Sample records for retail electricity providers

  1. Retail Electricity Competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability and Competitive Electricity Markets” mimeo, MITCSEM WP 130 Retail Electricity Competition * Paul Joskow andwww.ucei.org Retail Electricity Competition ? Paul Joskow †

  2. Notes2Providers.doc -1-Notes to Retail Providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    providers that purchase electricity from a power pool that submits an Annual Report to the Energy CommissionNotes2Providers.doc -1- Notes to Retail Providers February 2003 Power Source Disclosure an energy mix or fuel mix different than the California Mix, (Net System Power)i . As a retail provider you

  3. Retail electricity competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a number of unstudied aspects of retail electricity competition. We first explore the implications of load profiling of consumers whose traditional meters do not allow for measurement of their real time consumption, ...

  4. February 10, 2003 Dear Retail Provider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that purchase electricity from a power pool that submits an Annual Report to the Energy Commission may provideFebruary 10, 2003 Dear Retail Provider: Subject: Power Source Disclosure and Customer Credit on the mailing lists for the Power Source Disclosure Program and the Customer Credit Program. As someone involved

  5. 2004 Notes2Providers.doc -1-Notes to Retail Providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the meter data reported to the system operator (Retail providers that purchase electricity from a power pool2004 Notes2Providers.doc -1- Notes to Retail Providers February 2005 Power Source Disclosure than the California Mix, (Net System Power)i . As a retail provider you are probably aware that all

  6. Retail Sales of Electricity (Megawatthours) by State by Sector by Provider, 1990

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14Table 4.April 25, 20137a.06Retail Sales of

  7. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity (Thousand Dollars) by State by Provider

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14Table 4.April 25, 20137a.06Retail Sales ofRevenue

  8. Why do we need electricity retailers?; or, can you get it cheaper wholesale?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The opportunities for retail electricity competition to provide new value-added services to retail electricity consumers are discussed. The physical attributes of electricity supply make many of the traditional "convenience ...

  9. CSEM WP 130 Retail Electricity Competition*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    aspects of retail electricity competition. We first explore the implications of load profiling optimal given load-profiling and retail competition. Fi- nally, we consider the effects of physical consumers are homogeneous up to a scaling factor. In general, the combination of retail competition and load

  10. STAFF FORECAST: AVERAGE RETAIL ELECTRICITY PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION STAFF FORECAST: AVERAGE RETAIL ELECTRICITY PRICES 2005 TO 2018 Mignon Marks Principal Author Mignon Marks Project Manager David Ashuckian Manager ELECTRICITY ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender Acting Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY DIVISION B.B. Blevins Executive Director

  11. August 13, 2001 To Retail Providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.energy.ca.gov/regulations/retail_disclosure.html#retaildisclosure>. Sample power content labels for the "no specific purchase case" (default) and the "50% specific purchase Disclosure Regulations (SB 1305, Power Source Disclosure Program) In March of this year, the Energy Providers for providing customers with a quarterly power content label and additionally, in some cases

  12. April 21, 2006 To all retail providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & waste 0.0% -Geothermal 4.0% -Small hydroelectric 0.7% -Solar 0.0% -Wind 0.0% Coal 38.5% Large calculates Net System Power by taking all of the generation consumed by customers in California, which we have termed "Gross System Power," and then subtracting self-generation and retail providers' specific

  13. April 16, 2007 To all retail providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & waste 0.3% -Geothermal 4.2% -Small hydroelectric 0.3% -Solar 0.0% -Wind 0.3% Coal 28.6% Large System Power by taking all of the generation consumed by customers in California, which we have termed "Gross System Power," and then subtracting self-generation and retail providers' specific claims

  14. April 15, 2005 To all retail providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hydroelectric 1.1% -Solar 0.0% -Wind 0.2% Coal 28.9% Large hydroelectric 20.1% Natural gas 45.0% Nuclear 1 Net System Power by taking all of the generation consumed by customers in California, which we have termed "Gross System Power," and then subtracting self-generation and retail providers' specific claims

  15. February 8, 2002 Dear: Retail Provider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dates: Report/Filing Due Date 2001 Annual Retail Providers Report (to Energy Commission) March 1, 2002 2001 Annual Power Content Label (to Customers)i April 15, 2002 Independent Audit/Verification of 2001 Annual Power Content Label and Annual Report (to Energy Commission) June 1, 2002 As someone involved

  16. Mergers in the GB Electricity Market: effects on Retail Charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mergers in the GB Electricity Market: effects on Retail Charges N° 2006-08 Mai 2006 Evens SALIES OFCE hal-00972962,version1-3Apr2014 #12;Mergers in the GB Electricity Market: effects on Retail Charges-efficiency as variables relating to price and profitability. The retail electricity market is a case in point, as high

  17. Revised 1997 Retail Electricity Price Forecast Principal Author: Ben Arikawa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revised 1997 Retail Electricity Price Forecast March 1998 Principal Author: Ben Arikawa Electricity 1997 FORE08.DOC Page 1 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY ANALYSIS OFFICE REVISED 1997 RETAIL ELECTRICITY PRICE FORECAST Introduction The Electricity Analysis Office of the California Energy Commission

  18. April 24, 2001 To all retail Providers/Wholesalers/Power Pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    April 24, 2001 To all retail Providers/Wholesalers/Power Pools: This letter is to alert you a tradable certificates program for use by generators, pools/wholesalers and retail providers for supporting

  19. Retail competition in the UK electricity sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnick, Hugh

    residential · about 50% of total demand · used to phase in competition for coal industry · useful experience) · Initial concern about vertical integration: · between networks and activities across networks · fear-through, for 2 yrs · with 9% price reduction: end of coal protection cost · So retail competition means benefits

  20. The efficiency of wholesale vs. retail competition in electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohi, D.R.; Palmer, K. [Resources for the Future, Washington, DC (United States)] [Resources for the Future, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If markets are sufficiently competitive, the retail model of restructuring is likely to produce a greater array of products and services and lower electricity prices, but the wholesale model may yield lower transaction costs and better encourage transmission investment. Which model is best? The answer is not known yet. A central issue in the debate over restructuring the electric power industry is the extent to which the market should be opened to competition. One aspect of this debate is whether competition ought to be restricted to the wholesale power market or extended all the way to retail customers. Some state regulators have recommended retail competition, while others, including the U.S. Department of Energy, prefer to limit competition to the wholesale level, at least until experience warrants taking the additional step. The purpose of this paper is to describe some of the potential differences in economic efficiency that could arise between the wholesale and retail competition models. The comparison is limited to the qualitative properties of two hypothetical market structures that are intended to reflect the essential differences between wholesale and retail competition. The authors are not concerned with problems of getting from today`s market structure to either end state.

  1. Privacy Preserving Smart Metering System Based Retail Level Electricity Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franchetti, Franz

    1 Privacy Preserving Smart Metering System Based Retail Level Electricity Market Cory Thoma, Tao Cui, Student Member, IEEE, Franz Franchetti, Member, IEEE Abstract--Smart metering systems multi-party compu- tation (SMC) based privacy preserving smart metering system. Using the proposed SMC

  2. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other

  3. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"OtherKansas"

  4. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other

  5. Evaluating Government's Policies on Promoting Smart Metering Diffusion in Retail Electricity Markets via

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Evaluating Government's Policies on Promoting Smart Metering Diffusion in Retail Electricity on promoting smart metering in the U.K. retail electricity market. We break down the policy into four possible recommendations for the energy mar- ket is the adoption of smart metering technology, which, in addition

  6. Wholesale Electricity PriceWholesale Electricity Price and Retail Requirements,and Retail Requirements,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Requirements, and Natural Gas Priceand Natural Gas Price ForecastsForecasts Michael Schilmoeller Power Natural gas price #12;Page 2 3 Current Electricity Price ForecastCurrent Electricity Price Forecast recent electricity requirements forecast Most recent (11/28/2008) natural gas price forecast

  7. Impact on retail prices of non-neutral wholesale prices for content providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Impact on retail prices of non-neutral wholesale prices for content providers Giuseppe D Atlantique Rennes, France Email: bruno.tuffin@irisa.fr Abstract--The impact of wholesale prices is examined equal wholesale prices to the two content providers), the benefits coming from wholesale price

  8. THE ELECTRICITY RETAIL MARKET: REQUERIMENTS FOR AN E-BUSINESS SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteiro, Edmundo

    THE ELECTRICITY RETAIL MARKET: REQUERIMENTS FOR AN E-BUSINESS SYSTEM Victor Santos ISCAC to Client . Abstract: In the last decade the electric energy market as changed is structure in several countries, mainly in the most developed, ones where the regulated activity of electrical companies where

  9. Analysis of Competitive Electricity Markets under a New Model of Real-Time Retail Pricing with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Sangeeta

    Analysis of Competitive Electricity Markets under a New Model of Real-Time Retail Pricing with Ex for Information and Decision Systems, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA {mardavij, mdrine loop system. Under this pricing mechanism, electricity is priced at the exant´e price (calculated based

  10. Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim Richard

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005a. Time- varying retail electricity prices: Theory andpractice. Electricity Deregulation: Choices and Challenges.efficiency of real-time electricity pricing. Energy Journal

  11. A Nested Game-Based Optimization Framework for Electricity Retailers in the Smart Grid with Residential Users and PEVs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    A Nested Game-Based Optimization Framework for Electricity Retailers in the Smart Grid California Los Angeles, CA USA {yli760, yanzhiwa, shahin, pedram}@usc.edu Abstract--In the smart grid, real their electricity consumption, thereby improving the reliability of the grid. Retailers are incorporated

  12. Relative efficiency benefits of wholesale and retail competition in electricity: An analysis and a research agenda

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohi, D.R.; Palmer, K.L. [Resources for the Future, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)] [Resources for the Future, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A central issue in the debate over restructuring the electric power industry is the extent to which the market should be open to competition. One aspect of this debate is whether competition ought to be restricted to the whole sale power market or be extended to final retail consumers. This report begins to explore the potential differences in economic efficiency between wholesale and retail competition in the electric power industry. The two market-structure scenarios are defined and the factors responsible for differences in efficiency are described. The report also contains an assessment of the relative importance of the factors and recommendations for pursuing further research.

  13. E-BUSINESS FOR THE ELECTRICITY RETAIL MARKET A Business to Client perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteiro, Edmundo

    , real time price. Abstract: In the new deregulated market of the electricity industry the communication tool to reflect the changes made by one of the intervenients in the whole value chain. When prices prices that could take retail companies to bankruptcy, to huge blackouts that happened in Europe

  14. 2001Notes2Providers.doc -1-Notes to Retail Providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Administration (EIA) or if in the case that an identification number does not exist, an identification number that this information be provided electronically in a tabular spreadsheet or database format that allows separate fields

  15. The role of vibrant retail electricity markets in assuring that wholesale power markets operate effectively

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulding, A.J.; Rufin, C.; Swinand, G.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Barriers to competitive supplier entry such as California's wholesale-price pass-through model can provide an almost insurmountable barrier to effective retail competition. The telecommunications, airline, and software industries provide lessons--positive and negative--on how creating competitive wholesale markets is insufficient to bring the benefits of competition to smaller consumers.

  16. Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Sun, Y.; Bush, B.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both hydrogen and plug-in electric vehicles offer significant social benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We compare retail infrastructure costs on a common basis - cost per mile, assuming fueling service to 10% of all light-duty vehicles in a typical 1.5 million person city in 2025. Our analysis considers three HRS sizes, four distinct types of EVSE and two distinct EVSE scenarios. EVSE station costs, including equipment and installation, are assumed to be 15% less than today's costs. We find that levelized retail capital costs per mile are essentially indistinguishable given the uncertainty and variability around input assumptions. Total fuel costs per mile for battery electric vehicle (BEV) and plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) are, respectively, 21% lower and 13% lower than that for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) under the home-dominant scenario. Including fuel economies and vehicle costs makes FCEVs and BEVs comparable in terms of costs per mile, and PHEVs are about 10% less than FCEVs and BEVs. To account for geographic variability in energy prices and hydrogen delivery costs, we use the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model and confirm the aforementioned estimate of cost per mile, nationally averaged, but see a 15% variability in regional costs of FCEVs and a 5% variability in regional costs for BEVs.

  17. An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the retail cost and break-even gasoline price, becauseof the retail cost and the break-even gasoline price, foreven gasoline prices at least double, and initial retail

  18. Impact of residential PV adoption on Retail Electricity Rates Desmond W.H. Cai a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    companies to recover its fixed costs. However, higher electricity rates give households more incentives companies could lose a significant fraction of high consumption customers. a r t i c l e i n f o Article) solar cells has fallen below the retail price of grid electricity in some areas. A number of residential

  19. RECONCILIATION OF RETAILER CLAIMS, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electricity generators who report meter data to a system operator to also report generation, fuel type requires retail providers of electricity to disclose fuel source information to consumers about, and fuel type consumed (as a percentage of generation) data to the system operator on a quarterly basis

  20. RECONCILIATION OF RETAILER CLAIMS, COMMISSIONREPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ." All retail providers of electricity must disclose fuel source information to consumers about's default product. #12;- 2 - The law also requires all electricity generators who report meter data to a system operator to also report generation (in kWh), generator technology, and fuel type consumed (as

  1. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS FOR ELECTRIC ENERGY REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS FOR ELECTRIC ENERGY The...

  2. Texas - PUC Substantive Rule 25.5 - Electric Service Providers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Texas - PUC Substantive Rule 25.5 - Electric Service Providers-General ProvisionsLegal Abstract This section provides...

  3. Reconciliation of Retailer Claims, 2005 CommissionReport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    used to provide electric services." All retail providers of electricity must disclose fuel source's default product. The law also requires all electricity generators who report meter data to a system operator to also report generation (in kilowatt-hours), generator technology, and fuel type consumed (as

  4. Evaluating Government's Policies on Promoting Smart Metering in Retail Electricity Markets via Agent Based Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tao; Nuttall, William J

    to the potential energy savings, final customers for electricity, natural gas…are provided with competitively priced individual meters that accurately reflect the final customer’s actual energy consumption and that provide information on actual time of use” [13... in the UK energy market. Lessons from international experience (e.g. Italy, Sweden and California) suggest that introducing smart metering in the context of monopoly provision can be a very successful strategy. However, the characteristics of competition...

  5. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commission (FERC) 2008a. “Wholesale Competition in RegionsDemand Response into Wholesale Electricity Markets,” (URL:1 2. Wholesale and Retails Electricity Markets in

  6. A restructuring agenda for developing competitive retail electric markets that is based on a low-cost, real-time, smart-kilowatt-hour meter adapter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chasek, N.E.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes six agenda items that should expedite a politically smooth transition into a most efficient economically viable market-driven public power system. The agenda would introduce: the virtual marketplace for retail electric power, smart meters, smart meter readers, near-real-time load balancing and load apportionment, advanced supply and demand or commodity-style pricing, and reliability metering.

  7. Monitoring and Characterization of Miscellaneous Electrical Loads in a Large Retail Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentile-Polese, L.; Frank, S.; Sheppy, M.; Lobato, C.; Rader, E.; Smith, J.; Long, N.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buildings account for 40% of primary energy consumption in the United States (residential 22%; commercial 18%). Most (70% residential and 79% commercial) is used as electricity. Thus, almost 30% of U.S. primary energy is used to provide electricity to buildings. Plug loads play an increasingly critical role in reducing energy use in new buildings (because of their increased efficiency requirements), and in existing buildings (as a significant energy savings opportunity). If all installed commercial building miscellaneous electrical loads (CMELs) were replaced with energy-efficient equipment, a potential annual energy saving of 175 TWh, or 35% of the 504 TWh annual energy use devoted to MELs, could be achieved. This energy saving is equivalent to the annual energy production of 14 average-sized nuclear power plants. To meet DOE's long-term goals of reducing commercial building energy use and carbon emissions, the energy efficiency community must better understand the components and drivers of CMEL energy use, and develop effective reduction strategies. These goals can be facilitated through improved data collection and monitoring methodologies, and evaluation of CMELs energy-saving techniques.

  8. Texas - PUC Substantive Rule 25.198 - Electric Service Providers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Electric Reliability Council of TexasLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2001 Legal Citation PUC Substantive Rule 25.198 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability:...

  9. Electrical Deregulation - Planning for Success in Texas Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, J. D.; Schreppler, S.; Bristow, G.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning January 1, 2002, Texas' electric industry is opening to customer choice, giving consumers the power to choose the company that provides their electricity. Under electrical deregulation in Texas, there are three separate players. The Retail...

  10. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    End Use: December 2014 Retail ratesprices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are...

  11. Customer Risk from Real-Time Retail Electricity Pricing: Bill Volatility and Hedgability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Options in a Competitive Wholesale Electricity Market,”cases to cover the full wholesale cost of the power. Fromusing three di?erent wholesale price scenarios. The ?rst is

  12. Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Green Mountain Power Corp","Investor-Owned",2477751,835602,896610,745539,0 2,"Central...

  13. Supply chain networks, consisting of manufacturers, distributors, retailers, and consumers, provide the critical infrastructure for the production of goods,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    developed in Part I to energy supply chains in the form of electric power generation and distri- bution not only in terms of the product flows but also in terms of pricing in order to satisfy the consumers competition as well as cooperation and yield the resulting product and ma- terial flows and prices

  14. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period:Dakota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All

  15. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period:Dakota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","AllTennessee"

  16. Retail Electricity Competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

    2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ?P [ max s E [S (s, ?) ? p ? D (s, ?) | ? ? P ] ] ? C(P) } . (7) This utility is maximized when the consumer is confronted with the wholesale prices: p? ? = p ? . Proposition 4 With real-time meters and imperfectly reactive, but rational consumers: (i... purchase cost corresponds to: 1 entire consumption profile (RT meter) yes customer’s RT profile 2 entire consumption profile (RT meter) no / partial customer’s RT profile 3 aggregate consumption only (traditional meter) no customer’s RT profile 4 aggregate...

