National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for retail electricity providers

  1. Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Chicago Regional Support Office (Purchase Order DE-AP45-97R553188). Funding was provided by the Department of Energy's Office of Power Technologies, Ofiice of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. PDF icon Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection More

  2. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",6,29,3,9,11,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",1653072,1092343,15588,186056,11,"NA","NA",2947070 "Retail sales

  3. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",7,42,2,4,69,16,3," " "Number of retail customers",11805131,3248291,2193,16376,73,153026,"NA",15225090 "Retail sales

  4. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",2,29,1,28,9,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",1486366,435070,14,622879,9,"NA","NA",2544338 "Retail sales

  5. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,8,"NA","NA",4,29,2," " "Number of retail customers",845007,72702,"NA","NA",4,692239,"NA",1609952 "Retail sales

  6. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",1,9,"NA",1,1,25,1," " "Number of retail customers",276172,65959,"NA",86096,1,27812,"NA",456040 "Retail sales

  7. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,11,2,17,4,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",683856,43864,2,83450,4,"NA","NA",811177 "Retail sales

  8. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",4,41,"NA",26,2,43,3," " "Number of retail customers",1985354,267486,"NA",300844,302,3169795,"NA",5723781 "Retail sales

  9. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",4,118,1,29,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",946301,234421,1,293171,"NA","NA","NA",1473894 "Retail

  10. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",5,30,1,24,2,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",1216704,209426,17,813389,2,"NA","NA",2239538 "Retail sales

  11. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",1,4,"NA",2,"NA",30,6," " "Number of retail customers",37,10538,"NA",2518,"NA",783980,"NA",797073 "Retail sales

  12. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",5,5,"NA",3,7,43,5," " "Number of retail customers",1616182,34095,"NA",205915,7,618710,"NA",2474909 "Retail sales

  13. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",6,40,"NA","NA",8,34,6," " "Number of retail customers",2201824,404811,"NA","NA",13,510563,"NA",3117211 "Retail

  14. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",8,41,"NA",10,3,12,3," " "Number of retail customers",4167904,305481,"NA",319033,3,6595,"NA",4799016 "Retail sales

  15. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",5,124,1,46,5,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",1487785,367230,4,767282,8,"NA","NA",2622309 "Retail sales

  16. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",5,1,2,29,"NA",2,2," " "Number of retail customers",369184,984,20910,195647,"NA",449,"NA",587174 "Retail sales

  17. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",2,9,1,8,1,3,3," " "Number of retail customers",1189594,30352,2,36951,1,9,"NA",1256909 "Retail sales

  18. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,5,"NA",1,1,16,4," " "Number of retail customers",514095,12197,"NA",77880,1,108287,"NA",712460 "Retail sales

  19. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",5,9,"NA",1,25,44,4," " "Number of retail customers",3202218,62911,"NA",11528,25,678906,"NA",3955588 "Retail sales

  20. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,8,1,20,1,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",718354,85240,13,209064,1,"NA","NA",1012672 "Retail sales

  1. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",9,48,"NA",4,5,59,9," " "Number of retail customers",5020899,1278061,"NA",18148,16,1759152,"NA",8076276 "Retail sales

  2. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",8,85,"NA",25,4,34,6," " "Number of retail customers",2312998,374308,"NA",382103,4,2439254,"NA",5508667 "Retail sales

  3. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,18,1,19,1,4,3," " "Number of retail customers",1411786,295114,1,201893,1,595,"NA",1909390 "Retail sales

  4. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",11,35,"NA",13,5,59,9," " "Number of retail customers",3629465,84412,"NA",219222,5,2053710,"NA",5986814 "Retail sales

  5. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",6,36,1,31,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",241333,60042,21,152666,"NA","NA","NA",454062 "Retail

  6. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,61,1,26,1,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",47276,2195950,23,965871,1,"NA","NA",3209121 "Retail sales

  7. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",1,40,1,9,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",822874,236865,7,47341,"NA","NA","NA",1107087 "Retail

  8. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",1,14,"NA",2,2,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",258872,55228,"NA",49162,2,"NA","NA",363264 "Retail

  9. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,41,2,18,2,3,2," " "Number of retail customers",1451599,1650971,10,166079,2,16,"NA",3268677 "Retail sales

  10. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",5,13,1,18,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",196786,35737,5,99235,"NA","NA","NA",331763 "Retail

  11. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",243,1949,6,810,137,145,67," " "Number of retail customers",93012392,21383674,38870,18905267,565,13065447,"NA",146406278 "Retail sales

  12. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",17,34,"NA",19,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  13. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",1,"NA","NA","NA","NA",22,1," " "Number of retail

  14. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,"NA","NA",1,2,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  15. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",6,72,"NA",40,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  16. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,137,"NA",42,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  17. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",5,21,"NA",12,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  18. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",4,86,"NA",42,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  19. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities","NA",149,1,10,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  20. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,62,1,31,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  1. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",4,22,"NA",21,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  2. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,16,"NA",13,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  3. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",5,2,"NA",2,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  4. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",5,33,"NA",16,1,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",7473876,1396974,"NA",1079234,1,"NA","NA",9950085

  5. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",1,53,"NA",42,1,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",2387727,338375,"NA",1948580,1,"NA","NA",4674683

  6. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",2,23,1,25,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",627484,134811,7,734263,"NA","NA","NA",1496565

  7. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,72,1,31,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",3300103,593690,4,1039246,"NA","NA","NA",4933043

  8. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Dakota" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,12,1,21,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",233453,11071,20,177426,"NA","NA","NA",421970

  9. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",2,1,"NA","NA","NA",16,1," " "Number of retail customers",474274,4618,"NA","NA","NA",19537,"NA",498429

  10. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",83,72,"NA",67,13,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",7567394,1818721,"NA",2030847,50,"NA","NA",11417012

  11. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",12,82,"NA",24,2,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",2425518,280677,"NA",259861,2,"NA","NA",2966058

  12. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4560,1201929.7,"NA","NA","NA",7923662.4 "Percentage of revenue",62.5,18.74,3.59,15.17,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average retail price (centskWh)",9.02,9.15,4.92,11.02,"NA","NA","NA",9.02...

  13. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,"NA",1063623.3,"NA","NA","NA",3703710.6 "Percentage of revenue",58.49,12.8,"NA",28.72,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average retail price (centskWh)",7.81,7.9,"NA",8.22,"NA","NA","NA",7.93...

  14. Impact of residential PV adoption on Retail Electricity Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, DWH; Adlakha, S; Low, SH; De Martini, P; Chandy, KM

    2013-11-01

    The price of electricity supplied from home rooftop photo voltaic (PV) solar cells has fallen below the retail price of grid electricity in some areas. A number of residential households have an economic incentive to install rooftop PV systems and reduce their purchases of electricity from the grid. A significant portion of the costs incurred by utility companies are fixed costs which must be recovered even as consumption falls. Electricity rates must increase in order for utility companies to recover fixed costs from shrinking sales bases. Increasing rates will, in turn, result in even more economic incentives for customers to adopt rooftop PV. In this paper, we model this feedback between PV adoption and electricity rates and study its impact on future PV penetration and net-metering costs. We find that the most important parameter that determines whether this feedback has an effect is the fraction of customers who adopt PV in any year based solely on the money saved by doing so in that year, independent of the uncertainties of future years. These uncertainties include possible changes in rate structures such as the introduction of connection charges, the possibility of PV prices dropping significantly in the future, possible changes in tax incentives, and confidence in the reliability and maintainability of PV. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Reliant Energy Retail Services","Investor-owned",39511303,17784060,3813963,17913280,0 2,"TXU Energy Retail Co LP","Investor-owned",37916867,22545174,5383121,9988572,0 3,"City of San Antonio -

  16. State Policies Provide Critical Support for Renewable Electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2008-07-15

    Growth in renewable energy in the U.S. over the past decade has been propelled by a number of forces, including rising fossil fuel prices, environmental concerns, and policy support at the state and federal levels. In this article, we review and discuss what are arguably the two most important types of state policies for supporting electricity generation from geothermal and other forms of renewable energy: renewables portfolio standards and utility integrated resource planning requirements. Within the Western U.S., where the vast majority of the nation's readily-accessible geothermal resource potential resides, these two types of state policies have been critical to the growth of renewable energy, and both promise to continue to play a fundamental role for the foreseeable future. In its essence, a renewables portfolio standard (RPS) requires utilities and other retail electricity suppliers to produce or purchase a minimum quantity or percentage of their generation supply from renewable resources. RPS purchase obligations generally increase over time, and retail suppliers typically must demonstrate compliance on an annual basis. Mandatory RPS policies are backed by various types of compliance enforcement mechanisms, although most states have incorporated some type of cost-containment provision, such as a cost cap or a cap on retail rate impacts, which could conceivably allow utilities to avoid (full) compliance with their RPS target. Currently, 27 states and the District of Columbia have mandatory RPS requirements. Within the eleven states of the contiguous Western U.S., all but three (Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming) now have a mandatory RPS legislation (Utah has a more-voluntary renewable energy goal), covering almost 80% of retail electricity sales in the region. Although many of these state policies have only recently been established, their impact is already evident: almost 1800 MW of new renewable capacity has been installed in Western states following the implementation of RPS policies. To date, wind energy has been the primary beneficiary of state RPS policies, representing approximately 83% of RPS-driven renewable capacity growth in the West through 2007. Geothermal energy occupies a distant second place, providing 7% of RPS-driven new renewable capacity in the West since the late 1990s, though geothermal's contribution on an energy (MWh) basis is higher. Looking to the future, a sizable quantity of renewable capacity beyond pre-RPS levels will be needed to meet state RPS mandates: about 25,000 MW by 2025 within the Western U.S. Geothermal energy is beginning to provide an increasingly significant contribution, as evidenced by the spate of new projects recently announced to meet state RPS requirements. Most of this activity has been driven by the RPS policies in California and Nevada, where the Geothermal Energy Association has identified 47 new geothermal projects, totaling more than 2,100 MW, in various stages of development. Additional geothermal projects in Arizona, New Mexico, Oregon, and Washington are also under development to meet those states RPS requirements. The other major state policy driver for renewable electricity growth, particularly in the West, is integrated resource planning (IRP). IRP was first formalized as a practice in the 1980s, but the practice was suspended in some states as electricity restructuring efforts began. A renewed interest in IRP has emerged in the past several years, however, with several Western states (California, Montana, and New Mexico) reestablishing IRP and others developing new rules to strengthen their existing processes. In its barest form, IRP simply requires that utilities periodically submit long-term resource procurement plans in which they evaluate alternative strategies for meeting their resource needs over the following ten to twenty years. However, many states have developed specific requirements for the IRP process that directly or indirectly support renewable energy. The most general of these is an explicit requirement that utilities evaluate renewables, and that

  17. Reconfiguration of Paducah Site's Electrical Distribution Provides

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency and Savings | Department of Energy Reconfiguration of Paducah Site's Electrical Distribution Provides Efficiency and Savings Reconfiguration of Paducah Site's Electrical Distribution Provides Efficiency and Savings September 24, 2015 - 12:15pm Addthis Electricians prepare to attach a new power cable to a transformer located inside the former Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Electricians prepare to attach a new power cable to a transformer located inside the former Paducah Gaseous

  18. Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... CLOMB-2 Stewart 2010 Coulomb Shrp ePump PIA 2012 Shorepower, multi-head SCHDR-Evlnk PIA 2013 Schneider Electric EVlink Outdoor model GG-JB PIA 2012 Green Garage Assoc. Juice Bar. ...

  19. Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Sun, Y.; Bush, B.

    2014-08-01

    Both hydrogen and plug-in electric vehicles offer significant social benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We compare retail infrastructure costs on a common basis - cost per mile, assuming fueling service to 10% of all light-duty vehicles in a typical 1.5 million person city in 2025. Our analysis considers three HRS sizes, four distinct types of EVSE and two distinct EVSE scenarios. EVSE station costs, including equipment and installation, are assumed to be 15% less than today's costs. We find that levelized retail capital costs per mile are essentially indistinguishable given the uncertainty and variability around input assumptions. Total fuel costs per mile for battery electric vehicle (BEV) and plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) are, respectively, 21% lower and 13% lower than that for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) under the home-dominant scenario. Including fuel economies and vehicle costs makes FCEVs and BEVs comparable in terms of costs per mile, and PHEVs are about 10% less than FCEVs and BEVs. To account for geographic variability in energy prices and hydrogen delivery costs, we use the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model and confirm the aforementioned estimate of cost per mile, nationally averaged, but see a 15% variability in regional costs of FCEVs and a 5% variability in regional costs for BEVs.

  20. Retail Unbundling

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    This special report provides a brief summary of the status of retail unbundling programs (also known as "customer choice" programs) for residential natural gas customers in various states,

  1. Reconfiguration of Paducah Site's Electrical Distribution Provides...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PADUCAH, Ky. - While EM's Paducah Site is preparing its gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) ... Currently, electricity consumption at the site is only about 0.5 percent of what was used ...

  2. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on retail electricity rates and utility financial viability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodmer, E.; Fisher, R.E.; Hemphill, R.C.

    1995-03-01

    Changes in power contract terms for customers of Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office affect electricity rates for consumers of electric power in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. The impacts of electricity rate changes on consumers are studied by measuring impacts on the rates charged by individual utility systems, determining the average rates in regional areas, and conducting a detailed rate analysis of representative utility systems. The primary focus is an evaluation of the way retail electricity rates for Western`s preference customers vary with alternative pricing and power quantity commitment terms under Western`s long-term contracts to sell power (marketing programs). Retail rate impacts are emphasized because changes in the price of electricity are the most direct economic effect on businesses and residences arising from different Western contractual and operational policies. Retail rates are the mechanism by which changes in cost associated with Western`s contract terms are imposed on ultimate consumers, and rate changes determine the dollar level of payments for electric power incurred by the affected consumers. 41 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Retailer Energy Alliance Subcommittees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the Retailer Energy Alliances Subcommittees: Lighting and Electrical, Restaurant and Food Preparation, Refrigeration, HVAC, and Whole Building Systems.

  4. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Coop Corp","Cooperative",1904813,1241089,190612,473112,0 " ","Total sales, top five providers",,32825557,11112603,8604957,13107894,103 " ","Percent of total state...

  5. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Hawaiian Electric Co Inc","Investor-owned",6858536,1667309,2341257,2849970,0 2,"Maui Electric Co Ltd","Investor-owned",1134873,387909,379461,367503,0 3,"Hawaii Electric Light Co

  6. Texas - PUC Substantive Rule 25.174 - Electric Service Providers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    74 - Electric Service Providers-Renewable Energy Resources and Use of Natural Gas Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  7. Texas - PUC Substantive Rule 25.5 - Electric Service Providers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5 - Electric Service Providers-General Provisions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Texas - PUC Substantive...

  8. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Georgia Power Co","Investor-owned",81178648,25478655,32457010,23086501,156482 2,"Jackson Electric Member Corp - (GA)","Cooperative",4924212,2809034,1445094,670084,0 3,"Cobb Electric Membership

  9. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Baltimore Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",11968295,8967015,2846423,154857,0 2,"WGL Energy Services, Inc.","Investor-owned",7553788,1092845,6460943,0,0 3,"Potomac Electric Power

  10. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",24203012,8668433,9357636,6176943,0 2,"Public Service Co of Oklahoma","Investor-owned",17681663,6289643,6309019,5083001,0 3,"Oklahoma Electric Coop

  11. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Green Mountain Power Corp","Investor-owned",4295605,1556518,1560705,1178382,0 2,"Vermont Electric Cooperative, Inc","Cooperative",442890,222441,119722,100727,0 3,"City of Burlington Electric -

  12. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Virginia Electric & Power Co","Investor-owned",74469354,28802062,39078780,6393908,194604 2,"Appalachian Power Co","Investor-owned",15783445,6297314,4011928,5474203,0 3,"Rappahannock Electric

  13. Texas - PUC Substantive Rule 25.83 - Electric Service Providers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Texas - PUC Substantive Rule 25.83 - Electric Service Providers-Records, Reports, and other...

  14. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Arizona Public Service Co","Investor-owned",28087605,13290096,12594486,2203023,0 2,"Salt River Project","Public",27127199,12581984,10940149,3605066,0 3,"Tucson Electric Power

  15. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Pacific Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",76390000,30552342,36055810,9781848,0 2,"Southern California Edison Co","Investor-owned",74480098,29742778,36850508,7826556,60256 3,"Los Angeles Department of Water &

  16. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"MidAmerican Energy Co","Investor-owned",20217549,5829442,5195709,9192398,0 2,"Interstate Power and Light Co","Investor-owned",14586595,3939183,3951419,6695993,0 3,"Board of Water Electric &

  17. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Westar Energy Inc","Investor-owned",9826375,3409863,4433462,1983050,0 2,"Kansas Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",9669223,3113287,3132064,3423872,0 3,"Kansas City Power & Light

  18. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"DTE Electric Company","Investor-owned",42272312,15273084,16715877,10283351,0 2,"Consumers Energy Co","Investor-owned",32556015,12792609,11117015,8646391,0 3,"First Energy Solutions

  19. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Union Electric Co - (MO)","Investor-owned",37030285,13561749,14737190,8709141,22205 2,"Kansas City Power & Light Co","Investor-owned",8562163,2598738,4458883,1504542,0 3,"KCP&L Greater Missouri Operations

  20. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC","Investor-owned",55301813,20601105,22341733,12351570,7405 2,"Duke Energy Progress - (NC)","Investor-owned",36886571,15249396,13425824,8211351,0 3,"Virginia Electric & Power

  1. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"South Carolina Electric&Gas Company","Investor-owned",21371090,7571438,7799857,5999795,0 2,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC","Investor-owned",20566058,6313640,5619965,8632453,0 3,"South Carolina Public Service

  2. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Wisconsin Electric Power Co","Investor-owned",24144805,7974652,8872580,7297573,0 2,"Wisconsin Public Service Corp","Investor-owned",10541535,2795812,3922944,3822779,0 3,"Wisconsin Power & Light

  3. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Florida Power & Light Co","Investor-owned",103058588,54074164,45932938,2963404,88082 2,"Georgia Power Co","Investor-owned",81178648,25478655,32457010,23086501,156482 3,"Pacific Gas & Electric

  4. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"City of Farmington - (NM)","Public",1096394,281379,426457,388558,0 2,"Lea County Electric Coop, Inc","Cooperative",802924,83420,400831,318673,0 " ","Total sales, top five providers",,17659537,5444921,7581145,4633471,0 "

  5. Monitoring and Characterization of Miscellaneous Electrical Loads in a Large Retail Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentile-Polese, L.; Frank, S.; Sheppy, M.; Lobato, C.; Rader, E.; Smith, J.; Long, N.

