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1

Kolkata Restaurant Problem as a generalised El Farol Bar Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generalisation of the El Farol bar problem to that of many bars here leads to the Kolkata restaurant problem, where the decision to go to any restaurant or not is much simpler (depending on the previous experience of course, as in the El Farol bar problem). This generalised problem can be exactly analysed in some limiting cases discussed here. The fluctuation in the restaurant service can be shown to have precisely an inverse cubic behavior, as widely seen in the stock market fluctuations.

Chakrabarti, Bikas K

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Assessing the Exposure and Health Risks of Secondhand Smoke in Restaurants and Bars by Workers and Patrons & Evaluating the Efficacy of Different Smoking Policies in Beijing Restaurants and Bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ban in Minnesota Bars and Restaurants." American Journal ofof second-hand smoke in restaurants and bars in five citiesof second-hand smoke in restaurants and bars in five cities

Liu, Ruiling

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph Restaurant and Bar Owners ’ Exposure to Secondhand Smoke and Attitudes Regarding Smoking Bans in Five Chinese Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Despite the great progress made towards smoke-free environments, only 9 % of countries worldwide mandate smoke-free restaurants and bars. Smoking was generally not regulated in restaurants and bars in China before 2008. This study was designed to examine the public attitudes towards banning smoking in these places in China. A convenience sample of 814 restaurants and bars was selected in five Chinese cities and all owners of these venues were interviewed in person by questionnaire in 2007. Eighty six percent of current nonsmoking subjects had at least one-day exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) at work in the past week. Only 51 % of subjects knew SHS could cause heart disease. Only 17 % and 11 % of subjects supported prohibiting smoking completely in restaurants and in bars, respectively, while their support for restricting smoking to designated areas was much higher. Fifty three percent of subjects were willing to prohibit or restrict smoking in their own venues. Of those unwilling to do so, 82 % thought smokingInt. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8 1521

Ruiling Liu; S. Katharine Hammond; Andrew Hyl; Mark J. Travers; Yan Yang; Yi Nan; Guoze Feng; Qiang Li; Yuan Jiang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

North Bar Lake South Bar Lake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traverse Lake Lime Lake Crystal River Sh alda Cr GOOD HARBOR BAY SLEEPING BEAR BAY PLATTE BA Y LAKE South Bar Lake Otter Lake Loon Lake Long Lake Rush Lake Platte Lake Little Platte Lake CRYSTAL LAKE MICHIGAN LAKE MICHIGAN Lake Elevation 580ft (177m) MANITOU PAS S A G E Ott er C reek Pl atte River Platt e

5

Barred Owl Hooting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barred Owl Hooting Barred Owl Hooting Name: ray Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: have barred owls ever been known to hoot during the daylight hours? Replies: I spent two years researching barred and horned owls when I was a graduate student and these owls are often found to call during daylight hours. I found both species fairly active at about 3pm and sometimes as late as 10am. The fledglings may be active anytime day and night. Parents are most vocal in the spring when trying to locate young and in the pre-nesting season during January-March. However, the barred owl is most active during the night and many times the calling is dependent upon the time of year [breeding season of November through April is more active for adults in particular]. Yearlings can make calls, noise anytime during the day.

6

L-Bar.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

L-Bar disposal site is in Cibola County L-Bar disposal site is in Cibola County approximately 47 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico, and 10 miles north of Laguna Pueblo. The disposal site is located on part of the former L-Bar ranch and is about 4 miles east-southeast of the village of Seboyeta. The site was previously owned and operated by SOHIO Western Mining Company . Mining and milling at L-Bar began in 1977 and continued until 1981, when the mine closed because of economic conditions of the uranium industry. About 2.1 million tons of ore was processed at the mill. The milling operation created radioactive tailings, a predominantly sandy material. Tailings and liquid wastes were pumped in slurry form into an onsite tailings impoundment for disposal. All aboveground structures, including the mine and

7

$\\{Q\\bar{q}\\}\\{\\bar{Q}^{(')}q\\}$ molecular states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Masses for $\\{Q\\bar{q}\\}\\{\\bar{Q}^{(')}q\\}$ molecular states are systematically studied in QCD sum rules. The interpolating currents representing the related molecular states are proposed. Technically, contributions of the operators up to dimension six are included in operator product expansion (OPE). Mass spectra for molecular states with $\\{Q\\bar{q}\\}\\{\\bar{Q}^{(')}q\\}$ configurations are obtained.

Zhang, Jian-Rong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Bahasa Indonesia Kfir Bar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bahasa Indonesia Kfir Bar #12;Malay Archipelago · During Islam era: Malay) · Dutch and Portuguese traders arrived during the 15th century · Indonesia became a Dutch colony · Indonesia independent - 1945 #12;#12;Indonesian · Formed ­ 15th

Dershowitz, Nachum

9

BaBar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detektor der B - Fabrik, BaBar, wird durch eine internationale Detektor der B - Fabrik, BaBar, wird durch eine internationale Kollaboration gebaut. Er dient dazu, Paare von elektrisch neutralen B und anti-B Mesonen zu erzeugen. Das neutrale B enthält ein anti-b Quark und ein d Quark, während das neutrale anti-B ein b Quark und ein anti-d Quark enthält. Die Teilchenstrahlen werden so eingestellt, dass bei ihrer Kollision gerade die richtige Menge an Energie frei wird, um diese zwei Mesonen zu erzeugen. Weil Elektronen und Positronen mit verschiedenen Energien umlaufen, werden die so entstandenen B und anti-B Mesonen mit grosser Geschwindigkeit in derselben Richtung laufen. Dabei bewegen sie sich in gleicher Richtung wie die schneller laufenden Elektronen. Das macht es möglich, ihre Lebensdauer durch die Wegstrecke, die sie bis zu ihrem

10

Smoke-free ordinances increase restaurant profit and value  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Differential Effects on Restaurants, Bars and Taverns. ’’between the Massachusetts Restaurant Association and thefree laws hurt the restaurant business, the marketplace

Alamar, B C; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Generation of sand bars under surface waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) Experiments were performed in a large wave flume to validate the theory and to study additional aspects of sand bar evolution. The wave envelope and bar profile were recorded for low and high beach reflection, ...

Hancock, Matthew James, 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Restaurants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quick-find list Argonne | Continental | Mixed Menu | Burgers & Dogs | Pizza | Chicken | Seafood | Italian Mexican | Breakfast | Sandwiches | Asian | Other/Ethnic | BBQ | Brew Pubs | 24-Hour | Dinner/Movie updated 12/11/2013 Argonne Cafeteria (ANL access only) Bldg. 213 Argonne Guest House Bldg. 460 630-739-6000 401 Grill Bldg. 401 CONTINENTAL 2100 Blue (Renaissance Hotel) 2100 Spring Road, Oak Brook 630-573-2800 The Clubhouse Restaurant 298 Oak Brook Center, Oak Brook 630-472-9322 J. Alexander's 1410 W. 16th., Oak Brook 630-573-8180 The Flame 803 Joliet Rd., Countryside 708-352-3442 MIXED MENU Baker's Square 7409 Rt. 83, Hinsdale 630-986-9330 Baker's Square 2020 W. 75th St., Woodridge 630-241-0609 Bar Louie 619 E Boughton Rd #A, Bolingbrook 630-410-7100

13

Microsoft Word - BAR 2012 CR.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

L-Bar, New Mexico L-Bar, New Mexico Page 3-1 3.0 L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site 3.1 Compliance Summary The L-Bar, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title II disposal site was inspected on August 22, 2012. The tailings impoundment was in excellent condition. Erosion and vegetation measurements to monitor the condition of the impoundment cover indicate that no erosion is occurring, and foliar cover of the vegetation has increased since the 2011 inspection. No cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. 3.2 Compliance Requirements Requirements for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the L-Bar site are specified in the Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy L-Bar, New Mexico, (UMTRCA Title II) Disposal Site, Seboyeta, New Mexico (DOE-LM/GJ709-2004,

14

P{bar P} collider physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief introduction to {bar p}p collider physics is given. Selected results from the collider experiments at the CERN S{bar p}pS and the Tevatron collider are described. The emphasis is on experimental aspects of {bar p}p collisions. Minimum bias physics and the production of jets, Intermediate Vector Bosons and heavy flavors is reviewed. The outlook for physics at hadron colliders for the near future is briefly discussed.

Demarteau, M. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

16

Nucleon pole contributions in $J/?\\to N \\bar{N} ?$, $p \\bar{p} ?$, $p \\bar{p} ?^{\\prime}$ and $p \\bar{p} ?$ decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nucleon pole contributions in $J/\\psi \\to N \\bar N \\pi$, $p \\bar p \\eta$, $p \\bar p \\eta^{\\prime}$ and $p \\bar{p} \\omega$ decays are re-studied. Different contributions due to PS-PS and PS-PV couplings in the $\\pi$-N interaction and the effects of $NN\\pi$ form factors are investigated in the $J/\\psi \\to N \\bar N \\pi$ decay channel. It is found that when the ratio of $|F_0| /|F_M|$ takes small value, without considering the $NN\\pi$ form factor, the difference between PS-PS and PS-PV couplings are negligible. However, when the $NN\\pi$ form factor is included, this difference is greatly enlarged. The resultant decay widths are sensitive to the form factors. As a conclusion, the nucleon-pole contribution as a background is important in the $J/\\psi\\to N\\bar{N}\\pi$ decay and must be accounted. In the $J/\\psi\\to N\\bar{N}\\eta$ and $N\\bar{N}\\eta'$ decays, its contribution is less than 0.1% of the data. In the $J/\\psi\\to N\\bar{N}\\omega$ decay, it provides rather important contribution without considering form factors. But the contribution is suppressed greatly when adding the off-shell form factors. Comparing these results with data would help us to select a proper form factor for such kind of decay.

Wei-Hong Liang; Peng-Nian Shen; Bing-Song Zou; Amand Faessler

2004-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

17

Bar Gadda LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Bar-Gadda LLC Place Palo Alto, California Zip 94306 Sector Geothermal energy, Hydro, Hydrogen Product Has developed a new technology to produce hydrogen from...

18

New Corrosion Resistance Bar in Sandwich Wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandwich masonry wall is an energy-saving composite wall with good mechanical properties and durability. But the adhesion strength to its tie bar affects its permanence. In order to simple the traditional production processes, a new method was proposed. ... Keywords: energy-saving, durability, steel bar, insulation

Li Yancang; Ge Xiaohua; Wang Fengxin

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Cam-controlled boring bar  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cam-controlled boring bar system (100) includes a first housing (152) which is rotatable about its longitudinal axis (154), and a second housing in the form of a cam-controlled slide (158) which is also rotatable about the axis (154) as well as being translatable therealong. A tool-holder (180) is mounted within the slide (158) for holding a single point cutting tool. Slide (158) has a rectangular configuration and is disposed within a rectangularly configured portion of the first housing (152). Arcuate cam slots (192) are defined within a side plate (172) of the housing (152), while cam followers (194) are mounted upon the cam slide (158) for cooperative engagement with the cam slots (192). In this manner, as the housing (152) and slide (158) rotate, and as the slide (158) also translates, a through-bore (14) having an hourglass configuration will be formed within a workpiece (16) which may be, for example, a nuclear reactor steam generator tube support plate.

Glatthorn, Raymond H. (St. Petersburg, FL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "restaurant bar bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 11 Bar Soap Finishing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 11 Bar Soap Finishing Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 11 Bar Soap Finishing from ...

22

Gas Feedback on Stellar Bar Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze evolution of live disk-halo systems in the presence of various gas fractions, f_gas less than 8% in the disk. We addressed the issue of angular momentum (J) transfer from the gas to the bar and its effect on the bar evolution. We find that the weakening of the bar, reported in the literature, is not related to the J-exchange with the gas, but is caused by the vertical buckling instability in the gas-poor disks and by a steep heating of a stellar velocity dispersion by the central mass concentration (CMC) in the gas-rich disks. The gas has a profound effect on the onset of the buckling -- larger f_gas brings it forth due to the more massive CMCs. The former process leads to the well-known formation of the peanut-shaped bulges, while the latter results in the formation of progressively more elliptical bulges, for larger f_gas. The subsequent (secular) evolution of the bar differs -- the gas-poor models exhibit a growing bar while gas-rich models show a declining bar whose vertical swelling is driven by a secular resonance heating. The border line between the gas-poor and -rich models lies at f_gas ~ 3% in our models, but is model-dependent and will be affected by additional processes, like star formation and feedback from stellar evolution. The overall effect of the gas on the evolution of the bar is not in a direct J transfer to the stars, but in the loss of J by the gas and its influx to the center that increases the CMC. The more massive CMC damps the vertical buckling instability and depopulates orbits responsible for the appearance of peanut-shaped bulges. The action of resonant and non-resonant processes in gas-poor and gas-rich disks leads to a converging evolution in the vertical extent of the bar and its stellar dispersion velocities, and to a diverging evolution in the bulge properties.

Ingo Berentzen; Isaac Shlosman; Inma Martinez-Valpuesta; Clayton Heller

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Spontaneous formation of double bars in dark matter dominated galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although nearly one-third of barred galaxies host an inner, secondary bar, the formation and evolution of double barred galaxies remain unclear. We show here an example model of a galaxy, dominated by a live dark matter halo, in which double bars form naturally, without requiring gas, and we follow its evolution for a Hubble time. The inner bar in our model galaxy rotates almost as slowly as the outer bar, and it can reach up to half of its length. The route to the formation of a double bar may be different from that of a single strong bar. Massive dark matter halo or dynamically hot stellar disc may play an important role in the formation of double bars and their subsequent evolution.

Saha, Kanak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The BaBar Drift Chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The central drift chamber for the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B-factory at SLAC is a cylindrical chamber with a length of 280 cm and outer radius of 81 cm. It consists of 40 layers of small hexagonal cells arranged in 10 axial and stereo super-layers. In order to minimize multiple scattering, light materials are used for the mechanical structure, and the gas mixture is Helium based. The pulse-height and timing electronics are mounted directly on the chamber rear end-plate. A full length prototype of the BaBar drift chamber has been built. The analysis of cosmic ray events measures the spatial resolution averaged in the cell to be 130 m and the dE/dx resolution to be 6.8%, meeting the performance goals for the BaBar central tracker. The mechanical assembly and stringing of the chamber was completed in December 1997 and the detector will be integrated into BaBar during summer 1998. 1

G. Sciolla

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - BaBar Data Preserved in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to keep the BaBar virtual world safe and unchanging, isolated not only from the SLAC network, but from the rest of the World Wide Web. BaBar collaboration members can...

26

Bar-code automated waste tracking system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bar-Code Automated Waste Tracking System was designed to be a site-Specific program with a general purpose application for transportability to other facilities. The system is user-friendly, totally automated, and incorporates the use of a drive-up window that is close to the areas dealing in container preparation, delivery, pickup, and disposal. The system features ``stop-and-go`` operation rather than a long, tedious, error-prone manual entry. The system is designed for automation but allows operators to concentrate on proper handling of waste while maintaining manual entry of data as a backup. A large wall plaque filled with bar-code labels is used to input specific details about any movement of waste.

Hull, T.E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

American Bar Association Section on Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bar Association Section on Environment Bar Association Section on Environment Jump to: navigation, search Name American Bar Association Section on Environment Place Chicago, Illinois Zip 60610 Product The Section of Environment, Energy, and Resources is the premier forum for lawyers working in areas related to environment law, natural resources law, and energy law. References American Bar Association Section on Environment[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. American Bar Association Section on Environment is a company located in Chicago, Illinois . References ↑ "American Bar Association Section on Environment" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=American_Bar_Association_Section_on_Environment&oldid=342108

28

Study of the decay $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow?_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}?^{+}?^{-}$ and its intermediate states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the decay $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$, reconstructing the \\Lambda_{c}^{+} baryon in the $p K^{-}\\pi^{+}$ mode, using a data sample of $467\\times 10^{6}$ $B\\bar{B}$ pairs collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-2 storage rings at SLAC. We measure branching fractions for decays with intermediate $\\Sigma_{c}$ baryons to be ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2455)^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^{-}]=(21.3 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 5.5) \\times 10^{-5}$, ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2520)^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^{-}]=(11.5\\pm 1.0 \\pm 0.5 \\pm 3.0)\\times 10^{-5}$, ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2455)^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}]=(9.1 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.4 \\pm 2.4)\\times10^{-5}$, and ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2520)^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}]= (2.2 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.1\\pm 0.6) \\times 10^{-5}$, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and due to the uncertainty on the $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\rightarrow\\proton\\Km\\pi^{+}$ branching fraction, respectively. For decays without $\\Sigma_{c}(2455)$ or $\\Sigma_{c}(2520)$ resonances, we measure ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}]_{\\mathrm{non-\\Sigma_{c}}}=(79 \\pm 4 \\pm 4 \\pm 20)\\times10^{-5}$. The total branching fraction is determined to be ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}]_{\\mathrm{total}}=(123 \\pm 5 \\pm 7 \\pm 32)\\times10^{-5}$. We examine multibody mass combinations in the resonant three-particle $\\Sigma_{c}\\bar{p}\\pi$ final states and in the four-particle $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ final state, and observe different characteristics for the $\\bar{p}\\pi$ combination in neutral versus doubly-charged $\\Sigma_{c}$ decays.

The Babar Collaboration; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; E. Grauges; A. Palano; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; D. N. Brown; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Lynch; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. J. Asgeirsson; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; R. Y. So; A. Khan; V. E. Blinov; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; A. N. Yushkov; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; H. Atmacan; J. W. Gary; O. Long; G. M. Vitug; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; C. A. West; A. M. Eisner; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; A. J. Martinez; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; D. S. Chao; C. H. Cheng; B. Echenard; K. T. Flood; D. G. Hitlin; P. Ongmongkolkul; F. C. Porter; A. Y. Rakitin; R. Andreassen; Z. Huard; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; L. Sun; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; A. Gaz; U. Nauenberg; J. G. Smith; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; W. H. Toki; B. Spaan; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; D. Bernard; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; S. Playfer; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Fioravanti; I. Garzia; E. Luppi; L. Piemontese; V. Santoro; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; R. Contri; E. Guido; M. Lo Vetere; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; B. Bhuyan; V. Prasad; M. Morii; A. Adametz; U. Uwer; H. M. Lacker; T. Lueck; P. D. Dauncey; U. Mallik; C. Chen; J. Cochran; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; D. Derkach; G. Grosdidier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; B. Malaescu; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; J. P. Coleman; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. Di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; D. N. Brown; C. L. Davis; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; W. Gradl; K. Griessinger; A. Hafner; E. Prencipe; R. J. Barlow; G. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; E. Behn; R. Cenci; B. Hamilton; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; C. Dallapiccola; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; G. Sciolla; R. Cheaib; D. Lindemann; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; P. Biassoni; N. Neri; F. Palombo; S. Stracka; L. Cremaldi; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; P. Sonnek; D. J. Summers; X. Nguyen; M. Simard; P. Taras; G. De Nardo; D. Monorchio; G. Onorato; C. Sciacca; M. Martinelli; G. Raven; C. P. Jessop; J. M. LoSecco; W. F. Wang; K. Honscheid; R. Kass; J. Brau; R. Frey; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; E. Torrence; E. Feltresi; N. Gagliardi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; G. Simi; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; S. Akar; E. Ben-Haim; M. Bomben; G. R. Bonneaud; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; G. Marchiori; J. Ocariz; S. Sitt; M. Biasini; E. Manoni; S. Pacetti; A. Rossi; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; G. Casarosa; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; B. Oberhof; A. Perez; G. Rizzo; J. J. Walsh; D. Lopes Pegna; J. Olsen; A. J. S. Smith; F. Anulli; R. Faccini; F. Ferrarotto; F. Ferroni; M. Gaspero; L. Li Gioi; M. A. Mazzoni; G. Piredda; C. Bünger; O. Grünberg; T. Hartmann; T. Leddig; H. Schröder; C. Voß; R. Waldi; T. Adye; E. O. Olaiya; F. F. Wilson; S. Emery; G. Hamel de Monchenault; G. Vasseur; Ch. Y\\`; D. Aston; R. Bartoldus; J. F. Benitez; C. Cartaro; M. R. Convery; J. Dorfan; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; W. Dunwoodie; M. Ebert; R. C. Field; M. Franco Sevilla; B. G. Fulsom; A. M. Gabareen; M. T. Graham; P. Grenier; C. Hast; W. R. Innes; M. H. Kelsey; P. Kim; M. L. Kocian; D. W. G. S. Leith; P. Lewis; B. Lindquist; S. Luitz; V. Luth; H. L. Lynch; D. B. MacFarlane; D. R. Muller; H. Neal; S. Nelson; M. Perl; T. Pulliam; B. N. Ratcliff; A. Roodman; A. A. Salnikov; R. H. Schindler; A. Snyder; D. Su; M. K. Sullivan; J. Va'vra; A. P. Wagner; W. J. Wisniewski; M. Wittgen; D. H. Wright; H. W. Wulsin; C. C. Young; V. Ziegler; W. Park; M. V. Purohit; R. M. White; J. R. Wilson; A. Randle-Conde; S. J. Sekula; M. Bellis; P. R. Burchat; T. S. Miyashita; E. M. T. Puccio; M. S. Alam; J. A. Ernst; R. Gorodeisky; N. Guttman; D. R. Peimer; A. Soffer; S. M. Spanier; J. L. Ritchie; A. M. Ruland; R. F. Schwitters; B. C. Wray; J. M. Izen; X. C. Lou; F. Bianchi; D. Gamba; S. Zambito; L. Lanceri; L. Vitale; F. Martinez-Vidal; A. Oyanguren; P. Villanueva-Perez; H. Ahmed; J. Albert; Sw. Banerjee; F. U. Bernlochner; H. H. F. Choi; G. J. King; R. Kowalewski; M. J. Lewczuk; I. M. Nugent; J. M. Roney; R. J. Sobie; N. Tasneem; T. J. Gershon; P. F. Harrison; T. E. Latham; H. R. Band; S. Dasu; Y. Pan; R. Prepost; S. L. Wu

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Why Buckling Stellar Bars Weaken in Disk Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Young stellar bars in disk galaxies experience a vertical buckling instability which terminates their growth and thickens them, resulting in a characteristic peanut/boxy shape when viewed edge on. Using N-body simulations of galactic disks embedded in live halos, we have analyzed the bar structure throughout this instability and found that the outer third of the bar dissolves completely while the inner part (within the vertical inner Lindblad resonance) becomes less oval. The bar acquires the frequently observed peanut/boxy-shaped isophotes. We also find that the bar buckling is responsible for a mass injection above the plane, which is subsequently trapped by specific 3-D families of periodic orbits of particular shapes explaining the observed isophotes, in line with previous work. Using a 3-D orbit analysis and surfaces of sections, we infer that the outer part of the bar is dissolved by a rapidly widening stochastic region around its corotation radius -- a process related to the bar growth. This leads to a dramatic decrease in the bar size, decrease in the overall bar strength and a mild increase in its pattern speed, but is not expected to lead to a complete bar dissolution. The buckling instability appears primarily responsible for shortening the secular diffusion timescale to a dynamical one when building the boxy isophotes. The sufficiently long timescale of described evolution, ~1 Gyr, can affect the observed bar fraction in local universe and at higher redshifts, both through reduced bar strength and the absence of dust offset lanes in the bar.

Inma Martinez-Valpuesta; Isaac Shlosman

2004-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

30

Minimally flavored colored scalar in $\\bar B \\to D^{(*)} \\tau \\bar \  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presence of a colored scalar that is a weak doublet with fractional electric charges of $|Q|=2/3$ and $|Q|=5/3$ with mass below 1\\,TeV can provide an explanation of the observed branching ratios in $B \\to D^{(*)} \\tau \\bar \

Dorsner, Ilja; Kosnik, Nejc; Nisandzic, Ivan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Preheating Collector Bars and Cathode Blocks Prior to Rodding with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrically heating collector bar/cathode block assemblies uses less than 15% of the energy required for propane gas burner heating. The method is quiet, ...

32

Bus bar electrical feedthrough for electrorefiner system  

SciTech Connect

A bus bar electrical feedthrough for an electrorefiner system may include a retaining plate, electrical isolator, and/or contact block. The retaining plate may include a central opening. The electrical isolator may include a top portion, a base portion, and a slot extending through the top and base portions. The top portion of the electrical isolator may be configured to extend through the central opening of the retaining plate. The contact block may include an upper section, a lower section, and a ridge separating the upper and lower sections. The upper section of the contact block may be configured to extend through the slot of the electrical isolator and the central opening of the retaining plate. Accordingly, relatively high electrical currents may be transferred into a glovebox or hot-cell facility at a relatively low cost and higher amperage capacity without sacrificing atmosphere integrity.

Williamson, Mark; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

33

ORKPROCESSINSELECTIVNEURON BAR99 WIC69 WIL81 FIN79 AND81 HIN84 AND81 BAR81 KOH81  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BAR99 WIC69 WIL81 FIN79 AND81 HIN84 AND81 BAR81 KOH81 CATEGORIZ Figure 5: A sketch of the AIR system 3D interactive animation. Communications of the ACM 39.56{71. Rose, Daniel E., & Richard K. Belew of the 16th Annual Inter- national ACM/SIGIR Conference, 49{58, Pittsburgh, PA. ||, & Chris Buckley. 1992

Hearst, Marti

34

Distributed Generation Study/Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille < Distributed Generation Study Jump to: navigation, search Study Location Liverpool, New York Site Description Commercial-Restaurant Study Type Field Test Technology Internal Combustion Engine Prime Mover Aisin Seiki G60 Heat Recovery Systems Built-in Fuel Natural Gas System Installer ECO Technical Solutions System Enclosure Outdoor System Application Combined Heat and Power Number of Prime Movers 1 Stand-alone Capability None Power Rating 6 kW0.006 MW 6,000 W 6,000,000 mW 6.0e-6 GW 6.0e-9 TW Nominal Voltage (V) 240 Heat Recovery Rating (BTU/hr) 46105 Cooling Capacity (Refrig/Tons) Origin of Controller Manufacturer-Integrated Component Integration Customer Assembled Start Date 2005/07/10 Monitoring Termination Date 2005/07/21

35

Why Buckling Stellar Bars Weaken in Disk Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Young stellar bars in disk galaxies experience a vertical buckling instability which terminates their growth and thickens them, resulting in a characteristic peanut/boxy shape when viewed edge on. Using N-body simulations of galactic disks embedded in live halos, we have analyzed the bar structure throughout this instability and found that the outer third of the bar dissolves completely while the inner part (within the vertical inner Lindblad resonance) becomes less oval. The bar acquires the frequently observed peanut/boxy-shaped isophotes. We also find that the bar buckling is responsible for a mass injection above the plane, which is subsequently trapped by specific 3-D families of periodic orbits of particular shapes explaining the observed isophotes, in line with previous work. Using a 3-D orbit analysis and surfaces of sections, we infer that the outer part of the bar is dissolved by a rapidly widening stochastic region around its corotation radius -- a process related to the bar growth. This leads to a...

Martinez-Valpuesta, I

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

BARS REJUVENATING BULGES? EVIDENCE FROM STELLAR POPULATION ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

We obtained stellar ages and metallicities via spectrum fitting for a sample of 575 bulges with spectra available from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The structural properties of the galaxies have been studied in detail in 2009 by Gadotti and the sample contains 251 bulges in galaxies with bars. Using the whole sample, where galaxy stellar mass distributions for barred and unbarred galaxies are similar, we find that bulges in barred and unbarred galaxies occupy similar loci in the age versus metallicity plane. However, the distribution of bulge ages in barred galaxies shows an excess of populations younger than {approx}4 Gyr, when compared to bulges in unbarred galaxies. Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics confirm that the age distributions are different with a significance of 99.94%. If we select sub-samples for which the bulge stellar mass distributions are similar for barred and unbarred galaxies, this excess vanishes for galaxies with bulge mass log M < 10.1 M{sub Sun }, while for more massive galaxies we find a bimodal bulge age distribution for barred galaxies only, corresponding to two normal distributions with mean ages of 10.4 and 4.7 Gyr. We also find twice as much active galactic nuclei among barred galaxies, as compared to unbarred galaxies, for low-mass bulges. By combining a large sample of high-quality data with sophisticated image and spectral analysis, we are able to find evidence that the presence of bars affects the mean stellar ages of bulges. This lends strong support to models in which bars trigger star formation activity in the centers of galaxies.

Coelho, P. [Nucleo de Astrofisica Teorica, Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, R. Galvao Bueno 868, Liberdade 01506-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gadotti, D. A., E-mail: paula.coelho@cruzeirodosul.edu.br, E-mail: dgadotti@eso.org [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

37

Production of htt_bar and htT_bar in littlest Higgs model with T-parity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the littlest Higgs model with T-parity, which predicts a pair of T-even and T-odd partners for the top quark, the top quark interactions are altered with respect to the Standard Model predictions and deviation will manifest in various top quark processes. In this work we examine the effects in htt_bar productions at the ILC and LHC. We find that in the allowed parameter space, the cross sections can be significantly deviated from the Standard Model predictions and thus provide a good test for the littlest Higgs model with T-parity. We also examine the new production channel, the htT_bar or hTt_bar production, at the LHC, which give the same final states as htt_bar production due to the dominant decay T->Wb. We find that, compared with htt_bar production, this new production channel can have a sizable production rate for a T-quark below TeV scale. Such a production will be counted into htt_bar events or possibly extracted from htt_bar events, depending on if we can distinguish the T-quark from the top quark from mass reconstructions.

Lei Wang; Wenyu Wang; Jin Min Yang; Huanjun Zhang

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

38

Study of $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The decays $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$ have been investigated with a sample of 225.2 million $J/\\psi$ events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII $e^+e^-$ collider. The branching fractions are determined to be $\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p})=(2.112\\pm0.004\\pm0.031)\\times10^{-3}$ and $\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n})=(2.07\\pm0.01\\pm0.17)\\times10^{-3}$. Distributions of the angle $\\theta$ between the proton or anti-neutron and the beam direction are well described by the form $1+\\alpha\\cos^2\\theta$, and we find $\\alpha=0.595\\pm0.012\\pm0.015$ for $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $\\alpha=0.50\\pm0.04\\pm0.21$ for $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$. Our branching-fraction results suggest a large phase angle between the strong and electromagnetic amplitudes describing the $J/\\psi\\to N\\bar{N}$ decay.

Ablikim, M; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; An, Z H; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R B; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Berger, N; Bertani, M B; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, X; Calcaterra, A C; Cao, G F; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, Y; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Feng, C Q; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, B; Huang, G M; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y P; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jia, L K; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kavatsyuk, M; Kuehn, W; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Leung, J K C; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, N B; Li, Q J; Li, S L; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Liu, B J; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, C Y; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, Kun; Liu, Kai; Liu, K Y; Liu, P L; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X H; Liu, Y B; Liu, Y; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, H; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Morales, C Morales; Motzko, C; Muchnoi, N Yu; Nefedov, Y; Nicholson, C; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S P; Park, J W; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prencipe, E; Pun, C S J; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schulze, J; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, X D; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Thorndike, E H; Tian, H L; Toth, D; Ulrich, M U; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B Q; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, X F; Wang, X L; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Werner, M W; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, S X; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, H; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Xu, Y; Xu, Z R; Xue, F; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, T; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A Z; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J G; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, T R; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y S; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, J W; Zhao, K X; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, B; Zhong, J; Zhou, L; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, X W; Zhu, Y M; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H; Zuo, J X

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

A quark model of {bar {Lambda}}{Lambda} production in {bar p}p interactions  

SciTech Connect

A quark model which includes both scalar and vector contributions to the reaction mechanism (SV quark model) is used in a DWBA calculation of {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} production in {bar p}p interactions. Total and differential cross-sections, polarizations, depolarizations, and spin-correlation coefficients are computed for laboratory momenta from threshold to 1695 MeV/c. The free parameters of the calculation are the scalar and vector strengths, a quark cluster size parameter, and the parameters of the unknown {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} potentials. Good agreement with experiment is found for constructive interference of the scalar and vector terms, and for {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} potentials which differ from those suggested by several authors on the basis of SU(3) arguments. The fit to the data is better than that obtained by other quark models, which use only scalar or vector annihilation terms. The agreement with experiment is also better than that found in meson-exchange models. The recent suggestion [1] that measurement of the depolarization parameter D{sub nn} can be used to discriminate between meson-exchange and quark models is examined in detail. We conclude that a measurement of D{sub nn} will provide a test of which of these models, as presently constructed, is the more appropriate description of strangeness production in the {bar p}p {yields} {anti {Lambda}}{Lambda} reaction.

Alberg, M.A. [Seattle Univ., WA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Henley, E.M.; Wilets, L. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Kunz, P.D. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Nuclear Physics Lab.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Induction machine stray loss from inter-bar currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stray load loss refers generally to the sources of induction machine loss not accounted for by typical calculations of primary or secondary copper loss, no load core loss, or friction and windage loss. Harmonic rotor bar ...

Englebretson, Steven Carl

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "restaurant bar bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy proposed action to conduct a lead test assembly program to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor to produce tritium. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 22, 1997 EA-1210: Finding of No Significant Impact Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington July 22, 1997 EA-1210: Final Environmental Assessment

42

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - BaBar Searches for New...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 31, 2013 Scientists analyzing data from the BaBar experiment, which operated at SLAC between 1999 and 2008, recently published the results of a search for signs of...

43

A Cautionary Note on the Use of Error Bars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate studies often involve comparisons between estimates of some parameter derived from different observed and/or model-generated datasets. It is common practice to present estimates of two or more statistical quantities with error bars about ...

John R. Lanzante

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

The distribution of stellar population age in galactic bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent analysis of stellar populations in barred galaxies have focused on the spatial distribution of stellar population ages and metallicities. However, barred galaxies are complex objects where dynamical instabilities play a leading role in shaping any spatial distribution. The age distribution of stellar populations should thus be analyzed from the two points of view of stellar population evolution and dynamical secular evolution. Chemodynamical simulations of single barred galaxies with simple but realistic star formation and feedback recipes are used to produce face-on mass-weighted maps of stellar population ages. Luminosity-weighted maps in V-band are also displayed after calibrating the simulation with mass-to-light ratios provided by a synthesis population model. It is shown that inside a stellar bar two persistent diametrically opposed regions display a mean age lower than the surrounding average. These two low-age regions are due to the accumulation of young stellar populations trapped on elliptica...

Wozniak, H

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Exclusive initial-state-radiation production of the DD[over-bar], D[superscript *]D[over-bar] , and D[superscript *]D[over-bar][superscript * ] systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a study of the exclusive production of DD[over-bar], D[superscript *]D[over-bar], and D[superscript *]D[over-bar][superscript *] in initial-state-radiation events, from e[superscript +]e[superscript -] annihilations ...

Zhao, M.

46

Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students Remarkable Teacher Raises Bar for Building Students January 7, 2010 - 2:58pm Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy For 13 years, Tony Grahame has inspired students to pursue careers building sustainable, energy-efficient houses or to find other niches in the green-building industry. His Residential Building Technology program at Yavapai College in Prescott, Ariz., gets students out of the classroom and constructing real homes in a nearby subdivision. On the jobsite, they learn the skills and knowledge essential to launch their careers as the next generation of energy-efficient builders. Tony's expertise draws from technologies and strategies in residential efficiency and renewable energy developed through

47

~~~~: Gmt Lakes Cat-bar) ALTERNaTE I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

~~~: Gmt Lakes Cat-bar) ~~~: Gmt Lakes Cat-bar) ALTERNaTE I --------------------------------------- NAME: 333 Iv. Mkhi qr) Aw. thka o ~~~---~~~--~~~_-----__ C I TV : 8 Morim 'Love 82 10 bhh &Q Ir -+----------- STATE- fL I - ------ l OWNER(S) -__----_ past: Current: I --------------------____ Owner contacted q yes p no; _____--_____-____------~~~l if yes, data contacted -_--------__- TYPE OF OPERATION ---_------------- 0 Research & Development q Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & Analysis Facility Type p Manufacturing I ! fJ University 0 Research Organization ! 0 Government Sponsored F+ci li ty 0 Other ----~~-~~~----~------ 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CUNTRKT ----~---~__----_ / w Prime

48

The Fueling of Nuclear Activity: II. The Bar Properties of Seyfert and Normal Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a recent near-infrared imaging survey of samples of Seyfert and normal galaxies to study the role of bars in the fueling of nuclear activity. The active galaxy sample includes Seyfert galaxies in the Revised Shapely-Ames (RSA) and Sandage & Tammann's (1987) extension to this catalog. The normal galaxies were selected to match the Seyfert sample in Hubble type, redshift, inclination and blue luminosity. All the galaxies in both samples classified as barred in the RSA catalog are also barred in the near-infrared. In addition, ~55% of the galaxies classified as non-barred in the RSA show evidence for bars at 2.1 microns. Overall, ~70% of the galaxies observed show evidence for bar structures. The incidence of bars in the Seyfert and normal galaxies is similar, suggesting Seyfert nuclei do not occur preferentially in barred systems. Furthermore, a slightly higher percentage of normal galaxies have multiple-bar structures.

John S. Mulchaey; Michael W. Regan

1997-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

49

Antihydrogen $(\\bar{\\rm{H}})$ and muonic antihydrogen $(\\bar{\\rm{H}}_{\\mu})$ formation in low energy three-charge-particle collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A few-body formalism is applied for computation of two different three-charge-particle systems. The first system is a collision of a slow antiproton, $\\bar{\\rm{p}}$, with a positronium atom: Ps$=(e^+e^-)$ $-$ a bound state of an electron and a positron. The second problem is a collision of $\\bar{\\rm{p}}$ with a muonic muonium atom, i.e. true muonium $-$ a bound state of two muons one positive and one negative: Ps$_{\\mu}=(\\mu^+\\mu^-)$. The total cross section of the following two reactions: $\\bar{\\rm p}+(e^+e^-) \\rightarrow \\bar{\\rm{H}} + e^-$ and $\\bar{\\rm p}+(\\mu^+\\mu^-) \\rightarrow \\bar{\\rm{H}}_{\\mu} + \\mu^-$, where $\\bar{\\rm{H}}=(\\bar{\\rm p}e^+)$ is antihydrogen and $\\bar{\\rm{H}}_{\\mu}=(\\bar{\\rm p}\\mu^+)$ is a muonic antihydrogen atom, i.e. a bound state of $\\bar{\\rm{p}}$ and $\\mu^+$, are computed in the framework of a set of coupled two-component Faddeev-Hahn-type (FH-type) equations. Unlike the original Faddeev approach the FH-type equations are formulated in terms of only two but relevant components: $\\...