  17. ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING The department provides a solid education in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    Communications, 7) Sustainable Energy Systems: Smart Electric Power Grids DIVERSE CAREER OPTIONS GraduatesELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING CURRICULUM The department provides a solid education are recruited in a variety of fields including telecommunications, energy and electrical power, semiconductors

  18. The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renew- ables”, The Electricity Journal, Volume 14 (2001),from Real-Time Retail Electricity Pricing: Bill VolatilityReal- Time Retail Electricity Pricing,” Energy Journal,28(

  19. DOE Provides up to $51.8 Million to Modernize the U.S. Electric...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Provides up to 51.8 Million to Modernize the U.S. Electric Grid System. June 27, 2007 DOE Provides up to 51.8 Million to Modernize the U.S. Electric Grid System. June 27, 2007...

  20. BATTERY-POWERED, ELECTRIC-DRIVE VEHICLES PROVIDING BUFFER STORAGE FOR PV CAPACITY VALUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    BATTERY-POWERED, ELECTRIC-DRIVE VEHICLES PROVIDING BUFFER STORAGE FOR PV CAPACITY VALUE Steven, however, the use of batteries from parked electric- drive vehicles (EDV) to provide buffer storage for PV requirements that will result in a number of new battery-powered electric drive vehicles being sold beginning

  1. Inventory planning for low demand items in online retailing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chhaochhria, Pallav

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large online retailer strategically stocks inventory for SKUs with low demand. The motivations are to provide a wide range of selections and faster customer fulfillment service. We assume the online retailer has the ...

  2. A Model of Vertical Restriction and Equilibrium in Retailing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bittlingmayer, George

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This model of distribution provides a rationale for restrictions placed on retailers by manufacturers. The manufacturer's customers are located uniformly along a road, and retailing operations are subject to increasing ...

  3. Providing Vehicle OEMs Flexible Scale to Accelerate Adoption of Electric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+ ReportEnergyProviding Grid Flexibility in Wyoming

  4. Retail Buildings: Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Retail Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in retail spaces are poorly understood.

  5. Abstract--Load serving entities (LSE) and holders of default service obligations, in restructured electricity markets, provide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    , in restructured electricity markets, provide electricity service at regulated or contracted fixed prices while standard forward contracts and commodity derivatives. Keywords: Electricity Markets, Risk Management, Volumetric hedging, I. INTRODUCTION The introduction of competitive wholesale markets in the electricity

  6. Illinois Municipal Electric Agency- Electric Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Illinois Municipal Electric Agency (IMEA) offers rebates to member municipal utilities* (those who purchase wholesale electric service from IMEA) and retail customers for energy efficiency...

  7. The Impact of Carbon Pricing on Wholesale Electricity Prices, Carbon Pass-Through Rates and Retail Electricity Tariffs in Australia.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 The Impact of Carbon Pricing on Wholesale Electricity Prices, Carbon Pass-Through Rates that the introduction of a carbon price signal will have on wholesale electricity prices, carbon-pass-through rates is used to determine optimal dispatch of generation plant and wholesale prices within the ANEM model. We

  8. The difficult transition to competitive electricity markets in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a comprehensive discussion of the causes and consequences of state and federal initiatives to introduce wholesale and retail competition into the U.S. electricity sector between 1995 and the present. ...

  9. Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for understanding the role electricity storage resources (storage) can play in wholesale and retail electricity markets, 2) assessing the value of electricity storage in a...

  10. Variable Renewable Generation can Provide Balancing Control to the Electric Power System (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As wind and solar plants become more common in the electric power system, they may be called on to provide grid support services to help maintain system reliability. For example, through the use of inertial response, primary frequency response, and automatic generation control (also called secondary frequency response), wind power can provide assistance in balancing the generation and load on the system. These active power (i.e., real power) control services have the potential to assist the electric power system in times of disturbances and during normal conditions while also potentially providing economic value to consumers and variable renewable generation owners. This one-page, two-sided fact sheet discusses the grid-friendly support and benefits renewables can provide to the electric power system.

  11. Setting a retail generation credit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, J.M.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the additional cost components will vary depending on the way that the wholesale energy component is calculated, at minimum a generation credit should recognize the following costs: Additional value of shaping or load-following; Premia associated with the risks of serving retail load; Transmission costs incurred by competitive suppliers; Commercial costs; and Reasonable profits. In this article the author reviews the construction of a generation credit, starting with three different ways to compute the wholesale cost of electric energy--as a forecast, as a forward price, or from the spot market--and then moving to consideration of additional cost items. Throughout the authors attempts to estimate the costs an efficient competitor will incur in order to illustrate the difference between a retail generation credit and a wholesale price index.

  12. Century Electric Distribution System Operations Lorenzo Kristov,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    May 2014 1 21st Century Electric Distribution System Operations Lorenzo Kristov,1 California Independent System Operator Paul De Martini, Caltech Resnick Institute Introduction The electric industry has to provide similar functions for their area of responsibility. Many states also opened retail electricity

  13. Electric power annual 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and state levels: generating capability and additions, net generation, fossil-fuel statistics, retail sales and revenue, finanical statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, demand side management, nonutility power producers. Purpose is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets.

  14. Electric equipment providing space conditioning, water heating, and refrigeration consumes 12.5% of the nation's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Electric equipment providing space conditioning, water heating, and refrigeration consumes 12 are the heart of air conditioners, heat pumps, chillers, supermarket refrigeration systems, and more. Global use-acceptable refrigerants. Whether involving design of specific new products or refriger- ants to which the entire industry

  15. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RETAIL PRICES CONTENTS Page Tuna, Canned White Meat Tuna. (Albacore), Solid Pack, In Oil All BrandsCANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU PRICES APRIL 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch of Market Development FISHERY

  16. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRICES CONTENTS Page Tuna, Canned White Meat Tuna (Albacore), Solid Pack, In Oil All Brands ExceptCANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JUNE ll959 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDUFE, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JUNE 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch

  17. Policy Issues for Retail Beamed Power Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    solar electric power using retail delivery of beamed power. Recent advances in power beaming have made to enable widespread adoption of this clean and sustainable contribution to meeting energy needs. It is seen to micro-renewable energy resource exploitation since wired power transmission is only cost effective over

  18. The modern day discount house as a separate retail establishment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broussard, Carroll James

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the economic bases for the . uccess of discount houses relative to other retail operations; 3, to determine the effect, if any, of dis- count house retailing on the historic channels of distribution; 4. to determine and predict the future of discount..., wholesale and retail, provided ad- ded incentives to move more goods, but still there were surpluses, It was now relatively easy for additional stores, such as discount houses, to obtain merchandise which they could sell at low prices because of their un...

  19. Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim Richard

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    USA. CEC, 2012. Electricity Consumption by Planning Area [of customer gross electricity consumption, for three levelsresponse reduces electricity consumption, sometimes through

  20. Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim Richard

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    not imply that the average cost of electricity purchased islower. The average cost of electricity purchased is in factto the reduced average cost of electricity purchased on the

  1. Device to facilitate moving an electrical cable of an electric vehicle charging station and method of providing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karner, Donald B

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Some embodiments include a device to facilitate moving an electrical cable of an electric vehicle charging station. Other embodiments of related systems and methods are also disclosed.

  2. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - electricity section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on electricity generation, capacity, end-use, fuel use and stocks, and retail price.

  3. Method for providing slip energy control in permanent magnet electrical machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S.

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric machine (40) has a stator (43), a permanent magnet rotor (38) with permanent magnets (39) and a magnetic coupling uncluttered rotor (46) for inducing a slip energy current in secondary coils (47). A dc flux can be produced in the uncluttered rotor when the secondary coils are fed with dc currents. The magnetic coupling uncluttered rotor (46) has magnetic brushes (A, B, C, D) which couple flux in through the rotor (46) to the secondary coils (47c, 47d) without inducing a current in the rotor (46) and without coupling a stator rotational energy component to the secondary coils (47c, 47d). The machine can be operated as a motor or a generator in multi-phase or single-phase embodiments and is applicable to the hybrid electric vehicle. A method of providing a slip energy controller is also disclosed.

  4. Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems: Sensitivities to Changes in Future Electricity Market Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency of real-time electricity pricing. Energy JournalTime-varying retail electricity prices: Theory and practice.Electricity Deregulation: Choices and Challenges.

  5. Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim Richard

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    case of wind electricity in Spain. Energy Policy 36, 3345–case of wind electricity in Spain. Energy Policy 36, 3345–wind penetrations will affect investment incentives in the GB electricity sector. Energy Policy

  6. Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim Richard

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley, CA, USA. CEC, 2012. Electricity Consumption byUSA. E3, 2010c. Greenhouse Gas Modeling of California’s Electricity

  7. April 15, 2004 To all retail providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .4% -Biomass & waste 2.0% -Geothermal 5.0% -Small hydroelectric 1.9% -Solar 0.3% -Wind 1.2% Coal 21.3% Large Eligible Renewable 8.1% -Biomass & waste 2.0% -Geothermal 3.3% -Small hydroelectric 2.3% -Solar 0.0% -Wind Commission calculates Net System Power by taking all of the generation consumed by customers in California

  8. May 13, 2003 To all retail providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .7% -Small hydroelectric 1.9% -Solar 0.0% -Wind 0.5% Coal 15.4% Large hydroelectric 22.5% Natural gas 42.9% -Biomass & waste 2.6% -Geothermal 5.1% -Small hydroelectric 1.6% -Solar 0.3% -Wind 1.3% Coal 20.0% Large Net System Power by taking all of the generation consumed by customers in California, which we have

  9. April 9, 2002 To all retail providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable 12% 12% -Biomass & waste 3% 3% -Geothermal 5% 5% -Small hydroelectric 3% 3% -Solar (projected) (for comparison) Eligible Renewable 56% 12% -Biomass & waste - 3% -Geothermal - 5% -Small shown below: (Corrected Small Hydro Percentage) Fuel Type 2001 Net System Power Eligible Renewable 12

  10. Electric power monthly, March 1998 with data for December 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 63 tabs.

  11. Strong permanent magnets provide a backbone technology required many products, including computers, electric cars, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    , electric cars, and wind-powered generators. Currently, the strongest permanent magnets contain rare earth

  12. System for measuring electricity and method of providing and using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamer, Doanld B; Page, Robert

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Some embodiments include a system for measuring electricity. Other embodiments of related systems and methods are also disclosed.

  13. Essays in Competition and Investment in Electricity Market 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Xin

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Many jurisdiction has opened retail electricity markets to competition. In Texas, retailers offer hundreds of electricity plans with different prices. The first paper uses search cost and product differentiation to explain the price dispersion using...

  14. Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim Richard

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Public Economies of Renewable Electricity Generation.wind power development. Renewable Energy 33, 1854–1867.SR-581-42303). National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL),

  15. Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim Richard

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photovoltaics (PV) in traditional electric power systems.Photovoltaics: Research and Applications 16, 629– CAISO (California Independent Systemphotovoltaics (PV), allowing customers with PV systems to

  16. Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim Richard

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distributed generation from elimination of electric utilitydistributed generation sites in urban areas and eight utility-57 . The utility-scale and distributed solar generation were

  17. Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim Richard

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by biomass, 1.5% by small hydro, and 0.3% by PV. The pricebiomass, geothermal, and small hydro electricity generation

  18. Electric power monthly, February 1999 with data for November 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Statistics are provided for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt-hour of electricity sold.

  19. High thermal power density heat transfer apparatus providing electrical isolation at high temperature using heat pipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, J. F.

    1985-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is directed to transferring heat from an extremely high temperature source to an electrically isolated lower temperature receiver. The invention is particularly concerned with supplying thermal power to a thermionic converter from a nuclear reactor with electric isolation. Heat from a high temperature heat pipe is transferred through a vacuum or a gap filled with electrically nonconducting gas to a cooler heat pipe. The heat pipe is used to cool the nuclear reactor while the heat pipe is connected thermally and electrically to a thermionic converter. If the receiver requires greater thermal power density, geometries are used with larger heat pipe areas for transmitting and receiving energy than the area for conducting the heat to the thermionic converter. In this way the heat pipe capability for increasing thermal power densities compensates for the comparatively low thermal power densities through the electrically nonconducting gap between the two heat pipes.

  20. Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric)- Commercial Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Central Hudson Gas and Electric's (Central Hudson) Commercial Lighting Rebate Program is for businesses, retailers, institutional customers and non-profit customers of Central Hudson. The progam...

  1. Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim Richard

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants. U.S. Energyelectricity prices may rise above the marginal variable cost of generation during some hours of the years (“scarcity pricing”), allowing peaker plants

  2. Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Retail Buildings (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in retail spaces are poorly understood.

  3. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1 -- with a focus on US electric utilities -- contains final 1997 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1997 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on a monthly sample: Form EIA-826, ``Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions``). Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA.

  4. Slow oscillations of KATP conductance in mouse pancreatic islets provide support for electrical bursting driven by metabolic oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertram, Richard

    of the ramp current-voltage curves, oscillated and was larger during the silent phase than during the activeSlow oscillations of KATP conductance in mouse pancreatic islets provide support for electrical bursting driven by metabolic oscillations Jianhua Ren,1 Arthur Sherman,2 Richard Bertram,3 Paulette B

  5. Texas Retail Energy, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheasternInformation TengchongTex-La ElectricTexas Retail

  6. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Beeson, Tracy A.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CALiPER program first began investigating LED lamps sold at retail stores in 2010, purchasing 33 products from eight retailers and covering six product categories. The findings revealed a fragmented marketplace, with large disparities in performance of different products, accuracy of manufacturer claims, and offerings from different retail outlets. Although there were some good products, looking back many would not be considered viable competitors to other available options, with too little lumen output, not high enough efficacy, or poor color quality. CALiPER took another look in late 2011purchasing 38 products of five different types from nine retailers and the improvement was marked. Performance was up; retailer claims were more accurate; and the price per lumen and price per unit efficacy were down, although the price per product had not changed much. Nonetheless, there was still plenty of room for improvement, with the performance of LED lamps not yet reaching that of well-established classes of conventional lamps (e.g., 75 W incandescent A19 lamps). Since the second retail lamp study was published in early 2012, there has been substantial progress in all aspects of LED lamps available from retailers. To document this progress, CALiPER again purchased a sample of lamps from retail stores 46 products in total, focusing on A19, PAR30, and MR16 lamps but instead of a random sample, sought to select products to answer specific hypotheses about performance. These hypotheses focused on expanding ranges of LED equivalency, the accuracy of lifetime claims, efficacy and price trends, as well as changes to product designs. Among other results, key findings include: There are now very good LED options to compete with 60 W, 75 W, and 100 W incandescent A19 lamps, and 75 W halogen PAR30 lamps. MR16 lamps have shown less progress, but there are now acceptable alternatives to 35 W, 12 V halogen MR16 lamps and 50 W, 120 V halogen MR16 lamps for some applications. Other uses, such as in enclosed luminaires, may require more development. At the same price point, lamps purchased in 2013 tended to have higher output and slightly higher efficacy than in 2011 or 2010. Over 30% of the products purchased in 2013 exceeded the maximum efficacy measured in 2011 (71 lm/W), with the most efficacious product measured at 105 lm/W. There appears to be increasing consistency in color quality, with a vast majority of products having a CCT of 2700 K or 3000 K and a CRI between 80 and 85. There were also fewer poor performing products tested and more high-performing products available in 2013 than in previous years. The accuracy of equivalency and performance claims was better than in 2011, but remains a concern, with 43% of tested products failing to completely meet their equivalency claim and 20% of products failing to match the manufacturer’s performance data. Although progress has been substantial, on average LED lamps remain more expensive than other energy efficiency lighting technologies -- although some aspects can be superior. Although not universal to all product lines or all product types, the issue of insufficient lumen output from LED lamps is waning. Thus, manufacturers can focus on other issues, such as reducing cost, improving electrical/dimmer compatibility, eliminating flicker, or improving color quality. While these issues are not inherent to all products, they remain a concern for the broader market.

  7. Edgeworth Price Cycles: Evidence from the Toronto Retail Gasoline Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noel, Michael

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Johnson. “Gas Wars: Retail Gasoline Price Fluctua- tions”,Canadian cities, retail gasoline prices are very volatileset of twelve-hourly retail gasoline prices for 22 service

  8. Retail Policies and Competition in the Gasoline Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin; Bushnell, Jim

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wholesale gasoline prices and retail prices. It includes theTable 4 - Gasoline Price Components Year Retail Price TaxesSupply Lower Retail Gasoline Prices? ” Contemporary Economic

  9. How to Use this Information This guide provides an overview of strategic electric-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy plan; but, in some cases, the city or a city agency will lead the process. A time commitment and meeting space are typically provided in kind by invested stakeholders. Several federal agencies offer Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (http://www.eere.energy.gov/) U.S. Department of Housing and Urban

  10. Shai Agassi's story of his evolving personal interest in energy issues, and the evolv-ing business plan of his electric vehicle company, Better Place, provides an impor-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    plan of his electric vehicle company, Better Place, provides an impor- tant lens on the pace short-lived efforts at developing electric vehicles. All this can be seen, in retrospect, as a clarion electric vehicles--is notable and challenging at the same time. The benefit of pure EV technology

  11. Electric power annual 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

  12. Electric Power annual 1996: Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a summary of electric power industry statistics. Data are included on electric utility retail sales of electricity, revenues, environmental information, power transactions, emissions, and demand-side management.