    2014-02-01

    Buildings account for 40% of primary energy consumption in the United States (residential 22%; commercial 18%). Most (70% residential and 79% commercial) is used as electricity. Thus, almost 30% of U.S. primary energy is used to provide electricity to buildings. Plug loads play an increasingly critical role in reducing energy use in new buildings (because of their increased efficiency requirements), and in existing buildings (as a significant energy savings opportunity). If all installed commercial building miscellaneous electrical loads (CMELs) were replaced with energy-efficient equipment, a potential annual energy saving of 175 TWh, or 35% of the 504 TWh annual energy use devoted to MELs, could be achieved. This energy saving is equivalent to the annual energy production of 14 average-sized nuclear power plants. To meet DOE's long-term goals of reducing commercial building energy use and carbon emissions, the energy efficiency community must better understand the components and drivers of CMEL energy use, and develop effective reduction strategies. These goals can be facilitated through improved data collection and monitoring methodologies, and evaluation of CMELs energy-saving techniques.

  6. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Golden Valley Elec Assn Inc","Cooperative",1253161,286768,133156,833237,0 2,"Chugach Electric Assn Inc","Cooperative",1162364,534522,573447,54395,0 3,"Anchorage Municipal Light and Power","Public",1047470,139733,907737,0,0

  7. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Delmarva Power","Investor-owned",3647192,2744059,880296,22837,0 2,"Delaware Electric Cooperative","Cooperative",1262619,1033946,228673,0,0 3,"City of Dover - (DE)","Public",708294,201140,226520,280634,0 4,"Constellation

  8. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Florida Power & Light Co","Investor-owned",103058588,54074164,45932938,2963404,88082 2,"Duke Energy Florida, Inc","Investor-owned",36615990,18507962,14901674,3206354,0 3,"Tampa Electric Co","Investor-owned",18417662,8469567,7921282,2026813,0

  9. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Kentucky Utilities Co","Investor-owned",18527337,6194856,5489716,6842765,0 2,"Louisville Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",11698975,4164049,4834960,2699966,0 3,"Kenergy Corp","Cooperative",9761288,743715,326221,8691352,0

  10. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Omaha Public Power District","Public",10801979,3629597,3574255,3598127,0 2,"Lincoln Electric System","Public",3236591,1217375,1517814,501402,0 3,"Nebraska Public Power District","Public",3216813,845775,1109885,1261153,0

  11. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Portland General Electric Co","Investor-owned",17808023,7701768,6816977,3281460,7818 2,"PacifiCorp","Investor-owned",13089576,5534975,5115094,2424852,14655 3,"City of Eugene - (OR)","Public",2404522,980515,873103,550904,0

  12. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"City of Memphis - (TN)","Public",13926088,5245511,4652594,4026201,1782 2,"Nashville Electric Service","Public",11703738,4668568,6044539,990631,0 3,"Tennessee Valley Authority","Federal",5904077,0,0,5904077,0 4,"City of

  13. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"PacifiCorp","Investor-Owned",24510395,6976758,8556034,8923492,54111 2,"Provo City Corp","Public",788727,242592,410382,135753,0 3,"City of St George","Public",619529,278940,67594,272995,0 4,"Moon Lake Electric Assn

  14. Texas - PUC Substantive Rule 25.198 - Electric Service Providers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Access Comparable Transmission Service for Electric Utilities in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  15. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS FOR ELECTRIC ENERGY

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The enclosed report is submitted to Congress pursuant to section 1815 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Section 1815 of the Act established a five-member Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force.

  16. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy LLC - (MT)","Investor-owned",5974533,2398528,3120726,455279,0 2,"Talen Energy Marketing, LLC","Investor-owned",2202299,0,131400,2070899,0 3,"Flathead Electric ...

  17. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"NextEra Energy Power Marketing","Investor-owned",19844...

  18. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total sales, top five providers" "Nevada" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Nevada Power Co","Investor-owned",21184405,9012407,4576328,7587394,8276 2,"Sierra Pacific Power Co","Investor-owned",8151543,2369781,2963657,2818105,0 3,"Shell Energy North America (US),

  19. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Co of Colorado","Investor-owned",28861229,9266046,12881189,6652330,61664 2,"City of Colorado Springs - (CO)","Public",4553294,1461825,1106926,1984543,0 3,"Intermountain Rural Elec

  20. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-owned",19729300,869767,12641305,5509689,708539 2,"Commonwealth Edison Co","Investor-owned",18295340,9548453,7883890,862997,0 3,"Homefield

  1. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Duke Energy Indiana Inc","Investor-owned",28003070,9183527,8450462,10369081,0 2,"Northern Indiana Pub Serv Co","Investor-owned",16798335,3444738,3992698,9339677,21222 3,"Indiana Michigan Power

  2. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Entergy Louisiana LLC","Investor-owned",32220423,8819573,6688333,16712517,0 2,"Entergy Gulf States - LA LLC","Investor-owned",19663315,5206322,5435688,9021305,0 3,"Cleco Power

  3. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Northern States Power Co - Minnesota","Investor-owned",30950305,8933573,13704440,8293190,19102 2,"ALLETE, Inc.","Investor-owned",9284816,1086481,1324342,6873993,0 3,"Otter Tail Power

  4. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Elec & Gas Co","Investor-owned",19192403,11493325,6936055,763023,0 2,"Jersey Central Power & Lt Co","Investor-owned",9947655,7417321,2298350,231984,0 3,"Direct Energy Business Marketing,

  5. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Northern States Power Co - Minnesota","Investor-owned",2301544,827062,1138952,335530,0 2,"Montana-Dakota Utilities Co","Investor-owned",1949522,786334,994607,168581,0 3,"Otter Tail Power

  6. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"First Energy Solutions Corp.","Investor-owned",49437270,14024133,21080138,14272628,60371 2,"Ohio Power Co","Investor-owned",19142615,10834999,3492174,4815442,0 3,"DPL Energy

  7. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Northern States Power Co - Minnesota","Investor-owned",2040726,725505,980503,334718,0 2,"NorthWestern Energy - (SD)","Investor-owned",1564096,579570,690191,294335,0 3,"Black Hills Power

  8. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Appalachian Power Co","Investor-owned",14186224,5616869,3650678,4918677,0 2,"Monongahela Power Co","Investor-owned",10812645,3604310,2752010,4452343,3982 3,"The Potomac Edison

  9. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Idaho Power Co","Investor-owned",13971178,5167474,3820824,4982880,0 2,"PacifiCorp","Investor-owned",3621646,718090,440163,2463393,0 3,"Avista Corp","Investor-owned",3236645,1205385,1012843,1018417,0 4,"City of Idaho Falls -

  10. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Entergy Mississippi Inc","Investor-owned",13118968,5629032,5224792,2265144,0 2,"Mississippi Power Co","Investor-owned",9731505,2087704,2905087,4738714,0 3,"Tennessee Valley Authority","Federal",4549938,0,0,4549938,0

  11. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Co of NH","Investor-Owned",3772359,2488177,1149989,134193,0 2,"Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-Owned",978706,0,577347,401359,0 3,"Integrys Energy Services, Inc.","Investor-Owned",789158,3122,786036,0,0

  12. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Puget Sound Energy Inc","Investor-owned",21208609,10769101,9205670,1229556,4282 2,"City of Seattle - (WA)","Public",9457191,3137668,5261681,1057188,654 3,"Bonneville Power Administration","Federal",7222335,0,833256,6389079,0

  13. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"PacifiCorp","Investor-owned",9553734,1092932,1538409,6922393,0 2,"Powder River Energy Corp","Cooperative",2633437,215755,912786,1504896,0 3,"Cheyenne Light Fuel & Power Co","Investor-owned",1100543,269296,549520,281727,0

  14. The calm before the storm. [Retail wheeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studness, C.M.

    1993-05-15

    The right to refuse retail wheeling requests is one of the cornerstones of a utility's monopoly power. Utilities have fought staunchly to preserve it, most recently in preventing retail wheeling from becoming an important issue in the congressional debate over deregulation; the Energy Policy Act of 1992 steered clear of it. For the present, the prohibition of retail wheeling gives utilities enormous power over the retail electric power market. The ability to refuse retail wheeling requests, of course, prevents retail customers from buying power from third parties. This enables a utility to sell retail customers all the power it can generate, at a price that covers its cost plus an allowed return-even if its price exceeds that of power available in the wholesale market. The denial of retail wheeling thus protects a utility's inefficiencies, whose price is ultimately shouldered onto customers through cost-plus electric rates. Allowing retail wheeling would remove the foundation for much of the current monopoly power that utilities enjoy. Third parties could sell power to a utility's retail customers, since the utility would be required to wheel it. Retail customers would be able to bypass the local distribution utility to buy power from the cheapest source available. Market forces would drive pricing rather than the cost-plus ratemaking process. A utility whose electric rates were above market would have to meet the competitive price or lose sales.

  15. EAC Presentation: How DOE is Organized to Provide Leadership on Electricity

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Delivery, October 29, 2010 | Department of Energy How DOE is Organized to Provide Leadership on Electricity Delivery, October 29, 2010 EAC Presentation: How DOE is Organized to Provide Leadership on Electricity Delivery, October 29, 2010 Presentation to the DOE Electricity Advisory Committee on the Department of Energy and the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability by the Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman on October 29, 2010. PDF icon How DOE is Organized to Provide

  16. Electric Power Annual 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electric industry retail statistics by state State Retail sales (million kWh) Retail revenue (thousand dollars) Customers Alabama 87,852 7,923,662 2,524,639 Alaska 6,268 1,033,347...

  17. Texas - PUC Substantive Rule 25.101 - Electric ServiceProviders...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Texas - PUC Substantive Rule 25.101 - Electric Service Providers-Certification, Licensing...

  18. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    End Use: December 2015 Retail rates/prices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on

  19. TVA - Green Power Providers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    North Carolina Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount 1,000 upon installation Years 1-10: retail electric rate + premium payment Years 11-20: retail electric rate...

  20. DOE Provides $4.3 Million to Improve Reliability of the U.S. Electric Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Department of Energy Provides $4.3 Million to Improve Reliability of the U.S. Electric Grid DOE Provides $4.3 Million to Improve Reliability of the U.S. Electric Grid August 21, 2009 - 3:47pm Addthis Innovative Synchrophasor Research Will Provide Better Real-Time Information WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's Office of Electricity and Energy Reliability today announced that it will provide $4.3 million for four projects that will use innovative synchrophasor research to improve

  1. Reliant Energy Retail Services, LLC Smart Grid Project | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    deploys new services and market offerings for retail customers in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) region. Reliant is deploying in-home energy displays,...

  2. DOE Provides up to $51.8 Million to Modernize the U.S. Electric Grid

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    System. June 27, 2007 | Department of Energy Provides up to $51.8 Million to Modernize the U.S. Electric Grid System. June 27, 2007 DOE Provides up to $51.8 Million to Modernize the U.S. Electric Grid System. June 27, 2007 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced that DOE will provide up to $51.8 million for five cost-shared projects that will help accelerate much-needed modernization of our Nation's electricity grid. This research will advance the

  3. Variable Renewable Generation can Provide Balancing Control to the Electric Power System (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-09-01

    As wind and solar plants become more common in the electric power system, they may be called on to provide grid support services to help maintain system reliability. For example, through the use of inertial response, primary frequency response, and automatic generation control (also called secondary frequency response), wind power can provide assistance in balancing the generation and load on the system. These active power (i.e., real power) control services have the potential to assist the electric power system in times of disturbances and during normal conditions while also potentially providing economic value to consumers and variable renewable generation owners. This one-page, two-sided fact sheet discusses the grid-friendly support and benefits renewables can provide to the electric power system.

  4. Retail Buildings: Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Retail Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-04-01

    Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in retail spaces are poorly understood.

  5. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    End Use: August 2015 Retail ratesprices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based...

  6. Retail wheeling: Is this revolution necessary?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cudahy, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    As of a former state regulator and a once enthusiastic practitioner of public utility law, I find it fascinating to see the latest nostrum to burst on the electric utility scene: retail wheeling. Wheeling became a personal interest in the Texas interconnection fight of the late seventies and may have led to the interconnection and wheeling provision of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). Retail wheeling contemplates that every electric power customer should be given an opportunity to seek out the lowest cost source of power wherever it can be found. As a practical matter, the drums for retail wheeling are presently being beaten by large industrial users, who believe that they have the capability to find low cost sources and to make advantageous commercial arrangements to acquire electricity. Large industrials have long been fighting the utilities for cheaper electricity, frequently using the threat of self-generation and cogeneration.

  7. Price of Motor Gasoline Through Retail Outlets

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    & Stocks by State (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Data Series: Retail Price - Motor Gasoline Retail Price - Regular Gasoline Retail Price - Midgrade Gasoline Retail Price...

  8. Device to facilitate moving an electrical cable of an electric vehicle charging station and method of providing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karner, Donald B

    2014-04-29

    Some embodiments include a device to facilitate moving an electrical cable of an electric vehicle charging station. Other embodiments of related systems and methods are also disclosed.

  9. Method for providing slip energy control in permanent magnet electrical machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S.

    2006-11-14

    An electric machine (40) has a stator (43), a permanent magnet rotor (38) with permanent magnets (39) and a magnetic coupling uncluttered rotor (46) for inducing a slip energy current in secondary coils (47). A dc flux can be produced in the uncluttered rotor when the secondary coils are fed with dc currents. The magnetic coupling uncluttered rotor (46) has magnetic brushes (A, B, C, D) which couple flux in through the rotor (46) to the secondary coils (47c, 47d) without inducing a current in the rotor (46) and without coupling a stator rotational energy component to the secondary coils (47c, 47d). The machine can be operated as a motor or a generator in multi-phase or single-phase embodiments and is applicable to the hybrid electric vehicle. A method of providing a slip energy controller is also disclosed.

  10. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general...

  11. Magnitude and Variability of Controllable Charge Capacity Provided by Grid Connected Plug-in Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scoffield, Don R; Smart, John; Salisbury, Shawn

    2015-03-01

    As market penetration of plug-in electric vehicles (PEV) increases over time, the number of PEVs charging on the electric grid will also increase. As the number of PEVs increases, their ability to collectively impact the grid increases. The idea of a large body of PEVs connected to the grid presents an intriguing possibility. If utilities can control PEV charging, it is possible that PEVs could act as a distributed resource to provide grid services. The technology required to control charging is available for modern PEVs. However, a system for wide-spread implementation of controllable charging, including robust communication between vehicles and utilities, is not currently present. Therefore, the value of controllable charging must be assessed and weighed against the cost of building and operating such as system. In order to grasp the value of PEV charge control to the utility, the following must be understood: 1. The amount of controllable energy and power capacity available to the utility 2. The variability of the controllable capacity from day to day and as the number of PEVs in the market increases.

  12. Electric power annual 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-08

    This report presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and state levels: generating capability and additions, net generation, fossil-fuel statistics, retail sales and revenue, finanical statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, demand side management, nonutility power producers. Purpose is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets.

  13. System for measuring electricity and method of providing and using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamer, Doanld B; Page, Robert

    2013-11-26

    Some embodiments include a system for measuring electricity. Other embodiments of related systems and methods are also disclosed.

  14. The great ``retail wheeling`` illusion, and more productive energy futures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavanagh, R.

    1994-12-31

    This paper sets out the reasons why many environmental and public interest organizations oppose retail wheeling. Cavanagh argues that retail wheeling would destroy incentives for energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy generation--benefits that reduce long-term energy service costs to society as a whole. The current debate over the competitive restructuring of the electric power industry is critical from both economic and environmental perspectives. All attempts to introduce broad-scale retail wheeling in the United States have failed; instead, state regulators are choosing a path that emphasizes competition and choice, but acknowledges fundamental differences between wholesale and retail markets. Given the physical laws governing the movement of power over centrally controlled grids, the choice offered to customers through retail wheeling of electricity is a fiction -- a re-allocation of costs is all that is really possible. Everyone wants to be able to claim the cheapest electricity on the system; unfortunately, there is not enough to go around. By endorsing the fiction of retail wheeling for certain types of customers, regulators would be recasting the retail electricity business as a kind of commodity exchange. That would reward suppliers who could minimize near-term unit costs of electricity while simultaneously destroying incentives for many investments, including cost-effective energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy generation, that reduce long-term energy service costs to society as a whole. This result, which has been analogized unpersuasively to trends in telecommunications and natural gas regulation, is neither desirable nor inevitable. States should go on saying no to retail wheeling in order to be able to create something better: regulatory reforms that align utility and societal interests in pursuing a least-cost energy future. An appendix contains notes on some recent Retail Wheeling Campaigns.

  15. Winning with Wind: Electric Co-ops Providing Clean Energy to Customers |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Mehoopany wind farm in Pennsylvania can produce enough energy to power more than 40,000 homes under a contract with Old Dominion Electric Cooperative and the Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative. Old Dominion was named one of the winners of the Wind Cooperative of the Year Award last week. | Photo courtesy Old Dominion Electric Cooperative Mehoopany wind farm in Pennsylvania can produce enough energy to power more than 40,000 homes under a contract with Old Dominion

  16. DOE Provides up to $51.8 Million to Modernize the U.S. Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This research will advance the development and application of high-temperature superconductors, which have the potential to alleviate congestion on an electricity grid that is ...

  17. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - electricity section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2016-01-01

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on electricity generation, capacity, end-use, fuel use and stocks, and retail price.

  18. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - electricity section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on electricity generation, capacity, end-use, fuel use and stocks, and retail price.