Sultanov, Renat A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Some aspects of $?^+$ parity determination in the reaction $? N\\to ?^+ \\bar{K}\\to N K \\bar{K}$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the problem of how to determine the parity of the $\\Theta^+$ pentaquark in the reaction $\\gamma N\\to K\\Theta\\to NK\\bar{K}$, where $N=n,p$. Our model calculations indicate that the contribution of the non-resonant background of the reaction $\\gamma N\\to NK\\bar{K}$ cannot be neglected, and that suggestions to determine the parity based solely on the initial-stage process $\\gamma N\\to K\\Theta$ cannot be implemented cleanly. We discuss the various mechanisms that contribute to the background, and we identify some spin observables which are sensitive.

A. I. Titov; H. Ejiri; H. Haberzettl; K. Nakayama

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

51

Interactive SIGHT: textual access to simple bar charts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information graphics, such as bar charts and line graphs, are an important component of many articles from popular media. The majority of such graphics have an intention (a high-level message) to communicate to the graph viewer. Since the intended message ... Keywords: Accessibility, Assistive technology, Graph summarization, Information graphics, Visual impairments

Seniz Demir; David Oliver; Edward Schwartz; Stephanie Elzer; Sandra Carberry; Kathleen F. Mccoy; Daniel Chester

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

TWO-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF BARRED GALAXIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Barred galaxies are known to possess magnetic fields that may affect the properties of bar substructures such as dust lanes and nuclear rings. We use two-dimensional high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to investigate the effects of magnetic fields on the formation and evolution of such substructures, as well as on the mass inflow rates to the galaxy center. The gaseous medium is assumed to be infinitesimally thin, isothermal, non-self-gravitating, and threaded by initially uniform, azimuthal magnetic fields. We find that there exists an outermost x{sub 1}-orbit relative to which gaseous responses to an imposed stellar bar potential are completely different between inside and outside. Inside this orbit, gas is shocked into dust lanes and infalls to form a nuclear ring. Magnetic fields are compressed in dust lanes, reducing their peak density. Magnetic stress removes further angular momentum of the gas at the shocks, temporarily causing the dust lanes to bend into an 'L' shape and eventually leading to a smaller and more centrally distributed ring than in unmagnetized models. The mass inflow rates in magnetized models correspondingly become larger, by more than two orders of magnitude when the initial fields have an equipartition value with thermal energy, than in the unmagnetized counterparts. Outside the outermost x{sub 1}-orbit, on the other hand, an MHD dynamo due to the combined action of the bar potential and background shear operates near the corotation and bar-end regions, efficiently amplifying magnetic fields. The amplified fields shape into trailing magnetic arms with strong fields and low density. The base of the magnetic arms has a thin layer in which magnetic fields with opposite polarity reconnect via a tearing-mode instability. This produces numerous magnetic islands with large density that propagate along the arms to turn the outer disk into a highly chaotic state.

Kim, Woong-Tae [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Stone, James M., E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jstone@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users...

54

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - BaBar Data Hint at Cracks...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Press Release Archive BaBar Data Hint at Cracks in the Standard Model June 18, 2012 Menlo Park, Calif. - Recently analyzed data from the BaBar experiment may suggest possible flaws...

55

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 15 Soap Bar Performance Evaluation Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 15 Soap Bar Performance Evaluation Methods Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 15 Soap Bar Performance Evaluation

56

Spreader-Bar Radiation Detection System Enhancements: A Modeling and Simulation Study  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the modeling and simulation results of the investigation of enhanced spreader bar radiation detection systems.

Ely, James H.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Batdorf, Michael T.; Baciak, James E.; Hensley, Walter K.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Robinson, Sean M.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Schweppe, John E.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

57

MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bar Field Bend Bar Field Bend < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.8967,"lon":-89.6897,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

58

Diamond Bar, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bar, California: Energy Resources Bar, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.0286226°, -117.8103367° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.0286226,"lon":-117.8103367,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

59

Analysis of B ? ?l? Decays With BaBar  

SciTech Connect

As part of the BaBar project at SLAC to study the properties of B mesons, we have carried out a study of the exclusive charmless semileptonic decay mode B ? ?l?, which can be used to determine the magnitude of the Cabbibo- Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element Vub. Using simulated event samples, this study focuses on determining criteria on variables for selection of B ? ?l? signal and suppression of background from other types of BB events and continuum processes. In addition, we determine optimal cuts on variables to ensure a good neutrino reconstruction. With these selection cuts, we were able to achieve a signal-to-background ratio of 0.68 and a signal efficiency of the order of 1%. Applying these cuts to a sample of 83 million BB events recorded by BaBar in e+e– collisions at the (4S) resonance, we obtain a yield of 115 ± 19 B ? ?l? decays.

Chu, Y.; Littlejohn, B.; Binfelder, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Measurements of Charged Current Lepton Universality and $|V_{us}|$ using Tau Lepton Decays to $e^- \\bar{\  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using 467 $fb^{-1}$ of $e^+e^-$ annihilation data collected with the BaBar detector, we measure $\\frac{{\\cal{B}}(\\tau^- \\to \\mu^- \\bar{\

Aubert, B

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "restaurant bar bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Electroweak Penguin and Leptonic Decays at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

Recent BABAR results on electroweak penguin and leptonic decays are reviewed. In particular, the measurements of B {yields} K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} and the preliminary results on B {yields} X{sub s}l{sup +}l{sup -} are presented. Also summarized are the preliminary limits on B{sup +} {yields} l{sup +}{nu} (l = e,{mu}) and B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}.

Bucci, F.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

62

Semileptonic decays $B/B_s \\to (?,\\etar, G)(l^+l^-,l\\bar?,?\\bar?)$ in the perturbative QCD approach beyond the leading order  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we make a systematic study of the semileptonic decays $B/B_s \\to (\\eta,\\etar, G)(l^+l^-,l\\bar{\

Wen-Fei Wang; Ying-Ying Fan; Min Liu; Zhen-Jun Xiao

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

63

Energy dependence of $\\bar{K}N$ interaction in nuclear medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When the $\\bar{K}N$ system is submerged in nuclear medium the $\\bar{K}N$ scattering amplitude and the final state branching ratios exhibit a strong energy dependence when going to energies below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold. A sharp increase of $\\bar{K}N$ attraction below the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold provides a link between shallow $\\bar{K}$-nuclear potentials based on the chiral $\\bar{K}N$ amplitude evaluated at threshold and the deep phenomenological optical potentials obtained in fits to kaonic atoms data. We show the energy dependence of the in-medium $K^{-}p$ amplitude and demonstrate the impact of energy dependent branching ratios on the $\\Lambda$-hypernuclear production rates. \\keywords{kaon-nucleon amplitude \\and nuclear medium \\and hypernuclei

A. Cieply

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

64

Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330 steel with kolsky bar techniques.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical striker set inside the gun barrel is launched to impact on the end cap that is threaded into the open end of the gun barrel, producing a tension on the gun barrel and the incident bar.

Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330-V steel with kolsky bar techniques.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical striker set inside the gun barrel is launched to impact on the end cap that is threaded into the open end of the gun barrel, producing a tension on the gun barrel and the incident bar.

Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Thermal and environmental effects on fiber-reinforced polymer reinforcing bars and reinforced concrete elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corrosion of steel reinforcement in bridge decks results in high repair costs, unwanted traffic disruption, and unsafe structures. To help alleviate this problem, non-metallic fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) bars are being studied as an alternate type of reinforcement in bridge decks. In order to determine the suitability of the use of FRP bars, a number of tests have been performed on FRP bars to evaluate their long-term performance. These tests include uniaxial tension tests under a variety of environmental conditions and thermal expansion of the bars embedded in concrete. In an effort to characterize the FRP bars and to gain insight into their long-term performance, batteries of tests have been carried out. Samples from three different manufacturers were exposed under different environmental conditions and tested in uniaxial tension. For one of the bar types, the strength increased, while the other two bar types lost strength. In all cases, the modulus of the bars increased with exposure time. In addition, FRP reinforced concrete specimens were evaluated for thermal expansion. The results indicate that thermal cracking of the concrete by FRP bar expansion is not a significant problem.

Schaefer, Benjamin Carl

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor to continue with the project, the Watts Bar Dam Project was canceled and the Exploranium radiation monitors were removed from the doors of Watts Bar Dam in early 2006. The DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office decided to proceed with a Pilot building on the ORNL work performed at the TN and SC weigh stations in the highway sector of the Trusted Corridors project and eventually expanded it to other southern states under the name of Southeastern Corridor Pilot Project (SETCP). Many of the Phase I goals were achieved however real-world test data of private watercraft and barges was never obtained.

Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Measurement of \\mathcal{B}(\\tau^{-}\\-->\\bar{K^{0}}\\pi^{-}\  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary measurement of the branching fraction {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) is made using 384.6 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data provided by the PEP-II collider, operating primarily at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV, and recorded using the BABAR detector. From this they measure: {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.840 {+-} 0.004(stat) {+-} 0.023(syst))%. This result is the most precise measurement to date and is consistent with the world average.

Wren, A

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

69

X-ray nuclear activity in S4G barred galaxies: No link between bar strength and co-occurrent supermassive black hole fueling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stellar bars can lead to gas inflow toward the center of a galaxy and stimulate nuclear star formation. However, there is no compelling evidence on whether they also feed a central supermassive black hole: by measuring the fractions of barred active and inactive galaxies, previous studies have yielded conflicting results. In this paper, we aim to understand the lack of observational evidence for bar-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity by studying a sample of 41 nearby (d nuclear 2--10 keV X-ray luminosities and estimate Eddington ratios, together with Spitzer 3.6um imaging to quantify the strength of the stellar bar in two independent ways: (1) from its structure, as traced by its ellipticity and boxiness, and (2) from its gravitational torque Q_b, taken as the maximum ratio of the tangential force to the mean background radial force. In this way, rather than discretizing th...

Cisternas, Mauricio; Knapen, Johan H; Kim, Taehyun; Díaz-García, Simón; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; González-Martín, Omaira; Ho, Luis C; Elmegreen, Bruce G; Zaritsky, Dennis; Sheth, Kartik; Athanassoula, E; Bosma, Albert; Comerón, Sébastien; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; De Paz, Armando Gil; Hinz, Joannah L; Holwerda, Benne W; Laine, Jarkko; Meidt, Sharon; Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Mizusawa, Trisha; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Regan, Michael; Seibert, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Search for low-mass Higgs and dark bosons at BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present BaBar latest results for the direct search of a light CP-odd Higgs boson using radiative decays of the Y(nS) (n=1,2,3) resonances in different final states. I also present the results for the search of a hidden sector gauge and Higgs bosons using the full BaBar datasample.

Oberhof, Benjamin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Research on Vortex Unstablity Caused by Bending Deformation of Drilling Bar in BTA Deep Hole Machining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vortex and unstability of bending boring bar caused by cutting fluid force are researched, with Timoshenko beam model and mated vibration model, based on which machining quality of BTA deep hole drilling and tools life can be promoted in practice. Linear ... Keywords: deep hole boring, boring bar, Timoshenko beam, mating vibration, vortex motion stability

Zhanqi Hu; Wu Zhao

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Using Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Nuclear Dust Morphology to Rule Out Bars Fueling Seyfert Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If AGN are powered by the accretion of matter onto massive black holes, how does the gas in the host galaxy lose the required angular momentum to approach the black hole? Gas easily transfers angular momentum to stars in strong bars, making them likely candidates. Although ground-based searches for bars in active galaxies using both optical and near infrared surface brightness have not found any excess of bars relative to quiescent galaxies, the searches have not been able to rule out small-scale nuclear bars. To look for these nuclear bars we use HST WFPC2-NICMOS color maps to search for the straight dust lane signature of strong bars. Of the twelve Seyfert galaxies in our sample, only three have dust lanes consistent with a strong nuclear bar. Therefore, strong nuclear bars cannot be the primary fueling mechanism for Seyfert nuclei. We do find that a majority of the galaxies show an spiral morphology in their dust lanes. These spiral arms may be a possible fueling mechanism.

Michael W. Regan; John S. Mulchaey

1999-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

73

Observation of ?_{cJ} decaying into the p\\bar{p}K^{+}K^{-} final state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First measurements of the decays of the three $\\chi_{cJ}$ states to $p\\bar{p}K^{+}K^{-}$ final states are presented. Intermediate $\\phi\\to K^{+}K^{-}$ and $\\Lambda(1520)\\to pK^{-}$ resonance states are observed, and branching fractions for $\\chi_{cJ}\\to \\bar{p}K^{+}\\Lambda(1520)$, $\\Lambda(1520) \\bar{\\Lambda}(1520)$, and $\\phi p\\bar{p}$ are reported. We also measure branching fractions for direct $\\chi_{cJ}\\to p\\bar{p} K^{+}K^{-}$ decays. These are first observations of $\\chi_{cJ}$ decays to unstable baryon resonances and provide useful information about the $\\chi_{cJ}$ states. The experiment uses samples of $\\chi_{cJ}$ mesons produced via radiative transitions from 106 million $\\psi^{\\prime}$ mesons collected in the BESIII detector at the BEPCII $e^+e^-$ collider.

BESIII Collaboration

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing 7: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability August 16, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability PLATFORM: Version(s): Mozilla Firefox 6 - 12 ABSTRACT: To exploit this issue, an attacker must entice an unsuspecting user to follow a crafted URI. REFERENCE LINKS: http://www.securityfocus.com/bid/54585 CVE-2012-1950 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: The drag-and-drop implementation in Mozilla Firefox 4.x through 13.0 and Firefox ESR 10.x before 10.0.6 allows remote attackers to spoof the address bar by canceling a page load. mozilla Firefox is prone to a URI-spoofing spoofing vulnerability. Attackers may exploit this issue to display

75

U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

37: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing 37: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability August 16, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability PLATFORM: Version(s): Mozilla Firefox 6 - 12 ABSTRACT: To exploit this issue, an attacker must entice an unsuspecting user to follow a crafted URI. REFERENCE LINKS: http://www.securityfocus.com/bid/54585 CVE-2012-1950 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: The drag-and-drop implementation in Mozilla Firefox 4.x through 13.0 and Firefox ESR 10.x before 10.0.6 allows remote attackers to spoof the address bar by canceling a page load. mozilla Firefox is prone to a URI-spoofing spoofing vulnerability. Attackers may exploit this issue to display

76

Evidence for Spin Correlation in t(t)over-bar Production  

SciTech Connect

We present a measurement of the ratio of events with correlated t and {bar t} spins to the total number of t{bar t} events. This ratio f is evaluated using a matrix-element-based approach in 729 t{bar t} candidate events with a single lepton {ell} (electron or muon) and at least four jets. The analyzed p{bar p} collisions data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb{sup -1} and were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Combining this result with a recent measurement of f in dileptonic final states, we find f in agreement with the standard model. In addition, the combination provides evidence for the presence of spin correlation in t{bar t} events with a significance of more than 3 standard deviations.

Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De la Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; la Cruz, I. Heredia-De; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

77

SQA(TM): Surface Quality Assured Steel Bar Program  

SciTech Connect

OG Technologies, Inc. (OGT) has led this SQA (Surface Quality Assured Steel Bar) program to solve the major surface quality problems plaguing the US special quality steel bars and rods industry and their customers, based on crosscutting sensors and controls technologies. Surface defects in steel formed in a hot rolling process are one of the most common quality issues faced by the American steel industry, accounting for roughly 50% of the rejects or 2.5% of the total shipment. Unlike other problems such as the mechanical properties of the steel product, most surface defects are sporadic and cannot be addressed based on sampling techniques. This issue hurts the rolling industry and their customers in their process efficiency and operational costs. The goal of this program is to develop and demonstrate an SQA prototype, with synergy of HotEye® and other innovations, that enables effective rolling process control and efficient quality control. HotEye®, OGT’s invention, delivers high definition images of workpieces at or exceeding 1,450?C while the workpieces travel at 100 m/s. The elimination of surface defect rejects will be achieved through the integration of imaging-based quality assessment, advanced signal processing, predictive process controls and the integration with other quality control tools. The SQA program team, composed of entities capable of and experienced in (1) research, (2) technology manufacturing, (3) technology sales and marketing, and (4) technology end users, is very strong. There were 5 core participants: OGT, Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), University of Wisconsin (UW), Charter Steel (Charter) and ArcelorMittal Indiana Harbor (Inland). OGT served as the project coordinator. OGT participated in both research and commercialization. GIT and UW provided significant technical inputs to this SQA project. The steel mills provided access to their rolling lines for data collection, design of experiments, host of technology test and verification, and first-hand knowledge of the most advanced rolling line operation in the US. This project lasted 5 years with 5 major tasks. The team successfully worked through the tasks with deliverables in detection, data analysis and process control. Technologies developed in this project were commercialized as soon as they were ready. For instance, the advanced surface defect detection algorithms were integrated into OGT’s HotEye® RSB systems late 2005, resulting in a more matured product serving the steel industry. In addition to the commercialization results, the SQA team delivered 7 papers and 1 patent. OGT was also recognized by two prestigious awards, including the R&D100 Award in 2006. To date, this SQA project has started to make an impact in the special bar quality industry. The resulted product, HotEye® RSB systems have been accepted by quality steel mills worldwide. Over 16 installations were completed, including 1 in Argentina, 2 in Canada, 2 in China, 2 in Germany, 2 in Japan, and 7 in the U.S. Documented savings in reduced internal rejects, improved customer satisfaction and simplified processes were reported from various mills. In one case, the mill reported over 50% reduction in its scrap, reflecting a significant saving in energy and reduction in emission. There exist additional applications in the steel industry where the developed technologies can be used. OGT is working toward bringing the developed technologies to more applications. Examples are: in-line inspection and process control for continuous casting, steel rails, and seamless tube manufacturing.

Tzyy-Shuh Chang; Jianjun Shi; Shiyu Zhou

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

78

Nonlinear Development of the Secular Bar-mode Instability in Rotating Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have modelled the nonlinear development of the secular bar-mode instability that is driven by gravitational radiation-reaction (GRR) forces in rotating neutron stars. In the absence of any competing viscous effects, an initially uniformly rotating, axisymmetric $n=1/2$ polytropic star with a ratio of rotational to gravitational potential energy $T/|W| = 0.181$ is driven by GRR forces to a bar-like structure, as predicted by linear theory. The pattern frequency of the bar slows to nearly zero, that is, the bar becomes almost stationary as viewed from an inertial frame of reference as GRR removes energy and angular momentum from the star. In this ``Dedekind-like'' state, rotational energy is stored as motion of the fluid in highly noncircular orbits inside the bar. However, in less than 10 dynamical times after its formation, the bar loses its initially coherent structure as the ordered flow inside the bar is disrupted by what appears to be a purely hydrodynamical, short-wavelength, ``shearing'' type instability. The gravitational waveforms generated by such an event are determined, and an estimate of the detectability of these waves is presented.

Shangli Ou; Joel E. Tohline; Lee Lindblom

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The Bar-Halo Interaction - II. Secular evolution and the religion of N-body simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores resonance-driven secular evolution between a bar and dark-matter halo using N-body simulations. We make direct comparisons to our analytic theory (Weinberg & Katz 2005) to demonstrate the great difficulty that an N-body simulation has representing these dynamics for realistic astronomical interactions. In a dark-matter halo, the bar's angular momentum is coupled to the central density cusp (if present) by the Inner Lindblad Resonance. Owing to this angular momentum transfer and self-consistent re-equilibration, strong realistic bars WILL modify the cusp profile, lowering the central densities within about 30% of the bar radius in a few bar orbits. Past results to the contrary (Sellwood 2006, McMillan & Dehnen 2005) may be the result of weak bars or numerical artifacts. The magnitude depends on many factors and we illustrate the sensitivity of the response to the dark-matter profile, the bar shape and mass, and the galaxy's evolutionary history. For example, if the bar length is comparable to the size of a central dark-matter core, the bar may exchange angular momentum without changing its pattern speed significantly. We emphasise that this apparently simple example of secular evolution is remarkably subtle in detail and conclude that an N-body exploration of any astronomical scenario requires a deep investigation into the underlying dynamical mechanisms for that particular problem to set the necessary requirements for the simulation parameters and method (e.g. particle number and Poisson solver). Simply put, N-body simulations do not divinely reveal truth and hence their results are not infallible. They are unlikely to provide useful insight on their own, particularly for the study of even more complex secular processes such as the production of pseudo-bulges and disk heating.

Martin D. Weinberg; Neal Katz

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

80

BaBar Results on E+ E- ---> P Anti-P By Means of ISR  

SciTech Connect

BaBar has measured with unprecedented accuracy the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} p{bar p} cross section from the threshold up to Q{sub p{bar p}}{sup 2} {approx} 20 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 4}, finding out an unexpected cross section, with plateaux and negative steps. Evidence for a ratio |G{sub E}/G{sub M}| > 1 has also been found as well as a sudden variation in |G{sub M}| just above the threshold.

Ferroli, Rinaldo Baldini; /Enrico Fermi Ctr., Rome /Frascati

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "restaurant bar bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Robinson Bar Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Clayton, Idaho Coordinates 44.2593623°, -114.4017296° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

82

Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Baker's Bar M Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Adams, Oregon Coordinates 45.767354°, -118.5624734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

83

T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets 5: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code May 4, 2011 - 7:15am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in IBM Rational System Architect. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. PLATFORM: IBM Rational System 11.4 and prior versions ABSTRACT: There is a high risk security vulnerability with the ActiveBar ActiveX controls used by IBM Rational System Architect. reference LINKS: IBM Advisory: 21497689 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025464 CVE-2011-1207 Secunia Advisory: SA43399 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A remote user can create a specially crafted HTML that, when loaded by the

84

DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application December 28, 2009 - 10:57am Addthis Washington, DC - The Office of General Counsel was recently asked whether the Sudan Accountability and Divestment Act of 2007 barred the Department from considering a loan guarantee application submitted by Areva Enrichment Services LLC to help fund a uranium enrichment facility in Idaho. The simple answer is no. The Act, as passed by Congress, applies only to government procurements. It does not apply to financial assistance programs or loan guarantee programs. The Act, as passed by Congress, also applies only to the investments of the actual offerors (or contractors) for

85

Higgs boson pair production at the LHC in the $b \\bar{b} W^+ W^-$ channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider Higgs boson pair production at the LHC in the $b \\bar{b} W^+ W^-$ channel, with subsequent decay of the $W^+W^-$ pair into $\\ell \

Papaefstathiou, Andreas; Zurita, José

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

High strain rate mechanical characterization of trabecular bone utilizing the split-Hopkinson pressure bar technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique has been in use in one form or another for more than fifty years and has recently gained a great deal of attention for its ability to characterize materials such as metals, ...

Johnson, Timothy Paul Mahal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Experimental Use as a Potential Bar to Patentability in the U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are a number of activities that, by statute, prevent an inventor from obtaining a valid U.S. patent on an invention. Two of the most common statutory bars to ...

88

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 5 Chemistry, Formulation, and Performance of Syndet and Combo Bars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 5 Chemistry, Formulation, and Performance of Syndet and Combo Bars Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 5 Chemistry

89

Locating of leaks in water-cooled generator stator bars using perfluorocarbon tracers  

SciTech Connect

Water cooled stator bars in power plant generators often fail during the maintenance cycle due to water leakage. After the hydrogen pressure in the generator shell has been released water can leak through cracks in the copper and through the insulation. Leaking bars, but not the leaks themselves, are detected with so-called ``hi-pot`` (high potential) tests where direct electrical current is applied to the stator bar windings. A study initiated by ConEd and Brookhaven`s Tracer Technology Center to explore the cause of these leakage problems to determine if the failures originate in the manufacturing process or are created in service by phase related torque stresses. To this purpose bars that had failed the hi-pot test were investigated first with the insulation in place and then stripped to the bare copper. The bars were pressurized with gases containing perfluorocarbon tracers and the magnitude and location of the leaks was detected by using tracers technology principles and instruments such as the ``double source`` method and the Dual Trap Analyzer. In the second part of the project the windings within a generator were tested in-situ for leaks during an outage using tracer principles. Recommendations are given suggesting the shut down of stator bar cooling water before hydrogen bleeding during outages and a revision of the current vent flow rate. The new standard should establish a reasonable leak rate for the stator bar windings proper and exclude leakage of pump seals and connections. Testing during the maintenance cycle in generators should include routine tracer leak detection following the hi-pot test.

Loss, W.M.; Dietz, R.N.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Locating of leaks in water-cooled generator stator bars using perfluorocarbon tracers  

SciTech Connect

Water cooled stator bars in power plant generators often fail during the maintenance cycle due to water leakage. After the hydrogen pressure in the generator shell has been released water can leak through cracks in the copper and through the insulation. Leaking bars, but not the leaks themselves, are detected with so-called hi-pot'' (high potential) tests where direct electrical current is applied to the stator bar windings. A study initiated by ConEd and Brookhaven's Tracer Technology Center to explore the cause of these leakage problems to determine if the failures originate in the manufacturing process or are created in service by phase related torque stresses. To this purpose bars that had failed the hi-pot test were investigated first with the insulation in place and then stripped to the bare copper. The bars were pressurized with gases containing perfluorocarbon tracers and the magnitude and location of the leaks was detected by using tracers technology principles and instruments such as the double source'' method and the Dual Trap Analyzer. In the second part of the project the windings within a generator were tested in-situ for leaks during an outage using tracer principles. Recommendations are given suggesting the shut down of stator bar cooling water before hydrogen bleeding during outages and a revision of the current vent flow rate. The new standard should establish a reasonable leak rate for the stator bar windings proper and exclude leakage of pump seals and connections. Testing during the maintenance cycle in generators should include routine tracer leak detection following the hi-pot test.

Loss, W.M.; Dietz, R.N.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

AUTOMATIC DETECTION OF GRAVEL BARS IN A RIVER CHANNEL FROM AIRBORNE LIDAR-DERIVED DTM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airborne Laser Scanning or LiDAR data are widely used nowadays in river valleys for topography and hydro-morphology. However, the large data sets of unprocessed 3D point clouds require some challenging treatment and end-users may prefer to deal with DTMs (Digital Terrain Models) derived from LiDAR surveys. Without any complementary data (such as field survey or photographs) detecting position and shape of gravel bars in a river is a demanding task, especially if done manually. This paper presents a method for automatic segmentation of a river channel into distinct hydro- morphological entities: water, gravel bars, banks,... This method is based on image processing algorithms (region growing segmentation combined with morphological closing and altitude thresholding) in order to separate water from other elements present in the channel, based on the altitude information. This method is applied to a reach of the Arcen-Maurienne River, France, with alternate gravel bars. The only data source is the 0.25 m resolution DTM, derived from an airborne LiDAR survey. Results show that the developed method succeeds in automatically delimiting the main channel and in detecting gravel bars. It is then possible to get global information on the gravel bars such as location along the river or emerged surface area and topography.

Lionel Pénard; Maxime Morel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Diffractive Dijet Production in $\\bar{p}p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV  

SciTech Connect

We report on a study of diffractive dijet production in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}p collider. A data sample from 310 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by triggering on a high transverse energy jet, E{sub T}{sup jet}, in coincidence with a recoil antiproton detected in a Roman pot spectrometer is used to measure the ratio of single-diffractive to inclusive-dijet event rates as a function of x{sup {bar p}} of the interacting parton in the antiproton, the Bjorken-x, x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}}, and a Q{sup 2} {approx} (E{sub T}{sup jet}){sup 2} in the ranges 10{sup -3} < x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} < 10{sup -1} and 10{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 10{sup 4} GeV{sup 2}, respectively. Results are presented for the region of {bar p}-momentum-loss fraction 0.03 < {zeta}{sub {bar p}} < 0.09 and a four-momentum transfer squared t{sub {bar p}} > -4 GeV{sup 2}. The t{sub {bar p}} dependence is measured as a function of Q{sup 2} and x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} and compared with that of inclusive single diffraction dissociation. We find weak x{sub Bj}{sup bar p}} and Q{sup 2} dependencies in the ratio of single diffractive to inclusive event rates, and no significant Q{sup 2} dependence in the diffractive t{sub {bar p}} distributions.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Albrow, M.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Search for a narrow t(t)over-bar resonance in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect

We report a search for a narrow t{bar t} resonance that decays into a lepton+jets final state based on an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We set upper limits on the production cross section of such a resonance multiplied by its branching fraction to t{bar t}. We exclude a leptophobic topcolor Z' at the 95% confidence level for masses below 835 GeV (940 GeV) if its width is 1.2% (3%) of its mass. We also exclude color octet vector bosons (colorons) with masses below 775 GeV.

Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph; Grivaz J-F; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

94

Search for D0 - D0bar Mixing and Rare Charm Decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on a dataset acquired by the BaBar experiment running on and near the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance from 1999-2002, limits are set on the rate of $D^0$-- $\\kern 0.2em\\bar{\\kern -0.2em D}{}^0$ mixing using the decay mode $D^{*+} \\to D^0 \\pi^{+}$, followed by a semi-leptonic decay of the $D^0$. Results are compared to previous BaBar analysis using hadronic decays. We also report on a search for the flavor-changing neutral current decays $D^0 \\to e^{+} e^{-}$ ($\\mu^{+} \\mu^{-}$) and the lepton-flavor violation decays $D^0 \\to e^{\\pm} \\mu^{\\mp}$.

U. Egede; for the BABAR Collaboration

2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

95

Multipole Field Effects for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities  

SciTech Connect

The superconducting parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity is currently being considered as one of the design options in rf separation for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for the crabbing cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade. Knowledge of multipole field effects is important for accurate beam dynamics study of rf structures. The multipole components can be accurately determined numerically using the electromagnetic surface field data in the rf structure. This paper discusses the detailed analysis of those components for the fundamental deflecting/crabbing mode and higher order modes in the parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity.

De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika [JLAB, Old Dominion U.; Delayen, Jean Roger [Old Dominion U.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Energy Calibration of the BaBar EMC Using the Pi0 Invariant Mass Method  

SciTech Connect

The BaBar electromagnetic calorimeter energy calibration method was compared with the local and global peak iteration procedures, of Crystal Barrel and CLEO-II. An investigation was made of the possibility of {Upsilon}(4S) background reduction which could lead to increased statistics over a shorter time interval, for efficient calibration runs. The BaBar software package was used with unreconstructed data to study the energy response of the calorimeter, by utilizing the {pi}{sup 0} mass constraint on pairs of photon clusters.

Tanner, David J.; /Manchester U.

2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

97

3D Hopkinson bar: new experiments for dynamic testing on soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The direct analysis of the dynamic response of materials is possible using Split Hopkinson pressure bar method. For soils, it has to be adapted since the specimen has generally poor mechanical properties. An original experimental arrangement called "Three-Dimensional Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar" (3D SHPB) is proposed. It allows the measurement of the complete three-dimensional dynamic response of soils. Different types of confinement systems are used. The results on different loading paths are compared with other works on sand and clay. The analysis at grain-size level gives further elements on the comminution process.

Semblat, J F; Gary, G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Designs of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting Cavities for Deflecting/Crabbing Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties, compared to other conventional designs, that is currently being considered for a number of applications. The new parallel-bar design with curved loading elements and circular or elliptical outer conductors have improved properties compared to the designs with rectangular outer conductors. We present the designs proposed as deflecting cavities for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for Project-X and as crabbing cavities for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade and electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab.

J.R. Delayen, S.U. De Silva

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Regularization of singular terms in $N\\bar{N}$ potential model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest a method of singular terms regularization in potential model of $N\\bar{N}$ interaction. This method is free from any uncertainties, related to the usual cut-off procedure and based on the fact, that in the presence of sufficiently strong short-range annihilation $N$ and $\\bar{N}$ never approach close enough to each other. The effect of mentioned singular terms of OBE potential, modified by annihilation is shown to be repulsive. The obtained results for S- and P-wave scattering lengths are in agreement with existing theoretical models.

O. D. Dalkarov A. Yu. Voronin

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

100

The Visibility of Galactic Bars and Spiral Structure At High Redshifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the visibility of galactic bars and spiral structure in the distant Universe by artificially redshifting 101 B-band CCD images of local spiral galaxies from the Ohio State University Bright Spiral Galaxy Survey. Our artificially redshifted images correspond to Hubble Space Telescope I-band observations of the local galaxy sample seen at z=0.7, with integration times matching those of both the very deep Northern Hubble Deep Field data, and the much shallower Flanking Field observations. The expected visibility of galactic bars is probed in two ways: (1) using traditional visual classification, and (2) by charting the changing shape of the galaxy distribution in "Hubble space", a quantitative two-parameter description of galactic structure that maps closely on to Hubble's original tuning fork. Both analyses suggest that over 2/3 of strongly barred luminous local spirals i.e. objects classified as SB in the Third Reference Catalog) would still be classified as strongly barred at z=0.7 in the Hubbl...

Van den Bergh, S; Whyte, L F; Merrifield, M R; Eskridge, P B; Frogel, J A; Pogge, R W; Bergh, Sidney van den; Abraham, Roberto G.; Whyte, Laura F.; Merrifield, Michael R.; Eskridge, Paul; Frogel, Jay A.; Pogge, Richard

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "restaurant bar bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Search for Physics Beyond the Standard Model at BaBar and Belle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent results on the search for new physics at BaBar and Belle B-factories are presented. The search for a light Higgs boson produced in the decay of different Y resonances is shown. In addition, recent measurements aimed to discover invisible final states produced by new physics mechanisms beyond the standard model are presented.

Calderini, G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care ProductsChapter 3 Detergent Powders, Bars, Pastes, and Tablets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formulating Detergents and Personal Care Products Chapter 3 Detergent Powders, Bars, Pastes, and Tablets Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents AOCS Press 31AE8E3D42D3E14DDBA41DE5FCD66625 AOCS Press

103

Bar-driven fueling of galactic nuclei: a 2D view  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I discuss evidences for bar-driven gas fueling in the central regions of galaxies, focusing on scales down to about 10 pc. I thus mention the building of inner disks, and the link with resonances, as well as the corresponding kinematic signatures such as sigma-drops and counter-rotating nuclear disks as probed via integral-field spectroscopy.

Emsellem, E

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Improved grating and bar cell models in cortical area V1 and texture coding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents improved models of cortical neurons in V1 that act like grating and bar detectors. Both models use the same frontend, which consists of a contrast normalisation in combination with isotropic DOG filtering, followed by anisotropic ... Keywords: Computational models, Cortical cells, Diatoms, Groupings, Symmetry order, Texture analysis

J. M. H. du Buf

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Diffractive Dijet Production in $\\bar{p}p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on a study of diffractive dijet production in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}p collider. A data sample from 310 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by triggering on a high transverse energy jet, E{sub T}{sup jet}, in coincidence with a recoil antiproton detected in a Roman pot spectrometer is used to measure the ratio of single-diffractive to inclusive-dijet event rates as a function of x{sup {bar p}} of the interacting parton in the antiproton, the Bjorken-x, x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}}, and a Q{sup 2} {approx} (E{sub T}{sup jet}){sup 2} in the ranges 10{sup -3} -4 GeV{sup 2}. The t{sub {bar p}} dependence is measured as a function of Q{sup 2} and x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} and compared with that of inclusive single diffraction dissociation. We find weak x{sub Bj}{sup bar p}} and Q{sup 2} dependencies in the ratio of single diffractive to inclusive event rates, and no significant Q{sup 2} dependence in the diffractive t{sub {bar p}} distributions.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Albrow, M.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

THE TWO-PHASE FORMATION HISTORY OF SPIRAL GALAXIES TRACED BY THE COSMIC EVOLUTION OF THE BAR FRACTION  

SciTech Connect

We study the evolution of galactic bars and the link with disk and spheroid formation in a sample of zoom-in cosmological simulations. Our simulation sample focuses on galaxies with present-day stellar masses in the 10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} range, in field and loose group environments, with a broad variety of mass growth histories. In our models, bars are almost absent from the progenitors of present-day spirals at z > 1.5, and they remain rare and generally too weak to be observable down to z Almost-Equal-To 1. After this characteristic epoch, the fractions of observable and strong bars rise rapidly, bars being present in 80% of spiral galaxies and easily observable in two thirds of these at z {<=} 0.5. This is quantitatively consistent with the redshift evolution of the observed bar fraction, although the latter is presently known up to z Almost-Equal-To 0.8 because of band-shifting and resolution effects. Our models hence predict that the decrease in the bar fraction with increasing redshift should continue with a fraction of observable bars not larger than 10%-15% in disk galaxies at z > 1. Our models also predict later bar formation in lower-mass galaxies, in agreement with existing data. We find that the characteristic epoch of bar formation, namely redshift z Almost-Equal-To 0.8-1 in the studied mass range, corresponds to the epoch at which today's spirals acquire their disk-dominated morphology. At higher redshift, disks tend to be rapidly destroyed by mergers and gravitational instabilities and rarely develop significant bars. We hence suggest that the bar formation epoch corresponds to the transition between an early 'violent' phase of spiral galaxy formation at z {>=} 1 and a late 'secular' phase at z {<=} 0.8. In the secular phase, the presence of bars substantially contributes to the growth of the (pseudo-)bulge, but the bulge mass budget remains statistically dominated by the contribution of mergers, interactions, and disk instabilities at high redshift. Early bars at z > 1 are often short-lived, while most of the bars formed at z {<=} 1 persist down to z = 0, late cosmological gas infall being necessary to maintain some of them.

Kraljic, Katarina; Bournaud, Frederic [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp, CNRS/INSU, Universite Paris Diderot, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Martig, Marie [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

107

ECONOMIC EFFECT OF THE STATEWIDE BAN ON SMOKING IN RESTAURANTS AND BARS IN ARIZONA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.wpcarey.asu.edu/seid PREFACE On November 7, 2006, the voters of Arizona approved the Smoke-Free Arizona Act, listed as Proposition 201 on the November 2006 ballot. The new law (Arizona Revised Statute 36-601.01) specified that the Act was to be implemented and enforced by the Arizona Department of Health Services. The Smoke-Free Arizona Act went into effect on May 1, 2007. In December 2006, the Arizona Department of Health Services requested that the L. William Seidman Research Institute, W. P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University conduct a study of the economic effect of the Smoke-Free Arizona Act. This report presents the findings from that study.