  13. Multilevel-Dc-Bus Inverter For Providing Sinusoidal And Pwm Electrical Machine Voltages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Su, Gui-Jia [Knoxville, TN

    2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A circuit for controlling an ac machine comprises a full bridge network of commutation switches which are connected to supply current for a corresponding voltage phase to the stator windings, a plurality of diodes, each in parallel connection to a respective one of the commutation switches, a plurality of dc source connections providing a multi-level dc bus for the full bridge network of commutation switches to produce sinusoidal voltages or PWM signals, and a controller connected for control of said dc source connections and said full bridge network of commutation switches to output substantially sinusoidal voltages to the stator windings. With the invention, the number of semiconductor switches is reduced to m+3 for a multi-level dc bus having m levels. A method of machine control is also disclosed.

  14. Contractual form, retail price and asset characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepard, Andrea

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictions derived from a principal-agent analysis of the manufacturer-retailer relationship are derived and tested using microdata on contractual form, outlet characteristics and retail prices for gasoline stations in ...

  15. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Retail Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Weimin; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

    2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Retail Buildings is a component of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

  16. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipal shale gas:14 EarlyNatural

  17. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipal shale gas:14

  18. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012,Montana"Utah" "Sector",

  19. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012,Montana"Utah" "Sector",Arizona" ,"Full

  20. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012,Montana"Utah" "Sector",Arizona"

  1. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012,Montana"Utah"

  2. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012,Montana"Utah"Connecticut" ,"Full service

  3. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012,Montana"Utah"Connecticut" ,"Full

  4. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012,Montana"Utah"Connecticut" ,"FullDistrict of

  5. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012,Montana"Utah"Connecticut" ,"FullDistrict

  6. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012,Montana"Utah"Connecticut"

  7. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012,Montana"Utah"Connecticut"Hawaii" ,"Full

  8. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012,Montana"Utah"Connecticut"Hawaii"

  9. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013, 2012,Montana"Utah"Connecticut"Hawaii"Illinois"

  10. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,

  11. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"Full service

  12. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"Full serviceLouisiana" ,"Full service

  13. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"Full serviceLouisiana" ,"Full

  14. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"Full serviceLouisiana" ,"FullMaryland"

  15. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"Full serviceLouisiana"

  16. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"Full serviceLouisiana"Michigan" ,"Full

  17. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"Full serviceLouisiana"Michigan"

  18. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"Full

  19. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"FullMissouri" ,"Full service

  20. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"FullMissouri" ,"Full serviceMontana"

  1. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"FullMissouri" ,"Full

  2. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"FullMissouri" ,"FullNevada" ,"Full

  3. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"FullMissouri" ,"FullNevada"

  4. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"FullMissouri" ,"FullNevada"Jersey"

  5. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"FullMissouri"

  6. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"FullMissouri"York" ,"Full service

  7. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"FullMissouri"York" ,"Full

  8. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"FullMissouri"York" ,"FullNorth

  9. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"FullMissouri"York" ,"FullNorthOhio"

  10. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"FullMissouri"York"

  11. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"FullMissouri"York"Oregon" ,"Full

  12. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"FullMissouri"York"Oregon"

  13. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa" ,"FullMissouri"York"Oregon"Rhode

  14. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"

  15. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota" ,"Full service

  16. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota" ,"Full serviceTexas" ,"Full service

  17. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota" ,"Full serviceTexas" ,"Full

  18. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota" ,"Full serviceTexas" ,"FullUtah"

  19. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota" ,"Full serviceTexas"

  20. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota" ,"Full serviceTexas"Virginia"

  1. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota" ,"Full

  2. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota" ,"FullWest Virginia" ,"Full service

  3. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota" ,"FullWest Virginia" ,"Full

  4. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota" ,"FullWest Virginia"

  5. Electricity Use in the Pacific Northwest: Utility Historical Sales by Sector, 1989 and Preceding Years.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report officially releases the compilation of regional 1989 retail customer sector sales data by the Bonneville Power Administration. This report is intended to enable detailed examination of annual regional electricity consumption. It gives statistics covering the time period 1970--1989, and also provides observations based on statistics covering the 1983--1989 time period. The electricity use report is the only information source that provides data obtained from each utility in the region based on the amount of electricity they sell to consumers annually. Data is provided on each retail customer sector: residential, commercial, industrial, direct-service industrial, and irrigation. The data specifically supports forecasting activities, rate development, conservation and market assessments, and conservation and market program development and delivery. All of these activities require a detailed look at electricity use. 25 figs., 34 tabs.

  6. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Annual 1997, Volume 2 contains annual summary statistics at national, regional, and state levels for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; power transactions; and demand-side management. Also included are data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity; gross generation; emissions; and supply and disposition of energy. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. 15 figs., 62 tabs.

  7. Electric power monthly, February 1998 with data for November 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 63 tabs.

  8. Electric sales and revenue: 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1993. Operating revenue includes energy charges, demand charges, consumer service charges, environmental surcharges, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. Because electric rates vary based on energy usage, average revenue per kilowatthour are affected by changes in the volume of sales. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  9. Retail Beamed Power for a Micro Renewable Energy Architecture: Survey Narayanan Komerath, Girish Chowdhary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    komerath@gatech.edu Abstract-- Retail delivery of electric power through millimeter waves is relevant in developing areas where the market for micro devices outpaces the power grid infrastructure. It is also for the electric power grid as well. This poses a window of opportunity for options that are compatible with micro

  10. Bacteria that generate significant amounts of electricity could be used in microbial fuel cells to provide power in remote environments or to convert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Bacteria that generate significant amounts of electricity could be used in microbial fuel cells to provide power in remote environments or to convert waste to electricity. Professor Derek Lovley from at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh. The researchers isolated a strain of Geobacter sulfurreducens which

  11. Electric power monthly, May 1998, with data for February 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974. The EPM provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 30 refs., 58 tabs.

  12. Electric power monthly, August 1998, with data for May 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 9 refs., 57 tabs.

  13. Electric power monthly, March 1999 with data for December 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be sued in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 63 tabs.

  14. Electric power monthly, December 1997 with data for September 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 63 tabs.

  15. Residential property values and neighborhood retail : a comparison of pedestrian and automobile oriented retail clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiffany, Thacher

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study tests the hypothesis that home buyers pay a premium to live within walking distance of pedestrian accessible retail. To answer this question two types of retail clusters are identified in the Boston metropolitan ...

  16. Vertical relationships between manufacturers and retailers: inference with limited data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villas-Boas, Sofia B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    square-foot-price IL Retail rental IL Gasoline IL Gasolinesquare-foot-price IL Retail rental IL Gasoline IL Gasolineprices and retail wages also look reasonable for some states; in general, increases in gasoline

  17. Vertical relationships between manufacturers and retailers: inference with limited data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villas-Boas, Sofia B.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    square-foot-price IL Retail rental IL Gasoline IL Gasolinesquare-foot-price IL Retail rental IL Gasoline IL Gasolineprices and retail wages also look reasonable for some states; in general, increases in gasoline

  18. An assessment of the value of retail ready packaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Kathleen Anne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of retail-ready packaging reduces the costs of replenishing store shelves by eliminating the labor of removing packaging materials and stocking individual items on shelves. While reducing costs for retailers, retail-ready ...

  19. Electric Power Monthly with data for July 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the state, census division, and U.S. levels for net generation; fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity, and quality of fossil fuels; cost of fossil fuels; electricity retail sales; associated revenue; and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council regions. Statistics on net generation are published by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The monthly update is summarized, and industry developments are briefly described. 57 tabs.

  20. Electric power monthly with data for June 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the state, census division, and U.S. levels for net generation; fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity, and quality of fossil fuels; cost of fossil fuels; electricity retail sales; associated revenue; and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity, and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council regions. Statistics on net generation by energy source and capability of new generating units by company and plant are also included. A section is included in the report which summarizes major industry developments. 1 fig., 64 tabs.

  1. Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, P.; Logan, J.; Bird, L.; Short, W.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyzes potential impacts of proposed national renewable electricity standard (RES) legislation. An RES is a mandate requiring certain electricity retailers to provide a minimum share of their electricity sales from qualifying renewable power generation. The analysis focuses on draft bills introduced individually by Senator Jeff Bingaman and Representative Edward Markey, and jointly by Representative Henry Waxman and Markey. The analysis uses NREL's Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to evaluate the impacts of the proposed RES requirements on the U.S. energy sector in four scenarios.

  2. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

  3. Rethinking Real Time Electricity Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allcott, Hunt

    Most US consumers are charged a near-constant retail price for electricity, despite substantial hourly variation in the wholesale market price. This paper evaluates the .rst program to expose residential consumers to hourly ...

  4. Reliability and competitive electricity markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite all of the talk about ?deregulation? of the electricity sector, a large number of non-market mechanisms have been imposed on emerging competitive wholesale and retail markets. These mechanisms include spot market ...

  5. Electric sales and revenue 1992, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1992. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the applicable revenue from kilowatthours sold; revenue from income; unemployment and other State and local taxes; energy, demand, and consumer service charges; environmental surcharges; franchise fees; fuel adjustments; and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  6. Electric power monthly, December 1996 with data for September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

  7. Electric power annual 1994. Volume 2, Operational and financial data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This year, the annual is published in two volumes. Volume I focused on US electric utilities and contained final 1994 data on net generation, fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost. This Volume II presents annual 1994 summary statistics for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are preliminary data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on form EIA-861) and for electric utility financial statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, and demand- side management. Final 1994 data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity and gross generation, as well as supply and disposition information, are also provided in Volume II. Technical notes and a glossary are included.

  8. Integrated Retail & Wholesale Power System Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Integrated Retail & Wholesale Power System Operation with Smart-Grid Functionality PIs: Dionysios Retail/Wholesale Power System Operation with Smart-Grid Functionality Project PIs: Dionysios Aliprantis (open-source release): AMES Wholesale Power Market Testbed (ISU) + GridLAB-D distribution platform (DOE

  9. prescription drug program highlights retail pharmacy prescriptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharer, John E.

    prescription drug program highlights SHIP retail pharmacy prescriptions The informedRx retail interactions and duplicate therapies. Brand name and generic drugs are included in your pharmacy benefit, but you will save the most money by selecting generic drug options when available. On myinformedRx.com you

  10. Retail Sales Allocation Tool (RSAT)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of0OctoberRetail Sales

  11. Rotary electrical contact device and method for providing current to and/or from a rotating member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koplow, Jeffrey P

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Examples of rotary electrical connectors include a first pair and a second pair of opposing sheaves coupled together by intersecting first shaft connecting the first pair of opposing sheaves and a second shaft connecting the second pair of opposing sheaves, and at least partially electrically conductive belt disposed about respective perimeters of the first pair and second pair of opposing sheaves and adapted to remain in contact with at least a portion of the respective perimeters of the sheaves during motion of said sheaves. In example devices, one of the plurality of sheaves may remain stationary during operation of the device while the remaining sheaves rotate and/or orbit around a center axis of the stationary sheave, the device being configured to couple current between a stationary power source and a rotating member through the electrically conductive belt.

  12. Electricity markets in the western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, E.M.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article introduces the use of rigorous econometric tools to understand the geographic scope of the market for generation services. These tools are applied to data from the current wholesale electricity market in the western United States. The behavior of the current wholesale electricity market and the methods used to assess the expanse of the geographic market in the current wholesale electricity market can go a long way toward informing the discussion of pricing behavior and performance in a restructured electricity industry. First, the current wholesale electricity market is already effectively unregulated and suffers from the same technical complexities that face a retail electricity market. Consequently, understanding the supply and demand conditions that cause the extent of the geographic market for generation services to narrow in the current wholesale electricity market can shed light on which times the geographic expanse of the market may narrow in a restructures electricity market. Second, the techniques developed in this paper to assess the extent of the current wholesale electricity market can be applied readily to a restructured electricity market. Finally, because market conditions in the electricity industry are likely to change significantly in the next few years, as the structure of the electricity sector changes dramatically, this analysis of the geographic expanse of the market can provide a useful benchmark against which to compare post-restructuring wholesale price relationships.

  13. Texas Retail Energy, LLC (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheasternInformation TengchongTex-La ElectricTexas Retail Energy,

  14. Making more efficient fuel cells 08.09.2009 -Bacteria that generate significant amounts of electricity could be used in microbial fuel cells to provide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Making more efficient fuel cells 08.09.2009 - Bacteria that generate significant amounts of electricity could be used in microbial fuel cells to provide power in remote environments or to convert waste power in fuel cells than bacteria with a smooth surface. The team's findings were reported

  15. Electric power monthly, July 1999, with data for April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM). This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 1 fig., 64 tabs.

  16. Asymmetric Price Adjustment and Consumer Search: An Examination of the Retail Gasoline Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Matt

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Behavior of Retail Gasoline Prices: Symmetric or Not? ”Adjustment of U.K. Retail Gasoline Prices to Cost Changes. ”documented that retail gasoline prices respond more quickly

  17. Asymmetric Price Adjustment and Consumer Search: An Examination of the Retail Gasoline Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Matt

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adjustment of U.K. Retail Gasoline Prices to Cost Changes. ”The Behavior of Retail Gasoline Prices: Symmetric or Not? ”documented that retail gasoline prices respond more quickly

  18. Edgeworth Price Cycles, Cost-based Pricing and Sticky Pricing in Retail Gasoline Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noel, Michael

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Johnson. “Gas Wars: Retail Gasoline Price Fluctua- tions”,were collected on retail gasoline prices, wholesale (rack)ancillary information. Retail gasoline prices, RET AIL mt ,

  19. Asymmetric Price Adjustment and Consumer Search: An Examination of the Retail Gasoline Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Matt

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    George. (2004) “Retail Gasoline Price Dynamics and Localof Information and Retail Gasoline Price Behavior: Andocumented that retail gasoline prices respond more quickly

  20. Electric power annual 1996. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1--with a focus on US electric utilities--contains final 1996 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1996 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA. Data published in the Electric Power Annual Volume 1 are compiled from three statistical forms filed monthly and two forms filed annually by electric utilities. These forms are described in detail in the Technical Notes. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  1. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer’s underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems.

  2. Killing Two Birds with One Stone: Can Real-Time Pricing SupportRetail Competition and Demand Response?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Hopper,Nicole; Neenan, Bernie

    2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As retail choice states reach the end of their transitional, rate-cap periods, state regulators must decide what type of default supply service to provide to customers that have not switched to a competitive retail supplier. In a growing number of states, regulators have adopted real-time pricing (RTP) as the default service for large commercial and industrial (C&I) customers. Although this trend is driven chiefly by policy objectives related to retail competition, default service RTP may have the added benefit of stimulating demand response. To evaluate the potential role of RTP as a means to both ends--retail market development and demand response--we conducted a comprehensive review of experience with default RTP in the U.S. and examined the emergence of RTP as a product offering by competitive retail suppliers. Across the ten utilities with default RTP in place in 2005, between 5% and 35% of the applicable load remained on the rate. Based on interviews with competitive retailers, we find evidence to suggest that a comparable amount of load in these states has switched to hourly pricing arrangements with competitive retailers. Many customers on default or competitive hourly pricing are paying prices indexed to the real-time spot market, and thus have no advance knowledge of prices. Because the price responsiveness of customers under these conditions has yet to be formally analyzed, and relatively few efforts have been undertaken to help these customers become price responsive, the actual demand response impacts from hourly pricing in retail choice states remains largely an open question. However, we find that policymakers and other stakeholders in retail choice states have various strategies at their disposal to capture the potential demand response benefits from hourly pricing, while simultaneously supporting retail competition.

  3. Segmentation strategies for managing retail supply chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Catherine G. (Catherine Gloria)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-technology manufacturing companies often face rapid price decline and capacity constraints. Especially in the retail side of the business where the supply chain is much longer and revenue is sometimes not recognized ...

  4. Edgeworth price cycles in retail gasoline markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noel, Michael David, 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, I present three essays that are motivated by the interesting and dynamic price-setting behavior of firms in Canadian retail gasoline markets. In the first essay, I examine behavior at the market level ...

  5. The LBNL Water Heater Retail Price Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex; Glover, Julie; Lutz, Jim

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Olson, and Stuart Chaitkin (LBNL). We also want to thank ourand Mithra Moezzi, also of LBNL. This work was supported byLBNL – 44749 The LBNL Water Heater Retail Price Database

  6. The bricks, clicks, economics and mortar of contemporary retail : the consequences that retailer storing strategies and retail performance across markets have on real estate investments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagan, Kevin William

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The retail industry in the 21st century is undergoing a confluence of transformative changes. In this paper we discuss particularly noteworthy changes related to demography, retail economics and the Internet. We note how, ...

  7. Electric power annual 1995. Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes pertinent statistics on various aspects of the U.S. electric power industry for the year and includes a graphic presentation. Data is included on electric utility retail sales and revenues, financial statistics, environmental statistics of electric utilities, demand-side management, electric power transactions, and non-utility power producers.

  8. Electricity sector restructuring and competition : lessons learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We now have over a decade of experience with the privatization, restructuring, regulatory reform, and wholesale and retail competition in electricity sectors around the world. The objectives and design attributes of these ...