  19. This document is to provide input for a probable future state of the electric system and electric industry in 2030

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bruce Renz - Renz Consulting State of the Electric System in 2030 The Issue Last month's SGN article by Joe Miller discussed how the transition to a Smart Grid might take place. Joe's article was part of a series that has discussed the seven Principal Characteristics of a Smart Grid. While those seven characteristics promise a future in which the power grid supports and enables the needs of 21 st century society, such a grid does not exist today. And it will not exist tomorrow unless there is a

  20. DOE Provides up to $51.8 Million to Modernize the U.S. Electric Grid System

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy Provides up to $51.8 Million to Modernize the U.S. Electric Grid System DOE Provides up to $51.8 Million to Modernize the U.S. Electric Grid System June 27, 2007 - 11:05am Addthis Superconductor Research Crucial to Improving Power Delivery Equipment WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced that DOE will provide up to $51.8 million for five cost-shared projects that will help accelerate much-needed modernization of our

  1. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LBNL-1470E Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Ranjit Bharvirkar, Grayson Heffner and Charles Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2009 The work described in this report was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was

  2. DOE Provides up to $51.8 Million to Modernize the U.S. Electric Grid System

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy up to $51.8 Million to Modernize the U.S. Electric Grid System DOE Provides up to $51.8 Million to Modernize the U.S. Electric Grid System June 27, 2007 - 2:08pm Addthis Superconductor Research Crucial to Improving Power Delivery Equipment WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced that DOE will provide up to $51.8 million for five cost-shared projects that will help accelerate much-needed modernization of our Nation's

  3. Information for Retailers of Lighting Products | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products U.S. retailers who sell lighting products can use the...

  4. Electric power monthly, March 1998 with data for December 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 63 tabs.

  5. Multilevel-Dc-Bus Inverter For Providing Sinusoidal And Pwm Electrical Machine Voltages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Gui-Jia

    2005-11-29

    A circuit for controlling an ac machine comprises a full bridge network of commutation switches which are connected to supply current for a corresponding voltage phase to the stator windings, a plurality of diodes, each in parallel connection to a respective one of the commutation switches, a plurality of dc source connections providing a multi-level dc bus for the full bridge network of commutation switches to produce sinusoidal voltages or PWM signals, and a controller connected for control of said dc source connections and said full bridge network of commutation switches to output substantially sinusoidal voltages to the stator windings. With the invention, the number of semiconductor switches is reduced to m+3 for a multi-level dc bus having m levels. A method of machine control is also disclosed.

  6. Retail Power Marketer

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Retail Power Marketer What is the current address for this entity's principal business office? What is the legal name of the entity that this form is being prepared for? Email: Who is the survey contact's supervisor? -Contact EIA by email at eia-861@eia.gov to correct or update this information First Name: Title: NOTICE: This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other

  7. Dominion Retail Inc (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dominion Retail Inc (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dominion Retail Inc Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 1-888-216-3718 Website: www.dominionenergy.comen Outage...

  8. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS FOR ELECTRIC ENERGY Pursuant to Section 1815 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 The Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force The Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force Members: J. Bruce McDonald, Department of Justice Michael Bardee, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission John H. Seesel, Federal Trade Commission David Meyer, Department of Energy Karen Larsen, Department of Agriculture Report Contributors: Robin Allen -

  9. Electric power monthly, February 1999 with data for November 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-02-01

    The Electric Power Monthly presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Statistics are provided for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt-hour of electricity sold.

  10. TVA - Green Power Providers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Years 11-20: retail electric rate 2014 Premium Rates: Solar: 0.04kWh Wind, Biomass, and Hydro: 0.03kWh Summary Note: Enrollment for 2015 was conducted from January 26th to...

  11. Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Retail Buildings (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in retail spaces are poorly understood.

  12. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Beeson, Tracy A.

    2014-02-01

    The CALiPER program first began investigating LED lamps sold at retail stores in 2010, purchasing 33 products from eight retailers and covering six product categories. The findings revealed a fragmented marketplace, with large disparities in performance of different products, accuracy of manufacturer claims, and offerings from different retail outlets. Although there were some good products, looking back many would not be considered viable competitors to other available options, with too little lumen output, not high enough efficacy, or poor color quality. CALiPER took another look in late 2011purchasing 38 products of five different types from nine retailers and the improvement was marked. Performance was up; retailer claims were more accurate; and the price per lumen and price per unit efficacy were down, although the price per product had not changed much. Nonetheless, there was still plenty of room for improvement, with the performance of LED lamps not yet reaching that of well-established classes of conventional lamps (e.g., 75 W incandescent A19 lamps). Since the second retail lamp study was published in early 2012, there has been substantial progress in all aspects of LED lamps available from retailers. To document this progress, CALiPER again purchased a sample of lamps from retail stores 46 products in total, focusing on A19, PAR30, and MR16 lamps but instead of a random sample, sought to select products to answer specific hypotheses about performance. These hypotheses focused on expanding ranges of LED equivalency, the accuracy of lifetime claims, efficacy and price trends, as well as changes to product designs. Among other results, key findings include: There are now very good LED options to compete with 60 W, 75 W, and 100 W incandescent A19 lamps, and 75 W halogen PAR30 lamps. MR16 lamps have shown less progress, but there are now acceptable alternatives to 35 W, 12 V halogen MR16 lamps and 50 W, 120 V halogen MR16 lamps for some applications. Other uses, such as in enclosed luminaires, may require more development. At the same price point, lamps purchased in 2013 tended to have higher output and slightly higher efficacy than in 2011 or 2010. Over 30% of the products purchased in 2013 exceeded the maximum efficacy measured in 2011 (71 lm/W), with the most efficacious product measured at 105 lm/W. There appears to be increasing consistency in color quality, with a vast majority of products having a CCT of 2700 K or 3000 K and a CRI between 80 and 85. There were also fewer poor performing products tested and more high-performing products available in 2013 than in previous years. The accuracy of equivalency and performance claims was better than in 2011, but remains a concern, with 43% of tested products failing to completely meet their equivalency claim and 20% of products failing to match the manufacturer’s performance data. Although progress has been substantial, on average LED lamps remain more expensive than other energy efficiency lighting technologies -- although some aspects can be superior. Although not universal to all product lines or all product types, the issue of insufficient lumen output from LED lamps is waning. Thus, manufacturers can focus on other issues, such as reducing cost, improving electrical/dimmer compatibility, eliminating flicker, or improving color quality. While these issues are not inherent to all products, they remain a concern for the broader market.

  13. Retail Replacement Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CALiPER Testing » Application Reports » Retail Replacement Lamps Retail Replacement Lamps Annual CALiPER testing of A19, G25, candelabra, night light, MR16/PAR16, PAR20, and PAR30 replacement lamps - purchased directly from store shelves - offers insights on performance trends from year to year. The report findings offer valuable insights for manufacturers and retailers alike. Retail Lamps Study 3 (48 pages, February 2014) Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality

  14. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1 -- with a focus on US electric utilities -- contains final 1997 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1997 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on a monthly sample: Form EIA-826, ``Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions``). Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA.

  15. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers This presentation provides helpful background information on the new legislation and the types of energy-efficient lighting available today. PDF icon Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers More Documents & Publications Interior Lighting Efficiency for Municipalities Lighting Tip

  16. Energy options: Cogen V and retail wheeling alternatives technical conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The Energy Options technical conference proceedings contains 265 papers, of which 17 were selected for the database. The conference was split into two primary topics: cogeneration and retail wheeling. Subtopics under cogeneration included: the state of cogeneration in the United States, case studies in facility ownership, fuels considerations for tomorrow, and plant design considerations for cogeneration systems. Retail wheeling alternatives subtopics included U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission rulings, end-user options for retail wheeling, deregulation issues, and forecasting of electricity generating costs. Papers not selected for the database, while clearly pertinent topics of interest, consisted of viewgraphs which were judged not to have sufficient technical information and coherence without the corresponding presentation. However, some papers which did consist of viewgraphs were included.

  17. The New Hampshire retail competition pilot program and the role of green marketing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, E.A.; Fang, J.M.

    1997-11-01

    Most states in the US are involved in electric industry restructuring, from considering the pros and cons in regulatory dockets to implementing legislative mandates for full restructuring and retail access for all consumers. Several states and utilities have initiated pilot programs in which multiple suppliers or service providers may compete for business and some utility customers can choose among competing suppliers. The State of New Hampshire has been experimenting with a pilot program, mandated by the State Legislature in 1995 and implemented by the New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission (NHPUC), before it implements full retail access. Green marketing, an attempt to characterize the supplier or service provider as environmentally friendly without referring to the energy resource used to generate electricity, was used by several suppliers or service providers to attract customers. This appeal to environmental consumerism was moderately successful, but it raised a number of consumer protection and public policy issues. This issue brief examines the marketing methods used in New Hampshire and explores what green marketing might mean for the development of renewable energy generation. It also addresses the issues raised and their implications.

  18. Category:StandAloneRetail | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IN Duke Energy Indiana Inc.png SVStandAloneRetail Ind... 66 KB SVStandAloneRetail Jackson MS Entergy Mississippi Inc.png SVStandAloneRetail Jac... 63 KB SVStandAloneRetail...

  19. Dominion Retail Inc (Maine) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dominion Retail Inc (Maine) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dominion Retail Inc Place: Maine Phone Number: 1-866-366-4357 Website: www.dom.com Outage Hotline: 1-866-366-4357...

  20. Electric sales and revenue, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-21

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenues, and average revenue. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1990. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the revenue billed for the amount of kilowatthours sold, revenue from income, unemployment and other State and local taxes, energy or demand charges, consumer services charges, environmental surcharges, franchise fees, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  1. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Retail Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Weimin; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

    2011-09-19

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Retail Buildings is a component of the Department of Energys Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

  2. Electric power annual 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-06

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

  3. Electric Power annual 1996: Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This document presents a summary of electric power industry statistics. Data are included on electric utility retail sales of electricity, revenues, environmental information, power transactions, emissions, and demand-side management.

  4. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California (CAISO) due to very low natural gas prices. Hawaii's retail electricity revenue per kilowatthour fell the most of any state for the fifth month in a row, down 24%...

  5. DOE to Provide Nearly $20 Million to Further Development of Advanced Batteries for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    ANN ARBOR, MI - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Kevin M. Kolevar today announced DOE will invest nearly $20 million in plug-in...

  6. Rotary electrical contact device and method for providing current to and/or from a rotating member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koplow, Jeffrey P

    2013-11-19

    Examples of rotary electrical connectors include a first pair and a second pair of opposing sheaves coupled together by intersecting first shaft connecting the first pair of opposing sheaves and a second shaft connecting the second pair of opposing sheaves, and at least partially electrically conductive belt disposed about respective perimeters of the first pair and second pair of opposing sheaves and adapted to remain in contact with at least a portion of the respective perimeters of the sheaves during motion of said sheaves. In example devices, one of the plurality of sheaves may remain stationary during operation of the device while the remaining sheaves rotate and/or orbit around a center axis of the stationary sheave, the device being configured to couple current between a stationary power source and a rotating member through the electrically conductive belt.

  7. Final Report Providing the Design for Low-Cost Wireless Current Transducer and Electric Power Sensor Prototype

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Burghard, Brion J.; Reid, Larry D.

    2005-01-31

    This report describes the design and development of a wireless current transducer and electric power sensor prototype. The report includes annotated schematics of the power sensor circuitry and the printed circuit board. The application program used to illustrate the functionality of the wireless sensors is described in this document as well.

  8. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Electric Power Annual 1997, Volume 2 contains annual summary statistics at national, regional, and state levels for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; power transactions; and demand-side management. Also included are data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity; gross generation; emissions; and supply and disposition of energy. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. 15 figs., 62 tabs.

  9. Electric sales and revenue: 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1993. Operating revenue includes energy charges, demand charges, consumer service charges, environmental surcharges, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. Because electric rates vary based on energy usage, average revenue per kilowatthour are affected by changes in the volume of sales. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  10. Electric power monthly, February 1998 with data for November 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 63 tabs.

  11. Electricity Use in the Pacific Northwest: Utility Historical Sales by Sector, 1989 and Preceding Years.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-06-01

    This report officially releases the compilation of regional 1989 retail customer sector sales data by the Bonneville Power Administration. This report is intended to enable detailed examination of annual regional electricity consumption. It gives statistics covering the time period 1970--1989, and also provides observations based on statistics covering the 1983--1989 time period. The electricity use report is the only information source that provides data obtained from each utility in the region based on the amount of electricity they sell to consumers annually. Data is provided on each retail customer sector: residential, commercial, industrial, direct-service industrial, and irrigation. The data specifically supports forecasting activities, rate development, conservation and market assessments, and conservation and market program development and delivery. All of these activities require a detailed look at electricity use. 25 figs., 34 tabs.

  12. ,"Motor Gasoline Sales Through Retail Outlets Prices "

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Motor Gasoline Sales Through Retail Outlets Prices ",60,"Annual",2014,"6301984" ,"Release...

  13. Dominion Retail Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  14. The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview of Policy,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Practice and Issues | Department of Energy Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview of Policy, Practice and Issues The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview of Policy, Practice and Issues In this report, the authors studied different facets of crediting mechanisms, and defined five different theoretical models describing different ways competitive suppliers and utilities provide net metering options for their customers. They then provided case studies

  15. Guide to Federal Regulation of Sales of Imported Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... which regulate or monitor retail sales of electricity and the nature of such regulation or monitoring. E) Statute or Public Law granting Federal agency with regulatory authority. ...

  16. DOE to Provide up to $14 Million to Develop Advanced Batteries for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that it will provide up to $14 million in funding for a $28 million cost-shared solicitation by the United States Advanced...

  17. Study Finds DOE-Funded Research in Energy Storage Provides a Vital Foundation for Success of Today's Hybrid and Electric Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    r ams Number of Citations Office of Planning, Budget and Analysis U.S. Department of Energy * Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy May 2 0 0 9 � EERERe eS d y B - De mo at gRe sAc h i db y EERE e v e t l s u i n t n sr if re t u i v t t r o s p e c Study Finds DOE-funded Research in Energy Storage Provides a Vital Foundation for Success of Today's Hybrid & Electric Vehicles ‹ Hybrid and electric vehicles are showing great developmental and commercial market progress. ‹

  18. Information for Retailers of Lighting Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products U.S. retailers who sell lighting products can use the information below to help their customers better understand energy-efficient lighting choices. New information will be added as it becomes available. U.S. retailers are welcome to use parts of these materials in their retail displays. In those cases, please do so without the Department of Energy's name, since we will

  19. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Retailer Business Model Conclusion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Retailer Business Model Conclusion, Summary of Retailer Insights.

  20. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Delaware) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Delaware) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Delaware References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  1. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Connecticut) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 212-997-8500...

  2. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (District of Columbia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (District of Columbia) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: District of Columbia References:...

  3. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) ...

  4. Electric sales and revenue, 1990. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-21

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenues, and average revenue. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1990. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the revenue billed for the amount of kilowatthours sold, revenue from income, unemployment and other State and local taxes, energy or demand charges, consumer services charges, environmental surcharges, franchise fees, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  5. Electric power monthly, August 1998, with data for May 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-08-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 9 refs., 57 tabs.

  6. Electric power monthly, March 1999 with data for December 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be sued in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 63 tabs.

  7. Electric power monthly, May 1998, with data for February 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974. The EPM provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 30 refs., 58 tabs.

  8. Electric power monthly, December 1997 with data for September 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 63 tabs.

  9. FGD markets & business in an age of retail wheeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.C.; Dalton, S.M.

    1995-06-01

    This paper discusses (1) the market and technology outlook for flue gas desulfurization ({open_quotes}FGD{close_quotes}) systems, with particular emphasis on wet systems in North America and the implications of retail wheeling of electricity and emission allowances for the utility industry, and (2) implications for the utility industry of architect/engineering ({open_quotes}A/E{close_quotes}) firm tendencies to reduce greatly the FGD vendor`s scope of award. The paper concludes that (1) the FGD market will be modest domestically and robust offshore over the forecast period (5-10 years), although the utility industry`s response to federal and state air toxics rules and retail wheeling may eventually grow the FGD market domestically beyond that created by compliance with Phase II of the Clean Air Act`s Title IV acid rain program alone, (2) new designs are likely to follow trends established in the past few years, but will likely include advanced processes that use higher velocity and smaller space, and possibly multi-pollutant control to remain competitive, and (3) shrinking of the FGD vendor`s scope may have adverse implications for the utility end-user, while retail wheeling may increase third-party ownership of FGD technology

  10. Electricity Use in the Pacific Northwest: Utility Historical Sales by Sector, 1990 and Preceding Years.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-06-01

    This report officially releases the compilation of regional 1990 retail customer sector sales data by the Bonneville Power Administration. The report is intended to enable detailed examination of annual regional electricity consumption. It also provides observations based on statistics covering the 1983--1990 time period, and gives statistics covering the time period 1970--1990. The electricity use report is the only information source that provides data obtained from each utility in the region based on the amount of electricity they sell annually to four sectors. Data is provided on each retail customer sector and also on the customers Bonneville serves directly: residential, commercial, industrial, direct-service industrial, and irrigation. 21 figs., 40 tabs.

  11. Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, P.; Logan, J.; Bird, L.; Short, W.

    2009-05-01

    This paper analyzes potential impacts of proposed national renewable electricity standard (RES) legislation. An RES is a mandate requiring certain electricity retailers to provide a minimum share of their electricity sales from qualifying renewable power generation. The analysis focuses on draft bills introduced individually by Senator Jeff Bingaman and Representative Edward Markey, and jointly by Representative Henry Waxman and Markey. The analysis uses NREL's Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to evaluate the impacts of the proposed RES requirements on the U.S. energy sector in four scenarios.

  12. A Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Patrick; Logan, Jeffrey; Bird, Lori; Short, Walter

    2009-05-01

    This paper analyzes potential impacts of proposed national renewable electricity standard (RES) legislation. An RES is a mandate requiring certain electricity retailers to provide a minimum share of their electricity sales from qualifying renewable power generation. The analysis focuses on draft bills introduced individually by Senator Jeff Bingaman and Representative Edward Markey, and jointly by Representative Henry Waxman and Markey. The analysis uses NREL's Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to evaluate the impacts of the proposed RES requirements on the U.S. energy sector in four scenarios.

  13. Electric power monthly with data for June 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the state, census division, and U.S. levels for net generation; fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity, and quality of fossil fuels; cost of fossil fuels; electricity retail sales; associated revenue; and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity, and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council regions. Statistics on net generation by energy source and capability of new generating units by company and plant are also included. A section is included in the report which summarizes major industry developments. 1 fig., 64 tabs.

  14. Electric Power Monthly with data for July 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the state, census division, and U.S. levels for net generation; fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity, and quality of fossil fuels; cost of fossil fuels; electricity retail sales; associated revenue; and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council regions. Statistics on net generation are published by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The monthly update is summarized, and industry developments are briefly described. 57 tabs.