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

NREL: News Feature - NREL Sets the Bar for Office Building Energy Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Sets the Bar for Office Building Energy Use NREL Sets the Bar for Office Building Energy Use December 7, 2009 Photo of a truck delivering materials to an office building under construction. Enlarge image Designers met NREL's aggressive energy use requirement for the Research Support Facility by taking advantage Colorado's sunny climate. Large windows for daylighting and thermally sophisticated wall systems for solar heating are crucial to the net-zero energy design. Credit: Pat Corkery Technology - from sophisticated computer modeling to advanced windows that actually open! - will help the newest building at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory be one of the world's most energy efficient offices. But making NREL's new Research Support Facility into a showcase for engineering net zero energy office design didn't begin with rooftop solar

109

Polarization Observables in $?N\\to K\\bar{K}N$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore some of the rich structure of the polarization observables recently developed for processes like $\\gamma N\\to\\pi\\pi N$ and $\\gamma N\\to K \\bar{K} N$ in the framework of a specific model for the latter process. Emphasis is placed on observables that may be accesible at existing facilities in the near future. The sensitivity of the observables to the details of the model indicate that they will be a very useful tool in differentiating between different models for reactions like these. In the framework of a model for $\\gamma N\\to K \\bar{K} N$, we examine the sensitivity of the observables to coupling constants of the $\\phi$, to the properties of the $\\Lambda(1405)$, and to the existence of the $\\Theta^+$.

W. Roberts

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

110

Fundamental and HOM Coupler Design for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Cavity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is currently being considered as a deflecting system for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and as a crabbing cavity for a possible LHC luminosity upgrade. Currently the designs are optimized to achieve lower surface fields within the dimensional constraints for the above applications. A detailed analysis of the fundamental input power coupler design for the parallel-bar cavity is performed considering beam loading and the effects of microphonics. For higher beam loading the damping of the HOMs is vital to reduce beam instabilities generated due to the wake fields. An analysis of threshold impedances for each application and impedances of the modes that requires damping are presented in this paper with the design of HOM couplers.

S.U. De Silva, J.R. Delayen,

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Water Velocity Measurement on an Extended-Length Submerged Bar Screen at John Day Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study of water velocity around an extended-length submerged bar screen (ESBS) at John Day Dam. The study was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers by AScI Corporation and MEVATEC Corporation in March of 2000. This report was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. ESBS are being studied as one method for diverting juvenile migrating fish from the dam's turbine intakes into the gate well and through the juvenile fish bypass channels.

Weiland, Mark A

2001-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

112

Design and Development of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities  

SciTech Connect

The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties that is being considered for a number of applications. We present the designs of a 499 MHz deflecting cavity developed for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade and a 400 MHz crabbing cavity for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade. Prototypes of these two cavities are now under development and fabrication.

Payagalage Subashini Uddi De Silva, Jean Delayen

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Results on Charmonium(?like) and Bottomonium(?like) States from Belle and BaBar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectroscopy results for Belle and BaBar are reported. A particular focus is put on new results of the X(3872) state with its radiative decays to J/?? and ??? its decay into J/?3? and the search for production in radiative Upsilon decays. Another focus is L?=?2 mesons in particlar a possible D?wave assignment to the X(3872) and the confirmation of an Upsilon D?wave state.

Jens Sören; The Belle Collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Nuclear Bar, Star Formation and Gas Fueling in the Active Galaxy NGC 4303  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combination of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 and NICMOS images are used to investigate the gas/dust and stellar structure inside the central 300 pc of the nearby active galaxy NGC 4303. The NICMOS H-band (F160W) image reveals a bright core and a nuclear elongated bar-like structure of 250 pc in diameter. The bar is centered on the bright core, and its major axis is oriented in proyection along the spin axis of the nuclear gaseous rotating disk recently detected (Colina & Arribas 1999). The V-H (F606W - F160W) image reveals a complex gas/dust distribution with a two-arm spiral structure of about 225 pc in radius. The southwestern arm is traced by young star-forming knots while the northeastern arm is detected by the presence of dust lanes. These spirals do not have a smooth structure but rather they are made of smaller flocculent spirals or filament-like structures. The magnitudes and colors of the star-forming knots are typical of clusters of young stars with masses of 0.5 to 1 x $10^5 M_{solar}, and ages of 5 to 25 million years. The overall structure of the nuclear spirals as well as the size, number and masses of the star-forming knots are explained in the context of a massive gaseous nuclear disk subject to self-gravitational instabilities and to the gravitational field created by the nuclear bar. According to the model, the gaseous disk has a mass of about 5 x 10^7 M_{solar} inside a radius of 400 pc, the bar has a radius of 150 pc and a pattern speed of about 0.5 Myr^{-1}, and the average mass accretion rate into the core (R < 8 pc) is about 0.01 M_{solar}$ yr^{-1} for about 80 Myr.

L. Colina; K. Wada

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

115

STAR FORMATION HISTORY IN TWO FIELDS OF THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD BAR  

SciTech Connect

The Bar is the most productive region of the Small Magellanic Cloud in terms of star formation but also the least studied one. In this paper, we investigate the star formation history of two fields located in the SW and in the NE portion of the Bar using two independent and well-tested procedures applied to the color-magnitude diagrams of their stellar populations resolved by means of deep Hubble Space Telescope photometry. We find that the Bar experienced a negligible star formation activity in the first few Gyr, followed by a dramatic enhancement from 6 to 4 Gyr ago and a nearly constant activity since then. The two examined fields differ both in the rate of star formation and in the ratio of recent over past activity, but share the very low level of initial activity and its sudden increase around 5 Gyr ago. The striking similarity between the timing of the enhancement and the timing of the major episode in the Large Magellanic Cloud is suggestive of a close encounter triggering star formation.

Cignoni, M. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, via Ranzani, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Cole, A. A. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); Tosi, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Gallagher, J. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Sabbi, E.; Anderson, J.; Nota, A. [STScI, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Grebel, E. K., E-mail: michele.cignoni@unibo.it [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Moenchhofstr. 12-14, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Optimization of Design and Manufacturing Process of Metal Foam Filled Anti-Intrusion Bars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of an anti-intrusion bar for automotive use is to absorb the kinetic energy of the colliding bodies that is partially converted into internal work of the bodies involved in the crash. The aim of this paper is to investigate the performances of a new kind of anti-intrusion bars for automotive use, filled with metallic foams. The reason for using a cellular material as a filler deals with its capacity to absorb energy during plastic deformation, while being lightweight. The study is the evolution of a previous paper presented by the authors at Esaform 2010 and will present new results and findings. It is conducted by evaluating some key technical issues of the manufacturing problem and by conducting experimental and numerical analyses. The evaluation of materials and shapes of the closed sections to be filled is made in the perspective of a car manufacturer (production costs, weight reduction, space availability in a car door, etc.). Experimentally, foams are produced starting from an industrial aluminium precursor with a TiH{sub 2} blowing agent. Bars are tested in three point bending, in order to evaluate their performances in terms of force-displacement response and other specific performance parameters. In order to understand the role of interface between the inner surface of the tube and the external surface of the foam, different kinds of interface are tested.

Villa, Andrea; Mussi, Valerio [Laboratorio MUSP-via Turotti 9, 29122 Piacenza (Italy); Strano, Matteo [Politecnico di Milano-Dipartimento di Meccanica, via La Masa 1, 20156, Milan (Italy)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

117

Sensitivity of LHC experiments to the $t\\bar{t}H$ final state, with $H \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}$, at center of mass energy of 14 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the discovery of a Higgs-like particle in 2012, attention has now turned to measuring its properties, e.g., coupling to various bosonic and fermionic final states, its spin and parity, etc. In this note, we study the sensitivity of experiments at the LHC to its coupling to the top quark, by searching for the process pp $\\rightarrow t\\bar{t}H$, where the primary decay mode of the $H$ is $\\rightarrow b\\bar{b}$. In this paper, the $t\\bar{t}$ system is detected in the dilepton final state. This study is performed assuming a center of mass energy of 14 TeV and integrated luminosities of 300 fb$^{-1}$ (with an average pileup ($\\mu$) of 50 additional collisions per bunch crossing) and 3000 fb$^{-1}$ (with $\\mu=140$). We include systematic uncertainties in production cross-sections as well as the more important experimental uncertainties. Preliminary studies indicate that we will observe the $t\\bar{t}H$ final state with a significance of 2.4 and $\\ge 5.3$ for the two luminosity scenarios, respectively; addition of other $t\\bar{t}$ final states should increase the overall significance for observing $t\\bar{t}H$.

Ricardo Goncalo; Stefan Guindon; Vivek Jain

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

HERSCHEL SEARCH FOR O{sub 2} TOWARD THE ORION BAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the results of a search for molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) toward the Orion Bar, a prominent photodissociation region at the southern edge of the H II region created by the luminous Trapezium stars. We observed the spectral region around the frequency of the O{sub 2} N{sub J} = 3{sub 3}-1{sub 2} transition at 487 GHz and the 5{sub 4}-3{sub 4} transition at 774 GHz using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared on the Herschel Space Observatory. Neither line was detected, but the 3{sigma} upper limits established here translate to a total line-of-sight O{sub 2} column density <1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} for an emitting region whose temperature is between 30 K and 250 K, or <1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} if the O{sub 2} emitting region is primarily at a temperature of {approx}<100 K. Because the Orion Bar is oriented nearly edge-on relative to our line of sight, the observed column density is enhanced by a factor estimated to be between 4 and 20 relative to the face-on value. Our upper limits imply that the face-on O{sub 2} column density is less than 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}, a value that is below, and possibly well below, model predictions for gas with a density of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} exposed to a far-ultraviolet flux 10{sup 4} times the local value, conditions inferred from previous observations of the Orion Bar. The discrepancy might be resolved if (1) the adsorption energy of O atoms to ice is greater than 800 K; (2) the total face-on A{sub V} of the Bar is less than required for O{sub 2} to reach peak abundance; (3) the O{sub 2} emission arises within dense clumps with a small beam filling factor; or (4) the face-on depth into the Bar where O{sub 2} reaches its peak abundance, which is density dependent, corresponds to a sky position different from that sampled by our Herschel beams.

Melnick, Gary J.; Tolls, Volker [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 66, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Goldsmith, Paul F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Kaufman, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Hollenbach, David J. [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Black, John H.; Hjalmarson, Ake; Liseau, Rene [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Encrenaz, Pierre; Pagani, Laurent [LERMA and UMR8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Av. de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France); Falgarone, Edith; Gerin, Maryvonne [LRA/LERMA, CNRS, UMR8112, Observatoire de Paris and Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Li, Di [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, A20 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Lis, Dariusz C. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Neufeld, David A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Snell, Ronald L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Van der Tak, Floris [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV, and Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

119

16th International Conference in Quantum ChromoDynamics: Charmonium-like states at BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new results on charmonium-like states from the BaBar experiment located at the PEP-II asymmetric energy $e^+e^-$ collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Elisa Fioravanti

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

120

Search for New Bottomlike Quark Pair Decays Q Q-Bar to (T W- ) (T-Bar W -) in Same-Charge Dilepton Events  

SciTech Connect

We report the most restrictive direct limits on masses of fourth-generation down-type quarks b{prime}, and quark-like composite fermions (B or T{sub 5/3}), decaying promptly to tW{sup {-+}}. We search for a significant excess of events with two same-charge leptons (e, {mu}), several hadronic jets, and missing transverse energy. An analysis of data from p{bar p} collisions with an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb{sup -1} collected with the CDF II detector at Fermilab yields no evidence for such a signal, setting mass limits m{sub b{prime}}, m{sub B} > 338 GeV/c{sup 2} and m{sub T{sub 5/3}} > 365 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% confidence level.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR; Asaadi, J.; /Texas A-M; Ashmanskas, W.; /Fermilab; Attal, A.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Aurisano, A.; /Texas A-M; Azfar, F.; /Oxford U.; Badgett, W.; /Fermilab; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; /LBL, Berkeley; Barnes, V.E.; /Purdue U.; Barnett, B.A.; /Johns Hopkins U. /INFN, Pisa /Comenius U. /MIT /TRIUMF /INFN, Pisa /University Coll. London /Johns Hopkins U. /INFN, Pisa /Wisconsin U., Madison /Duke U. /Fermilab /CERN /Rockefeller U. /Fermilab /INFN, Padua /University Coll. London /Argonne, HEP /Brandeis U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Duke U. /Rochester U. /Rochester U. /Purdue U. /Pittsburgh U. /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Barbara /Illinois U., Urbana /INFN, Bologna /Michigan State U. /Chicago U., EFI /Dubna, JINR; /more authors..

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

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121

The Secular Bar-Mode Instability in Rapidly Rotating Stars Revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uniformly rotating, homogeneous, incompressible Maclaurin spheroids that spin sufficiently rapidly are secularly unstable to nonaxisymmetric, bar-mode perturbations when viscosity is present. The intuitive explanation is that energy dissipation by viscosity can drive an unstable spheroid to a stable, triaxial configuration of lower energy - a Jacobi ellipsoid. But what about rapidly rotating compressible stars? Unlike incompressible stars, which contain no internal energy and therefore immediately liberate all the energy dissipated by viscosity, compressible stars have internal energy and can retain the dissipated energy as internal heat. Now compressible stars that rotate sufficiently rapidly and also manage to liberate this dissipated energy very quickly are known to be unstable to bar-mode perturbations, like their incompressible counterparts. But what is the situation for rapidly rotating compressible stars that have very long cooling timescales, so that all the energy dissipated by viscosity is retained as heat, whereby the total energy of the star remains constant on a secular (viscous) evolution timescale? Are such stars also unstable to the nonlinear growth of bar modes, or is the viscous heating sufficient to cause them to expand, drive down the ratio of rotational kinetic to gravitational potential energy T/|W| ~ 1/R, where R is the equatorial radius, and turn off the instability before it gets underway? If the instability still arises in such stars, at what rotation rate do they become unstable, and to what final state do they evolve? We provide answers to these questions in the context of the compressible ellipsoid model for rotating stars. The results should serve as useful guides for numerical simulations in 3+1 dimensions for rotating stars containing viscosity.

Stuart L. Shapiro

2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

122

Effect of couple-stress on the pure bending of a prismatic bar  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the applicability of the couple-stress theory to the stress analysis of graphite structures is performed by solving a pure bending problem. The differences between solutions from the couple-stress theory and from the classical theory of elasticity are compared. It is found that the differences are sufficient to account for the inconsistencies which have often been observed between the classical elasticity theory and actual behavior of graphite under bend and tensile loadings. An experimental procedure to measure the material constants in the couple-stress theory is also suggested. The linear couple-stress theory, the origins of which go back to the turn of the last century, adds linear relations between couple-stresses and rotation gradients to the classical stress-strain law. By adopting the classical assumption that the plane cross section remains plane after deformation, the pure-bending problem is reduced to a plane couple-stress problem with traction-free boundary conditions. A general solution for an isotropic elastic prismatic bar under pure bending is then obtained using the Airy stress function and another stress function wich accounts for the couple-stresss. For a cylindrical bar, it reduces to a simple series solution. The moment-curvature and stress-curvature relations derived for a cylindrical bar from the general solution are used to examine the effect of couple-stresses. Numerical compilation of relations indicates that the couple stress parameters can be practically determined by measuring the moment-curvature ratio of various diametered specimens under bending. Although there is not sufficient data for such evaluation at present, it appears that the theory is consistent with the limited bend and tensile strength data of cylindrical specimens for H-451 graphite.

Tzung, F.; Kao, B.; Ho, F.; Tang, P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Broken Bar Detection in Synchronous Machines Based Wind Energy Conversion System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical machines are subject to different types of failures. Early detection of the incipient faults and fast maintenance may prevent costly consequences. Fault diagnosis of wind turbine is especially important because they are situated at extremely high towers and therefore inaccessible. For offshore plants, bad weather can prevent any repair actions for several weeks. In some of the new wind turbines synchronous generators are used and directly connected to the grid without the need of power converters. Despite intensive research efforts directed at rotor fault diagnosis in induction machines, the research work pertinent to damper winding failure of synchronous machines is very limited. This dissertation is concerned with the in-depth study of damper winding failure and its traceable symptoms in different machine signals and parameters. First, a model of a synchronous machine with damper winding based on the winding function approach is presented. Next, simulation and experimental results are presented and discussed. A specially designed inside-out synchronous machine with a damper winding is employed for the experimental setup. Finally, a novel analytical method is developed to predict the behavior of the left sideband amplitude for different numbers and locations of the broken bars. This analysis is based on the magnetic field theory and the unbalanced multiphase circuits. It is found that due to the asymmetrical structure of damper winding, the left sideband component in the stator current spectrum of the synchronous machine during steady state asynchronous operation is not similar to that of the induction machine with broken bars. As a result, the motor current signature analysis (MCSA) for detection rotor failures in the induction machine is usable to detect broken damper bars in synchronous machines. However, a novel intelligent-systems based approach is developed that can identify the severity of the damper winding failure. This approach potentially can be used in a non-invasive condition monitoring system to monitor the deterioration of a synchronous motor damper winding as the number of broken bars increase over time. Some other informative features such as speed spectrum, transient time, torque-speed curve and rotor slip are also found for damper winding diagnosis.

Rahimian, Mina Mashhadi

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Acoustic emission monitoring of hot functional testing: Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant during hot functional preservice testing is described in this report. The report deals with background, methodology, and results. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing toward AE monitoring during reactor operation.

Hutton, P.H.; Dawson, J.F.; Friesel, M.A.; Harris, J.C.; Pappas, R.A.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

BaBar technical design report: Chapter 9, Magnet coil and flux return  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BaBar magnet is a thin, 1.5 T superconducting solenoid with a hexagonal flux return. This chapter discusses the physics requirements and performance goals for the magnet, describes key interfaces, and summarizes the projected magnet performance. It also presents the design of the superconducting solenoid, including magnetic design, cold mass design, quench protection and stability, cold mass cooling, cryostat design, and coil assembly and transportation. The cryogenic supply system and instrumentation are described briefly, and the flux return is described.

O`Connor, T.; The BaBar Collaboration

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Search for Universal Extra Dimensions in p(p)over-bar Collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at a p{bar p} center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R{sup -1} > 260 GeV in a minimal UED model.

Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goryachev V. N.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph; Grivaz J-F; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Mansour J.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

Stochastic Gravitational Wave Measurements with Bar Detectors: Dependence of Response on Detector Orientation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The response of a cross-correlation measurement to an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background depends on the observing geometry via the overlap reduction function. If one of the detectors being correlated is a resonant bar whose orientation can be changed, the response to stochastic gravitational waves can be modulated. I derive the general form of this modulation as a function of azimuth, both in the zero-frequency limit and at arbitrary frequencies. Comparisons are made between pairs of nearby detectors, such as LIGO Livingston-ALLEGRO, Virgo-AURIGA, Virgo-NAUTILUS, and EXPLORER-AURIGA, with which stochastic cross-correlation measurements are currently being performed, planned, or considered.

John T Whelan

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

128

Radiation monitoring with CVD Diamonds and PIN Diodes at BaBar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center has been using two polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition (pCVD) diamonds and 12 silicon PIN diodes for radiation monitoring and protection of the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT). We have used the pCVD diamonds for more than 3 years, and the PIN diodes for 7 years. We will describe the SVT and SVT radiation monitoring system as well as the operational difficulties and radiation damage effects on the PIN diodes and pCVD diamonds in a high-energy physics environment.

Bruinsma, M.; Burchat, P.; Curry, S.; Edwards, A.J.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Kirkby, D.; Majewski, S.; Petersen, B.A.; /UC, Irvine /SLAC /Ohio State U.

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

129

Remedial investigation/feasibility study report for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Operable Unit  

SciTech Connect

This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR) Operable Unit (OU). The LWBR is located in Roane, Rhea, and Meigs counties, Tennessee, and consists of Watts Bar Reservoir downstream of the Clinch river. This area has received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). As required by this law, the ORR and all off-site areas that have received contaminants, including LWBR, must be investigated to determine the risk to human health and the environment resulting from these releases, the need for any remedial action to reduce these risks, and the remedial actions that are most feasible for implementation in this OU. Contaminants from the ORR are primarily transported to the LWBR via the Clinch River. There is little data regarding the quantities of most contaminants potentially released from the ORR to the Clinch River, particularly for the early years of ORR operations. Estimates of the quantities released during this period are available for most radionuclides and some inorganic contaminants, indicating that releases 30 to 50 years ago were much higher than today. Since the early 1970s, the release of potential contaminants has been monitored for compliance with environmental law and reported in the annual environmental monitoring reports for the ORR.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Observation of D0-D0bar Mixing using the CDF II Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the time dependence of the ratio of decay rates for D0 -> K+ pi- to the Cabibbo-favored decay D0 -> K- pi+. The charge conjugate decays are included. A signal of 3.3 x 10^4 D*+ -> pi+ D0, D0 -> K+ pi- decays is obtained with D0 proper decay times between 0.75 and 10 mean D0 lifetimes. The data were recorded with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.6 fb-1 for p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. Assuming CP conservation, we search for D0-D0bar mixing and measure the mixing parameters to be R_D = (3.51 +/- 0.35) x 10^{-3}, y' = (4.3 +/- 4.3) x 10^{-3}, and x'^2 = (0.08 +/- 0.18) x 10^{-3}. We report Bayesian probability intervals in the x'^2 - y' plane and find that the significance of excluding the no-mixing hypothesis is equivalent to 6.1 Gaussian standard deviations, providing the second observation of D0-D0bar mixing from a single experiment.

Aaltonen, T; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Marchese, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; D'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Ramos, J P Fernández; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; López, O González; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kulkarni, N; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucà, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Fernández, I Redondo; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Sorin, V; Song, H; Stancari, M; Denis, R St; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W -M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Observation of D0-D0bar Mixing using the CDF II Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the time dependence of the ratio of decay rates for D0 -> K+ pi- to the Cabibbo-favored decay D0 -> K- pi+. The charge conjugate decays are included. A signal of 3.3 x 10^4 D*+ -> pi+ D0, D0 -> K+ pi- decays is obtained with D0 proper decay times between 0.75 and 10 mean D0 lifetimes. The data were recorded with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.6 fb-1 for p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. Assuming CP conservation, we search for D0-D0bar mixing and measure the mixing parameters to be R_D = (3.51 +/- 0.35) x 10^{-3}, y' = (4.3 +/- 4.3) x 10^{-3}, and x'^2 = (0.08 +/- 0.18) x 10^{-3}. We report Bayesian probability intervals in the x'^2 - y' plane and find that the significance of excluding the no-mixing hypothesis is equivalent to 6.1 Gaussian standard deviations, providing the second observation of D0-D0bar mixing from a single experiment.

CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; M. Cavalli-Sforza; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernández Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; G. Giurgiu; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González López; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; S. Grinstein; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; N. Kulkarni; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; A. Lucà; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; M. Martínez; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; N. Ranjan; I. Redondo Fernández; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vázquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizán; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

132

Near-threshold production of a0(980) mesons in the reaction pp -> d K^+ \\bar{K}^0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using an effective Lagrangian approach as well as the Quark-Gluon Strings Model we analyze near-threshold production of a0(980)-mesons in the reaction NN -> d K \\bar{K} as well as the background of non-resonant K\\bar{K}-pair production. We argue that the reaction pp -> d K^+ \\bar{K}^0 at an energy release Qproduction of the a0(980)-resonance. At larger energies the non-resonant K^+\\bar{K}^0-pair production - where the kaons are produced in a relative P-wave - becomes important. Then effects of final-state interactions are evaluated in a unitarized scattering-length approach and found to be in the order of a 20% suppression close to threshold. Thus in present experiments at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY-J\\"ulich for Q<=107 MeV the a_0^+ signal can reliably be separated from the non-resonant K^+\\bar{K^0} background.

V. Yu. Grishina; L. A. Kondratyuk; M. Buescher; W. Cassing

2004-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

133

Dark Matter Halos and Evolution of Bars in Disk Galaxies: Varying Gas Fraction and Gas Spatial Resolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We conduct numerical experiments by evolving gaseous/stellar disks embedded in live dark matter halos aiming at quantifying the effect of gas spatial resolution and gas content on the bar evolution. Model sequences have been constructed using different resolution, and gas fraction has been varied along each sequence within fgas=0%-50%, keeping the disk and halo properties unchanged. We find that the spatial resolution becomes important with an increase in `fgas'. For the higher resolution model sequences, we observe a bimodal behavior in the bar evolution with respect to the gas fraction, especially during the secular phase of this evolution. The switch from the gas-poor to gas-rich behavior is abrupt and depends on the resolution used. The diverging evolution has been observed in nearly all basic parameters characterizing bars, such as the bar strength, central mass concentration, vertical buckling amplitude, size, etc. We find that the presence of the gas component severely limits the bar growth and affects...

Villa-Vargas, Jorge; Heller, Clayton

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Observation of the Baryonic B decay B0bar to Lambda_c^+ anti-Lambda K-  

SciTech Connect

The authors report the observation of the baryonic B decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {bar {Lambda}}K{sup -} with a significance larger than 7 standard deviations based on 471 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring at SLAC. They measure the branching fraction for the decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {bar {Lambda}}K{sup -} to be (3.8 {+-} 0.8{sub stat} {+-} 0.2{sub sys} {+-} 1.0 {sub {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}}) x 10{sup -5}. The uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and due to the uncertainty in the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} branching fraction. They find that the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} K{sup -} invariant mass distribution shows an enhancement above 3.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Sassari U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

135

Molecular Gas in NUclei of GAlaxies (NUGA): IX. The decoupled bars and gas inflow in NGC 2782  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) maps of the starburst/Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 2782, obtained with the IRAM interferometer. The CO emission is aligned along the stellar nuclear bar of radius 1 kpc, configured in an elongated structure with two spiral arms at high pitch angle. At the extremity of the nuclear bar, the CO changes direction to trace two more extended spiral features at a lower pitch angle. These are the beginning of two straight dust lanes, which are aligned parallel to an oval distortion, reminiscent of a primary bar, almost perpendicular to the nuclear one. The two embedded bars appear in Spitzer IRAC near-infrared images, and HST color images, although highly obscured by dust in the latter. We compute the torques exerted by the stellar bars on the gas, and find systematically negative average torques down to the resolution limit of the images, providing evidence of gas inflow tantalizingly close to the nucleus of NGC 2782. The observations are well reproduced by numerical simulations, including gas...

Hunt, L K; García-Burillo, S; Schinnerer, E; Krips, M; Baker, A J; Boone, F; Eckart, A; Léon, S; Neri, R; Tacconi, L J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Measurement of $e^+ e^- \\to ??^0$, $K^{\\ast}(892)\\bar{K}$ and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)\\bar{K}$ at $\\sqrt{s}$ near 10.6 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using data samples of 89 fb$^{-1}$, 703 fb$^{-1}$, and 121 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider at center-of-mass energies 10.52 GeV, 10.58 GeV, and 10.876 GeV, respectively, we study the exclusive reactions $e^+e^- \\to \\omega\\pi^0$, $K^{\\ast}(892)\\bar{K}$, and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)\\bar{K}$ (Charge-conjugate modes are included implicitly). Significant signals of $\\omega\\pi^0$, $K^{\\ast}(892)^0\\bar{K}^0$, and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^-K^+$ are observed for the first time at these energies, and the energy dependencies of the cross sections are presented. On the other hand, no significant excesses for $K^{\\ast}(892)^-K^+$ and $K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^0 \\bar{K}^0$ are found, and we set limits on the cross section ratios $R_{\\rm VP} = \\frac{\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K^{\\ast}(892)^0\\bar K^0)} {\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K^{\\ast}(892)^-K^+)}>$ 4.3, 20.0, and 5.4, and $R_{\\rm TP} = \\frac{\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^0\\bar K^0)} {\\sigma_B(e^+e^-\\to K_2^{\\ast}(1430)^-K^+)}<$ 1.1, 0.4, and 0.6, for center-of-mass energies of 10.52 GeV, 10.58 GeV, and 10.876 GeV, respectively, at the 90% C.L.

Belle Collaboration; C. P. Shen; C. Z. Yuan; A. Sibidanov; P. Wang; K. Hayasaka; X. L. Wang; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; D. M. Asner; T. Aushev; A. M. Bakich; A. Bala; V. Bhardwaj; B. Bhuyan; A. Bondar; G. Bonvicini; A. Bozek; M. Bra?ko; T. E. Browder; M. -C. Chang; A. Chen; B. G. Cheon; R. Chistov; I. -S. Cho; K. Cho; V. Chobanova; S. -K. Choi; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; J. Dalseno; Z. Doležal; Z. Drásal; A. Drutskoy; D. Dutta; S. Eidelman; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; T. Ferber; A. Frey; V. Gaur; N. Gabyshev; S. Ganguly; R. Gillard; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; J. Haba; H. Hayashii; Y. Hoshi; W. -S. Hou; H. J. Hyun; T. Iijima; A. Ishikawa; R. Itoh; Y. Iwasaki; T. Iwashita; I. Jaegle; T. Julius; D. H. Kah; J. H. Kang; E. Kato; T. Kawasaki; C. Kiesling; D. Y. Kim; H. J. Kim; H. O. Kim; J. B. Kim; J. H. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; B. R. Ko; P. Kodyš; S. Korpar; P. Križan; P. Krokovny; T. Kumita; A. Kuzmin; Y. -J. Kwon; J. S. Lange; S. -H. Lee; Y. Li; J. Libby; C. Liu; Y. Liu; P. Lukin; D. Matvienko; H. Miyata; R. Mizuk; A. Moll; T. Mori; N. Muramatsu; R. Mussa; Y. Nagasaka; M. Nakao; Z. Natkaniec; M. Nayak; C. Ng; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Ogawa; S. Okuno; Y. Onuki; G. Pakhlova; H. Park; H. K. Park; T. K. Pedlar; R. Pestotnik; M. Petri?; L. E. Piilonen; M. Ritter; M. Röhrken; A. Rostomyan; S. Ryu; H. Sahoo; T. Saito; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; L. Santelj; T. Sanuki; Y. Sato; V. Savinov; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; C. Schwanda; D. Semmler; K. Senyo; M. Shapkin; T. -A. Shibata; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; F. Simon; Y. -S. Sohn; A. Sokolov; E. Solovieva; M. Stari?; M. Steder; T. Sumiyoshi; U. Tamponi; K. Tanida; G. Tatishvili; Y. Teramoto; M. Uchida; S. Uehara; T. Uglov; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; S. E. Vahsen; C. Van Hulse; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; A. Vinokurova; A. Vossen; M. N. Wagner; C. H. Wang; Y. Watanabe; K. M. Williams; E. Won; Y. Yamashita; S. Yashchenko; Y. Yook; C. C. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

137

Measurement of the top quark mass in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions using events with two leptons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the top quark mass (m{sub t}) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using t{bar t} events with two leptons (ee, e{mu} or {mu}{mu}) in the final state in 4.3 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We analyze the kinematically underconstrained dilepton events by integrating over the neutrino rapidity distributions. We reduce the dominant systematic uncertainties from jet energy calibration using a correction obtained from t{bar t} {yields} {ell} + jets events. We also correct jets in simulated events to replicate the quark flavor dependence of the jet response in data. In combination with our previous analysis, we measure m{sub t} = 174.0 {+-} 2.4(stat) {+-} 1.4(syst) GeV.

Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Aoki, Masato; /Fermilab; Askew, Andrew Warren; /Florida State U. /Stockholm U.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The d-bar approach to approximate inverse scattering at fixed energy in three dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop the d-bar approach to inverse scattering at fixed energy in dimensions $d\\ge 3$ of [Beals, Coifman 1985] and [Henkin, Novikov 1987]. As a result we propose a stable method for nonlinear approximate finding a potential $v$ from its scattering amplitude $f$ at fixed energy $E>0$ in dimension $d=3$. In particular, in three dimensions we stably reconstruct n-times smooth potential $v$ with sufficient decay at infinity, $n>3$, from its scattering amplitude $f$ at fixed energy $E$ up to $O(E^{-(n-3-\\epsilon)/2})$ in the uniform norm as $E\\to +\\infty$ for any fixed arbitrary small $\\epsilon >0$ (that is with almost the same decay rate of the error for $E\\to +\\infty$ as in the linearized case near zero potential).

Roman Novikov

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

139

Investigation of novel decay B _____ ____(2S)____K at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the undocumented B meson decay, B{sup +} {yields} {Psi}(2S){omega}K{sup +}. The data were collected with the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collier operating at the {gamma}(4S) resonance, a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV/c{sup 2}. The {gamma}(4S) resonance primarily decays to pairs of B-mesons. The BaBar collaboration at the PEP-II ring was located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and was designed to study the collisions of positrons and electrons. The e{sup -}e{sup +} pairs collide at asymmetric energies, resulting in a center of mass which is traveling at relativistic speeds. The resulting time dilation allows the decaying particles to travel large distances through the detector before undergoing their rapid decays, a process that occurs in the in the center of mass frame over extremely small distances. As they travel through silicon vertex trackers, a drift chamber, a Cerenkov radiation detector and finally an electromagnetic calorimeter, we measure the charge, energy, momentum, and particle identification in order to reconstruct the decays that have occurred. While all well understood mesons currently fall into the qq model, the quark model has no a priori exclusion of higher configuration states such as qqqq which has led experimentalists and theorists alike to seek evidence supporting the existence of such states. Currently, there are hundreds of known decay modes of the B mesons cataloged by the Particle Data Group, but collectively they only account for approximately 60% of the B branching fraction and it is possible that many more exist.

Schalch, Jacob; /Oberlin Coll. /SLAC

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

140

2274 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL INFORMATICS, VOL. 9, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2013 Rotor Bar Fault Monitoring Method Based on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilizes the data analysis of the air-gap torque profile in conjunction with a Bayesian classifier, and abrupt load changes, which can produce bearing faults and rotor bar breakages. Meanwhile, electrical Monitoring Method Based on Analysis of Air-Gap Torques of Induction Motors Aderiano M. da Silva, Member, IEEE

Povinelli, Richard J.

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141

Circumnuclear Dust in Nearby Active and Inactive Galaxies. II. Bars, Nuclear Spirals, and the Fueling of Active Galactic Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Abridged) We present a detailed study of the relation between circumnuclear dust morphology, host galaxy properties, and nuclear activity in nearby galaxies. We use our sample of 123 nearby galaxies with visible--near-infrared colormaps from the Hubble Space Telescope to create well-matched, "paired" samples of 28 active and 28 inactive galaxies, as well as 19 barred and 19 unbarred galaxies, that have the same host galaxy properties. Comparison of the barred and unbarred galaxies shows that grand design nuclear dust spirals are only found in galaxies with a large-scale bar. Tightly wound nuclear dust spirals, in contrast, show a strong tendency to avoid galaxies with large-scale bars. Comparison of the AGN and inactive samples shows that nuclear dust spirals, which may trace shocks and angular momentum dissipation in the ISM, occur with comparable frequency in both active and inactive galaxies. The only difference between the active and inactive galaxies is that several inactive galaxies appear to completely lack dust structure in their circumnuclear region, while none of the AGN lack this structure. The comparable frequency of nuclear spirals in active and inactive galaxies, combined with previous work that finds no significant differences in the frequency of bars or interactions between well-matched active and inactive galaxies, suggests that no universal fueling mechanism for low-luminosity AGN operates at spatial scales greater than ~100 pc radius from the galactic nuclei. The similarities instead suggest that the lifetime of nuclear activity is less than the characteristic inflow time from these spatial scales. An order-of-magnitude estimate of this inflow time is the dynamical timescale. This sets an upper limit of several million years to the lifetime of an individual episode of nuclear activity.

Paul Martini; Michael W. Regan; John S. Mulchaey; Richard W. Pogge

2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

142

Benchmarking the Bayesian reconstruction of the non-perturbative heavy $Q\\bar{Q}$ potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The extraction of the finite temperature heavy quark potential from lattice QCD relies on a spectral analysis of the real-time Wilson loop. Through its position and shape, the lowest lying spectral peak encodes the real and imaginary part of this complex potential. We benchmark this extraction strategy using leading order hard-thermal loop (HTL) calculations. I.e. we analytically calculate the Wilson loop and determine the corresponding spectrum. By fitting its lowest lying peak we obtain the real- and imaginary part and confirm that the knowledge of the lowest peak alone is sufficient for obtaining the potential. We deploy a novel Bayesian approach to the reconstruction of spectral functions to HTL correlators in Euclidean time and observe how well the known spectral function and values for the real and imaginary part are reproduced. Finally we apply the method to quenched lattice QCD data and perform an improved estimate of both real and imaginary part of the non-perturbative heavy $Q\\bar{Q}$ potential.

Yannis Burnier; Alexander Rothkopf

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Observation of the bottomonium ground state, eta_b, at BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first observation of the bottomonium ground state eta_b(1S) in the photon energy spectrum using a sample of 109+/-1 million of Upsilon(3S) events recorded at the Upsilon(3S) energy with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B factory at SLAC. A peak at E_gamma = 921.2 {+2.1}{-2.8}(stat) +/- 2.4(syst) MeV observed with a significance of 10 standard deviations in the photon energy spectrum is interpretated as being due to the radiative transition Upsilon(3S) -> gamma eta_b(1S). This photon energy corresponds to an eta_b(1S) mass of 9388.9 {+3.1}{-2.3}(stat) +/- 2.7(syst) MeV/c2. The hyperfine Upsilon(1S)-eta_b(1S) mass splitting is 71.4 {+2.3}{-3.1}(stat) +/- 2.7(syst) MeV/c2. The branching fraction for this radiative \\Upsilon(3S) decay is obtained as (4.8 +/- 0.5(stat) +/- 1.2 (syst)) x 10^(-4).

Grenier, Philippe

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Observation of the Bottomonium Ground State, eta_b, at BaBar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present the first observation of the bottomonium ground state {eta}{sub b}(1S) in the photon energy spectrum using a sample of (109 {+-} 1) million of {Upsilon}(3S) events recorded at the {Upsilon}(3S) energy with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B factory at SLAC. A peak at E{sub {gamma}} = 921.2{sub -2.8}{sup +2.1}(stat) {+-} 2.4(syst) MeV observed with a significance of 10 standard deviations in the photon energy spectrum is interpreted as being due to the radiative transition {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma} {eta}{sub b}(1S). This photon energy corresponds to an {eta}{sub b}(1S) mass of 9388.9{sub -2.3}{sup +3.1}(stat) {+-} 2.7(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. The hyperfine {Upsilon}(1S)-{eta}{sub b}(1S) mass splitting is 71.4{sub -3.1}{sup +2.3}(stat) {+-} 2.7(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. The branching fraction for this radiative {Upsilon}(3S) decay is obtained as (4.8 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 1.2(syst)) x 10{sup -4}.