  9. Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    increased electric demand and wholesale and retail prices over last February. Coal consumption rose across the U.S. and out competed natural gas on price in the East. A gas...

  10. ELECTRICITY AND NATURAL GAS DATA COLLECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION HISTORICAL ELECTRICITY AND NATURAL GAS DATA COLLECTION Formsand of Power Plants Semi-Annual Report ..................................... 44 CEC-1306D UDC Natural Gas Tolling Agreement Quarterly Report.......................... 46 i #12;Natural Gas Utilities and Retailers

  11. A case study review of technical and technology issues for transition of a utility load management program to provide system reliability resources in restructured electricity markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, G.H.

    2001-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility load management programs--including direct load control and interruptible load programs--were employed by utilities in the past as system reliability resources. With electricity industry restructuring, the context for these programs has changed; the market that was once controlled by vertically integrated utilities has become competitive, raising the question: can existing load management programs be modified so that they can effectively participate in competitive energy markets? In the short run, modified and/or improved operation of load management programs may be the most effective form of demand-side response available to the electricity system today. However, in light of recent technological advances in metering, communication, and load control, utility load management programs must be carefully reviewed in order to determine appropriate investments to support this transition. This report investigates the feasibility of and options for modifying an existing utility load management system so that it might provide reliability services (i.e. ancillary services) in the competitive markets that have resulted from electricity industry restructuring. The report is a case study of Southern California Edison's (SCE) load management programs. SCE was chosen because it operates one of the largest load management programs in the country and it operates them within a competitive wholesale electricity market. The report describes a wide range of existing and soon-to-be-available communication, control, and metering technologies that could be used to facilitate the evolution of SCE's load management programs and systems to provision of reliability services. The fundamental finding of this report is that, with modifications, SCE's load management infrastructure could be transitioned to provide critical ancillary services in competitive electricity markets, employing currently or soon-to-be available load control technologies.

  12. Electric power monthly with data for January 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  13. Electric power monthly, September 1996, with data for June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  14. Electric power monthly with data for December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  15. Building Out Alternative Fuel Retail Infrastructure: Government Fleet Spillovers in E85

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corts, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    average county retail gasoline prices in May 2009, denotedor retail gas price, to affect margins on gasoline, which

  16. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY...

  17. Electric power monthly, June 1998, with data for March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and Us levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 5 refs., 57 tabs.

  18. Communicating the value of veal to retail and food service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeill, Michael Scott

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and associated components by trained meat cutters. Each style selected (n = 6) was used to generate mean retail yields and labor requirements, which were calculated from wholesale and retail weights (kg) and processing times (s) . Means and standard errors...

  19. Composition of carcasses and retail cuts from lightweight heifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guzman Mirabal, Luis Alejandro

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee: Dr. H. R. cross Dr. J, W, Savell Twenty-nine sides from lightweight heifer carcasses, ranging from 113 to 250 kg, were fabricated into wholesale and retail cuts using standardized procedures. Retail cuts were trimmed to either zero or 0. 64... were below the ten percent fat level. Retail cut yields from the chuck, rib, loin and round for both trim levels were considerably lower than those reported in other studies. Retail cut yield from the four major wholesale cuts increased...

  20. Retailer-Wholesaler Response to State-Sponsored Marketing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    Retailer-Wholesaler Response to State-Sponsored Marketing Programs: The Case of Jersey Fresh Ramu #12;Retailer-Wholesaler Response to State-Sponsored Marketing Programs: The Case of Jersey Fresh Ramu is expressed to each and every participant of the retailer and wholesaler focus group meeting and mail survey

  1. Dominion Retail Inc (Ohio) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict of Columbia:Dominion RetailDominion Retail

  2. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Description

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The home improvement market includes a range of private-sector entities that currently provide or could offer home energy upgrade services. Most of these entities are remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers; other actors are present in the sector (such as window installers and insulators), but this analysis focuses on these four main categories.

  3. Retail Lighting: Title 24 & Technology Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Retail Lighting: Title 24 & Technology Update Kelly Cunningham Outreach Director kcunning@ucdavis.edu California Lighting Technology Center, UC Davis RESEARCH . INNOVATION . PARTNERSHIP Supporting compliance Lighting: Title 24 and Technology Update C00005 Kelly Cunningham April 24,2014 #12;Credit(s) earned

  4. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources among SPP members. For these entities, investment in DR is often driven by the need to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demand charges for each distribution cooperative. o About 65-70percent of the interruptible/curtailable tariffs and DLC programs are routinely triggered based on market conditions, not just for system emergencies. Approximately, 53percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and 447 MW can be dispatched with less than thirty minutes notice. o Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels ranged from $0.40 to $8.30/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $0.30 to $4.60/kW-month for DLC programs. A few interruptible programs offered incentive payments which were explicitly linkedto actual load reductions during events; payments ranged from 2 to 40 cents/kWh for load curtailed.

  5. Vertical Relationships and Competition in Retail Gasoline Markets: An Empirical Evidence from Contract Changes in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastings, Justine

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Behavior of Retail Gasoline Prices: Symmetric or Not? ”vertical contracts and retail gasoline prices. The thirdthe differences in retail gasoline prices between markets is

  6. Electric power monthly, October 1998, with data for July 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

  7. Electric power monthly, June 1999, with data for March 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

  8. Electric power monthly, November 1998, with data for August 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

  9. Electric power monthly, April 1999 with data for January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  10. Electric power monthly, September 1998, with data for June 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  11. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 3: Electricity Demand Forecast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been influenced by expected higher electricity prices that reflect a rapid rise in fuel prices and emerging carbon-emission penalties. For example, residential consumer retail electricity prices of this projected demand growth. The electricity demand increase is driven primarily by significant growth in two

  12. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  13. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  14. Industrial Powerhouse Optimization in the Deregulated Electricity Marketplace 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, P. D.; Bailey, W. F.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The State of Delaware deregulated the retail sale of electricity in 2002, enabling buyers to procure power on a real-time price schedule and sell excess generated power to the grid. This initiative has prompted industrial sites, especially those...

  15. Industrial Powerhouse Optimization in the Deregulated Electricity Marketplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, P. D.; Bailey, W. F.

    The State of Delaware deregulated the retail sale of electricity in 2002, enabling buyers to procure power on a real-time price schedule and sell excess generated power to the grid. This initiative has prompted industrial sites, especially those...

  16. Becoming a cloud service provider: The evolution of communications service providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telecommunications Industry White Paper Cloud Computing #12;2 Cloud computing for retail #12;3 If they takeBecoming a cloud service provider: The evolution of communications service providers IBM demand. This paper examines ways that CSPs can take advantage of cloud computing--both internally

  17. Electric power monthly with data for October 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council regions. Statistics are published on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. A monthly utility update and summary of industry developments are also included. 63 tabs., 1 fig.

  18. Electric power monthly with data for August 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the state, census division, and U.S. levels for net generation; fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity, and quality of fossil fuels; cost of fossil fuels; electricity retail sales; associated revenue; and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council regions. Statistics on net generation are published by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The monthly update is summarized, and industry developments are briefly described. 1 fig., 63 tabs.

  19. To Own or Lease Solar: Understanding Commercial Retailers Decisions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    among financing methods for businesses installing onsite photovoltaics (PV). We present case studies of PV financing strategies used by two large commercial retailers that have...

  20. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robinson, Michael, 2008, "Demand Response in Midwest ISOPresentation at MISO Demand Response Working Group Meeting,Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO

  1. Retail Building Guide for Entrance Energy Efficiency Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, J.; Kung, F.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This booklet is based on the findings of an infiltration analysis for supermarkets and large retail buildings without refrigerated cases. It enables retail building managers and engineers to calculate the energy savings potential for vestibule additions for supermarkets; and bay door operation changes in large retail stores without refrigerated cases. Retail managers can use initial estimates to decide whether to engage vendors or contractors of vestibules for pricing or site-specific analyses, or to decide whether to test bay door operation changes in pilot stores, respectively.

  2. Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 Fact 858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest...

  3. How Three Retail Buyers Source Large-Scale Solar Electricity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Large-scale, non-utility solar power purchase agreements (PPAs) are still a rarity despite the growing popularity of PPAs across the country. In this webinar, participants will learn more about how...

  4. The Creation of a Market for Retail Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Littlechild, Stephen

    of State at the Department of Energy, was of a different disposition to Nigel Lawson. He privatized British Gas as a single entity in 1986, which did not take forward thinking or practice on competition (Helm 2004 pp. 108, 116, citing Hammond et al 1985a... premises’ (7.08). The initial licenses did indeed list the specific customers that the Secretary of State allowed each company to supply beyond its own area, and the companies had to apply for approval to serve other customers. One of my earliest actions...

  5. Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingof EnhancedRestructuring ourU.S.

  6. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Heffner, Grayson; Sedano, Richard

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Organization of Midwest ISO States (OMS) launched the Midwest Demand Resource Initiative (MWDRI) in 2007 to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) region and develop policies to overcome them. The MWDRI stakeholders decided that a useful initial activity would be to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This additional detail could then be used to assess any"seams issues" affecting coordination and integration of retail DR resources with MISO's wholesale markets. Working with state regulatory agencies, we conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs, dynamic pricing tariffs, and their features in MISO states. Utilities were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g., seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. This report describes the results of this comprehensive survey and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into organized wholesale markets. Survey responses from 37 MISO members and 4 non-members provided information on 141 DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs with a peak load reduction potential of 4,727 MW of retail DR resource. Major findings of this study area:- About 72percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;18percent. Almost 90percent of the DR resources included in this survey are provided by investor-owned utilities. - Approximately, 90percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and over 1,900 MW can be dispatched on less than thirty minutes notice. These legacy DR programs are increasingly used by utilities for economic in addition to reliability purposes, with over two-thirds (68percent) of these programs callable based on market conditions. - Approximately 60percent of DLC programs and 30percent of interruptible rate programs called ten or more DR events in 2006. Despite the high frequency of DR events, customer complaints remained low. The use of economic criteria to trigger DR events and the flexibility to trigger a large number of events suggests that DR resources can help improve the efficiency of MISO wholesale markets. - Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels averaged about $5/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $6/kW-month for DLC programs. Few programs offered incentive payments that were explicitly linked to actual load reductions during events and at least 27 DR programs do not have penalties for non-performance. - Measurement and verification (M&V) protocols to estimate load impacts vary significantly across MISO states. Almost half of the DR programs have not been evaluated in recent times and thus performance data for DR events is not available. For many DLC programs, M&V protocols may need to be enhancedin order to allow participation in MISO's proposed EDR schedule. System operators and planners will need to develop more accurate estimates of the load reduced capability and actual performance.

  7. Effect of real-time electricity pricing on renewable generators and system emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connolly, Jeremiah P. (Jeremiah Peter)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Real-time retail pricing (RTP) of electricity, in which the retail price is allowed to vary with very little time delay in response to changes in the marginal cost of generation, offers expected short-run and long-run ...

  8. Vertical Relationships and Competition in Retail Gasoline Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    , if any, of the differences in retail gasoline prices between markets is attributable to differences substantially higher retail gasoline prices than other regions of the country. For example, for the first week of August 1999, the price of reformulated gasoline in California was 39.6 cents higher than the average

  9. Electric power monthly: October 1996, with data for July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. This report contains approximately 60 tables.

  10. Electric power monthly, May 1999, with data for February 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 64 tabs.

  11. State electricity profiles, March 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the role electricity plays in the Nation`s economic and social well-being, interested parties have been following the electric power industry`s transition by keeping abreast of the restructuring and deregulation events that are taking place almost daily. Much of the attention centers around the States and how they are restructuring the business of electricity supply within their respective jurisdictions. This report is designed to profile each State and the District of Columbia regarding not only their current restructuring activities, but also their electricity generation and concomitant statistics from 1986 through 1996. Included are data on a number of subject areas including generating capability, generation, revenues, fuel use, capacity factor for nuclear plants, retail sales, and pollutant emissions. Although the Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes this type of information, there is a lack of a uniform overview for each individual State. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. In addition to basic statistics in tables and graphs, a textual section is provided for each State, discussing some of the points relative to electricity production that are noteworthy in, or unique to, that particular State. Also, each State is ranked according to the place it holds, as compared to the rest of the states, in various relevant areas, such as its average price of electricity per kilowatthour, its population, and its emissions of certain atmospheric pollutants. The final chapter covers the Nation as a whole. 451 figs., 520 tabs.

  12. Marketing of Retail Signage in Different Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le, Mai

    2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    will be found at locations with higher quality architecture, which contributes to the overall atmosphere of a nicer area. On the other end of the spectrum, a small town like Tomball does not have luxury brands, simply because of the different target market...://www.cstx.gov/Modules/ShowDocument. aspx?documentid=5723 Code of Ordinances. (2006, December 06). Retrieved from http://library.municode.com/ index. aspx?clientId=11633 Davis, B. and Ward P. (2002). Managing Retail Consumption. Great Britain: John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Ewald, W...

  13. Dominion Retail Inc (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict of Columbia:Dominion Retail Inc (Connecticut)

  14. Dominion Retail Inc (Maine) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict of Columbia:Dominion Retail Inc

  15. Dominion Retail Inc (Maryland) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict of Columbia:Dominion Retail IncMaryland) Jump

  16. Dominion Retail Inc (Massachusetts) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict of Columbia:Dominion Retail IncMaryland)

  17. Dominion Retail Inc (Pennsylvania) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict of Columbia:Dominion RetailDominion

  18. Dominion Retail Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict of Columbia:Dominion RetailDominionDominion

  19. Electric power annual 1998. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report, Electric Power Annual 1998 Volume 1 (EPAVI), is to provide a comprehensive overview of the electric power industry during the most recent year for which data have been collected, with an emphasis on the major changes that occurred. In response to the changes of 1998, this report has been expanded in scope. It begins with a general review of the year and incorporates new data on nonutility capacity and generation, transmission information, futures prices from the Commodity futures Trading commission, and wholesale spot market prices from the pennsylvania-new Jersey-Maryland Independent System Operator and the California Power Exchange. Electric utility statistics at the Census division and State levels on generation, fuel consumption, stocks, delivered cost of fossil fuels, sales to ultimate customers, average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold, and revenues from those retail sales can be found in Appendix A. The EPAVI is intended for a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric power industry, and the general public.

  20. Volume 30, Issue 2 Penalizing Consumers for Saving Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , new entrant retailer Poweo introduced an innovative time-of-use tariff with discounted running charges electric utilities introduce pricing schemes to induce their customers to consume less electricity. When enhances understanding of why a typical electric utility may instead prefer to increase prices, in so doing

  1. An Optimization Framework for Data Centers to Minimize Electric Bill under Day-Ahead Dynamic Energy Prices While Providing Regulation Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    computing services, which in turn brings about rapid increase in the electric power consumption associated with IT infrastructure. This growing power demand precipitates adverse environmental impacts and imposes a significant strain on the Power System Infrastructure [1]-[5]. Large data centers--such as those owned by Google

  2. Stackelberg Game based Demand Response for At-Home Electric Vehicle Charging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    Member, IEEE Abstract--Consumer electricity consumption can be controlled through electricity prices and customers respond accordingly with their electricity consumption levels. In particular, the demands as a game [7]. Note that in reality, electricity retailers are significantly regulated by governments

  3. The Difficult Transition to Competitive Electricity Markets in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul

    2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the causes and consequences of state and federal initiatives to introduce wholesale and retail competition into the U.S. electricity sector from 1995. The development and performance of wholesale market institutions...

  4. Biomedical | Chemical & Biomolecular | Civil & Environmental | Electrical & Computer | Industrial | Mechanical | Petroleum Careers in Industrial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glowinski, Roland

    | Mechanical | Petroleum Careers in Industrial Engineering Manufacturing, service and retail industries hireBiomedical | Chemical & Biomolecular | Civil & Environmental | Electrical & Computer | Industrial a significant number of industrial engineers. Specific industries include automobile manufacturers, electronics

  5. Deregulating and regulatory reform in the U.S. electric power sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the evolution of wholesale and retail competition in the U.S electricity sector and associated industry restructuring and regulatory reforms. It begins with a discussion of the industry structure and ...

  6. DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a special report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. The report follows similar...

  7. Inventory optimization in a retail multi-echelon environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkaresvimun, Rintiya

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the study is to find an optimal inventory distribution in a retail three-echelon environment, consisting of a supplier, a DC, and stores. An inventory model is built by replicating the echelons' periodic, ...

  8. Who stocks the shelf? : an analysis of retail replenishment strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuai, Jiaqi

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to analyze the trade-offs of two retail replenishment strategies, DSD (Direct Store Delivery) model and Traditional model. Conceptual and cost models are set up to analyze the trade-offs, ...

  9. Demand allocation strategies in the seasonal retail industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Carin H

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amazon.com is a publicly-held company headquartered in Seattle, Washington. It revolutionized the retail industry by being one of the first major companies to sell goods over the Internet. It is an international company ...

  10. Improving promotional effectiveness through supplier-retailer collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapur, Gautam, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the consumer products industry, retail chains and manufacturers run promotions to maintain consumer and brand loyalty. The two major issues in planning and executing promotions are to accurately forecast demand and to ...