  15. Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Joyce Jihyun; Kiliccote, Sila

    2012-06-01

    In New York State, the default electricity pricing for large customers is Mandatory Hourly Pricing (MHP), which is charged based on zonal day-ahead market price for energy. With MHP, retail customers can adjust their building load to an economically optimal level according to hourly electricity prices. Yet, many customers seek alternative pricing options such as fixed rates through retail access for their electricity supply. Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) is an XML (eXtensible Markup Language) based information exchange model that communicates price and reliability information. It allows customers to evaluate hourly prices and provide demand response in an automated fashion to minimize electricity costs. This document shows how OpenADR can support MHP and facilitate price responsive demand for large commercial customers in New York City.

  16. Electric sales and revenue 1992, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-20

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1992. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the applicable revenue from kilowatthours sold; revenue from income; unemployment and other State and local taxes; energy, demand, and consumer service charges; environmental surcharges; franchise fees; fuel adjustments; and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  17. Electric power annual 1994. Volume 2, Operational and financial data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-28

    This year, the annual is published in two volumes. Volume I focused on US electric utilities and contained final 1994 data on net generation, fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost. This Volume II presents annual 1994 summary statistics for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are preliminary data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on form EIA-861) and for electric utility financial statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, and demand- side management. Final 1994 data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity and gross generation, as well as supply and disposition information, are also provided in Volume II. Technical notes and a glossary are included.

  18. Electric power monthly, December 1996 with data for September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    The report presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

  19. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    869,73104419,70006764,67580676,65057675,62166661,61227325,59925613,100,100,100 "Retail revenue (thousand dollars)" "Residential",3532583.5,3491379.5,3661469.6,3790734,3356042,33475...

  20. CPL Retail Energy, LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 13151 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a...

  1. Texas Retail Energy, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 50046 Utility Location Yes Ownership R ISO Ercot Yes ISO NY Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help...

  2. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-02-01

    This is a special CALiPER report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. It follows similar reports published in 2011 and 2012 (products purchased in 2010 and 2011), and is intended as a continuation that identifies long-term trends. For this report, products were selected to investigate specific hypotheses, rather than represent a sample of the increasingly large retail LED market.

  3. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer’s underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems.

  4. Retail Sales Allocation Tool (RSAT)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  5. Electric power annual 1996. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1--with a focus on US electric utilities--contains final 1996 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1996 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA. Data published in the Electric Power Annual Volume 1 are compiled from three statistical forms filed monthly and two forms filed annually by electric utilities. These forms are described in detail in the Technical Notes. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  6. Electric power monthly, July 1999, with data for April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-07-01

    The Electric Power Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM). This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 1 fig., 64 tabs.

  7. Electric industry restructuring in Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadsworth, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    A law restructuring the electric utility industry in Massachusetts became effective on November 25, 1997. The law will break up the existing utility monopolies into separate generation, distribution and transmission entities, and it will allow non-utility generators access to the retail end user market. The law contains many compromises aimed at protecting consumers, ensuring savings, protecting employees and protecting the environment. While it appears that the legislation recognizes the sanctity of independent power producer contracts with utilities, it attempts to provide both carrots and sticks to the utilities and the IPP generators to encourage renegotiations and buy-down of the contracts. Waste-to-energy contracts are technically exempted from some of the obligations to remediate. Waste-to-energy facilities are classified as renewable energy sources which may have positive effects on the value to waste-to-energy derived power. On November 25, 1997, the law restructuring the electric utility industry in Massachusetts became effective. The law will have two primary effects: (1) break up the existing utility monopolies into separate generation, distribution and transmission entities, and (2) allow non-utility generators access to the retail end-user market.

  8. Electric power annual 1995. Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    This document summarizes pertinent statistics on various aspects of the U.S. electric power industry for the year and includes a graphic presentation. Data is included on electric utility retail sales and revenues, financial statistics, environmental statistics of electric utilities, demand-side management, electric power transactions, and non-utility power producers.

  9. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A

  10. Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaOtherRetail Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Other retail Pages using the...

  11. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maine) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maine) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Maine Phone Number: 1-800-437-7645 Website:...

  12. Texas Retail Energy, LLC (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Retail Energy, LLC (Texas) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Texas Retail Energy, LLC Address: 2001 SE 10th St Place: Bentonville, AR Zip: 72712 Phone Number: (479) 204-0845...

  13. Electric power monthly, September 1996, with data for June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  14. Electric power monthly with data for January 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  15. Electric power monthly with data for December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  16. 2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 2,340.0 9.94 Texas Retail Energy, LLC CT Power Marketer 1 87,776 8,143.3 9.28 Town Square Energy CT Power Marketer 7,388 33,128 7,931.7 23.94 TransCanada Power Marketing, Ltd. ...

  17. Electric power monthly, June 1998, with data for March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and Us levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 5 refs., 57 tabs.

  18. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Description

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The home improvement market includes a range of private-sector entities that currently provide or could offer home energy upgrade services. Most of these entities are remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers; other actors are present in the sector (such as window installers and insulators), but this analysis focuses on these four main categories.

  19. How Three Retail Buyers Source Large-Scale Solar Electricity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large-scale, non-utility solar power purchase agreements (PPAs) are still a rarity despite the growing popularity of PPAs across the country. In this webinar, participants will learn more about how...

  20. Hedging effects of wind on retail electric supply costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, Frank; Litvinova, Julia

    2009-12-15

    In the short term, renewables - especially wind - are not as effective as conventional hedges due to uncertain volume and timing as well as possibly poor correlation with high-value periods. In the long term, there are more potential hedging advantages to renewables because conventional financial hedges are not available very far in the future. (author)

  1. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-05-11

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  2. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-06-24

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  3. Financial Management for Retail Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Financial Management for Retail Energy Efficiency Financial Management for Retail Energy Efficiency Lead Performer: Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA) - Arlington, VA Partners: -- Deloitte - New York, NY -- Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) - Boston, MA -- Institute for Market Transformation (IMT) - Washington, D.C. -- Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Boston, MA DOE Total Funding: $750,000 Cost Share: $750,000 Project Term: April 1, 2015 - June 30, 2018 Funding Opportunity:

  4. Retail Building Guide for Entrance Energy Efficiency Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, J.; Kung, F.

    2012-03-01

    This booklet is based on the findings of an infiltration analysis for supermarkets and large retail buildings without refrigerated cases. It enables retail building managers and engineers to calculate the energy savings potential for vestibule additions for supermarkets; and bay door operation changes in large retail stores without refrigerated cases. Retail managers can use initial estimates to decide whether to engage vendors or contractors of vestibules for pricing or site-specific analyses, or to decide whether to test bay door operation changes in pilot stores, respectively.

  5. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Pennsylvania) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pennsylvania) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Pennsylvania References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

  6. Innovation for Food Retail: The 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    guide includes specialty sections for refrigeration and food service found, not only in ... guide also helps those who build or design retail stores that may include refrigeration. ...

  7. Market and policy barriers for demand response providing ancillary services in U.S. markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; MacDonald, Jason; Goldman, Charles

    2013-03-01

    This study provides an examination of various market and policy barriers to demand response providing ancillary services in both ISO/RTO and non-ISO/RTO regions, especially at the program provider level. It is useful to classify barriers in order to create a holistic understanding and identify parties that could be responsible for their removal. This study develops a typology of barriers focusing on smaller customers that must rely on a program provider (i.e., electric investor owned utility or IOU, ARC) to create an aggregated DR resource in order to bring ancillary services to the balancing authority. The barriers were identified through examinations of regulatory structures, market environments, and product offerings; and discussions with industry stakeholders and regulators. In order to help illustrate the differences in barriers among various wholesale market designs and their constituent retail environments, four regions were chosen to use as case studies: Colorado, Texas, Wisconsin, and New Jersey.

  8. Electric power monthly, June 1999, with data for March 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-06-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

  9. Electric power monthly, November 1998, with data for August 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-11-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

  10. Electric power monthly, April 1999 with data for January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  11. Electric power monthly, September 1998, with data for June 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  12. Electric power monthly, October 1998, with data for July 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

  13. Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    comparing the national average retail price for a gallon of regular gasoline and a kilowatt-hour (kWh) for residential electricity, the pricing for gasoline is far more volatile. ...

  14. Providing Grid Flexibility in

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Providing Grid Flexibility in Wyoming and Montana Introduction Powder River Energy Corporation (PRECorp) is an electric cooperative serving approximately 11,900 customers in a 16,200 square-mile area of rural Wyoming and Montana. PRECorp's customers frequently experience harsh weather conditions. Severe weather conditions in PRECorp's rural and remote service territory present unique challenges in providing reliable electric service to PRECorp's customers. PRECorp's customers include coal mining

  15. Optical devices having flakes suspended in a host fluid to provide a flake/fluid system providing flakes with angularly dependent optical properties in response to an alternating current electric field due to the dielectric properties of the system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kosc, Tanya Z.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2006-05-09

    Optical devices utilizing flakes (also called platelets) suspended in a host fluid have optical characteristics, such as reflective properties, which are angular dependent in response to an AC field. The reflectivity may be Bragg-like, and the characteristics are obtained through the use of flakes of liquid crystal material, such as polymer liquid crystal (PLC) materials including polymer cholesteric liquid crystal (PCLC) and polymer nematic liquid crystal (PNLC) material or birefringent polymers (BP). The host fluid may be propylene carbonate, poly(ethylene glycol) or other fluids or fluid mixtures having fluid conductivity to support conductivity in the flake/host system. AC field dependent rotation of 90.degree. can be obtained at rates and field intensities dependent upon the frequency and magnitude of the AC field. The devices are useful in providing displays, polarizers, filters, spatial light modulators and wherever switchable polarizing, reflecting, and transmission properties are desired.

  16. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail Sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  17. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  18. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  19. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  20. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  1. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  2. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  3. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  4. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  5. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  6. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  7. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  8. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  9. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  10. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  11. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  12. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  13. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  14. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  15. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  16. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  17. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  18. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  19. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  20. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  1. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  2. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "Sector",, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  3. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  4. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  5. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  6. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  7. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  8. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  9. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  10. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  11. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  12. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  13. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  14. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  15. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  16. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  17. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  18. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  19. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  20. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  1. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  2. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  3. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  4. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  5. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  6. CALiPER Special Summary Report: Retail Replacement Lamp Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-04-01

    CALiPER testing has evaluated many products for commercial lighting markets and found some excellent performers. However, many of these are not available on the retail market. This special testing was undertaken to identify and test solid-state lighting (SSL) replacement lamp products that are available to the general public through retail stores and websites.

  7. EIA - Electric Power Data

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Survey-Level Detailed Data Files The electric power data collected by EIA surveys are, for the most part, not proprietary and are available in these files at the level of plants, generators, and companies. Examples of the available data include generation by plant and prime mover for each fuel consumed; retail sales by sector, seller and state; and the quality and volumes of fossil fuels delivered to power plants. Aggregated data tables and graphical displays are available through the

  8. Electric power monthly with data for August 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-11-01

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the state, census division, and U.S. levels for net generation; fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity, and quality of fossil fuels; cost of fossil fuels; electricity retail sales; associated revenue; and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council regions. Statistics on net generation are published by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The monthly update is summarized, and industry developments are briefly described. 1 fig., 63 tabs.

  9. Electric power monthly with data for October 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council regions. Statistics are published on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. A monthly utility update and summary of industry developments are also included. 63 tabs., 1 fig.

  10. State electricity profiles, March 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    Due to the role electricity plays in the Nation`s economic and social well-being, interested parties have been following the electric power industry`s transition by keeping abreast of the restructuring and deregulation events that are taking place almost daily. Much of the attention centers around the States and how they are restructuring the business of electricity supply within their respective jurisdictions. This report is designed to profile each State and the District of Columbia regarding not only their current restructuring activities, but also their electricity generation and concomitant statistics from 1986 through 1996. Included are data on a number of subject areas including generating capability, generation, revenues, fuel use, capacity factor for nuclear plants, retail sales, and pollutant emissions. Although the Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes this type of information, there is a lack of a uniform overview for each individual State. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. In addition to basic statistics in tables and graphs, a textual section is provided for each State, discussing some of the points relative to electricity production that are noteworthy in, or unique to, that particular State. Also, each State is ranked according to the place it holds, as compared to the rest of the states, in various relevant areas, such as its average price of electricity per kilowatthour, its population, and its emissions of certain atmospheric pollutants. The final chapter covers the Nation as a whole. 451 figs., 520 tabs.

  11. Should utility incumbents be able to extend their brand name to competitive retail markets? An economic perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abel, J.R.; Clements, M.E.

    1998-06-01

    As retail competition begins, at least for the short run, there should be policy restrictions on an incumbent utility`s ability to extend its brand to an affiliated marketer. However, a utility-affiliated marketer should be permitted to compete in a newly deregulated market using a generic or self-developed brand name. If extending a brand name from an incumbent utility to an affiliated marketer does in fact create real barriers to entry in the retail market, competition will be crippled in this market and consumers will suffer. More important, deregulation will appear to have failed in the electric power market--a consequence with effects reaching past the electricity industry to other industries considering deregulation as a viable policy choice. However, if real barriers to entry are not erected by this type of brand name extension, the industry may suffer from lower quality products, less service, and reduced innovation if policymakers prohibit brand name extension.

  12. Net Metering and Market Feedback Loops: Exploring the Impact of Retail Rate Design on Distributed PV Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darghouth, Nam R.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Mills, Andrew

    2015-01-13

    The substantial increase in deployment of customer-sited solar photovoltaics (PV) in the United States has been driven by a combination of steeply declining costs, financing innovations, and supportive policies. Among those supportive policies is net metering, which in most states effectively allows customers to receive compensation for distributed PV generation at the full retail electricity price. The current design of retail electricity rates and the presence of net metering have elicited concerns that the possible under-recovery of fixed utility costs from PV system owners may lead to a feedback loop of increasing retail prices that accelerate PV adoption and further rate increases. However, a separate and opposing feedback loop could offset this effect: increased PV deployment may lead to a shift in the timing of peak-period electricity prices that could reduce the bill savings received under net metering where time-varying retail electricity rates are used, thereby dampening further PV adoption. In this paper, we examine the impacts of these two competing feedback dynamics on U.S. distributed PV deployment through 2050 for both residential and commercial customers, across states. Our results indicate that, at the aggregate national level, the two feedback effects nearly offset one another and therefore produce a modest net effect, although their magnitude and direction vary by customer segment and by state. We also model aggregate PV deployment trends under various rate designs and net-metering rules, accounting for feedback dynamics. Our results demonstrate that future adoption of distributed PV is highly sensitive to retail rate structures. Whereas flat, time-invariant rates with net metering lead to higher aggregate national deployment levels than the current mix of rate structures (+5% in 2050), rate structures with higher monthly fixed customer charges or PV compensation at levels lower than the full retail rate can dramatically erode aggregate customer adoption of PV (from -14% to -61%, depending on the design). Moving towards time-varying rates, on the other hand, may accelerate near- and medium-term deployment (through 2030), but is found to slow adoption in the longer term (-22% in 2050).

  13. Electric power annual 1998. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this report, Electric Power Annual 1998 Volume 1 (EPAVI), is to provide a comprehensive overview of the electric power industry during the most recent year for which data have been collected, with an emphasis on the major changes that occurred. In response to the changes of 1998, this report has been expanded in scope. It begins with a general review of the year and incorporates new data on nonutility capacity and generation, transmission information, futures prices from the Commodity futures Trading commission, and wholesale spot market prices from the pennsylvania-new Jersey-Maryland Independent System Operator and the California Power Exchange. Electric utility statistics at the Census division and State levels on generation, fuel consumption, stocks, delivered cost of fossil fuels, sales to ultimate customers, average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold, and revenues from those retail sales can be found in Appendix A. The EPAVI is intended for a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric power industry, and the general public.

  14. Competition, antitrust, and the marketplace for electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szymanski, P.A.

    1995-03-01

    As the electric industry continues its unprecedented restructuring, state public utility regulators must determine which rules and analytical tools will best enable the industry`s participants to compete to provide electricity and its functional components. Even in the early stages of transformation, elements of a competitive marketplace are pervasive: generation markets are battlegrounds for increasingly diverse, numerous, and zealous participants; boundaries delineating traditional service territories are becoming blurred; associations of similarly-situated participants are forming to promote their interests; increased concentration through mergers and joint ventures looms as a possibility; vertically integrated utilities are considering or are being challenged to consider reconfiguration into a more horizontal structure; and generally, the industry`s end-users, its retail customers, are demanding choice. Large industrial customers, groups of residential customers, or entire municipalities are seeking to obtain electric service outside their native electric utilities service territories. These demands for increased consumer choice threaten the legislatively defined franchise rules, which grant monopolies to utilities in exchange for a system of regulation which includes an obligation to serve customers in the service territories both reliably and at reasonable cost. These events foreshadow an industry-wide transition to a customer-driven, competitive system for the provision of electric service in which the price for the service is determined by market-based signals. It would be unrealistic if state utility regulators did not expect commensurate change in the issues they confront and the existing methods of analysis.

  15. Electric power monthly: October 1996, with data for July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. This report contains approximately 60 tables.

  16. Electric power monthly, May 1999, with data for February 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 64 tabs.

  17. Commercial Building Loads Providing Ancillary Services in PJM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, Jason; Kiliccote, Sila; Boch, Jim; Chen, Jonathan; Nawy, Robert

    2014-06-27

    The adoption of low carbon energy technologies such as variable renewable energy and electric vehicles, coupled with the efficacy of energy efficiency to reduce traditional base load has increased the uncertainty inherent in the net load shape. Handling this variability with slower, traditional resources leads to inefficient system dispatch, and in some cases may compromise reliability. Grid operators are looking to future energy technologies, such as automated demand response (DR), to provide capacity-based reliability services as the need for these services increase. While DR resources are expected to have the flexibility characteristics operators are looking for, demonstrations are necessary to build confidence in their capabilities. Additionally, building owners are uncertain of the monetary value and operational burden of providing these services. To address this, the present study demonstrates the ability of demand response resources providing two ancillary services in the PJM territory, synchronous reserve and regulation, using an OpenADR 2.0b signaling architecture. The loads under control include HVAC and lighting at a big box retail store and variable frequency fan loads. The study examines performance characteristics of the resource: the speed of response, communications latencies in the architecture, and accuracy of response. It also examines the frequency and duration of events and the value in the marketplace which can be used to examine if the opportunity is sufficient to entice building owners to participate.

  18. NextEra Retail of Texas LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56620 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This...