Grenier, Philippe; Collaboration, for the BABAR

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

145

Observation of the bottomonium ground state, eta_b, at BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first observation of the bottomonium ground state eta_b(1S) in the photon energy spectrum using a sample of 109+/-1 million of Upsilon(3S) events recorded at the Upsilon(3S) energy with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B factory at SLAC. A peak at E_gamma = 921.2 {+2.1}{-2.8}(stat) +/- 2.4(syst) MeV observed with a significance of 10 standard deviations in the photon energy spectrum is interpretated as being due to the radiative transition Upsilon(3S) -> gamma eta_b(1S). This photon energy corresponds to an eta_b(1S) mass of 9388.9 {+3.1}{-2.3}(stat) +/- 2.7(syst) MeV/c2. The hyperfine Upsilon(1S)-eta_b(1S) mass splitting is 71.4 {+2.3}{-3.1}(stat) +/- 2.7(syst) MeV/c2. The branching fraction for this radiative \\Upsilon(3S) decay is obtained as (4.8 +/- 0.5(stat) +/- 1.2 (syst)) x 10^(-4).

Philippe Grenier; for the BABAR Collaboration

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

146

Method and an apparatus to control the lateral motion of a long metal bar being formed by a mechanical process such as rolling or drawing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An adjustable guide, includes two or more mechanisms each having a rotatable retaining element containing a retaining groove with a variable radius in its perimeter surface. The grooves form a guidance path to control the lateral, i.e. non-axial, motion of a long bar moving along a longitudinal axis during a production process.The diameter of the guidance path varies according to the variable radii of the grooves. The guidance path increases in size at a predetermined rate, from a point of origin to an end point on the retaining groove. Rotating the retaining elements causes the diameter of the retaining grooves to change so that the size of the guidance path can be changed to match the diameter of the bar being rolled, size of the guidance path can be changed to fit the diameter of a new bar rolled without having to exchange the guide for a different sized guide, reduce fiction between the bar and the guide, a media, such as compressed air, can be injected between the retaining elements via orifices.Each retaining element is attached to a mounting apparatus. The mounting apparatus can be fixed or flexible. The flexible mounting apparatus includes one or more springs and one or more shock absorbers. A force neutral position of the flexible mounting apparatus is designed to be located on the predetermined ideal bar path line. The flexible mounting apparatus dissipates kinetic energy from the bar thereby reducing the bar's lateral motion relative to the ideal bar path line.The damping ratio of the mounting apparatus can be adjustable to alter the product's vibration mode to enable better control of the bar's lateral motion.

Chang, Tzyy-Shuh (Ann Arbor, MI); Huang, Hsun-Hau (Ann Arbor, MI); Lin, Chang-Hung (Ann Arbor, MI)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

147

The Road to the Higgs in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect

Presented is a series of analyses which are central to the search for a low-mass Higgs boson. A search for ZZ production in the ZZ {yields} {ell}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}} channel is introduced then the successful combination of this analysis with with the ZZ {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{ell}'{sup +}{ell}'{sup -} search to produce the first observation of the ZZ process at a hadron collider is then detailed. The final analysis presented is the search for the Higgs in the ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} channel and the interpretation as a ZZ {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} search in order to validate the techniques. Common themes are discussed, such as multivariate techniques and instrumental backgrounds from energy measurement fluctuations and the tools used to combat them. The formalism of the statistical analysis of the final selected sample is introduced generally and demonstrated in the context of the above mentioned searches. The optimization of the selection through the identification of poorly reconstructed leptons is included as well as the utilization of b-quark identifying tools. Some space is given to jet reconstruction/identification and the Level 1 Calorimeter Trigger. The efficient identification and calibration of jets is central to many physics analysis especially in the low mass higgs search. Another key component of the ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} search is the proficient identification of jets and an imbalance of transverse energy in the first level of the triggering system. Therefore, the Level 1 Calorimeter Trigger, designed to achieve this, is a necessary component for a sensitive ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} search.

Facini, Gabriel; /Northeastern U.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

$W$ boson polarization measurement in the $t\\bar{t}$ dilepton channel using the CDF II Detector  

SciTech Connect

We present a measurement of W boson polarization in top-quark decays in t{bar t} events with decays to dilepton final states using 5.1 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity in p{bar p} collisions collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron. A simultaneous measurement of the fractions of longitudinal (f{sub 0}) and right-handed (f{sub +}) W bosons yields the results f{sub 0} = 0.71{sub -0.17}{sup +0.18}(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst) and f{sub +} = -0.07 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst). Combining this measurement with our previous result based on single lepton final states, we obtain f{sub 0} = 0.84 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst) and f{sub +} = -0.16 {+-} 0.05(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst). The results are consistent with standard model expectation.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

An analysis of monojet data in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TEV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis is presented of events with a single jet and significant missing transverse energy selected from 4.7 pb{sup {minus}1} of data collected at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF detector. The goal is to identify events of the type p{bar p} {yields} Z{sup 0} + jet; Z{sup 0} {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}. Event selection and backgrounds are discussed. The number of observed monojet events is compared to the number of observed Z{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{sup {minus}} events in which the Z{sup 0} is accompanied by a jet. We measure the number of light neutrino species to be N{sub {nu}} = 2.2{plus_minus}1.5 and we place an upper limit on the number of neutrino species at N{sub {nu}} < 5 (90% C.L.).

Markeloff, R.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkinson bar configuration. Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil, rock, and ice penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact of 125 fps. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these more sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reaches the electronics contained in the various mechanical systems. As part of the investigation of packaging techniques, a two phase study of shock mitigating materials is being conducted. The purpose of the first phase reported here is to examine the performance of a joint that consists of shock mitigating material sandwiched in between steel and to compare the performance of the shock mitigating materials. A split Hopkinson bar experimental configuration simulates this joint and has been used to study the shock mitigating characteristics of seventeen, unconfined materials. The nominal input for these tests is an incident compressive wave with 50 fps peak (1,500 {micro}{var_epsilon} peak) amplitude and a 100 {micro}s duration (measured at 10% amplitude).

Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

An Analysis of a Spreader Bar Crane Mounted Gamma-Ray Radiation Detection System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over 95% of imports entering the United States from outside North America arrive via cargo containers by sea at 329 ports of entry. The current layered approach for the detection only scans 5% of cargo bound for the United States. This is inadequate to protect our country. This research involved the building of a gamma-ray radiation detection system used for cargo scanning. The system was mounted on a spreader bar crane (SBC) at the Port of Tacoma (PoT) and the applicability and capabilities of the system were analyzed. The detection system provided continuous count rate and spectroscopic data among three detectors while operating in an extreme environment. In a separate set of experiments, 60Co and 137Cs sources were positioned inside a cargo container and data were recorded for several count times. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code was used to simulate a radioactive source inside an empty cargo container and the results were compared to experimentally recorded data. The detection system demonstrated the ability to detect 60Co, 137Cs, 192Ir, highly-enriched uranium (HEU), and weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) with minimum detectable activities (MDA) of 5.9 ± 0.4 microcuries (?Ci), 19.3 ± 1.1 ?Ci, 11.7 ± 0.6 ?Ci, 3.5 ± 0.3 kilograms (kg), and 30.6 ± 1.3 grams (g), respectively. This system proved strong gamma-ray detection capabilities, but was limited in the detection of fissile materials Additional details of this system are presented and advantages of this approach to cargo scanning over current approaches are discussed.

Grypp, Matthew D

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

STRATIGRAPHY OF COUNTER-POINT-BAR AND EDDY-ACCRETION DEPOSITS IN LOW-ENERGY MEANDER BELTS OF THE PEACE-ATHABASCA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STRATIGRAPHY OF COUNTER-POINT-BAR AND EDDY-ACCRETION DEPOSITS IN LOW-ENERGY MEANDER BELTS-7th Ave. SW, Nexen Inc., Calgary, AB, T2P 3P7, Canada ABSTRACT: Previously termed concave bank

153

Measurement of W and Z production cross-sections in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cross sections for W and Z production in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV are measured using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The detected final states are W {yields} ev{sub e}, Z {yields} e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, W {yields} {mu}v{sub {mu}}, and Z {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}. In the ratio of these measurements, many common sources of systematic error cancel and we measure R = {sigma},(p{bar p} {yields} W) {center_dot} Br(W {yields} lv)/ {sigma},(p{bar p} {yields} Z) {center_dot} Br(Z {yields} l{sup +}l{sup {minus}}). Assuming standard model couplings, this result is used to determine the width of the W bosom and to set a limit on the decay W{sup +} {yields} t{bar b}.

Quintas, P.Z.; D0 Collaboration

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Search for the Higgs boson produced with $Z \\to \\ell^+\\ell^-$ in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect

The authors present a search for the Higgs boson in the process q{bar q} {yields} ZN {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} b{bar b}. The analysis uses an integrated luminosity of 1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions produced at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV and accumulated by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II). They employ artificial neural networks both to correct jets mismeasured in the calorimeter, and to distinguish the signal kinematic distributions from those of the background. They see no evidence for Higgs boson production, and set 95% CL upper limits on {sigma}{sub ZH} {center_dot} {Beta}(H {yields} b{bar b}), ranging from 1.5 pb to 1.2 pb for a Higgs mass (m{sub H}) of 110 to 150 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, Michael G.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /CSIC, Catalunya; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, Dante E.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, Alberto; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab /Purdue U.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Search for a heavy particle decaying to a top quark and a light quark in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV  

SciTech Connect

We present a search for a new heavy particle M produced in association with a top quark, p{bar p} {yields} t(M {yields} {bar t}q) or p{bar p} {yields} {bar t}({bar M} {yields} t{bar q}), where q stands for up quarks and down quarks. Such a particle may explain the recent anomalous measurements of top-quark forward-backward asymmetry. If the light-flavor quark (q) is reconstructed as a jet (j), this gives a {bar t}+j or t+j resonance in t{bar t}+jet events, a previously unexplored experimental signature. In a sample of events with exactly one lepton, missing transverse momentum and at least five jets, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector, we find the data to be consistent with the standard model. We set cross-section upper limits on the production (p{bar p} {yields} Mt or {bar M} {bar t}) at 95% confidence level from 0.61 pb to 0.02 pb for M masses ranging from 200 GeV/c{sup 2} to 800 GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Yale U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Combination of searches for anomalous top quark couplings with 5.4 fb(-1) of p(p)over-bar collisions  

SciTech Connect

We present measurements of the tWb coupling form factors using information from electroweak single top quark production and from the helicity of W bosons from top quark decays in t{bar t} events. We set upper limits on anomalous tWb coupling form factors using data collected with the D0 detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}.

Abazov V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Gonzalez, J. A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Lashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffe, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

157

Real-time rotor bar current measurements using bluetooth technology for a brushless doubly-fed machine (BDFM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Brushless Doubly Fed Machine (BDFM) shows economic promise as a variable speed drive or generator. The optimization of the machine and model-based control strategies both rely on machine models, and the experimental verification of these models. To date, dynamic measurements of rotor quantities have not been possible. The authors present a system of measuring rotor bar currents in real time using a Rogowski coil to detect the current and recently developed Bluetooth wireless technology to transmit the data from the moving rotor to a computer. Experimental data collected from the system are included. 1.

P. C. Roberts; E. Abdi Jalebi; R. A. Mcmahon; T. J. Flack

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

(BARS) -- Bibliographic Retrieval System Sandia shock compression (SSC) database shock physics index (SPHINX) database. Volume 3, UNIX version Systems Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Bibliographic Retrieval System (BARS) is a database management system specially designed to store and retrieve bibliographic references and track documents. The system uses INGRES to manage this database and user interface. It uses forms for journal articles, books, conference proceedings, theses, technical reports, letters, memos, visual aids, as well as a miscellaneous form which can be used for data sets or any other material which can be assigned an access or file number. Sorted output resulting from flexible BOOLEAN searches can be printed or saved in files which can be inserted in reference lists for use with word processors.

von Laven, G.M. [Advanced Software Engineering, Madison, AL (United States); Herrmann, W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

A Measurement of the B ---> Eta/C K Branching Fraction Using the BaBar Detector  

SciTech Connect

The branching fraction is measured for the decay channels B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sub S}{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sup +} where {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{bar K}{pi}, using the BABAR detector. The {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decay channels are used, including non-resonant decays and possibly those through intermediate resonances.

Jackson, Frank; /Manchester U.

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

160

Mutual transformation of light waves by reflection holograms in photorefractive crystals of the 4-bar 3m symmetry  

SciTech Connect

The mutual transformation of light waves in the case of their simultaneous diffraction from a bulk reflection phase hologram, which was formed in a cubic photorefractive crystal of the 4-bar 3m symmetry class, has been studied. The indicator surfaces of the polarization-optimized values of the relative intensity of the object wave, which make it possible to determine the amplification of this wave for any crystal cut, are constructed. The linear polarization azimuths at which the energy exchange between the light waves reaches a maximum are found numerically for crystals of different cuts.

Naunyka, V. N.; Shepelevich, V. V., E-mail: vasshep@inbox.ru [Mozyr State Pedagogical University (Belarus)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "restaurant bar bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Branching Fraction for B0 -> pi- l+ nu and Determination of |Vub| in Upsilon(4S) -> B0 B0bar Events Tagged by B0bar -> D(*)+ l- nubar  

SciTech Connect

We report preliminary results from a study of the charmless exclusive semileptonic decay B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu} based on the data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance using the BABAR detector at SLAC. The analysis uses events in which the signal B meson recoils against a B meson that has been reconstructed in a semileptonic decay {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)+}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}. We extract the total branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.03 {+-} 0.25{sub stat.} {+-} 0.13{sub syst.}) x 10{sup -4} and the partial branching fractions in three bins of q{sup 2}, the invariant mass squared of the lepton-neutrino system. From the partial branching fractions and theoretical predictions for the form factors, we determine the magnitude of the CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}|. We find |V{sub ub}| = (3.3 {+-} 0.4{sub stat.} {+-} 0.2{sub syst.} {sub -0.4}{sup +0.8}FF) x 10{sup -3}, where the last error is due to normalization of the form factor.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

162

A Measurement of CP-violation Parameters in B0B0barMixing using Partially Reconstructed D^{*-}l^+ nu_l Events at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

CP violation in B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} mixing is characterized by the value of the parameter |q/p| being different from 1, and the Standard Model predicts this difference to be smaller than 10{sup -3}. We present a measurement of this parameter using a partial reconstruction of one of the B mesons in the semileptonic channel D*{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}, where only the hard lepton and the soft pion from the D*{sup -} {yields} {bar D}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} decay are reconstructed. The flavor of the other B is determined by means of lepton tagging. The determination of |q/p| is then performed with a fit to the proper time difference of the two B decays. We use a luminosity of 200.8 fb{sup -1}, collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetrical-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, in the period 1999-2004. We obtain the preliminary result: |q/p| - 1 = (6.5 {+-} 3.4(stat.) {+-} 2.0(syst.)) {center_dot} 10{sup -3}.

Aubert, B.

2006-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

163

Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured-geothermal resources in Texas: Barrier-bar tidal-channel reservoir facies architecture, Jackson Group, Prado field, South Texas; Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandstone reservoirs in the Jackson barrier/strandplain play are characterized by low recovery efficiencies and thus contain a large hydrocarbon resource target potentially amenable to advanced recovery techniques. Prado field, Jim Hogg County, South Texas, has produced over 23 million bbl of oil and over 32 million mcf gas from combination structural-stratigraphic traps in the Eocene lower Jackson Group. Hydrocarbon entrapment at Prado field is a result of anticlinal nosing by differential compaction and updip pinch-out of barrier bar sandstone. Relative base-level lowering resulted in forced regression that established lower Jackson shoreline sandstones in a relatively distal location in central Jim Hogg County. Reservoir sand bodies at Prado field comprise complex assemblages of barrier-bar, tidal-inlet fill, back-barrier bar, and shoreface environments. Subsequent progradation built the barrier-bar system seaward 1 to 2 mi. Within the barrier-bar system, favorable targets for hydrocarbon reexploration are concentrated in tidal-inlet facies because they possess the greatest degree of depositional heterogeneity. The purpose of this report is (1) to describe and analyze the sand-body architecture, depositional facies variations, and structure of Prado field, (2) to determine controls on distribution of hydrocarbons pertinent to reexploration for bypassed hydrocarbons, (3) to describe reservoir models at Prado field, and (4) to develop new data affecting the suitability of Jackson oil fields as possible candidates for thermally enhanced recovery of medium to heavy oil.

Seni, S.J.; Choh, S.J.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Study of Higgs boson production and its b-b(bar) decay in gamma-gamma processes in proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC  

SciTech Connect

We explore for the first time the possibilities to measure an intermediate-mass (m{sub H} = 115-140 GeV/c{sup 2}) Standard-Model Higgs boson in electromagnetic proton-lead (p Pb) interactions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) via its b{bar b} decay. Using equivalent Weizsacker-Williams photon fluxes and Higgs effective field theory for the coupling {gamma}{gamma} {yields} H, we obtain a leading-order cross section of the order of 0.3 pb for exclusive Higgs production in elastic (p Pb {yields} {gamma}{gamma} p H Pb) and semielastic (p Pb {yields} {gamma}{gamma} X H Pb) processes at {radical}S{sub NN} = 8.8 TeV. After applying various kinematics cuts to remove the main backgrounds ({gamma}{gamma} {yields} b{bar b} and misidentified {gamma}{gamma} {yields} q{bar q} events), we find that a Higgs boson with m{sub H} = 120 GeV/c{sup 2} could be observed in the b{bar b} channel with a 3{sigma}-significance integrating 300 pb{sup -1} with an upgraded pA luminosity of 10{sup 31} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. We also provide for the first time semielastic Higgs cross sections, along with elastic t{bar t} cross sections, for electromagnetic pp, pA and AA collisions at the LHC.

d' Enterria, David; /ICC, Barcelona U. /ICREA, Barcelona; Lansberg, Jean-Philippe; /Ecole Polytechnique, CPHT /SLAC

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

165

Part 70 License NRC Docket No. 70-07018 Subject: References: SUPPLEMENT TO APPLICATION FOR A SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL LICENSE FOR WATTS BAR NUCLEAR PLANT UNIT 2 IN ACCORDANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(TAC NO. ME0853)" As part of TVA's application for a Special Nuclear Material (SNM) License for Watts Bar Unit 2

Watts Bar; Nuclear Plant; Watts Bar; Nuclear Plant

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Task 5: TVA sediment-disturbing activities within the Watts Bar Reservoir and Melton Hill Reservoir areas of the Clinch River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of Task 5 of the Interagency Agreement No. DE-AI05-91OR22007 were to review: (1) the extent of dredging, construction, and other sediment-disturbing activities conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in potentially contaminated areas of Watts Bar Reservoir, and (2) the disposition of the materials from these activities. This memorandum is the final report for Task 5. This memorandum describes major activities in the Watts Bar Reservoir and Melton Hill Reservoir areas of the Clinch River that possibly resulted in significant disturbance of potentially contaminated sediments. TVA records from the construction of Watts Bar Dam, Kingston Fossil Plant, and Melton Hill Dam were reviewed to facilitate qualitative description of the effect of these activities in disturbing potentially contaminated sediments. The critical period for these activities in disturbing contaminated sediments was during or after 1956 when the peak releases of radioactive contaminants occurred from the Oak Ridge Reservation.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Measurement of the differential cross section d?/dt in elastic $p\\bar{p}$ scattering at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the elastic differential cross section $d\\sigma(p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow p\\bar{p})/dt$ as a function of the four-momentum-transfer squared t. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of $\\approx 31 nb^{-1}$ collected with the D0 detector using dedicated Tevatron $p\\bar{p} $ Collider operating conditions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV and covers the range $0.26 <|t|< 1.2 GeV^2$. For $|t|<0.6 GeV^2$, d\\sigma/dt is described by an exponential function of the form $Ae^{-b|t|}$ with a slope parameter $ b = 16.86 \\pm 0.10(stat) \\pm 0.20(syst) GeV^{-2}$. A change in slope is observed at $|t| \\approx 0.6 GeV^2$, followed by a more gradual |t| dependence with increasing values of |t|.

D0 Collaboration; V. M. Abazov; B. Abbott; B. S. Acharya; M. Adams; T. Adams; G. D. Alexeev; G. Alkhazov; A. Alton; G. Alverson; G. A. Alves; M. Aoki; A. Askew; S. Atkins; K. Augsten; C. Avila; F. Badaud; L. Bagby; B. Baldin; D. V. Bandurin; S. Banerjee; E. Barberis; P. Baringer; J. Barreto; J. F. Bartlett; U. Bassler; V. Bazterra; A. Bean; M. Begalli; L. Bellantoni; S. B. Beri; G. Bernardi; R. Bernhard; I. Bertram; M. Besançon; R. Beuselinck; V. A. Bezzubov; P. C. Bhat; S. Bhatia; V. Bhatnagar; G. Blazey; S. Blessing; K. Bloom; A. Boehnlein; D. Boline; E. E. Boos; G. Borissov; T. Bose; A. Brandt; O. Brandt; R. Brock; G. Brooijmans; A. Bross; D. Brown; J. Brown; X. B. Bu; M. Buehler; V. Buescher; V. Bunichev; S. Burdin; C. P. Buszello; E. Camacho-Pérez; W. Carvalho; B. C. K. Casey; H. Castilla-Valdez; S. Caughron; S. Chakrabarti; D. Chakraborty; K. M. Chan; A. Chandra; E. Chapon; G. Chen; S. Chevalier-Théry; D. K. Cho; S. W. Cho; S. Choi; B. Choudhary; S. Cihangir; D. Claes; J. Clutter; M. Cooke; W. E. Cooper; M. Corcoran; F. Couderc; M. -C. Cousinou; A. Croc; D. Cutts; A. Das; G. Davies; S. J. de Jong; E. De La Cruz-Burelo; C. De Oliveira Martins; F. Déliot; R. Demina; D. Denisov; S. P. Denisov; S. Desai; C. Deterre; K. DeVaughan; H. T. Diehl; M. Diesburg; P. F. Ding; A. Dominguez; A. Dubey; L. V. Dudko; D. Duggan; A. Duperrin; S. Dutt; A. Dyshkant; M. Eads; D. Edmunds; J. Ellison; V. D. Elvira; Y. Enari; H. Evans; A. Evdokimov; V. N. Evdokimov; G. Facini; L. Feng; T. Ferbel; F. Fiedler; F. Filthaut; W. Fisher; H. E. Fisk; M. Fortner; H. Fox; S. Fuess; A. Garcia-Bellido; J. A. García-González; G. A. García-Guerra; V. Gavrilov; P. Gay; W. Geng; D. Gerbaudo; C. E. Gerber; Y. Gershtein; G. Ginther; G. Golovanov; A. Goussiou; P. D. Grannis; S. Greder; H. Greenlee; E. M. Gregores; G. Grenier; Ph. Gris; J. -F. Grivaz; A. Grohsjean; S. Grünendahl; M. W. Grünewald; T. Guillemin; G. Gutierrez; P. Gutierrez; A. Haas; S. Hagopian; J. Haley; L. Han; K. Harder; A. Harel; J. M. Hauptman; J. Hays; T. Head; T. Hebbeker; D. Hedin; H. Hegab; A. P. Heinson; U. Heintz; C. Hensel; I. Heredia-De La Cruz; K. Herner; G. Hesketh; M. D. Hildreth; R. Hirosky; T. Hoang; J. D. Hobbs; B. Hoeneisen; M. Hohlfeld; I. Howley; Z. Hubacek; V. Hynek; I. Iashvili; Y. Ilchenko; R. Illingworth; A. S. Ito; S. Jabeen; M. Jaffré; A. Jayasinghe; R. Jesik; K. Johns; E. Johnson; M. Johnson; A. Jonckheere; P. Jonsson; J. Joshi; A. W. Jung; A. Juste; K. Kaadze; E. Kajfasz; D. Karmanov; P. A. Kasper; I. Katsanos; R. Kehoe; S. Kermiche; N. Khalatyan; A. Khanov; A. Kharchilava; Y. N. Kharzheev; I. Kiselevich; J. M. Kohli; A. V. Kozelov; J. Kraus; S. Kulikov; A. Kumar; A. Kupco; T. Kur?a; V. A. Kuzmin; S. Lammers; G. Landsberg; P. Lebrun; H. S. Lee; S. W. Lee; W. M. Lee; J. Lellouch; H. Li; L. Li; Q. Z. Li; J. K. Lim; D. Lincoln; J. Linnemann; V. V. Lipaev; R. Lipton; H. Liu; Y. Liu; A. Lobodenko; M. Lokajicek; R. Lopes de Sa; H. J. Lubatti; R. Luna-Garcia; A. L. Lyon; A. K. A. Maciel; R. Madar; R. Magaña-Villalba; S. Malik; V. L. Malyshev; Y. Maravin; J. Martínez-Ortega; R. McCarthy; C. L. McGivern; M. M. Meijer; A. Melnitchouk; L. Mendoza; D. Menezes; P. G. Mercadante; M. Merkin; A. Meyer; J. Meyer; F. Miconi; J. Molina; N. K. Mondal; H. da Motta; M. Mulhearn; L. Mundim; E. Nagy; M. Naimuddin; M. Narain; R. Nayyar; H. A. Neal; J. P. Negret; P. Neustroev; S. F. Novaes; T. Nunnemann; G. Obrant; V. Oguri; J. Orduna; N. Osman; J. Osta; M. Padilla; A. Pal; N. Parashar; V. Parihar; S. K. Park; R. Partridge; N. Parua; A. Patwa; B. Penning; M. Perfilov; Y. Peters; K. Petridis; G. Petrillo; P. Pétroff; M. -A. Pleier; P. L. M. Podesta-Lerma; V. M. Podstavkov; M. -E. Pol; A. V. Popov; W. L. Prado da Silva; M. Prewitt; D. Price; N. Prokopenko; J. Qian; A. Quadt; B. Quinn; M. S. Rangel; K. Ranjan; P. N. Ratoff; I. Razumov; P. Renkel; I. Ripp-Baudot; F. Rizatdinova; M. Rominsky; A. Ross; C. Royon; P. Rubinov; R. Ruchti; G. Sajot; P. Salcido; A. Sánchez-Hernández; M. P. Sanders; B. Sanghi; A. Santoro; A. S. Santos; G. Savage; L. Sawyer; T. Scanlon; R. D. Schamberger; Y. Scheglov; H. Schellman; S. Schlobohm; C. Schwanenberger; R. Schwienhorst; J. Sekaric; H. Severini; E. Shabalina; V. Shary; S. Shaw; A. A. Shchukin; R. K. Shivpuri; V. Simak; P. Skubic; P. Slattery; D. Smirnov; K. J. Smith; G. R. Snow; J. Snow; S. Snyder; S. Söldner-Rembold; L. Sonnenschein; K. Soustruznik; J. Stark; D. A. Stoyanova; M. A. Strang; M. Strauss; L. Stutte; L. Suter; P. Svoisky; M. Takahashi; M. Titov; V. V. Tokmenin; Y. -T. Tsai; K. Tschann-Grimm; D. Tsybychev; B. Tuchming; C. Tully; L. Uvarov; S. Uvarov; S. Uzunyan; R. Van Kooten; W. M. van Leeuwen; N. Varelas; E. W. Varnes; I. A. Vasilyev; P. Verdier; A. Y. Verkheev; L. S. Vertogradov; M. Verzocchi; M. Vesterinen; D. Vilanova; P. Vokac; H. D. Wahl; M. H. L. S. Wang; J. Warchol

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

168

CP violating anomalous top-quark coupling in p$\\bar{p}$ collision at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV  

SciTech Connect

We conduct the first study of the T-odd correlations in tt events produced in p{bar p} collision at the Fermilab Tevatron collider that can be used to search for CP violation. We select events which have lepton+jets final states to identify t{bar t} events and measure counting asymmetries of several physics observables. Based on the result, we search the top quark anomalous couplings at the production vertex at the Tevatron. In addition, Geant4 development, photon identification, the discrimination of a single photon and a photon doublet from {pi}{sup 0} decay are discussed in this thesis.

Lee, Sehwook; /Iowa State U.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Branching Fraction Measurements of the Color-Suppressed Decays B0bar to D(*)0 pi0, D(*)0 eta, D(*)0 omega, and D(*)0 eta_prime and Measurement of the Polarization in the Decay B0bar to D*0 omega  

SciTech Connect

We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0}{eta}, D*{sup 0}{eta}, D{sup 0}{omega}, D*{sup 0}{omega}, D{sup 0}{eta}', and D*{sup 0}{eta}'. We measure the branching fractions (x10{sup -4}): {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.13, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 3.05 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.28, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.53 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.11, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.23, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{omega}) = 2.57 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.14, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{omega}) = 4.55 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.39, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.48 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.07, and {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.49 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.15. We also present the first measurement of the longitudinal polarization fraction of the decay channel D*{sup 0}{omega}, f{sub L} = (66.5 {+-} 4.7 {+-} 1.5)%. In the above, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The results are based on a sample of (454 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. The measurements are the most precise determinations of these quantities from a single experiment. They are compared to theoretical predictions obtained by factorization, Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). We find that the presence of final state interactions is favored and the measurements are in better agreement with SCET than with pQCD.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

170

Measurements of D0-D0bar Mixing and Searches for CP Violation: HFAG Combination of all Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present world average values for D0-D0bar mixing parameters x and y, CP violation parameters |q/p| and Arg(q/p), and strong phase differences \\delta and \\delta_{K\\pi\\pi}. These values are calculated by the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG) by performing a global fit to relevant experimental measurements. The results for x and y differ significantly from zero and are inconsistent with no mixing at the level of 6.7 sigma. The results for |q/p| and Arg(q/p) are consistent with no CP violation. The strong phase difference \\delta is less than 45 degrees at 95% C.L.

Schwartz, A J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Search for Long-Lived Massive Charged Particles in 1.96 TeV $\\bar{p}p}$ Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We performed a signature-based search for long-lived charged massive particles (CHAMPs) produced in 1.0 $\\rm{fb}^{-1}$ of $\\bar{p}p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV, collected with the CDF II detector using a high transverse-momentum ($p_T$) muon trigger. The search used time-of-flight to isolate slowly moving, high-$p_T$ particles. One event passed our selection cuts with an expected background of $1.9 \\pm 0.2$ events. We set an upper bound on the production cross section, and, interpreting this result within the context of a stable scalar top quark model, set a lower limit on the particle mass of 249 GeV/$c^2$ at 95% C.L.

CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen

2009-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

172

Measurement of W-Boson Polarization in Top-Quark Decay in pp[over-bar] Collisions at [sqrt]s=1.96 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report measurements of the polarization of W bosons from top-quark decays using 2.7 fb[superscript -1] of pp[over-bar] collisions collected by the CDF II detector. Assuming a top-quark mass of 175??GeV/c[superscript 2], ...

Bauer, Gerry P.

173

Measurement of D-D-bar mixing using the ratio of lifetimes for the decays D-->K- pi + and K+K-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the rate of D0-D[over-bar] 0 mixing with the observable yCP=(?Kpi/?KK)-1, where ?KK and ?Kpi are, respectively, the mean lifetimes of CP-even D0-->K+K- and CP-mixed D0-->K-pi+ decays, using a data sample of ...

Fisher, Peter H.

174

Figure 2. Above ground woody biomass across a gradient of forest degradation in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. Mean and one standard error given by connected bars, one standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Indonesia. Mean and one standard error given by connected bars, one standard deviation given by outer in 51 subsampled plots at 17 locations in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia in July and August 2009 across, Indonesia . From left to right intact forest , advanced regrowth, degraded area with some regrowth

175

Summary report on water quality, sediment and water chemistry data for water and sediment samples collected from source areas to Melton Hill and Watts Bar reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contamination of surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system as a result of past and present activities by the US Department of Energy (DOE) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and also activities by non-ORR facilities are being studied by the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). Previous studies have documented the presence of heavy metals, organics, and radionuclides in the sediments of reservoirs in the vicinity. In support of the CR-ERP, during the summer of 1991, TVA collected and evaluated water and sediment samples from swimming areas and municipal water intakes on Watts Bar Reservoir, Melton Hill Reservoir (which is considered part of the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir System), and Norris Reservoir, which was considered a source of less-contaminated reference or background data. Results of this study indicated that the levels of contamination in the samples from the Watts Bar and Melton Hill Reservoir sites did not pose a threat to human health. Despite the numerous studies, until the current work documented by this report, relatively few sediment or water samples had been collected by the CR-ERP in the immediate vicinity of contaminant point sources. This work focused on water and sediment samples taken from points immediately downstream from suspected effluent point sources both on and off the ORR. In August and September, 1994, TVA sampled surface water and sediment at twelve locations in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. Eleven of the sampling sites were selected based on existence of pollutant discharge permits, known locations of hazardous waste sites, and knowledge of past practices. The twelfth sample site was selected as a relatively less contaminated reference site for comparison purposes.

Tomaszewski, T.M.; Bruggink, D.J.; Nunn, D.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Venditti, J.G., J.T. Minear, P.A. Nelson, J. Wooster, W.E. Dietrich (2006), Response of alternate bar topography to variation in sediment supply in gravel-bedded rivers, Eos Trans. AGU, 87(52), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract H51G-0583.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Reactivation of geomorphic process in these channels, which are commonly incised with heavily armored river downstream migration, became stationary. Bar top surfaces were heavily armored, while adjacent pools and bar

Venditti, Jeremy G.

177

First Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Using the Semileptonic Decay Channel: H --> WW --> mu bar nu jj  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation presents the first search for the standard model Higgs boson (H) in decay topologies containing a muon, an imbalance in transverse momentum (E{sub T}) and jets, using p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb{sup -1} recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. This analysis is sensitive primary to contributions from Higgs bosons produced through gluon fusion, with subsequent decay H {yields} WW {yields} {mu}{nu}jj where W represents a real or virtual W boson. In the absence of signal, limits are set at 95% confidence on the production and decay of the standard model Higgs boson for M{sub H} in the range of 115-200 GeV. For M{sub H} = 165 GeV, the observed and expected limits are factors of 11.2 larger than the standard model value. Combining this channel with e{nu}jj final states and including earlier data to increase the integrated luminosity to 5.4 fb{sup -1} produces observed(expected) limits of 5.5(3.8) times the standard model value.

Zelitch, Shannon Maura; /Virginia U.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Measurements of WW and WZ Production in W plus jets Final States in p(p)over-bar Collisions  

SciTech Connect

We study WW and WZ production with {ell}{nu}qq ({ell} = e,{mu}) final states using data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Assuming the ratio between the production cross sections {sigma}(WW) and {sigma}(WZ) as predicted by the standard model, we measure the total WV (V = W,Z) cross section to be {sigma}(WV) = 19.6{sub -3.0}{sup +3.2} pb and reject the background-only hypothesis at a level of 7.9 standard deviations. We also use b-jet discrimination to separate the WZ component from the dominant WW component. Simultaneously fitting WW and WZ contributions, we measure {sigma}(WW) = 15.9{sub -3.2}{sup +3.7} pb and {sigma}(WZ) = 3.3{sub -3.3}{sup +4.1} pb, which is consistent with the standard model predictions.

Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De la Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De la Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin et al.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

179

Copper Heat Exchanger for the External Auxiliary Bus-Bars Routing Line in the LHC Insertion Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The corrector magnets and the main quadrupoles of the LHC dispersion suppressors are powered by a special superconducting line (called auxiliary bus-bars line N), external to the cold mass and housed in a 50 mm diameter stainless steel tube fixed to the cold mass. As the line is periodically connected to the cold mass, the same gaseous and liquid helium cools both the magnets and the line. The final sub-cooling process (from around 4.5 K down to 1.9 K) consists in the phase transformation from liquid to superfluid helium. Heat is extracted from the line through the magnets via their point of junction. In dispersion suppressor zones, approximately 40 m long, the sub-cooling of the line is slightly delayed with respect to the magnets. This might have an impact on the readiness of the accelerator for operation. In order to accelerate the process, a special heat exchanger has been designed. It is located in the middle of the dispersion suppressor portion of the line. Its main function consists in providing a loca...

Garion, C; Seyvet, F; Sitko, M; Skoczen, B; Tock, J P

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

THE APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT: FIRST DETECTION OF HIGH-VELOCITY MILKY WAY BAR STARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commissioning observations with the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, have produced radial velocities (RVs) for {approx}4700 K/M-giant stars in the Milky Way (MW) bulge. These high-resolution (R {approx} 22, 500), high-S/N (>100 per resolution element), near-infrared (NIR; 1.51-1.70 {mu}m) spectra provide accurate RVs ({epsilon}{sub V} {approx} 0.2 km s{sup -1}) for the sample of stars in 18 Galactic bulge fields spanning -1 Degree-Sign -32 Degree-Sign . This represents the largest NIR high-resolution spectroscopic sample of giant stars ever assembled in this region of the Galaxy. A cold ({sigma}{sub V} {approx} 30 km s{sup -1}), high-velocity peak (V{sub GSR} Almost-Equal-To +200 km s{sup -1}) is found to comprise a significant fraction ({approx}10%) of stars in many of these fields. These high RVs have not been detected in previous MW surveys and are not expected for a simple, circularly rotating disk. Preliminary distance estimates rule out an origin from the background Sagittarius tidal stream or a new stream in the MW disk. Comparison to various Galactic models suggests that these high RVs are best explained by stars in orbits of the Galactic bar potential, although some observational features remain unexplained.

Nidever, David L.; Zasowski, Gail; Majewski, Steven R.; Beaton, Rachael L.; Wilson, John C.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; O'Connell, Robert W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Bird, Jonathan; Schoenrich, Ralph; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Sellgren, Kris [Department of Astronomy and the Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Robin, Annie C.; Schultheis, Mathias [Institut Utinam, CNRS UMR 6213, OSU THETA, Universite de Franche-Comte, 41bis avenue de l'Observatoire, F-25000 Besancon (France); Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma; Gerhard, Ortwin [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Shetrone, Matthew [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, Fort Davis, TX 79734 (United States); Schiavon, Ricardo P. [Gemini Observatory, 670 North A'Ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Weiner, Benjamin [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Street, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Allende Prieto, Carlos, E-mail: dln5q@virginia.edu [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); and others

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

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181

SEARCH FOR THE RARE KAON DECAY K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}}  

SciTech Connect

This thesis describes the search for the rare decay K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} in the pion momentum region 140 MeV/c {le} P{sub {pi}{sup +}} {le} 195 MeV/c. This is a Flavor Changing Neutral Current (FCNC) decay which is forbidden to the first order in the Standard Model (SM) by the GIM mechanism. However, this decay mode is allowed in the second order by two Z-Penguin and one box diagram and is expected to have a branching ratio of (0.72 {+-} 0.21) x 10{sup -10}. This decay mode is sensitive to the coupling of top to down quark and therefore a measurement of the branching ratio for this decay mode provides a measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V{sub td}. The recent observation of two events in the pion momentum region 211 MeV/c {le} P{sup {pi}{sup +}} {le} 229 MeV/c estimates a branching ratio of 1.57{sub -0.82}{sup +1.75} x 10{sup -10} for the same decay mode. We have extended the search for this decay to the lower pion momentum region. Data collected by the Experiment E787 at Brookhaven National Laboratory during the 1996 and 1997 run were analyzed in this thesis.