  11. Commercial Building Loads Providing Ancillary Services in PJM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, Jason; Kiliccote, Sila; Boch, Jim; Chen, Jonathan; Nawy, Robert

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The adoption of low carbon energy technologies such as variable renewable energy and electric vehicles, coupled with the efficacy of energy efficiency to reduce traditional base load has increased the uncertainty inherent in the net load shape. Handling this variability with slower, traditional resources leads to inefficient system dispatch, and in some cases may compromise reliability. Grid operators are looking to future energy technologies, such as automated demand response (DR), to provide capacity-based reliability services as the need for these services increase. While DR resources are expected to have the flexibility characteristics operators are looking for, demonstrations are necessary to build confidence in their capabilities. Additionally, building owners are uncertain of the monetary value and operational burden of providing these services. To address this, the present study demonstrates the ability of demand response resources providing two ancillary services in the PJM territory, synchronous reserve and regulation, using an OpenADR 2.0b signaling architecture. The loads under control include HVAC and lighting at a big box retail store and variable frequency fan loads. The study examines performance characteristics of the resource: the speed of response, communications latencies in the architecture, and accuracy of response. It also examines the frequency and duration of events and the value in the marketplace which can be used to examine if the opportunity is sufficient to entice building owners to participate.

  12. Trends in demand for retail and wholesale cuts of meat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holloway, David Wayne

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRENDS IN DEMAND FOR RETAIL AND WHOLESALE CUTS OF MEAT A Thesis by DAVID WAYNE HOLLOWAY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1990 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics TRENDS IN DEMAND FOR RETAIL AND WHOLESALE CUTS OF MEAT A Thesis by DAVID WAYNE HOLLOWAY Approved as to style and content by: Donald E. Farris (Chair of Committee) Carl E. Shafer (Member) Rudo J...

  13. Optical devices having flakes suspended in a host fluid to provide a flake/fluid system providing flakes with angularly dependent optical properties in response to an alternating current electric field due to the dielectric properties of the system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kosc, Tanya Z. (Rochester, NY); Marshall, Kenneth L. (Rochester, NY); Jacobs, Stephen D. (Pittsford, NY)

    2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical devices utilizing flakes (also called platelets) suspended in a host fluid have optical characteristics, such as reflective properties, which are angular dependent in response to an AC field. The reflectivity may be Bragg-like, and the characteristics are obtained through the use of flakes of liquid crystal material, such as polymer liquid crystal (PLC) materials including polymer cholesteric liquid crystal (PCLC) and polymer nematic liquid crystal (PNLC) material or birefringent polymers (BP). The host fluid may be propylene carbonate, poly(ethylene glycol) or other fluids or fluid mixtures having fluid conductivity to support conductivity in the flake/host system. AC field dependent rotation of 90.degree. can be obtained at rates and field intensities dependent upon the frequency and magnitude of the AC field. The devices are useful in providing displays, polarizers, filters, spatial light modulators and wherever switchable polarizing, reflecting, and transmission properties are desired.

  14. THE INTRODUCTION OF DIRECT ACCESS IN NEW ZEALAND'S ELECTRICITY MARKET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    to electricity sector design. Instead, now, the code-words are markets, forward contracts, transmission rights of California Energy Institute 2539 Channing Way Berkeley, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.berkeley.edu/ucei #12 incentives into the generation, transmission, distribution and retailing of electricity, with, in many cases

  15. The changing structure of the electric power industry: Selected issues, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 3,000 electric utilities in the United States provide electricity to sustain the Nation`s economic growth and promote the well-being of its inhabitants. At the end of 1996, the net generating capability of the electric power industry stood at more than 776,000 megawatts. Sales to ultimate consumers in 1996 exceeded 3.1 trillion kilowatthours at a total cost of more than $210 billion. In addition, the industry added over 9 million new customers during the period from 1990 through 1996. The above statistics provide an indication of the size of the electric power industry. Propelled by events of the recent past, the industry is currently in the midst of changing from a vertically integrated and regulated monopoly to a functionally unbundled industry with a competitive market for power generation. Advances in power generation technology, perceived inefficiencies in the industry, large variations in regional electricity prices, and the trend to competitive markets in other regulated industries have all contributed to the transition. Industry changes brought on by this movement are ongoing, and the industry will remain in a transitional state for the next few years or more. During the transition, many issues are being examined, evaluated, and debated. This report focuses on three of them: how wholesale and retail prices have changed since 1990; the power and ability of independent system operators (ISOs) to provide transmission services on a nondiscriminatory basis; and how issues that affect consumer choice, including stranded costs and the determination of retail prices, may be handled either by the US Congress or by State legislatures.

  16. The top 100 electric utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warkentin, D.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This has been an extremely interesting market during the past year or so due to the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) and the US FERC actions since then to make it more competitive. A major move was a 1994 proposal to open up access to the nation`s privately owned transmission grid to make it easier for buyers and sellers of wholesale electricity to do business. Overall, the wholesale market in the US generates about $50 billion in annual revenues. That compares with a retail market about four times that size. The term retail refers to electricity sales to ultimate consumers, while wholesale refers to bulk power transactions among utilities or purchases by utilities from NUGs. The data in this report can be considered a baseline look at the major utility players in the wholesale market. Results of wholesale deregulation have not really been felt yet, so this may be the last look at the regulated market.

  17. The growth of retail REITs : an exploration of current practices and implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toth, A. Eric (Anthony Eric), 1971-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is an exploration of the current growth activity of retail real estate investment trusts (REITs). The specific questions to be explored are: How are retail REITs currently growing, how is this growth being ...

  18. State of competition in gasoline marketing. The effects of refiner operation at retail (a study required by Title III of the Petroleum Marketing Practices Act)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delaney, J.B.; Fenili, R.N.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title III of the Petroleum Marketing Practices Act requires the Secretary of Energy to report to the Congress on the extent to which producers, refiners, and other suppliers of motor fuel subsidize the sale of such fuel at retail or wholesale with profits obtained from other operations. This is Part I of the report required under that Title. It addresses a number of questions relating to the central issue - the state of competition in the gasoline marketing industry. Part II of the report, to be issued this fall, will discuss the subpoenaed documents of nine integrated companies, and will contain recommendations for action, if deemed necessary. The basic thrust of Part I is an examination of three issues: (1) Are integrated refiners subsidizing their company operated gasoline retail outlets; (2) Are integrated refiners moving gasoline away from their branded dealer network into their own retail outlets; and (3) Are integrated refiners manipulating the allocation system in favor of their own retail outlets to the detriment of other gasoline marketers. At a series of regional hearings, independent marketers charged that integrated refiners were engaging in each of these practices. In essence, integrated refiners were portrayed as using unfair or illegal competitive practices which would ultimately lead to their domination of retail gasoline markets. This report addresses each allegation, after providing a historical and theoretical framework for today's debate.

  19. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Business Models

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Business models information focused on remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers.

  20. Factors affecting expanded electricity trade in North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, L.J.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors explore factors that affect electricity trade between enterprises in the US and Canada and the US and Mexico. They look to those underlying policy and institutional factors that affect the relative costs of producing electricity in the three countries. In particular, they consider six factors that appear to have a significant impact on electricity trade in North America: differences in the types of economic regulation of power leading to differences in cost recovery for wholesale and retail power and wheeling charges; changing regulatory attitudes, placing more emphasis on demand-side management and environmental concerns; differences in energy and economic policies; differences in national and subnational environmental policies; changing organization of electric power industries which may foster uncertainty, change historical relationships, and provide other potentially important sources of power for distribution utilities; and differences in the ability of enterprises to gain access to electric power markets because of restrictions placed on transmission access. In Section 2, the authors discuss the regulation of electricity trade in North America and provide an overview of the recent trading experience for electricity between Canada and the US and between Mexico and the US, including the volume of that trade over the past decade and existing transmission capacity between regions of the three countries. In Section 3, they look at the benefits that accrue to trading counties and what those benefits are likely to be for the three countries. The discussion in Section 4 centers on the relevant provisions of the Canada Free Trade Agreement and the proposed North American Free Trade Agreement. In Section 5, they set the stage for the discussion of policy and institutional differences presented in Section 6 by outlining differences in the organization of the electric power sectors of Canada, the US, and Mexico. The study is synthesized in Section 7.

  1. Hedging Quantity Risks with Standard Power Options in a Competitive Wholesale Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedging Quantity Risks with Standard Power Options in a Competitive Wholesale Electricity Market and distribution and introduced competition in generation, wholesale procure- ment, and to a limited extent in retail supply of electricity. Electricity is now bought and sold in the wholesale market by numerous

  2. HE ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY in the United States is facing a disquieting shortage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , wholesale and retail electricity marketing, reactive power management, and other ancillary support systemsT HE ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY in the United States is facing a disquieting shortage of trained lower than those of vir- tually all other electrical engineers. Student enroll- ments have steadily

  3. On Coordinating Electricity Markets: Smart Power Scheduling for Demand Side Management and Economic Dispatch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    On Coordinating Electricity Markets: Smart Power Scheduling for Demand Side Management and Economic;On Coordinating Electricity Markets: Smart Power Scheduling for Demand Side Management and Economic Dispatch Abstract Information asymmetry in retail electricity markets is one of the largest sources of inef

  4. Development of an International Electric Cooperative Initiative on Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Clark; David South

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NRECA conceived of the International Electric Cooperative Initiative on Energy Efficiency (IECIEE) in order to provide an ongoing means of contributing voluntary actions on greenhouse gas emissions mitigation as an integral component of its international programs and projects. This required designing the IECIEE to be integrated directly with the core interests and attributes of participating cooperatives in the U.S. and Latin America, which was the initial focus area selected for the IECIEE. In the case of NRECA International, the core interests related to promoting and strengthening the electric cooperative model, which has proved highly successful in maximizing operational efficiencies in electric power generation, distribution and retailing, as compared to government-owned entities. The approach involved three basic components: (i) establishing the IECIEE mechanism, which involved setting up a functioning organizational vehicle providing for investment, management, and emissions credit accounting; (ii) developing a portfolio of projects in countries where NRECA International could effectively implement the broader mandate of cooperative development as energy efficient suppliers and distributors of electrical energy; and (iii) conducting outreach to obtain the commitment of participants and resources from U.S. and Latin American cooperatives and partnering agencies in the development financing community.

  5. Effects of Price-Responsive Residential Demand on Retail and Wholesale Power Market Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 Effects of Price-Responsive Residential Demand on Retail and Wholesale Power Market Operations/C) on integrated retail and wholesale power market operations. The physical operations of the A/C sys- tem at wholesale conditional on A/C load, and the retail energy prices offered to residential A/C consumers

  6. Integrated Retail and Wholesale (IRW) Power System Operations with Smart-Grid Functionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Integrated Retail and Wholesale (IRW) Power System Operations with Smart-Grid Functionality Leigh of the Integrated Retail/Wholesale (IRW) project at Iowa State University · IRW Test Bed development · Integration-NE, MISO, XM, RTE, MEC IRW Project: Integrated Retail/Wholesale Power System Operation with Smart

  7. The LBNL Water Heater Retail Price Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex; Glover, Julie; Lutz, Jim

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    display the distribution of water heater models by fee typeelectric and gas-fired water heaters, respectively. DeliveryDistribution of Electric Water Heaters by Fee Type Figure B-

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Retail Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Regulations Retail PEV charging services provided by an individual who is not a public utility, public service corporation, or public service...

  9. Status of State Electric Industry Restructuring Activity --as of February 2003 --

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota retail access. The local distribution company continues to provide transmission and distribution (delivery of energy) services. Retail access allows customers to choose their own supplier of generation

  10. Dominion Retail Inc (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict of Columbia:Dominion RetailDominion Retail Inc

  11. Customer response to day-ahead wholesale market electricity prices: Case study of RTP program experience in New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.; Hopper, N.; Sezgen, O.; Moezzi, M.; Bharvirkar, R.; Neenan, B.; Boisvert, R.; Cappers, P.; Pratt, D.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is growing interest in policies, programs and tariffs that encourage customer loads to provide demand response (DR) to help discipline wholesale electricity markets. Proposals at the retail level range from eliminating fixed rate tariffs as the default service for some or all customer groups to reinstituting utility-sponsored load management programs with market-based inducements to curtail. Alternative rate designs include time-of-use (TOU), day-ahead real-time pricing (RTP), critical peak pricing, and even pricing usage at real-time market balancing prices. Some Independent System Operators (ISOs) have implemented their own DR programs whereby load curtailment capabilities are treated as a system resource and are paid an equivalent value. The resulting load reductions from these tariffs and programs provide a variety of benefits, including limiting the ability of suppliers to increase spot and long-term market-clearing prices above competitive levels (Neenan et al., 2002; Boren stein, 2002; Ruff, 2002). Unfortunately, there is little information in the public domain to characterize and quantify how customers actually respond to these alternative dynamic pricing schemes. A few empirical studies of large customer RTP response have shown modest results for most customers, with a few very price-responsive customers providing most of the aggregate response (Herriges et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 2002). However, these studies examined response to voluntary, two-part RTP programs implemented by utilities in states without retail competition.1 Furthermore, the researchers had limited information on customer characteristics so they were unable to identify the drivers to price response. In the absence of a compelling characterization of why customers join RTP programs and how they respond to prices, many initiatives to modernize retail electricity rates seem to be stymied.

  12. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M. W.; Heath, G.; Sandor, D.; Steward, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Warner, E.; Webster, K. W.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Achieving the Department of Energy target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 depends on transportation-related strategies combining technology innovation, market adoption, and changes in consumer behavior. This study examines expanding low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure to achieve deep GHG emissions reductions, with an emphasis on fuel production facilities and retail components serving light-duty vehicles. Three distinct low-carbon fuel supply scenarios are examined: Portfolio: Successful deployment of a range of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies; Combustion: Market dominance by hybridized internal combustion engine vehicles fueled by advanced biofuels and natural gas; Electrification: Market dominance by electric drive vehicles in the LDV sector, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles, that are fueled by low-carbon electricity and hydrogen. A range of possible low-carbon fuel demand outcomes are explored in terms of the scale and scope of infrastructure expansion requirements and evaluated based on fuel costs, energy resource utilization, fuel production infrastructure expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion for LDVs. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored transportation-related strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence.

  13. Consumer Attitudes and Handling Practices of Retailers for Lamb, Mutton and Goat.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stelly, Randall

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with respect to carcass and wholesale cuts and grade and weight of cuts, (4) seasonality of sales and (5) promotion policies and practices in selling lamh, mutton and goat meat. Types of Retail Stores Retail meat stores included in this stud! were... About 50 percent of the independent meat retailers and 2 out of 3 retailers in chain stores stated that they purchase wholesale cuts of lamb. Wholesale cuts purchased most often by inde- pendent retailers are leg, rack or rib chops and shank of lamb...

  14. Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008

  15. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings - 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-MBBR) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-MBBR is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in retail stores over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-MBBR was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  16. Safeguarding Truck-Shipped Wholesale and Retail Fuels (STSWRF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safeguarding Truck-Shipped Wholesale and Retail Fuels (STSWRF) Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the wholesaler/distributor level or below. This presents additional challenges in tracking untaxed fuel after approved ORNL's plan to conduct a Phase II Pilot Test titled Safeguarding Truck-Shipped Wholesale

  17. Retail Shelf-life Characteristics of Dry-aged Beef

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulbrich, Carson

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    counts, lactic acid bacteria, and yeast and mold counts. Surface discoloration (P = 0.007) and fat discoloration (P < 0.0001) of steaks increased as aging period and retail steak shelf-life day increased. Also, off-odor development increased (P < 0...

  18. Responsive pricing for retail competition - a customer perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meade, D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Market forces have motivated utility customers to institute a work process improvement program which has resulted in reorganizations, increased market focus, re-engineering and cost reductions. The market has also provided motivation to look for new and creative ways to work with customers and suppliers. Factors involved in competitive power sourcing strategies which play a role in customer decisions are discussed. Electricity users need efficient, flexible, customer-focused suppliers and a choice of competitively priced electrical service. Government and regulatory policy needs to support and encourgage competitive actions by utilities so that they can effectively participate in the evolving market.

  19. EAC Presentation: How DOE is Organized to Provide Leadership...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    How DOE is Organized to Provide Leadership on Electricity Delivery, October 29, 2010 EAC Presentation: How DOE is Organized to Provide Leadership on Electricity Delivery, October...

  20. Electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

  1. Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems: Sensitivities to Changes in Future Electricity Market Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darghouth, Naim; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This scoping study investigates the impact of, and interactions among, three key sources of uncertainty in the future value of bill savings from customer-sited PV, focusing in particular on residential customers. These three sources of uncertainty are: changes to electricity market conditions that would affect retail electricity prices, changes to the types of retail rate structures available to residential customers with PV, and shifts away from standard net-metering toward other compensation mechanisms for residential PV. We investigate the impact of a range of electricity market scenarios on retail electricity prices and rate structures, and the resulting effects on the value of bill savings from PV. The scenarios include various levels of renewable and solar energy deployment, high and low natural gas prices, the possible introduction of carbon pricing, and greater or lesser reliance on utility-scale storage and demand response. We examine the bill savings from PV with time-invariant, flat residential retail rates, as well as with time-varying retail rates, including time-of-use (TOU) rates and real-time pricing (RTP). In addition, we explore a flat rate with increasing-block pricing (IBP). We evaluate the bill savings from PV with net metering, as currently allowed in many states, as well as scenarios with hourly netting, a partial form of net metering. This scoping study is the first known effort to evaluate these types of interactions in a reasonably comprehensive fashion, though by no means have we considered every possible change to electricity market conditions, retail rate structures, or PV compensation mechanisms. It focuses solely on the private value of bill savings for residential PV and does not seek to quantify the broader social or economic cost or value of solar electricity. Our analysis applies assumptions based loosely on California’s electricity market in a future year (2030); however, it is neither intended to forecast California’s future market, nor are our conclusions intended to have implications specific only to the California market. That said, some of the findings are unique to our underlying assumptions, as described further within the main body of the report, along with other key limitations.

