.240 2.277 2.264

  8. No. 2 Distillate Prices - Through Retail Outlets

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Connecticut 2.481 - - - - - 1983-2015 Maine 2.540 - - - - - 1983-2015 Massachusetts 2.588 - - - - - 1983-2015 New Hampshire 2.512 - - - - - 1983-2015 Rhode Island 2.507 - - - - - ...

  9. Motor Gasoline Sales Through Retail Outlets Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Connecticut 2.422 - - - - - 1984-2015 Maine 2.360 - - - - - 1984-2015 Massachusetts 2.360 - - - - - 1984-2015 New Hampshire 2.376 - - - - - 1984-2015 Rhode Island 2.328 - - - - - ...

  10. Washington Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.309 2.330 2.320 2.362 2.384 2.453 2003-2016 Regular 2.243 2.266 2.254 2.297 2.317 2.387 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.243 2.266 2.254 2.297 2.317 ...

  11. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Industrial

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... 9 20,211 1,603.0 7.93 Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp KY Cooperative 10 337,889 ... 59 43,861 3,070.7 7.00 City of Bowling Green - (KY) KY Municipal 6 118,189 8,185.0 6.93 ...

  12. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Industrial"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...ative",9,20211,1603,7.9313245 "Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp","KY","Cooperative",10,337889,2...9,43861,3070.7,7.0009804 "City of Bowling Green - (KY)","KY","Municipal",6,118189,8185,6.9...

  13. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Residential"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Solutions Corp.","IL","Power Marketer",477853,4492034,227638.8,5.0676108 "Green Mountain Energy Company","IL","Power Marketer",24959,190336,16176.4,8.4988652 "Homefield ...

  14. 2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 6.03 Glacial Energy Holdings IL Power Marketer 2,426 128,194 8,721.1 6.80 Green Mountain Energy Company IL Power Marketer 24,967 198,273 16,620.1 8.38 Homefield Energy IL ...

  15. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Total"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... "Glacial Energy Holdings","IL","Power Marketer",2426,128194,8721.1,6.8030485 "Green Mountain Energy Company","IL","Power Marketer",24967,198273,16620.1,8.3824323 "Homefield ...

  16. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Commercial"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... "Glacial Energy Holdings","IL","Power Marketer",2426,128194,8721.1,6.8030485 "Green Mountain Energy Company","IL","Power Marketer",8,7937,443.7,5.5902734 "Homefield ...

  17. 2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Residential

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 227,638.8 5.07 Green Mountain Energy Company IL Power Marketer 24,959 190,336 16,176.4 8.50 Homefield Energy IL Power Marketer 677,675 5,726,072 347,820.0 6.07 IDT Energy, Inc. ...

  18. 2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Commercial

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... 6.03 Glacial Energy Holdings IL Power Marketer 2,426 128,194 8,721.1 6.80 Green Mountain Energy Company IL Power Marketer 8 7,937 443.7 5.59 Homefield Energy IL Power Marketer ...

  19. Reviewers required major changes, including rearranging the two articles, so the new title of the first paper is: HVAC and Refrigeration Experiments at Wal-Mart Experimental Supercenters in Texas and Colorado --- original title: ASHRAE Journal DRAFT article McKinney and Aurora Wal-Mart Stores, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, J Michael; Deru, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, Wal-Mart opened experimental stores in McKinney, Texas (hot climate), and Aurora, Colo. (cold climate). With these projects Wal-Mart can: * Learn how to achieve sustainability improvements; * Gain experience with the design, design process, and operations for some specific advanced technologies; * Understand energy use patterns in their stores more clearly; * Lay groundwork for better understanding of how to achieve major carbon footprint reductions; and * Measure the potential benefits of specific technologies tested.

  20. Xcel Energy- Lighting Discount Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Focus on Energy partners with retailers around Wisconsin to offer instant discounts on ENERGY STAR® qualified products in stores. Discounts do not apply to ENERGY STAR® qualified fixtures, fans or...

  1. 4th ISFEH.dot

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Harm from radiant heat fluxes is expressed in terms of a ... be expected to conduct search and rescue operations. Because the hydrogen system does not enter the retail store at any ...

  2. Energy Department Recognizes San Antonio Area Partners for Advancing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Each unit is renovated with low-e windows, which help to ... speaks volumes to SAHA's commitment of creating dynamic ... The retailer has reduced the store's electricity use by 30 ...

  3. Staples | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Staples Jump to: navigation, search Name: Staples Sector: Solar Product: Global retailer of office products, with two solar power systems totaling 560kW on stores in California....