BHUYAN,B.

2003-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

182

$B^{(*)}\\bar B^{(*)}$ intermediate state contribution to $?(4S,5S)\\to ?_b+?$ radiative decay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, we investigate the re-scattering effects in the radiative decay $\\Upsilon(5S)\\to\\eta_b+\\gamma$, which were suggested to be crucially important for understanding the anomalous largeness of the branching ratios $B(\\Upsilon(5S)\\to \\Upsilon(1S)+\\pi\\pi)$ and $B(\\Upsilon(5S)\\to \\Upsilon(1S)+\\eta)$. Our calculations show that the re-scattering effects may enhance $\\Gamma(\\Upsilon(10860)\\to \\eta_b+\\gamma)$ by four orders, but the tetraquark structure does not. Recently the BaBar and CLEO collaborations have measured the mass of ${\\eta_b}$ and the branching ratios $\\mathcal{B}(\\Upsilon(2S)\\rightarrow\\eta_b+\\gamma)$, $\\mathcal{B}(\\Upsilon(3S)\\rightarrow\\eta_b+\\gamma)$. We hope that very soon, $\\Upsilon(10860)\\to \\eta_b+\\gamma$ will be measured and it would be an ideal opportunity for testing whether the re-scattering or the tetraquark structure is responsible for the anomaly of $\\mathcal{B}\\big(\\Upsilon(5S)\\rightarrow\\Upsilon(nS)\\pi^+\\pi^- (n=1,2,3)\\big)$, $i.e.$, the future measurements on the radiative decays of $\\Upsilon(5S)$ might be a touchstone of the two mechanisms.

Hong-Wei Ke; Xue-Qian Li; Xiang Liu

2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

183

Search for Higgs bosons of the minimal supersymmetric standard model in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect

We report results from searches for neutral Higgs bosons produced in p{bar p} collisions recorded by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We study the production of inclusive neutral Higgs boson in the {tau}{tau} final state and in association with a b quark in the b{tau}{tau} and bbb final states. These results are combined to improve the sensitivity to the production of neutral Higgs bosons in the context of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). The data are found to be consistent with expectation from background processes. Upper limits on MSSM Higgs boson production are set for Higgs boson masses ranging from 90 to 300 GeV. We exclude tan {beta} > 20-30 for Higgs boson masses below 180 GeV. These are the most stringent constraints on MSSM Higgs boson production in p{bar p} collisions.

Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jaminn D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; Lopes de Sa R.; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; et al.

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

184

Search for $WH$ associated production in 5.3 fb$^{-1}$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

We present a search for associated production of Higgs and W bosons in p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in 5.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity recorded by the D0 experiment. Multivariate analysis techniques are applied to events containing one lepton, an imbalance in transverse energy, and one or two b-tagged jets to discriminate a potential WH signal from standard model backgrounds. We observe good agreement between data and background, and set an upper limit of 4.5 (at 95% confidence level and for m{sub H} = 115 GeV) on the ratio of the WH cross section multiplied by the branching fraction of H {yields} b{bar b} to its standard model prediction. A limit of 4.8 is expected from simulation.

Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Development and Demonstration of a High Efficiency, Rapid Heating, Low NOx Alternative to Conventional Heating of Round Steel Shapes, Steel Substrate (Strip) and Coil Box Transfer Bars  

SciTech Connect

Direct Flame Impingement involves the use of an array of very high-velocity flame jets impinging on a work piece to rapidly heat the work piece. The predominant mode of heat transfer is convection. Because of the locally high rate of heat transfer at the surface of the work piece, the refractory walls and exhaust gases of a DFI furnace are significantly cooler than in conventional radiant heating furnaces, resulting in high thermal efficiency and low NOx emissions. A DFI furnace is composed of a successive arrangement of heating modules through or by which the work piece is conveyed, and can be configured for square, round, flat, and curved metal shapes (e.g., billets, tubes, flat bars, and coiled bars) in single- or multi-stranded applications.

Kurek, Harry; Wagner, John

2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

186

Longitudinal Spin Transfer to Lambda and Lambda bar Hyperons in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at sqrt s = 200 GeV  

SciTech Connect

The longitudinal spin transfer, D{sub LL}, from high energy polarized protons to {Lambda} and {bar {Lambda}} hypersons has been measured for the first time in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 200 GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. The measurements cover pseudorapidity, {eta}, in the range |{eta}| < 1.2 and transverse momenta, p{sub T}, up to 4 GeV/c. The longitudinal spin transfer is found to be D{sub LL} = -0.03{+-}0.13(stat){+-}0.04(syst) for inclusive {Lambda} and D{sub LL} = -0.12{+-}0.08(stat){+-}0.03(syst) for inclusive {bar {Lambda}} hyperons with <{eta}> = 0.5 and = 3.7 GeV/c. The dependence on {eta} and p{sub T} is presented.

STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

187

Low energy tracking and particles identification in the MUNU Time Projection Chamber at 1 bar. Possible application in low energy solar neutrino spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present the results from the measurements made with the MUNU TPC at 1bar pressure of CF4 in the energy region below 1 MeV. Electron events down to 80 keV are successfully measured. The electron energy and direction are reconstructed for every contained single electron above 200 keV. As test the 137Cs photopeak is reconstructed by measuring both the energy and direction of the Compton electrons in the TPC.

Z. Daraktchieva; C. Amsler; M. Avenier; C. Broggini; J. Busto; C. Cerna; F. Juget; D. H. Koang; J. Lamblin; D. Lebrun; O. Link; G. Puglierin; A. Stutz; A. Tadsen; J. -L. Vuilleumier; J. -M. Vuilleumier; V. Zacek

2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

188

Lineshape of $e^+ e^-\\to D^* \\bar D+c.c.$ and electromagnetic form factor of $D^*\\to D$ transition in the time-like region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, we apply the vector meson dominance (VMD) model to extract the electromagnetic time-like form factor of the $D^*\\to D$ transition combining the recent Belle data for $e^+ e^-\\to D^{*+} D^- + c.c.$ and data for $D^*\\to D\\gamma$. Two solutions are obtained in the interpretation of the cross section lineshape: i) With a relatively large coupling for $\\psi D^*\\bar{D}$ determined by experiment, destructive interferences among those charmonium components are required to bring down the overall cross sections, and then account for the cross section lineshape. ii) With a relatively small value for the $\\psi D^*\\bar{D}$ coupling based on heavy quark theory, an apparent cross section deficit near threshold is observed, and contributions from other mechanisms are needed. It might imply the presence of an additional resonance X(3900). Meanwhile, we also point out that an enhancement like that could be produced by the $D_s^*\\bar{D_s}+c.c.$ open channel effects.

Yuan-Jiang Zhang; Qiang Zhao

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

189

A simultaneous measurement of the $b$-tagging efficiency scale factor and the $t\\bar{t}$ Production Cross Section at the Collider Detector at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

The ability to compare results between Monte Carlo and data is imperative in modern experimental high-energy physics analyses. The b-tagging efficiency Scale Factor (SF) allows for an accurate comparison of b quark identification in data samples and Monte Carlo. This thesis presents a simultaneous measurement of the SF for the SecVtx algorithm and the t{bar t} production cross section using 5.6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment. The t{bar t} cross section was measured to be 7.26 {+-} 0.47 pb, consistent with prior CDF analyses. The tight SF value was measured to be 0.925 {+-} 0.032 and the loose SF value was measured at 0.967 {+-} 0.033. These are the most precise SF SecVtx measurements to be performed at CDF to date.

Hussain, Nazim; /McGill U.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The Stars Aligned Over the Cornfields: Tobacco Industry Political Influence and Tobacco Policy Making in Iowa 1897-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banning Smoking in Restaurants. October 2, 2000. http://11, 2000. 8B. Lewis, R. Restaurant, bar owners pitch banlimits smoking in restaurants, bars. Des Moines Register. (

Epps-Johnson, BA, Tiana; Barnes, JD, Richard; Glantz, PhD, Stanton

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

List of Property Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Store with Gas Station Convenience Store without Gas Station BarNightclub Fast Food Restaurant Restaurant Other - RestaurantBar Food Sales Food Service Hospital (General Medical...

192

Test Bar Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 11   Automotive applications of gray cast iron...to minimize heat checking G3000 Automobile and diesel cylinder blocks, cylinder heads,

193

L-Bar.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

with local vegeta- tion, which will assist in mitigating potential erosion damage by wind and water. Drainage from the cover is directed toward a controlled discharge swale...

194

Factors affecting the failure of copper connectors brazed to copper bus bar segments on a 615-MVA hydroelectric generator at Grand Coulee Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On March 21, 1986, the United States Bureau of Reclamation experienced a ground fault in the main parallel ring assembly of Unit G19 - a 615-MVA hydroelectric generator - at Grand Coulee Dam, Washington. Inspection of the unit revealed that the ground fault had been induced by fracture of one or more of the copper connectors used to join adjacent segments of one of the bus bars in the north half of the assembly. Various experimental techniques were used to detect and determine the presence of cracks, crack morphology, corrosion products, and material microstructure and/or embrittlement. The results of these inspections and recommendations are given. 7 refs., 27 figs.

Atteridge, D.G.; Klein, R.F.; Layne, R.; Anderson, W.E.; Correy, T.B.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 12  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supplement No. 12 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for license to operate Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391, located in Rhea County, Tennessee, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this supplement is to update the Safety Evaluation of (1) additional information submitted by the applicant since Supplement No. 11 was issued, and (2) matters that the staff had under review when Supplement No. 11 was issued.

Tam, P.S.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

(BARS) -- Bibliographic Retrieval System Sandia Shock Compression (SSC) database Shock Physics Index (SPHINX) database. Volume 1: UNIX version query guide customized application for INGRES  

SciTech Connect

The Bibliographic Retrieval System (BARS) is a data base management system specially designed to retrieve bibliographic references. Two databases are available, (i) the Sandia Shock Compression (SSC) database which contains over 5700 references to the literature related to stress waves in solids and their applications, and (ii) the Shock Physics Index (SPHINX) which includes over 8000 further references to stress waves in solids, material properties at intermediate and low rates, ballistic and hypervelocity impact, and explosive or shock fabrication methods. There is some overlap in the information in the two data bases.

Herrmann, W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); von Laven, G.M. [Advanced Software Engineering, Madison, AL (United States); Parker, T. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Search for anomalous Wtb couplings in single top quark production in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect

We present new direct constraints on a general Wtb interaction using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider. The standard model provides a purely left-handed vector coupling at the Wtb vertex, while the most general, lowest dimension Lagrangian allows right-handed vector and left- or right-handed tensor couplings as well. We obtain precise limits on these anomalous couplings by comparing the data to the expectations from different assumptions on the Wtb coupling.

Abazov V. M.; Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beni S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

198

Precise study of the $Z/\\gamma^*$ boson transverse momentum distribution in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions using a novel technique  

SciTech Connect

Using 7.3 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, we measure the distribution of the variable {phi}*{sub {eta}}, which probes the same physical effects as the Z/{gamma}* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. A QCD prediction is found to describe the general features of the {phi}*{sub {eta}} distribution, but is unable to describe its detailed shape or dependence on boson rapidity. A prediction that includes a broadening of transverse momentum for small values of the parton momentum fraction is strongly disfavored.

Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, Maris A.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Search for a Fermiophobic Higgs Boson Decaying into Diphotons in p p-bar Collisions at sqrt{s} = 1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect

A search for a narrow diphoton mass resonance is presented based on data from 3.0 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF experiment. No evidence of a resonance in the diphoton mass spectrum is observed, and upper limits are set on the cross section times branching fraction of the resonant state as a function of Higgs boson mass. The resulting limits exclude Higgs bosons with masses below 106 GeV/c{sup 2} at a 95% Bayesian credibility level (C.L.) for one fermiophobic benchmark model.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, Jahred A.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, Dante E.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, Alberto; /Frascati; Antos, Jaroslav; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 15  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (SER), NUREG-0847 (June 1982), Supplement No. 1 (September 1982), Supplement No. 2 (January 1984), Supplement No. 3 (January 1985), Supplement No. 4 (March 1985), Supplement No. 5 (November 1990), Supplement No. 6 (April 1991), Supplement No. 7 (September 1991), Supplement No. 8 (January 1992), Supplement No. 9 (June 1992), Supplement No. 10 (October 1992), Supplement No. 11 (April 1993), Supplement No. 12 (October 1993), Supplement No. 13 (April 1994), and Supplement No. 14 (December 1994) issued by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority, as applicant and owner, for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). The facility is located in Rhea County, Tennessee, near the Watts Bar Dam on the Tennessee River. This supplement provides recent information regarding resolution of some of the outstanding and confirmatory items, and proposed license conditions identified in the SER.

Tam, P.S.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Updated Measurement of the Strong Phase in D0 --> K+pi- Decay Using Quantum Correlations in e+e- --> D0 D0bar at CLEO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze a sample of 3 million quantum-correlated D0 D0bar pairs from 818 pb^-1 of e+e- collision data collected with the CLEO-c detector at E_cm = 3.77 GeV, to give an updated measurement of \\cos\\delta and a first determination of \\sin\\delta, where \\delta is the relative strong phase between doubly Cabibbo-suppressed D0 --> K+pi- and Cabibbo-favored D0bar --> K+pi- decay amplitudes. With no inputs from other experiments, we find \\cos\\delta = 0.81 +0.22+0.07 -0.18-0.05, \\sin\\delta = -0.01 +- 0.41 +- 0.04, and |\\delta| = 10 +28+13 -53-0 degrees. By including external measurements of mixing parameters, we find alternative values of \\cos\\delta = 1.15 +0.19+0.00 -0.17-0.08, \\sin\\delta = 0.56 +0.32+0.21 -0.31-0.20, and \\delta = (18 +11-17) degrees. Our results can be used to improve the world average uncertainty on the mixing parameter y by approximately 10%.

Asner, D M; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Napolitano, J; Ecklund, K M; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Pearson, L J; Thorndike, E H; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Horwitz, N; Mountain, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Onyisi, P U E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Lincoln, A; Smith, M J; Zhou, P; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Edwards, K W; White, E J; Briere, R A; Vogel, H; Onyisi, P U E; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Das, S; Ehrlich, R; Gibbons, L; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Lowrey, N; Mehrabyan, S; Selen, M; Wiss, J; Libby, J; Kornicer, M; Mitchell, R E; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Hietala, J; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Xiao, T; Powell, A; Thomas, C; Wilkinson, G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Search for Production of Heavy Particles Decaying to Top Quarks and Invisible Particles in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV  

SciTech Connect

We present a search for a new particle T{prime} decaying to a top-quark via T{prime} {yields} t + X, where X is an invisible particle. In a data sample with 4.8 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab in p{bar p} collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, we search for pair production of T0 in the lepton+jets channel, p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} + XX {yields} {ell}{nu}bqq{prime}b + XX. We interpret our results primarily in terms of a model where T{prime} are exotic fourth generation quarks and X are dark matter particles. The data are consistent with standard model expectations, and we set 95% confidence level limits on the generic production of T{prime}{bar T}{prime} {yields} t{bar t} + XX. We apply these limits to the dark matter model and exclude the fourth generation exotic quarks T{prime} at 95% confidence level up to m{sub T{prime}} = 360 GeV/c{sup 2} for m{sub x} {<=} 100 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The model electric restaurant  

SciTech Connect

Restaurants are the most intensive users of energy of all types of commercial buildings. As a result, they have some of the highest energy costs. New and existing restaurants are important customers to electric utilities. Many opportunities exist to use electricity to improve restaurant energy performance. This report discusses a project in which computer simulations were used to investigate restaurant energy subsystem performance and to assess the potential for electric equipment to reduce energy consumption, reduce peak demand improve load factors, and reduce energy cost in new all-electric restaurants. The project investigated typical restaurant designs for all-electric and gas/electric facilities and compared them to high efficiency electric options in all-electric restaurants. This analysis determined which investiments in high-efficiency electric equipment are attractive for restaurant operators. Improved equipment for food preparation, heating and cooling, ventilation, sanitation, and lighting subsystem was studied in cafeteria, full menu, fast food, and pizza restaurants in Atlanta, Cleveland, Los Angeles, and Phoenix. In addition to the actual rate structures, four synthetic rate structures were used to calculate energy costs, so that the results can be applied to other locations. The results indicate that high efficiency and improved all-electric equipment have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption, peak demand, and operating costs in almost all restaurants in all locations. The all-electric restaurants, with a combination of improved equipment, also offer the customer a competitive choice in fuels in most locations. 12 refs., 26 figs., 55 tabs.

Frey, D.J.; Oatman, P.A. (Architectural Energy Corp., Boulder, CO (USA)); Claar, C.N. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Search for Scalar Top Quark Production in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV  

SciTech Connect

We report on a search for the supersymmetric partner of the top quark (scalar top) decaying into a charm quark and a neutralino in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data sample, collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.6 fb{sup -1}. Candidate events are selected by requiring two or more jets and a large imbalance in the transverse momentum. To enhance the analysis sensitivity, at least one of the jets is required to be identified as originating from a charm quark using an algorithm specifically designed for this analysis. The selected events are in good agreement with standard model predictions. In the case of large mass splitting between the scalar top quark and the neutralino we exclude a scalar top quark mass below 180 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% confidence level.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Search for Higgs bosons decaying to tau(+)tau(-) pairs in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a search for the production of neutral Higgs bosons decaying into {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} pairs in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}, were collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We set upper limits at the 95% C.L. on the product of production cross section and branching ratio for a scalar resonance decaying into {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} pairs, and we interpret these limits as limits on the production of Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) and as constraints in the MSSM parameter space.

Abazov, V.M.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Achary, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjea, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopia, S.; Haley, J.; Hang, L.; Harder, K.; Harein, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoangau, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Lashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I. I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect

We present a measurement of the inclusive jet cross section using the Run II cone algorithm and data collected by the D0 experiment in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.70 fb{sup -1}. The jet energy calibration and the method used to extract the inclusive jet cross section are described. We discuss the main uncertainties, which are dominated by the jet energy scale uncertainty. The results cover jet transverse momenta from 50 GeV to 600 GeV with jet rapidities in the range -2.4 to 2.4 and are compared to predictions using recent proton parton distribution functions. Studies of correlations between systematic uncertainties in transverse momentum and rapidity are presented.

Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Gillberg D.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J-F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Hegeman J. G.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Makovec N.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

207

Search for High Mass Resonances Decaying to Muon Pairs in $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions  

SciTech Connect

We present a search for a new narrow, spin-1, high mass resonance decaying to {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} + X, using a matrix element based likelihood and a simultaneous measurement of the resonance mass and production rate. In data with 4.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1960 GeV, the most likely signal cross section is consistent with zero at 16% confidence level. We therefore do not observe evidence for a high mass resonance, and place limits on models predicting spin-1 resonances, including M > 1071 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% confidence level for a Z{prime} boson with the same couplings to fermions as the Z boson.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Search for a Standard Model Higgs Boson in the H to ZZ to l(+)l(-)v(v)over-bar Decay Channel with the ATLAS Detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A search for a heavy standard model Higgs boson decaying via H {yields} ZZ {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} {nu}{bar {nu}}, where {ell} = e, {mu}, is presented. It is based on proton-proton collision data at {radical}s = 7 TeV, collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in the first half of 2011 and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.04 fb{sup -1}. The data are compared to the expected standard model backgrounds. The data and the background expectations are found to be in agreement and upper limits are placed on the Higgs boson production cross section over the entire mass window considered; in particular, the production of a standard model Higgs boson is excluded in the region 340 < m{sub H} < 450 GeV at the 95% confidence level.

Aad, G.; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, AA; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbi, E; Acharya, BS; Adams, DL; Addy, N; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, JA; A

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

209

Search for Doubly Charged Higgs Boson Pair Production in p(p)over-bar Collisions at root s=1.96 TeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a search for pair production of doubly-charged Higgs bosons in the processes q{bar q} {yields} H{sup 2+}H{sup 2-} decaying through H{sup {+-}{+-}} {yields} {tau}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {+-}}, {mu}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {+-}}, {mu}{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {+-}}. The search is performed in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using an integrated luminosity of up to 7.0 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The results are used to set 95% C.L. limits on the pair production cross section of doubly-charged Higgs bosons and on their mass for different H{sup {+-}{+-}} branching fractions. Models predicting different H{sup {+-}{+-}} decays are investigated. Assuming B(H{sup {+-}{+-}} {yields} {tau}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {+-}}) = 1 yields an observed (expected) lower limit on the mass of a left-handed H{sub L}{sup {+-}{+-}} boson of 128 (116) GeV and assuming {Beta}(H{sup {+-}{+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {+-}}) = 1 the corresponding limits are 144 (149) GeV. In a model with {Beta}(H{sup {+-}{+-}} {yields} {tau}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {+-}}) = {Beta}(H{sup {+-}{+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {+-}}) = {Beta}(H{sup {+-}{+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {+-}}) = 1/3, we obtain M(H{sub L}{sup {+-}{+-}}) > 130 (138) GeV.

Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orbaker, D.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; et. al.

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

210

Measurement of D0-D0bar Mixing using the Ratio of D0->K-pi and K-K Lifetimes  

SciTech Connect

We measure the rate of D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with the observable y{sub CP} = ({tau}{sub K{pi}}/{tau}{sub KK}) - 1, where {tau}{sub KK} and {tau}{sub K{pi}} are respectively the mean lifetimes of CP-even D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and CP-mixed D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays, using a data sample of 384 fb{sup -1} collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory. From a sample of D{sup 0} and {bar D}{sup 0} decays where the initial flavor of the decaying meson is not determined, we obtain y{sub CP} = [1.12 {+-} 0.26(stat) {+-} 0.22(syst)]%, which excludes the no-mixing hypothesis at 3.3{sigma}, including both statistical and systematic uncertainties. This result is in good agreement with a previous BABAR measurement of y{sub CP} obtained from a sample of D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} events, where the D{sup 0} decays to K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}K{sup -}, and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, which is disjoint with the untagged D{sup 0} events used here. Combining the two results taking into account statistical and systematic uncertainties, where the systematic uncertainties are assumed to be 100% correlated, we find y{sub CP} = [1.16 {+-} 0.22(stat) {+-} 0.18(syst)]%, which excludes the no-mixing hypothesis at 4.1{sigma}.

Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Tico, J.Garra; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt State U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2009-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

211

Chaos and dynamical trends in barred galaxies: bridging the gap between N-body simulations and time-dependent analytical models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-consistent N-body simulations are an efficient tool to study galactic dynamics. However, it can be challenging to use them for the detailed study of individual trajectories (or ensembles of trajectories). Such orbital studies are important to shed light on global phase space properties, which are the underlying cause of observed structures. The potentials needed to describe self-consistent models are in this case time-dependent. For this reason, we aim to investigate the different dynamical properties (such as regular and chaotic motion) of a non-autonomous galactic system, whose time-dependent potential adequately mimics certain realistic trends arising from N-body barred galaxy simulations. We construct a fully time-dependent analytical model, which manages to capture and reproduce several features of an N-body simulation. We model the gravitational potentials of three components (disc, bar and dark matter halo), whose time-dependent parameters are derived from an N-body simulation. We start by studying the dynamical stability of its reduced time-independent 2-degrees of freedom model by charting the different islands of stability associated with certain orbital morphologies and detecting the chaotic and regular regions. We then turn our interest to the full 3-degrees of freedom time-dependent case, where we show a few representative trajectories which experience different typical dynamical behaviours, i.e., an interplay between regular and chaotic motion for different epochs. Finally, we focus on the study of the underlying global dynamical transitions of the time-dependent system in terms of estimating the relative total fraction of (un)stable motion of an ensemble of initial conditions taken from the simulation and evolved with the time-dependent potential. We find that, for such an ensemble, the fraction of regular motion increases with time.

T. Manos; Rubens E. G. Machado

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

212

Measurement of the ratio [ital scrB]([ital D][sup +][r arrow][pi][sup 0][ital l+][nu])/[ital scrB]([ital D][sup +][r arrow][ital [bar K  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the CLEO-II detector, the branching ratio of the Cabibbo suppressed decay [ital D][sup +][r arrow][pi][sup 0][ital l+][nu], relative to the branching ratio of the Cabibbo favored decay [ital D][sup +][r arrow][ital [bar K

Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Nemati, B.; O'Neill, J.; Severini, H.; Sun, C.R.; Zoeller, M.M.; Crawford, G.; Daubenmier, C.M.; Fulton, R.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Malchow, R.; Morrow, F.; Skovpen, Y.; Sung, M.; White, C.; Whitmore, J.; Wilson, P.; Butler, F.; Fu, X.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Lambrecht, M.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Snow, J.; Wang, P.L.; Wood, M.; Bortoletto, D.; Brown, D.N.; Fast, J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miao, T.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Schaffner, S.F.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Wang, P.N.; Battle, M.; Ernst, J.; Kroha, H.; Roberts, S.; Sparks, K.; Thorndike, E.H.; Wang, C.H.; Dominick, J.; Sanghera, S.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stroynowski, R.; Artuso, M.; He, D.; Goldberg, M.; Horwitz, N.; Kennett, R.; Moneti, G.C.; Muheim, F.; Mukhin, Y.; Playfer, S.; Rozen, Y.; Stone, S.; Thulasidas, M.; Vasseur, G.; Zhu, G.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Egyed, Z.; Jain, V.; Sheldon, P.; Akerib, D.S.; Barish, B.; Chadha, M.; Chan, S.; Cowen, D.F.; Eigen, G.; (CLEO Collaboration)

1993-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

213

Search for the Higgs Boson Using Neural Networks in Events with Missing Energy and b-Quark Jets in p[over-bar p] Collisions at [sqrt]s=1.96??TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson in p[over-bar p] collisions at [sqrt]s=1.96 ??TeV recorded by the CDF II experiment at the Tevatron in a data sample ...

Paus, Christoph M. E.

214

Examining contextual settings to explain gender differences in cigarette and alcohol use among Asian immigrants : work, hospitality venues, and household settings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

laws in workplaces, restaurants and bars. Accessed from:SMOKING IN KOREAN BARS AND RESTAURANTS IN CA: OR WOULD YOUCalifornia’s smoke-free restaurant and bar policies is a

Irvin, Veronica Lea

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Restaurant resources | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Restaurant resources Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial...

216

Are Restaurants Really Supersizing America?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

total effect of eating at restaurants on BMI for the averageThe Effect of Fast Food Restaurants on Obesity. ” AmericanHaley. 2007. “Sacramento Restaurants May Be Forced to Serve

Anderson, Michael L.; Matsa, David A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Restaurant Fire Houston Texas 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Houston Fast Food Restaurant Fire, Texas, 2000. On February 14, 2000, a fire in a one story restaurant in Texas claimed the lives of two firefighters. ...

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

218

Studies of the Strange Hadronic Tau Decay Tau- to K0(S) Pi- Nu-Tau Using the BaBar Detector  

SciTech Connect

A study of the decay {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} (K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) using the BABAR detector is presented. Using 124.4 fb{sup -1} of data we measure {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.830 {+-} 0.005(stat) {+-} 0.042(syst))%, which is the world's most precise measurement to date of this branching ratio, and is consistent with the current world average. This preliminary result, unlike most of the {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) measurements already published, is systematics dominated and so the biggest future improvement to this number should come from reducing the systematic uncertainties in the analysis. A study of the K{pi} mass spectrum, from which the strange (K{pi}) spectral function can be measured, reveals excess contributions above the K*(892) tail at higher K{pi} mass. While in the past this has been thought to be due to K*(892) - K*(1410) interference, we find that the K*(1410), whose branching ratio to K{pi} is approximately 7%, seems insufficient to explain the excess mass observed in the data. Instead, we perform a fit using a K*(892) - K*(1680) interference model and find better agreement. The discrepancy that remains could be due to an s-wave contribution to the interference that is not parameterized in the model used, and/or detector smearing that is not accounted for in our fit. We also attempt to find an s-wave contribution to the K{pi} mass spectrum by searching for an sp-interference effect. While we find a hint that such an effect exists, we have neither the confidence in the statistics nor systematics in the higher K{pi} mass region to announce an observation. We conclude that it would be a worthwhile study to pursue.

Lyon, Andrew J.; /Manchester U. /SLAC

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

219

The model electric restaurant  

SciTech Connect

Starting in December 1987, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Southern California Edison (SCE) initiated a project with the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) to study the energy performance of restaurants. Penn State formed the Restaurant Subsystems Technology (REST) project team to conduct the Model Restaurant Project. For the first phase of the project, the REST team was charged with the responsibility of identifying and investigating electric technologies to improve energy efficiency and to reduce peak demand in new restaurants. Energy and economic analyses were performed to determine whether these electric technologies are competitive with existing technologies in gas/electric restaurants and whether they are improvements to current technologies in all-electric restaurants. Technologies for heating and cooling, lighting, sanitation, food preparation, ventilation, and refrigeration were studied. This report contains detailed monthly information about the restaurants that were simulated. The results are presented on a monthly basis so the reader can study performance during all seasons. However, this second volume is not a stand alone'' document. To fully understand the information presented here, the reader must have a copy of Volume 1 and be familiar with the terminology used to describe the various restaurants and the process used to analyze the buildings.

Frey, D.J.; Oatman, P.A. (Architectural Energy Corp., Boulder, CO (USA)); Claar, C.N. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Investigation Of The Friction Factor Behavior for Flat Plate Tests Of Smooth And Roughened Surfaces With Supply Pressures Up To 84 Bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annular gas seal clearances were simulated with closely spaced parallel plates using a Flat?Plate tester. The device is designed to measure the pressure gradient along the test specimen. The main function of the Flat?Plate tester is to provide friction factor data and measure dynamic pressure oscillations. A detailed description of the test facility is described, and a theory for determining the friction factor is reviewed. Three clearances were investigated: 0.635, 0.381, and 0.254 mm. Tests were conducted at three different inlet pressures (84, 70, and 55 bars), producing Reynolds numbers range from 50,000 to 700,000. Three surface configurations were tested including smooth?on-smooth, smooth?on?hole, and hole?on?hole. The Hole?pattern plates are identical with the exception of the hole depth. The results indicate that, for the smooth?on?smooth and smooth?on?hole configurations, the friction factor remains constant or increases slightly with increasing Reynolds numbers. Moreover, the friction factor increases as the clearance between the plates increases. However, the results from the hole?on-hole configurations are quite different. A "friction?factor jump" phenomenon was observed, and the Helmholtz frequency was detected on the frequency spectra.

Kheireddin, Bassem A.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Measurement of D^0-\\bar{D^0} Mixing From a Time-Dependent Amplitude Analysis of D^0\\ -> K^+\\pi^-\\pi0 Decays  

SciTech Connect

The authors present evidence of D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} in a data sample of 384 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. Assuming CP conservation, they measure the mixing parameters x{prime}{sub K{pi}{pi}{sup 0}} = [2.61{sub -0.68}{sup +0.57}(stat.) {+-} 0.39(syst.)]%, y{prime}{sub K{pi}{pi}{sup 0}} = [-0.06{sub -0.64}{sup +0.55}(stat.) {+-} 0.34(syst.)]%. The confidence level for the data to be consistent with the no-mixing hypothesis is 0.1%, including systematic uncertainties. This result is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations. They find no evidence of CP violation in mixing.

Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

222

Searches for the Theta_s(1540)+ Strange-Pentaquark Candidate in e+e- Annihilation, Hadroproduction and Electroproduction with the BaBar Detector  

SciTech Connect

Since early in 2003, several experiments have presented evidence for the existence of a positive strangeness baryon state of mass around 1540 MeV/c{sup 2} and width <8 MeV, the {Theta}(1540), which decays to K{sup +}n and K{sup 0}p. Such a state has minimum quark content udud{bar s} and consequently has been interpreted as the S = +1 member of the anti-decuplet of pentaquark states proposed by Diakonov et al. Subsequently, the NA49 experiment presented evidence for the S = -2 member of the anti-decuplet, the {Xi}{sub 5}(1860){sup --}, but this has yet to be observed in any other experiment. Results from the search for the production of the {Theta}(1540) memember of the anti-decuplet of pentaquark states using data from e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions obtained with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II Collider are presented. No signal is observed, and cross section limits for the {Theta}(1540) are given; these prove to be well below the cross section values for ordinary baryons of similar mass. In addition, a search has been carried out for the electroproduction of the {Theta}(1540) in the material of the BABAR detector. Event selection procedures are discussed in detail, the results of this search are presented, and are discussed in the light of several other experiments.

Coleman, Jonathan P.; /SLAC

2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

223

Search for $WH$ associated production in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\,{\\rm TeV}$  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a search for associated production of W and Higgs bosons based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L {approx} 5.3 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. Events containing a W {yields} {ell}{nu} candidate (with {ell} corresponding to e or {mu}) are selected in association with two or three reconstructed jets. One or two of the jets are required to be consistent with having evolved from a b quark. A multivariate discriminant technique is used to improve the separation of signal and backgrounds. Expected and observed upper limits are obtained for the product of the WH production cross section and branching ratios and reported in terms of ratios relative to the prediction of the standard model as a function of the mass of the Higgs boson (M{sub H}). The observed and expected 95% C.L. upper limits obtained for an assumed M{sub H} = 115 GeV are, respectively, factors of 4.5 and 4.8 larger than the value predicted by the standard model.

Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Aoki, Masato; Askew, Andrew Warren

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Prospects for Observing the Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying into b\\bar{b} Final States Produced in Weak Boson Fusion with an Associated Photon at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the primary goals of the Large Hadron Collider is to understand the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. In the Standard Model, electroweak symmetry breaking is described by the Higgs mechanism which includes a scalar Higgs boson. Electroweak measurements constrain the Standard Model Higgs boson mass to be in the 114.4 to 157 GeV/c^2 range. Within this mass window, the Higgs predominantly decays into two b-quarks. As such, we investigate the prospect of observing the Standard Model Higgs decaying to b\\bar{b} produced in weak-boson-fusion with an associated central photon. An isolated, high pt, central photon trigger is expected to be available at the ATLAS and CMS experiments. In this study, we investigated the effects originating from showering, hadronization, the underlying event model, and jet performance including b-jet calibration on the sensitivity of this channel. We found that the choice of Monte Carlo and Monte Carlo tune has a large effect on the efficacy of the central jet veto and consequently the signal significance. A signal significance of about 1.86 can be achieved for m(Higgs)=115 GeV/c^2 with 100 1/fb of integrated luminosity which correspond to one year at design luminosity at 14 TeV pp collisions.

D. M. Asner; M. Cunningham; S. Dejong; K. Randrianarivony; C. Santamarina; M. Schram

2010-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

225

Model-independent measurement of t-channel single top quark production in p(p)over-bar collisions at,root s=1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect

We present a model-independent measurement of t-channel electroweak production of single top quarks in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, and selecting events containing an isolated electron or muon, missing transverse energy and one or two jets originating from the fragmentation of b quarks, we measure a cross section {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tqb + X) = 2.90 {+-} 0.59 (stat + syst) pb for a top quark mass of 172.5 GeV. The probability of the background to fluctuate and produce a signal as large as the one observed is 1.6 x 10{sup -8}, corresponding to a significance of 5.5 standard deviations.

Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Ancu, L. S.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, R.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cochran, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Eller, P.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Focke, C.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khatidze, D.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; et al.

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

226

Z(gamma) production and limits on anomalous ZZ(gamma) and Z(gamma gamma) couplings in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s 1.96 TeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a measurement of p{bar p} {yields} Z{sub {gamma}} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{sub {gamma}} ({ell} = e, {mu}) production with a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.2 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. The results of the electron and muon channels are combined, and we measure the total production cross section and the differential cross section d{sigma}/dp{sub T}{sup {gamma}}, where p{sub T}{sup {gamma}} is the momentum of the photon in the plane transverse to the beam line. The results obtained are consistent with the standard model predictions from next-to-leading order use ttransverse momentum spectrum of the photon to place limits on anomalous ZZ{gamma} and Z{gamma}{gamma} couplings.

Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kobach, A. C.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; et al.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

PTG 2010PTG 2010 i i 33 P blP bl 55PTG 2010PTG 2010 vningvning 33 ProblemProblem 55 2 kg of steam at a pressure of 1 bar are contained in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of steam at a pressure of 1 bar are contained in a i id l d t k h l i 3 97 3 Th trigid sealed tank whose volume is 3.97 m3. The steam begins to cool off as heat is transferred to the atmosphere. When is the initial temperature of the steam in the tank (°C)? c) What will the temperature be in the tank when thec

Zevenhoven, Ron

228

Cesium/oxide interactions for ultrathin films on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(1{bar 1}02)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interaction of cesium at the (0001) and (1{bar 1}02) surfaces of sapphire has been investigated using a variety of surface analytical techniques. Reflection mass spectrometric measurements yield initial Cs adsorption probabilities of 0.9 and 0.85 for the unreconstructed (0001) and (1{bar 1}02) surfaces, respectively. The adsorption probability decreases dramatically for these surfaces at critical Cs coverages of 2.O {times} 10{sup 14} and 3.4 {times} 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2}, respectively. Thermally induced reconstruction of the (0001) surface to form an oxygen deficient surface results in a decrease in the initial probability and capacity for Cs adsorption. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) demonstrates that an intermediate, mixed domain surface yields an initial adsorption probability of 0.5 while a ({radical}31 {times} {radical}31) R {plus_minus} 9{degree} reconstructed surface yields a value of 0.27. Thermal desorption mass spectrometry (TDMS) shows that surface reconstruction eliminates the high binding energy states of Cs (2.7 eV/atom), consistent with the observed changes in adsorption probability. In contrast, reconstruction of the (1{bar 1}02) surface produces only minor changes in Cs adsorption. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicates that no formal reductive/oxidative chemistry takes place at the interface. We interpret the facile adsorption and strong binding of Cs on sapphire to result from Cs interacting with coordinatively unsaturated oxygen.