  2. Lessons from a Comparative Analysis of California and PJM Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    .4 Market Performance Before the State's Crisis:1998-1999......................11 2.4.1 Wholesale Market.1.1 High Wholesale Prices.................................................................15 3..................................................................................16 3.2.1 Mismatch: Wholesale and Retail Electricity Prices.....................17 3.2.2 Lack

  3. Trends in Regional Electricity Demands 1995-2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Department of Energy in EIA form 861. Council staff takes annual reported retail sales by each utility. Street lighting sales are not metered but rather estimated . 10 #12;Losses are Defined as Energy LoadsTrends in Regional Electricity Demands 1995-2012 January 29, 2014 #12;In Today's Conversation

  4. CSEM WP 117 Vertical Integration in Restructured Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    , the vertical integration of firms in the PJM market re- duces electricity producers' interest in setting high to their retail customers at set rates. My model reflects this degree of vertical integration of PJM firms. Second imperfections during the summer following PJM's restructuring increased procurement costs 51% ($950 million

  5. Contractual Pricing Problems for Retail Distribution under Different Channel Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Su

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    and Mallik (2010)) examining this setting under the wholesale price contract from supplier-driven perspective, the prior work considers Bertrand com- petition (Bertrand (1883)) between buyers. That is, “In the Bertrand model, firms simultaneously choose... of competing on quantities or prices after observing the suppliers’ wholesale prices. However, either Cournot or Bertrand competition is not involved in the buyer-driven channel. It is because after observing the suppliers’ wholesale prices, the buyers’ retail...

  6. Simulating the Impact of a Carbon Market Electricity System in the Western U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    and engineering methods. This approach has been implemented in a model of the WECC, the Western Electricity Coordinating Council. The methods and assumptions of the WECC model are explained in the appendicies Act C. Electricity Generation 4. Could We See Similar Results in the WECC? D. Wholesale and Retail

  7. DOE handbook electrical safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical Safety Handbook presents the Department of Energy (DOE) safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety guidance and information for DOE installations to effect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of this handbook are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  8. Electrical safety guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  9. The Shifting Landscape of Ratepayer-Funded Energy Efficiency in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electricity retail sales and retail price projections inprojections were calculated by multiplying projected retail electricity priceselectricity sales. Retail sales and retail price projections

  10. Traditional Inventory Models in an E-Retailing Setting: A Two-Stage Serial System with Space Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allgor, Russell

    In an e-retailing setting, the efficient utilization of inventory, storage space, and labor is paramount to achieving high levels of customer service and company profits. To optimize the storage space and labor, a retailer ...

  11. Dr. StrangeBox or : how I learned to stop worrying and love urban big box retail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Press, Jared Harding

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past decade, Big Box retailers have been trying to tap into urban markets after years of explicitly avoiding them in favor of suburban environments. In the past few years, retailers have begun experimenting with ...

  12. Does mix matter? : comparing the performance of mixed-use and single-use retail clusters during an economic downturn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Caroline (Caroline Todd)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Retail development in suburban locations has long been dominated by retail "strips" along major roadways and large, enclosed shopping malls. More compact, planned alternatives to sprawl development have been gaining in ...

  13. The regulatory divide: Federal and state jurisdiction in a restructured electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jubien, S.M.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In any restructuring, close attention should be paid to how transactions are characterized. The approach adopted in California tends to minimize jurisdictional complications and preserve state jurisdiction over local distribution, while a retail wheeling approach may raise preemption and Commerce Clause concerns. In the United States, the wholesale electricity market and the interstate transmission of electricity have been subject to exclusive federal jurisdiction, while the retail sale and local distribution of electricity have been subject to the jurisdiction of the separate states. Until recently, the jurisdictional dividing line has been relatively clear. Indeed, Congress intended to establish a {open_quotes}bright line{close_quotes} between state and federal jurisdiction. This bright line, however, is becoming blurred by proposals to allow retail customers direct access to competitive generation markets. Regulation of transactions relating to the transmission and sale of electricity at wholesale is within the exclusive jurisdiction of the federal government. Thus, historically, {open_quotes}transmission{close_quotes} has coincided precisely with wholesale transactions, while {open_quotes}local distribution{close_quotes} has coincided precisely with retail transactions. Since 1978, Congress and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) have promulgated statutes and regulations to enhance the competitiveness of the wholesale generation market. As a consequence, there are many more non-utility entities competing as sellers of wholesale electricity. Now the push is on at the state level to introduce retail competition in the generation supply side of the electricity market. Introduction of retail competition has the potential to upset, if not extinguish, the traditional bright line between federal and state jurisdiction.

  14. Method for protecting an electric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuehnle, Barry W. (Ammon, ID); Roberts, Jeffrey B. (Ammon, ID); Folkers, Ralph W. (Ammon, ID)

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for protecting an electrical generator which includes providing an electrical generator which is normally synchronously operated with an electrical power grid; providing a synchronizing signal from the electrical generator; establishing a reference signal; and electrically isolating the electrical generator from the electrical power grid if the synchronizing signal is not in phase with the reference signal.

  15. Massachusetts Electric Vehicle Efforts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Massachusetts Electric Vehicle Efforts Christine Kirby, MassDEP ZE-MAP Meeting October 24, 2014 #12 · Provide Clean Air · Grow the Clean Energy Economy · Electric vehicles are a key part of the solution #12 is promoting EVs 4 #12;TCI and Electric Vehicles · Established the Northeast Electric Vehicle Network through

  16. Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Development Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM) Development Project objective: Provide a tool for estimating...

  17. VT Electric Services VTES 601 Energy Dr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    units on campus · Designs, operates, and maintains 3 substations Virginia Tech Electric Services Electric Services is to provide adequate, reliable and economical electric service to the buildings

  18. Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The degree to which any deregulated market functions efficiently often depends on the ability of market agents to respond quickly to fluctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium model, we find that price elasticity both increases the retailers revenue risk exposure and decreases the spot price. Since the latter induces the retailer to reduce forward electricity purchases, while the former has the opposite effect, the overall impact of price responsive demand on the relative magnitudes of its risk exposure and end-user price elasticity. Nevertheless, price elasticity decreases cumulative electricity consumption. By extending the analysis to allow for early settlement of demand, we find that forward stage end-user price responsiveness decreases the electricity forward price relative to the case with price-elastic demand only in real time. Moreover, we find that only if forward stage end-user demand is price elastic will the equilibrium electricity forward price be reduced.

  19. Integrated Retail and Wholesale Power System Operation with Smart-Grid Functionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 Integrated Retail and Wholesale Power System Operation with Smart-Grid Functionality Dionysios of retail and wholesale power markets operating over transmission and distribution networks with smart-grid functionality. This test bed seams together two existing test beds, the AMES Wholesale Power Market Test Bed

  20. Fiber to the Premise (FTTP) Industry Structure: Implications of a Wholesale-Retail Split

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sirbu, Marvin

    Fiber to the Premise (FTTP) Industry Structure: Implications of a Wholesale-Retail Split Anupam. In other cases, either out of choice or regulation, we observe the network owner (the wholesaler) leasing the shared network (wholesale-retail split). The network owner can either wholesale dark fiber or "lit

  1. A conceptual framework to understand retailers' logistics1 and transport organization illustrated for groceries' goods2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A conceptual framework to understand retailers' logistics1 and transport organization ­ illustrated38 * Corresponding author9 10 11 1 IFSTTAR,12 Production Systems, logistics, Transport Organisation as retailers, through in-house or51 outsourced logistics deliveries to points of sale, have a high share

  2. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingof EnhancedRestructuring ourU.S. DepartmentRetail

  3. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -DepartmentRetail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

  4. Reliant Energy Retail Services LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History FacebookRegenesys Holdings Ltd JumpReliant Energy Retail

  5. Reliant Energy Retail Services, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History FacebookRegenesys Holdings Ltd JumpReliant Energy RetailReliant

  6. Dominion Retail Inc (New Jersey) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict of Columbia:Dominion Retail

  7. NextEra Retail of Texas LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpen EnergyNelsoniX LtdNew EnergyCity DataNextEra Retail of

  8. ,"Motor Gasoline Sales Through Retail Outlets Prices "

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future ProductionNetPriceGas, WetThrough Retail

  9. Electric Metering | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Forrestal electric meters provide daily read-outs and comparison of data on electricity consumption for overhead lighting and power outlets. The purpose is to measure...

  10. assessing retail fruit: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Contracts University of Cambridge - Dspace Summary: Long-term contracts for electricity can counter market power and reduce prices in short-term markets. If...

  11. Introduction The electric power grid and electric power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of systems" that integrates an end-to-end, advanced com- munications infrastructure into the electric powerIntroduction The electric power grid and electric power industry are undergoing a dramatic transforma- tion. By linking information technologies with the electric power grid--to provide "electricity

  12. Mohave Electric Cooperative- Renewable Energy Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mohave Electric Cooperative provides incentives for its customers to install renewable energy systems on their homes and businesses. Mohave Electric Cooperative will provide rebates for...

  13. Customer-Economics of Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Impact of High Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings with Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential photovoltaic (PV) systems in the US are often compensated at the customer's underlying retail electricity rate through net metering. There is growing interest in understanding how potential changes in rates may impact the value of bill savings from PV. This article uses a production cost and capacity expansion model to project California hourly wholesale electricity market prices under a reference scenario and a 33% renewables scenario. Second, based on the wholesale electricity market prices generated by the model, the article develops retail rates (i.e., flat, time-of-use, and real-time pricing) for each future scenario based on standard retail rate design principles. Finally, based on these retail rates, the bill savings from PV are estimated for 226 California residential customers under two types of net metering, for each scenario. The article finds that high renewable penetrations can drive substantial changes in residential retail rates and that these changes, together with variations in retail rate structures and PV compensation mechanisms, interact to place substantial uncertainty on the future value of bill savings from residential PV.

  14. Electric sales and revenue 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the US. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1996. 16 figs., 20 tabs.

  15. Fuel Mix Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hawaii requires the state’s retail electric suppliers to disclose details regarding the fuel mix of their electric generation to retail customers. Such information must be provided on customers’...

  16. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Bremson, J.; Solo, K.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The availability of retail stations can be a significant barrier to the adoption of alternative fuel light-duty vehicles in household markets. This is especially the case during early market growth when retail stations are likely to be sparse and when vehicles are dedicated in the sense that they can only be fuelled with a new alternative fuel. For some bi-fuel vehicles, which can also fuel with conventional gasoline or diesel, limited availability will not necessarily limit vehicle sales but can limit fuel use. The impact of limited availability on vehicle purchase decisions is largely a function of geographic coverage and consumer perception. In this paper we review previous attempts to quantify the value of availability and present results from two studies that rely upon distinct methodologies. The first study relies upon stated preference data from a discrete choice survey and the second relies upon a station clustering algorithm and a rational actor value of time framework. Results from the two studies provide an estimate of the discrepancy between stated preference cost penalties and a lower bound on potential revealed cost penalties.

  17. Electricity | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the current electric grid into the next-generation grid. PE enable utilities to deliver power to their customers effectively while providing increased reliability, security, and...

  18. Foreign Direct Investment in Food Retailing: The Case of the People’s Republic of China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Au-Yeung, Amelia Y.S.

    Foreign direct investment (FDI) in food retailing has generated a considerable amount of attention in both the media and the business world throughout the 199Os, with a strong focus on Asian and Central and Eastern ...

  19. Dynamic retail assortment models with demand learning for seasonal consumer goods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro, Felipe

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main research question we explore in this dissertation is: How should a retailer modify its product assortment over time in order to maximize overall profits for a given selling season? Historically, long development, ...

  20. A Case Study of Food Safety Culture Within a Retailer Corporate Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santibanez-Rivera, Rodrigo

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The retail business has been negatively affected due to the increasing customer concerns about food safety and the recent events related to microbiological and chemical contamination of food products, such as the melamine in infant formula...

  1. Market research of commercial recommendation engines for online and offline retail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Yaoyao Clare

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the era of big data and predictive analytics, recommendation systems or recommendation engines that recommend merchandise or service offerings based on individual preferences have had a revolutionary impact on retail ...

  2. Big box, no more quick fixes : a historical account of consumption, retail and discount shopping typologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Erik R

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As of 2011, the fastest growing sectors of the American economy are related to, or directly involved in the retail business. The conditions which led to this phenomenon are rooted in the fundamental precepts of capitalism, ...

  3. Managing Product Variety and Collocation in a Competitive Environment: An Empirical Investigation of Consumer Electronics Retailing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Charlotte R.

    Product variety is an important strategic tool that firms can use to attract customers and respond to competition. This study focuses on the retail industry and investigates how stores manage their product variety, contingent ...

  4. Market behavior under partial price controls: the case of the retail gasoline market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camm, F.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of firm-specific controls on the price of gasoline during 1979 and 1980, at both the wholesale and the retail level, dramatically affected the retail market for gasoline. The most visible effect was a diversity of monetary prices across service stations within particular retail market areas. Price could no longer play its usual role in clearing the retail market for gasoline. Queues and other changes in quality of service at stations arose to maintain the balance of market demand and supply. This report examines the behavior of an otherwise competitive market in the presence of such regulation-induced nonprice phenomena. In such a market, consumers consider both monetary prices and costs imposed by queues in deciding where to buy gasoline and how much to buy. Using a price-theoretic model of behavior, this paper predicts how various changes in effective price regulation affect consumers. 14 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Assessment of reforms in the electricity supply industry: A review of some recent empirical studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peerbocus, Nash

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An empirical review suggests that progress has been made in bringing competition into the inherently complex and challenging electricity market, generating substantial efficiency gains. But the large disconnect between the wholesale and retail markets indicates that much effort is needed to allow consumers to optimally reap those gains. (author)

  6. Pricing mechanism for real-time balancing in regional electricity markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weerdt, Mathijs

    an econometric analysis of the regulating power market on the Nordic power exchange Nord Pool, and M¨oller et al , Wolfgang Ketter , and John Collins Abstract We consider the problem of designing a pricing mechanism for precisely controlling the real-time balance in electricity markets, where retail brokers aggregate

  7. HOUSEHOLD RESPONSE TO DYNAMIC PRICING OF ELECTRICITY A SURVEY OF SEVENTEEN PRICING EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the dynamic variation in wholesale energy costs. This can be accomplished by letting retail prices varyHOUSEHOLD RESPONSE TO DYNAMIC PRICING OF ELECTRICITY A SURVEY OF SEVENTEEN PRICING EXPERIMENTS Ahmad Faruqui and Sanem Sergici1 November 13, 2008 Since the energy crisis disrupted markets

  8. Retail market test: An in-depth evaluation of a new product concept for lamb.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naylor, Robert Kenneth

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Consumer panel test 42 42 43 Design of Consumer Purchase and Acceptance Test ~ 44 Retail store test 45 Test city criteria Sales analysis procedure Promotional campaign Television Newspaper Radio Point-of-Purchase 47 47 47 47 In... Multiple covariance analysis Field Organization for the Market Test 50 50 VI THE RETAIL STORE TEST 52 General Consumer Awareness 52 General Sales Analysis Lamb sales analysis Summary Pork sales analysis Beef sales analysis 53 53 57 58 59...

  9. An analysis of the threshold necessary to sustain rural Texas retail outlets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adcock, Donna P

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN ANALYSIS OF THE THRESHOLD NECESSARY TO SUSTAIN RURAL TEXAS RETAIL OUTLETS A Thesis by DONNA PFLUGER ADCOCK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics AN ANALYSIS OF THE THRESHOLD NECESSARY TO SUSTAIN RURAL TEXAS RETAIL OUTLETS A Thesis by DONNA PFLUGER ADCOCK Approved as to style and content by: Dennis U. Fisher (Chair...

  10. Other utilities, not IPPs key concern for electric executives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Driscoll, M.

    1994-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolving competitive electric utility world is making executives more cautious and focused on their core businesses at the expense of high-profile issues like international investment, global warming, demand side management and electric and magnetic fields, a new survey shows. The 1994 Electric Utility Outlook, conducted by the Washington International Energy Group, also shows growing concern about utility-on-utility competition and a decline of the independent power producer threat, a growing but grudging acknowledgement of retail wheeling and increasing discomfort with nuclear power.

  11. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Kathan, David

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Empirical evidence concerning demand response (DR) resources is needed in order to establish baseline conditions, develop standardized methods to assess DR availability and performance, and to build confidence among policymakers, utilities, system operators, and stakeholders that DR resources do offer a viable, cost-effective alternative to supply-side investments. This paper summarizes the existing contribution of DR resources in U.S. electric power markets. In 2008, customers enrolled in existing wholesale and retail DR programs were capable of providing ~;;38,000 MW of potential peak load reductions in the United States. Participants in organized wholesale market DR programs, though, have historically overestimated their likely performance during declared curtailments events, but appear to be getting better as they and their agents gain experience. In places with less developed organized wholesale market DR programs, utilities are learning how to create more flexible DR resources by adapting legacy load management programs to fit into existing wholesale market constructs. Overall, the development of open and organized wholesale markets coupled with direct policy support by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has facilitated new entry by curtailment service providers, which has likely expanded the demand response industry and led to product and service innovation.

  12. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    experiencing year-over-year declines between 5-10%. Only six states (Wyoming, North Dakota, Arizona, West Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina) had higher retail sales...