  4. Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benefits » Retirement Retirement Retirement Plans Your appointment type determines your eligibility for retirement coverage similar to the eligibility requirements for enrollment in the insurance programs. If your appointment confers eligibility you will automatically be enroll in the applicable retirement plan which is determined by your date of hire. Your servicing HR office is responsible for determining the applicable retirement plan for you. There are various retirement plans and types the

  5. Paperclips Supply Store Forms | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Catalog Order Form for Non-Stocked or Specialty Items For any non-stocked or special item that needs to be ordered, the Catalog Order Form (pdf) needs to be filled in. All supplies...

  6. Walmart Experimental Store Performance Stories: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... the lighting energy for the sales floor area assuming the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 allowable LPD of 1.7 Wft 2 for a sales area and 24- hour, 365-day operation (ASHRAE 2004). ...

  7. System and method for storing energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yarger, Eric Jay [Rigby, ID; Morrison, John [Butte, MT; Richardson, John Grant [Idaho Falls, ID; Spencer, David Frazer [Idaho Falls, ID; Christiansen, Dale W. [Blackfoot, ID

    2010-03-30

    A self-recharging battery comprising a generator and an energy storage device contained within the battery case. The generator comprises a magnetic structure configured to generate a compressed magnetic field and a coil configured to focus the compressed magnetic field in electrical conductive elements of the coil.

  8. Walmart Experimental Store Performance Stories: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Piping and control changes in the second year reduced pumping energy use by 43% from 2006 ... The waste oil boilers accounted for 3% and 4% of the total HHW load in 2006 and 2007, ...

  9. QER- Comment of Solar Store of Greenfield

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    I speak for many millions of Americans who are ready and able to more the USA towards that goal of 100% renewables by 2050. WE are ready to START TODAY. And in fact we have started already. Thank you for your time and consideration. Claire Chang

  10. Method for storing radioactive combustible waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Godbee, H.W.; Lovelace, R.C.

    1973-10-01

    A method is described for preventing pressure buildup in sealed containers which contain radioactively contaminated combustible waste material by adding an oxide getter material to the container so as to chemically bind sorbed water and combustion product gases. (Official Gazette)

  11. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Kohl's Department Stores

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kohl's is committed to protecting and conserving the environment by seeking innovative solutions that encourage long-term sustainability. Providing electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) supports...

  12. Energy Savings Store | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    15209 W. 99th Street Place: Lenexa, Kansas Zip: 66219 Sector: Solar Product: Solar and wind systems Phone Number: 913-495-9434 Website: www.ewindandsolar.com Coordinates:...

  13. How to Store Carbon | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    leaves a power plant so it can't trap heat in the atmosphere. Energy innovators have developed many technologies to separate CO2 from the gas stream of coal-fired power plants, ...

  14. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,8374110,8204704,7597337,7442490,7146835,6865634,6698105,6176586,6300359,6075079,21,25.3,25.5 "Industrial",16565376,16847755,16993922,16774699,14710294,17038455,17839032,17990009,1...

  15. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  16. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  17. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share ...

  18. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  19. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  20. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  1. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  2. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  3. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  4. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  5. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  6. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  7. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, ...

  8. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  9. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share ...

  10. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  11. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share ...

  12. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  13. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  14. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  15. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  16. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  17. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, ...

  18. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, ...

  19. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  20. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  1. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  2. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, ...

  3. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share ...

  4. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share ...

  5. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, ...

  6. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  7. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  8. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  9. Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    310 2.283 2.283 2.326 2.357 2.361 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.346 2.321 2.326 2.371 2.412 2.405 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.288 2.260 2.256 2.298 2.323 2.334 1994-2016 Regular 2.172 2.144 2.143 2.187 2.220 2.225 1993-2016 Conventional Areas 2.224 2.198 2.204 2.246 2.290 2.285 1993-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.139 2.110 2.105 2.150 2.176 2.187 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.450 2.423 2.424 2.467 2.494 2.497 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.446 2.426 2.429 2.484 2.514 2.503

  10. East Coast (PADD 1) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    44 2.210 2.221 2.270 2.314 2.314 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.227 2.193 2.215 2.266 2.318 2.314 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.271 2.238 2.230 2.276 2.308 2.315 1994-2016 Regular 2.100 2.066 2.075 2.126 2.172 2.173 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.081 2.048 2.069 2.118 2.173 2.171 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.130 2.097 2.086 2.138 2.171 2.176 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.378 2.345 2.364 2.407 2.451 2.440 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.346 2.313 2.344 2.395 2.442 2.422

  11. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Industrial"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial" "(Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4B)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Customers (Count)","Sales (Megawatthours)","Revenues (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (cents/kWh)" "3 Phases Renewables","CA","Power Marketer",36,77724,4536.3,5.8364212 "City of Cerritos - (CA)","CA","Municipal",8,12150,902.7,7.4296296 "City of Corona -