Zavadil, K.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ing, J.L. [AEA Technology, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Argonne area restaurants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

area restaurants area restaurants Amber Cafe 13 N. Cass Ave. Westmont, IL 60559 630-515-8080 www.ambercafe.net Argonne Guest House Building 460 Argonne, IL 60439 630-739-6000 www.anlgh.org Ballydoyle Irish Pub & Restaurant 5157 Main Street Downers Grove, IL 60515 630-969-0600 www.ballydoylepub.com Bd's Mongolian Grill The Promenade Shopping Center Boughton Rd. & I-355 Bolingbrook, IL 60440 630-972-0450 www.gomongo.com Branmor's American Grill 300 Veterans Parkway Bolingbrook, IL 60440 630-226-9926 www.branmors.com Buca di Beppo 90 Yorktown Convenience Center Lombard, IL 60148 630-932-7673 www.bucadibeppo.com California Pizza Kitchen 551 Oakbrook Center Oak Brook, IL 60523 630-571-7800 www.cpk.com Capri Ristorante 5101 Main Street Downers Grove, IL 60516 630-241-0695 www.capriristorante.com Carrabba's Italian Grill

230

Minimum Wage Shocks, Employment Flows and Labor Market Frictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and over the teens and restaurant samples. Regressions areEstimates from the Restaurant- and-Bar Sector. ” Britishgroups: teens and restaurant workers. To our knowledge,

Dube, Arindrajit; Lester, T. William; Reich, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Tobacco Control in Transition: Public Support and Governmental Disarray in Arizona 1997-2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dealing with the Arizona Restaurant and HospitalityMJ, Ramirez C. "State Restaurant Group Backs Prop. 201'swould hurt bars and restaurants would "Mesa-ize" Arizona

Hendlin M.Sc., Yogi H.; Barnes, Richard L JD; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Smoke-free law did not affect revenue from gaming in Delaware  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ordinances increase restaurant values. Contemporary Economicor a positive effect on restaurant and bar revenues, 4bingo revenue, 5 and restaurant values. 6 In response,

Mandel, Lev L MSc.; Alamar, Benjamin Ph.D.; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Tobacco Control in Florida 1999-2011: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Program for the Florida Restaurant Associaiton. June 14,Philip Morris. Florida Restaurant Owners Mobilize againstBan Would Hurt Bar, Restaurant Industry. September 11, 1999.

Kennedy, Allison; Sullivan, Sarah; Hendlin, Yogi; Barnes, Richard L.; Glantz, Stanton A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy events in ${p\\bar{p}}$ collisions at ${\\sqrt{s} =}$1.96 TeV}  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using events with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in $H\\rightarrow WW$ decays. The events are selected from data corresponding to 8.6 \\ifb\\ of integrated luminosity in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess above the standard model background expectation in the Higgs boson mass range this search is sensitive to is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived.

D0 Collaboration

2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

235

Search for the standard model Higgs boson in $\\bm{\\ell?}$+jets final states in 9.7~fb$\\bm{^{-1}}$ of $\\bm{p\\bar{p}}$ collisions with the D0 detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present, in detail, a search for the standard model Higgs boson, $H$, in final states with a charged lepton (electron or muon), missing energy, and two or more jets in data corresponding to 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity collected at a center of mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ Collider. The search uses $b$-jet identification to categorize events for improved signal versus background separation and is sensitive to associated production of the $H$ with a $W$ boson, $WH\\to\\ell\

D0 Collaboration

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

236

Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in Association with a $W$ Boson Using a Matrix Element Technique at CDF in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using events recorded by the CDF experiment in a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb{sup -1}. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which the signal and background hypotheses are used to create a powerful discriminator. The discriminant output distributions for signal and background are fit to the observed events using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson, and 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits are set on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WH) x {Beta}(H {yields} b{bar b}). The observed limits range from 3.5 to 37.6 relative to the standard model expectation for Higgs boson masses between m{sub H} = 100 GeV/c{sup 2} and m{sub H} = 150 GeV/c{sup 2}. The 95% C.L. expected limit is estimated from the median of an ensemble of simulated experiments and varies between 2.9 and 32.7 relative to the production rate predicted by the standard model over the Higgs boson mass range studied.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Smoke-free Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

smoking policy in workplaces, restaurants, bars, and homes.Nicotine in hair of bar and restaurant workers. N Z Med J,ordinances increase restaurant profit and value. Contemp

IARC World Health Organization

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Are Restaurants Really Supersizing America? *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulating specific inputs into health and safety production functions is unlikely to be effective when optimizing consumers can compensate along other margins. This paper examines the implications of this principle in the context of economic policies targeted at reducing obesity. Well-established cross-sectional and time-series correlations between average body weight and eating out have convinced many researchers and policymakers that restaurants are a leading cause of obesity in the United States. But a basic identification problem challenges these conclusions: do more restaurants cause obesity, or do preferences for greater food consumption lead to an increase in restaurant density? To answer this question, we design a natural experiment in which we exploit exogenous variation in the effective price of restaurants and examine the impact on consumers ’ body mass. We use the presence of Interstate Highways in rural areas as an instrument for the supply of restaurants. The instrument strongly predicts restaurant access and frequency of consumption, and robustness tests support its validity. The results find no evidence of a causal link between restaurants and obesity, and the estimates are precise enough to rule out any meaningful effect. Analysis of food intake micro data suggests that although consumers eat larger meals at restaurants than at home (even after accounting for selection), they offset these calories at other times of day. We conclude that public health policies targeting restaurants are unlikely to reduce obesity but could negatively affect consumer welfare.

Michael Anderson; David A. Matsa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Smoke-free ordinances increase restaurant profit and value  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Establishment of Smoke-Free Bars and Taverns. ’’ Journal ofS. A. Glantz. ‘‘Effect of Smoke- Free Workplaces on SmokingEconomic Effects of Smoke-Free Policies on the Hospitality

Alamar, B C; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

CO2-H2O Mixtures in the Geological Sequestration of CO2. II. Partitioning in Chloride Brines at 12-100 °C and 1-600 bar.  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

CO CO 2 -H 2 O Mixtures in the Geological Sequestration of CO 2 . II. Partitioning in Chloride Brines at 12-100°C and up to 600 bar. Nicolas Spycher and Karsten Pruess Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS 90-1116, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California, USA September 2004 ABSTRACT Correlations presented by Spycher et al. (2003) to compute the mutual solubilities of CO 2 and H 2 O are extended to include the effect of chloride salts in the aqueous phase. This is accomplished by including, in the original formulation, activity coefficients for aqueous CO 2 derived from several literature sources, primarily for NaCl solutions. Best results are obtained when combining the solubility correlations of Spycher et al. (2003) with the activity coefficient formulation of Rumpf et al. (1994) and Duan and Sun (2003), which

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241

Measurement of the $\\Lambda_b^0$ lifetime in the exclusive decay $\\Lambda_b^0 \\to J/\\psi \\Lambda^0$ in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We measure the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime in the fully reconstructed decay {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} {Lambda}{sup 0} using 10.4 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected with the D0 detector at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The lifetime of the topologically similar decay channel B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} K{sub S}{sup 0} is also measured. We obtain {tau} ({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}) = 1.303 {+-} 0.075 (stat.) {+-} 0.035 (syst.) ps and {tau} (B{sup 0}) = 1.508 {+-} 0.025 (stat.) {+-} 0.043 (syst.) ps. Using these measurements, we determine the lifetime ratio of {tau} ({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0})/{tau} (B{sup 0}) = 0.864 {+-} 0.052 (stat.) {+-} 0.033 (syst.).

Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Aoki, Masato; Askew, Andrew Warren; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /ABC Federal U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Measurement of the CP-violating phase phi sJ/psi phi using the flavor-tagged decay Bs(0) -> J/psi phi in 8 fb(-1) of p(p)over-bar collisions  

SciTech Connect

We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, {phi}{sub s}{sup J/{psi}{phi}} and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s}, from the flavor-tagged decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb{sup -1} accumulated with the D0 detector using p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s} = 0.163{sub -0.064}{sup +0.065} ps{sup -1} and {phi}{sub s}{sup J}/{psi}{phi} = -0.55{sub -0.36}{sup +0.38}. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

Abazov, V.M.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

243

Search for a low mass Standard Model Higgs boson in the $\\tau-\\tau$ decay channel in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on a search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying into pairs of {tau} leptons in p{bar p} collisions produced by the Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The analyzed data sample was recorded by the CDFII detector and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 6.0 fb{sup -1}. The search is performed in the final state with one {tau} decaying leptonically and the second one identified through its semi-hadronic decay. Since no significant excess is observed, a 95% credibility level upper limit on the production cross section times branching ratio to the {tau}{tau} final state is set for hypothetical Higgs boson masses between 100 and 150 GeV/c{sup 2}. For a Higgs boson of 120 GeV/c{sup 2} the observed (expected) limit is 14.6 (15.3) the predicted value.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Produced in Association with a $Z$ Boson in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson, using up to 7.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity from p{bar p} collisions collected with the CDF II detector. We utilize several novel techniques, including multivariate lepton selection, multivariate trigger parametrization, and a multi-stage signal discriminant consisting of specialized functions trained to distinguish individual backgrounds. By increasing acceptance and enhancing signal discrimination, these techniques have significantly improved the sensitivity of the analysis above what was expected from a larger dataset alone. We observe no significant evidence for a signal, and we set limits on the ZH production cross section. For a Higgs boson with mass 115 GeV/c{sup 2}, we expect (observe) a limit of 3.9 (4.8) times the standard model predicted value, at the 95% credibility level.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Lowell, Massachusetts, Restaurant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Restaurant Exceeds Energy Savings Expectations to someone by Restaurant Exceeds Energy Savings Expectations to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Lowell, Massachusetts, Restaurant Exceeds Energy Savings Expectations on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Lowell, Massachusetts, Restaurant Exceeds Energy Savings Expectations on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Lowell, Massachusetts, Restaurant Exceeds Energy Savings Expectations on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Lowell, Massachusetts, Restaurant Exceeds Energy Savings Expectations on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Lowell, Massachusetts, Restaurant Exceeds Energy Savings Expectations on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program:

246

Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in 7.9 fb[superscript ?1] of p[bar-over p] collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson, using up to 7.9 fb[superscript ?1] of integrated luminosity from p[bar-over p] collisions collected with the CDF II detector. ...

Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

247

Waging a Living in Casual Dining Restaurant Chains.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Through in-depth interviews with 14 restaurant servers who worked in âcasual diningâ restaurant chains, this study explores service work and serversâ perceptions of restaurant culture.… (more)

Bower, Hannah Blythe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Customer Perceptions of Restaurant Cleanliness: A Cross Cultural Study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??What is a clean restaurant in customersâ viewpoints? Restaurant cleanliness is considered one of the most significant conditions when customers evaluate overall restaurant quality or… (more)

Yoo, Seung Ah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Are Restaurants Really Supersizing America?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the United States Census ZIP Code Business Patterns. Thesefood”) restaurants for every ZIP code in the United States;data are identified by ZIP code and the obesity data are

Anderson, Michael L.; Matsa, David A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the process $ZH \\rightarrow \\ell^{+} \\ell^{-} b \\bar{b}$ in $4.1\\unit{fb^{-1}}$ OF CDF~II DATA}  

SciTech Connect

The standard model of particle physics provides a detailed description of a universe in which all matter is composed of a small number of fundamental particles, which interact through the exchange of force - carrying gauge bosons (the photon, W{sup {+-}}, Z and gluons). The organization of the matter and energy in this universe is determined by the effects of three forces; the strong, weak, and electromagnetic. The weak and electromagnetic forces are the low energy manifestations of a single electro-weak force, while the strong force binds quarks into protons and neutrons. The standard model does not include gravity, as the effect of this force on fundamental particles is negligible. Four decades of experimental tests, spanning energies from a few electron-volts (eV) up to nearly two TeV, confirm that the universe described by the standard model is a reasonable approximation of our world. For example, experiments have confirmed the existence of the top quark, the W{sup {+-}} and the Z bosons, as predicted by the standard model. The latest experimental averages for the masses of the top quark, W{sup {+-}} and Z are respectively 173.1 {+-} 0.6(stat.) {+-} 1.1(syst.), 80.399 {+-} 0.023 and 91.1876 {+-} 0.0021 GeV/c{sup 2}. The SM is a gauge field theory of zero mass particles. However, the SM is able to accommodate particles with non-zero mass through the introduction of a theoretical Higgs field which permeates all of space. Fermions gain mass through interactions with this field, while the longitudinal components of the massive W{sup {+-}} and Z are the physical manifestations of the field itself. Introduction of the Higgs field, directly leads to the predicted existence of an additional particle, the Higgs boson. The Higgs boson is the only particle of the standard model that has not been observed, and is the only unconfirmed prediction of the theory. The standard model describes the properties of the Higgs boson in terms of its mass, which is a free parameter in the theory. Experimental evidence suggests that the Higgs mass has a value between 114.4 and 186 GeV/c{sup 2}. Particles with a mass in this range can be produced in collisions of less massive particles accelerated to near the speed of light. Currently, one of only a few machines capable of achieving collision energies large enough to potentially produce a standard model Higgs boson is the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider located at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois. This dissertation describes the effort to observe the standard model Higgs in Tevatron collisions recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) II experiment in the ZH {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}b{bar b} production and decay channel. In this process, the Higgs is produced along with a Z boson which decays to a pair of electrons or muons (Z {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}), while the Higgs decays to a bottom anti-bottom quark pair (H {yields} b{bar b}). A brief overview of the standard model and Higgs theory is presented in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 explores previous searches for the standard model Higgs at the Tevatron and elsewhere. The search presented in this dissertation expands upon the techniques and methods developed in previous searches. The fourth chapter contains a description of the Tevatron collider and the CDF II detector. The scope of the discussion in Chapter 4 is limited to the experimental components relevant to the current ZH {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}b{bar b} search. Chapter 5 presents the details of object reconstruction; the methods used to convert detector signals into potential electrons, muons or quarks. Chapter six describes the data sample studied for the presence of a ZH {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}b{bar b} signal and details the techniques used to model the data. The model accounts for both signal and non-signal processes (backgrounds) which are expected to contribute to the observed event sample. Chapters 7 and 8 summarize the event selection applied to isolate ZH {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}b{bar b} candidate events

Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki; /Wayne State U.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Search for the Z_1(4050)^+ and Z_2(4250)^+ States in bar B^0 to chi_{c1} K^- pi^+ and B^+ to chi_{c1} K^0_S pi^+  

SciTech Connect

We search for the Z{sub 1}(4050){sup +} and Z{sub 2}(4250){sup +} states, reported by the Belle Collaboration, decaying to {chi}{sub c1}{pi}{sup +} in the decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {chi}{sub c1}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and B{sup +} {yields} {chi}{sub c1}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} where {chi}{sub c1} {yields} J/{psi}{gamma}. The data were collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operating at center-of-mass energy 10.58 GeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 429 fb{sup -1}. In this analysis, we model the background-subtracted, efficiency-corrected {chi}{sub c1}{pi}{sup +} mass distribution using the K{pi} mass distribution and the corresponding normalized K{pi} Legendre polynomial moments, and then test the need for the inclusion of resonant structures in the description of the {chi}{sub c1}{pi}{sup +} mass distribution. No evidence is found for the Z{sub 1}(4050){sup +} and Z{sub 2}(4250){sup +} resonances, and 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fractions are reported for the corresponding B-meson decay modes.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

252

Preliminary measurements of the time dependence of B{sub d}{sup 0} - {bar B}{sub d}{sup 0} mixing with kaon and charge dipole tags  

SciTech Connect

We report two preliminary measurements of the time dependence of B{sub d}{sup 0}- B{sub d}{sup 0} mixing using novel techniques with a sample of 150,000 hadronic Z{sup O} decays collected by the SLD experiment at the SLC. B decay vertices are reconstructed inclusively with a topological technique and the B hadron flavor at production is determined by exploiting the large left-right forward-backward asymmetry of Z{sup O} {r_arrow} b {bar b} decays in combination with a jet charge technique. Two methods are used to tag the B flavor at decay. The first uses the charge of kaons attached to the B decay vertex and identified with the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector. The second measurement is based on the construction of a charge dipole of the topological vertices to separate the B{sub d}{sup O}/B{sub d}{sup 0} decays by exploiting the B {r_arrow} D cascade charge structure. The measurement of the oscillation frequency yields {Delta}m{sub d} = 0.58 {+-} 0.07(stat){+-}0.08(syst) ps{sup -1} and 0.56 {+-} 0.08(stat){+-}0.04(syst) ps{sup {minus}1} for the kaon and dipole tags respectively.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

A Search for the Higgs Boson Using Neural Networks in Events with Missing Energy and \\boldit{b}-quark Jets in $p\\bar p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV  

SciTech Connect

We report on a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV recorded by the CDF II experiment at the Tevatron in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.1 fb{sup -1}. We consider events which have no identified charged leptons, an imbalance in transverse momentum, and two or three jets where at least one jet is consistent with originating from the decay of a b hadron. We find good agreement between data and predictions. We place 95% confidence level upper limits on the production cross section for several Higgs boson masses ranging from 110 GeV/c{sup 2} to 150 GeV/c{sup 2}. For a mass of 115 GeV/c{sup 2} the observed (expected) limit is 6.9 (5.6) times the standard model prediction.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

PREP: project on restaurant energy performance  

SciTech Connect

The goals, selection criteria, and methodology of the project to measure energy consumption in restaurants are described.

Mazzucchi, R.P.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Energy Savings for Quick Service Restaurants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Journal article describing PNNL's work to accomplish a 50% reduction in energy use for quick service restaurants.

Zhang, Jian; Schrock, D. W.; Livchak, A.; Liu, Bing

2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

256

Solar preheating of both domestic hot water and space. Final technical report for the Sea Loft restaurant in Long Branch, New Jersey (Engineering Materials)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stephen Giddio's Sea Loft Restaurant in Long Branch, NJ is equipped with an active solar system for preheating of both Space and Domestic Hot Water (DHW). Three pumped water loops, each closed circuit, transfer heat from one major equipment component to another. The closed loop drain back solar energy collection circuit uses a 3/4 horsepower pump to circulate seventeen gallons per minute of deionized water from the Solar Storage Tank to the Solar Collector Array, and return. This tank has a capacity of 600 gallons. The solar array consist of eighty-three evacuated tube type concentrating collectors. The heat gathered in this circuit is stored in the tank for either simultaneous or future use in either or both of the Space and DHW preheating loops. The preheating of city water prior to its entrance into the gas fired 86 gallon DHW heater is accomplished in a separate 600 gallon capacity tank. Two thirty-five square foot tubed heat exchanger bundles inserted into this tank accept solar heated hot water from the Solar Storage Tank. This solar heated water is pumped at sixteen GPM in a closed loop circuit using a 1/4 HP pump. The preheating of restaurant space is accomplished in a closed loop circuit between the Solar Storage Tank and an eight SF hot water coil inserted into the return air from the Main Dining Room of the restaurant. A 1/4 HP pump circulates fifteen gallons of solar heated hot water per minute. This system incorporates a differential temperature controller that utilizes a multitude of pressure sensors and temperature thermistors located throughout the various portions of the system components and piping. The Display Board mounted on the wall of the Bar-Lounge Area serves to integrate the entire solar system. It not only displays the flow but houses the Btu flowmeters, Digital temperature readouts, and HVAC EMS Programmer. Reference DOE/CS/30007-T1.

Not Available

1982-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

257

Measurements of Time-Dependent CP-Asymmetry Parameters in B Meson Decays to \\eta^{\\prime} K^0 and of Branching Fractions of SU(3) Related Modes with BaBar Experiment at SLAC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this thesis work we have measured the following upper limits at 90% of confidence level, for B meson decays (in units of 10{sup -6}), using a statistics of 465.0 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}) < 1.6 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{eta}) < 1.4 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{eta}{prime}) < 2.1 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{phi}) < 0.52 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{omega}) < 1.6 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{phi}) < 1.2 {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}) < 1.7 We have no observation of any decay mode, statistical significance for our measurements is in the range 1.3-3.5 standard deviation. We have a 3.5{sigma} evidence for B {yields} {eta}{omega} and a 3.1 {sigma} evidence for B {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}. The absence of observation of the B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0} open an issue related to the large difference compared to the charged mode B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +} branching fraction, which is measured to be 3.7 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.1 [118]. Our results represent substantial improvements of the previous ones [109, 110, 111] and are consistent with theoretical predictions. All these results were presented at Flavor Physics and CP Violation (FPCP) 2008 Conference, that took place in Taipei, Taiwan. They will be soon included into a paper to be submitted to Physical Review D. For time-dependent analysis, we have reconstructed 1820 {+-} 48 flavor-tagged B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0} events, using the final BABAR statistic of 467.4 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs. We use these events to measure the time-dependent asymmetry parameters S and C. We find S = 0.59 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02, and C = -0.06 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.02. A non-zero value of C would represent a directly CP non-conserving component in B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}, while S would be equal to sin2{beta} measured in B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} [108], a mixing-decay interference effect, provided the decay is dominated by amplitudes of a single weak phase. The new measured value of S can be considered in agreement with the expectations of the 'Standard Model', inside the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Inconsistency of our result for S with CP conservation (S = 0) has a significance of 7.1 standard deviations (statistical and systematics included). Our result for the direct-CP violation parameter C is 0.9 standard deviations from zero (statistical and systematics included). Our results are in agreement with the previous ones [18]. Despite the statistics is only 20% larger than the one used in previous measurement, we improved of 20% the error on S and of 14% the error on C. This error is the smaller ever achieved, by both BABAR and Belle, in Time-Dependent CP Violation Parameters measurement is a b {yields} s transition.

Biassoni, Pietro; /Milan U.

2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

258

BaBar News and Press Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the heart of the Canadian Rockies. BABAR Particle-Identification Detector: The Next Generation February 14, 2012 The technology behind the photon camera at the heart of...

259

2Cosmic Bar Graphs Galaxy Type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or cosmic gamma ray bursts by other instruments in the IPN. It has also observed over 130 events which review the highlights of these observations, which include gamma-ray bursts, soft gamma repeaters Name 1.Introduction The SPI anticoincidence system was first proposed as a gamma-ray burst (GRB

260

Plate, Bar, and Structural Steels III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... both good mechanical properties to meet deep-drawing request and good hydrogen trapping ability to meet sufficient fish-scale resistance. The purpose of this ...

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261

NYC Bar Association meeting, March 22, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% of global landfilling (N.J. Themelis and P. Ulloa, "Methane generation in landfills", Renewable Energy 32All other 1.0South Korea 3.8Switzerland and Norway 3.0China 4.0Singapore 7.0Taiwan 40.0Japan 48.8EU 25 of Municipal Solid Wastes (Congressional Research Service) #12;WTE is a major source of Renewable Energy (DOE

Columbia University

262

Bottomonium Results By BaBar  

SciTech Connect

Summary: Observation of {eta}{sub b}; Energy scan above {Upsilon}(4S); Search for {Upsilon} {r_arrow} {gamma}A{sup 0}, A{sup 0} {r_arrow} invisible; Hadronic transitions {Upsilon}(4S) {r_arrow} {Upsilon}(nS).

Tosi, Silvano; /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

263

1) Under the tool bar has a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Xcel: 30% by 2020) TX: 5,880 MW by 2015 AZ: 15% by 2025 CA: 20% by 2010 *NV: 20% by 2015 ME: 30 and shuts down. The automated protection system restores connections to the areas that had lost power The automated protection system restores connections. Too few seconds have passed for the control center to act

Boisvert, Jeff

264

Plate, Bar, and Structural Steels I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2013... Process to the Characteristics of SCM 440 Steel as Pin Component in Automobilie Chains: Myrna Ariati1; 1University of Indonesia

265

Plate, Bar, and Structural Steels II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2013... Kramer1; John Speer1; Kip Findley1; 1Colorado School of Mines ... to three heat treatments: low temperature gas carburizing at 899 °C, high ... i.e., furnace cooling and cooling in asbestos box whose cooling rate was ...

266

Mircoalloyed and Bar Forging Steel Symposium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cosponsoring Societies: Advanced Steel Processing & Products Research Center, Forging Industry Educational and Research Foundation, Forging Industry

267

Sensory study in restaurant interior design.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??According to five senses, sight, smell, taste, hearing, and haptic, sight receives the most attention in restaurant interior design; however, the other senses are significant… (more)

Yu, Xue

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Restaurant Hygiene Inspections and Online Reviews  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Restaurant hygiene inspections are often cited as a success story of public disclosure. Hygiene grades influence customer decisions and serve as an accountability system for restaurants. However, cities (which are responsible for inspections) have limited resources to dispatch inspectors, which in turn limits the number of inspections that can be performed. We argue that NLP can be used to improve the effectiveness of inspections by allowing cities to target restaurants that are most likely to have a hygiene violation. In this work, we report the first empirical study demonstrating the utility of review analysis for predicting restaurant inspection results. 1

Jun Seok Kang; Yejin Choi; Polina Kuznetsova; Michael Luca; Jun Seok; Kang Polina; Kuznetsova Yejin Choi; Michael Luca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Independent Restaurant Employee Job Satisfaction in College Towns.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The current study begins to close a gap in the restaurant industry literature that fails to recognize the independently operated restaurants as a viable resource… (more)

Dupnock, Lisa M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Customer satisfaction of dining experience in Malaysian malay restaurants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The subject of this Ph.D. thesis is Customer Satisfaction in Malaysian Malay Restaurants Dining Experience. The research was conducted in three Malay family restaurants in… (more)

Ismail, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Market analysis of Nepalese restaurant in South Ostrobothnia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of thesis was market analysis for establish of Nepalese restaurant in south Ostrobothnia. The aim of this study was to analysis. Nepalese restaurant… (more)

Karki, Navaraj

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

General Restaurant Equipment: Order (2013-CE-5344)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE ordered General Restaurant Equipment Co. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding General Restaurant Equipment had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

273

Going Smoke-free in the Land of Lakes: Law and Politics in Minnesota Smoke-free Campaigns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

did not allow its restaurants to renovate to create enclosedAbout Tobacco Smoke in Restaurants and Bars, 76 M ayo Csupport a smoke-free restaurant ordinance in Rochester. 16 M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Tobacco Control Policy Making in North Dakota: A Tradition of Activism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Mobilize North Dakota Restaurants against Federal Smokingbuildings Sm oke-free restaurant C h. 3, article 12Langdon M1):13-20. 175. Fedor L. Restaurants, Bars May Have to Quit

Welle, Jennifer R MPH; Ibrahim, Jennifer K. Ph.D.; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Jeffrey W. Leppo, AK Bar No. 0001003 Ryan P. Steen, AK Bar No. 0912084  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Anchorage, Alaska. AOGA's fifteen member companies account for the majority of oil and gas exploration: jwleppo@stoel.com rpsteen@stoel.com A ttorneys for Plaintiff Alaska Oil and Gas Association IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE DISTRICT OF ALASKA ALASKA OIL AND GAS ASSOCIATION, Civ. No. Plaintiff, V

276

Ir Zuns Bar-Mitsve/ Her Son’s Bar-Mitzvah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ö'Ö oisyys o^na pnx yrx .o^oio •p^a pmownyi x oy ? oo ny oyly^mav» iyp ly px tt>i&8 ^wn in oio oy 0811 >vw yp wrr .01 8

Samson Apter, Shimshen Apter/

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Body Mass Index, Neighborhood Fast Food and Restaurant Concentration, and Car Ownership  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VW. Weight status and restaurant availability: a multilevelL, MacIntyre S. McDonald's restaurants and neighborhoodprevalence of fast food restaurants: state- level analysis.

Inagami, Sanae; Cohen, Deborah A.; Brown, Arleen F.; Asch, Steven M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Competition and Personality in a Restaurant Entry Game: Is there an Entrepreneurial Personality Type?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

34, 1993. [15] Cline Group. Restaurant start-up and growthfail. Cornell Hotel and Restaurant Administration Quarterly,and Personality in a Restaurant Entry Game Theodore

Bergstrom, Ted C; Sonstelie, Jon C; Parendo, Shane

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

PREP--Project on restaurant energy performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PNL (Pacific Northwest Laboratories) has provided Penn State University with funds to design and perform the PREP (Project on Restaurant Energy Performance) for the DOE. Major goals, and criteria for restaurant selection, are listed. All restaurants were in the Philadelphia-Washington-Williamsburg area to reduce climactic effects. Each piece of heating and cooling equipment was metered. This split energy usage into comfort and process, and also facilitated computer analysis. Every 15 minutes, 24 hours a day, for thirty months, pulses sent to the I/O card are recorded. Each day Penn State called each unit to transmit the data to a Cromemco CS-2 computer installed in a location least susceptible to temperature variation at Penn State. At the end of each month the data was sent to the restaurants, to be used as they saw fit. The question of data analysis has not been finalized as of this report.

Claar, C.N.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

All-Electric Wendy's Restaurant Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How well can the power needs of a small restaurant be met by an all-electric solution? This demonstration project at a fast-food restaurant investigated the energy and economic performance of a suite of high-efficiency electro-technologies including an all-electric cookline; high efficiency lighting; and heat pumps for water heating, space heating, and cooling. The all-electric concept proved to be competitive with the more conventional gas/electric model.

1999-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "restaurant bar bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Category:QuickServiceRestaurant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

QuickServiceRestaurant QuickServiceRestaurant Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Building Type Media in category "QuickServiceRestaurant" The following 77 files are in this category, out of 77 total. SVQuickServiceRestaurant Albuquerque NM Public Service Co of NM.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 65 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 64 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Baltimore MD Baltimore Gas & Electric Co.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 67 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Bismarck ND Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (North Dakota).png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 72 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Boulder CO Public Service Co of Colorado.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 61 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png

282

Category:FullServiceRestaurant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FullServiceRestaurant FullServiceRestaurant Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Building Type Pages in category "FullServiceRestaurant" This category contains only the following page. O Openei test page Media in category "FullServiceRestaurant" The following 77 files are in this category, out of 77 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Albuquerque NM Public Service Co of NM.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 66 KB SVFullServiceRestaurant Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 63 KB SVFullServiceRestaurant Baltimore MD Baltimore Gas & Electric Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 69 KB SVFullServiceRestaurant Bismarck ND Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (North Dakota).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 72 KB SVFullServiceRestaurant Boulder CO Public Service Co of Colorado.png

283

Renovation project for Restaurant No. 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document describes the proposed renovation project for the Restaurant in the main building. The total cost of the project will be about 4 000 000 Swiss francs shared between NOVAE and the Organization as explained under item 4. The Finance Committee is invited to approve this project and the proposed funding arrangements.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Sustainability of the top ranked restaurants in France  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 1973, the Gault-Millau Guide (GM) is publishing each year a ranking of the best restaurants based on “toques”. During more than 25 years, on a scale of 20, the best restaurants were awarded 19 or 20 (4 toques), followed by restaurants graded 17 or 18 (3 toques). Out of 1600 restaurants listed in GM in 1974, only 27 (less than 2%) had at least 3 toques. The notation was changed in 2010 to allow 5 and 4 toques to the best restaurants but basically the scale remains equivalent to the previous one. In 2010, out of the 5140 restaurants listed in GM, only 64 were ranked in the top categories (less than 1.3%) (Table 1). The objective of this short note is to review the list of the top ranked restaurants from 1974 to 2010 and examine the sustainability of the grades of these restaurants over time. The migration and default rates are presented for selected years over the period under study. It is shown that these rates are relatively stable over time. 1 Past research on sustainability of restaurants has focused mostly on quantitative factors and bankruptcy rates. Restaurant failures have been attributed to economic and social factors, financial performance, competition and legal restrictions, or even government intervention. 2 Bankruptcy rates are relatively easy to get but are narrow by nature since they do not include change-of-ownership or they do not take into account the organizational life cycle of restaurants.

J. François Outreville

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Meeting Dinner at the El Principal Restaurant  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

http://www.lanl.gov/programs/asc/6lab.shtml http://www.lanl.gov/programs/asc/6lab.shtml Wednesday, October 26, 2011 Meeting Dinner at the El Principal Restaurant (time to be announced) Directions from the Hotel Majestic (A) to the El Principal Restaurant (B) ENGINEERING MATERIALS & AT EXTREME CONDITIONS Presentation Title International collaboration on the development and application of proton radiography Frank Merrill LANL Electro--Physical Research Methods for Materials at Extreme Conditions with the Use of Magnetic Generators Andrey V. Ivanovsky VNIIEF Research of Possibility of Radiography in Fast Neutrons by Use of Portable Neutron Generators Dmitriy I. Yurkov VNIIA Dynamic HED Experiments and Theory at the Sandia Z Facility Thomas Mattson SNL New regimes For Supernova--Relevant

286

Statistics of the Kolkata Paise Restaurant Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the dynamics of a few stochastic learning strategies for the 'Kolkata Paise Restaurant' problem, where N agents choose among N equally priced but differently ranked restaurants every evening such that each agent tries get to dinner in the best restaurant (each serving only one customer and the rest arriving there going without dinner that evening). We consider the learning strategies to be similar for all the agents and assume that each follow the same probabilistic or stochastic strategy dependent on the information of the past successes in the game. We show that some 'naive' strategies lead to much better utilization of the services than some relatively 'smarter' strategies. We also show that the service utilization fraction as high as 0.80 can result for a stochastic strategy, where each agent sticks to his past choice (independent of success achieved or not; with probability decreasing inversely in the past crowd size). The numerical results for utilization fraction of the services in some limiti...

Ghosh, Asim; Mitra, Manipushpak; Chakrabarti, Bikas K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Energy Use and Energy Efficiency Opportunities in Restaurants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use and Energy Efficiency Use and Energy Efficiency Opportunities in Restaurants Restaurant Energy Use Restaurants Making a Difference Tripp's Grill & Six Pack: North Bend Pennsylvania - Michael and Susan Tripp opened their 1,400 square-foot restaurant and grill in North Bend, PA in 2002, knowing that restaurants are among the most energy intensive businesses for their size and sales. That is why they purchased new ENERGY STAR qualified freezers to replace older freezers in their restaurant. With this smart purchase, Tripp's Grill & Six Pack is saving more than $1,900 a year in electricity costs due to reducing usage by more than 31,700 kWh, which is also preventing nearly 50,800 pounds of CO 2 emissions. The Reedville Café: Oregon - Reedville Café's growth in the past few years has

288

Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Restaurant | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Restaurant Restaurant Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Restaurant Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). benchmark-v1.0_3.0-sit_down_restaurant.zip benchmark-v1.1_3.1-sit_down_restaurant.zip benchmark-new-v1.2_4.0-full_service_restaurant.zip More Documents & Publications

289

The Model Electric Restaurant: Volume 3: Analysis and Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Model Electric Restaurant Project was initiated in 1987 to study energy use in restaurants and other types of foodservice facilities. This report describes the second phase of the project, which ultimately involved testing a number of energy-efficient electric concepts in several restaurants in Los Angeles, California, as well as Phoenix and Mesa, Arizona. Field auditing, computer analysis, design, and testing activities revealed the best combination of electric equipment for minimizing site and sour...

1996-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

290

Service design for Chinese restaurant management in Finland.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main objective of the thesis is focused on understanding the service and operation model of Chinese restaurants in Finland, identifying the gaps between the… (more)

Yang, Yan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

SunShine Café: A Breakfast Restaurant Business Plan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to create a business plan for the SunShine Café. While the commonly known statistic of 90% of restaurants… (more)

Burrow, Lillian I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

ENERGY STAR Guide for Restaurants: Putting Energy into Profits...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

293

Kolkata Paise Restaurant Problem in Some Uniform Learning Strategy Limits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the dynamics of some uniform learning strategy limits or a probabilistic version of the "Kolkata Paise Restaurant" problem, where N agents choose among N equally priced but differently ranked restaurants every evening such that each agent can get dinner in the best possible ranked restaurant (each serving only one customer and the rest arriving there going without dinner that evening). We consider the learning to be uniform among the agents and assume that each follow the same probabilistic strategy dependent on the information of the past successes in the game. The numerical results for utilization of the restaurants in some limiting cases are analytically examined.

Ghosh, Asim; Chakrabarti, Bikas K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Chinese Women in the Chinese Restaurant: Work and Cultural Identity.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This master's project explores the lives of Chinese women restaurant workers and owners working in the greater Bangor area. I became involved in this research… (more)

Hardink, Elizabeth Louise

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Responses to restaurant menu nutritional labeling in older adults.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not older adults utilize nutritional information displayed in restaurants to guide their ordering decisions.… (more)

Hillis, Valerie A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

The rise and fall of the occupation of restaurant musicians.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??I examine in this thesis 1) what kind of changes have occurred in the labour relations and terms of employment of restaurant musicians since the… (more)

Nikkonen, Ahti Jorma Ensio

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Locavore Exploring the Sustainable Table: A Restaurant in Tobacco Row.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Locavore is a restaurant centered around the principles of sustainable agriculture: foodthat is organically, humanely, and sustainably raised from farms and cooperatives nofurther than 150… (more)

Oliver, Kathryn Mia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Energy Star Guide for Restaurants, Putting Energy into Profit...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STAR Guide for Restaurants Putting Energy into Profit ENERGY STAR , a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency program, helps us all save money and protect our environment through...

299

Factors That Lead to Environmentally Sustainable Practices in the Restaurant Industry:a Qualitative Analysis of Two Green Restaurant Innovators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACT In recent years, more organizations, including restaurants, have concerned themselves with sustainability. As with any new endeavor, guidance is needed. The purpose of this… (more)

Nyheim, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Restaurant Service Employees Organizational Commitment: Shared Gratuity versus Independent Gratuity Environments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examined the organizational commitment levels between 207 restaurant service employees from 11 restaurants working in different types of gratuity distribution environments, those sharing… (more)

Roe, Susan J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "restaurant bar bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Critical success factors in barbecue restaurants: Do operators and patrons agree?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research addresses a gap in the literature regarding the barbecue restaurant industry. Specifically, it examines whether barbecue restaurant operators have a thorough understanding of… (more)

Farrish, John Raymond

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The Impact of the 2007 Oklahoma immigration reform act on labor costs in the restaurant industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Restaurant industry is becoming the largest employer of immigrants in the United States, immigration policies are fundamental to the success of the restaurant industry, as… (more)

Zhou, Xun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Body Mass Index, Neighborhood Fast Food and Restaurant Concentration, and Car Ownership  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Restaurant Concentration, and Car Ownership Sanae Inagami,body mass index and whether car ownership might moderateRESTAURANT CONCENTRATION, AND CAR OWNERSHIP Quiznos, Little

Inagami, Sanae; Cohen, Deborah A.; Brown, Arleen F.; Asch, Steven M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Model Electric Restaurant: Volume 1: Restaurant Subsystem Analysis and Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, designed to help utilities better serve the restaurant industry, presents conclusions formed following a detailed analysis of energy use in various foodservice establishments and climates. In particular, the report identifies types of high-efficiency electrical equipment that are attractive investments for foodservice clients.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

2010 TRECVID Workshop Registration Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... at Dogfish Head Alehouse and Restaurant, Gaithersburg, MD, on Tuesday, November 16, beginning with a cash bar at 6 pm One banquet ticket is ...