  13. Energy Department Announces Funding to Provide Better Visibility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Announces Funding to Provide Better Visibility into the Health of the Nation's Electric Grid Energy Department Announces Funding to Provide Better Visibility into the Health of the...

  14. Energy Optimization (Electric)- Commercial Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Optimization Programs, administered by WECC, provides commercial electric incentives for the following Michigan utilities:

  15. Energy Optimization (Electric)- Residential Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Optimization Programs, administered by WECC, provides residential electric incentives for the following Michigan utilities:

  16. Electricity Today30 American Electric Power, working

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Electricity Today30 American Electric Power, working at the request of, and in partnership with by building transmis- sion infrastructure that will enable wind power to become a larger part of the nation that could provide a basis for discussion to expand industry infrastructure needs in the future. AEP believes

  17. Wealth Transfers Among Large Customers from Implementing Real-Time Retail Electricity Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to re?ect changing wholesale prices — removes existingdisproportionately more when wholesale prices are highest.hour-to-hour, re?ecting wholesale price variation. Among

  18. Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,"Colorado River Comm of Nevada","Public",1886849,0,1102253,784596,0 4,"Shell Energy North America (US), L.P.","Investor-Owned",1020000,0,0,1020000,0 5,"Wells Rural...

  19. Impact of Reflective Roofing on Cooling Electrical Use and Peak Demand in a Florida Retail Mall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, D. S.; Sonne, J. K.; Sherwin, J. R.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Experimental Plan To isolate the impact of adding a reflective roof surface, a before-and-after experimental protocol was used. With this experimental approach, a period of base line data is collected on the space cooling performance at the facility... roof resurfacing. Firstly, a potential utility program would want to target facilities for a light colored roof that were involved in re-roofing. Whereas discretionary change to a white roof costs approximately $0.50/ft2, the incremental cost...

  20. Charges, Costs and Market Power in the Deregulated UK Electricity Retail Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    of East Anglia CCR Working Paper CCR 03-6 Abstract The UK energy regulator claims that prices are set: Energy: Pricing, Market Power Acknowledgements: We are grateful for financial support from the Economic a lower absolute quantity of energy than those who are richer. Prices for different consumption levels

  1. Customer Risk from Real-Time Retail Electricity Pricing: Bill Volatility and Hedgability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    these are simple forward power purchase contracts, and areof these forward power purchases can signi?cantly enhanceaspect of long-term power purchases; instead I set hedging

  2. Wealth Transfers Among Large Customers from Implementing Real-Time Retail Electricity Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available at http://www.ucei.org. PJM Interconnection Marketmarket-monitor/downloads/mmu- reports/pjm-som-2004.pdf.

  3. Customer Risk from Real-Time Retail Electricity Pricing: Bill Volatility and Hedgability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Orlando, FL: Dryden Press, 1988. PJM Interconnection Marketmonitor/downloads/mmu- reports/pjm-som-2004.pdf. FIGURE 1:gures are taken from the PJM (2005), pages 82-83. California

  4. Charges, Costs and Market Power: the Deregulated UK Electricity Retail Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , but consume a lower absolute quantity of energy than those who are richer. Prices for different consumption Economics Department, City University and Catherine Waddams Price* Centre for Competition and Regulation changed supplier in the first four years. After three years price caps were removed. We review

  5. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total Delivered Residentialtight oilU.S.

  6. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total Delivered Residentialtight oilU.S.Arkansas"

  7. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of

  8. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type ofArizona"

  9. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type

  10. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","TypeColorado"

  11. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska" "megawatthours"

  12. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska" "megawatthours"Delaware" "megawatthours"

  13. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska" "megawatthours"Delaware" "megawatthours"District of

  14. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska" "megawatthours"Delaware" "megawatthours"District

  15. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska" "megawatthours"Delaware"

  16. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska" "megawatthours"Delaware"Hawaii" "megawatthours"

  17. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska" "megawatthours"Delaware"Hawaii"

  18. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska" "megawatthours"Delaware"Hawaii"Illinois"

  19. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska" "megawatthours"Delaware"Hawaii"Illinois"Indiana"

  20. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"

  1. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of

  2. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type

  3. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","TypeLouisiana"

  4. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas" "megawatthours"

  5. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas" "megawatthours"Maryland" "megawatthours"

  6. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas" "megawatthours"Maryland"

  7. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas" "megawatthours"Maryland"Michigan"

  8. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas" "megawatthours"Maryland"Michigan"Minnesota"

  9. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas"

  10. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas"Missouri" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type

  11. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas"Missouri" "megawatthours"

  12. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas"Missouri" "megawatthours"Nebraska"

  13. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas"Missouri" "megawatthours"Nebraska"Total sales, top

  14. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas"Missouri" "megawatthours"Nebraska"Total sales,

  15. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas"Missouri" "megawatthours"Nebraska"Total

  16. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas"Missouri" "megawatthours"Nebraska"TotalMexico"

  17. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas"Missouri"

  18. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas"Missouri"Carolina" "megawatthours"

  19. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas"Missouri"Carolina" "megawatthours"Dakota"

  20. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas"Missouri"Carolina"

  1. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas"Missouri"Carolina"Oklahoma" "megawatthours"

  2. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas"Missouri"Carolina"Oklahoma"

  3. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas"Missouri"Carolina"Oklahoma"Pennsylvania"

  4. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: MonthlyDistrictAlaska"Kansas"Missouri"Carolina"Oklahoma"Pennsylvania"Rhode

  5. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period:

  6. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period:Dakota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of

  7. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period:Dakota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type ofUnited States"

  8. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period:Dakota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type ofUnited States"Utah"

  9. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period:Dakota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type ofUnited

  10. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period:Dakota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type ofUnitedVirginia"

  11. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period:Dakota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type ofUnitedVirginia"Washington"

  12. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period:Dakota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type ofUnitedVirginia"Washington"West

  13. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period:Dakota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type

  14. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period:Dakota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","TypeWyoming" "megawatthours"

  15. 2013 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment ActivitiesAge Refining Air1, 2015 Financial

  16. "2013 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49.Transportation" "(Data from

  17. Application of Dynamic Pricing toApplication of Dynamic Pricing to Retail and Supply Chain ManagementRetail and Supply Chain Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcotte, Patrice

    profit Variable cost Profit increase of 8.0% Capture 1% price increase Fixed cost Price is the biggestApplication of Dynamic Pricing toApplication of Dynamic Pricing to Retail and Supply Chain OF PRESENTATION ·· The pricing challengeThe pricing challenge ·· The practice of pricingThe practice of pricing

  18. Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the gasoline-equivalent fuel retail price, excluding exciseprice is the full retail price of gasoline, including allon the retail cost and break-even gasoline price, because

  19. Highline Electric Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | Open EnergyInformation Hess Retail NaturalHifluxHighline Electric

  20. Electric sales and revenue 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the United States. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1994.

  1. Electric sales and revenue 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the US. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1997. 16 figs., 17 tabs.

  2. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium Box Retail -- 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, E. T.; Macumber, D. L.; Long, N. L.; Griffith, B. T.; Benne, K. S.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini, P. A.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides recommendations that architects, designers, contractors, developers, owners, and lessees of medium box retail buildings can use to achieve whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004. The recommendations are given by climate zone and address building envelope, fenestration, lighting systems, HVAC systems, building automation and controls, outside air treatment, service water heating, plug loads, and photovoltaic systems. The report presents several paths to 50% savings, which correspond to different levels of integrated design. These are recommendations only, and are not part of a code or standard. The recommendations are not exhaustive, but we do try to emphasize the benefits of integrated building design, that is, a design approach that analyzes a building as a whole system, rather than as a disconnected collection of individually engineered subsystems.

  3. Small business success story: Gordon Electric Supply, Inc. |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small business success story: Gordon Electric Supply, Inc. May 14, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint Gordon Electric Supply has provided electrical and lighting products and services in the...

  4. Solar Renewable Energy Certificates (SREC-II)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Massachusetts' renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requires each regulated electricity supplier/provider serving retail customers in the state* to include in the electricity it sells 15% qualifying...

  5. Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

  6. Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA)

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

  7. Presentation to EAC: Renewable Electricity Futures Activities...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presentation to the Electricity Advisory Committee, October 29, 2010, on Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status. The presentation provides a high-level overview of the...

  8. An Agent-Based Test Bed for the Integrated Study of Retail and Wholesale Power System Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    An Agent-Based Test Bed for the Integrated Study of Retail and Wholesale Power System Operations D study of retail and wholesale power markets operating over transmission and distribution networks with smart-grid functionality. The test bed will seam together two existing test beds, the AMES Wholesale

  9. M A R K E T S P O T L I G H T Optimizing Supplier-Retailer Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    new collaboration opportunities and driving innovation across the entire retail and manufacturing supply chain. In addition to being a new means of data collection, mobile applications and smart devices. IDC Manufacturing Insights' Supply Chain Survey found that retailers and manufacturers alike have

  10. Optimal Power Flow Formulation in Market of Retail Wheeling Taiyou Yong, Student Member, IEEE Robert Lasseter, Fellow, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    power plants, nuclear power plants etc and selling power to consumers. The suppliers have contractsOptimal Power Flow Formulation in Market of Retail Wheeling Taiyou Yong, Student Member, IEEE at Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA Abstract: Power system deregulation along with retail wheeling

  11. Moreno Valley Electric Utility- Solar Electric Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Moreno Valley Electric Utility provides rebates to its electric customers for the purchase of photovoltaic (PV) systems. System must be on the same premises as the customer to qualify. Systems 30...

  12. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  13. Electrical system architecture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical system for a vehicle includes a first power source generating a first voltage level, the first power source being in electrical communication with a first bus. A second power source generates a second voltage level greater than the first voltage level, the second power source being in electrical communication with a second bus. A starter generator may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus, and at least one additional power source may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus. The electrical system also includes at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the first bus and at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the second bus.

  14. The Texas Retail Meat Industry -- Structure, Operational Characteristics, and Competitive Practices.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Raymond A.

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , supermarkets accounted for more than 90 percent of the 1,040 million pounds of fresh and processed red meat merchandised by Texas retail food stores. Grocery firms and affiliated independent groups with 11 or more stores accounted for more than four... interviewed. Forty-five percent found it difficult to estimate the effect of meat specials on total com- pany sales, since such specials were conducted on a weekly or daily basis. However, one-third of the retailers found company sales increas- ing from 1...

  15. AVTA: 2010 Electric Vehicles International Neighborhood Electric...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    10 Electric Vehicles International Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Testing Results AVTA: 2010 Electric Vehicles International Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Testing Results The...

  16. Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Joyce Jihyun

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a Energy Service Company (ESCO) through retail access. Sincea Energy Service Company (ESCO) through retail access. Since

  17. The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and utilities provide net metering options for their customers. They then provided case studies to illustrate the models. Date December 2010 Topic Financing, Incentives &...

  18. SUMMER 2007 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY AND DEMAND OUTLOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION SUMMER 2007 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY AND DEMAND OUTLOOK DRAFTSTAFFREPORT May ELECTRICITY ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender Acting Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ANALYSIS DIVISION B. B assessment of the capability of the physical electricity system to provide power to meet electricity demand

  19. Electrical Circuit Tester

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Love, Frank (Amarillo, TX)

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical circuit testing device is provided, comprising a case, a digital voltage level testing circuit with a display means, a switch to initiate measurement using the device, a non-shorting switching means for selecting pre-determined electrical wiring configurations to be tested in an outlet, a terminal block, a five-pole electrical plug mounted on the case surface and a set of adapters that can be used for various multiple-pronged electrical outlet configurations for voltages from 100 600 VAC from 50 100 Hz.

  20. Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Electric)- Commercial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Baltimore Gas and Electric (BGE) provides incentives for technical assistance, retrofitting inefficient equipment, starting a new construction project, launching a major renovation, purchasing new...

  1. Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, examines approaches to providing electrical power on board commercial aircraft using solid oxide fuel (SOFC) technology. The focus of...

  2. Electricity Reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electric power equipment with more energy efficiency and higher capacity than today's systems of modernizing the electric grid to meet the nations's need for reliable, electric power, enhancing security continues to increase within the electricity infrastructure. DOE is conducting research, development

  3. Electrical and Electronic Engineering 1 Faculty of Engineering, Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electrical and Electronic Engineering 1 Faculty of Engineering, Department of --Electrical.imperial.ac.uk/pgprospectus. #12;Undergraduate syllabuses2 Electrical and Electronic Engineering Imperial College provides Engineering (EEE) and Information Systems Engineering (ISE). Electrical and Electronic Engineering (EEE

  4. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by Customer Sector Average RevenuesSales (kWh) Retail Sales (1000s MWh) End-use sector January 2015 Change from January 2014 January 2015 Change from January 2014 Year to...

  5. Electric $ales and revenue 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides information on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers in the United States.

  6. DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, MIchael; Letschert, Virginie; Shen, Bo; Sathaye, Jayant; de la Ru du Can, Stephane

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The global economy has grown rapidly over the past decade with a commensurate growth in the demand for electricity services that has increased a country's vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Increasing need of reliable and affordable electricity supply is a challenge which is before every Asia Pacific Partnership (APP) country. Collaboration between APP members has been extremely fruitful in identifying potential efficiency upgrades and implementing clean technology in the supply side of the power sector as well established the beginnings of collaboration. However, significantly more effort needs to be focused on demand side potential in each country. Demand side management or DSM in this case is a policy measure that promotes energy efficiency as an alternative to increasing electricity supply. It uses financial or other incentives to slow demand growth on condition that the incremental cost needed is less than the cost of increasing supply. Such DSM measures provide an alternative to building power supply capacity The type of financial incentives comprise of rebates (subsidies), tax exemptions, reduced interest loans, etc. Other approaches include the utilization of a cap and trade scheme to foster energy efficiency projects by creating a market where savings are valued. Under this scheme, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of electricity are capped and electricity retailers are required to meet the target partially or entirely through energy efficiency activities. Implementation of DSM projects is very much in the early stages in several of the APP countries or localized to a regional part of the country. The purpose of this project is to review the different types of DSM programs experienced by APP countries and to estimate the overall future potential for cost-effective demand-side efficiency improvements in buildings sectors in the 7 APP countries through the year 2030. Overall, the savings potential is estimated to be 1.7 thousand TWh or 21percent of the 2030 projected base case electricity demand. Electricity savings potential ranges from a high of 38percent in India to a low of 9percent in Korea for the two sectors. Lighting, fans, and TV sets and lighting and refrigeration are the largest contributors to residential and commercial electricity savings respectively. This work presents a first estimates of the savings potential of DSM programs in APP countries. While the resulting estimates are based on detailed end-use data, it is worth keeping in mind that more work is needed to overcome limitation in data at this time of the project.

  7. Electric power monthly, March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report for March 1995, presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  8. DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRONIC & ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRONIC & ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING MSc NANO STUDENT NAME: Adam Orchard PROJECT for the imaging of live biological cells and the study of their electrical properties on the nanometre scale techniques. The microscope has provided some exceptional imaging capabilities however some of the electrical

  9. Powertrain system for a hybrid electric vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, R.G. Jr.; Boberg, E.S.; Lawrie, R.E.; Castaing, F.J.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid electric powertrain system is provided including an electric motor/generator drivingly engaged with the drive shaft of a transmission. The electric is utilized for synchronizing the rotation of the drive shaft with the driven shaft during gear shift operations. In addition, a mild hybrid concept is provided which utilizes a smaller electric motor than typical hybrid powertrain systems. Because the electric motor is drivingly engaged with the drive shaft of the transmission, the electric motor/generator is driven at high speed even when the vehicle speed is low so that the electric motor/generator provides more efficient regeneration. 34 figs.

  10. Powertrain system for a hybrid electric vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Jr., Richard G. (Royal Oak, MI); Boberg, Evan S. (Hazel Park, MI); Lawrie, Robert E. (Whitmore Lake, MI); Castaing, Francois J. (Bloomfield Township, MI)

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid electric powertrain system is provided including an electric motor/generator drivingly engaged with the drive shaft of a transmission. The electric is utilized for synchronizing the rotation of the drive shaft with the driven shaft during gear shift operations. In addition, a mild hybrid concept is provided which utilizes a smaller electric motor than typical hybrid powertrain systems. Because the electric motor is drivingly engaged with the drive shaft of the transmission, the electric motor/generator is driven at high speed even when the vehicle speed is low so that the electric motor/generator provides more efficient regeneration.

  11. Dynamic Electric Power Supply Chains and Transportation Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Dynamic Electric Power Supply Chains and Transportation Networks: an Evolutionary Variational energy Electric power supply chains, provide the foundations for theElectric power supply chains, provide and societies. Communication, transportation, heating, lighting, cooling,Communication, transportation, heating

  12. Should India open foreign direct investment in multi-brand retail : a case study using the Wal-Mart effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Ashish Kumar, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As India grows, driven by its success in information technology and services, there is another revolution waiting to happen in the Retail sector dependent on whether the Government of India can unshackle the various ...

  13. The role of content regulation on pricing and market power in regional retail and wholesale gasoline markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muehlegger, Erich J.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1999, regional retail and wholesale gasoline markets in the United States have experienced significant price volatility, both intertemporally and across geographic markets. This paper focuses on one potential explanation ...

  14. Product design for supply chain : quantifying the costs of complexity in Hewlett-Packard's retail desktop PC business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphel, Aaron Matthew

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past several years, Hewlett-Packard Company's North America Consumer Computing (NACC) division has faced pressures to increase retail product variety in response to growing customer demand. As they pursue incremental ...