  12. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Transportation"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Transportation" "(Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4B)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Customers (Count)","Sales (Megawatthours)","Revenues (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (cents/kWh)" "Northern California Power Agny","CA","Political Subdivision",1,370555,19963,5.3873244 "Constellation Energy Services, Inc.","CT","Power

  13. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Transportation"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Transportation" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Customers (Count)","Sales (Megawatthours)","Revenues (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (cents/kWh)" "City of North Little Rock - (AR)","AR","Municipal",1,345,40,11.594203 "Entergy Arkansas Inc","AR","Investor Owned",1,86,8.9,10.348837

  14. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Proposal for Standard Market Design 2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report ...

  15. Historic utility retail rate information | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    updates) until just recently, so you may not find too much history. Going forward, we hope to make historic rates more organized, using the "supersedes" field to connect historic...

  16. Effects of Demand Response on Retail and Wholesale Power Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chassin, David P.; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2012-07-26

    Demand response has grown to be a part of the repertoire of resources used by utilities to manage the balance between generation and load. In recent years, advances in communications and control technology have enabled utilities to consider continuously controlling demand response to meet generation, rather than the other way around. This paper discusses the economic applications of a general method for load resource analysis that parallels the approach used to analyze generation resources and uses the method to examine the results of the US Department of Energys Olympic Peninsula Demonstration Testbed. A market-based closed-loop system of controllable assets is discussed with necessary and sufficient conditions on system controllability, observability and stability derived.

  17. U.S. Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Gasoline - All Grades 2.835 3.576 3.680 3.575 3.437 2.520 1993-2015 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.793 3.528 3.610 3.511 3.376 2.423 1994-2015 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.921 3.675 3.822 3.707 3.559 2.718 1994-2015 Regular 2.782 3.521 3.618 3.505 3.358 2.429 1990-2015 Conventional Areas 2.742 3.476 3.552 3.443 3.299 2.334 1990-2015 Reformulated Areas 2.864 3.616 3.757 3.635 3.481 2.629 1994-2015 Midgrade 2.902 3.644 3.756 3.663 3.539 2.645

  18. Commercial Building Partnership Retail Food Sales Energy Savings Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    The Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) paired selected commercial building owners and operators with representatives of DOE, national laboratories and private sector exports to explore energy efficiency measures across general merchandise commercial buildings.

  19. Refiner Prices of Gasoline, All Grades - Through Retail Outlets

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 1.892 2.306 3.058 3.168 3.068 2.876 1978-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 1.871 2.291 3.054 3.172 3.058 2.716 1983-2014 New England (PADD...

  20. West Coast less California Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    488 2.454 2.414 2.419 2.457 2.469 1998-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.553 2.526 2.492 2.493 2.529 2.539 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.180 2.111 2.043 2.065 2.115 2.140 1998-2016 Regular 2.421 2.387 2.347 2.352 2.391 2.401 1998-2016 Conventional Areas 2.490 2.462 2.428 2.430 2.467 2.473 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.090 2.020 1.953 1.975 2.025 2.051 1998-2016 Midgrade 2.623 2.587 2.548 2.551 2.596 2.612 1998-2016 Conventional Areas 2.688 2.660 2.626 2.626 2.670 2.685

  1. Retail Prices for Diesel (On-Highway) - All Types

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    March) 2.094 2.089 2.096 2.122 2.132 2.131 1990-2016 East Coast (PADD 1) 2.100 2.095 2.101 2.127 2.137 2.136 1990-2016 New England (PADD 1A) 2.043 2.034 2.039 2.061 2.070 2.068 1990-2016 Connecticut 2.192 2.209 2.199 2.237 2.238 2.233 1990-2016 Maine 1.779 1.750 1.747 1.774 1.788 1.792 1990-2016 Massachusetts 2.133 2.115 2.126 2.140 2.157 2.155 1990-2016 New Hampshire 2.013 2.010 1.993 1.995 1.995 1.993 1990-2016 Rhode Island 2.111 2.093 2.123 2.157 2.178 2.169 1990-2016 Vermont 1.795 1.789

  2. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... alternative suppliers to enter and obtain multiple, ... A broad range of terms is used in different states to denote ... will have incentives to search for an alternative ...

  3. Financing Energy Efficiency in Retail | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Financial Opportunities Financial Opportunities The Department of Energy (DOE) is a major provider of funding for basic and applied research for converting biomass resources into biofuels. Many financial assistance opportunities are available for small-scale to large-scale research activities. Funding opportunities specific to DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), including the Bioenergy Technologies Office's solicitations, can be found on EERE's Funding Opportunity

  4. Dominion Retail Inc (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 3763 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Average Rates Residential: 0.0593kWh...

  5. Texas Retail Energy, LLC (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 50046 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Average Rates Commercial: 0.0507kWh...

  6. Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    054 2.038 2.052 2.076 2.118 2.113 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.056 2.037 2.053 2.077 2.127 2.113 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.045 2.039 2.046 2.071 2.088 2.115 1994-2016 Regular 1.944 1.928 1.938 1.964 2.009 2.005 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 1.947 1.928 1.939 1.965 2.018 2.005 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.936 1.928 1.937 1.963 1.980 2.005 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.195 2.179 2.204 2.218 2.259 2.251 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.195 2.174 2.207 2.219 2.267 2.247

  7. Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    84 2.149 2.175 2.227 2.284 2.281 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.187 2.150 2.179 2.231 2.287 2.284 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.156 2.138 2.133 2.181 2.249 2.245 1994-2016 Regular 2.025 1.991 2.016 2.068 2.128 2.125 1993-2016 Conventional Areas 2.030 1.993 2.021 2.073 2.132 2.130 1993-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.980 1.965 1.959 2.011 2.080 2.075 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.321 2.285 2.322 2.371 2.424 2.402 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.317 2.280 2.320 2.371 2.423 2.399

  8. Midwest (PADD 2) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    64 2.204 2.208 2.259 2.313 2.269 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.152 2.186 2.193 2.243 2.294 2.259 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.242 2.320 2.304 2.360 2.436 2.337 1994-2016 Regular 2.075 2.115 2.121 2.171 2.227 2.180 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.066 2.100 2.109 2.159 2.211 2.172 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.132 2.210 2.198 2.250 2.329 2.227 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.328 2.361 2.361 2.411 2.461 2.424 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.309 2.337 2.339 2.387 2.434 2.406

  9. New England (PADD 1A) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    79 2.237 2.219 2.270 2.305 2.309 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.286 2.261 2.246 2.294 2.336 2.346 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.278 2.231 2.212 2.264 2.298 2.299 1994-2016 Regular 2.168 2.125 2.104 2.166 2.201 2.202 1993-2016 Conventional Areas 2.181 2.156 2.141 2.192 2.239 2.248 1993-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.165 2.117 2.095 2.160 2.192 2.191 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.441 2.404 2.391 2.410 2.449 2.455 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.439 2.416 2.401 2.439 2.471 2.481

  10. New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    304 2.270 2.260 2.282 2.296 2.311 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.304 2.270 2.260 2.282 2.296 2.311 2000-2016 Regular 2.159 2.125 2.112 2.137 2.153 2.168 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.159 2.125 2.112 2.137 2.153 2.168 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.482 2.450 2.443 2.458 2.467 2.481 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.482 2.450 2.443 2.458 2.467 2.481 2000-2016 Premium 2.671 2.635 2.630 2.648 2.657 2.673 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.671 2.635 2.630 2.648 2.657 2.673

  11. U.S. Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History Gasoline - All Grades 2.071 2.216 2.371 2.467 2.345 2.284 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 1.996 2.129 2.303 2.405 2.263 2.226 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.223 2.390 2.509 2.593 2.512 2.402 1994-2016 Regular 1.969 2.113 2.268 2.366 2.239 2.178 1990-2016 Conventional Areas 1.895 2.027 2.199 2.303 2.157 2.119 1990-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.124 2.293 2.413 2.497 2.411 2.300 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.210 2.355 2.510 2.603

  12. U.S. Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    67 2.256 2.256 2.299 2.341 2.329 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.198 2.193 2.203 2.243 2.292 2.277 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.406 2.384 2.364 2.413 2.441 2.436 1994-2016 Regular 2.159 2.150 2.149 2.193 2.237 2.223 1990-2016 Conventional Areas 2.091 2.087 2.096 2.136 2.187 2.170 1990-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.302 2.281 2.262 2.312 2.341 2.333 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.413 2.398 2.401 2.441 2.481 2.468 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.335 2.325 2.340 2.378 2.424 2.405

  13. Responsive pricing for retail competition - a customer perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meade, D.

    1994-12-31

    Market forces have motivated utility customers to institute a work process improvement program which has resulted in reorganizations, increased market focus, re-engineering and cost reductions. The market has also provided motivation to look for new and creative ways to work with customers and suppliers. Factors involved in competitive power sourcing strategies which play a role in customer decisions are discussed. Electricity users need efficient, flexible, customer-focused suppliers and a choice of competitively priced electrical service. Government and regulatory policy needs to support and encourgage competitive actions by utilities so that they can effectively participate in the evolving market.

  14. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Stand-alone retail

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  15. Archived Reference Building Type: Stand-alone retail

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  16. Archived Reference Building Type: Stand-alone retail

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  17. How Three Retail Buyers Source Large-Scale Solar Electricity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large-scale, non-utility solar power purchase agreements (PPAs) are still a rarity despite the growing popularity of PPAs across the country. In this webinar, participants will learn more about how...

  18. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Stand-alone retail

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  19. State Regulators Promote Consumer Choice in Retail Gas Markets

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    Restructuring of interstate pipeline companies has created new choices and challenges for local distribution companies (LDCs), their regulators, and their customers. The process of separating interstate pipeline gas sales from transportation service has been completed and has resulted in greater gas procurement options for LDCs.

  20. A Look at Retail and Service Buildings - Index Page

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    the U.S. in 1995. Number of Buildings In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), information is collected separately for service buildings, enclosed malls,...

  1. Reliant Energy Retail Services LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facebook: https:www.facebook.comreliantenergy Outage Hotline: 1-866-222-7100 Green Button Access: Implemented Green Button Landing Page: www.reliant.comWelcome.d...

  2. TXU Energy Retail Co LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Green Button Access: Implemented Green Button Landing Page: www.txu.comenresidentia Green Button Reference Page: www.txu.comenresidentia References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  3. Hedging effects of wind on retail electric supply costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, Frank; Litvinova, Julia

    2009-12-15

    In the short term, renewables - especially wind - are not as effective as conventional hedges due to uncertain volume and timing as well as possibly poor correlation with high-value periods. In the long term, there are more potential hedging advantages to renewables because conventional financial hedges are not available very far in the future. (author)

  4. Challenges for improving estimates of soil organic carbon stored...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    determined, and research efforts that will reduce this discrepancy were identified. Five research challenges for improving empirical assessments of the distribution and potential...

  5. License Amendment Request for Storing Exelon Sister Nuclear Stations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... A LAR submittal to the NRC was also provided and NRC approval was received in 2011. (authors) less Authors: Azar, Miguel 1 ; Gardner, Donald A. 2 ; Taylor, Edward R. 3 + ...

  6. Where is DB config stored? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - 13:41 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hello-Sorry for the delay in... Use of DynamicAggregationProcessor I submitted a pull...

  7. Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Among the extensive engineered controls that have been put in place to protect workers is the Retrieval Containment Enclosure wall that isolates the remaining waste from the rest ...

  8. fy16 c store rd | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EVENT 2016 Mastering the Subsurface Through Technology Innovation and Collaboration: Carbon Storage and Oil and Natural Gas Technologies Review Meeting Dates: August 16-18, 2016 Registration Fee: $300.00 - Full $86.00 - Entrance Only Venue: Sheraton Station Square Hotel 300 W. Station Square Drive Pittsburgh, PA 15219-1122 Phone: (412) 803-3851 or 1-800-325-3535 P5---CO2-injection-well-at-Denburys-Citronelle-oil-field.jpg The Carbon Storage and Oil and Natural Gas Technologies Review Meeting

  9. Grocery Store 50% Energy Savings Technical Support Document 2009...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Publication Year 2009 URL http:www.nrel.govdocsfy09osti46101.pdf Building Models Grocery 2009 TSD Chicago Baseline, Grocery 2009 TSD Chicago 50% Energy Savings,...

  10. Energy Department Project Captures and Stores more than One Million...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) at the hydrogen-production facility in Port Arthur, Texas. ... of CO2 The Air Products and Chemicals hydrogen production facilities in Port Arthur, ...

  11. Method of generating hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Sesha S; Niemann, Michael U; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K

    2013-05-14

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  12. Equalizer system and method for series connected energy storing devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rouillard, Jean; Comte, Christophe; Hagen, Ronald A.; Knudson, Orlin B.; Morin, Andre; Ross, Guy

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for regulating the charge voltage of a number of electrochemical cells connected in series is disclosed. Equalization circuitry is provided to control the amount of charge current supplied to individual electrochemical cells included within the series string of electrochemical cells without interrupting the flow of charge current through the series string. The equalization circuitry balances the potential of each of the electrochemical cells to within a pre-determined voltage setpoint tolerance during charging, and, if necessary, prior to initiating charging. Equalization of cell potentials may be effected toward the end of a charge cycle or throughout the charge cycle. Overcharge protection is also provided for each of the electrochemical cells coupled to the series connection. During a discharge mode of operation in accordance with one embodiment, the equalization circuitry is substantially non-conductive with respect to the flow of discharge current from the series string of electrochemical cells. In accordance with another embodiment, equalization of the series string of cells is effected during a discharge cycle.