306

Big Windy (Great Escape Restaurant Turbine) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Big Windy (Great Escape Restaurant Turbine) Big Windy (Great Escape Restaurant Turbine) Jump to: navigation, search Name Big Windy (Great Escape Restaurant Turbine) Facility Big Windy (Great Escape Restaurant Turbine) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Great Escape Restaurant Location Schiller Park IL Coordinates 41.95547°, -87.865193° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.95547,"lon":-87.865193,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

307

Research on Food Allergy Information using Smart Mobile Media Devices to Enhance Communication at Restaurants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dealing with food allergies in the restaurant industry is becoming important as more customers have needs and restaurants are concerned with corporate social responsibilitiy CSR. This research discusses how to provide information to facilitate the communication ... Keywords: Consumer Communication, Enhanced Restaurant Communication, Food Allergy Information, Restaurant Industry, Smart Mobile Media Devices

Donald L. Amoroso; Mikako Ogawa; Ayaka Tanaka; Keiichi Noda; Ayako Kawai

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Bar Nunn, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming: Energy Resources Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.9135767°, -106.3433606° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.9135767,"lon":-106.3433606,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

309

Microsoft Word - Energy Storage 092209 BAR.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STORAGE-A KEY STORAGE-A KEY ENABLER OF THE SMART GRID Developed for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability by the National Energy Technology Laboratory September 2009 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Storage - A Key Enabler of the Smart Grid 1 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any

310

NETL: News Release - Setting the Bar for Safety & Responsibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 1, 2011 NETL Licensing Agreement Results in New Start-Up Company New Catalyst Technology will be Used for Fuel Reforming to Produce Hydrogen Pittsburgh - The National Energy...

311

American Bar Association Section of Environment, Energy, and Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chelan Hydroelectric Project FERC Project No. 637," prepared for Public Utility District No. 1 of Chelan

Wells, Scott A.

312

NETL: News Release - Setting the Bar for Safety & Responsibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to make recommendations to improve the safety and environmental performance of natural gas hydraulic fracturing from shale formations. Secretary Chu extended the Subcommittee...

313

BaBar Note #xxx January 29, 1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interface intended to aid in the debugging and troubleshooting of the board. The RS-- 232 interfaces gives

California at Santa Cruz, University of

314

Charmonium physics from {bar p}p interactions  

SciTech Connect

Heavy quarkonium is perhaps the best QCD laboratory in existence. Much of what we presently know about the fundamental interactions in nature has resulted from the study of two-body bound states. The hydrogen atom, the deuteron and positronium have provided valuable mechanisms for studying quantum mechanics, the theory of nuclear forces and QED. In the same way, one might hope that the study of two-body bound state systems built from heavy quarks will lead to a detailed understanding of at least some of the fundamental properties of strong interactions. While it is possible to gain some qualitative insights into strong interactions by studying bound states built from light quarks, it is not possible to reach more precise conclusions because of the additional complexities introduced by large relativistic corrections and long range confinement. Charmonium, c{anti c} bound states, has provided us with the first QCD laboratory where the system could be considered to be at least approximately non-relativistic while at the same time lending itself to perturbative calculations. The substantial mass of the charmed quark (m{sub c} {approximately} 1.5 GeV) corresponds to bound states sufficiently small to begin to probe the asymptotically free component of the strong interaction. The study of c{anti c} as well as b{anti b} bound states has greatly enhanced our understanding of the strong interaction between elementary particles. The scope of this article will be to review what has been learned to date, particularly on the experimental front, as well as to look at what remains to be done.

Ray, R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a loan guarantee application submitted by Areva Enrichment Services LLC to help fund a uranium enrichment facility in Idaho. The simple answer is no. The Act, as passed by...

316

Search for low-Mass Higgs states @ BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several types of new-physics models predict the existence of light dark matter candidates and low-mass Higgs states. Previous \\babar searches for invisible light-Higgs decays have excluded large regions of model parameter space. We present searches for a dark-sector Higgs produced in association with a dark gauge boson and searches for a light Higgs in $\\Upsilon (nS)$ decays.

Santoro, Valentina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Qubits from tight knots and bent nano-bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a novel mechanism for creating a qubit based on a tight knot, that is a nano-quantum wire system so small and so cold as to be quantum coherent with respect to curvature-induced effects. To establish tight knots as legitimate candidates for qubits, we propose an effective curvature-induced potential that produces the two-level system and identify the tunnel coupling between the two local states. We propose also a different design of nano-mechanical qubit based on twisted nano-rods. We describe how both devices can be manipulated. Also we outline possible decoherence channels, detection schemes and experimental setups.

Victor Atanasov; Rossen Dandoloff

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

Qubits from tight knots and bent nano-bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a novel mechanism for creating a qubit based on a tight knot, that is a nano-quantum wire system so small and so cold as to be quantum coherent with respect to curvature-induced effects. To establish tight knots as legitimate candidates for qubits, we propose an effective curvature-induced potential that produces the two-level system and identify the tunnel coupling between the two local states. We propose also a different design of nano-mechanical qubit based on twisted nano-rods. We describe how both devices can be manipulated. Also we outline possible decoherence channels, detection schemes and experimental setups.

Atanasov, Victor

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Characterisation of the Creep Behaviour of the Cathode Steel Bar ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanical properties of carbon steel in austenite temperature region and ... Frequency Modulation Effect on the Solidification of Alloy 718 Fusion Zone.

320

Searches for Leptonic B Decays at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of the branching fractions of purely leptonic decays of B-mesons translate into constraints in the plane of the charged Higgs mass versus tan {beta} which are relatively insensitive to the particular theoretical model. Using the full BABAR dataset of 450 million B-decays we search for these decays. No significant signal is found in the decays into electrons or muons and we set upper limits on the branching fractions of the order of a 10{sup -6} at 90% confidence level. We measure the branching fraction of B {yields} {tau}{mu} to be (1.7 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -4}.

Nelson, Silke; /SLAC

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "restaurant bar bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Unsteady State Hardness Prediction of Industrial Quenched Steel Bar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Abdlmanam S. A. E Elmaryami, Sulaiman Bin Haji Hasan, Khalid Hasnan, Mohamed Elshayeb. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Sulaiman Bin Haji Hasan.

322

Unsteady State Hardness Prediction of Industrial Quenched Steel Bar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Abdlmanam S. A. E Elmaryami, Sulaiman Bin Haji Hasan, Haji Badrul Bin Omar, Prof. Dr. Mohamed Elshayeb. On-Site Speaker (Planned) ...

323

Mircoalloyed and Bar Forging Steel Symposium: Monday AM Session  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"MICROALLOYED STEELS: SOLUBILITY REVISITED:" T. Gladman, University of Leeds, School of Materials, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK. 9:10 am "THE EFFECTS OF ...

324

Mircoalloyed and Bar Forging Steel Symposium: Monday PM Session  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"PRECIPITATION IN MICROALLOYED HIGHER CARBON STEELS:" D. V. Edmonds, University of Leeds, School of Materials, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK. 2:00 pm

325

Mircoalloyed and Bar Forging Steel Symposium: Tuesday PM Session  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF TWO STEELS AND THEIR FRACTURE MORPHOLOGIES:" P. Nguyen-Duy, V. Trembly, Hydro-Quebec Research Institute, ...

326

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - BaBar Experiment Confirms...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nice is that the effect was there the whole time, but nobody had thought about it the right way before." Time violation had previously been seen in particles called neutral...

327

Recent Results in Semileptonic B Decays with BaBar  

SciTech Connect

In this note, recent results of studies of semileptonic B meson decays from BABAR are discussed and preliminary results given. In particular, a recent measurement of {Beta}(B {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{nu}) and the ratio {Beta}(B {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{nu})/{Beta}(B {yields} D{sup (*)}{ell}{nu}) is presented. For the D* mode, a branching fraction of 1.79 {+-} 0.13(stat) {+-} 0.17(syst) is found, with a ratio of 0.325 {+-} 0.023(stat) {+-} 0.027(syst). For the D mode, the results are 1.04 {+-} 0.12(stat) {+-} 0.14(syst) and 0.456 {+-} 0.053(stat) {+-} 0.056(syst), respectively. In addition, a study of B{sub s} production and semileptonic decays using data collected in a center-of-mass energy region above the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance is discussed. The semileptonic branching fraction {Beta}(B{sub s} {yields} {ell}{nu}X) is measured to be 9.9{sub -2.1}{sup +2.6}(stat){sub -2.0}{sup +1.3}(syst).

Hamilton, B.K.; /Maryland U.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

328

Optimization of the Cathode Collector Bar with a Copper Insert ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Innovative Compact Heat Exchanger Solution for Aluminium Off-Gas Cooling and Heat Recovery · Autonomous Vehicle and Smelter Technologies.

329

Indirect Charged Higgs Constraints from BaBar  

SciTech Connect

The high-statistics data samples from the BABAR and Belle B-Factory experiments provide stringent constraints on charged Higgs bosons within the context of specific New Physics models. These constraints are obtained by comparing Standard Model predictions with experimental observations in rare B decays with potential sensitivity to contributions mediated by a virtual H{sup {+-}} in tree or loop diagrams. Recent experimental results on the decays B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}, B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu} and inclusive B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} are described and the implications of these measurements for charged Higgs bosons is discussed.

Robertson, Steven H.; /McGill U.

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

330

Search for a Light Higgs Boson at BaBar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We search for evidence of a light Higgs boson (A{sup 0}) in the radiative decays of the narrow {Upsilon}(3S) resonance: {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}, where A{sup 0} {yields} invisible or A{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. Such an object appears in extensions of the Standard Model, where a light CP-odd Higgs boson naturally couples strongly to b-quarks. We find no evidence for such processes in a sample of 122 x 106 {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected by the BABAR collaboration at the PEP-II B-factory, and set 90% C.L. upper limits on the product of the branching fractions {Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}) x {Beta}(A{sup 0} {yields} invisible) at (0.7-31) x 10{sup -6} in the mass range mA{sup 0} {le} 7.8 GeV, and on the product {Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}) x {Beta}(A{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) at (0.25-5.2) x 10{sup -6} in the mass range 0.212 {le} mA{sup 0} {le} 9.3GeV. We also set a limit on the dimuon branching fraction of the recently discovered {eta}{sub b} meson {Beta}({eta}{sub b} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 0.8% at 90% C.L. The results are preliminary.

Banerjee, Swagato; /Victoria U.

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

331

Nuclear medium effects in $?(\\bar?)$-nucleus deep inelastic scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the nuclear medium effects in the weak structure functions $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and $F_3(x,Q^2)$ in the deep inelastic neutrino/antineutrino reactions in nuclei. We use a theoretical model for the nuclear spectral functions which incorporates the conventional nuclear effects, such as Fermi motion, binding and nucleon correlations. We also consider the pion and rho meson cloud contributions calculated from a microscopic model for meson-nucleus self-energies. The calculations have been performed using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations. Our results are compared with the experimental data of NuTeV and CDHSW.

H. Haider; I. Ruiz Simo; M. Sajjad Athar; M. J. Vicente Vacas

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

332

Selected Topics in Tau Physics from BaBar  

SciTech Connect

Selected results from {tau} analyses performed using the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are presented. A precise measurement of the {tau} mass and the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} mass difference is undertaken using the hadronic decay mode {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup {+-}}{nu}{sub {tau}}. In addition an investigation into the strange decay modes {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is also presented, including a fit to the {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} invariant mass spectrum. Precise values for M(K*(892)) and {Lambda}(K*(892)) are obtained.

Paramesvaran, S.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

333

Mircoalloyed and Bar Forging Steel Symposium: Tuesday AM Session  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CARBON MICROALLOYED STEEL:" N. E. Aloi, Jr, The Timken Company, 1835 Dueber Avenue, S. W., Canton, OH 44706, USA; S. Julian, MSP Industries ...

334

The Bars That Bound Me: A Study of Female Parolees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. Mullins. 2006. “Taking Stock: The Status of FeministPp. 217-249 in Taking Stock: The Status of Criminological

D'Auria, Stephanie Chauntel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Strategies in Symmetric Kolkata Restaurant Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Quantum Kolkata restaurant problem is a multiple-choice version of the quantum minority game, where a set of n non-communicating players have to chose between one of m choices. A payoff is granted to the players that make a unique choice. It has previously been shown that shared entanglement and quantum operations can aid the players to coordinate their actions and acquire higher payoffs than is possible with classical randomization. In this paper the initial quantum state is expanded to a family of GHZ-type states and strategies are discussed in terms of possible final outcomes. It is shown that the players individually seek outcomes that maximize the collective good.

Puya Sharif; Hoshang Heydari

2012-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Exotic V[over-bar][subscript e] -->V[over-bar][subscript slash-e] oscillations in Double Chooz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we estimate the sensitivity of Double Chooz, a reactor Ve --> Ve experiment, to detect "early" neutrino oscillations based on a three-active plus one-sterile, or (3 + 1), neutrino mixing model by implementing ...

G. Duarte, Javier M. (Javier Mauricio Gonzalez Duarte)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

A Search for Nucleon Decay via $n \\rightarrow \\bar? ?^{0}$ and $p \\rightarrow \\bar? ?^{+}$ in Super-Kamiokande  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of searches for nucleon decay via bound neutron to antineutrino plus pizero and proton to antineutrino plus piplus using data from a combined 172.8 kiloton-years exposure of Super-Kamiokande-I, -II, and -III. We set lower limits on the partial lifetime for each of these modes. For antineutrino pizero, the partial lifetime is >1.1x10^{33} years; for antineutrino piplus, the partial lifetime is >3.9x10^{32} years at 90% confidence level.

Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; K. Abe; Y. Hayato; T. Iida; K. Iyogi; J. Kameda; Y. Koshio; Y. Kozuma; Ll. Marti; M. Miura; S. Moriyama; M. Nakahata; S. Nakayama; Y. Obayashi; H. Sekiya; M. Shiozawa; Y. Suzuki; A. Takeda; Y. Takenaga; K. Ueno; K. Ueshima; S. Yamada; T. Yokozawa; C. Ishihara; H. Kaji; T. Kajita; K. Kaneyuki; K. P. Lee; T. McLachlan; K. Okumura; Y. Shimizu; N. Tanimoto; E. Kearns; M. Litos; J. L. Raaf; J. L. Stone; L. R. Sulak; M. Goldhaber; K. Bays; W. R. Kropp; S. Mine; C. Regis; A. Renshaw; M. B. Smy; H. W. Sobel; K. S. Ganezer; J. Hill; W. E. Keig; J. S. Jang; J. Y. Kim; I. T. Lim; J. B. Albert; K. Scholberg; C. W. Walter; R. Wendell; T. M. Wongjirad; T. Ishizuka; S. Tasaka; J. G. Learned; S. Matsuno; S. N. Smith; T. Hasegawa; T. Ishida; T. Ishii; T. Kobayashi; T. Nakadaira; K. Nakamura; K. Nishikawa; Y. Oyama; K. Sakashita; T. Sekiguchi; T. Tsukamoto; A. T. Suzuki; Y. Takeuchi; M. Ikeda; A. Minamino; T. Nakaya; Y. Fukuda; Y. Itow; G. Mitsuka; T. Tanaka; C. K. Jung; G. D. Lopez; I. Taylor; C. Yanagisawa; H. Ishino; A. Kibayashi; S. Mino; T. Mori; M. Sakuda; H. Toyota; Y. Kuno; M. Yoshida; S. B. Kim; B. S. Yang; H. Okazawa; Y. Choi; K. Nishijima; M. Koshiba; M. Yokoyama; Y. Totsuka; K. Martens; J. Schuemann; M. R. Vagins; S. Chen; Y. Heng; Z. Yang; H. Zhang; D. Kielczewska; P. Mijakowski; K. Connolly; M. Dziomba; E. Thrane; R. J. Wilkes

2013-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

338

Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Restaurants Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaRestaurants" Showing 13 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0007 + 1,990 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 300 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 215 + Sweden Building 05K0038 + 345 + Sweden Building 05K0046 + 200 + Sweden Building 05K0058 + 330 + Sweden Building 05K0060 + 256 + Sweden Building 05K0065 + 520 + Sweden Building 05K0081 + 98 + Sweden Building 05K0089 + 155 + Sweden Building 05K0098 + 170 + Sweden Building 05K0105 + 2,450 + Sweden Building 05K0114 + 400 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants&oldid=285973#SMWResults"

339

The effect of information on product quality: Evidence from restaurant hygiene grade cards. The Quarterly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines the effect of an increase in product quality information to consumers on firms’ choices of product quality. In 1998, Los Angeles County introduced hygiene quality grade cards to be displayed in restaurant windows. We show that the grade cards cause (i) restaurant health inspection scores to increase, (ii) consumer demand to become sensitive to changes in restaurants ’ hygiene quality, and (iii) the number of foodborne illness hospitalizations to decrease. We also provide evidence that this improvement in health outcomes is not fully explained by consumers substituting from poor hygiene restaurants to good hygiene restaurants. These results imply the grade cards cause restaurants to make hygiene quality improvements.

Ginger Zhe Jin; Phillip Leslie

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Getting Buzzed In the Library: Use of Restaurant-Style Pagers for Reserves Checkout in an Academic Library  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

call for others using restaurant-style pagers in theirIn the Library: Use of Restaurant-Style Pagers for Reservesimplemented use of restaurant-style pagers for checking out

Goodson, Kymberly; Christensen, Marlayna K.; Elliott, Sarah M.; Lowery, Abigail

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "restaurant bar bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Chop Suey as Imagined Authentic Chinese Food: The Culinary Identity of Chinese Restaurants in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

see Daily News, “Chop Suey Restaurant in  Chinatown, Los 20Low&brand=oac.   The restaurant was located at 436 Gin The Boom in Chinese Restaurants Begins,” Chinese? American 

Liu, Haiming

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

The Effect of Fast Food Restaurants on Obesity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We investigate the health consequences of changes in the supply of fast food using the exact geographical location of fast food restaurants. Specifically, we ask how the supply of fast food affects the obesity rates of 3 million school children and the weight gain of over 1 million pregnant women. We find that among 9 th grade children, a fast food restaurant within a tenth of a mile of a school is associated with at least a 5.2 percent increase in obesity rates. There is no discernable effect at.25 miles and at.5 miles. Among pregnant women, models with mother fixed effects indicate that a fast food restaurant within a half mile of her residence results in a 2.5 percent increase in the probability of gaining over 20 kilos. The effect is larger, but less precisely estimated at.1 miles. In contrast, the presence of non-fast food restaurants is uncorrelated with obesity and weight gain. Moreover, proximity to future fast food restaurants is uncorrelated with current obesity and weight gain, conditional on current proximity to fast food. The implied effects of fast-food on caloric intake are at least one order of magnitude smaller for mothers, which suggests that they are less constrained by travel costs than school children. Our results imply that policies restricting access to fast food near schools could

Janet Currie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Alcohol Use among Restaurant Workers: An Examination of the Impact of Work-related Stress and Workplace Culture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Despite reports indicating high levels of alcohol use in the restaurant industry, little research has examined alcohol use among restaurant workers in an in depth… (more)

Rocheleau, Gregory Christopher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

General Restaurant Equipment: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5344) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5344) Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5344) General Restaurant Equipment: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5344) February 21, 2013 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that General Restaurant Equipment Co. failed to certify a variety of walk-in cooler or freezer components as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards. DOE regulations require a manufacturer (which includes importers) to submit reports certifying that its products have been tested and meet the applicable energy conservation standards. This civil penalty notice advises the company of the potential penalties and DOE's administrative process, including the company's right to a hearing. General Restaurant Equipment: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5344) More Documents & Publications

345

Queue-length Variations In A Two-Restaurant Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper attempts to find out numerically the distribution of the queue-length ratio in the context of a model of preferential attachment. Here we consider two restaurants only and a large number of customers (agents) who come to these restaurants. Each day the same number of agents sequentially arrives and decides which restaurant to enter. If all the agents literally follow the crowd then there is no difference between this model and the famous `P\\'olya's Urn' model. But as agents alter their strategies different kind of dynamics of the model is seen. It is seen from numerical results that the existence of a distribution of the fixed points is quite robust and it is also seen that in some cases the variations in the ratio of the queue-lengths follow a power-law.

Chakrabarti, Anindya S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Independent Restaurants: An Introduction to Business Characteristics, and Energy-Use and Decision Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While many energy providers are focusing efforts on large restaurant chains, the independent restaurant market, a significant target, is being overlooked. This market represents 65 percent of all restaurant establishments, occupying 50 percent of all quick service and 78 percent of full service establishments. This report examines the environment, motivations, and operational challenges faced by independent restaurant operators and describes their attitudes to energy-related issues. This report is availa...

1999-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

347

Analysis for a Fast Food Restaurant: Comparison of Three Fuel Choices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity consumes 75 percent or more of the energy dollar of a typical fast food restaurant. This report describes the results of a computer simulation comparing energy costs for four fast food restaurants in Phoenix, Arizona, with differences only in the fuel used for certain end uses. The all-electric restaurant with high-efficiency equipment proved a cost-competitive alternative to the fossil-fuel-based restaurant in this area.

1996-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

348

ENERGY STAR Guide for Restaurants: Putting Energy into Profits | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guide for Restaurants: Putting Energy into Profits Guide for Restaurants: Putting Energy into Profits Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories

349

Solar demonstration project in a fast-food restaurant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are given of a two-phase program in which the first phase included the successful use of heat reclamation equipment and energy conservation techniques at a typical fast-food restaurant. The project's second phase involved the engineering, designing, installation and interfacing of a solar collector system at the facility. The report will help to serve as a guide for other restaurants around the state, and possibly the nation, which wish to install energy saving systems, or adopt energy-saving techniques, geared to their special needs and equipment.

McClenahan, D.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Minimum Energy Ventilation for Fast Food Restaurant Kitchens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooking equipment exhaust systems have a significant impact on the energy consumption of fast food restaurants. This research investigated issues that relate to the energy performance of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and demonstrated that significant energy and cost savings can be achieved by reducing ventilation rates.

1996-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

Commercial Reference Building: Full Service Restaurant | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Full Service Restaurant Full Service Restaurant Dataset Summary Description Commercial reference buildings provide complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis using EnergyPlus simulation software. Included here is data pertaining to the reference building type Full-Service Restaurant for each of the 16 climate zones, and each of three construction categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings.The dataset includes four key components: building summary, zone summary, location summary and a picture. Building summary includes details about: form, fabric, and HVAC. Zone summary includes details such as: area, volume, lighting, and occupants for all types of zones in the building. Location summary includes key building information as it pertains to each climate zone, including: fabric and HVAC details, utility costs, energy end use, and peak energy demand.In total, DOE developed 16 reference building types that represent approximately 70% of commercial buildings in the U.S.; for each type, building models are available for each of the three construction categories. The commercial reference buildings (formerly known as commercial building benchmark models) were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with three of its national laboratories.Additional data is available directly from DOE's Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Website, including EnergyPlus software input files (.idf) and results of the EnergyPlus simulations (.html).

352

Commercial Reference Building: Quick Service Restaurant | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quick Service Restaurant Quick Service Restaurant Dataset Summary Description Commercial reference buildings provide complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis using EnergyPlus simulation software. Included here is data pertaining to the reference building type Quick Service Restaurant for each of the 16 climate zones, and each of three construction categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings.The dataset includes four key components: building summary, zone summary, location summary and a picture. Building summary includes details about: form, fabric, and HVAC. Zone summary includes details such as: area, volume, lighting, and occupants for all types of zones in the building. Location summary includes key building information as it pertains to each climate zone, including: fabric and HVAC details, utility costs, energy end use, and peak energy demand.In total, DOE developed 16 reference building types that represent approximately 70% of commercial buildings in the U.S.; for each type, building models are available for each of the three construction categories. The commercial reference buildings (formerly known as commercial building benchmark models) were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with three of its national laboratories.Additional data is available directly from DOE's Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Website, including EnergyPlus software input files (.idf) and results of the EnergyPlus simulations (.html).

353

The revised National Electrical Code reg sign for new restaurants  

SciTech Connect

A recent change in the 1990 National Electrical Code{reg sign} now makes it possible for restaurant owners and other foodservice operators to save substantial amounts of money on the electrical systems for any new facilities they build. This report discusses the code change in detail, shows how to apply the new code change effectively, and provides detailed information on the code change process. This report is a user's guide which includes a user's manual, containing all technical details necessary for a full understanding of the new provision in Section 220-36 of the 1990 National Electrical Code{reg sign}. The manual can help utility representatives, food-service consultants, and others determine the size of the electric service entrance and the main electrical panel for a new restaurant. It can also be used to determine if additional electrical loads can be added to an existing restaurant's electric service. Only a calculator is needed to work with the manual. In addition, this report details a cost impact study undertaken by EPRI to estimate likely savings resulting from implementing the new code section. In this study, 60% of the cases averaged savings of $9300 per facility. The report also details steps leading to successful adoption of a code change and the supporting documentation presented in the code change process. 40 figs.

Hart, G.K. (Hart, McMurphy and Parks, Inc., Middleburg, VA (United States)); Claar, C.N. (State College, PA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Family-Owned Restaurant Serves Up Huge Energy Savings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Family-Owned Restaurant Serves Up Huge Energy Savings Family-Owned Restaurant Serves Up Huge Energy Savings Family-Owned Restaurant Serves Up Huge Energy Savings May 8, 2013 - 2:27pm Addthis Energy efficiency upgrades helped the Athenian Corner reduce its operating costs and improved the restaurant's bottom line. | Photo courtesy of BetterBuildings Lowell Energy Upgrade program. Energy efficiency upgrades helped the Athenian Corner reduce its operating costs and improved the restaurant's bottom line. | Photo courtesy of BetterBuildings Lowell Energy Upgrade program. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? The Athenian Corner, a family-owned restaurant in Lowell, Massachusetts, made energy efficiency upgrades that are saving it more than

355

Project on restaurant energy performance: end-use monitoring and analysis. Appendixes I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second volume of the report, ''The Porject on Restaurant Energy Performance - End-Use Monitoring and Analysis''. The first volume (PNL-5462) contains a summary and analysis of the metered energy performance data collected by the Project on Restaurant Energy Performance (PREP). Appendix I, presented here, contains monitoring site descriptions, measurement plans, and data summaries for the seven restaurants metered for PREP. Appendix II, also in this volume, is a description of the PREP computer system.

Claar, C.N.; Mazzucchi, R.P.; Heidell, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Pricing Effect of Restaurant Industry Related Factors on Fama French Three Factor Model.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the addition of restaurant industry-related factors on the accuracy and explanatory power of the… (more)

Denizci, Basak

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Serving Up Crime: A Social Learning Perspective of Employee Deviance in Restaurants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study sought to examine the relationship between employee deviance within restaurants and the components of social learning theory. The behaviors examined in this research… (more)

Pantaleo, Katherine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Effects of Restaurant Tax and Price Increases: Implications for Managers, Policy Makers, and Lobbyists.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Legislation has been proposed in Kentucky that would authorize city legislative bodies to levy a tax on restaurant meals of no more than 3%, regardless… (more)

Han, Junghee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

ORIGINAL RESEARCH Strategies for and Barriers to Managing Weight When Eating at Restaurants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suggested citation for this article: Timmerman GM, Earvolino-Ramirez M. Strategies for and barriers to managing weight when eating at restaurants. Prev Chronic

Gayle M. Timmerman; Cns Marie Earvolino-ramirez; Peer Reviewed

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

An investigation of water usage in casual dining restaurants in Kansas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water is essential for many aspects of daily life including restaurant operations and is necessary for generation and service of properly produced, safe food. However,… (more)

VanSchenkhof, Matthew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "restaurant bar bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The restaurant at the end of the random walk: recent developments in the description of anomalous transport by fractional dynamics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The restaurant at the end of the random walk: recent developments in the description of anomalous transport by fractional dynamics.

Metzler, R

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Chinese Restaurant Game - Part II: Applications to Wireless Networking, Cloud Computing, and Online Social Networking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Part I of this two-part paper [1], we proposed a new game, called Chinese restaurant game, to analyze the social learning problem with negative network externality. The best responses of agents in the Chinese restaurant game with imperfect signals are constructed through a recursive method, and the influence of both learning and network externality on the utilities of agents is studied. In Part II of this two-part paper, we illustrate three applications of Chinese restaurant game in wireless networking, cloud computing, and online social networking. For each application, we formulate the corresponding problem as a Chinese restaurant game and analyze how agents learn and make strategic decisions in the problem. The proposed method is compared with four common-sense methods in terms of agents' utilities and the overall system performance through simulations. We find that the proposed Chinese restaurant game theoretic approach indeed helps agents make better decisions and improves the overall system performan...

Wang, Chih-Yu; Liu, K J Ray

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

West Virginia Higher Education Graduate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the importance of the energy sector to the state. The coal and natural gas sectors continued to post strong includes hotels, motels, restaurants, and bars. It also includes the gaming sector. #12;W.Va. Graduate

Mohaghegh, Shahab

364

Three-player quantum Kolkata restaurant problem under decoherence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of quantum decoherence in a three-player quantum Kolkata restaurant problem is investigated using tripartite entangled qutrit states. Amplitude damping, depolarizing, phase damping, trit-phase flip and phase flip channels are considered to analyze the behaviour of players payoffs. It is seen that Alice's payoff is heavily influenced by the amplitude damping channel as compared to the depolarizing and flipping channels. However, for higher level of decoherence, Alice's payoff is strongly affected by depolarizing noise. Whereas the behaviour of phase damping channel is symmetrical around 50 % decoherence. It is also seen that for maximum decoherence (p=1), the influence of amplitude damping channel dominates over depolarizing and flipping channels. Whereas, phase damping channel has no effect on the Alice's payoff. Therefore, the problem becomes noiseless one at maximum decoherence in case of phase damping channel. Furthermore, the Nash equilibrium of the problem does not change under decoherence.

Ramzan, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Three-player quantum Kolkata restaurant problem under decoherence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of quantum decoherence in a three-player quantum Kolkata restaurant problem is investigated using tripartite entangled qutrit states. Amplitude damping, depolarizing, phase damping, trit-phase flip and phase flip channels are considered to analyze the behaviour of players payoffs. It is seen that Alice's payoff is heavily influenced by the amplitude damping channel as compared to the depolarizing and flipping channels. However, for higher level of decoherence, Alice's payoff is strongly affected by depolarizing noise. Whereas the behaviour of phase damping channel is symmetrical around 50 % decoherence. It is also seen that for maximum decoherence (p=1), the influence of amplitude damping channel dominates over depolarizing and flipping channels. Whereas, phase damping channel has no effect on the Alice's payoff. Therefore, the problem becomes noiseless one at maximum decoherence in case of phase damping channel. Furthermore, the Nash equilibrium of the problem does not change under decoherence.

M. Ramzan

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

366

AliBaBa: Running BaBar jobs on the grid using gsub AFS Access to local installations of BaBar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

containing control parameters and processing instructions. This control has been implemented using tcl, and the files are known as the "*.tcl files" ­ .tcl files source more .tcl files, and the programs need other

367

Measurement of Branching Fractions and CP-Violating Asymmetries in B0 to K0K0bar and B+ to K0barK+ Decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Physics Higgs Boson and Beyond: This summer a highly-anticipated particle was discovered at the Large Hadron Collider. Is this particle the Higgs boson? The Higgs boson gives mass to quarks and electrons

Knowles, David William

368

Search for a Standard Model Higgs Boson in WH-->lvbb-bar in pp-bar Collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W boson using 2.7??fb[superscript -1] of integrated luminosity of pp? collision data taken at ?s=1.96??TeV. Limits on the Higgs boson ...

Xie, Si

369

Geothermal HVAC System Performance in a Quick Service Restaurant: Field Experience From McDonald's Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the monitored results from a geothermal heat pump system installed at a new McDonald's restaurant in Westland, Michigan, a suburb 23 miles west of Detroit.

1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Good grief, i can speak it! Preliminary experiments in audio restaurant reviews  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce a new envisioned application for speech which allows users to enter restaurant reviews orally via their mobile device, and, at a later time, update a shared and growing database of consumer-provided ...

Polifroni, Joseph

371

Technical Support Document: 50% Energy Savings for Quick-Service Restaurants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Document describing PNNL's project to develop a package of energy efficiency measures that demonstrate the feasibility of achieving a 50% energy savings for quick-service restaurants with a simple payback of 5 years or less.

Zhang, Jian; Schrock, D. W.; Fisher, D. R.; Livchak, A.; Zabrowski, D. A.; Athalye, Rahul A.; Liu, Bing

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

372

Passive solar renovations to the Common Ground Community Restaurant. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The passive solar and energy conserving renovations to the Common Ground Community Restaurant were funded primarily as a demonstration project under this program. The majority of work accomplished was (1) design and construction of a passive solar greenhouse on the existing second floor porch of the restaurant, and (2) the design and construction of energy conserving improvements to the interior of the building, consisting largely of renovating the walls and ceiling to provide an insulated space with a substantially reduced heat load.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The e¤ect of fast food restaurants on obesity and weight gain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate how changes in the supply of fast food restaurants affect weight outcomes of 3 million children and 3 million pregnant women. Among ninth graders, a fast food restaurant within 0.1 miles of a school results in a 5.2 percent increase in obesity rates. Among pregnant women, a fast-food restaurant within 0.5 miles of residence results in a 1.6 percent increase in the probability of gaining over 20 kilos. The implied effects on caloric intake are one order of magnitude larger for children than for mothers, consistent with smaller travel cost for adults. Non-fast food restaurants and future fast-food restaurants are uncorrelated with weight outcomes. (JEL I12, J13, J16, L83) In the public debate over obesity it is often assumed the widespread availability of fast food restaurants is an important determinant of obesity rates. Policy makers in several cities have responded by restricting the availability or content of fast food, or by requiring posting of the caloric content of the meals (Julie Samia Mair, Matthew

Janet Currie; Stefano Dellavigna; Enrico Moretti; Vikram Pathania

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

RESEARCH SARS-CoV Infection in a Restaurant from Palm Civet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Epidemiologic investigations showed that 2 of 4 patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) identified in the winter of 2003–2004 were a waitress at a restaurant in Guangzhou, China, that served palm civets as food and a customer who ate in the restaurant a short distance from animal cages. All 6 palm civets at the restaurant were positive for SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Partial spike (S) gene sequences of SARS-CoV from the 2 patients were identical to 4 of 5 S gene viral sequences from palm civets. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SARS-CoV from palm civets in the restaurant was most closely related to animal isolates. SARS cases at the restaurant were the result of recent interspecies transfer from the putative palm civet reservoir, and not the result of continued circulation of SARS-CoV in the human population. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic emerged in 2003 in 6 municipalities in the Pearl River delta region in Guangdong, China. Early casepatients were more likely to be persons with occupational exposure to animals, such as animal sellers or restaurant cooks (1,2). Tracing the source of infection has been complicated, given the sporadic nature of index cases without a clear history of contact with animals. After the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the end of the SARS epidemic, 4 new cases of SARS were reported from

Ming Wang; Meiying Yan; Huifang Xu; Weili Liang; Biao Kan; Bojian Zheng; Honglin Chen; Han Zheng; Yanmei Xu; Enmin Zhang; Hongxia Wang; Jingrong Ye; Guichang Li; Machao Li; Zhigang Cui; Yu-fei Liu; Rong-tong Guo; Xiao-ning Liu; Duan-hua Zhou; Ailan Zhao; Rong Hai; Dongzhen Yu; Yi Guan; Jianguo Xu

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Antimatter Factory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the proposed d-bar production by p-bar(p-bar, {pi}{sup -})d-bar, (light) antinuclei synthesis can be made by successive use of one and two antinucleon transfer reactions, (d-bar,n-bar),(d-bar,p-bar),(t-bar,p-bar),(t-bar,n-bar),...

Yamaguchi, Yoshio [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

376

Nutrition labeling for restaurant menu item: College students' preferences for nutrition information and its influence on purchase intention.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study is to identify what type of nutrition information college students find important to appear on restaurant menus when making their… (more)

Mayfield, Kelly

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

How different types of restaurants behaved differently through the recent recession an analysis of stock market and financial ratios.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study attempted to identify, quantify, and explain the possible impact the recession had on restaurant stock performance in comparison with the S&P 500 index… (more)

Wang, Xiaofan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Chinese Restaurant Game - Part I: Theory of Learning with Negative Network Externality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a social network, agents are intelligent and have the capability to make decisions to maximize their utilities. They can either make wise decisions by taking advantages of other agents' experiences through learning, or make decisions earlier to avoid competitions from huge crowds. Both these two effects, social learning and negative network externality, play important roles in the decision process of an agent. While there are existing works on either social learning or negative network externality, a general study on considering both these two contradictory effects is still limited. We find that the Chinese restaurant process, a popular random process, provides a well-defined structure to model the decision process of an agent under these two effects. By introducing the strategic behavior into the non-strategic Chinese restaurant process, in Part I of this two-part paper, we propose a new game, called Chinese Restaurant Game, to formulate the social learning problem with negative network externality. Throu...

Wang, Chih-Yu; Li, K J Ray

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Project on restaurant energy performance end-use monitoring and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of a research program intended to build an understanding of restaurant energy performance upon an empirical foundation. This discussion provides some background for this effort, brief descriptions of the facilities selected for study, the measurement methods, the empirical findings, an overview of conservation opportunities revealed, and general conclusions. Seven monitoring sites were carefully selected to represent the most common categories of food service by the National Restaurant Association. A microcomputer based data acquisition was designed and implemented to acquire 15-minute interval data on end-use energy consumption, interior temperatures, and external climate conditions for a one year monitoring period. The project archived over 87% of the available data, which has been converted into several formats for dissemination. Restaurants are found to be very intensive users of energy due largely to the frequent usage of food preparation equipment and the high ventilation requirements.