  19. Duke Energy Retail Sales, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56502 Utility Location Yes Ownership R Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can...

  20. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maryland) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maryland) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Maryland References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form...

  1. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Massachusetts) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Massachusetts Phone Number: 212-997-8500 Website: www.hess.com Twitter: @HessCorporation Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  2. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Rhode Island) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rhode Island) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Rhode Island References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

  3. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (New Hampshire) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: New Hampshire Phone Number: 1-800-437-7645 Website: www.hess.com Twitter: @HessCorporation Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  4. Net-Zero Energy Retail Store Debuts in Illinois

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Walgreens on November 21 opened a net-zero energy retail store in Evanston, Illinois that it anticipates will generate at least as much energy as it consumes over the course of a year.

  5. DOE Publishes New CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a special report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. While previous reports in...

  6. Mercantile (Retail Other Than Mall) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Other Than Mall) Definition Buildings used for the sale and display of goods other than food. Sub Categories retail store; beer, wine, or liquor store; rental center; dealership or...

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Digg Find

  8. Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A ...

  9. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Business Models

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Business models information focused on remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers.

  10. Mountain Retail Stores Become Showcase for Solar Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mountain Retail Stores Become Showcase for Solar Energy Local Officials, Business Leaders to Gather for Groundbreaking Ceremony For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., June 7, 1999 — A retail development owner who wants to set an example is helping make possible a new showcase for energy efficient buildings in the Colorado high country. Ground will be broken June 9 on the BigHorn Home Improvement Center in Silverthorne, which will boast a series of "firsts"

  11. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Industrial

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Industrial (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) Alaska Electric Light&Power Co AK Investor Owned 96 132,889 12,514.0 9.42 Chugach Electric Assn Inc AK Cooperative 7 57,198 6,718.0 11.75 City & Borough of Sitka - (AK) AK Municipal 21 21,003 785.0 3.74 City of Seward - (AK) AK Municipal 125 31,961 5,927.0 18.54 City of Unalaska - (AK) AK Municipal

  12. Turkey opens electricity markets as demand grows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeigue, J.; Da Cunha, A.; Severino, D. [Global Business Reports (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Turkey's growing power market has attracted investors and project developers for over a decade, yet their plans have been dashed by unexpected political or financial crises or, worse, obstructed by a lengthy bureaucratic approval process. Now, with a more transparent retail electricity market, government regulators and investors are bullish on Turkey. Is Turkey ready to turn the power on? This report closely examine Turkey's plans to create a power infrastructure capable of providing the reliable electricity supplies necessary for sustained economic growth. It was compiled with on-the-ground research and extensive interview with key industrial and political figures. Today, hard coal and lignite account for 21% of Turkey's electricity generation and gas-fired plants account for 50%. The Alfin Elbistan-B lignite-fired plant has attracted criticism for its lack of desulfurization units and ash dam facilities that have tarnished the industry's image. A 1,100 MW hard-coal fired plant using supercritical technology is under construction. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  13. CALiPER Exploratory Study Retail Replacement Lamps – 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-04-02

    In 2010, CALiPER conducted a study on LED replacement lamps found in retail stores. The results were less than satisfactory, and many products were classified as being unlikely to meet consumer expectations. In November 2011, CALiPER purchased a new sample of products for a follow-up study, with the intent of characterizing the progress of this essential market segment.

  14. DOE Publishes Long-Term Testing Investigation of Retail Lamps | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Long-Term Testing Investigation of Retail Lamps DOE Publishes Long-Term Testing Investigation of Retail Lamps February 13, 2015 - 2:58pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released another special report on LED lamps that are available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.2 focuses on lumen depreciation and color shift in a subset of 15 LED A lamps from CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3. The lamps

  15. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  16. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M. W.; Heath, G.; Sandor, D.; Steward, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Warner, E.; Webster, K. W.

    2013-04-01

    Achieving the Department of Energy target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 depends on transportation-related strategies combining technology innovation, market adoption, and changes in consumer behavior. This study examines expanding low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure to achieve deep GHG emissions reductions, with an emphasis on fuel production facilities and retail components serving light-duty vehicles. Three distinct low-carbon fuel supply scenarios are examined: Portfolio: Successful deployment of a range of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies; Combustion: Market dominance by hybridized internal combustion engine vehicles fueled by advanced biofuels and natural gas; Electrification: Market dominance by electric drive vehicles in the LDV sector, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles, that are fueled by low-carbon electricity and hydrogen. A range of possible low-carbon fuel demand outcomes are explored in terms of the scale and scope of infrastructure expansion requirements and evaluated based on fuel costs, energy resource utilization, fuel production infrastructure expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion for LDVs. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored transportation-related strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence.

  17. Energy Department Announces Funding to Provide Better Visibility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Provide Better Visibility into the Health of the Nation's Electric Grid Energy Department Announces Funding to Provide Better Visibility into the Health of the Nation's Electric ...

  18. Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008

  19. Development of an International Electric Cooperative Initiative on Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Clark; David South

    2004-05-01

    NRECA conceived of the International Electric Cooperative Initiative on Energy Efficiency (IECIEE) in order to provide an ongoing means of contributing voluntary actions on greenhouse gas emissions mitigation as an integral component of its international programs and projects. This required designing the IECIEE to be integrated directly with the core interests and attributes of participating cooperatives in the U.S. and Latin America, which was the initial focus area selected for the IECIEE. In the case of NRECA International, the core interests related to promoting and strengthening the electric cooperative model, which has proved highly successful in maximizing operational efficiencies in electric power generation, distribution and retailing, as compared to government-owned entities. The approach involved three basic components: (i) establishing the IECIEE mechanism, which involved setting up a functioning organizational vehicle providing for investment, management, and emissions credit accounting; (ii) developing a portfolio of projects in countries where NRECA International could effectively implement the broader mandate of cooperative development as energy efficient suppliers and distributors of electrical energy; and (iii) conducting outreach to obtain the commitment of participants and resources from U.S. and Latin American cooperatives and partnering agencies in the development financing community.

  20. Electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

  1. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Residential

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) Alaska Electric Light&Power Co AK Investor Owned 14,115 141,151 16,728.0 11.85 Alaska Power and Telephone Co AK Investor Owned 5,328 24,116 7,301.0 30.27 Alaska Village Elec Coop, Inc AK Cooperative 7,869 35,665 21,188.0 59.41 Anchorage Municipal Light and Power AK Municipal 24,429 133,411 21,435.0

  2. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings - 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.

    2013-06-01

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-MBBR) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-MBBR is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in retail stores over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-MBBR was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings - 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, Eric; Leach, Matt; Pless, Shanti

    2013-06-05

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-MBBR) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-MBBR is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in retail stores over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-MBBR was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. Customer response to day-ahead wholesale market electricity prices: Case study of RTP program experience in New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.; Hopper, N.; Sezgen, O.; Moezzi, M.; Bharvirkar, R.; Neenan, B.; Boisvert, R.; Cappers, P.; Pratt, D.

    2004-07-01

    There is growing interest in policies, programs and tariffs that encourage customer loads to provide demand response (DR) to help discipline wholesale electricity markets. Proposals at the retail level range from eliminating fixed rate tariffs as the default service for some or all customer groups to reinstituting utility-sponsored load management programs with market-based inducements to curtail. Alternative rate designs include time-of-use (TOU), day-ahead real-time pricing (RTP), critical peak pricing, and even pricing usage at real-time market balancing prices. Some Independent System Operators (ISOs) have implemented their own DR programs whereby load curtailment capabilities are treated as a system resource and are paid an equivalent value. The resulting load reductions from these tariffs and programs provide a variety of benefits, including limiting the ability of suppliers to increase spot and long-term market-clearing prices above competitive levels (Neenan et al., 2002; Boren stein, 2002; Ruff, 2002). Unfortunately, there is little information in the public domain to characterize and quantify how customers actually respond to these alternative dynamic pricing schemes. A few empirical studies of large customer RTP response have shown modest results for most customers, with a few very price-responsive customers providing most of the aggregate response (Herriges et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 2002). However, these studies examined response to voluntary, two-part RTP programs implemented by utilities in states without retail competition.1 Furthermore, the researchers had limited information on customer characteristics so they were unable to identify the drivers to price response. In the absence of a compelling characterization of why customers join RTP programs and how they respond to prices, many initiatives to modernize retail electricity rates seem to be stymied.

  5. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Commercial

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Commercial (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) Alaska Electric Light&Power Co AK Investor Owned 2,253 125,452 12,449.0 9.92 Alaska Power and Telephone Co AK Investor Owned 2,302 38,952 10,341.0 26.55 Alaska Village Elec Coop, Inc AK Cooperative 2,960 62,209 32,334.0 51.98 Anchorage Municipal Light and Power AK Municipal 6,362 879,373 113,515.6 12.91

  6. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) Alaska Electric Light&Power Co AK Investor Owned 16,464 399,492 41,691.0 10.44 Alaska Power and Telephone Co AK Investor Owned 7,630 63,068 17,642.0 27.97 Alaska Village Elec Coop, Inc AK Cooperative 10,829 97,874 53,522.0 54.68 Anchorage Municipal Light and Power AK Municipal 30,791 1,012,784 134,950.6 13.32

  7. Roles of electricity: Electric steelmaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burwell, C.C.

    1986-07-01

    Electric steel production from scrap metal continues to grow both in total quantity and in market share. The economics of electric-steel production in general, and of electric minimills in particular, seem clearly established. The trend towards electric steelmaking provides significant economic and competitive advantages for producers and important overall economic, environmental, and energy advantages for the United States at large. Conversion to electric steelmaking offers up to a 4-to-1 advantage in terms of the overall energy used to produce a ton of steel, and s similar savings in energy cost for the producer. The amount of old scrap used to produce a ton of steel has doubled since 1967 because of the use of electric furnaces.

  8. Electric Resistance Heating Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Resistance Heating Basics Electric Resistance Heating Basics August 16, 2013 - 3:10pm Addthis Electric resistance heat can be supplied by centralized forced-air electric furnaces or by heaters in each room. Electric resistance heating converts nearly all of the energy in the electricity to heat. Types of Electric Resistance Heaters Electric resistance heat can be provided by electric baseboard heaters, electric wall heaters, electric radiant heat, electric space heaters, electric

  9. CASL - Westinghouse Electric Company

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Westinghouse Electric Company Cranberry Township, PA Westinghouse Electric Company provides fuel, services, technology, plant design and equipment for the commercial nuclear electric power industry. Westinghouse nuclear technology is helping to provide future generations with safe, clean and reliable electricity. Key Contributions Definition of CASL challenge problems Existing codes and expertise Data for validation Computatinoal fluid dynamics modeling and analysis Development of test stand for

  10. Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems: Sensitivities to Changes in Future Electricity Market Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darghouth, Naim; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-09

    This scoping study investigates the impact of, and interactions among, three key sources of uncertainty in the future value of bill savings from customer-sited PV, focusing in particular on residential customers. These three sources of uncertainty are: changes to electricity market conditions that would affect retail electricity prices, changes to the types of retail rate structures available to residential customers with PV, and shifts away from standard net-metering toward other compensation mechanisms for residential PV. We investigate the impact of a range of electricity market scenarios on retail electricity prices and rate structures, and the resulting effects on the value of bill savings from PV. The scenarios include various levels of renewable and solar energy deployment, high and low natural gas prices, the possible introduction of carbon pricing, and greater or lesser reliance on utility-scale storage and demand response. We examine the bill savings from PV with time-invariant, flat residential retail rates, as well as with time-varying retail rates, including time-of-use (TOU) rates and real-time pricing (RTP). In addition, we explore a flat rate with increasing-block pricing (IBP). We evaluate the bill savings from PV with net metering, as currently allowed in many states, as well as scenarios with hourly netting, a partial form of net metering. This scoping study is the first known effort to evaluate these types of interactions in a reasonably comprehensive fashion, though by no means have we considered every possible change to electricity market conditions, retail rate structures, or PV compensation mechanisms. It focuses solely on the private value of bill savings for residential PV and does not seek to quantify the broader social or economic cost or value of solar electricity. Our analysis applies assumptions based loosely on Californias electricity market in a future year (2030); however, it is neither intended to forecast Californias future market, nor are our conclusions intended to have implications specific only to the California market. That said, some of the findings are unique to our underlying assumptions, as described further within the main body of the report, along with other key limitations.

  11. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 1 Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 2 * Briefing: - To schedule interviews, please contact DOE Public Affairs at 202-586-4940 * Terms: - Lumens: Commonly a measure of brightness (technically "luminous flux") - CFL: Compact Fluorescent Lamp: The curly fluorescent bulbs - LED: Light Emitting Diode: more recently emerging

  12. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  13. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  14. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  15. DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The report follows similar reports published in 2011 and 2012. LED replacement lamps are available through many retail outlets, and CALiPER testing offers insights on performance ...

  16. DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps March 4, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a special report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. The report follows similar reports published in 2011 and 2012. LED replacement lamps are available through many retail outlets, and CALiPER testing offers insights on performance trends from year

  17. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in ... Especially given the rapid development cycle for LED products, specifiers and purchasers ...

  18. The Impact of Retail Rate Structure on the Economics of Commercial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State Energy Advisory Board Meeting Berkeley, CA August 14, 2007 The Electricity Markets and Policy Group Conducts research and provides assistance to policy makers on issues ...

  19. Electrical safety guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  20. DOE handbook electrical safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    Electrical Safety Handbook presents the Department of Energy (DOE) safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety guidance and information for DOE installations to effect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of this handbook are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  1. Module Embedded Microninverter Smart Grid Ready Residential Solar Electric System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    $3/W total installed price vs. GE base residential system @ $4/W; $0.13/kWh LCOE (< average EIA 2015 retail electricity price) $0.10/W (30%) reduction of microinverter cost, and >$0.25/W reduction of installed price; Safety, MPPT and grid support functions including Volt/VAR support Module Embedded Microninverter Smart Grid Ready Residential Solar Electric System RUI ZHOU/ GE GLOBAL RESEARCH Develop and demonstrate power electronics technologies that address the following microinverter

  2. Method for protecting an electric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuehnle, Barry W. (Ammon, ID); Roberts, Jeffrey B. (Ammon, ID); Folkers, Ralph W. (Ammon, ID)

    2008-11-18

    A method for protecting an electrical generator which includes providing an electrical generator which is normally synchronously operated with an electrical power grid; providing a synchronizing signal from the electrical generator; establishing a reference signal; and electrically isolating the electrical generator from the electrical power grid if the synchronizing signal is not in phase with the reference signal.

  3. GETEM -Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GETEM -Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model GETEM -Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model A guide to providing input to GETEM, the Geothermal Electricity...

  4. Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Development Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Development Project objective: Provide a tool for estimating...

  5. Electric Metering | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Forrestal electric meters provide daily read-outs and comparison of data on electricity consumption for overhead lighting and power outlets. The purpose is to measure the ...

  6. Advanced Energy Design Guides Slash Energy Use in Schools and Retail Buildings by 50% (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Results Achievement NREL's Commercial Buildings Group executed advanced energy modeling simulations and optimized the design of schools and retail buildings to develop recommendations that result in 50% energy savings over code. NREL developed the simulation tools and led the committee that produced the guides. Key Result The Advanced Energy Design Guides, based on the work of NREL's researchers, provide owners, contractors, engineers, and architects user-friendly, how-to guidance by

  7. Lesson 2- Electricity Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It’s difficult to imagine life without convenient electricity. You just flip a switch or plug in an appliance, and it’s there. But how did it get there? Many steps go into providing the reliable electricity we take for granted. This lesson takes a closer look at electricity. It follows the path of electricity from the fuel source to the home, including the power plant and the electric power grid. It also covers the role of electric utilities in the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity.

  8. Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Characteristics of LED A Lamps | Department of Energy Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps PDF icon caliper_retail-study_3-1.pdf More Documents & Publications Report 22.1: Photoelectric Performance of LED MR16 Lamps Report 20.3: Stress Testing of LED PAR38 Lamps DOE Booth Presentations from LIGHTFAIR International 2015

  9. Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operated in Steady-State Conditions | Department of Energy Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions PDF icon Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions (42 pages, December 2014) More Documents & Publications Report 20.4: Lumen and Chromaticity

  10. Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Largest Decline since 2008 | Department of Energy 8 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 In the second half of 2014, the national average retail price per gallon of gasoline (all grades) fell from a high of $3.77 in June to a low of $2.63 in December - a difference of $1.14 per gallon. This is the largest price drop since the recession of

  11. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (New York) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: New York References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 22509 This article is a...

  12. Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps PDF icon caliperretail-study...

  13. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wheeler Elec Member Corp","Cooperative",1562763,588686,292390,681687,0 5,"Baldwin County El Member Corp","Cooperative",1271089,833798,437291,0,0 " ","Total sales, top five...

  14. 2014 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (cents/kWh...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total New England 17.82 14.70 11.84 10.38 15.45 Connecticut 19.75 15.55 12.92 13.08 17.05 Maine...

  15. "2014 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (cents/kWh...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and EIA-861U)" "State","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "New England",17.822291,14.699138,11.842263,10.37511,15.452998 "Connecticut",19.748254,15.5...

  16. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,"WGL Energy Services, Inc.","Investor-owned",1270636,59707,1210929,0,0 4,"Direct Energy Business Marketing, LLC","Investor-owned",1208043,0,839195,220720,148128 5,"Direct Energy ...

  17. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-owned",469721,0,296950,149198,23573 4,"TransCanada Power Marketing, Ltd.","Investor-owned",301970,0,0,301970,0 5,"Direct Energy Business ...

  18. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-owned",3073373,0,2140922,923167,9284 5,"TransCanada Power Marketing, Ltd.","Investor-owned",2374650,0,0,2374650,0 " ","Total sales, top five ...

  19. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,"Niagara Mohawk Power Corp.","Investor-owned",13152596,8914956,3220135,1017505,0 5,"Direct Energy Business Marketing, LLC","Investor-owned",8604263,0,4198880,4405383,0 " ...

  20. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,"United Illuminating Co","Investor-owned",1771412,1179978,547455,43979,0 4,"TransCanada Power Marketing, Ltd.","Investor-owned",1347975,0,0,1347975,0 5,"Direct Energy ...

  1. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,"PECO Energy Co","Investor-owned",11394476,8577010,2270505,546961,0 4,"Talen Energy Marketing, LLC","Investor-owned",10381698,1509992,5324011,3260638,287057 5,"PPL ...