  15. A review of "Perceptions of Retailing in Early Modern England. Hampshire, England." by Nancy Cox and Karin Dannehl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayworth, Gene

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Daniel Defoe during the 1720s, excerpts from literature of the period, images of English townships, and retail handbills serve as the primary material from which they draw their conclusions. Concepts of shopping from eighteenth century dictionaries...

  16. Determination of the total fat content of retail cuts of pork at different external fat trim levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippola, Linda Katherine

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    obtained from each pork subprimal . . . . 18 3. Chemical fat mean, minimum, maximum, standard deviation, student's t-Test and composite for pork loin retail cuts trimmed to 0. 0 cm or 0. 64 cm external fat level. . 24 4. Chemical fat mean, minimum..., maximum, standard deviation, student's t-Test and composite for pork ham retail cuts trimmed to 0. 0 cm or 0. 64 cm external fat level. . . . . . . . . . . 2 5 5. Chemical moisture mean, minimum, maximum, standard deviation, student's t-Test...

  17. Municipal Aggregation and Retail Competition in the Ohio Energy Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Littlechild, Stephen C

    communities Actual number of aggregating communities Ratio Actual to Proportionate Average low income electricity bill 2002 First Energy CEI 0.7 31 104 3.35 $77 OE 1.1 49 65 1.33 $67 TE 0.3 13 14 1.08 CGE/Duke 0.7 31 8 0.26 $52... should be drawn? Is municipal aggregation an efficient competitive mechanism, more 4 NOPEC July 2004, cited in Colton (2006) pp. 6,7. 5 NOPEC Year-end Report 2005. 6 Ohio Regulatory Update, Strategic Energy at http...

  18. Texas Retail Energy, LLC (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheasternInformation TengchongTex-La Electric

  19. Efficiency Effects of Quality of Service and Environmental Factors: Experience from Norwegian Electricity Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Growitsch, Christian; Jamasb, Tooraj; Wetzel, Heike

    . Initially, the focus of the early electricity sector reforms was mainly on implementing competition in the wholesale generation and retail supply activities. Meanwhile incentive regulation of the natural monopoly transmission and distribution networks may... ). However, it soon became evident that there is a potential conflict in the use of incentive regulation and provision of quality of service. Both theoretical arguments presented (e.g. Spence, 1975) and empirical findings (e.g. Ter- Martirosyan, 2003) have...

  20. Primer on electricity futures and other derivatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoft, S.; Belden, T.; Goldman, C.; Pickle, S.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increased competition in bulk power and retail electricity markets is likely to lower electricity prices, but will also result in greater price volatility as the industry moves away from administratively determined, cost-based rates and encourages market-driven prices. Price volatility introduces new risks for generators, consumers, and marketers. Electricity futures and other derivatives can help each of these market participants manage, or hedge, price risks in a competitive electricity market. Futures contracts are legally binding and negotiable contracts that call for the future delivery of a commodity. In most cases, physical delivery does not take place, and the futures contract is closed by buying or selling a futures contract on or near the delivery date. Other electric rate derivatives include options, price swaps, basis swaps, and forward contracts. This report is intended as a primer for public utility commissioners and their staff on futures and other financial instruments used to manage price risks. The report also explores some of the difficult choices facing regulators as they attempt to develop policies in this area.

  1. Hydrogen Fuel Cells Providing Critical Backup Power | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fuel Cells Providing Critical Backup Power Hydrogen Fuel Cells Providing Critical Backup Power April 9, 2010 - 3:43pm Addthis Customers of AT&T Wireless and Pacific Gas & Electric...

  2. State Policies Provide Critical Support for Renewable Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    against other renewable resource options. Acknowledgementsgeneration supply from renewable resources. RPS purchaseprocuring new renewable resources prior to enactment of

  3. State Policies Provide Critical Support for Renewable Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the West through 2007. Geothermal energy occupies a distantU.S. (see Figure 1). Geothermal energy is beginning toand Nevada, where the Geothermal Energy Association has

  4. Texas - PUC Substantive Rule 25.174 - Electric Service Providers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable Energy Resources and Use of Natural Gas Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Texas - PUC Substantive...

  5. Providing Vehicle OEMs Flexible Scale to Accelerate Adoption of Electric

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 |ofDepartment of EnergyDrive Vehicles |

  6. Providing Vehicle OEMs Flexible Scale to Accelerate Adoption of Electric

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 |ofDepartment of EnergyDrive Vehicles |Drive

  7. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 1: Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electricity can provide, such as heat for homes, lights for commercial buildings, or motors for industrial

  8. The Value of Distributed Solar Electric Generation to San Antonio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Nic [Solar San Antonio, TX (United States); Norris, Ben [Clean Power Research, Napa, CA (United States); Meyer, Lisa [City of San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an analysis of value provided by grid-connected, distributed PV in San Antonio from a utility perspective. The study quantified six value components, summarized in Table ES- 1. These components represent the benefits that accrue to the utility, CPS Energy, in accepting solar onto the grid. This analysis does not treat the compensation of value, policy objectives, or cost-effectiveness from the retail consumer perspective.

  9. National policy dialogue on state and federal regulation of the electricity industry - staff report on a Keystone policy dialogue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For over two years, The Keystone Center facilitated a dialogue on State and Federal Regulation of the Electricity Industry. The intent of this report is to assist policy-makers faced with decisions about changes to traditional utility regulation and planning and provide an overview of a diverse group`s deliberations on regulatory jurisdictional conflicts. This report is not a consensus document, rather it is a staff written summary of two years of discussion on the issues. The participants in the Keystone Dialogue believed that all affected interests could benefit from, if nothing else, a summary of their discussions of state/federal issues. The electric utility industry is one of the last remaining, heavily regulated industries in the United States. Rate and corporate regulation is split between state and federal governments and there is distinct regulatory authority at each level. For example, retail rate regulation occurs at the state level, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is responsible for wholesale rate regulation under the Federal Power Act, and the Securities and Exchange Commission oversees registered utility holding companies as defined under the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935. This jurisdictional split between state and federal regulation has evolved over many years through legislation and litigation on such matters. The creation of this allocation of regulatory responsibility was initiated in 1935 with the passage of the Public Utility Holding Company Act and the Federal Power Act when the economic and technological changes that are now occurring in the industry simply could not have been envisioned.

  10. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

  11. Benchmarking and Equipment and Controls Assessment for a 'Big Box' Retail Chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haves, Philip

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    annual results for electricity consumption and peak demandTampa Average Electricity Consumption, Annual Normalizeddifferences in electricity consumption. The ‘Total Source’

  12. Electric current locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, Paul E. (Corvallis, OR); Woodside, Charles Rigel (Corvallis, OR)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure herein provides an apparatus for location of a quantity of current vectors in an electrical device, where the current vector has a known direction and a known relative magnitude to an input current supplied to the electrical device. Mathematical constants used in Biot-Savart superposition equations are determined for the electrical device, the orientation of the apparatus, and relative magnitude of the current vector and the input current, and the apparatus utilizes magnetic field sensors oriented to a sensing plane to provide current vector location based on the solution of the Biot-Savart superposition equations. Description of required orientations between the apparatus and the electrical device are disclosed and various methods of determining the mathematical constants are presented.

  13. Packaging and fabrication systems for extending storage life and subsequent retail caselife of pork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rape, Steven Wayne

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These chops were changes were (1973) further reported that bacterial counts (log ) from cuts stored in poly- vinyl chloride film were 100 to 1, 000 fold higher than those from vacuum packaged cuts. Ashby and James (1973 b) compared the effects of certain... was created by use of a stationary nozzle type vacuum n&n- Table l. Experimental design for comparisons of packaging systems for fresh pork cuts Packaging treatment Cut Number of samples Storage temperature (' C) Storage intervals (days) Retail...

  14. The Beef Nutrient Database Improvement Project: Retail Cuts From the Chuck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Sarah

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    through fabrication, and the chucks were collected in combos. They then were shipped via refrigerated truck to the Rosenthal Meat Science and Technology Center at Texas A&M University and stored (0-4 ?C) until fabrication. 3.2. Fabrication Chucks... ........................................................... 15 4.1. Separable tissue components of raw and cooked retail cuts .... 15 4.2. Proximate analysis of the separable lean ................................. 16 4.3. Cooking...

  15. E85 Retail Business Case: When and Why to Sell E85

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeIdle Reduction WeightRebate - LADWPPublicE85 Retail Business

  16. Managing electricity reliability risk through the futures markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In competitive electricity markets, the vertically integrated utilities that were responsible for ensuring system reliability in their own service territories, or groups of territories, often cease to exist. Typically, the burden falls to an independent system operator (ISO) to insure that enough ancillary services (AS) are available for safe, stable, and reliable operation of the grid, typically defined, in part, as compliance with officially approved engineering specifications for minimum levels of AS. In order to characterize the behavior of market participants (generators, retailers, and an ISO) in a competitive electricity market with reliability requirements, we model a spot market for electricity and futures markets for both electricity and AS. By assuming that each participant seeks to maximize its expected utility of wealth and that all markets clear, we solve for the optional quantities of electricity and AS traded in each market by all participants, as well as the corresponding market-clearing prices. We show that future prices for both electricity and AS depend on expectations of the spot price, statistical aspects of system demand, and production cost parameters. More important, our model captures the fact that electricity and AS are substitute products for the generators, implying that anticipated changes in the spot market will affect the equilibrium futures positions of both electricity and AS. We apply our model to the California electricity and AS markets to test its viability.

  17. Abstract: In this paper we provide a systematic review of generator-provided reactive support as an unbundled ancillary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the provision of reactive power and voltage support was bundled with other services in supplying electricity electricity. Under open access, however, reactive support and voltage control from generation sources becomes1 Abstract: In this paper we provide a systematic review of generator-provided reactive support

  18. Ion electric propulsion unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Light, Max E; Colestock, Patrick L

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) thruster is disclosed having a plasma chamber which is electrically biased with a positive voltage. The chamber bias serves to efficiently accelerate and expel the positive ions from the chamber. Electrons follow the exiting ions, serving to provide an electrically neutral exhaust plume. In a further embodiment, a downstream shaping magnetic field serves to further accelerate and/or shape the exhaust plume.

  19. Electric power monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  20. Electric power monthly, September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  1. Providence Newberg Medical Center

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Newberg, OR In 2002, Providence Health & Services began planning a new 188,000 square foot medical center in Newberg, Oregon to respond to the growing community's need for accessible health care. Since this was Providence's first new hospital in almost thirty years, its leaders decided to approach the project through innovative planning, design, and construction, including the achievement of lifecycle energy savings and a potential LEED certification. The hospital is comprised of 40 inpatient beds with views out to the surrounding rural landscape or into lushly planted internal courtyards.

  2. Configuring load as a resource for competitive electricity markets--Review of demand response programs in the U.S. and around the world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffner, Grayson C.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The restructuring of regional and national electricity markets in the U.S. and around the world has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators to control and manage the load patterns of wholesale and retail end-users they serve. Demand Response Programs, once called Load Management, have re-emerged as an important element in the fine-tuning of newly restructured electricity markets. During the summers of 1999 and 2001 they played a vital role in stabilizing wholesale markets and providing a hedge against generation shortfalls throughout the U.S.A. Demand Response Programs include ''traditional'' capacity reservation and interruptible/curtailable rates programs as well as voluntary demand bidding programs offered by either Load Serving Entities (LSEs) or regional Independent System Operators (ISOs). The Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) has been monitoring the development of new types of Demand Response Programs both in the U.S. and around the world. This paper provides a survey and overview of the technologies and program designs that make up these emerging and important new programs.

  3. ISSN 1745-9648 Electrifying Integration: Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    ISSN 1745-9648 Electrifying Integration: Electricity Production and the South East Europe Regional: The paper provides an overview of the generation of electricity in ten countries in South East Europe during of the electricity markets in South East Europe is explored. We conduct a cross-country analysis of electricity

  4. Content Provider Speeds Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    protocols like SMPP for SMS and MM7 for MMS are industry standards, carriers typically layer their own APIs.0 standards," says Rose, "and we thought that would help speed development." The AT&T API Platform includesContent Provider Speeds Application Development AT&T API Platform cuts development time and costs

  5. Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    also for electricity generation in fuel cells” (Californiageneration capability to power a stationary fuel cell that would provide electricity

  6. Electricity prices in a competitive environment: Marginal cost pricing of generation services and financial status of electric utilities. A preliminary analysis through 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergence of competitive markets for electricity generation services is changing the way that electricity is and will be priced in the United States. This report presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated {open_quotes}cost-of-service{close_quotes} pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers? This study is not intended to be a cost-benefit analysis of wholesale or retail competition, nor does this report include an analysis of the macroeconomic impacts of competitive electricity prices.

  7. Electric-drive tractability indicator integrated in hybrid electric vehicle tachometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamai, Goro; Zhou, Jing; Weslati, Feisel

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An indicator, system and method of indicating electric drive usability in a hybrid electric vehicle. A tachometer is used that includes a display having an all-electric drive portion and a hybrid drive portion. The all-electric drive portion and the hybrid drive portion share a first boundary which indicates a minimum electric drive usability and a beginning of hybrid drive operation of the vehicle. The indicated level of electric drive usability is derived from at least one of a percent battery discharge, a percent maximum torque provided by the electric drive, and a percent electric drive to hybrid drive operating cost for the hybrid electric vehicle.

  8. Electric power monthly, May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  9. Electric power monthly, April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  10. Assessment of the transmission grid of Maryland utilities and some potential consequences of retail competition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullenbaum, M.S.; Moore, M.K.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates the transmission systems used by the four Maryland utilities--Delmarva Power and Light Company (Delmarva), Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BGE), Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO), and Allegheny Power Company (AP)--to provide a cost-effective, reliable source of power to consumers in the State. Maryland utilities use the high-voltage transmission systems in their own service territories and in utility systems in neighboring states to integrate their sources of supply to meet the demand of their customers. Transmission facilities make this possible by allowing Maryland utilities to import their share of remote generation in other states, to gain access to energy markets that reduce day-to-day generating costs, and to reduce the amount of capacity they must hold in reserve. The high-voltage system also permits Maryland utilities to purchase cost-effective energy that may be available in other nearby regions.

  11. Electrical Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The incumbent in this position will serve as an Electrical Engineer in the Strategy and Program Management organization of Transmission Services. The Strategy and Program Management organization is...

  12. Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  13. Electrical hazards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and certification by ANL prior to use. The Control of Hazardous Energy Sources - LockoutTagout (LOTO) Types of Energy Sources 1. Electricity 2. Gas, steam & pressurized...

  14. Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  15. Electrical stator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Olich, Eugene E. (Aptos, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical stator of an electromagnetic pump includes first and second spaced apart coils each having input and output terminals for carrying electrical current. An elongate electrical connector extends between the first and second coils and has first and second opposite ends. The connector ends include respective slots receiving therein respective ones of the coil terminals to define respective first and second joints. Each of the joints includes a braze filler fixedly joining the connector ends to the respective coil terminals for carrying electrical current therethrough.

  16. Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water-Cooled Electric Chillers Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal...

  17. Salt River Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Salt River Electric serves as the rural electric provider in Kentucky's Bullitt, Nelson, Spencer, and Washington counties. Residential customers are eligible for a variety of cash incentives for...

  18. Consolidated Electric Cooperative- Heat Pump and Water Heating Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Consolidated Electric Cooperative provides rebates to residential customers who install electric water heaters, dual-fuel heating system or geothermal heat pumps. A dual-fuel heating systems...

  19. Customer Strategies for Responding to Day-Ahead Market HourlyElectricity Pricing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Chuck; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan,Bernie; Boisvert, Dick; Cappers, Peter; Pratt, Donna; Butkins, Kim

    2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Real-time pricing (RTP) has been advocated as an economically efficient means to send price signals to customers to promote demand response (DR) (Borenstein 2002, Borenstein 2005, Ruff 2002). However, limited information exists that can be used to judge how effectively RTP actually induces DR, particularly in the context of restructured electricity markets. This report describes the second phase of a study of how large, non-residential customers' adapted to default-service day-ahead hourly pricing. The customers are located in upstate New York and served under Niagara Mohawk, A National Grid Company (NMPC)'s SC-3A rate class. The SC-3A tariff is a type of RTP that provides firm, day-ahead notice of hourly varying prices indexed to New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) day-ahead market prices. The study was funded by the California Energy Commission (CEC)'s PIER program through the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC). NMPC's is the first and longest-running default-service RTP tariff implemented in the context of retail competition. The mix of NMPC's large customers exposed to day-ahead hourly prices is roughly 30% industrial, 25% commercial and 45% institutional. They have faced periods of high prices during the study period (2000-2004), thereby providing an opportunity to assess their response to volatile hourly prices. The nature of the SC-3A default service attracted competitive retailers offering a wide array of pricing and hedging options, and customers could also participate in demand response programs implemented by NYISO. The first phase of this study examined SC-3A customers' satisfaction, hedging choices and price response through in-depth customer market research and a Constant Elasticity of Substitution (CES) demand model (Goldman et al. 2004). This second phase was undertaken to answer questions that remained unresolved and to quantify price response to a higher level of granularity. We accomplished these objectives with a second customer survey and interview effort, which resulted in a higher, 76% response rate, and the adoption of the more flexible Generalized Leontief (GL) demand model, which allows us to analyze customer response under a range of conditions (e.g. at different nominal prices) and to determine the distribution of individual customers' response.

  20. Green Mountain Energy Renewable Rewards Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Texas does not have statewide net metering as the term is generally understood. However, retail electricity providers in Texas are permitted, but not required, to compensate customers for...