Mazzucchi, R.P.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Solar energy system performance evaluation, Hogate's Restaurant, Washington, D. C. January 1980-December 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hogate's Restaurant site is a business establishment which serves as a restaurant on the waterfront in Washington, D.C. It is part of the National Solar Data Network. The active solar energy system is designed to supply 64% of the restaurant's hot water. It is equipped with 6,254 square feet of liquid flat-plate collectors, two 5,000-gallon tanks for storage, and an auxiliary gas boiler. Pump repairs are reported. Data are given describing the overall system performance, energy savings, and solar energy utilization and availability. Performance data for the collector, storage and Domestic Hot Water (DHW) subsystems are given, as are the system operating energy and site weather conditions. Performance evaluation techniques and sensor technology are discussed briefly. (LEW)

Whitehead, C.Y.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "restaurant bar bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Reserve Class Liquids Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves and the Extent and Nature of Restrictions to Their Development", prepared by the US Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Energy. Unnamed fields and fields generically named "wildcat" were renamed to a concatenate of their basin and state of occurrence,

382

BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BOE Reserve Class BOE Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves and the Extent and Nature of Restrictions to Their Development", prepared by the US Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Energy. Unnamed fields and fields generically named "wildcat" were renamed to a concatenate of their basin and state of occurrence,

383

Update on Angles and Sides of the CKM Unitarity Triangle from BaBar  

SciTech Connect

We report several recent updates from the BABAR Collaboration on the matrix elements |V{sub cb}|, |V{sub ub}|, and |V{sub td}| of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) quark-mixing matrix, and the angles {beta} and {alpha} of the unitarity triangle. Most results presented here are using the full BABAR {Upsilon}(4S) data set.

Cheng, Chih-hsiang; /Caltech

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

384

A hard thermal loop benchmark for the extraction of the nonperturbative $Q\\bar{Q}$ potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The extraction of the finite temperature heavy quark potential from lattice QCD relies on a spectral analysis of the Wilson loop. General arguments tell us that the lowest lying spectral peak encodes, through its position and shape, the real and imaginary part of this complex potential. Here we benchmark this extraction strategy using leading order hard-thermal loop (HTL) calculations. I.e. we analytically calculate the Wilson loop and determine the corresponding spectrum. By fitting its lowest lying peak we obtain the real- and imaginary part and confirm that the knowledge of the lowest peak alone is sufficient for obtaining the potential. Access to the full spectrum allows an investigation of spectral features that do not contribute to the potential but can pose a challenge to numerical attempts of an analytic continuation from imaginary time data. Differences in these contributions between the Wilson loop and gauge fixed Wilson line correlators are discussed. To better understand the difficulties in a numerical extraction we deploy the Maximum Entropy method with extended search space to HTL correlators in Euclidean time and observe how well the known spectral function and values for the real and imaginary part are reproduced. Possible venues for improvement of the extraction strategy are discussed.

Yannis Burnier; Alexander Rothkopf

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Radial sensitivity of kaonic atoms and strongly bound $\\bar K$ states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The strength of the low energy K^- nucleus real potential has recently received renewed attention in view of experimental evidence for the possible existence of strongly bound K^- states. Previous fits to kaonic atom data led to either 'shallow' or to 'deep' potentials, where only the former are in agreement with chiral approaches but only the latter can produce strongly bound states. Here we explore the uncertainties of the K^- nucleus optical potentials, obtained from fits to kaonic atom data, using the functional derivatives of the best-fit chi^2 values with respect to the potential. We find that only the deep type of potential provides information which is applicable to the K^- interaction in the nuclear interior.

N. Barnea; E. Friedman

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

386

Radial sensitivity of kaonic atoms and strongly bound $\\bar K$ states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The strength of the low energy K^- nucleus real potential has recently received renewed attention in view of experimental evidence for the possible existence of strongly bound K^- states. Previous fits to kaonic atom data led to either 'shallow' or to 'deep' potentials, where only the former are in agreement with chiral approaches but only the latter can produce strongly bound states. Here we explore the uncertainties of the K^- nucleus optical potentials, obtained from fits to kaonic atom data, using the functional derivatives of the best-fit chi^2 values with respect to the potential. We find that only the deep type of potential provides information which is applicable to the K^- interaction in the nuclear interior.

Barnea, N

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Reserve Class Gas Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves and the Extent and Nature of Restrictions to Their Development", prepared by the US Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Energy. Unnamed fields and fields generically named "wildcat" were renamed to a concatenate of their basin and state of occurrence,

388

Bimetallic bars with local control of composition by three-dimensional printing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three Dimensional Printing (3DP) is a process that enables the fabrication of geometrically complex parts directly from computer-aided design (CAD) models. The success of 3DP as an alternative manufacturing technology to ...

Techapiesancharoenkij, Ratchatee, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Failure Scenarios and Mitigations and for the BaBar Superconducting Solenoid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cryogenic department at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is responsible for the operation, troubleshooting, and upgrade of the 1.5 Tesla superconducting solenoid detector for the BABAR B-factory experiment. Events that disable the detector are rare but significantly impact the availability of the detector for physics research. As a result, a number of systems and procedures have been developed over time to minimize the downtime of the detector, for example improved control systems, improved and automatic backup systems, and spares for all major components. Together they can prevent or mitigate many of the failures experienced by the utilities, mechanical systems, controls and instrumentation. In this paper we describe various failure scenarios, their effect on the detector, and the modifications made to mitigate the effects of the failure. As a result of these modifications the reliability of the detector has increased significantly with only 3 shutdowns of the detector due to cryogenics systems over the last 2 years.

Thompson, EunJoo; Candia, A.; Craddock, W.W.; Racine, M.; Weisend, J.G., II; /SLAC

2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

390

Study of the Decays of Charm Mesons With the BaBar Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Presented hadronic form factor measurements of D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e} and D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e} with - dramatically reduced measurement error and first q{sup 2}-dependent study of D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}. First observation at > 6.5{sigma} level of doubly-Cabibbo suppressed D{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} decay mode - BF(D{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}) = (2.52 {+-} 0.47(stat) {+-} 0.25(syst) {+-} 0.08(ref)) x 10{sup -4}. Improved measurements of Cabibbo-suppressed to Cabibbo-favored branching ratios for D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} and D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} decay modes.

Bondioli, Mario; /UC, Irvine

2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

391

The Lambda Lambda-Bar calculus: a dual calculus for unconstrained strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a calculus which combines a simple, CCS-like representation of finite behaviors, with two dual binders ? and ?¯. Infinite behaviors are obtained through a syntactical fixed-point operator, which is used to give a translation ... Keywords: game semantics, lambda-calculus

Alexis Goyet

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

LLNL/Linde 875 bar Liquid Hydrogen Pump for High Density Cryogenic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3. Lemmon, E.W., McLinden, M.O., Huber, M.L., "REFPROP: NIST reference fluid thermodynamic and transport properties," National Institute of Standards and Technology, 2004....

393

Etude des désintégrations charmonium des mésons B dans l'expérience BaBar.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nous avons présenté dans cette habilitation à diriger des recherches une étude détaillée des désintégrations hadroniques des mésons B en résonance charmonium et kaon B?(J/?,?(2S),?c0,?c1,?c2)K(*).… (more)

Grenier, P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Search for Lepton Flavour Violating Decays tau- to l- Ks with the BaBar experiment  

SciTech Connect

A search for the lepton flavor violating decays {tau}{sup -} {yields} l{sup -} K{sub S}{sup 0} (l = e or {mu}) has been performed using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 469 fb{sup -1}, collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric energy collider. No statistically significant signal has been observed in either channel and the estimated upper limits on branching fractions are {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -} K{sub S}{sup 0}) < 3.3 x 10{sup -8} and {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {mu}{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0}) < 4.0 x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, R.N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

395

Study of High-multiplicity 3-prong and 5-prong Tau Decays at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

We present measurements of the branching fractions of 3-prong and 5-prong {tau} decay modes using a sample of 430 million {tau} lepton pairs, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1}, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} (3{pi}){sup -} {eta}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} (3{pi}){sup -} {yields} {omega}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} f{sub 1}(1285){nu}{sub {tau}} branching fractions are presented as well as a new limit on the branching fraction of the isospin-forbidden, second-class current {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} {eta}{prime}(958){nu}{sub {tau}} decay. We find no evidence for charged kaons in these decay modes and place the first upper limits on their branching fractions.

Lees, J.P

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Search for B+ --> mu+ nu_mu With Inclusive Reconstruction at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

We search for the purely leptonic decay B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}{sub {mu}} in the full BABAR dataset, having an integrated luminosity of approximately 426 fb{sup -1}. We adopt a fully inclusive approach, where the signal candidate is identified by the highest momentum lepton in the event and the companion B is inclusively reconstructed without trying to identify its decay products. We set a preliminary upper limit on the branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}{sub {mu}}) < 1.3 x 10{sup -6} at the 90% confidence level, using a Bayesian approach.

Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Search for a Low-Mass Higgs Boson (A0) at BaBar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BABAR Collaboration has performed three searches for a light Higgs boson, A{sup 0}, in radiative Upsilon ({Upsilon}) decays: {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}, A{sup 0} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}; {Upsilon}(nS) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}, A{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} (n = 2,3); and {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}, A{sup 0} {yields} invisible. Such a Higgs boson (A{sup 0}) appears in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, where a light CP-odd Higgs boson couples strongly to b-quarks. The searches are based on data samples that consist of 122 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) and 99 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) decays, collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The searches reveal no evidence for an A{sup 0}, and product of branching fractions upper limits, at 90% C.L., of (1.5-16) x 10{sup -5}, (0.44-44) x 10{sup -6}, and (0.7-31) x 10{sup -6} were obtained for these searches, respectively. Also, we set the upper limits {Beta}({eta}{sub b} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}) < 8% and {Beta}({eta}{sub b} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 0.9%.

Mokhtar, Arafat Gabareen; /SLAC

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

398

Probing the Neutrino Mass Hierarchy via Atmospheric $?_?+ \\bar ?_?$ Survival Rates in Megaton Water Cerenkov Detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neutrino mass hierarchy, presently unknown, is a powerful discriminator among various classes of unification theories. We show that the $\

Raj Gandhi; Pomita Ghoshal; Srubabati Goswami; Poonam Mehta; S Uma Sankar

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Production of BaBar Skimmed Analysis Datasets Using the Grid  

SciTech Connect

The BABAR Collaboration, based at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Stanford, US, has been performing physics reconstruction, simulation studies and data analysis for 8 years using a number of compute farms around the world. Recent developments in Grid technologies could provide a way to manage the distributed resources in a single coherent structure. We describe enhancements to the BABAR experiment's distributed skimmed dataset production system to make use of European Grid resources and present the results with regard to BABAR's latest cycle of skimmed dataset production. We compare the benefits of a local and Grid-based systems, the ease with which the system is managed and the challenges of integrating the Grid with legacy software. We compare job success rates and manageability issues between Grid and non-Grid production.

Brew, C.A.J.; /Rutherford; Wilson, F.F.; /Rutherford; Castelli, G.; /Rutherford; Adye, T.; /Rutherford; Roethel, W.; /Rutherford; Luppi, E.; /INFN, Ferrara; Andreotti, D.; /INFN, Ferrara; Smith, D.; /SLAC; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Barrett, M.; /Brunel U.; Barlow, R.; /Manchester U.; Bailey, D.; /Manchester U.

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

400

Wholesale Late Merger: Beyond the A/A[over-bar] Distinction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article, we develop a substantially expanded theory of late merger. Adopting related insights by Fox (2002), we argue that late merger is permitted whenever an output representation can be interpreted in the semantic ...

Takahashi, Shoichi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "restaurant bar bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Measurement of D0 lifetime with the BaBar detector  

SciTech Connect

This work is the result of the researchers carried out during a three years Ph.D. period in the BABAR experiment. The first chapter consists in an introduction to the theoretical aspects of the D{sup 0} meson lifetime determination and CP violation parameters, as well as an overview of the CP violation in the B sector, which is the main topic of the experiment. The description of the experimental apparatus follows with particular attention to the Silicon Vertex Tracker detector, the most critical detector for the determination of decay vertices and thus of lifetimes and time dependent CP violation asymmetries. In the fourth chapter the operation and running of the vertex detector is described, as a result from the experience as Operation Manager of the SVT, with particular attention to the safety of the device and the data quality assurance. The last chapter is dedicated to the determination of the D{sup 0} meson lifetime with the BABAR detector, which is the main data analysis carried out by the candidate. The analysis is characterized by the selection of an extremely pure sample of D{sup 0} mesons for which the decay flight length and proper time is reconstructed. The description of the unbinned maximum likelihood fit follows, as well as the discussion of the possible sources of systematic uncertainties. In the appendix is also presented a preliminary study of a possible development regarding the determination of mixing and CP violation parameters for the D{sup 0} meson.

Simi, Gabriele; /Pisa U. /SLAC

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

402

Production of BaBar Skimmed Analysis Datasets Using the Grid  

SciTech Connect

The BABAR Collaboration, based at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Stanford, US, has been performing physics reconstruction, simulation studies and data analysis for 8 years using a number of compute farms around the world. Recent developments in Grid technologies could provide a way to manage the distributed resources in a single coherent structure. We describe enhancements to the BABAR experiment's distributed skimmed dataset production system to make use of European Grid resources and present the results with regard to BABAR's latest cycle of skimmed dataset production. We compare the benefits of a local and Grid-based systems, the ease with which the system is managed and the challenges of integrating the Grid with legacy software. We compare job success rates and manageability issues between Grid and non-Grid production.

Brew, C.A.J.; /Rutherford; Wilson, F.F.; /Rutherford; Castelli, G.; /Rutherford; Adye, T.; /Rutherford; Roethel, W.; /Rutherford; Luppi, E.; /INFN, Ferrara; Andreotti, D.; /INFN, Ferrara; Smith, D.; /SLAC; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Barrett, M.; /Brunel U.; Barlow, R.; /Manchester U.; Bailey, D.; /Manchester U.

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

403

Charmless Hadronic B Decays into Vector, Axial Vector and Tensor Final States at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

We present experimental measurements of branching fraction and longitudinal polarization fraction in charmless hadronic B decays into vector, axial vector and tensor final states with the final dataset of BABAR. Measurements of such kind of decays are a powerful tool both to test the Standard Model and search possible sources of new physics. In this document we present a short review of the last experimental results at BABAR concerning charmless quasi two-body decays in final states containing particles with spin 1 or spin 2 and different parities. This kind of decays has received considerable theoretical interest in the last few years and this particular attention has led to interesting experimental results at the current b-factories. In fact, the study of longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L} in charmless B decays to vector vector (VV), vector axial-vector (VA) and axial-vector axial-vector (AA) mesons provides information on the underlying helicity structure of the decay mechanism. Naive helicity conservation arguments predict a dominant longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L} {approx} 1 for both tree and penguin dominated decays and this pattern seems to be confirmed by tree-dominated B {yields} {rho}{rho} and B{sup +} {yields} {Omega}{rho}{sup +} decays. Other penguin dominated decays, instead, show a different behavior: the measured value of f{sub L} {approx} 0.5 in B {yields} {phi}K* decays is in contrast with naive Standard Model (SM) calculations. Several solutions have been proposed such as the introduction of non-factorizable terms and penguin-annihilation amplitudes, while other explanations invoke new physics. New modes have been investigated to shed more light on the problem.

Gandini, Paolo; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

404

Lepton Universality Test in Upsilon(1S) Decays at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

Using a sample of 122 million {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, we measure the ratio R{sub {tau}{mu}} = BR({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -})/BR({Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}); the measurement is intended as a test of lepton universality and as a possible search for a light pseudoscalar Higgs boson in Next to Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) scenarios. Such a boson could appear in a deviation of the ratio R{sub {tau}{mu}} from the Standard Model expectation, that is 1, except for small lepton mass corrections. The analysis exploits the decays {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {Upsilon}(1S){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -}, where l = {mu},{tau}.

Guido, Elisa; /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

405

Searches for Exotic Decays of the Upsilon(3S) at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we present two searches for new physics in {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected by the BABAR detector. We search for charged lepton-flavour violating decays of the {Upsilon}(3S), which are unobservable in the Standard Model but are predicted to occur in several beyond-the-Standard Model scenarios. We also search for production of a light Higgs or Higgs-like state produced in radiative decays of the {Upsilon}(3S) and decaying to muon pairs.

Hooberman, Benjamin; /LBL, Berkeley /Heidelberg U.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment: First Detection of High Velocity Milky Way Bar Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commissioning observations with the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, have produced radial velocities (RVs) for ~4700 K/M-giant stars in the Milky Way bulge. These high-resolution (R \\sim 22,500), high-S/N (>100 per resolution element), near-infrared (1.51-1.70 um; NIR) spectra provide accurate RVs (epsilon_v~0.2 km/s) for the sample of stars in 18 Galactic bulge fields spanning -1-32 deg. This represents the largest NIR high-resolution spectroscopic sample of giant stars ever assembled in this region of the Galaxy. A cold (sigma_v~30 km/s), high-velocity peak (V_GSR \\sim +200 km/s) is found to comprise a significant fraction (~10%) of stars in many of these fields. These high RVs have not been detected in previous MW surveys and are not expected for a simple, circularly rotating disk. Preliminary distance estimates rule out an origin from the background Sagittarius tidal stream or a new stream in the MW disk. Comparison to various Galac...

Nidever, David L; Majewski, Steven R; Bird, Jonathan; Robin, Annie C; Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma; Beaton, Rachael L; Schoenrich, Ralph; Schultheis, Mathias; Wilson, John C; Skrutskie, Michael F; O'Connell, Robert W; Shetrone, Matthew; Schiavon, Ricardo P; Johnson, Jennifer A; Weiner, Benjamin; Gerhard, Ortwin; Schneider, Donald P; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Sellgren, Kris; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, Jon; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Frinchaboy, Peter M; Perez, Ana Elia Garcia; Holtzman, Jon; Hearty, Fred R; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Muna, Demitri; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Weaver, Benjamin A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Investigation of the Increase in Resistivity in the Steel Collector Bar ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During this period, cathode blocks go under various physical and chemical changes that could result in an increase of electrical resistivity. The increase may be ...

408

Search for the Xi(2220) and Study of the X(3872) at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

The BABAR Collaboration performed a search for x (2220) production in the initial-state radiation process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {gamma} J/{Psi}, J/{Psi} {yields} {gamma}K{sup +}K{sup -} or J/{Psi} {yields} {gamma}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}. No evidence for the {xi} (2220) resonance has been found. The 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of branching fractions are sensitive to the spin and helicity hypotheses. These upper limits are of the order 10{sup -5}, below the values reported in previous experiments. Also at BABAR, the decays B {yields} J/{Psi} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K are studied to search for the decay X(3872) {yields} J/{Psi}{gamma}. This search yields a four standard deviation evidence for X(3872) {yields} J/{Psi}{omega}, with product branching fractions of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} X(3872)K{sup +}) x {Beta}(X(3872) {yields} J/{Psi}{omega}) = [0.6 {+-} 0.2(stat) {+-} 0.1(syst)] x 10{sup -5}, and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} X(3872)K{sup 0}) x {Beta}(X(3872) {yields} J/y{Psi}) = [0.6 {+-} 0.3(stat) {+-} 0.1(syst)] x 10{sup -5}. A detailed study of the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} mass distribution from X(3872) decay favors a negative-parity assignment but does not rule out the positive-parity hypothesis.

Mokhtar, Arafat Gabareen; /SLAC

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

409

From self-assembly to engines: Simulating the nanoscale D. C. Rapaport, Bar-Ilan University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

could lead to some exciting new gas heat pump systems in five to ten years. The Stirling engine is being in the United States in which Stirling free-piston engine/compressors are being developed; also, there have been several efforts in the United States and abroad in which shaft-power Stirling engines have been coupled

Adler, Joan

410

Semileptonic B Decays From BaBar: |V(Ub)| And |V(Cb)|  

SciTech Connect

The authors report results from the BABAR Collaboration on the semileptonic B decays, highlighting the measurements of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements V{sub ub} and V{sub cb}. They describe the techniques used to obtain the matrix element |V{sub cb}| using the measurement of the inclusive B {yields} X{sub c}{ell}{nu} process and a large sample of exclusive B {yields} D*{ell}{nu} decays. The |V{sub ub}| matrix elements has been measured studying the hadronic mass distribution M{sub X} and the lepton spectra at the endpoint for the B {yields} X{sub u}{ell}{nu} process.

Rotondo, M.; /Padua U.

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

411

eCommerce and the competitiveness of small enterprises: A study of the restaurant industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

eCommerce can provide competitive advantage both by enhancing efficiency and helping an enterprise differentiate itself in the market. These forms of advantage apply differently according to industry sector and the size of the enterprise. This paper reports a study of one such industry sector, that of small, owner-operated restaurants within the larger hospitality industry. Drawing on two theoretical approaches to business competition and trends in consumer behaviour, we present a framework for understanding the advantages eCommerce offers to small restaurants and the broader implications of applying technology to businesses that are often still run on traditional lines. Theories of competitive advantage and consumption trends suggest that the primary potential of eCommerce for these restaurants is as a support for distinctiveness and differentiation rather than efficiency gains. However, the study found that while the small restaurant owners tended to identify potential efficiency gains from eCommerce, they relied on traditional business practices to differentiate themselves in the market. These considerations are relevant for the future development of eCommerce applications and systems designed for small businesses supplying services. 1.

Tanya Castleman; Tanya Castleman; Carolyn Ye-Phern Chin; Carolyn Ye-phern Chin

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Project on Restaurant Energy Performance: end-use monitoring and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although energy bills for restaurants throughout the United States exceed 5 billion dollars annually, very little has been documented with respect to when and how restaurants use energy, or how such use can be reduced cost-effectively. This report summarizes the results of a multiyear collaborative research effort, designed to collect information on end-use energy consumption. Objective is to reveal the quantities and profiles of energy consumption of typical food service operations by time of day and end use. This information, when examined in conjunction with building characteristics, allows detailed study of energy use cause and effect and energy conservation potential. Seven representative monitoring sites were selected, a computerized data acquisition network was designed and implemented, and detailed energy performance was compiled for a 1 year period (July 1983 through June 1984). Each of the seven facilities monitored was selected to represent the seven most common restaurant types and to provide information on a wide variety of commonly used restaurant equipment. Preliminary findings are presented.

Claar, C.N.; Mazzucchi, R.P.; Heidell, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Curriculum for B.S. in Restaurant, Hotel, and Institutional Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Curriculum for B.S. in Restaurant, Hotel, and Institutional Management FIRST YEAR Fall Spring HUSC., Organization 3 NS 1410, Science of Nutrition 4 RHIM 2310, Intro. to Hospitality Mgmt. 3 RHIM 2308, Hotel, Facilities Management 3 ANSC 3404, Cons. Selec./Util. 4 Oral Communications* 3 RHIM 3390, Purchasing in Hosp

Rock, Chris

414

Frying Technology and PracticesChapter 8 Critical Elements in the Selection and Operation of Restaurant Fryers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frying Technology and Practices Chapter 8 Critical Elements in the Selection and Operation of Restaurant Fryers Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

415

90.1 Prototype Building Models Quick Service Restaurant | Building Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quick Service Restaurant Quick Service Restaurant The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

416

90.1 Prototype Building Models Full Service Restaurant | Building Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

90.1 Prototype Building Models Full Service Restaurant 90.1 Prototype Building Models Full Service Restaurant The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each

417

The project on restaurant energy performance end-use monitoring and analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the results of a research program intended to build an understanding of restaurant energy performance upon an empirical foundation. This discussion provides some background for the effort, brief descriptions of the facilities selected for study, the methods of measurement, the empirical findings, an overview of conservation opportunities revealed, and general conclusions. Seven monitoring sites were carefully selected to represent the most common categories of food service by the National Restaurant Association. A microcomputer-based data acquisition was designed and implemented to acquire data at 15-minute intervals on end-use energy consumption, interior temperatures, and external climatic conditions for a one-year monitoring period. The project archived over 87% of the available data, which have been converted into several formats for dissemination.

Mazzucchi, R.P.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Solar heating and hot water system installed at Shoney's Restaurant, North Little Rock, Arkansas. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar heating system is designed to supply a major portion of the space and water heating requirements for a newly built Shoney's Big Boy Restaurant which was installed with completion occurring in December 1979. The restaurant has a floor space of approximately 4,650 square feet and requires approximately 1500 gallons of hot water daily. The solar energy system consists of 1,428 square feet of Chamberlain flat plate liquid collector subsystem, and a 1500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 321 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/yr (specified) building heating and hot water heating. Designer - Energy Solutions, Incorporated. Contractor - Stephens Brothers, Incorporated. This report includes extracts from site files, specification references for solar modifications to existing building heating and hot water systems, drawings installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Solid waste management and reduction in the restaurant industry. Case study  

SciTech Connect

The restaurant`s recycling and waste reduction program began by separating out recyclable materials from the dumpster. This included cardboard, glass, and aluminum tin cans. A cardboard baler and containers for the glass and cans were placed next to the dumpster making it easier for employees to remember to recycle rather than discard recyclable materials. Recyclable materials are picked up by independent haulers at a cost that is substantially less than disposal costs. Therefore, reducing the amount of waste placed into the dumpster generates cost savings. The next step in the waste reduction program was to reduce the amount of food waste discarded in the dumpster. The head chef uses a computerized system for monitoring food inventory, amount of food used per meal, and the percent waste per meal. This helped to minimize food waste generated in food preparation.

NONE

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Quantum solution to a three player Kolkata restaurant problem using entangled qutrits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three player quantum Kolkata restaurant problem is modeled using three entangled qutrits. This is a step towards a N-choice generalization of the N-player quantum minority game. It is shown that a better than classical payoff is achieved by a Nash equilibrium solution where the space of available strategies is spanned by SU(3), and the players share an tripartite entangled initial state.

Sharif, Puya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "restaurant bar bar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Generalized Chinese restaurant construction of exchangeable Gibbs partitions and related results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By resorting to sequential constructions of exchangeable random partitions (Pitman, 2006), and exploiting some known facts about generalized Stirling numbers, we derive a generalized Chinese restaurant process construction of exchangeable Gibbs partitions of type $\\alpha$ (Gnedin and Pitman, 2006). Our construction represents the natural theoretical probabilistic framework in which to embed some recent results about a Bayesian nonparametric treatment of estimation problems arising in genetic experiment under Gibbs, species sampling, models priors.

Cerquetti, Annalisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Quantum solution to a three player Kolkata restaurant problem using entangled qutrits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three player quantum Kolkata restaurant problem is modeled using three entangled qutrits. This first use of three level quantum states in this context is a step towards a $N$-choice generalization of the $N$-player quantum minority game. It is shown that a better than classical payoff is achieved by a Nash equilibrium solution where the space of available strategies is spanned by subsets of SU(3) and the players share a tripartite entangled initial state.

Puya Sharif; Hoshang Heydari

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

423

Een plek om te eten: 'Op welke wijze kan architectuur een meer bewuste en intense beleving in het restaurant teweeg brengen?'.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Architectuur kan bijdragen aan de versterking van een intense en bewuste ervaring in het restaurant. Doordat het ontwerp een onderdeel is dat juist bij het… (more)

In 't Veld, F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Brand preference and its impacts on customer share of visits and word-of-mouth intention: an empirical study in the full-service restaurant segment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study attempted to investigate antecedents and consequences of consumers’ utilitarian and hedonic attitudes toward restaurant brands and to examine the effects of brand prestige… (more)

Hwang, Jinsoo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

www.wine-economics.org Restaurant Prices and the Minimum Wage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the e¤ect of the minimum wage on restaurant prices. For that purpose, we estimate a price rigidity model by exploiting a unique dataset of individual price quotes used to calculate the Consumer Price Index in France. We …nd a positive and signi…cant impact of the minimum wage on prices. We obtain that the e¤ect of the minimum wage on prices is very protracted. The aggregate impact estimated with our model takes more than a year to fully pass through to retail prices.

Denis Fougère; Erwan Gautier; Hervé Le Bihan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Dynamic Multi-Relational Chinese Restaurant Process for Analyzing Influences on Users in Social Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the problem of analyzing influence of various factors affecting individual messages posted in social media. The problem is challenging because of various types of influences propagating through the social media network that act simultaneously on any user. Additionally, the topic composition of the influencing factors and the susceptibility of users to these influences evolve over time. This problem has not studied before, and off-the-shelf models are unsuitable for this purpose. To capture the complex interplay of these various factors, we propose a new non-parametric model called the Dynamic Multi-Relational Chinese Restaurant Process. This accounts for the user network for data generation and also allows the parameters to evolve over time. Designing inference algorithms for this model suited for large scale social-media data is another challenge. To this end, we propose a scalable and multi-threaded inference algorithm based on online Gibbs Sampling. Extensive evaluations on large-scale Twitter and...

Lakkaraju, Himabindu; Bhattacharyya, Chiranjib

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Measurement of the tt-bar cross section in pp-bar collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV using dilepton events with a lepton plus track selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports a measurement of the cross section for the pair production of top quarks in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The data were collected from the CDF run II detector in a set of runs ...

Xie, Si

428

Forward-Backward Asymmetry at High Mass in $t\\bar{t}$ Production in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV  

SciTech Connect

Current understanding of particle physics postulates that there are 17 fundamental particles that interact via four fundamental forces - gravity, the strong force, the weak force, and the electromagnetic force. These fundamental particles can be classified by their spins into bosons, which are the force-carrying particles with integer spins, and fermions, which have half-integer spins. Fermions can be further divided into quarks and leptons. The particles and three of the four forces - all but gravity - are described by the Standard Model, a local SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) gauge theory. Electromagnetic and weak interactions as described by Electroweak Theory or Quantum Electrodynamics, SU(2) x U(1). Strong interactions are described by Quantum Chromodynamics or QCD, SU(3). Fermions are grouped into three generations as shown in Table 1.1. Each generation consists of a leptonic doublet containing a charged and a neutral lepton and a weak isospin doublet containing two quarks. The first generation, containing the electron, the electron neutrino, the up quark, and the down quark, is the lightest generation and is thus the most frequently found in nature. The second generation contains the muon, the muon neutrino, the strange quark, and the charm quark. The third generation contains the tau, the tau neutrino, the bottom quark, and the top quark.

Eppig, Andrew; /Michigan U.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Annihilation of p-bar + p {yields} e{sup +} + e{sup -} + {pi}{sup 0} and p-bar + p {yields} {gamma} + {pi}{sup 0} through an {omega}-Meson intermediate state  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The s-channel annihilation of a proton and an antiproton into a neutral pion and a real or virtual photon followed by lepton pair emission is studied. Such a mechanism is expected to play a role at moderate values of the total energy {radical}s, when the pion is emitted in the angular region around 90 Degree-Sign in the center-of-mass system. A fair comparison with the existing data is obtained taking scattering and annihilation channels into account. The cross section is calculated and numerical results are given in the kinematical range accessible in the PANDA experiment at FAIR.

Kuraev, E. A., E-mail: kuraev@theor.jinr.ru; Bystritskiy, Yu. M., E-mail: bystr@theor.jinr.ru; Bytev, V. V., E-mail: bvv@jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Dbeyssi, A., E-mail: dbeyssy@ipno.in2p3.fr; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E., E-mail: egle.tomasi@cea.fr [Universite Paris-Sud, Institut de Physique Nucleaire (France)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Measurement of the tt-bar production cross section in pp-bar collisions at [sqrt]s=1.96??TeV using soft electron b-tagging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the top-quark pair-production cross section in pp? collisions at [sqrt]s=1.96??TeV using a data sample corresponding to 1.7??fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected with the Collider Detector ...

Paus, Christoph M. E.

431

Future prospects of baryon istability search in p-decay and n n(bar) oscillation experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings contain thirty-one papers which review both the theoretical and the experimental status and near future of baryon instability research. Baryon instability is investigated from the vantage point of supersymmetric and unified theories. The interplay between baryogenesis and antimatter is examined. Double beta decay experiments are discussed. The huge Icarus experiment is described with its proton decay capabilities. Neutron-antineutron oscillations investigations are presented, especially efforts with ultra-cold neutrons. Individual papers are indexed separately on the Energy Data Base.

Ball, S.J.; Kamyshkov, Y.A. [ed.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

GatorPreserveWhat UF Law alumni give to The Florida Bar, and their domination of its commanding heights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. When Pettis takes over the office in 2013 he will make history as the first African- American president-funded court clerks, state attorneys' offices and public defenders, which all contribute to our quality of life Mayor Michael Bloomberg took office in 2002, the city has engaged in the rezoning of about 11,000 lots

Choate, Paul M.

433

Relative Humidity in Limited Streamer Tubes for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's BaBar Detector  

SciTech Connect

The BABAR Detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center studies the decay of B mesons created in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions. The outermost layer of the detector, used to detect muons and neutral hadrons created during this process, is being upgraded from Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) to Limited Streamer Tubes (LSTs). The standard-size LST tube consists of eight cells, where a silver-plated wire runs down the center of each. A large potential difference is placed between the wires and ground. Gas flows through a series of modules connected with tubing, typically four. LSTs must be carefully tested before installation, as it will be extremely difficult to repair any damage once installed in the detector. In the testing process, the count rate in most modules showed was stable and consistent with cosmic ray rate over an approximately 500 V operating range between 5400 to 5900 V. The count in some modules, however, was shown to unexpectedly spike near the operation point. In general, the modules through which the gas first flows did not show this problem, but those further along the gas chain were much more likely to do so. The suggestion was that this spike was due to higher humidity in the modules furthest from the fresh, dry inflowing gas, and that the water molecules in more humid modules were adversely affecting the modules' performance. This project studied the effect of humidity in the modules, using a small capacitive humidity sensor (Honeywell). The sensor provided a humidity-dependent output voltage, as well as a temperature measurement from a thermistor. A full-size hygrometer (Panametrics) was used for testing and calibrating the Honeywell sensors. First the relative humidity of the air was measured. For the full calibration, a special gas-mixing setup was used, where relative humidity of the LST gas mixture could be varied from almost dry to almost fully saturated. With the sensor calibrated, a set of sensors was used to measure humidity vs. time in the LSTs. The sensors were placed in two sets of LST modules, one gas line flowing through each set. These modules were tested for count rate v. voltage while simultaneously measuring relative humidity in each module. One set produced expected readings, while the other showed the spike in count rate. The relative humidity in the two sets of modules looked very similar, but it rose significantly for modules further along the gas chain.

Lang, M.I.; /MIT; Convery, M.; /SLAC; Menges, W.; /Queen Mary, U. of London

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Extracting the Chern number from the dynamics of a Fermi gas: Implementing a quantum Hall bar for cold atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a scheme to measure the quantized Hall conductivity of an ultracold Fermi gas initially prepared in a topological (Chern) insulating phase, and driven by a constant force. We show that the time evolution of the center of mass, after releasing the cloud, provides a direct and clear signature of the topologically invariant Chern number. We discuss the validity of this scheme, highlighting the importance of driving the system with a sufficiently strong force to displace the cloud over measurable distances while avoiding band-mixing effects. The unusual shapes of the driven atomic cloud are qualitatively discussed in terms of a semi-classical approach.

Alexandre Dauphin; Nathan Goldman

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

435

Montreal Quebec City Corner Brook Charlottetown Sydney Halifax Saint John Bar Harbor Rockland/Camden Newport New York  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

synergy and fuel the momentum of the entire community. The metropolitan university serves as a gateway surcharge. Flats smaller than the minimum size are non-mailable. minimum size 3.5" x 5" minimum size 3.5" x

Raina, Ramesh

436

Implementation of Double Pulse Width Modulation for Uniformity of LED Light Bars in LCD Back-Light.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis proposes a dimming approach with Double Pulse Width Modulation for equalizing the light output of the back light with light emitted diodes (LEDs)… (more)

Huang, Chao-Hsuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Algorithmic [Bar06]. Algorithms [Mae94a, Mae96c]. Amplitude [Sko94]. Amusement [Rud95b]. Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Version 0.06 Title word cross-reference 2 [Tro99c]. 3 [Ful96b, SB94a, SB94b]. n [Fre93a]. p [De 99]. ? [Abb05b].-adic [De 99].-Queens [Fre93a]. 1 [TiS96]. 1999 [Ker98].

Nelson H. F. Beebe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Study of the Ds+ to K+K-e+ nu Decay Channel with the BaBar Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Charm semileptonic decays allow a validation of lattice QCD calculations through the measurement of the hadronic form factors, which characterize the effect of strong interaction in these reactions. The accuracy of such calculations is crucial for the improvement of the test of the standard model in flavor physics. This thesis presents a study of the D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e} channel using 214 fb{sup -1} recorded by de BAbar experiment. For events with a K{sup +}K{sup -} mass in the range between 1.01 GeV/c{sup 2} and 1.03 Gev/c{sup 2}, the {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} is the dominant component. Using the simple pole model to parameterize the q{sup 2} dependence of the form factors -V(q{sup 2}), A{sub 1}(q{sup 2}) and A{sub 2}(q{sup 2})- the following ratios are measured at q{sup 2} = 0; {tau}{sub V} = V(0)/A{sub 1}(0) = 1.868 {+-} 0.061 {+-} 0.079, r{sub 2} = A{sub 2}(0)/A{sub 1}(0) = 0.763 {+-} 0.072 {+-} 0.062. The mass pole of the axial-vector form factor is also obtained: m{sub A} = (2.30{sub -0.18}{sup +0.42} {+-} 0.21) GeV/c{sup 2}. In the same mass range, the semileptonic branching fraction, relative to the D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup +} channel, is measured, and the absolute normalization of the axial-vector form factor is extracted: A{sub 1}(q{sup 2} = 0) and = 0.605 {+-} 0.012 {+-} 0.018 {+-} 0.018. The stated errors refer to the statistical, systematic and errors from external inputs, respectively. An S wave component in the K{sup +}K{sup -} system, possibly originating from a f{sub 0}, is also studied through its interference with the {phi}. An S wave component is observed for the first time in this decay channel with a 5{sigma} significance.

Serrano, Justine; /Orsay, IPN /SLAC

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

439

A secure and covert communication channel for HTTP tar pits to implement dynamic web page blocks to bar spammer's harvesters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unsolicited commercial email (UCE, spam), scam and phishing emails make up for more than 90% of all emails sent world-wide. Most anti spam methods known rely on filtering emails. Meanwhile, even web browsers check URLs against blacklists to avoid fraud. ... Keywords: HTTP tar pit, access control, distributed, proactive anti-spam-measures, spam

Tobias Eggendorfer

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Application of the Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar Test for Seismic Property Characterization of Hydrate-bearing Sand Undergoing Water Saturation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

including a seismic source), jacketed rock or sediment corerock /sediment core Temperature sensor (RTD) (b) Jacketed sample core placed between steel extension rods (c) Source and

Nakagawa, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z