  2. DOE Awards $15 Million in Technical Assistance to Support Major Retailers,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Financial Institutions and Real Estate Firms to Adopt Energy-Efficient Technologies | Department of Energy 5 Million in Technical Assistance to Support Major Retailers, Financial Institutions and Real Estate Firms to Adopt Energy-Efficient Technologies DOE Awards $15 Million in Technical Assistance to Support Major Retailers, Financial Institutions and Real Estate Firms to Adopt Energy-Efficient Technologies September 26, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis Awards Encourage Adoption of Energy-Saving

  3. Customer-Economics of Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Impact of High Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings with Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential photovoltaic (PV) systems in the US are often compensated at the customer's underlying retail electricity rate through net metering. There is growing interest in understanding how potential changes in rates may impact the value of bill savings from PV. This article uses a production cost and capacity expansion model to project California hourly wholesale electricity market prices under a reference scenario and a 33% renewables scenario. Second, based on the wholesale electricity market prices generated by the model, the article develops retail rates (i.e., flat, time-of-use, and real-time pricing) for each future scenario based on standard retail rate design principles. Finally, based on these retail rates, the bill savings from PV are estimated for 226 California residential customers under two types of net metering, for each scenario. The article finds that high renewable penetrations can drive substantial changes in residential retail rates and that these changes, together with variations in retail rate structures and PV compensation mechanisms, interact to place substantial uncertainty on the future value of bill savings from residential PV.

  4. Electric sales and revenue 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the US. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1996. 16 figs., 20 tabs.

  5. DOE Electricity Advisory Committee

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electricity Advisory Committee March 2015 1 MEMORANDUM TO: Honorable Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy FROM: Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) Richard Cowart, Chair DATE: March 27, 2015 RE: Recommendations on Smart Grid Research and Development Needs _________________________________________________________________________ Overview The Smart Grid is envisioned to provide the enhancements to ensure higher levels of

  6. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Bremson, J.; Solo, K.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of retail stations can be a significant barrier to the adoption of alternative fuel light-duty vehicles in household markets. This is especially the case during early market growth when retail stations are likely to be sparse and when vehicles are dedicated in the sense that they can only be fuelled with a new alternative fuel. For some bi-fuel vehicles, which can also fuel with conventional gasoline or diesel, limited availability will not necessarily limit vehicle sales but can limit fuel use. The impact of limited availability on vehicle purchase decisions is largely a function of geographic coverage and consumer perception. In this paper we review previous attempts to quantify the value of availability and present results from two studies that rely upon distinct methodologies. The first study relies upon stated preference data from a discrete choice survey and the second relies upon a station clustering algorithm and a rational actor value of time framework. Results from the two studies provide an estimate of the discrepancy between stated preference cost penalties and a lower bound on potential revealed cost penalties.

  7. Electricity Generation, Transmission ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generation, Transmission and Energy Storage Systems Utilities and other electricity and transmission providers and regulators often require that equipment be proven safe and ...

  8. Mohave Electric Cooperative- Renewable Energy Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mohave Electric Cooperative provides incentives for its customers to install renewable energy systems on their homes and businesses. Mohave Electric Cooperative will provide rebates for...

  9. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1983-08-08

    A portable, hand-held electric arc saw apparatus comprising a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc between the blade and a workpiece of opposite polarity. Electrically conducting means are provided on said frame for transmitting current to said blade. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads are employed to facilitate movement of the apparatus relative to the workpiece.

  10. Insurance Provider Contacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Provider Contacts Retiree Insurance Provider Contacts Employees and retirees are the building blocks of LANL's success. Our employees get to contribute to the most pressing issues facing the nation.Retiree health and welfare benefits are managed by AonHewitt and Associates. Contact information for retiree providers LANS Pension Administrator - Hewitt AonHewitt & Associates Website Your Pension Resources (YPR) Member Services (866) 370-7301 Retiree Benefits Administrator - Empyrean Empyrean

  11. Provider Contact Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benefit Options » Provider Contact Information Provider Contact Information A comprehensive benefits package with plan options for health care and retirement to take care of our employees today and tomorrow. Contacts Benefits Office (505) 667-1806 Email Medical, mental health Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico (BCBSNM) Group Number HDHP (113794) PPO (N13794) Website BCBSNM for LANL Member Services 877-878-5265 Claims Address P.O. Box 27630 Albuquerque, NM 87125-7630 Claims Resolution On-site

  12. Energy and IAQ Implications of Alternative Minimum Ventilation Rates in California Retail and School Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Fisk, William J.

    2015-01-01

    For a stand-alone retail building, a primary school, and a secondary school in each of the 16 California climate zones, the EnergyPlus building energy simulation model was used to estimate how minimum mechanical ventilation rates (VRs) affect energy use and indoor air concentrations of an indoor-generated contaminant. The modeling indicates large changes in heating energy use, but only moderate changes in total building energy use, as minimum VRs in the retail building are changed. For example, predicted state-wide heating energy consumption in the retail building decreases by more than 50% and total building energy consumption decreases by approximately 10% as the minimum VR decreases from the Title 24 requirement to no mechanical ventilation. The primary and secondary schools have notably higher internal heat gains than in the retail building models, resulting in significantly reduced demand for heating. The school heating energy use was correspondingly less sensitive to changes in the minimum VR. The modeling indicates that minimum VRs influence HVAC energy and total energy use in schools by only a few percent. For both the retail building and the school buildings, minimum VRs substantially affected the predicted annual-average indoor concentrations of an indoor generated contaminant, with larger effects in schools. The shape of the curves relating contaminant concentrations with VRs illustrate the importance of avoiding particularly low VRs.

  13. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... In fact, there are some environmental restrictions that ... RM94-20-000). 212 Comments of U.S. Department of Justice, ... by Consumers, ELECTRICITY JOURNAL, Volume 19, N 2006) at ...

  14. Electric sales and revenue 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the US. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1997. 16 figs., 17 tabs.

  15. Electric sales and revenue 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the United States. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1994.

  16. RAPID/Roadmap/7-TX-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in this state a facility to provide retail electric utility service. If a power producer is not a "retail electric utility" then the developer is not required to obtain a...

  17. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium Box Retail -- 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, E. T.; Macumber, D. L.; Long, N. L.; Griffith, B. T.; Benne, K. S.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini, P. A.

    2008-09-01

    This report provides recommendations that architects, designers, contractors, developers, owners, and lessees of medium box retail buildings can use to achieve whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004. The recommendations are given by climate zone and address building envelope, fenestration, lighting systems, HVAC systems, building automation and controls, outside air treatment, service water heating, plug loads, and photovoltaic systems. The report presents several paths to 50% savings, which correspond to different levels of integrated design. These are recommendations only, and are not part of a code or standard. The recommendations are not exhaustive, but we do try to emphasize the benefits of integrated building design, that is, a design approach that analyzes a building as a whole system, rather than as a disconnected collection of individually engineered subsystems.

  18. Providence Newberg Medical Center

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Newberg, Oregon In 2002, Providence Health & Services began planning a new 188,000 square foot medical center in Newberg, Oregon to respond to the growing community's need for accessible health care. Since this was Providence's first new hospital in almost thirty years, its leaders decided to approach the project through innovative planning, design, and construction, including the achievement of lifecycle energy savings and a potential LEED certification. The hospital is comprised of 40 inpatient beds with views out to the surrounding rural landscape or into lushly planted internal courtyards.

  19. The political economy of retail wheeling, or how to not re-fight the last war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, A.; Kihm, S.

    1994-04-01

    Disparities in utility rates - observably the result of poor supply-side resource planning - have been small before and will be small once again. Retail wheeling`s promise of short-run gains for a few would, ironically, destroy integrated resource processes in place today that guard against a repeat of yesterday`s planning mistakes. The authors argue that retail wheeling is a troubling answer to a mis-diagnosis of yesterday`s problem. They believe that a variety of other policies offer most of the benefits and few of the risks that retail wheeling poses. These include aggressive wholesale competition, judicious pruning of uneconomic capacity, and serious incorporation of environmental risks into utility planning and regulation.

  20. Electricity Fuel Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Vehicles & Fuels » Fuels » Electricity Fuel Basics Electricity Fuel Basics August 19, 2013 - 5:44pm Addthis Electricity used to power vehicles is generally provided by the electricity grid and stored in the vehicle's batteries. Vehicles that run on electricity have no tailpipe emissions. Emissions that can be attributed to electric vehicles are generated during electricity production at the power plant. Charging plug-in electric vehicles at home is as simple as plugging them into an

  1. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-12-31

    This CALiPER report examines the characteristics of a subset of lamps from CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3 in more detail. Specifically, it focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of 14 LED A lamps, as controlled by four different retail-available dimmers.

  2. water service provider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    service provider - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  3. The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose slightly to $3.90 a gallon on Monday. That's up 8-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Diesel prices were highest in the New England region, at 4.16 a gallon, down a penny from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Rocky Mountain States at $3.68 a gallon, down 1.7

  4. The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to $3.93 a gallon on Monday. That's up 2 ½ cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Prices increased in all regions across the U.S. The highest prices were found in the New England region, at 4.18 a gallon, up 2.3 cents from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Rocky Mountain States at $3.74 a gallon,

  5. Electrical system architecture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

    2008-07-15

    An electrical system for a vehicle includes a first power source generating a first voltage level, the first power source being in electrical communication with a first bus. A second power source generates a second voltage level greater than the first voltage level, the second power source being in electrical communication with a second bus. A starter generator may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus, and at least one additional power source may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus. The electrical system also includes at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the first bus and at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the second bus.

  6. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  7. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Industrial"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Customers (Count)","Sales (Megawatthours)","Revenues (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (cents/kWh)" "Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK","Investor Owned",96,132889,12514,9.4168818 "Chugach Electric Assn

  8. Connections to Electricity Use Data and Information | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Connections to Electricity Use Data and Information Jump to: navigation, search Different electric utilities provide different kinds of data to their customers. Why is electricity...

  9. Small business success story: Gordon Electric Supply, Inc. |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small business success story: Gordon Electric Supply, Inc. May 14, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint Gordon Electric Supply has provided electrical and lighting products and services in the...

  10. Office of Electricity Delivery

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4 DOE Resilient Electric Distribution Grid R&D Workshop June 11, 2014 Upton, New York 2014 DOE Resilient Electric Distribution Grid R&D Workshop Report Page i June 24, 2014 Acknowledgment The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) acknowledges the support provided by the organizations represented at the Resilient Electric Distribution Grid R&D Workshop. The report content is based on the workshop session discussions, with session summary descriptions taken from the report-out presentations

  11. Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chassin, David P.; Donnelly, Matthew K.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2011-12-06

    Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

  12. Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chassin, David P.; Donnelly, Matthew K.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2006-12-12

    Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

  13. Liquid metal thermal electric converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

  14. Electric Metering | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Metering Electric Metering Saving Money by Saving Energy The Department of Energy has installed meters in the James Forrestal Building that will enable DOE to measure electricity use and costs in its headquarters facility. You may explore this data further by visiting our Forrestal Metering Dashboard at the following website: http://forrestal.nrel.gov The Forrestal electric meters provide daily read-outs and comparison of data on electricity consumption for overhead lighting and power

  15. Tampa Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tampa Electric provides a variety of financial incentives to promote energy efficiency in the residential sector. The Ductwork Rebate Program gives Tampa Electric customers the opportunity to have...

  16. Lane Electric Cooperative- Residential Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lane Electric Cooperative provides rebates for duct sealing measures, heat pumps, and newly constructed Energy Star Homes. Lane Electric Cooperative must receive the necessary application forms in...

  17. Talquin Electric Cooperative Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    32351 Product: Florida-based energy service provider. Talquin Electric are involved in a smart metering project in the city. References: Talquin Electric Cooperative Inc.1 This...

  18. Aiken Electric Cooperative Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aiken Electric Cooperative Inc Place: Aiken, South Carolina Zip: 29802 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen, Renewable Energy Product: A utility that provides electricity from renewable sources...

  19. United States Electricity Industry Primer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United States Electricity Industry Primer provides a high-level overview of the U.S. electricity supply chain, including generation, transmission, and distribution; markets and ownership structures, including utilities and regulatory agencies; and system reliability and vulnerabilities.

  20. What HERA May Provide?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Hannes; De Roeck, Albert; Bartels, Jochen; Behnke, Olaf; Blumlein, Johannes; Brodsky, Stanley; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Deak, Michal; Devenish, Robin; Diehl, Markus; Gehrmann, Thomas; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gustafson, Gosta; Khoze, Valery; Knutsson, Albert; Klein, Max; Krauss, Frank; Kutak, Krzysztof; Laenen, Eric; Lonnblad, Leif; Motyka, Leszek; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II /Birmingham U. /Southern Methodist U. /DESY /Piemonte Orientale U., Novara /CERN /Paris, LPTHE /Hamburg U. /Penn State U.

    2011-11-10

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. The HERA accelerator and the HERA experiments H1, HERMES and ZEUS stopped running in the end of June 2007. This was after 15 years of very successful operation since the first collisions in 1992. A total luminosity of {approx} 500 pb{sup -1} has been accumulated by each of the collider experiments H1 and ZEUS. During the years the increasingly better understood and upgraded detectors and HERA accelerator have contributed significantly to this success. The physics program remains in full swing and plenty of new results were presented at DIS08 which are approaching the anticipated final precision, fulfilling and exceeding the physics plans and the previsions of the upgrade program. Most of the analyses presented at DIS08 were still based on the so called HERA I data sample, i.e. data taken until 2000, before the shutdown for the luminosity upgrade. This sample has an integrated luminosity of {approx} 100 pb{sup -1}, and the four times larger statistics sample from HERA II is still in the process of being analyzed.

  1. Electric sales and revenue 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenue, and average revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  2. Electrical Circuit Tester

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Love, Frank (Amarillo, TX)

    2006-04-18

    An electrical circuit testing device is provided, comprising a case, a digital voltage level testing circuit with a display means, a switch to initiate measurement using the device, a non-shorting switching means for selecting pre-determined electrical wiring configurations to be tested in an outlet, a terminal block, a five-pole electrical plug mounted on the case surface and a set of adapters that can be used for various multiple-pronged electrical outlet configurations for voltages from 100 600 VAC from 50 100 Hz.

  3. Electricity | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    above is either the statewide average retail price or a multi-state regional average price reported by EIA. The latest gasoline pricing data is available on EIA's webpage....

  4. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    not necessarily coincide with the beginning and the end of months. For example, retail revenue and sales data reported in July reflects data for billing cycles that end sometime...

  5. Energy Department Announces Funding to Provide Better Visibility into the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health of the Nation's Electric Grid | Department of Energy Provide Better Visibility into the Health of the Nation's Electric Grid Energy Department Announces Funding to Provide Better Visibility into the Health of the Nation's Electric Grid September 26, 2013 - 12:06pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 Editor's note: This post has been edited to correct the deadline for application submissions. WASHINGTON - As part of the Administration's commitment to improve the reliability and

  6. Small Solar Electric Systems | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Solar Electric Systems Small Solar Electric Systems A small solar electric or photovoltaic system can be a reliable and pollution-free producer of electricity for your home or office. A small solar electric or photovoltaic (PV) system can be a reliable and pollution-free producer of electricity for your home or office. Small PV systems also provide a cost-effective power supply in locations where it is expensive or impossible to send electricity through conventional power lines. Because PV

  7. Small Solar Electric Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Electric Systems Small Solar Electric Systems A small solar electric or photovoltaic system can be a reliable and pollution-free producer of electricity for your home or office. A small solar electric or photovoltaic (PV) system can be a reliable and pollution-free producer of electricity for your home or office. Small PV systems also provide a cost-effective power supply in locations where it is expensive or impossible to send electricity through conventional power lines. Because PV

  8. Hydrogen Fuel Cells Providing Critical Backup Power | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cells Providing Critical Backup Power Hydrogen Fuel Cells Providing Critical Backup Power April 9, 2010 - 3:43pm Addthis Customers of AT&T Wireless and Pacific Gas & Electric...

  9. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Commercial"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Customers (Count)","Sales (Megawatthours)","Revenues (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (cents/kWh)" "Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK","Investor Owned",2253,125452,12449,9.9233173 "Alaska Power and Telephone Co","AK","Investor

  10. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Residential"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Customers (Count)","Sales (Megawatthours)","Revenues (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (cents/kWh)" "Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK","Investor Owned",14115,141151,16728,11.851138 "Alaska Power and Telephone Co","AK","Investor

  11. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Total"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Customers (Count)","Sales (Megawatthours)","Revenues (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (cents/kWh)" "Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK","Investor Owned",16464,399492,41691,10.436004 "Alaska Power and Telephone Co","AK","Investor

  12. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    retail sales to ultimate customers by electric utilities and, beginning in 1996, other energy service providers. 8 Use of electricity that is 1) self-generated, 2)...

  13. Solar Renewable Energy Certificates (SREC-II)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Massachusetts' renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requires each regulated electricity supplier/provider serving retail customers in the state* to include in the electricity it sells 15% qualifying...

  14. Electric power monthly, March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-20

    This report for March 1995, presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  15. Electric $ales and revenue 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    This publication provides information on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers in the United States.

  16. Heat wave contributes to higher summer electricity demand in the Northeast

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat wave contributes to higher summer electricity demand in the Northeast In its new energy forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration expects summer retail electricity prices in the Northeast to be 2.7 percent higher than last summer...mainly due to rising costs for the fuels used to generate electricity. Many households ran their air conditioners more than usual last month to try to beat the East Coast heat wave. While customers in New England are expected to use 1 percent more

  17. Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gasoline Prices | Department of Energy 6: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than Gasoline Prices Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than Gasoline Prices All energy prices vary from month to month and year to year. However, when comparing the national average retail price for a gallon of regular gasoline and a kilowatt-hour (kWh) for residential electricity, the pricing for gasoline is far more volatile. In the two year period shown in the

  18. Intelligent electrical outlet for collective load control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Ford, Justin R.; Spires, Shannon V.; Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2015-10-27

    Various technologies described herein pertain to an electrical outlet that autonomously manages loads in a microgrid. The electrical outlet can provide autonomous load control in response to variations in electrical power generation supply in the microgrid. The electrical outlet includes a receptacle, a sensor operably coupled to the receptacle, and an actuator configured to selectively actuate the receptacle. The sensor measures electrical parameters at the receptacle. Further, a processor autonomously controls the actuator based at least in part on the electrical parameters measured at the receptacle, electrical parameters from one or more disparate electrical outlets in the microgrid, and a supply of generated electric power in the microgrid at a given time.