  13. Climate change stored below the earth`s surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cermak, V.; Safanda, J.; Kresl, M.

    1997-12-31

    Earth`s subsurface has a certain capability to remember what has happened on its surface tens to hundreds (or even thousands) years ago. Long-term climate changes accompanied by variations in tile mean annual temperature determine tile soil temperature, the time variations of which then propagate downwards with an attenuated amplitude and delayed phase. Ground surface temperature (GST) history, reflecting the past climate, can thus be evaluated by analysing its excursions left on the present-day temperature-depth T(z) distribution measured by precise temperature logging in the boreholes. Whereas the depths of several hundred metres may still keep and reveal a reliable record oil the climate of the past several centuries, tile uppermost layer of 100-150 in presents a plentiful archive of the recent global warming. Several characteristic examples of extracted climate recollections from holes all over the world will be resented and discussed.

  14. Marine Diatoms Survive Iron Droughts in the Ocean by Storing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In particular, phytoplankton, which are aquatic, free-drifting, single-celled organisms that can harvest energy from the sun, have an elevated demand for iron due to the large role ...

  15. Handbook for Handling, Storing, and Dispensing E85

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-04-01

    Guidebook contains information about EPAct alternative fuels regulations for fleets, flexible fuel vehicles, E85 properties and specifications, and E85 handling and storage guidelines.

  16. Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2013-01-29

    Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

  17. Ion-exchange material and method of storing radioactive wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Komarneni, S.; Roy, D.M.

    1983-10-31

    A new cation exchanger is a modified tobermorite containing aluminum isomorphously substituted for silicon and containing sodium or potassium. The exchanger is selective for lead, rubidium, cobalt, and cadmium and is selective for cesium over calcium or sodium. The tobermorites are compatible with cement and are useful for the long-term fixation and storage of radioactive nuclear wastes.

  18. Handbook for Handling, Storing, and Dispensing E85 and Other...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ... National Fire Protection Association NREL . . . . . . . . . National Renewable Energy ... E85, also known as flex fuel, is an alternative motor fuel authorized by the Energy Policy ...

  19. Record of Decision: Stabilization of Plutonium Solutions Stored...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... has prepared and issued a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOEEIS-0219, December 30, ... CFR Parts 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). ...

  20. Record of Decision: Stabilization of Plutonium Solutions Stored...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... activities, and decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are no longer ... The Department of Energy received letters from the following organizations following the ...

  1. GE Store: Water Microclarification Inspired by Blood Separation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    while the other is a mixture of dirt and water, ideal for Jeeps on a backcountry road. ... For mud, separation is crucial to removing solids and contaminants from produced water in ...

  2. J. Nash Copeland Store | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Michael McQuade About Us J. Michael McQuade - Senior Vice President, Science and Technology - United Technologies Corporation J. Michael McQuade J. Michael McQuade is Senior Vice President for Science & Technology at United Technologies Corporation. His responsibilities include providing strategic oversight and guidance for research, engineering and development activities throughout the business units of the corporation and at the United Technologies Research Center. Dr. McQuade held

  3. J. Nash Copeland Store | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J

  4. Handbook for Handling, Storing, and Dispensing E85 | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    as a guide for blenders, distributors, sellers, and users of E85 as an alternative motor fuel. It provides basic information on the proper and safe use of E85 and offers...

  5. A Better Way to Store Energy for Less Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darmon, Jonathan M.; Weiss, Charles J.; Hulley, Elliott B.; Helm, Monte L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2013-01-01

    Representing the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis (CME), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE energy. The mission of CME to understand, design and develop molecular electrocatalysts for solar fuel production and use.

  6. Self Service Supply Store Forms | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    All supplies ordered MUST be used for Official Government Business. All catalog orders are subject to full payment or a restocking fee if items ordered are returned to the supplier ...

  7. Method of storing radioactive wastes using modified tobermorite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Komarneni, Sridhar; Roy, Della M.

    1985-01-01

    A new cation exchanger is a modified tobermorite containing aluminum isomorphously substituted for silicon and containing sodium or potassium. The exchanger is selective for lead, rubidium, cobalt and cadmium and is selective for cesium over calcium or sodium. The tobermorites are compatable with cement and are useful for the long-term fixation and storage of radioactive nuclear wastes.

  8. Preparing T Plant to Store K-Basin Sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCKENNEY, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    This paper will explain the history and status of the modification of the Hanford T Plant facility for storage of K Basin sludge.

  9. NREL Recommends Ways to Cut Building Energy Costs in Half (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    Building designers and operators could cut energy use by 50% in large office buildings, hospitals, schools, and a variety of stores - including groceries, general merchandise outlets, and retail outlets - by following the recommendations of researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

  10. NREL Recommends Ways to Cut Building Energy Costs in Half (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-08-01

    Building designers and operators could cut energy use by 50% in large office buildings, hospitals, schools, and a variety of stores -- including groceries, general merchandise outlets, and retail outlets -- by following the recommendations of NREL researchers. The innovative energy-saving recommendations are contained in technical support documents and Advanced Energy Design Guides compiled by NREL.

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for installing energy efficient food service equipment, laundry equipment, HVAC and water heating equipment, and certain weatherization... Eligibility: Commercial, Local...

  12. 2014 EIA-821 SURVEY: LINE-BY-LINE REFERENCE GUIDE Kerosene

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Page 1 2014 EIA-821 SURVEY: LINE-BY-LINE REFERENCE GUIDE Kerosene Line No. Sold directly to consumers for: 1 Residential Use (Non-Farm): * Backup generator * Home heating and cooking * Personal lawn equipment * Exclude: Apartment buildings and Farmhouses 2 Commercial Use: * Apartment building * Bank * Casino * Church * College/School/Institution * Department/Retail store * Environmental clean-up service * Flushing fuel lines * Forestry service * Golf course * Government (federal, state, local,

  13. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    State Shares of U.S. Deliveries Definitions Key Terms Definition Commercial Consumption Gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services. Included are such establishments as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; gas used by local, State, and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing activities. Delivered (Gas) The physical transfer of natural, synthetic, and/or supplemental gas from facilities

  14. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration (EIA) Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background The commercial sector encompasses a vast range of building types-service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as certain buildings that would not be considered "commercial" in a traditional economic sense, such as public and private schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded

  15. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Prices Definitions Key Terms Definition Citygate A point or measuring station at which a distributing gas utility receives gas from a natural gas pipeline company or transmission system. Commercial Price The price of gas used by nonmanufacturing establishments or agencies primarily engaged in the sale of goods or services such as hotels, restaurants, wholesale and retail stores and other service enterprises; and gas used by local, State and Federal agencies engaged in nonmanufacturing

  16. Advanced Energy Design Guides | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design & Decision Support Guides » Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Design Guides Cover of Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small to Medium Office Buildings The 50% AEDGs provide practical approaches to achieve 50% energy savings compared to base code requirements. Download them free from ASHRAE: Small to Medium Office Buildings K-12 School Buildings Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings Large Hospitals Grocery Stores The Advanced Energy Design Guides (AEDGs) accelerate the

  17. Profiles in garbage: Corrugated boxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.

    1997-12-01

    Corrugated boxes (also known as old corrugated containers, or OCC) are used to ship products to factories, warehouses, retail stores, offices, and homes. The primary market for OCC is the paperboard industry, which uses OCC for corrugated medium, linerboard, recycled paperboard, and other paper products. In addition, 2.6 million tons of OCC were exported in 1996. OCC provided 37% of the scrap paper that was exported in 1996. Some corrugated boxes can be reused before recycling. Corrugated boxes are easily and highly recyclable. Large producers such as grocery store warehouses and factories have recycled their corrugated boxes for some time. If shredded properly, uncoated corrugated boxes are easily compostable.

  18. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Entergy Arkansas Inc","Investor-owned",21049257,8069917,6170936,6808318,86 2,"Southwestern Electric Power Co","Investor-owned",4018839,1121436,1354356,1543047,0 3,"Mississippi County Electric

  19. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee E M C","Cooperative",5743330,3134733,1993358,615239,0 5,"Knoxville Utilities Board","Public",5536187,2506771,2279472,749944,0 " ","Total sales, top five ...

  20. The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview of Policy, Practice and Issues

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this report, the authors studied different facets of crediting mechanisms, and defined five different theoretical models describing different ways competitive suppliers and utilities provide net metering options for their customers. They then provided case studies to illustrate the models.

  1. Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Initiatives » Nuclear Facility Operations » Resumption of Transient Testing Resumption of Transient Testing April 15, 2013 - 11:11am Addthis Resumption of Transient Testing Capability The Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to re-establish the capability to conduct transient testing of nuclear fuels. Transient testing involves placing fuel or material into the core of a nuclear reactor and subjecting it to short bursts of intense, high-power radiation. After the experiment is completed,

  2. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utilities Co","Investor-owned",2068166,811250,1081889,175027,0 3,"Mountrail-Williams Elec Coop","Cooperative",2025153,263270,182264,1579619,0 4,"Otter Tail Power ...

  3. Learning Based Bidding Strategy for HVAC Systems in Double Auction Retail Energy Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yannan; Somani, Abhishek; Carroll, Thomas E.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a bidding strategy is proposed using reinforcement learning for HVAC systems in a double auction market. The bidding strategy does not require a specific model-based representation of behavior, i.e., a functional form to translate indoor house temperatures into bid prices. The results from reinforcement learning based approach are compared with the HVAC bidding approach used in the AEP gridSMART® smart grid demonstration project and it is shown that the model-free (learning based) approach tracks well the results from the model-based behavior. Successful use of model-free approaches to represent device-level economic behavior may help develop similar approaches to represent behavior of more complex devices or groups of diverse devices, such as in a building. Distributed control requires an understanding of decision making processes of intelligent agents so that appropriate mechanisms may be developed to control and coordinate their responses, and model-free approaches to represent behavior will be extremely useful in that quest.

  4. The Impact of Retail Rate Structure on the Economics of Commercial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    assistance to policy makers on issues related to: Energy Efficiency and Demand Response (Chuck Goldman) - Tracking industry trends - Program administration, planning, ...

  5. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... for Lamps (Light Bulbs), available at: https:www.energystar.govsitesdefaultfilesENERGY%20STAR%20Lamps%20V1%201Specification.pdf 8 The RRL3 summary report is available at: ...

  6. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Arizona Public Service Co","Investor-owned",27584533,12837752,12477518,2269263,0 2,"Salt River Project","Public",27548529,12293633,11099759,4155137,0 3,"Tucson Electric Power

  7. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Southern California Edison Co","Investor-owned",75828585,29972416,37903351,7874457,78361 2,"Pacific Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",75114523,29289082,28107971,17717470,0 3,"Los Angeles Department of Water &

  8. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Co of Colorado","Investor-owned",28671219,9008526,12886370,6712282,64041 2,"City of Colorado Springs - (CO)","Public",4477715,1425423,1097160,1955132,0 3,"Intermountain Rural Elec

  9. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Connecticut Light & Power Co","Investor-owned",8945482,6146224,2365991,367962,65305 2,"Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-owned",2018823,0,1320397,692814,5612 3,"United Illuminating

  10. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Delmarva Power","Investor-owned",3604764,2673209,902845,28710,0 2,"Delaware Electric Cooperative","Cooperative",1301698,1060347,241351,0,0 3,"Direct Energy Business","Investor-owned",709072,0,709072,0,0 4,"City of Dover -

  11. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-owned",3556542,40286,3515507,749,0 2,"Potomac Electric Power Co","Investor-owned",3015764,1733437,1282327,0,0 3,"WGL Energy Services,

  12. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Florida Power & Light Co","Investor-owned",104431096,55224658,46172611,2942385,91442 2,"Duke Energy Florida, Inc","Investor-owned",37240099,19002681,14970106,3267312,0 3,"Tampa Electric

  13. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Georgia Power Co","Investor-Owned",83740365,27132065,32894391,23548775,165134 2,"Jackson Electric Member Corp - (GA)","Cooperative",5201199,3003210,1476773,721216,0 3,"Cobb Electric Membership

  14. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Hawaiian Electric Co Inc","Investor-owned",6781665,1611149,2270495,2900021,0 2,"Maui Electric Co Ltd","Investor-owned",1132056,381979,373947,376130,0 3,"Hawaii Electric Light Co

  15. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Idaho Power Co","Investor-owned",13462077,4784073,3792971,4885033,0 2,"PacifiCorp","Investor-owned",3495174,665344,457510,2372320,0 3,"Avista Corp","Investor-owned",3083614,1188464,1029305,865845,0 4,"City of Idaho Falls -

  16. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Commonwealth Edison Co","Investor-owned",18061768,9114941,7890441,1056386,0 2,"Constellation Energy Services, Inc.","Investor-owned",10686139,5208659,5477480,0,0 3,"Homefield

  17. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Kentucky Utilities Co","Investor-owned",18888411,6334638,5483135,7070638,0 2,"Louisville Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",11817164,4157326,4885866,2773972,0 3,"Kenergy Corp","Cooperative",9670080,757715,325857,8586508,0

  18. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Entergy Louisiana LLC","Investor-owned",32904509,9047299,6757407,17099803,0 2,"Entergy Gulf States - LA LLC","Investor-owned",20822523,5368421,5529206,9924896,0 3,"Cleco Power

  19. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"NextEra Energy Power Marketing","Investor-owned",1984446,859679,1082377,42390,0 2,"New Brunswick Power Generation Corp.","Investor-owned",2101006,1963787,58020,79199,0 3,"Electricity Maine,

  20. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Baltimore Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",12270475,8927905,3147168,195402,0 2,"WGL Energy Services, Inc.","Investor-owned",7202209,1077458,6124751,0,0 3,"Potomac Electric Power