  19. Intelligent electrical outlet for collective load control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lentine, Anthony L; Ford, Justin R; Spires, Shannon V; Goldsmith, Steven Y

    2015-11-05

    Various technologies described herein pertain to an electrical outlet that autonomously manages loads in a microgrid. The electrical outlet can provide autonomous load control in response to variations in electrical power generation supply in the microgrid. The electrical outlet includes a receptacle, a sensor operably coupled to the receptacle, and an actuator configured to selectively actuate the receptacle. The sensor measures electrical parameters at the receptacle. Further, a processor autonomously controls the actuator based at least in part on the electrical parameters measured at the receptacle, electrical parameters from one or more disparate electrical outlets in the microgrid, and a supply of generated electric power in the microgrid at a given time.

  20. DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, MIchael; Letschert, Virginie; Shen, Bo; Sathaye, Jayant; de la Ru du Can, Stephane

    2011-01-12

    The global economy has grown rapidly over the past decade with a commensurate growth in the demand for electricity services that has increased a country's vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Increasing need of reliable and affordable electricity supply is a challenge which is before every Asia Pacific Partnership (APP) country. Collaboration between APP members has been extremely fruitful in identifying potential efficiency upgrades and implementing clean technology in the supply side of the power sector as well established the beginnings of collaboration. However, significantly more effort needs to be focused on demand side potential in each country. Demand side management or DSM in this case is a policy measure that promotes energy efficiency as an alternative to increasing electricity supply. It uses financial or other incentives to slow demand growth on condition that the incremental cost needed is less than the cost of increasing supply. Such DSM measures provide an alternative to building power supply capacity The type of financial incentives comprise of rebates (subsidies), tax exemptions, reduced interest loans, etc. Other approaches include the utilization of a cap and trade scheme to foster energy efficiency projects by creating a market where savings are valued. Under this scheme, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of electricity are capped and electricity retailers are required to meet the target partially or entirely through energy efficiency activities. Implementation of DSM projects is very much in the early stages in several of the APP countries or localized to a regional part of the country. The purpose of this project is to review the different types of DSM programs experienced by APP countries and to estimate the overall future potential for cost-effective demand-side efficiency improvements in buildings sectors in the 7 APP countries through the year 2030. Overall, the savings potential is estimated to be 1.7 thousand TWh or 21percent of the 2030 projected base case electricity demand. Electricity savings potential ranges from a high of 38percent in India to a low of 9percent in Korea for the two sectors. Lighting, fans, and TV sets and lighting and refrigeration are the largest contributors to residential and commercial electricity savings respectively. This work presents a first estimates of the savings potential of DSM programs in APP countries. While the resulting estimates are based on detailed end-use data, it is worth keeping in mind that more work is needed to overcome limitation in data at this time of the project.

  1. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Sandra R.; Johnson, Melvin; McClevey, Kenneth; Calopedis, Stephen; Bolden, Deborah

    1992-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

  2. Primer on electricity futures and other derivatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoft, S.; Belden, T.; Goldman, C.; Pickle, S.

    1998-01-01

    Increased competition in bulk power and retail electricity markets is likely to lower electricity prices, but will also result in greater price volatility as the industry moves away from administratively determined, cost-based rates and encourages market-driven prices. Price volatility introduces new risks for generators, consumers, and marketers. Electricity futures and other derivatives can help each of these market participants manage, or hedge, price risks in a competitive electricity market. Futures contracts are legally binding and negotiable contracts that call for the future delivery of a commodity. In most cases, physical delivery does not take place, and the futures contract is closed by buying or selling a futures contract on or near the delivery date. Other electric rate derivatives include options, price swaps, basis swaps, and forward contracts. This report is intended as a primer for public utility commissioners and their staff on futures and other financial instruments used to manage price risks. The report also explores some of the difficult choices facing regulators as they attempt to develop policies in this area.

  3. Powertrain system for a hybrid electric vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Jr., Richard G. (Royal Oak, MI); Boberg, Evan S. (Hazel Park, MI); Lawrie, Robert E. (Whitmore Lake, MI); Castaing, Francois J. (Bloomfield Township, MI)

    1999-08-31

    A hybrid electric powertrain system is provided including an electric motor/generator drivingly engaged with the drive shaft of a transmission. The electric is utilized for synchronizing the rotation of the drive shaft with the driven shaft during gear shift operations. In addition, a mild hybrid concept is provided which utilizes a smaller electric motor than typical hybrid powertrain systems. Because the electric motor is drivingly engaged with the drive shaft of the transmission, the electric motor/generator is driven at high speed even when the vehicle speed is low so that the electric motor/generator provides more efficient regeneration.

  4. Powertrain system for a hybrid electric vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, R.G. Jr.; Boberg, E.S.; Lawrie, R.E.; Castaing, F.J.

    1999-08-31

    A hybrid electric powertrain system is provided including an electric motor/generator drivingly engaged with the drive shaft of a transmission. The electric is utilized for synchronizing the rotation of the drive shaft with the driven shaft during gear shift operations. In addition, a mild hybrid concept is provided which utilizes a smaller electric motor than typical hybrid powertrain systems. Because the electric motor is drivingly engaged with the drive shaft of the transmission, the electric motor/generator is driven at high speed even when the vehicle speed is low so that the electric motor/generator provides more efficient regeneration. 34 figs.

  5. Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-07-23

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  6. Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-05-02

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  7. Electric current locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, Paul E. (Corvallis, OR); Woodside, Charles Rigel (Corvallis, OR)

    2012-02-07

    The disclosure herein provides an apparatus for location of a quantity of current vectors in an electrical device, where the current vector has a known direction and a known relative magnitude to an input current supplied to the electrical device. Mathematical constants used in Biot-Savart superposition equations are determined for the electrical device, the orientation of the apparatus, and relative magnitude of the current vector and the input current, and the apparatus utilizes magnetic field sensors oriented to a sensing plane to provide current vector location based on the solution of the Biot-Savart superposition equations. Description of required orientations between the apparatus and the electrical device are disclosed and various methods of determining the mathematical constants are presented.

  8. Method for providing a compliant cantilevered micromold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morales, Alfredo M. (Livermore, CA); Domeier, Linda A. (Danville, CA); Gonzales, Marcela G. (Shoreline, WA); Keifer, Patrick N. (Livermore, CA); Garino, Terry J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-12-16

    A compliant cantilevered three-dimensional micromold is provided. The compliant cantilevered micromold is suitable for use in the replication of cantilevered microparts and greatly simplifies the replication of such cantilevered parts. The compliant cantilevered micromold may be used to fabricate microparts using casting or electroforming techniques. When the compliant micromold is used to fabricate electroformed cantilevered parts, the micromold will also comprise an electrically conducting base formed by a porous metal substrate that is embedded within the compliant cantilevered micromold. Methods for fabricating the compliant cantilevered micromold as well as methods of replicating cantilevered microparts using the compliant cantilevered micromold are also provided.

  9. Ion electric propulsion unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Light, Max E; Colestock, Patrick L

    2014-01-28

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) thruster is disclosed having a plasma chamber which is electrically biased with a positive voltage. The chamber bias serves to efficiently accelerate and expel the positive ions from the chamber. Electrons follow the exiting ions, serving to provide an electrically neutral exhaust plume. In a further embodiment, a downstream shaping magnetic field serves to further accelerate and/or shape the exhaust plume.

  10. Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Procurement of Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment This Guidance provides a description of the types of requirements to be included in an employer's workplace charging request for proposal (RFP). This Guidance is not intended to be a sample or manual for acquiring electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), but rather to serve as a reference for an employer to consider when acquiring EVSE as part of a workplace charging program. Contact the Workplace Charging Challenge at

  11. Solar Electric Power Association | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington, DC Product: Nonprofit organization whose membership consists of more than 100 electric service providers, utilities, manufacturers, government agencies, research...

  12. Electric machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi (Niskayuna, NY); Reddy, Patel Bhageerath (Madison, WI)

    2012-07-17

    An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

  13. Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy reve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta; Smith, Brennan T

    2008-02-01

    Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy revenue, while meeting other legal water requirements. Reservoir optimization schemes used in practice do not seek flow regimes that maximize aquatic ecosystem health. Here, we review optimization studies that considered environmental goals in one of three approaches. The first approach seeks flow regimes that maximize hydropower generation, while satisfying legal requirements, including environmental (or minimum) flows. Solutions from this approach are often used in practice to operate hydropower projects. In the second approach, flow releases from a dam are timed to meet water quality constraints on dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature and nutrients. In the third approach, flow releases are timed to improve the health of fish populations. We conclude by suggesting three steps for bringing multi-objective reservoir operation closer to the goal of ecological sustainability: (1) conduct research to identify which features of flow variation are essential for river health and to quantify these relationships, (2) develop valuation methods to assess the total value of river health and (3) develop optimal control softwares that combine water balance modelling with models that predict ecosystem responses to flow.

  14. Electric power monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-13

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  15. Electric power monthly, September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-17

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  16. The Value of Distributed Solar Electric Generation to San Antonio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Nic; Norris, Ben; Meyer, Lisa

    2013-02-14

    This report presents an analysis of value provided by grid-connected, distributed PV in San Antonio from a utility perspective. The study quantified six value components, summarized in Table ES- 1. These components represent the benefits that accrue to the utility, CPS Energy, in accepting solar onto the grid. This analysis does not treat the compensation of value, policy objectives, or cost-effectiveness from the retail consumer perspective.

  17. Electric power monthly, April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-07

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  18. Electric power monthly, May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-25

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  19. Lesson 2 - Electricity Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 - Electricity Basics Lesson 2 - Electricity Basics It's difficult to imagine life without convenient electricity. You just flip a switch or plug in an appliance, and it's there. But how did it get there? Many steps go into providing the reliable electricity we take for granted. This lesson takes a closer look at electricity. It follows the path of electricity from the fuel source to the home, including the power plant and the electric power grid. It also covers the role of electric utilities

  20. Electrical connector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dilliner, Jennifer L.; Baker, Thomas M.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Hoff, Brian D.

    2006-11-21

    An electrical connector includes a female component having one or more receptacles, a first test receptacle, and a second test receptacle. The electrical connector also includes a male component having one or more terminals configured to engage the one or more receptacles, a first test pin configured to engage the first test receptacle, and a second test pin configured to engage the second test receptacle. The first test receptacle is electrically connected to the second test receptacle, and at least one of the first test pin and the second test pin is shorter in length than the one or more terminals.

  1. Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your Fingertips |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your Fingertips Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Provides Info at Your Fingertips November 15, 2013 - 10:12am Addthis The Alternative Fueling Station Locator iPhone app helps you find fueling stations that offer electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, E85, propane, or hydrogen. | Energy Department The Alternative Fueling Station Locator iPhone app helps you find fueling stations that offer electricity, natural

  2. Micromachined electrical cauterizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, A.P.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Northrup, M.A.

    1999-08-31

    A micromachined electrical cauterizer is disclosed. Microstructures are combined with microelectrodes for highly localized electro cauterization. Using boron etch stops and surface micromachining, microneedles with very smooth surfaces are made. Micromachining also allows for precision placement of electrodes by photolithography with micron sized gaps to allow for concentrated electric fields. A microcauterizer is fabricated by bulk etching silicon to form knife edges, then parallelly placed microelectrodes with gaps as small as 5 {mu}m are patterned and aligned adjacent the knife edges to provide homeostasis while cutting tissue. While most of the microelectrode lines are electrically insulated from the atmosphere by depositing and patterning silicon dioxide on the electric feedthrough portions, a window is opened in the silicon dioxide to expose the parallel microelectrode portion. This helps reduce power loss and assist in focusing the power locally for more efficient and safer procedures. 7 figs.

  3. Micromachined electrical cauterizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A micromachined electrical cauterizer. Microstructures are combined with microelectrodes for highly localized electro cauterization. Using boron etch stops and surface micromachining, microneedles with very smooth surfaces are made. Micromachining also allows for precision placement of electrodes by photolithography with micron sized gaps to allow for concentrated electric fields. A microcauterizer is fabricated by bulk etching silicon to form knife edges, then parallelly placed microelectrodes with gaps as small as 5 .mu.m are patterned and aligned adjacent the knife edges to provide homeostasis while cutting tissue. While most of the microelectrode lines are electrically insulated from the atmosphere by depositing and patterning silicon dioxide on the electric feedthrough portions, a window is opened in the silicon dioxide to expose the parallel microelectrode portion. This helps reduce power loss and assist in focusing the power locally for more efficient and safer procedures.

  4. Electric-drive tractability indicator integrated in hybrid electric vehicle tachometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tamai, Goro; Zhou, Jing; Weslati, Feisel

    2014-09-02

    An indicator, system and method of indicating electric drive usability in a hybrid electric vehicle. A tachometer is used that includes a display having an all-electric drive portion and a hybrid drive portion. The all-electric drive portion and the hybrid drive portion share a first boundary which indicates a minimum electric drive usability and a beginning of hybrid drive operation of the vehicle. The indicated level of electric drive usability is derived from at least one of a percent battery discharge, a percent maximum torque provided by the electric drive, and a percent electric drive to hybrid drive operating cost for the hybrid electric vehicle.

  5. Electricity prices in a competitive environment: Marginal cost pricing of generation services and financial status of electric utilities. A preliminary analysis through 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The emergence of competitive markets for electricity generation services is changing the way that electricity is and will be priced in the United States. This report presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated {open_quotes}cost-of-service{close_quotes} pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers? This study is not intended to be a cost-benefit analysis of wholesale or retail competition, nor does this report include an analysis of the macroeconomic impacts of competitive electricity prices.

  6. Electric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foster, Jr., John S. (Pleasanton, CA); Wilson, James R. (Livermore, CA); McDonald, Jr., Charles A. (Danville, CA)

    1983-01-01

    1. In an electrical energy generator, the combination comprising a first elongated annular electrical current conductor having at least one bare surface extending longitudinally and facing radially inwards therein, a second elongated annular electrical current conductor disposed coaxially within said first conductor and having an outer bare surface area extending longitudinally and facing said bare surface of said first conductor, the contiguous coaxial areas of said first and second conductors defining an inductive element, means for applying an electrical current to at least one of said conductors for generating a magnetic field encompassing said inductive element, and explosive charge means disposed concentrically with respect to said conductors including at least the area of said inductive element, said explosive charge means including means disposed to initiate an explosive wave front in said explosive advancing longitudinally along said inductive element, said wave front being effective to progressively deform at least one of said conductors to bring said bare surfaces thereof into electrically conductive contact to progressively reduce the inductance of the inductive element defined by said conductors and transferring explosive energy to said magnetic field effective to generate an electrical potential between undeformed portions of said conductors ahead of said explosive wave front.

  7. To Own or Lease Solar: Understanding Commercial Retailers' Decisions to Use Alternative Financing Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, D.; Margolis, R.

    2014-12-01

    This report examines the tradeoffs among financing methods for businesses installing onsite photovoltaics (PV). We present case studies of PV financing strategies used by two large commercial retailers that have deployed substantial U.S. PV capacity: IKEA, which owns its PV, and Staples, which purchases power generated from onsite PV systems through power purchase agreements (PPAs). We also analyze the financial considerations that influence any company's choice of PV financing strategy. Our goal in this report is to clarify the financial and institutional costs and benefits of financing strategies and to inform other companies that are considering launching or expanding similar PV programs.

  8. Business Case for Installing E85 at Retail Stations, Clean Cities Fact Sheet

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    January 2008 Fact Sheet In a business environment where there are up to four gas stations on every major intersection, it's hard for retailers to differentiate themselves from their competitors. One way station owners can distinguish themselves and make a profit is to add alternative fuels, such as E85 (85% ethanol, 15% gasoline), to their product mix. When pricing and availability of the fuel are positive, adding E85 can be a profitable move that can position a station as "green."

  9. E85 Retail Business Case: When and Why to Sell E85

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    E85 Retail Business Case: When and Why to Sell E85 C. Johnson and M. Melendez Technical Report NREL/TP-540-41590 December 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337

  10. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 2010 Top Supermarkets, by Sales 2010 All Commodity Supermarket Wal-Mart Stores 3,001 Kroger Co. 2,460 Safeway, Inc. 1,461 Supervalu, Inc. 1,504 Ahold USA, Inc. (Stop and Shop, Giant) 746 Publix Super Markets, Inc. 1,035 Delhaize America, Inc. (Food Lion) 1,641 H.E. Butt Grocery Co. (HEB) 291 Meijer Inc. 195 Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. (Pathmark) 373 Note(s): Source(s): All commodity volume in this example represents the "annualized range of the estimated retail sales volume of

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Retail Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Climate Zone Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 108.9 0.1 9.4 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate

  12. 2016 Energy Exchange (Providence, RI)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2016 Energy Exchange in Providence, Rhode Island, will provide training to energy managers and sustainability professionals who are working to improve facility performance, advance the use of renewable energy, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions at federal sites.

  13. Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cells | Department of Energy Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells This study, completed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, examines approaches to providing electrical power on board commercial aircraft using solid oxide fuel (SOFC) technology. The focus of this study is on application to "more-electric" airplanes with the Boeing 787 used as a case study. PDF

  14. Electric power monthly, May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Statistics by company and plant are published on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  15. Electric power monthly, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the U.S., Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. This April 1994 issue contains 1993 year-end data and data through January 1994.

  16. Configuring load as a resource for competitive electricity markets--Review of demand response programs in the U.S. and around the world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffner, Grayson C.

    2002-09-01

    The restructuring of regional and national electricity markets in the U.S. and around the world has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators to control and manage the load patterns of wholesale and retail end-users they serve. Demand Response Programs, once called Load Management, have re-emerged as an important element in the fine-tuning of newly restructured electricity markets. During the summers of 1999 and 2001 they played a vital role in stabilizing wholesale markets and providing a hedge against generation shortfalls throughout the U.S.A. Demand Response Programs include ''traditional'' capacity reservation and interruptible/curtailable rates programs as well as voluntary demand bidding programs offered by either Load Serving Entities (LSEs) or regional Independent System Operators (ISOs). The Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) has been monitoring the development of new types of Demand Response Programs both in the U.S. and around the world. This paper provides a survey and overview of the technologies and program designs that make up these emerging and important new programs.

  17. Electric Power monthly, November 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    This publication presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and state agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Purpose is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  18. Electric power monthly, May 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    This publication presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and Stage agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Purpose is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. EIA collected the information to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities in Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  19. Small Solar Electric Systems | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A small solar electric or photovoltaic system can be a reliable and pollution-free producer of electricity for your home or office. A small solar electric or photovoltaic (PV) system can be a reliable and pollution-free producer of electricity for your home or office. Small PV systems also provide a cost-effective power supply in locations where it is expensive or impossible to send electricity through conventional power lines. Because PV technologies use both direct and scattered sunlight to

  20. Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (EAC) Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) EAC MISSION The mission of the Electricity Advisory Committee is to provide advice to the U.S. Department of Energy in implementing the Energy Policy Act of 2005, executing the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, and modernizing the nation's electricity delivery infrastructure. EAC GOALS The goals of the EAC are to: Advise on electricity policy issues pertaining to the Department of Energy. Review and make

  1. Energy Implications of Retrofitting Retail Sector Rooftop Units with Stepped-Speed and Variable-Speed Functionality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studer, D.; Romero, R.; Herrmann, L.; Benne, K.

    2012-04-01

    Commercial retailers understand that retrofitting constant-speed RTU fan motors with stepped- or variable-speed alternatives could save significant energy in most U.S. climate zones. However, they lack supporting data, both real-world and simulation based, on the cost effectiveness and climate zone-specific energy savings associated with this measure. Thus, building managers and engineers have been unable to present a compelling business case for fan motor upgrades to upper management. This study uses whole-building energy simulation to estimate the energy impact of this type of measure so retailers can determine its economic feasibility.

  2. Salt River Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Salt River Electric serves as the rural electric provider in Kentucky's Bullitt, Nelson, Spencer, and Washington counties. Residential customers are eligible for a variety of cash incentives for...

  3. Electric Transmission Siting at the California PUC | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    01302009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Electric Transmission Siting at the California PUC Citation Electric...

  4. Consolidated Electric Cooperative- Heat Pump and Water Heating Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Consolidated Electric Cooperative provides rebates to residential customers who install electric water heaters, dual-fuel heating system or geothermal heat pumps. A dual-fuel heating systems...

  5. Huaiji County Huilian Hydro electric Group Company Limited |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 526400 Sector: Hydro Product: Hydro-electric project designer, constructor, and maintenance service provider. CLP Holding has 25% ownership of Huilian Hydro-electric....

  6. Cagayan Electric Power and Light Co Cepalco | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Cepalco) Place: Philippines Sector: Solar Product: Provides electricity to Cagayan de Oro City. Has developed a 1MW solar power plant. References: Cagayan Electric Power and...

  7. Left Coast Electric Formerly Left Coast Conversions | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Services Product: California-based company that provides services and products for electric cars. References: Left Coast Electric (Formerly Left Coast Conversions)1 This...

  8. Customer Strategies for Responding to Day-Ahead Market HourlyElectricity Pricing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Chuck; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan,Bernie; Boisvert, Dick; Cappers, Peter; Pratt, Donna; Butkins, Kim

    2005-08-25

    Real-time pricing (RTP) has been advocated as an economically efficient means to send price signals to customers to promote demand response (DR) (Borenstein 2002, Borenstein 2005, Ruff 2002). However, limited information exists that can be used to judge how effectively RTP actually induces DR, particularly in the context of restructured electricity markets. This report describes the second phase of a study of how large, non-residential customers' adapted to default-service day-ahead hourly pricing. The customers are located in upstate New York and served under Niagara Mohawk, A National Grid Company (NMPC)'s SC-3A rate class. The SC-3A tariff is a type of RTP that provides firm, day-ahead notice of hourly varying prices indexed to New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) day-ahead market prices. The study was funded by the California Energy Commission (CEC)'s PIER program through the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC). NMPC's is the first and longest-running default-service RTP tariff implemented in the context of retail competition. The mix of NMPC's large customers exposed to day-ahead hourly prices is roughly 30% industrial, 25% commercial and 45% institutional. They have faced periods of high prices during the study period (2000-2004), thereby providing an opportunity to assess their response to volatile hourly prices. The nature of the SC-3A default service attracted competitive retailers offering a wide array of pricing and hedging options, and customers could also participate in demand response programs implemented by NYISO. The first phase of this study examined SC-3A customers' satisfaction, hedging choices and price response through in-depth customer market research and a Constant Elasticity of Substitution (CES) demand model (Goldman et al. 2004). This second phase was undertaken to answer questions that remained unresolved and to quantify price response to a higher level of granularity. We accomplished these objectives with a second customer survey and interview effort, which resulted in a higher, 76% response rate, and the adoption of the more flexible Generalized Leontief (GL) demand model, which allows us to analyze customer response under a range of conditions (e.g. at different nominal prices) and to determine the distribution of individual customers' response.

  9. S. 3047: A Bill to amend the antitrust laws in order to preserve and promote wholesale and retail competition in the retail gasoline market. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, September 13, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This bill would amend the antitrust laws in order to preserve and promote wholesale and retail competition in the retail gasoline market. The bill defines limits on the purchases required of a retailer from the producer or refiner and defines the exceptions under which any large integrated refiner can operate any motor fuel service station in the US. The Federal Trade Commission is charged with the enforcement.

  10. Software Providers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Buildings » Home Energy Score » Software Providers Software Providers Software providers interested in linking their software to the Home Energy Scoring Tool can do so via an application programming interface (API). By licensing the Home Energy Score API, third-party software can generate a Home Energy Score along with any other outputs the software already produces. This capability reduces data entry burdens for Assessors already using other software tools. Interested API users

  11. Electrically powered hand tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, Kurt S.; Reed, Teddy R.

    2007-01-16

    An electrically powered hand tool is described and which includes a three phase electrical motor having a plurality of poles; an electrical motor drive electrically coupled with the three phase electrical motor; and a source of electrical power which is converted to greater than about 208 volts three-phase and which is electrically coupled with the electrical motor drive.

  12. Electric sales and revenue 1991. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenue, and average revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  13. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Matthew K.; Chassin, David P.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Winiarski, David W.; Pratt, Robert G.; Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie

    2006-03-07

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  14. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Matthew K.; Chassin, David P.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Winiarski, David W.; Pratt, Robert G.; Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie

    2008-09-02

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  15. Electric sales, revenue, and bills 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-15

    This document contains two sections. The Background'' section provides a discussion on (1) how average revenue per kilowatthour and typical net monthly bills differ; (2) the classes of electric utility ownership; and, (3) the classes of service or sectors. The Year at a Glance'' section provides a summary of pertinent statistics during the year related to sales of electricity to ultimate consumers, electric revenue from those sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. 5 figs., 22 tabs.

  16. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other.

  17. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, J.P.; Andraka, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

    1992-01-14

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other. 3 figs.

  18. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMeo, E.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at Wind Powering America States Summit. The Summit, which follows the American Wind Energy Association's (AWEA's) annual WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, provides state Wind Working Groups, state energy officials, U.S. Energy Department and national laboratory representatives, and professional and institutional partners an opportunity to review successes, opportunities, and challenges for wind energy and plan future collaboration.

  19. Electric power monthly, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  20. Electric power monthly, June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  1. Electric power monthly, August 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-24

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  2. Possible effects of competition on electricity consumers in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

    1998-01-01

    In part, the impetus for restructuring the U.S. electricity industry stems from the large regional disparities in electricity prices. Indeed, industry reforms are moving most rapidly in high-cost states, such as California and those in the Northeast. Legislators, regulators, and many others in states that enjoy low electricity prices, on the other hand, ask whether increased competition will benefit consumers in their states. This report quantifies the effects of increased competition on electricity consumers and producers in two regions, the Pacific Northwest and California. California`s generating costs are roughly double those of the Northwest. We use a new strategic-planning model called Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) to conduct these analyses. Specifically, we analyzed four cases: a pre-competition base case intended to represent conditions as they might exist under current regulation in the year 2000, a post-competition case in which customer loads and load shapes respond to real-time electricity pricing, a sensitivity case in which natural-gas prices are 20% higher than in the base case, and a sensitivity case in which the hydroelectric output in the Northwest is 20% less than in the base case. The ORCED analyses suggest that, absent regulatory intervention, retail competition would increase profits for producers in the Northwest and lower prices for consumers in California at the expense of consumers in the Northwest and producers in California. However, state regulators may be able to capture some or all of the increased profits and use them to lower electricity prices in the low-cost region. Perhaps the most straightforward way to allocate the costs and benefits to retail customers is through development of transition-cost charges or credits. With this option, the consumers in both regions can benefit from competition. The magnitude and even direction of bulk-power trading between regions depends strongly on the amount of hydroelectric power and energy available in the Northwest. Market prices respond much more strongly to changes in natural-gas prices and hydro output than do regulated prices. Indeed, market prices are intended to closely track changes in marginal costs, while regulated prices typically track changes in average cost. The bottom line from this analysis is that increased competition can benefit retail customers in high-cost regions without harming customers in low-cost regions. Such a desirable outcome, however, is not automatic. State regulators may have to intervene to be sure that what would otherwise be additional profits for the producers in the low-cost region are used to lower prices to retail customers.

  3. Tomoe Electric Manufacturing Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Tomoe Electric Manufacturing Co Ltd Place: Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan Zip: 140-0013 Product: Tomoe Electric MFG, a Tokyo-based electric vehicle provider, is...

  4. Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) Plan for non-Medicare retirees is a medical insurance plan with a lower deductible but higher premium than the 2016 High-Deductible Health...

  5. Electric power emergency handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labadie, J.R.

    1980-09-01

    The Emergency Electric Power Administration's Emergency Operations Handbook is designed to provide guidance to the EEPA organization. It defines responsibilities and describes actions performed by the government and electric utilities in planning for, and in operations during, national emergencies. The EEPA Handbook is reissued periodically to describe organizational changes, to assign new duties and responsibilities, and to clarify the responsibilities of the government to direct and coordinate the operations of the electric utility industry under emergencies declared by the President. This Handbook is consistent with the assumptions, policies, and procedures contained in the National Plan for Emergency Preparedness. Claimancy and restoration, communications and warning, and effects of nuclear weapons are subjects covered in the appendices.

  6. Lab Subcontractor Consortium provides grants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Subcontractor Consortium provides grants Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Lab Subcontractor Consortium provides grants Eight Northern New Mexico non-profits to benefit February 1, 2014 Lab director meets with LANL Subcontrator Consortium Laboratory Director Charlie McMillan speaks to members of the LANL Major Subcontractors Consortium Jan. 7 at the J. Robert Oppenheimer Study

  7. Tampa Electric- Solar Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tampa Electric provides financial incentives to customers who install solar-energy systems on their homes and businesses. Customers who install eligible solar water heating systems may receive a ...

  8. December 2011 Electrical Safety Occurrences

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and they provided no indication that the secondary 120V electrical line was in the area. Pre-job utility locates were performed by the LANL Utility Mapping (UMAP) team. Two...

  9. Electric vehicles | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    existence in the mid-19th century, when electricity was among the preferred methods for motor vehicle propulsion, providing a level of comfort and ease of operation that could not...

  10. Healthy Zero Energy Buildings (HZEB) Program - Cross-Sectional Study of Contaminant Levels, Source, Strengths, and Ventilation Rates in Retail Stores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Sidheswaran, Meera; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William

    2014-02-01

    This field study measured ventilation rates and indoor air quality parameters in 21 visits to retail stores in California. The data was collected to guide the development of new, science-based commercial building ventilation rate standards that balance the dual objectives of increasing energy efficiency and maintaining acceptable indoor air quality. Data collection occurred between September 2011 and March 2013. Three types of stores participated in this study: grocery stores, furniture/hardware stores, and apparel stores. Ventilation rates and indoor air contaminant concentrations were measured on a weekday, typically between 9 am and 6 pm. Ventilation rates measured using a tracer gas decay method exceeded the minimum requirement of California’s Title 24 Standard in all but one store. Even though there was adequate ventilation according to Title 24, concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein exceeded the most stringent chronic health guidelines. Other indoor air contaminants measured included carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O{sub 3}), and particulate matter (PM). Concentrations of CO{sub 2} were kept low by adequate ventilation, and were assumed low also because the sampling occurred on a weekday when retail stores were less busy. CO concentrations were also low. The indoor-outdoor ratios of O{sub 3} showed that the first-order loss rate may vary by store trade types and also by ventilation mode (mechanical versus natural). Analysis of fine and ultrafine PM measurements showed that a substantial portion of the particle mass in grocery stores with cooking-related emissions was in particles less than 0.3 μm. Stores without cooking as an indoor source had PM size distributions that were more similar indoors and outdoors. The whole-building emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and PM were estimated from the measured ventilation rates and indoor and outdoor contaminant concentrations. Mass balance models were then used to determine the ventilation rates, filtration strategies, or source reductions needed to maintain indoor contaminant concentrations below reference levels. Several scenarios of potential concern were considered: (i) formaldehyde levels in furniture/hardware stores, (ii) contaminants associated with cooking (e.g., PM, acrolein, and acetaldehyde) in grocery stores, and (iii) outdoor contaminants (e.g., PM and O{sub 3}) impacting stores that use natural ventilation. Estimated formaldehyde emission rates suggest that retail stores would need to ventilate at levels far exceeding the current Title 24 requirement to lower indoor concentrations below California’s stringent formaldehyde reference level. Given the high costs of providing ventilation but only modest chronic health benefit is expected, effective source control is an attractive alternative, as demonstrated by some retail stores in this study. Predictions showed that grocery stores need MERV 13 air filters, instead of MERV 8 filters that are more commonly used, to maintain indoor PM at levels that meet the chronic health standards for PM. Exposure to acrolein is a potential health concern in grocery stores, and should be addressed by increasing the use of kitchen range hoods or improving their contaminant removal efficiency. In stores that rely on natural ventilation, indoor PM can be a health concern if the stores are located in areas with high outdoor PM. This concern may be addressed by switching to mechanical ventilation when the outdoor air quality is poor, while continuing natural ventilation when outdoor air quality is good.

  11. Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Brown, Charles C.

    2014-12-14

    To date, all three reports in the retail lamps series have focused on basic performance parameters, such as lumen output, efficacy, and color quality. This report goes a step further, examining the photoelectric characteristics (i.e., dimming and flicker) of a subset of lamps from CALiPER Retails Lamps Study 3. Specifically, this report focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of 14 LED A lamps, as controlled by four different retail-available dimmers. The results demonstrate notable variation across the various lamps, but little variation between the four dimmers. Overall, the LED lamps: ~tended to have higher relative light output compared to the incandescent and halogen benchmark at the same dimmer output signal (RMS voltage). The lamps’ dimming curves (i.e., the relationship between control signal and relative light output) ranged from linear to very similar to the square-law curve typical of an incandescent lamp. ~generally exhibited symmetrical behavior—the same dimming curve—when measured proceeding from maximum to minimum or minimum to maximum control signal. ~mostly dimmed below 10% of full light output, with some exceptions for specific lamp and dimmer combinations ~exhibited a range of flicker characteristics, with many comparing favorably to the level typical of a magnetically-ballasted fluorescent lamp through at least a majority of the dimming range. ~ always exceeded the relative (normalized) efficacy over the dimming range of the benchmark lamps, which rapidly decline in efficacy when they are dimmed. This report generally does not attempt to rank the performance of one product compared to another, but instead focuses on the collective performance of the group versus conventional incandescent or halogen lamps, the performance of which is likely to be the baseline for a majority of consumers. Undoubtedly, some LED lamps perform better—or more similar to conventional lamps—than others. Some perform desirably for one characteristic, but not others. Consumers (and specifiers) may have a hard time distinguishing better-performing lamps from one another; at this time, physical experimentation is likely the best evaluation tool.

  12. Ancillary Services Provided from DER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.B.

    2005-12-21

    Distributed energy resources (DER) are quickly making their way to industry primarily as backup generation. They are effective at starting and then producing full-load power within a few seconds. The distribution system is aging and transmission system development has not kept up with the growth in load and generation. The nation's transmission system is stressed with heavy power flows over long distances, and many areas are experiencing problems in providing the power quality needed to satisfy customers. Thus, a new market for DER is beginning to emerge. DER can alleviate the burden on the distribution system by providing ancillary services while providing a cost adjustment for the DER owner. This report describes 10 types of ancillary services that distributed generation (DG) can provide to the distribution system. Of these 10 services the feasibility, control strategy, effectiveness, and cost benefits are all analyzed as in the context of a future utility-power market. In this market, services will be provided at a local level that will benefit the customer, the distribution utility, and the transmission company.

  13. BIA Providers Conference Energy Track

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy is offering an energy track at the 25th Annual BIA Tribal Providers Conference Dec. 2-3, 2015. The track will feature breakout sessions on a variety of topics to help tribal energy leaders and professionals make informed decisions about energy projects.

  14. Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The petroleum-based transportation fuel system is complex and highly developed, in contrast to the nascent low-petroleum, low-carbon alternative fuel system. This report examines how expansion of the low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure could contribute to deep reductions in petroleum use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions across the U.S. transportation sector. Three low-carbon scenarios, each using a different combination of low-carbon fuels, were developed to explore infrastructure expansion trends consistent with a study goal of reducing transportation sector GHG emissions to 80% less than 2005 levels by 2050.These scenarios were compared to a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario and were evaluated with respect to four criteria: fuel cost estimates, resource availability, fuel production capacity expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion.

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Retail Buildings (1) Shell Percent Glass 0.4 Window (U-Factor 0.38-0.69 SHGC 0.40-0.44 Wall R-Value (2) 7.6-15.2 c.i. Roof R-Value Attic 30-60 Insulation Above Deck 15-25 c.i. Lighting Average Power Density (W/ft.^2) 1.3 System and Plant Heating Plant Gas Furnace(>225 kBtuh) 80% Combustion Efficiency Cooling Plant Air conditioner (>135-240 kBtuh) 10.8 EER/11.2 IPLV - 11.0 EER/11.5 IPLV Service Hot Water Gas Storage Water Heater (>75kBtuh) 90%

  16. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics,...

  17. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Information and Staff The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S....

  18. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by Sector, by Provider, 2003 through 2013 (Million Dollars) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation...

  19. Empire District Electric- Solar PV Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: Effective May 16, 2015, Empire began offering this solar rebate to retail customers who installed eligible systems after December 31, 2009, and meet all other program requirements.

  20. Louisville Gas & Electric Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes...