Sample records for responsibilities include facilitating

  1. The LBNL's Health Care Facilitator Role and Responsibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LBNL's Health Care Facilitator Role and Responsibilities The University of California Office of the President (UCOP) administers the Health Care Facilitator (HCF) program, but the HCF works under and health plan practices/policy. · HCF provides UCOP's Health and Welfare Administration (HWA

  2. abolish response facilitation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 57 Facilitating Consensus,...

  3. Roles of Major Facilitator Superfamily Transporters in Phosphate Response in Drosophila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, Matthew D.

    The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporter Pho84 and the type III transporter Pho89 are responsible for metabolic effects of inorganic phosphate in yeast. While the Pho89 ortholog Pit1 was also shown to be involved ...

  4. #include #include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Andrew T.

    process #12;#include #include pid_t pid = fork(); if (pid () failed */ } else if (pid == 0) { /* parent process */ } else { /* child process */ } #12;thread #12

  5. #include #include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poinsot, Laurent

    #include #include //Rappels : "getpid()" permet d'obtenir son propre pid // "getppid()" renvoie le pid du père d'un processus int main (void) { pid_t pid_fils; pid_fils = fork(); if(pid_fils==-1) { printf("Erreur de création du processus fils\

  6. Friendship as a facilitator of emotional responsiveness and helping behavior in young children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costin, Susan Evonne

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in altering the negative emotions of a peer or on the strategies and motives they report for doing so. Forty-four children ranging in age from 48 to 77 months watched puppet scenarios in which the target child in eight hypothetical dilemmas was either a... that reflected a concern for the other child's needs. In addition, affective responses that preceded proposed interventions by children in the friendship group suggest- ed that there are multiple affective pathways to prosocial behavior. The results...

  7. Calculation of rotordynamic unbalance response including torque and cross-coupled stiffness and damping effects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleespies, Henry Sattoli

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    code was developed using the transfer matrix method to investigate the effects of cross-coupled sti ffness, cross-coupled damping, and torque on synchronous response of rotating machinery. Several models showing the effects of cross.... Phase plot of rotor with ZX damping. Figure 3 1. Response plot for rotor with forward driving cross-coupled stiffness. Figure 32. Response plot with cross-coupled 53 55 57 sti ffness negating lateral damping. Figure 33. Response plot with cross...

  8. Facilitating Forgiveness 1 Running head: FACILITATING FORGIVENESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Facilitating Forgiveness 1 Running head: FACILITATING FORGIVENESS FACILITATING FORGIVENESS. Infidelity causes significant damage for couples and results in a loss of trust and relationship stability undermine a relationship's stability and security, resulting in confusion, loss of trust, and tremendous

  9. Team Facilitator: Urban Garden Youth Employment 7 team facilitator positions open for summer 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janssen, Michel

    Team Facilitator: Urban Garden Youth Employment 7 team facilitator positions open for summer 2012 team of 6 urban teenagers. The Team Facilitator creates and maintains a dynamic garden work experience for their teams. Facilitators are responsible for setting the stage for their team to build successful

  10. lue light affects many aspects of plant growth and develop-ment. Plant blue-light responses include inhibition of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Chentao

    B lue light affects many aspects of plant growth and develop- ment. Plant blue-light responses have identified three blue- light receptors: cryptochrome 1, cryptochrome 2 and phototropin, which of the cryptochromes Plant blue-light receptors have long been recognized from their action spectra to have roles

  11. Co-Facilitator Learning Community (CFLC) Facilitator Benchmarking Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    1 Co-Facilitator Learning Community (CFLC) Facilitator Benchmarking Survey Office for Equity & Diversity (OED), University of Wisconsin-Madison Greetings! We invite you to join the Co-Facilitator Learning Community. This survey is designed for self-"benchmarking" of your co-facilitation understandings

  12. Please TYPE your responses to these questions. If you would like to include a more detailed account of your proposed research, please include it on page two of this document. SAVE your document (titled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    of your proposed research, please include it on page two of this document. SAVE your document (titled account of your proposed research, please include it on page two of this document. SAVE your document

  13. Department Chair Leadership and Management Roles This document is not intended to include every duty or responsibility of every chair; rather, it is intended to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Department Chair Leadership and Management Roles This document is not intended to include every leadership role that is part-administrator (managing, budgeting, scheduling) and part-faculty (teaching and correctives when necessary. Management · Managing the department's curriculum, being conversant

  14. Facilitated Strontium Transport by Remobilization of Strontium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilitated Strontium Transport by Remobilization of Strontium-Containing Secondary Precipitates in Hanford Site Subsurface. Facilitated Strontium Transport by Remobilization of...

  15. Facilitation Guide Forging the Link

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Facilitation Guide Forging the Link: Linking the Economic Incentives of Low Impact Development of the economic incentives as well as how LID plays a role in helping communities adapt to changes in climate. Now heard? What about inconsistent? #12;Forging the Link: Linking the Economic Benefits of Low Impact

  16. Calorimetric glass transition explained by hierarchical dynamic facilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrahan, Juan P.

    Calorimetric glass transition explained by hierarchical dynamic facilitation Aaron S. Keysa Contributed by David Chandler, February 11, 2013 (sent for review November 15, 2012) The glass transition different on cooling than on heating, and the response to melting a glass depends markedly on the cooling

  17. Response

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingof Enhanced Dr. JuliaPOINTRespond to theResponse SEAB

  18. Designing Reactors to Facilitate Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard H. Meservey

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critics of nuclear power often cite issues with tail-end-of-the-fuel-cycle activities as reasons to oppose the building of new reactors. In fact, waste disposal and the decommissioning of large nuclear reactors have proven more challenging than anticipated. In the early days of the nuclear power industry the design and operation of various reactor systems was given a great deal of attention. Little effort, however, was expended on end-of-the-cycle activities, such as decommissioning and disposal of wastes. As early power and test reactors have been decommissioned difficulties with end-of-the-fuel-cycle activities have become evident. Even the small test reactors common at the INEEL were not designed to facilitate their eventual decontamination, decommissioning, and dismantlement. The results are that decommissioning of these facilities is expensive, time consuming, relatively hazardous, and generates large volumes of waste. This situation clearly supports critics concerns about building a new generation of power reactors.

  19. Component with inspection-facilitating features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J; Zombo, Paul J

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine airfoil can be formed with features to facilitate measurement of its wall thickness. An outer wall of the airfoil can include an outer surface and an inner surface. The outer surface of the airfoil can have an outer inspection target surface, and the inner surface of the airfoil can have an inner inspection target surface. The inner and outer target surfaces can define substantially flat regions in surfaces that are otherwise highly contoured. The inner and outer inspection target surfaces can be substantially aligned with each other. The inner and outer target surfaces can be substantially parallel to each other. As a result of these arrangements, a highly accurate measurement of wall thickness can be obtained. In one embodiment, the outer inspection target surface can be defined by an innermost surface of a groove formed in the outer surface of the outer wall of the airfoil.

  20. Energy Savings Performance Contract Project Facilitators | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    developing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) energy savings performance contract (ESPC) projects are required to work with a qualified project facilitator. Project...

  1. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY07 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report is a deliverable for fiscal year 2007 (FY07) for Project 2002-077-00, Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS). The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to responsibilities arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. In FY07, EOS project accomplishments included 1) subgroup meetings; 2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; 3) project management via the project tracking system, PISCES; 4) quarterly project status reports; and 5) a major revision to the Estuary RME Plan (new version September 2007) based on comments by EOS members and invited reviewers.

  2. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Research, Monitoring and Evaluation - FY07 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report is a deliverable for fiscal year 2007 (FY07) for Project 2002-077-00, Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS). The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort of the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to responsibilities arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. In FY07, EOS project accomplishments included (1) subgroup meetings; (2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; (3) project management via the project tracking system, PISCES; (4) quarterly project status reports; and (5) a major revision to the Estuary RME Plan (new version September 2007) based on comments by EOS members and invited reviewers.

  3. Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Techniques for Demand Response. May 2007. LBNL-59975.to facilitate automating  demand response actions at the Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,

  4. Internship Contract (Includes Practicum)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Internship Contract (Includes Practicum) Student's name-mail: _________________________________________ Internship Agency Contact Agency Name: ____________________________________ Address-mail: __________________________________________ Location of Internship, if different from Agency: ________________________________________________ Copies

  5. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  6. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY10 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort that the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as applied to operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. The EOS is one of multiple work groups in the federal research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed in response to responsibilities arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the FCRPS. The EOS is tasked by NOAA Fisheries and the Action Agencies to design and coordinate implementation of the federal RME plan for the lower Columbia River and estuary, including the plume.

  7. Living Expenses (includes approximately

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    & engineering programs All other programs Graduate: MBA/INFSY at Erie & Harrisburg (12 credits) Business Guarantee 3 (Does not include Dependents Costs4 ) Altoona, Berks, Erie, and Harrisburg 12-Month Estimated

  8. Device to facilitate moving an electrical cable of an electric vehicle charging station and method of providing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karner, Donald B

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Some embodiments include a device to facilitate moving an electrical cable of an electric vehicle charging station. Other embodiments of related systems and methods are also disclosed.

  9. Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model - Facilitator Guide ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of the nation's electric grid and reducing the risk of energy disruptions due to cyber attack, visit the Cybersecurity page. C2M2 Facilitator Guide (February 2014) More Documents &...

  10. LOCH: Open Access Facilitator Job Description (DRAFT) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, Jacqueline

    2015-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    DRAFT Job Description for an Open Access Facilitator job in the University of Edinburgh's College of Humanities and Social Sciences. This draft job description is being made available as part of the Jisc-funded LOCH Project....

  11. High Temperature Separation of Carbon Dioxide/Hydrogen Mixtures Using Facilitated Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, C.R.; Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Dixon, J.K. (Univ. of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN); Maginn, E.J. (Univ. of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN); Brennecke, J.F. (Univ. of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN)

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiently separating CO2 from H2 is one of the key steps in the environmentally responsible uses of fossil fuel for energy production. A wide variety of resources, including petroleum coke, coal, and even biomass, can be gasified to produce syngas (a mixture of COand H2). This gas stream can be further reacted with water to produce CO2 and more H2. Once separated, the CO2 can be stored in a variety of geological formations or sequestered by other means. The H2 can be combusted to operate a turbine, producing electricity, or used to power hydrogen fuel cells. In both cases, onlywater is produced as waste. An amine functionalized ionic liquid encapsulated in a supported ionic liquid membrane (SILM) can separate CO2 from H2 with a higher permeability and selectivity than any known membrane system. This separation is accomplished at elevated temperatures using facilitated transport supported ionic liquid membranes.

  12. Facilitating Sound, Cost-Effective Federal Energy Management (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Federal Government, as the nation's largest energy consumer, has a tremendous opportunity and acknowledged responsibility to lead by example. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) plays a critical role in this effort. FEMP facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. FEMP does this by focusing on the needs of its Federal customers, delivering an array of services across a variety of program areas.

  13. EWB Facilitator Position Descriptions Facilitators will manage a group of 3-5 Vice-Presidents. They will run bi-weekly meetings with these Vice-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Randy

    and communication aspects of the Chapter's ventures and projects. Strong communication and networking skills would-Presidents. They will also be responsible for guiding the entire Enabling Facilitation Group in organization of the large at Queen's, which will involve networking with administration and catering services as well as the Canadian

  14. [Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and include the consumer exist. Some examples include advanced two-way metering (AMI), demand response (DR), and distributed energy resources (DER). A common misconception is...

  15. T-705: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation Facilitates...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation Facilitates Packet Injection Attacks T-705: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation Facilitates Packet Injection...

  16. Argonne Facilitation of PHEV Standard Testing Procedure (SAE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Argonne Facilitation of PHEV Standard Testing Procedure (SAE J1711) Argonne Facilitation of PHEV Standard Testing Procedure (SAE J1711) 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

  17. PIER: Demand Response Research Center Director, Mary Ann Piette

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 PIER: Demand Response Research Center Director, Mary Ann Piette Program Development and Outreach Response Research Plan #12;2 Demand Response Research Center Objective Scope Stakeholders Develop, prioritize, conduct and disseminate multi- institutional research to facilitate Demand Response. Technologies

  18. Radiological Emergency Response Health and Safety Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. R. Bowman

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual was created to provide health and safety (H&S) guidance for emergency response operations. The manual is organized in sections that define each aspect of H and S Management for emergency responses. The sections are as follows: Responsibilities; Health Physics; Industrial Hygiene; Safety; Environmental Compliance; Medical; and Record Maintenance. Each section gives guidance on the types of training expected for managers and responders, safety processes and procedures to be followed when performing work, and what is expected of managers and participants. Also included are generic forms that will be used to facilitate or document activities during an emergency response. These ensure consistency in creating useful real-time and archival records and help to prevent the loss or omission of information.

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: facilitate developing cell materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia received funding for its "Mechanistic Modeling Framework for Predicting Extreme Battery Response: Coupled Hierarchical Models for Thermal, Mechanical, Electrical and...

  20. Hybrid powertrain system including smooth shifting automated transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beaty, Kevin D.; Nellums, Richard A.

    2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A powertrain system is provided that includes a prime mover and a change-gear transmission having an input, at least two gear ratios, and an output. The powertrain system also includes a power shunt configured to route power applied to the transmission by one of the input and the output to the other one of the input and the output. A transmission system and a method for facilitating shifting of a transmission system are also provided.

  1. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup and the Expert Regional Technical Group, Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.

    2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project covers facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) for federal research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) and the Expert Regional Technical Group (ERTG) for estuary habitat restoration. The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort that the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [Corps], U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as applied to operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The EOS is tasked by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and the Action Agencies (AAs) to design and coordinate implementation of the federal RME plan for the lower Columbia River and estuary, including the river’s plume in the ocean. Initiated in 2002, the EOS is composed of members from BPA, the Corps, NMFS, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL’s) Marine Sciences Laboratory, and other agencies as necessary.

  2. LI Co-Facilitator Position Information & Application Leadership Institute (LI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    1 LI Co-Facilitator Position Information & Application Leadership Institute (LI) Office for Equity for the Co-Facilitator Position in the Leadership Institute. What follows is an overview of LI, a description of LI Co-Facilitator role, and the application. What is the Leadership Institute (LI)? The LI

  3. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring and Evaluation FY08 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, GE; Diefenderfer, HL [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort that the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as applied to operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. In fiscal year 2008 (FY08), EOS project accomplishments included (1) subgroup meetings; (2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; (3) project management via BPA's project tracking system, Pisces; (4) quarterly project status reports; and (5) a major revision to the Estuary RME document and its subsequent regional release (new version January 2008). Many of the estuary RME recommendations in this document were incorporated into the Biological Opinion on FCRPS operations (May 2008). In summary, the FY08 EOS project resulted in expanded, substantive coordination with other regional RME forums, a new version of the federal Estuary RME program document, and implementation coordination. This annual report is a FY08 deliverable for the project titled Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup.

  4. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY08 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort that the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) developed in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as applied to operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The goal of the EOS project is to facilitate activities of the estuary/ocean RME subgroup as it coordinates design and implementation of federal RME in the lower Columbia River and estuary. In fiscal year 2008 (FY08), EOS project accomplishments included 1) subgroup meetings; 2) participation in the estuary work group of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership; 3) project management via the project tracking system, Pisces; 4) quarterly project status reports; and 5) a major revision to the Estuary RME document and its subsequent regional release (new version January 2008). Many of the estuary RME recommendations in this document were incorporated into the Biological Opinion on hydrosystem operations (May 2008). In summary, the FY08 EOS project resulted in expanded, substantive coordination with other regional RME forums, a new version of the federal Estuary RME program document, and implementation coordination. This annual report is a FY08 deliverable for the project titled Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup.

  5. Integration of health into urban spatial planning through impact assessment: Identifying governance and policy barriers and facilitators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, Laurence, E-mail: Laurence.carmichael@uwe.ac.uk [WHO Collaborating Centre for Healthy Urban Environments, University of the West of England Bristol, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom); Barton, Hugh [WHO Collaborating Centre for Healthy Urban Environments, University of the West of England Bristol, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom); Gray, Selena [University of the West of England, Bristol, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Blackberry Hill, Stapleton, Bristol BS16 1DD (United Kingdom); Lease, Helen [RPS Planning and Development, 2420 The Quadrant, Aztec West, Almondsbury, Bristol BS32 4AQ (United Kingdom); Pilkington, Paul [University of the West of England, Bristol, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Blackberry Hill, Stapleton, Bristol BS16 1DD (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents the results of a review of literature examining the barriers and facilitators in integrating health in spatial planning at the local, mainly urban level, through appraisals. Our literature review covered the UK and non UK experiences of appraisals used to consider health issues in the planning process. We were able to identify four main categories of obstacles and facilitators including first the different knowledge and conceptual understanding of health by different actors/stakeholders, second the types of governance arrangements, in particular partnerships, in place and the political context, third the way institutions work, the responsibilities they have and their capacity and resources and fourth the timeliness, comprehensiveness and inclusiveness of the appraisal process. The findings allowed us to draw some lessons on the governance and policy framework regarding the integration of health impact into spatial planning, in particular considering the pros and cons of integrating health impact assessment (HIA) into other forms of impact assessment of spatial planning decisions such as environmental impact assessment (EIA) and strategic environment assessment (SEA). In addition, the research uncovered a gap in the literature that tends to focus on the mainly voluntary HIA to assess health outcomes of planning decisions and neglect the analysis of regulatory mechanisms such as EIA and SEA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Governance and policy barriers and facilitators to the integration of health into urban planning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Review of literature on impact assessment methods used across the world. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knowledge, partnerships, management/resources and processes can impede integration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HIA evaluations prevail uncovering research opportunities for evaluating other techniques.

  6. Analysis of Automotive Turbocharger Nonlinear Response Including Bifurcations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vistamehr, Arian

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Automotive turbochargers (TCs) increase internal combustion engine power and efficiency in passenger and commercial vehicles. TC rotors are usually supported on floating ring bearings (FRBs) or semi-floating ring bearings (SFRBs), both of which...

  7. Analysis of Automotive Turbocharger Nonlinear Response Including Bifurcations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vistamehr, Arian

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................................................... 1 Figure 2 Waterfalls of TC center housing acceleration for 30?C oil inlet temperature and 4bar oil inlet pressure...................................... 6 Figure 3 Waterfalls of TC center housing... ........................................................ 8 Figure 6 Waterfalls of TC center housing acceleration for 30?C oil inlet temperature and 4bar oil inlet pressure; (a) low imbalance amount, (b) high...

  8. Facilitated diffusion framework for transcription factor search with conformational changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jérôme Cartailler; Jürgen Reingruber

    2015-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellular responses often require the fast activation or repression of specific genes, which depends on Transcription Factors (TFs) that have to quickly find the promoters of these genes within a large genome. Transcription Factors (TFs) search for their DNA promoter target by alternating between bulk diffusion and sliding along the DNA, a mechanism known as facilitated diffusion. We study a facilitated diffusion framework with switching between three search modes: a bulk mode and two sliding modes triggered by conformational changes between two protein conformations. In one conformation (search mode) the TF interacts unspecifically with the DNA backbone resulting in fast sliding. In the other conformation (recognition mode) it interacts specifically and strongly with DNA base pairs leading to slow displacement. From the bulk, a TF associates with the DNA at a random position that is correlated with the previous dissociation point, which implicitly is a function of the DNA structure. The target affinity depends on the conformation. We derive exact expressions for the mean first passage time (MFPT) to bind to the promoter and the conditional probability to bind before detaching when arriving at the promoter site. We systematically explore the parameter space and compare various search scenarios. We compare our results with experimental data for the dimeric Lac repressor search in E.Coli bacteria. We find that a coiled DNA conformation is absolutely necessary for a fast MFPT. With frequent spontaneous conformational changes, a fast search time is achieved even when a TF becomes immobilized in the recognition state due to the specific bindings. We find a MFPT compatible with experimental data in presence of a specific TF-DNA interaction energy that has a Gaussian distribution with a large variance.

  9. Modeling suggests that oblique extension facilitates rifting and continental break-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaus, Boris

    Modeling suggests that oblique extension facilitates rifting and continental break-up Sascha Brune; accepted 5 June 2012; published 2 August 2012. [1] In many cases the initial stage of continental break-up was and is associated with oblique rifting. That includes break-up in the Southern and Equatorial Atlantic, separation

  10. Facilitating Navigation and Information Access with CANOES: Collaborative Agents and Natural Operations in Enhanced Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheyer, Adam

    the global system. This process is continually iterated to produce a bootstrap effect. Collaborative Agents and flexibility in the makeup of agent communities. Distinguishing features of the OAA include facilitator- based delegation of complex goals, temporal control and data management facilities that may be used consistently

  11. Wang et al. 1 Ethanol-Mediated Facilitation of AMPA Receptor Function in the Dorsomedial Striatum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Wang et al. 1 Ethanol-Mediated Facilitation of AMPA Receptor Function in the Dorsomedial Striatum, California 94608 Running Title: Ethanol and AMPA receptors in the dorsomedial striatum # To whom as well as repeated cycles of in vivo ethanol exposure and withdrawal, including excessive voluntary

  12. arousal facilitates collision: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 128 Facilitating Consensus,...

  13. arrest facilitating caspase: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 147 Facilitating Consensus,...

  14. aav5 vector facilitates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 169 Facilitating Consensus,...

  15. a3 facilitates lysosomal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 94 Facilitating Consensus,...

  16. analysis facilitates mutation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 153 Facilitating Consensus,...

  17. activity facilitates microtubule: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 398 Facilitating Consensus,...

  18. aspergillus niger facilitates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 102 Facilitating Consensus,...

  19. a2 domain facilitate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 76 Facilitating Consensus,...

  20. abandoned parses facilitate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 457 Facilitating Consensus,...

  1. auditory noise facilitates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 464 Facilitating Consensus,...

  2. Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Selected Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 51115 6.15 6.08 6.28 6.83 6.96 6.75 3.06 5415 6.14 6.06...

  3. Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

  4. Top-down facilitation of visual recognition , K. S. Kassam*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bar, Moshe

    Top-down facilitation of visual recognition M. Bar* , K. S. Kassam*§ , A. S. Ghuman*§¶ , J. Boshyan gradually promote the role of top-down processing in recognition, but how such facilitation is triggered object recognition by initiating top-down processes projected from orbitofrontal to visual cortex

  5. WINS: Market Simulation Tool for Facilitating Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahidehpour, Mohammad [Illinois Institute of Technology

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrating 20% or more wind energy into the system and transmitting large sums of wind energy over long distances will require a decision making capability that can handle very large scale power systems with tens of thousands of buses and lines. There is a need to explore innovative analytical and implementation solutions for continuing reliable operations with the most economical integration of additional wind energy in power systems. A number of wind integration solution paths involve the adoption of new operating policies, dynamic scheduling of wind power across interties, pooling integration services, and adopting new transmission scheduling practices. Such practices can be examined by the decision tool developed by this project. This project developed a very efficient decision tool called Wind INtegration Simulator (WINS) and applied WINS to facilitate wind energy integration studies. WINS focused on augmenting the existing power utility capabilities to support collaborative planning, analysis, and wind integration project implementations. WINS also had the capability of simulating energy storage facilities so that feasibility studies of integrated wind energy system applications can be performed for systems with high wind energy penetrations. The development of WINS represents a major expansion of a very efficient decision tool called POwer Market Simulator (POMS), which was developed by IIT and has been used extensively for power system studies for decades. Specifically, WINS provides the following superiorities: (1) An integrated framework is included in WINS for the comprehensive modeling of DC transmission configurations, including mono-pole, bi-pole, tri-pole, back-to-back, and multi-terminal connection, as well as AC/DC converter models including current source converters (CSC) and voltage source converters (VSC). (2) An existing shortcoming of traditional decision tools for wind integration is the limited availability of user interface, i.e., decision results are often text-based demonstrations. WINS includes a powerful visualization tool and user interface capability for transmission analyses, planning, and assessment, which will be of great interest to power market participants, power system planners and operators, and state and federal regulatory entities. (3) WINS can handle extended transmission models for wind integration studies. WINS models include limitations on transmission flow as well as bus voltage for analyzing power system states. The existing decision tools often consider transmission flow constraints (dc power flow) alone which could result in the over-utilization of existing resources when analyzing wind integration. WINS can be used to assist power market participants including transmission companies, independent system operators, power system operators in vertically integrated utilities, wind energy developers, and regulatory agencies to analyze economics, security, and reliability of various options for wind integration including transmission upgrades and the planning of new transmission facilities. WINS can also be used by industry for the offline training of reliability and operation personnel when analyzing wind integration uncertainties, identifying critical spots in power system operation, analyzing power system vulnerabilities, and providing credible decisions for examining operation and planning options for wind integration. Researches in this project on wind integration included (1) Development of WINS; (2) Transmission Congestion Analysis in the Eastern Interconnection; (3) Analysis of 2030 Large-Scale Wind Energy Integration in the Eastern Interconnection; (4) Large-scale Analysis of 2018 Wind Energy Integration in the Eastern U.S. Interconnection. The research resulted in 33 papers, 9 presentations, 9 PhD degrees, 4 MS degrees, and 7 awards. The education activities in this project on wind energy included (1) Wind Energy Training Facility Development; (2) Wind Energy Course Development.

  6. activation facilitates memory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Fractal Consistency: Architecting the Memory System to Facilitate Verification Computer...

  7. Facilitating Opportunistic Communication by Tracking the Documents People Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    Facilitating Opportunistic Communication by Tracking the Documents People Use Jay Budzik, Xiaobin. Evanston, IL 60201 USA +1 847 467 1265 {budzik, fu, hammond}@infolab.nwu.edu ABSTRACT Many of our

  8. Surface electromyography of facilitated versus free arm activation after stroke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsiang, Mina

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this study is to determine if the amount of volitional muscle activation in a stroke affected arm is altered by facilitation. An experiment was designed in which surface EMG was recorded from the biceps brachii ...

  9. Using Process Mapping to Facilitate Positive Library Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    Using Process Mapping to Facilitate Positive Library Change Emily Campbell Special Projects Librarian for Collections University of Michigan #12;What is Process Mapping? "Business process mapping organization's objectives to make sure that all processes are aligned with the company's values

  10. Dynamical facilitation governs glassy dynamics in suspensions of colloidal ellipsoids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandan K. Mishra; K. Hima Nagamanasa; Rajesh Ganapathy; A. K. Sood; Shreyas Gokhale

    2014-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the greatest challenges in contemporary condensed matter physics is to ascertain whether the formation of glasses from liquids is fundamentally thermodynamic or dynamic in origin. While the thermodynamic paradigm has dominated theoretical research for decades, the purely kinetic perspective of the dynamical facilitation (DF) theory has attained prominence in recent times. In particular, recent experiments and simulations have highlighted the importance of facilitation using simple model systems composed of spherical particles. However, an overwhelming majority of liquids possess anisotropy in particle shape and interactions and it is therefore imperative to examine facilitation in complex glass-formers. Here, we apply the DF theory to systems with orientational degrees of freedom as well as anisotropic attractive interactions. By analyzing data from experiments on colloidal ellipsoids, we show that facilitation plays a pivotal role in translational as well as orientational relaxation. Further, we demonstrate that the introduction of attractive interactions leads to spatial decoupling of translational and rotational facilitation, which subsequently results in the decoupling of dynamical heterogeneities. Most strikingly, the DF theory can predict the existence of reentrant glass transitions based on the statistics of localized dynamical events, called excitations, whose duration is substantially smaller than the structural relaxation time. Our findings pave the way for systematically testing the DF approach in complex glass-formers and also establish the significance of facilitation in governing structural relaxation in supercooled liquids.

  11. Systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans; , Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Some or all of the needs above can be addressed by embodiments of the invention. According to embodiments of the invention, systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies can be implemented. In one embodiment, a method for storing hydrogen can be provided. The method can include providing diatoms comprising diatomaceous earth or diatoms from a predefined culture. In addition, the method can include heating the diatoms in a sealed environment in the presence of at least one of titanium, a transition metal, or a noble metal to provide a porous hydrogen storage medium. Furthermore, the method can include exposing the porous hydrogen storage medium to hydrogen. In addition, the method can include storing at least a portion of the hydrogen in the porous hydrogen storage medium.

  12. Key ornamental innovations facilitate diversification in an avian radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubenstein, Dustin R.

    Key ornamental innovations facilitate diversification in an avian radiation Rafael Maiaa,1 , Dustin novel ways of interacting with the en- vironment (key innovations) play a fundamental role in promoting evolution of orna- mental traits. Because selection can operate only on existing vari- ation, the tendency

  13. Facilitating Document Annotation using Content and Querying Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hristidis, Vagelis

    content management software (e.g., Microsoft SharePoint), allow users to share documents and annotate1 Facilitating Document Annotation using Content and Querying Value Eduardo J. Ruiz #1 , Vagelis the generation of the structured metadata by identifying documents that are likely to contain informa- tion

  14. Networked Innovation: Using Roadmapping to Facilitate Coordination, Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Networked Innovation: Using Roadmapping to Facilitate Coordination, Collaboration and Cooperation, as are the resulting uncertainties. Roadmapping is a method that at its core is used to buy down uncertainty (linking activity to value creation across an ecosystem or platform). Ultimately, the way that roadmapping

  15. Phenotypic plasticity facilitates recurrent rapid adaptation to introduced predators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfrender, Michael

    Phenotypic plasticity facilitates recurrent rapid adaptation to introduced predators Alison G) A central role for phenotypic plasticity in adaptive evolution is often posited yet lacks empirical support of preexisting developmental pathways, producing rapid adaptive change. We examined the role of plasticity

  16. Limited Personal Use of Government Office Equipment including Information Technology

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes requirements and assigns responsibilities for employees' limited personal use of Government resources (office equipment and other resources including information technology) within DOE, including NNSA. The Order is required to provide guidance on appropriate and inappropriate uses of Government resources. This Order was certified 04/23/2009 as accurate and continues to be relevant and appropriate for use by the Department. Certified 4-23-09. No cancellation.

  17. ROMP-Facilitated Methodologies and Automated Library Development of Thiadiazepin-1,1-dioxide-4-ones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Toby R.

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    for cell growth and proliferation. 12 Scheme 1.9 highlights the use of an oligomeric coupling reagent (OACC100) for the synthesis of various substituted furans, thiophenes, and pyridines (not shown). Scheme 1.9 Facilitated amide formation via OACC100... of bound reagents, catalysts, or scavengers including the use of micro-scale reactors for performing homogeneous chemistry.46 BBB B B B BBB B B B BBB B B B C A Heterogeneous Flow-through A B C D Homogeneous Flow-through m i c ro re a c to r Co lu m n w...

  18. Autimated Price and Demand Response Demonstration for Large Customers in New York City using OpenADR 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, J. J.; Yin, R.; Kiliccote, S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR), an XML-based information exchange model, is used to facilitate continuous price-responsive operation and demand response participation for large commercial buildings in New York who are subject...

  19. Autimated Price and Demand Response Demonstration for Large Customers in New York City using OpenADR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, J. J.; Yin, R.; Kiliccote, S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR), an XML-based information exchange model, is used to facilitate continuous price-responsive operation and demand response participation for large commercial buildings in New York who are subject...

  20. Exposure Levels for Chemical Threat Compounds; Information to Facilitate Chemical Incident Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Public Health Command] [U.S. Army Public Health Command; Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure Standards, Limits and Guidelines for Chemical Threat Compunds ABSTRACT Exposure criteria for chemical warfare (CW) agents and certain toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) used as CW agents (such as chlorine fill in an improvised explosive device) have been developed for protection of the civilian general public, civilian employees in chemical agent processing facilities and deployed military populations. In addition, compound-specific concentrations have been developed to serve as how clean is clean enough clearance criteria guiding facility recovery following chemical terrorist or other hazardous release events. Such criteria are also useful to verify compound absence, identify containment boundaries and expedite facility recovery following chemical threat release. There is no single right value or concentration appropriate for all chemical hazard control applications. It is acknowledged that locating and comparing the many sources of CW agent and TIC exposure criteria has not been previously well-defined. This paper summarizes many of these estimates and assembles critical documentation regarding their derivation and use.

  1. Roles of Major Facilitator Superfamily Transporters in Phosphate Response in Drosophila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perrimon, Norbert

    , and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Funding: Funding was provided-mail: cbergwitz@partners.org ¤ Current address: Biological Statistics and Computational Biology, Cornell and membrane lipid synthesis, generation of high-energy phosphate esters, and intracellular signaling [1

  2. Multi-Sensory Cognitive Learning as Facilitated in a Multimedia Tutorial for Item Response Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Alex

    measurement theories in the field of educational assessment [2]. Unlike the classical true score theory performance measured by an objective test. It was found that while there is no significant performance gap group. A plausible explanation is that un-natural audio requires additional cognitive power to process

  3. Metabolic role of thioredoxin-interacting protein in facilitating the fasting response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andres, Allen Mariano

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are in a higher energy state than their wild-type controlsof a fasting wild-type mouse to maintain whole-body energy

  4. Metabolic role of thioredoxin-interacting protein in facilitating the fasting response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andres, Allen Mariano

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dehydrogenase complex (PDC) (reviewed in [176] and Figureof inhibition of the PDC by examining thephosphorylationE1? subunit of the PDC (Figure 29), which would be

  5. Rural electrification, climate change, and local economies: Facilitating communication in development policy and practice on Nicaragua's Atlantic Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casillas, Christian E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate change, and local economies:  Facilitating communication climate change, and local economies:  Facilitating communication 

  6. A Dynamic Algorithm for Facilitated Charging of Plug-In Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taheri, Nicole; Ye, Yinyu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs) are a rapidly developing technology that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions and change the way vehicles obtain power. PEV charging stations will most likely be available at home and at work, and occasionally be publicly available, offering flexible charging options. Ideally, each vehicle will charge during periods when electricity prices are relatively low, to minimize the cost to the consumer and maximize societal benefits. A Demand Response (DR) service for a fleet of PEVs could yield such charging schedules by regulating consumer electricity use during certain time periods, in order to meet an obligation to the market. We construct an automated DR mechanism for a fleet of PEVs that facilitates vehicle charging to ensure the demands of the vehicles and the market are met. Our dynamic algorithm depends only on the knowledge of a few hundred driving behaviors from a previous similar day, and uses a simple adjusted pricing scheme to instantly assign feasible and satisfactory c...

  7. Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model - Facilitator Guide (February 2014)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30,Crafty Gifts| Department of Energy Facilitator

  8. Threat Facilitates Subsequent Executive Control During Anxious Mood Jeffrey L. Birk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Aniruddh D.

    Threat Facilitates Subsequent Executive Control During Anxious Mood Jeffrey L. Birk Tufts) posits that low-level threat may facilitate behavioral performance by influencing executive control functions. Anxiety is thought to strengthen this effect by enhancing threat's affective significance

  9. MHK technologies include current energy conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research leverages decades of experience in engineering and design and analysis (D&A) of wind power technologies, and its vast research complex, including high-performance...

  10. COLLOID AND COLLOID-FACILITATED RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AT THE SEMI-ARID HANFORD SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    COLLOID AND COLLOID-FACILITATED RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AT THE SEMI-ARID HANFORD SITE By ZIRU LIU support, and endless love. iv #12;COLLOID AND COLLOID-FACILITATED RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AT THE SEMI for colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides is from indirect field observations, models, and laboratory

  11. Co-Facilitator Professional Development Learning Community Office for Equity and Diversity (OED)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Co-Facilitator Professional Development Learning Community (CFPDLC) Office for Equity and Diversity 2012 through May 2013, for continued learning. * If you serve as a co-facilitator for any OED Learning Communities, you will decide with your co-facilitator team the length and frequency of planning meeting time

  12. Overview of Demand Side Response

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—discusses the utility PJM's demand side response (DSR) capabilities, including emergency and economic responses.

  13. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup and the Expert Regional Technical Group, Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the annual report for fiscal year 2014 for the project called Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS) and the Expert Regional Technical Group (ERTG). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the project for the Bonneville Power Administration. The EOS and ERTG are part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation and habitat restoration efforts, respectively, developed by the Action Agencies (BPA, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System and implemented under the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program.

  14. Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup for Federal Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation, FY09 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.

    2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the annual report for fiscal year 2009 (FY09) for the project called Facilitation of the Estuary/Ocean Subgroup (EOS). The EOS is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [Corps or USACE], U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS).

  15. EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

  16. DIDACTICAL HOLOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT INCLUDING (HOLOGRAPHIC TELEVISION)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

    DIDACTICAL HOLOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT INCLUDING HoloTV (HOLOGRAPHIC TELEVISION) José J. Lunazzi , DanielCampinasSPBrasil Abstract: Our Institute of Physics exposes since 1980 didactical exhibitions of holography in Brazil where

  17. Sessions include: Beginning Farmer and Rancher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Sessions include: ­ Beginning Farmer and Rancher ­ New Markets and Regulations ­ Food Safety ­ Good Bug, Bad Bug ID ­ Horticulture ­ Hydroponics ­ Livestock and Pastured Poultry ­ Mushrooms ­ Organic ­ Live animal exhibits ­ Saturday evening social, and ­ Local foods Florida Small Farms and Alternative

  18. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  19. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  20. Crystallographic Structure of SurA, a Molecular Chaperone that Facilitates Folding of Outer Membrane Porins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitto, E.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SurA protein facilitates correct folding of outer membrane proteins in gram-negative bacteria. The sequence of Escherichia coli SurA presents four segments, two of which are peptidyl-prolyl isomerases (PPIases); the crystal structure reveals an asymmetric dumbbell, in which the amino-terminal, carboxy-terminal, and first PPIase segments of the sequence form a core structural module, and the second PPIase segment is a satellite domain tethered approximately 30 A from this module. The core module, which is implicated in membrane protein folding, has a novel fold that includes an extended crevice. Crystal contacts show that peptides bind within the crevice, suggesting a model for chaperone activity whereby segments of polypeptide may be repetitively sequestered and released during the membrane protein-folding process.

  1. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  2. INTERAGENCY AGREEMENT FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROJECT FACILITATOR SUPPORT FORM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document provides a Federal interagency agreement template for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including instructions on how to complete the form.

  3. Method for facilitating the introduction of material into cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, David E. (Oak Ridge, TN); McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method for creating a localized disruption within a boundary of a cell or structure by exposing a boundary of a cell or structure to a set of energetically charged particles while regulating the energy of the charged particles so that the charged particles have an amount of kinetic energy sufficient to create a localized disruption within an area of the boundary of the cell or structure, then upon creation of the localized disruption, the amount of kinetic energy decreases to an amount insufficient to create further damage within the cell or structure beyond the boundary. The present invention is also a method for facilitating the introduction of a material into a cell or structure using the same methodology then further exciting the area of the boundary of the cell or structure where the localized disruption was created so to create a localized temporary opening within the boundary then further introducing the material through the temporary opening into the cell or structure.

  4. TEMPORARILY ALLOYING TITANIUM TO FACILITATE FRICTION STIR WELDING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovanski, Yuri

    2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    While historically hydrogen has been considered an impurity in titanium, when used as a temporary alloying agent it promotes beneficial changes to material properties that increase the hot-workability of the metal. This technique known as thermohydrogen processing was used to temporarily alloy hydrogen with commercially pure titanium sheet as a means of facilitating the friction stir welding process. Specific alloying parameters were developed to increase the overall hydrogen content of the titanium sheet ranging from commercially pure to 30 atomic percent. Each sheet was evaluated to determine the effect of the hydrogen content on process loads and tool deformation during the plunge phase of the friction stir welding process. Two materials, H-13 tool steel and pure tungsten, were used to fabricate friction stir welding tools that were plunged into each of the thermohydrogen processed titanium sheets. Tool wear was characterized and variations in machine loads were quantified for each tool material and weld metal combination. Thermohydrogen processing was shown to beneficially lower plunge forces and stabilize machine torques at specific hydrogen concentrations. The resulting effects of hydrogen addition to titanium metal undergoing the friction stir welding process are compared with modifications in titanium properties documented in modern literature. Such comparative analysis is used to explain the variance in resulting process loads as a function of the initial hydrogen concentration of the titanium.

  5. Communication in automation, including networking and wireless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antsaklis, Panos

    Communication in automation, including networking and wireless Nicholas Kottenstette and Panos J and networking in automation is given. Digital communication fundamentals are reviewed and networked control are presented. 1 Introduction 1.1 Why communication is necessary in automated systems Automated systems use

  6. Electrochemical cell including ribbed electrode substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breault, R.D.; Goller, G.J.; Roethlein, R.J.; Sprecher, G.C.

    1981-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical cell including an electrolyte retaining matrix layer located between and in contact with cooperating anode and cathode electrodes is disclosed herein. Each of the electrodes is comprised of a ribbed (or grooved) substrate including a gas porous body as its main component and a catalyst layer located between the substrate and one side of the electrolyte retaining matrix layer. Each substrate body includes a ribbed section for receiving reactant gas and lengthwise side portions on opposite sides of the ribbed section. Each of the side portions includes a channel extending along its entire length from one surface thereof (e.g., its outer surface) to but stopping short of an opposite surface (e.g., its inner surface) so as to provide a web directly between the channel and the opposite surface. Each of the channels is filled with a gas impervious substance and each of the webs is impregnated with a gas impervious substance so as to provide a gas impervious seal along the entire length of each side portion of each substrate and between the opposite faces thereof (e.g., across the entire thickness thereof).

  7. Prices include compostable serviceware and linen tablecloths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    & BLACK BEAN ENCHILADAS Fresh corn tortillas stuffed with tender brown butter sautéed butternut squash, black beans and yellow on- ions, garnished with avocado and sour cream. $33 per person EDAMAME & CORN SQUASH & BLACK BEAN ENCHILADA FREE RANGE CHICK- EN SANDWICH PLATED ENTREES All plated entrees include

  8. Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namboodiri, Vinod

    Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Communication Devices Pavel Somavat1 consumption, questions are being asked about the energy contribution of computing equipment. Al- though studies have documented the share of energy consumption by this type of equipment over the years, research

  9. The Impact of Uncertain Physical Parameters on HVAC Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yannan; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Lu, Shuai; Fuller, Jason C.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HVAC units are currently one of the major resources providing demand response (DR) in residential buildings. Models of HVAC with DR function can improve understanding of its impact on power system operations and facilitate the deployment of DR technologies. This paper investigates the importance of various physical parameters and their distributions to the HVAC response to DR signals, which is a key step to the construction of HVAC models for a population of units with insufficient data. These parameters include the size of floors, insulation efficiency, the amount of solid mass in the house, and efficiency of the HVAC units. These parameters are usually assumed to follow Gaussian or Uniform distributions. We study the effect of uncertainty in the chosen parameter distributions on the aggregate HVAC response to DR signals, during transient phase and in steady state. We use a quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method with linear regression and Prony analysis to evaluate sensitivity of DR output to the uncertainty in the distribution parameters. The significance ranking on the uncertainty sources is given for future guidance in the modeling of HVAC demand response.

  10. Determination Of Ph Including Hemoglobin Correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maynard, John D. (Albuquerque, NM); Hendee, Shonn P. (Albuquerque, NM); Rohrscheib, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Nunez, David (Albuquerque, NM); Alam, M. Kathleen (Cedar Crest, NM); Franke, James E. (Franklin, TN); Kemeny, Gabor J. (Madison, WI)

    2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatuses of determining the pH of a sample. A method can comprise determining an infrared spectrum of the sample, and determining the hemoglobin concentration of the sample. The hemoglobin concentration and the infrared spectrum can then be used to determine the pH of the sample. In some embodiments, the hemoglobin concentration can be used to select an model relating infrared spectra to pH that is applicable at the determined hemoglobin concentration. In other embodiments, a model relating hemoglobin concentration and infrared spectra to pH can be used. An apparatus according to the present invention can comprise an illumination system, adapted to supply radiation to a sample; a collection system, adapted to collect radiation expressed from the sample responsive to the incident radiation; and an analysis system, adapted to relate information about the incident radiation, the expressed radiation, and the hemoglobin concentration of the sample to pH.

  11. Subterranean barriers including at least one weld

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Sloan, Paul A.; Richardson, John G.; Walsh, Stephanie; Kostelnik, Kevin M.

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

  12. Power generation method including membrane separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

  13. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snitchler, Gregory L. (Shrewsbury, MA); Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Voccio, John P. (Somerville, MA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  14. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  15. Facing fear: Expression of fear facilitates processing of emotional information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnall, Simone; Laird, James D.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and frowns of politicians (Ottati et al., 1997) and colors perceived as happy and sad (Soldat & Sinclair, 2001) can have the same effects as moods. Like affective feelings, embodied expressions are repre- sentations of value, that is, of goodness... effects of facial expressions and postures on emotional experience and memory. Cognition and Emotion, 17, 787-797. Soldat, A. S., & Sinclair, R. C. (2001). Colors, smiles, and frowns: External affective cues can directly affect responses...

  16. Multiverse rate equation including bubble collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael P. Salem

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The volume fractions of vacua in an eternally inflating multiverse are described by a coarse-grain rate equation, which accounts for volume expansion and vacuum transitions via bubble formation. We generalize the rate equation to account for bubble collisions, including the possibility of classical transitions. Classical transitions can modify the details of the hierarchical structure among the volume fractions, with potential implications for the staggering and Boltzmann-brain issues. Whether or not our vacuum is likely to have been established by a classical transition depends on the detailed relationships among transition rates in the landscape.

  17. analog fret-pair facilitating: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open learner models, communication, multiple users. 1 Introduction Open learner models (OLM) are learner models that are accessible Bull, Susan 183 Facilitating Consensus,...

  18. BIRC6 promotes hepatocellular carcinogenesis: Interaction of BIRC6 with p53 facilitating p53 degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that BIRC6 could regulate the degradation of p53 rather thanp53 and facilitated its degradation by ubiquitination incantly promoted the degradation of p53 by ubiquitination (

  19. Zero-tension lysimeters: An improved design to monitor colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in the vadose zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, M.L.; Scharf, R.L.; Shang, C.

    1995-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increasing evidence that mobile colloids facilitate the long-distance transport of contaminants. The mobility of fine particles and macromolecules has been linked to the movement of actinides, organic contaminants, and heavy metals through soil. Direct evidence for colloid mobility includes the presence of humic materials in deep aquifers as well as coatings of accumulated clay, organic matter, or sesquioxides on particle or aggregate surfaces in subsoil horizons of many soils. The potential for colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants from hazardous-waste sites requires adequate monitoring before, during, and after in-situ remediation treatments. Zero-tension lysimeters (ZTLs) are especially appropriate for sampling water as it moves through saturated soil, although some unsaturated flow events may be sampled as well. Because no ceramic barrier or fiberglass wick is involved to maintain tension on the water (as is the case with other lysimeters), particles suspended in the water as well as dissolved species may be sampled with ZTLs. In this report, a ZTL design is proposed that is more suitable for monitoring colloid-facilitated contaminant migration. The improved design consists of a cylinder made of polycarbonate or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) that is placed below undisturbed soil material. In many soils, a hydraulically powered tube may be used to extract an undisturbed core of soil before placement of the lysimeter. In those cases, the design has significant advantages over conventional designs with respect to simplicity and speed of installation. Therefore, it will allow colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants to be monitored at more locations at a given site.

  20. LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; Fred Zhang; Glendon W. Gee; Earl D. Mattson; Peter C. L

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of this project was to improve the fundamental mechanistic understanding and quantification of long-term colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone, with special emphasis on the semi-arid Hanford site. While we focused some of the experiments on hydrogeological and geochemical conditions of the Hanford site, many of our results apply to colloid and colloid-facilitated transport in general. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the mechanisms of colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in undisturbed Hanford sediments under unsaturated flow, (2) to quantify in situ colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclidetransport from Hanford sediments under field conditions, and (3) to develop a field-scale conceptual and numerical model for colloid mobilization and transport at the Hanford vadose zone, and use that model to predict long-term colloid and colloid- facilitated radionuclide transport. To achieve these goals and objectives, we have used a combination of experimental, theoretical, and numerical methods at different spatial scales, ranging from microscopic investigationsof single particle attachment and detachment to larger-scale field experiments using outdoor lysimeters at the Hanford site. Microscopic and single particle investigations provided fundamental insight into mechanisms of colloid interactions with the air-water interface. We could show that a moving air water interface (such as a moving water front during infiltration and drainage) is very effective in removing and mobilizing particles from a stationary surface. We further demonstrated that it is particularly the advancing air-water interface which is mainly responsible for colloid mobilization. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborated our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface movement were stronger than during the receding movement. Theory indicates that, for hydrophilic colloids, the advancing interface movement generally exerts a stronger detachment force than the receding, except when the hysteresis of the colloid-air-water contact angle is small. These results of our study are particularly relevant for colloid mobilization and transport related to three process in the vadose zone at Hanford: (1) water infiltration into sediments during rainfall or snowmelt events, (2) groundwater fluctuations as caused by river stage fluctuations, and (3) steady-state, low-flow recharge in deep vadose zone sediments. Transient water flow, like during infiltration or groundwater level fluctuations, are most conducive for colloid mobilization, but even during steady-state, low-flow recharge, colloids can be mobile, although to a much lesser extent. The results of this project have led to a comprehensive and fundamental understanding of colloid transport and mobilization under unsaturated flow conditions at the Hanford site.

  1. Argument structure hierarchy system and method for facilitating analysis and decision-making processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janssen, Terry (9840 Faust Dr., Vienna, VA 22182)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for facilitating decision-making comprising a computer program causing linkage of data representing a plurality of argument structure units into a hierarchical argument structure. Each argument structure unit comprises data corresponding to a hypothesis and its corresponding counter-hypothesis, data corresponding to grounds that provide a basis for inference of the hypothesis or its corresponding counter-hypothesis, data corresponding to a warrant linking the grounds to the hypothesis or its corresponding counter-hypothesis, and data corresponding to backing that certifies the warrant. The hierarchical argument structure comprises a top level argument structure unit and a plurality of subordinate level argument structure units. Each of the plurality of subordinate argument structure units comprises at least a portion of the grounds of the argument structure unit to which it is subordinate. Program code located on each of a plurality of remote computers accepts input from one of a plurality of contributors. Each input comprises data corresponding to an argument structure unit in the hierarchical argument structure and supports the hypothesis or its corresponding counter-hypothesis. A second programming code is adapted to combine the inputs into a single hierarchical argument structure. A third computer program code is responsive to the second computer program code and is adapted to represent a degree of support for the hypothesis and its corresponding counter-hypothesis in the single hierarchical argument structure.

  2. Broadening Industry Governance to Include Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hund, Gretchen; Seward, Amy M.

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    As industry is the first line of defense in detecting and thwarting illicit trade networks, the engagement of the private sector is critical to any government effort to strengthen existing mechanisms to protect goods and services throughout the supply chain. This study builds on previous PNNL work to continue to evaluate means for greater industry engagement to complement and strengthen existing governmental efforts to detect and stem the trade of illicit goods and to protect and secure goods that could be used in making a weapon of mass destruction. Specifically, the study evaluates the concept of Industry Self Regulation, defined as a systematic voluntary program undertaken by an industry or by individual companies to anticipate, implement, supplement, or substitute for regulatory requirements in a given field, generally through the adoption of best practices. Through a series of interviews with companies with a past history of non-compliance, trade associations and NGOs, the authors identify gaps in the existing regulatory infrastructure, drivers for a self regulation approach and the form such an approach might take, as well as obstacles to be overcome. The authors conclude that it is at the intersection of industry, government, and security that—through collaborative means—the effectiveness of the international nonproliferation system—can be most effectively strengthened to the mutual benefit of both government and the private sector. Industry has a critical stake in the success of this regime, and has the potential to act as an integrating force that brings together the existing mechanisms of the global nonproliferation regime: export controls, physical protection, and safeguards. The authors conclude that industry compliance is not enough; rather, nonproliferation must become a central tenant of a company’s corporate culture and be viewed as an integral component of corporate social responsibility (CSR).

  3. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSanto, Leonard (Dunkirk, MD); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  4. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  5. Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

  6. Engine lubrication circuit including two pumps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lane, William H.

    2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A lubrication pump coupled to the engine is sized such that the it can supply the engine with a predetermined flow volume as soon as the engine reaches a peak torque engine speed. In engines that operate predominately at speeds above the peak torque engine speed, the lubrication pump is often producing lubrication fluid in excess of the predetermined flow volume that is bypassed back to a lubrication fluid source. This arguably results in wasted power. In order to more efficiently lubricate an engine, a lubrication circuit includes a lubrication pump and a variable delivery pump. The lubrication pump is operably coupled to the engine, and the variable delivery pump is in communication with a pump output controller that is operable to vary a lubrication fluid output from the variable delivery pump as a function of at least one of engine speed and lubrication flow volume or system pressure. Thus, the lubrication pump can be sized to produce the predetermined flow volume at a speed range at which the engine predominately operates while the variable delivery pump can supplement lubrication fluid delivery from the lubrication pump at engine speeds below the predominant engine speed range.

  7. Models of Procyon A including seismic constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Eggenberger; F. Carrier; F. Bouchy

    2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed models of Procyon A based on new asteroseismic measurements by Eggenberger et al (2004) have been computed using the Geneva evolution code including shellular rotation and atomic diffusion. By combining all non-asteroseismic observables now available for Procyon A with these seismological data, we find that the observed mean large spacing of 55.5 +- 0.5 uHz favours a mass of 1.497 M_sol for Procyon A. We also determine the following global parameters of Procyon A: an age of t=1.72 +- 0.30 Gyr, an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.290 +- 0.010, a nearly solar initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0234 +- 0.0015 and a mixing-length parameter alpha=1.75 +- 0.40. Moreover, we show that the effects of rotation on the inner structure of the star may be revealed by asteroseismic observations if frequencies can be determined with a high precision. Existing seismological data of Procyon A are unfortunately not accurate enough to really test these differences in the input physics of our models.

  8. Boronic Acids Facilitate the Transport of Ribonucleosides through Lipid PAMELA R. WESTMARK AND BRADLEY D. SMITHX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Bradley D.

    Boronic Acids Facilitate the Transport of Ribonucleosides through Lipid Bilayers PAMELA R. WESTMARK for publication November 14, 1995X. Abstract 0 Boronic acids were found to facilitate the transport of various and influx experiments with mixtures of nucleosides and sucrose showed virtually complete transport

  9. BiP Clustering Facilitates Protein Folding in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petzold, Linda R.

    BiP Clustering Facilitates Protein Folding in the Endoplasmic Reticulum Marc Griesemer1. *, Carissa (ER): translocation, protein folding, and ER-associated degradation. To facilitate protein folding may enhance protein folding and maturation. Scenarios were simulated to gauge the effectiveness

  10. USING CORIOLIS FORCE TO FACILITATE MOLECULAR TRANSPORTATION AND FLUID MIXING IN CD MICROFLUIDICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassegne, Samuel Kinde

    e. USING CORIOLIS FORCE TO FACILITATE MOLECULAR TRANSPORTATION AND FLUID MIXING IN CD MICROFLUIDICS Coriolis Force to Facilitate Molecular Transportation and Fluid Mixing in CD Microfluidics Platform and Fluid mixing in compact disk (CD) microfluidic platform where centrifugal force is used as the driving

  11. Process Control Minitoring by Stress Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, Terry C.; Stahl, David A.

    2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental contamination with a variety of pollutants hasprompted the development of effective bioremediation strategies. But howcan these processes be best monitored and controlled? One avenue underinvestigation is the development of stress response systems as tools foreffective and general process control. Although the microbial stressresponse has been the subject of intensive laboratory investigation, theenvironmental reflection of the laboratory response to specific stresseshas been little explored. However, it is only within an environmentalcontext, in which microorganisms are constantly exposed to multiplechanging environmental stresses, that there will be full understanding ofmicrobial adaptive resiliency. Knowledge of the stress response in theenvironment will facilitate the control of bioremediation and otherprocesses mediated by complex microbial communities.

  12. Calculation of rotordynamic unbalance response including torque and cross-coupled stiffness and damping effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleespies, Henry Sattoli

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    matrix shown on Figure 4. 1 Ai 1' K?+D 1 ECC Y K Yx a AB &dCY . . . . . B Yx Vy yy 'I C y &S'&. = Lup]{S&. = -&dC Y 1 Ai 1 KY+D 1 -mCY Yx -C C N C It C y 'xY tdC -AB 1 Ai 1 Kx+D 1 Cx ey y y y xY AB K -IdC x Ai 1 K...=vK+C2u X X X X 8 2 2 2 Fy Vy Ky Cy (Z. 28) 27 F ~ (Kxvx +K?yvy ) cos mt - (K v +K v ) sin mt X X XT T - w(C v +C v ) cos wt - m(C v +C v ) sTn wt X X XT T (2. 29) y ( yvy KTx x ) cos mt (Kyvy +KT v ) sin mt - w(Cyvy +C xvx ) cos mt - m(Cyvy +C...

  13. Operational Impacts of Responsive Electricity Loads: A Modeling Framework Including Policy Implications for Cyprus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruchon, Matthew Bremer

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to meet EU mandates, the island nation of Cyprus must raise penetration of renewable energy from roughly 5% in 2013 to 16% in 2020. This means Cyprus will need economical ways of balancing intermittency, a special ...

  14. Protoplanetary disks including radiative feedback from accreting planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montesinos, Matias; Perez, Sebastian; Baruteau, Clement; Casassus, Simon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While recent observational progress is converging on the detection of compact regions of thermal emission due to embedded protoplanets, further theoretical predictions are needed to understand the response of a protoplanetary disk to the planet formation radiative feedback. This is particularly important to make predictions for the observability of circumplanetary regions. In this work we use 2D hydrodynamical simulations to examine the evolution of a viscous protoplanetary disk in which a luminous Jupiter-mass planet is embedded. We use an energy equation which includes the radiative heating of the planet as an additional mechanism for planet formation feedback. Several models are computed for planet luminosities ranging from $10^{-5}$ to $10^{-3}$ Solar luminosities. We find that the planet radiative feedback enhances the disk's accretion rate at the planet's orbital radius, producing a hotter and more luminous environement around the planet, independently of the prescription used to model the disk's turbul...

  15. Toward a Data Scalable Solution for Facilitating Discovery of Science Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Jesse R.; Castellana, Vito G.; Morari, Alessandro; Tumeo, Antonino; Purohit, Sumit; Chappell, Alan R.; Haglin, David J.; Villa, Oreste; Choudhury, Sutanay; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Feo, John T.

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Science is increasingly motivated by the need to process larger quantities of data. It is facing severe challenges in data collection, management, and processing, so much so that the computational demands of “data scaling” are competing with, and in many fields surpassing, the traditional objective of decreasing processing time. Example domains with large datasets include astronomy, biology, genomics, climate/weather, and material sciences. This paper presents a real-world use case in which we wish to answer queries pro- vided by domain scientists in order to facilitate discovery of relevant science resources. The problem is that the metadata for these science resources is very large and is growing quickly, rapidly increasing the need for a data scaling solution. We propose a system – SGEM – designed for answering graph-based queries over large datasets on cluster architectures, and we re- port performance results for queries on the current RDESC dataset of nearly 1.4 billion triples, and on the well-known BSBM SPARQL query benchmark.

  16. A DISTRIBUTED INTELLIGENT AUTOMATED DEMAND RESPONSE BUILDING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auslander, David; Culler, David; Wright, Paul; Lu, Yan; Piette, Mary

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the 2.5 year Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) project was to reduce peak electricity load of Sutardja Dai Hall at UC Berkeley by 30% while maintaining a healthy, comfortable, and productive environment for the occupants. We sought to bring together both central and distributed control to provide “deep” demand response1 at the appliance level of the building as well as typical lighting and HVAC applications. This project brought together Siemens Corporate Research and Siemens Building Technology (the building has a Siemens Apogee Building Automation System (BAS)), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (leveraging their Open Automated Demand Response (openADR), Auto-­Demand Response, and building modeling expertise), and UC Berkeley (related demand response research including distributed wireless control, and grid-­to-­building gateway development). Sutardja Dai Hall houses the Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS), which fosters collaboration among industry and faculty and students of four UC campuses (Berkeley, Davis, Merced, and Santa Cruz). The 141,000 square foot building, occupied in 2009, includes typical office spaces and a nanofabrication laboratory. Heating is provided by a district heating system (steam from campus as a byproduct of the campus cogeneration plant); cooling is provided by one of two chillers: a more typical electric centrifugal compressor chiller designed for the cool months (Nov-­ March) and a steam absorption chiller for use in the warm months (April-­October). Lighting in the open office areas is provided by direct-­indirect luminaries with Building Management System-­based scheduling for open areas, and occupancy sensors for private office areas. For the purposes of this project, we focused on the office portion of the building. Annual energy consumption is approximately 8053 MWh; the office portion is estimated as 1924 MWh. The maximum peak load during the study period was 1175 kW. Several new tools facilitated this work, such as the Smart Energy Box, the distributed load controller or Energy Information Gateway, the web-­based DR controller (dubbed the Central Load-­Shed Coordinator or CLSC), and the Demand Response Capacity Assessment & Operation Assistance Tool (DRCAOT). In addition, an innovative data aggregator called sMAP (simple Measurement and Actuation Profile) allowed data from different sources collected in a compact form and facilitated detailed analysis of the building systems operation. A smart phone application (RAP or Rapid Audit Protocol) facilitated an inventory of the building’s plug loads. Carbon dioxide sensors located in conference rooms and classrooms allowed demand controlled ventilation. The extensive submetering and nimble access to this data provided great insight into the details of the building operation as well as quick diagnostics and analyses of tests. For example, students discovered a short-­cycling chiller, a stuck damper, and a leaking cooling coil in the first field tests. For our final field tests, we were able to see how each zone was affected by the DR strategies (e.g., the offices on the 7th floor grew very warm quickly) and fine-­tune the strategies accordingly.

  17. Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ORAU's Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

  18. Expanded breadth of the T-cell response to mosaic HIV-1 envelope DNA vaccination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fischer, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wallstrom, Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An effective AIDS vaccine must control highly diverse circulating strains of HIV-1. Among HIV -I gene products, the envelope (Env) protein contains variable as well as conserved regions. In this report, an informatic approach to the design of T-cell vaccines directed to HIV -I Env M group global sequences was tested. Synthetic Env antigens were designed to express mosaics that maximize the inclusion of common potential Tcell epitope (PTE) 9-mers and minimize the inclusion of rare epitopes likely to elicit strain-specific responses. DNA vaccines were evaluated using intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in inbred mice with a standardized panel of highly conserved 15-mer PTE peptides. I, 2 and 3 mosaic sets were developed that increased theoretical epitope coverage. The breadth and magnitude ofT-cell immunity stimulated by these vaccines were compared to natural strain Env's; additional comparisons were performed on mutant Env's, including gpl60 or gpl45 with or without V regions and gp41 deletions. Among them, the 2 or 3 mosaic Env sets elicited the optimal CD4 and CD8 responses. These responses were most evident in CD8 T cells; the 3 mosaic set elicited responses to an average of 8 peptide pools compared to 2 pools for a set of3 natural Env's. Synthetic mosaic HIV -I antigens can therefore induce T-cell responses with expanded breadth and may facilitate the development of effective T -cell-based HIV -1 vaccines.

  19. The Dangerous Policy of Weakening Security to Facilitate Surveillance Jon M. Peha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peha, Jon M.

    The Dangerous Policy of Weakening Security to Facilitate Surveillance Jon M. Peha peha@cmu.edu, www. If the security features of these widely available products and services are weak, everyone is in greater danger

  20. Design for an invertible water bottle to facilitate cleaning and promote sustainable water bottle usage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metlitz, Matthew S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis is to explore the design of a reusable water bottle that can be inverted to expose the inside. Being able to directly touch the entire inside of the product could facilitate cleaning and consequently ...

  1. MaGKeyS : a haptic guidance keyboard system for facilitating sensorimotor training and rehabilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewiston, Craig Edwin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Magnetic Guidance Keyboard System (MaGKeyS) embodies a new haptic guidance technology designed to facilitate sensorimotor training and rehabilitation. MaGKeyS works by employing active magnetic force to guide finger ...

  2. Using an electronic lab notebook to facilitate Research Data Management at the University of Edinburgh 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard, Nigel

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines how adoption of an electronic lab notebook can facilitate a research data management programme, using the design and integration of the RSpace electronic lab notebook at the University of Edinburgh ...

  3. A Bayesian statistical analysis of behavioral facilitation associated with deep brain stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Anne C.

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for Parkinson's Disease and is being investigated as a treatment for chronic depression, obsessive compulsive disorder and for facilitating functional recovery of ...

  4. Facilitating conceptual change through instructional strategies: an experimental study using the Karplus Learning Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollard, Rebecca Janet

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Facilitating Conceptual Change Through Instructional Strategies: An Experimental Study Using the Karplus Learning Cycle A Thesis by REBECCA JANET POLLARD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... by REBECCA JANET POLLARD Approved as to style and content by: Carol L Stuessy (Chair of Committee) Stephanie L. Kmg t (Member) William H. Peters (Department Head) Donald Barker (Member) August 1990 ABSTRACT Facilitating Conceptual Change Through...

  5. Colloid Facilitated Transport of Radioactive Cations in the Vadose Zone: Field Experiments Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Saiers

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overarching goal of this study was to improve understanding of colloid-facilitated transport of radioactive cations through unsaturated soils and sediments. We conducted a suite of laboratory experiments and field experiments on the vadose-zone transport of colloids, organic matter, and associated contaminants of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The laboratory and field experiments, together with transport modeling, were designed to accomplish the following detailed objectives: 1. Evaluation of the relative importance of inorganic colloids and organic matter to the facilitation of radioactive cation transport in the vadose zone; 2. Assessment of the role of adsorption and desorption kinetics in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 3. Examination of the effects of rainfall and infiltration dynamics and in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations through the vadose zone; 4. Exploration of the role of soil heterogeneity and preferential flow paths (e.g., macropores) on the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 5. Development of a mathematical model of facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone that accurately incorporates pore-scale and column-scale processes with the practicality of predicting transport with readily available parameters.

  6. Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HCTT-CHE

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster—readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that—help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners' (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. While the purpose of the CAT is to further prepare the community for an influenza pandemic, its framework is an extension of the traditional all-hazards approach to planning and preparedness. As such, the information gathered by the tool is useful in preparation for most widespread public health emergencies. This tool is primarily intended for use by those involved in healthcare emergency preparedness (e.g., community planners, community disaster preparedness coordinators, 9-1-1 directors, hospital emergency preparedness coordinators). It is divided into sections based on the core agency partners, which may be involved in the community's influenza pandemic influenza response.

  7. Structural building response review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The integrity of a nuclear power plant during a postulated seismic event is required to protect the public against radiation. Therefore, a detailed set of seismic analyses of various structures and equipment is performed while designing a nuclear power plant. This report describes the structural response analysis method, including the structural model, soil-structure interaction as it relates to structural models, methods for seismic structural analysis, numerical integration methods, methods for non-seismic response analysis approaches for various response combinations, structural damping values, nonlinear response, uncertainties in structural properties, and structural response analysis using random properties. The report describes the state-of-the-art in these areas for nuclear power plants. It also details the past studies made at Sargent and Lundy to evaluate different alternatives and the conclusions reached for the specific purposes that those studies were intended. These results were incorporated here because they fall into the general scope of this report. The scope of the present task does not include performing new calculations.

  8. Interim performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeBlasio, R.; Forman, S.; Hogan, S.; Nuss, G.; Post, H.; Ross, R.; Schafft, H.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a response to the Photovoltaic Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-590) which required the generation of performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. Since the document is evolutionary and will be updated, the term interim is used. More than 50 experts in the photovoltaic field have contributed in the writing and review of the 179 performance criteria listed in this document. The performance criteria address characteristics of present-day photovoltaic systems that are of interest to manufacturers, government agencies, purchasers, and all others interested in various aspects of photovoltaic system performance and safety. The performance criteria apply to the system as a whole and to its possible subsystems: array, power conditioning, monitor and control, storage, cabling, and power distribution. They are further categorized according to the following performance attributes: electrical, thermal, mechanical/structural, safety, durability/reliability, installation/operation/maintenance, and building/site. Each criterion contains a statement of expected performance (nonprescriptive), a method of evaluation, and a commentary with further information or justification. Over 50 references for background information are also given. A glossary with definitions relevant to photovoltaic systems and a section on test methods are presented in the appendices. Twenty test methods are included to measure performance characteristics of the subsystem elements. These test methods and other parts of the document will be expanded or revised as future experience and needs dictate.

  9. Roles and Responsibilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    discussions b. Facilitated discussions c. Mediation 7. Where specific organizational structures, requirements of a collateral duty Ombudsman, or other contractual agreements...

  10. [Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    penetration of distribution Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition systems (SCADA) and demand response into today's grid. The current utilization rate of assets within a...

  11. Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos A consortium led by the University of Michigan that includes LANL as...

  12. A Roadmap to Success: Hiring, Retaining, and Including People...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A Roadmap to Success: Hiring, Retaining, and Including People with Disabilities A Roadmap to Success: Hiring, Retaining, and Including People with Disabilities December 5, 2014...

  13. Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts Document describes...

  14. Investigations into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory Analyses. Investigations into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry Adapted...

  15. Response Elements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide provides acceptable methods for meeting the requirement of DOE O 151.1C for response elements that respond or contribute to response as needed in an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-5, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-6.

  16. Microfluidic System for Facilitated Quantification of Nanoparticle Accumulation to Cells Under Laminar Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Scott I.

    Microfluidic System for Facilitated Quantification of Nanoparticle Accumulation to Cells Under to endothelial receptors has led to the rapid devel- opment of targeted nanoparticles for drug, gene and imaging nanoparticle accumulation under phys- iologically-relevant laminar flow. We designed reversibly vacuum

  17. Self-assembly of resins and asphaltenes facilitates asphaltene dissolution by an organic acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Self-assembly of resins and asphaltenes facilitates asphaltene dissolution by an organic acid Sara Accepted 28 November 2012 Available online 28 December 2012 Keywords: Asphaltenes Self-assembly Colloidal stability Non-polar electrostatics a b s t r a c t Asphaltene precipitation occurs in petroleum fluids under

  18. Use of Physical Models to Facilitate Transfer of Physics Learning to Understand Positron Emission Tomography*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zollman, Dean

    interactive learning with the aid of physical models. Three different types of non-scaffolded transfer haveUse of Physical Models to Facilitate Transfer of Physics Learning to Understand Positron Emission, positron emission tomography, transfer of learning PACS: 01.40Fk Supported by the National Science

  19. Brazil Should Facilitate Research Brazil is home to more species of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letters Brazil Should Facilitate Research Permits Brazil is home to more species of plants 2009). Given Brazil's expanding in- vestments in meat and ethanol pro- duction and industrial in Brazil is particularly prob- lematic. To further assess this prob- lem, we launched a survey among

  20. Three Cell Wall Mannoproteins Facilitate the Uptake of Iron in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botstein, David

    for publication, September 24, 2001, and in revised form, October 19, 2001 Published, JBC Papers in Press, October-dependent transcrip- tion factor in yeast. FIT1, FIT2, and FIT3 (for facilitator of iron transport) were more highly active allele of AFT1, was expressed. Northern blot analysis confirmed that FIT1, FIT2, and FIT3 m

  1. Katz et al. 2009 Fish induced sediment focusing Sediment resuspension by groundfish facilitates the transport and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yahel, Gitai

    Katz et al. 2009 Fish induced sediment focusing 1| P a g e Sediment resuspension by groundfish focusing Key words: sediment resuspension, sediment transport, fish, Saanich Inlet #12;Katz et al. 2009 to the base of the fish distribution zone. This resuspension by fish facilitates the transport of large

  2. Solar mechanics thermal response capabilities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobranich, Dean D.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many applications, the thermal response of structures exposed to solar heat loads is of interest. Solar mechanics governing equations were developed and integrated with the Calore thermal response code via user subroutines to provide this computational simulation capability. Solar heat loads are estimated based on the latitude and day of the year. Vector algebra is used to determine the solar loading on each face of a finite element model based on its orientation relative to the sun as the earth rotates. Atmospheric attenuation is accounted for as the optical path length varies from sunrise to sunset. Both direct and diffuse components of solar flux are calculated. In addition, shadowing of structures by other structures can be accounted for. User subroutines were also developed to provide convective and radiative boundary conditions for the diurnal variations in air temperature and effective sky temperature. These temperature boundary conditions are based on available local weather data and depend on latitude and day of the year, consistent with the solar mechanics formulation. These user subroutines, coupled with the Calore three-dimensional thermal response code, provide a complete package for addressing complex thermal problems involving solar heating. The governing equations are documented in sufficient detail to facilitate implementation into other heat transfer codes. Suggestions for improvements to the approach are offered.

  3. The DNA Single-Strand Break Repair Machinery Facilitates CAF-1-Mediated Histone Deposition at Oxidative DNA Strand Breaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arman Nabatiyan; Zhihong Zeng; Keith W. Caldecott

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxidative DNA single strand breaks arise continuously in cells and defects in their repair have been implicated in neurological disease. While much progress has been made in understanding how chromosomal single strand breaks are repaired little is known about the changes chromatin structure that accompany this process. Here, we show that nascent recombinant histone H3.1 protein accumulates and is deposited into chromatin at sites of DNA strand breakage in quiescent human cells following oxidative stress, and that core components of the single-strand break repair machinery are required for this process. We show that the SSBR sensor and scaffold proteins poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and XRCC1 facilitate accumulation of chromatin assembly factor-1 (CAF-1) at sites of oxidative DNA strand breakage, which in turn mediates the deposition of Histone H3.1. We also demonstrate that depletion of CAF-1 slows global rates of DNA strand break repair in quiescent cells following oxidative stress, demonstrating that single-strand break repair and histone deposition are tightly coordinated processes. These data describe a novel role for the DNA singlestrand break repair machinery and implicate histone turnover as a core component of the cellular response of quiescent cells to oxidative damage.

  4. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

  5. Responsible recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugh, A. (Britannia Refined Metals, Northfleet (United Kingdom))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The issues that affect the recycling of lead-acid batteries and the challenges that this issue brings to both the lead industry and to the battery manufacturers are covered. Topics include the lead market (its size and structure), the economic constraints on the recycling system, recycling rates for batteries, the technology of recycling, and future considerations.

  6. Demand Response Programs, 6. edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

  7. acid analysis including: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nairn, John A. 12 A bottom-up analysis of including aviation within theEU's Emissions Trading Scheme Geosciences Websites Summary: A bottom-up analysis of including aviation...

  8. analysis including quantification: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ausloos 2004-12-31 29 A bottom-up analysis of including aviation within theEU's Emissions Trading Scheme Geosciences Websites Summary: A bottom-up analysis of including aviation...

  9. Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    v3102014 Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include Kit Cost PURCHASED by INVESTIGATOR/1/2013 Page 1 of 5 #12;Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include Kit Cost PURCHASED by INVESTIGATOR

  10. Example Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work to Include Services...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work to Include Services as Part of an ESPC Investment-Grade Audit Example Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work to Include Services as Part of an ESPC...

  11. Transportation R and D included in thermal and mechanical sciences program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory is a multiprogram research and development laboratory operated by The University of Chicago for the US Department of Energy. At Argonne, applied research in thermal and mechanical sciences is performed within the Thermal and Mechanical Sciences Section of the Energy Technology Division. Current program areas include compact evaporators and condensers for the process and transportation industries, ice slurries for district cooling, advanced fluids for improved heat transfer and reduced pressure drop, flow-induced vibration and flow distribution in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, and dynamics and control of maglev systems. In general, the objective of the research is to extend the technology base in each of these areas and to facilitate its application in solving problems of importance to US industries and utilities. This is accomplished by developing validated design correlations and predictive methods. The staff of the Thermal and Mechanical Sciences Section have extensive experimental and analytical experience in heat transfer, multiphase flow, structural dynamics and control, fluid-structure interaction, transient flow and mixing, thermally driven flows, and flow visualization using ultra-high-speed video. Large, general-purpose test facilities and smaller, single-purpose test apparatuses are available for experiments and component design evaluation. A world-class capability in the study of flow-induced vibrations exists within the Section. Individual fact sheets, describing currently active research program areas, related facilities, and listing, as a contact, the principal investigator, are included.

  12. Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale...

  13. Laboratory Curiosity rover ChemCam team, including Los Alamos...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MEXICO, August 23, 2012-Members of the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover ChemCam team, including Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists, squeezed in a little extra target...

  14. PLOT: A UNIX PROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis, Pavel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simple, easy-to-read graphics language designed specificallyPROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS Pavel Curtismeanings as in the GRAFPAC graphics system. Definl. ~ tions

  15. analysis including plasma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assembly 2010 Space Plasmas in the Solar System, including Planetary Magnetospheres (D) Solar Variability, Cosmic Rays and Climate (D21) GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY AT HIGH-LATITUDE:...

  16. Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy has expanded its gas gouging reporting system to include a toll-free telephone...

  17. arch dams including: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: insight into the gamut of shallow water waves, including kinematic, diffusion, dynamic, and gravity wavesDam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using...

  18. Detailed Modeling and Response of Demand Response Enabled Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vyakaranam, Bharat; Fuller, Jason C.

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper modeling of end use loads is very important in order to predict their behavior, and how they interact with the power system, including voltage and temperature dependencies, power system and load control functions, and the complex interactions that occur between devices in such an interconnected system. This paper develops multi-state time variant residential appliance models with demand response enabled capabilities in the GridLAB-DTM simulation environment. These models represent not only the baseline instantaneous power demand and energy consumption, but the control systems developed by GE Appliances to enable response to demand response signals and the change in behavior of the appliance in response to the signal. These DR enabled appliances are simulated to estimate their capability to reduce peak demand and energy consumption.

  19. Markets to Facilitate Wind and Solar Energy Integration in the Bulk Power Supply: An IEA Task 25 Collaboration; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Holttinen, H.; Soder, L.; Clark, C.; Pineda, I.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind and solar power will give rise to challenges in electricity markets regarding flexibility, capacity adequacy, and the participation of wind and solar generators to markets. Large amounts of wind power will have impacts on bulk power system markets and electricity prices. If the markets respond to increased wind power by increasing investments in low-capital, high-cost or marginal-cost power, the average price may remain in the same range. However, experiences so far from Denmark, Germany, Spain, and Ireland are such that the average market prices have decreased because of wind power. This reduction may result in additional revenue insufficiency, which may be corrected with a capacity market, yet capacity markets are difficult to design. However, the flexibility attributes of the capacity also need to be considered. Markets facilitating wind and solar integration will include possibilities for trading close to delivery (either by shorter gate closure times or intraday markets). Time steps chosen for markets can enable more flexibility to be assessed. Experience from 5- and 10-minute markets has been encouraging.

  20. Articles which include chevron film cooling holes, and related processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunker, Ronald Scott; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An article is described, including an inner surface which can be exposed to a first fluid; an inlet; and an outer surface spaced from the inner surface, which can be exposed to a hotter second fluid. The article further includes at least one row or other pattern of passage holes. Each passage hole includes an inlet bore extending through the substrate from the inlet at the inner surface to a passage hole-exit proximate to the outer surface, with the inlet bore terminating in a chevron outlet adjacent the hole-exit. The chevron outlet includes a pair of wing troughs having a common surface region between them. The common surface region includes a valley which is adjacent the hole-exit; and a plateau adjacent the valley. The article can be an airfoil. Related methods for preparing the passage holes are also described.

  1. Automated Price and Demand Response Demonstration for Large Customers in New York City using OpenADR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Joyce Jihyun; Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR), an XML-based information exchange model, is used to facilitate continuous price-responsive operation and demand response participation for large commercial buildings in New York who are subject to the default day-ahead hourly pricing. We summarize the existing demand response programs in New York and discuss OpenADR communication, prioritization of demand response signals, and control methods. Building energy simulation models are developed and field tests are conducted to evaluate continuous energy management and demand response capabilities of two commercial buildings in New York City. Preliminary results reveal that providing machine-readable prices to commercial buildings can facilitate both demand response participation and continuous energy cost savings. Hence, efforts should be made to develop more sophisticated algorithms for building control systems to minimize customer's utility bill based on price and reliability information from the electricity grid.

  2. Turbomachine injection nozzle including a coolant delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An injection nozzle for a turbomachine includes a main body having a first end portion that extends to a second end portion defining an exterior wall having an outer surface. A plurality of fluid delivery tubes extend through the main body. Each of the plurality of fluid delivery tubes includes a first fluid inlet for receiving a first fluid, a second fluid inlet for receiving a second fluid and an outlet. The injection nozzle further includes a coolant delivery system arranged within the main body. The coolant delivery system guides a coolant along at least one of a portion of the exterior wall and around the plurality of fluid delivery tubes.

  3. VESPA: Software to Facilitate Genomic Annotation of Prokaryotic Organisms Through Integration of Proteomic and Transcriptomic Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Elena S.; McCue, Lee Ann; Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Walker, Julia; Kobold, Mark A.; Webb, Samantha R.; Payne, Samuel H.; Ansong, Charles; Adkins, Joshua N.; Cannon, William R.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Visual Exploration and Statistics to Promote Annotation (VESPA) is an interactive visual analysis software tool that facilitates the discovery of structural mis-annotations in prokaryotic genomes. VESPA integrates high-throughput peptide-centric proteomics data and oligo-centric or RNA-Seq transcriptomics data into a genomic context. The data may be interrogated via visual analysis across multiple levels of genomic resolution, linked searches, exports and interaction with BLAST to rapidly identify location of interest within the genome and evaluate potential mis-annotations.

  4. Lessons learned from facilitating the state and tribal government working group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurstedt, H.A. Jr.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thirteen lessons learned from my experience in facilitating the State and Tribal Government Working Group for the U.S. Department of Energy have been identified. The conceptual base for supporting the veracity of each lesson has been developed and the lessons are believed to be transferable to any stakeholder group. The crux of stakeholder group success if the two-directional, two-mode empowerment required in this case. Most of the lessons learned deal with the scope of that empowerment. A few of the lessons learned deal with the operations of the group.

  5. [Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surges; the extra cost of these premium features can be included in the electric service contract. The Smart Grid will mitigate PQ events that originate in the transmission and...

  6. Including costs of supply chain risk in strategic sourcing decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Avani

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost evaluations do not always include the costs associated with risks when organizations make strategic sourcing decisions. This research was conducted to establish and quantify the impact of risks and risk-related costs ...

  7. Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Palensky, Peter; McParland, Charles

    2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of the Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification, also known as OpenADR or Open Auto-DR, began in 2002 following the California electricity crisis. The work has been carried out by the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC), which is managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This specification describes an open standards-based communications data model designed to facilitate sending and receiving demand response price and reliability signals from a utility or Independent System Operator to electric customers. OpenADR is one element of the Smart Grid information and communications technologies that are being developed to improve optimization between electric supply and demand. The intention of the open automated demand response communications data model is to provide interoperable signals to building and industrial control systems that are preprogrammed to take action based on a demand response signal, enabling a demand response event to be fully automated, with no manual intervention. The OpenADR specification is a flexible infrastructure to facilitate common information exchange between the utility or Independent System Operator and end-use participants. The concept of an open specification is intended to allow anyone to implement the signaling systems, the automation server or the automation clients.

  8. Emergency response determinants confirm situation status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, T.K.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since introducing the Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) standard in December 1986, OSHA has received hundreds of letters requesting clarification of emergency response.'' To facilitate more efficient access to policy interpretations, the agency's Directorate of Compliance Programs has created interpretive quips (IQs), which are abstracted from OSHA letters and memoranda, and, therefore, represent agency policy. IQ language can be incorporated into new letters of interpretation or provided as technical guidance during telephone inquiries. However, IQs are no substitute for provisions of the 1970 OSHAct. To maintain consistency, OSHA prepares a compliance guidance document (CPL) on particular standards. The agency usually prepares CPLs for performance-oriented standards, such as hazard communication, lockout/tagout, confined space entry and, of course, HAZWOPER. CPLs are detailed documents delineating how OSHA determines whether a company is in compliance with the provisions of a particular standard. The agency has developed several CPLs but only recently has created IQs.

  9. Exploiting the Use of Social Networking to Facilitate Collaboration in the Scientific Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coppock, Edrick G. [Information International Associates, Inc.

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to exploit social networking to facilitate scientific collaboration. The project objective was to research and identify scientific collaboration styles that are best served by social networking applications and to model the most effective social networking applications to substantiate how social networking can support scientific collaboration. To achieve this goal and objective, the project was to develop an understanding of the types of collaborations conducted by scientific researchers, through classification, data analysis and identification of unique collaboration requirements. Another technical objective in support of this goal was to understand the current state of technology in collaboration tools. In order to test hypotheses about which social networking applications effectively support scientific collaboration the project was to create a prototype scientific collaboration system. The ultimate goal for testing the hypotheses and research of the project was to refine the prototype into a functional application that could effectively facilitate and grow collaboration within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research community.

  10. Crop and pasture response to climate change Francesco N. Tubiello*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and pasture plant species response to climate change. Topics include plant response to elevated CO2 will take place in developing countries, most of it in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America (2, 4), while

  11. Comparison of Joint Modeling Approaches Including Eulerian Sliding Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomov, I; Antoun, T; Vorobiev, O

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate representation of discontinuities such as joints and faults is a key ingredient for high fidelity modeling of shock propagation in geologic media. The following study was done to improve treatment of discontinuities (joints) in the Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN (Lomov and Liu 2005). Lagrangian methods with conforming meshes and explicit inclusion of joints in the geologic model are well suited for such an analysis. Unfortunately, current meshing tools are unable to automatically generate adequate hexahedral meshes for large numbers of irregular polyhedra. Another concern is that joint stiffness in such explicit computations requires significantly reduced time steps, with negative implications for both the efficiency and quality of the numerical solution. An alternative approach is to use non-conforming meshes and embed joint information into regular computational elements. However, once slip displacement on the joints become comparable to the zone size, Lagrangian (even non-conforming) meshes could suffer from tangling and decreased time step problems. The use of non-conforming meshes in an Eulerian solver may alleviate these difficulties and provide a viable numerical approach for modeling the effects of faults on the dynamic response of geologic materials. We studied shock propagation in jointed/faulted media using a Lagrangian and two Eulerian approaches. To investigate the accuracy of this joint treatment the GEODYN calculations have been compared with results from the Lagrangian code GEODYN-L which uses an explicit treatment of joints via common plane contact. We explore two approaches to joint treatment in the code, one for joints with finite thickness and the other for tight joints. In all cases the sliding interfaces are tracked explicitly without homogenization or blending the joint and block response into an average response. In general, rock joints will introduce an increase in normal compliance in addition to a reduction in shear strength. In the present work we consider the limiting case of stiff discontinuities that only affect the shear strength of the material.

  12. Search Response Team | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    is a full-response asset, which includes the manpower and equipment to conduct aerial, vehicle, or search operations by foot to locate a potential radiological source. In addition...

  13. Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovement of theResponses to Public Comments onContracts |

  14. Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovement of theResponses to Public Comments onContracts

  15. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

  16. Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

  17. Metal vapor laser including hot electrodes and integral wick

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA); Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal vapor laser, specifically one utilizing copper vapor, is disclosed herein. This laser utilizes a plasma tube assembly including a thermally insulated plasma tube containing a specific metal, e.g., copper, and a buffer gas therein. The laser also utilizes means including hot electrodes located at opposite ends of the plasma tube for electrically exciting the metal vapor and heating its interior to a sufficiently high temperature to cause the metal contained therein to vaporize and for subjecting the vapor to an electrical discharge excitation in order to lase. The laser also utilizes external wicking arrangements, that is, wicking arrangements located outside the plasma tube.

  18. Metal vapor laser including hot electrodes and integral wick

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ault, E.R.; Alger, T.W.

    1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal vapor laser, specifically one utilizing copper vapor, is disclosed herein. This laser utilizes a plasma tube assembly including a thermally insulated plasma tube containing a specific metal, e.g., copper, and a buffer gas therein. The laser also utilizes means including hot electrodes located at opposite ends of the plasma tube for electrically exciting the metal vapor and heating its interior to a sufficiently high temperature to cause the metal contained therein to vaporize and for subjecting the vapor to an electrical discharge excitation in order to lase. The laser also utilizes external wicking arrangements, that is, wicking arrangements located outside the plasma tube. 5 figs.

  19. Watson Library enhancements to include new service desk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12/5/13 KU Libraries News: Watson Library enhancements to include new service desk www.lib.ku.edu/news/newservicedesk.shtml 1/1 Contact Us The University of Kansas Libraries Lawrence, KS 66045 (785) 864-8983 Copyright © 2013 by the University... of Kansas Watson Library enhancements to include new service desk The University of Kansas Libraries is adding a new service desk to Watson Library to enhance the user experience and draw attention to new and existing resources. The desk, which...

  20. Thin film solar cell including a spatially modulated intrinsic layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Yang, Chi-Chung (Troy, MI); Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

    1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    One or more thin film solar cells in which the intrinsic layer of substantially amorphous semiconductor alloy material thereof includes at least a first band gap portion and a narrower band gap portion. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is spatially graded through a portion of the bulk thickness, said graded portion including a region removed from the intrinsic layer-dopant layer interfaces. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is always less than the band gap of the doped layers. The gradation of the intrinsic layer is effected such that the open circuit voltage and/or the fill factor of the one or plural solar cell structure is enhanced.

  1. New protection method for HVDC lines including cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeda, H.; Ayakawa, H.; Tsumenaga, N.; Sanpei, M.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the third project of the Hokkaido-Honshu HVDC Link in Japan, called the HVDC Link III project (rated at 250 kVdc-1,200 A-300 MW), the authors developed an HVDC transmission line protection method based on a new working principle that allows high-speed and highly sensitive detection of faults, enhancing reliability in the supply of electric power. In general, increasing the sensitivity of relays will lead to an increased likelihood of undesired operation whereas lowering the sensitivity will impair the responsiveness of the relays. The proposed method meets these apparently incompatible requirements very well. Basically classified as a differential scheme, the HVDC transmission line protection method compensates for a charging and discharging current that flows through the line-to-ground capacitance at times of voltage variations caused by a line fault or by the operation of dc power systems. The developed protection method is also characterized in that it uses current changes induced by voltage variations to restrain the operation of a relay. This configuration has made the proposed method far superior in responsiveness and sensitivity to the conventional protection method. A simulation using an EMTP (Electro-Magnetic Transients Program) was conducted on this method. Developed relay equipment embodying the new protection method was subjected to various verification tests, where this equipment was connected to a power system simulator, before being delivered to the HVDC Link III facility.

  2. Including Blind Students in Computer Science Through Access to Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, R. Michael

    Including Blind Students in Computer Science Through Access to Graphs Suzanne Balik, Sean Mealin SKetching tool, GSK, to provide blind and sighted people with a means to create, examine, and share graphs (node-link diagrams) in real-time. GSK proved very effective for one blind computer science student

  3. Bayesian hierarchical reconstruction of protein profiles including a digestion model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Bayesian hierarchical reconstruction of protein profiles including a digestion model Pierre to recover the protein biomarkers content in a robust way. We will focus on the digestion step since and each branch to a molecular processing such as digestion, ionisation and LC-MS separation

  4. Biomass Potentials from California Forest and Shrublands Including Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomass Potentials from California Forest and Shrublands Including Fuel Reduction Potentials-04-004 February 2005 Revised: October 2005 Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor, State of California #12;Biomass Tiangco, CEC Bryan M. Jenkins, University of California #12;Biomass Potentials from California Forest

  5. Optimal Energy Management Strategy including Battery Health through Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Optimal Energy Management Strategy including Battery Health through Thermal Management for Hybrid: Energy management strategy, Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, Li-ion battery aging, thermal management, Pontryagin's Minimum Principle. 1. INTRODUCTION The interest for energy management strategy (EMS) of Hybrid

  6. Area of cooperation includes: Joint research and development on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    Technologies August 2, 2006: HCL Technologies Ltd (HCL), India's leading global IT services company, has signed projects that are using this technology currently such as BioGrid in Japan, National Grid Service in UKArea of cooperation includes: · Joint research and development on Grid computing technologies

  7. Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Engineering) W. VA #12;Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach August 2011 version Page 2 Energy Transitions sources globally, some very strong short-term drivers of energy transitions reflect rising concerns over

  8. 1 INTRODUCTION A typical flexible pavement system includes four

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    1 INTRODUCTION A typical flexible pavement system includes four distinct layers: asphalt concrete course in order to reduce costs or to minimize capil- lary action under the pavement. Figure 1: Cross-section of flexible pavement system (Muench 2006) Pavement distress may occur due to either traffic or environmental

  9. SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM Including the Chemical Hygiene Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul G.

    SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM Including the Chemical Hygiene Plan Wisconsin Center for Applied, Technical Staff & Chemical Hygiene Officer kakupcho@wisc.edu 262-2982 Lab Facility Website http..........................................................................................................3 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN III. Work-site Analysis and Hazard Identification 3.1 Hazardous Chemical

  10. HTS Conductor Design Issues Including Quench and Stability,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HTS Conductor Design Issues Including Quench and Stability, AC Losses, and Fault Currents M. J objective and technical approach · The purpose of this collaborative R&D project is an investigation of HTS conductor design optimization with emphasis on stability and protection issues for YBCO wires and coils

  11. Free Energy Efficiency Kit includes CFL light bulbs,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Annkatrin

    Free Energy Efficiency Kit Kit includes CFL light bulbs, spray foam, low-flow shower head, and more for discounted energy assessments. FREE HOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY SEMINAR N e w R i ver L i g ht & Pow e r a n d W! Building Science 101 Presentation BPI Certified Building Professionals will present home energy efficiency

  12. DO NOT INCLUDE: flatten cardboard staples, tape & envelope windows ok

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    / bottles Metal items other than cans/foil Napkins Paper towels Plastic bags Plastic films Plastic utensilsDO NOT INCLUDE: flatten cardboard staples, tape & envelope windows ok Aerosol cans Books Bottle, PDAs, inkjet cartridges, CFL bulbs (cushioned, sealed in plastic) computers, printers, printer

  13. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

    1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

  14. Perhaps federal research grants can include infrastructure costs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sur, Mriganka

    Perhaps federal research grants can include infrastructure costs. There are signs to find favour in China, a country beset by similar problems. The particular structure of Indian science and healthystart-uppackages. The government could contribute to these costs. 487 NATURE|Vol 436|28 July 2005

  15. Public Input I would like to suggest that FESAC consider including in your response to the charge on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pinch devices. One important aspect of such collaborations is the relevance to tokamaks and specifically experiment called KTX has been funded for construction at the University of Science and Technology of China

  16. Selenium nutrition of Morone hybrids including dietary requirements, bioavailability, toxicity and effects on immune responses and disease resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Francisco , Jr

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    enhance immunocompetence and disease resistance of HSB. In the first experiment, purified and practical diets were supplemented with ?-glucan and selenium in a factorial arrangement and fed to juvenile HSB for 6 wk followed by a S. iniae challenge...

  17. Characterization of host lymphoid cells in antibody-facilitated bone marrow chimeras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, S.A.; Griffith, I.J.; Gambel, P.; Francescutti, L.H.; Wegmann, T.G.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have produced stable murine antibody-facilitated (AF) chimeras by the simultaneous injection of P1 bone marrow cells and anti-P2 monoclonal antibody into normal (unirradiated) adult (P1 X P2)F1 recipients. These AF chimeras are healthy, long-lived, and exhibit no overt signs of graft-versus-host disease. They are immunocompetent and tolerant of host, P2-encoded alloantigens. Donor cell engraftment and takeover, monitored by glucosephosphate isomerase isozyme patterns, is usually complete (greater than 95%) in the peripheral blood, bone marrow, and hemopoietic stem cell compartments of long-term (greater than 3 months posttransplantation) AF chimeras. The authors report here, however, that splenic, lymph node, and thymic leukocytes of AF chimeras represent donor/host chimeric populations. Spleen cell populations of AF chimeras exhibit substantial chimera-to-chimera variation in the preponderant residual host cell type(s) present. Interpretations of the implications of these findings are discussed.

  18. CO Oxidation Facilitated by Robust Surface States on Au-Covered Topological Insulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Hua [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Zhu, Wenguang [ORNL; Xiao, Di [ORNL; Zhang, Zhenyu [University of Science and Technology, Beijing, China

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface states the electronic states emerging as a solid material terminates at a surface are usually vulnerable to contaminations and defects. The robust topological surface state(s) (TSS) on the three-dimensional topological insulators provide a perfect platform for exploiting surface states in less stringent environments. Employing first-principles density functional theory calculations, we demonstrate that the TSS can play a vital role in facilitating surface reactions by serving as an effective electron bath. We use CO oxidation on gold-covered Bi2Se3 as a prototype example, and show that the robust TSS can significantly enhance the adsorption energy of both CO and O2 molecules, by promoting different directions of electron transfer. The concept of TSS as an electron bath may lead to new design principles beyond the conventional d-band theory of heterogeneous catalysis.

  19. Facilitation of polymer looping and giant polymer diffusivity in crowded solutions of active particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, J; Kim, W K; Metzler, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of polymer chains in a bath of self-propelled particles (SPP) by extensive Langevin dynamics simulations in a two dimensional system. Specifically, we analyse the polymer looping properties versus the SPP activity and investigate how the presence of the active particles alters the chain conformational statistics. We find that SPPs tend to extend flexible polymer chains while they rather compactify stiffer semiflexible polymers, in agreement with previous results. Here we show that larger activities of SPPs yield a higher effective temperature of the bath and thus facilitate looping kinetics of a passive polymer chain. We explicitly compute the looping probability and looping time in a wide range of the model parameters. We also analyse the motion of a monomeric tracer particle and the polymer's centre of mass in the presence of the active particles in terms of the time averaged mean squared displacement, revealing a giant diffusivity enhancement for the polymer chain via SPP pooling. Our...

  20. Bursty communication patterns facilitate spreading in a threshold-based epidemic dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takaguchi, Taro; Holme, Petter

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Records of social interactions provide us with new sources of data for understanding how interaction patterns affect collective dynamics. Such human activity patterns are often bursty, i.e., they consist of short periods of intense activity followed by long periods of silence. This burstiness has been shown to affect spreading phenomena; it accelerates epidemic spreading in some cases and slows it down in other cases. We investigate a model of history-dependent contagion. In our model, repeated interactions between susceptible and infected individuals in a short period of time is needed for a susceptible individual to contract infection. We carry out numerical simulations on real temporal network data to find that bursty activity patterns facilitate epidemic spreading in our model.

  1. Multi-processor including data flow accelerator module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davidson, George S. (Albuquerque, NM); Pierce, Paul E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accelerator module for a data flow computer includes an intelligent memory. The module is added to a multiprocessor arrangement and uses a shared tagged memory architecture in the data flow computer. The intelligent memory module assigns locations for holding data values in correspondence with arcs leading to a node in a data dependency graph. Each primitive computation is associated with a corresponding memory cell, including a number of slots for operands needed to execute a primitive computation, a primitive identifying pointer, and linking slots for distributing the result of the cell computation to other cells requiring that result as an operand. Circuitry is provided for utilizing tag bits to determine automatically when all operands required by a processor are available and for scheduling the primitive for execution in a queue. Each memory cell of the module may be associated with any of the primitives, and the particular primitive to be executed by the processor associated with the cell is identified by providing an index, such as the cell number for the primitive, to the primitive lookup table of starting addresses. The module thus serves to perform functions previously performed by a number of sections of data flow architectures and coexists with conventional shared memory therein. A multiprocessing system including the module operates in a hybrid mode, wherein the same processing modules are used to perform some processing in a sequential mode, under immediate control of an operating system, while performing other processing in a data flow mode.

  2. Conversion of geothermal waste to commercial products including silica

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the treatment of geothermal residue includes contacting the pigmented amorphous silica-containing component with a depigmenting reagent one or more times to depigment the silica and produce a mixture containing depigmented amorphous silica and depigmenting reagent containing pigment material; separating the depigmented amorphous silica and from the depigmenting reagent to yield depigmented amorphous silica. Before or after the depigmenting contacting, the geothermal residue or depigmented silica can be treated with a metal solubilizing agent to produce another mixture containing pigmented or unpigmented amorphous silica-containing component and a solubilized metal-containing component; separating these components from each other to produce an amorphous silica product substantially devoid of metals and at least partially devoid of pigment. The amorphous silica product can be neutralized and thereafter dried at a temperature from about 25.degree. C. to 300.degree. C. The morphology of the silica product can be varied through the process conditions including sequence contacting steps, pH of depigmenting reagent, neutralization and drying conditions to tailor the amorphous silica for commercial use in products including filler for paint, paper, rubber and polymers, and chromatographic material.

  3. Using the stress response to monitor process control: pathways to more effective bioremediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    Using the stress response to monitor process control: pathways to more effective bioremediation the development of effective bioremediation strategies. But how can these processes be best monitored will facilitate the control of bioremediation and other processes mediated by complex microbial communities

  4. Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems ­ Importance of dimming ­ New wireless controls technologies · Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives · Provide up-to-date information

  5. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNEX Q HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE #12;ANNEX Q - HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE 03/10/2014 v.2.0 Page Q-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex Q: Hazardous Materials Emergency Response, and contents within, is a guide to how the University conducts a response specific to a hazardous materials

  6. Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKane, Aimee T.; Piette, Mary Ann; Faulkner, David; Ghatikar, Girish; Radspieler Jr., Anthony; Adesola, Bunmi; Murtishaw, Scott; Kiliccote, Sila

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2006 the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) formed an Industrial Demand Response Team to investigate opportunities and barriers to implementation of Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) systems in California industries. Auto-DR is an open, interoperable communications and technology platform designed to: Provide customers with automated, electronic price and reliability signals; Provide customers with capability to automate customized DR strategies; Automate DR, providing utilities with dispatchable operational capability similar to conventional generation resources. This research began with a review of previous Auto-DR research on the commercial sector. Implementing Auto-DR in industry presents a number of challenges, both practical and perceived. Some of these include: the variation in loads and processes across and within sectors, resource-dependent loading patterns that are driven by outside factors such as customer orders or time-critical processing (e.g. tomato canning), the perceived lack of control inherent in the term 'Auto-DR', and aversion to risk, especially unscheduled downtime. While industry has demonstrated a willingness to temporarily provide large sheds and shifts to maintain grid reliability and be a good corporate citizen, the drivers for widespread Auto-DR will likely differ. Ultimately, most industrial facilities will balance the real and perceived risks associated with Auto-DR against the potential for economic gain through favorable pricing or incentives. Auto-DR, as with any ongoing industrial activity, will need to function effectively within market structures. The goal of the industrial research is to facilitate deployment of industrial Auto-DR that is economically attractive and technologically feasible. Automation will make DR: More visible by providing greater transparency through two-way end-to-end communication of DR signals from end-use customers; More repeatable, reliable, and persistent because the automated controls strategies that are 'hardened' and pre-programmed into facility's software and hardware; More affordable because automation can help reduce labor costs associated with manual DR strategies initiated by facility staff and can be used for long-term.

  7. Intern Opportunity: Office of Technology Alliances at UC Irvine What we need: Technology assessment of university inventions including patent landscape,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    assessment of university inventions including patent landscape, invention summary, and initial market at UCI. Licensing Officers within OTA are responsible for making decisions about proceeding with a patent filing and, for cases that are already filed, whether or not to continue with patent prosecution. A big

  8. Methods and systems to facilitate reducing NO.sub.x emissions in combustion systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul (Greer, SC); Kraemer, Gilbert Otto (Greer, SC); Varatharajan, Balachandar (Clifton Park, NY); Yilmaz, Ertan (Albany, NY); Lipinski, John Joseph (Simpsonville, SC); Ziminsky, Willy Steve (Simpsonville, SC)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for assembling a gas turbine combustor system is provided. The method includes providing a combustion liner including a center axis, an outer wall, a first end, and a second end. The outer wall is orientated substantially parallel to the center axis. The method also includes coupling a transition piece to the liner second end. The transition piece includes an outer wall. The method further includes coupling a plurality of lean-direct injectors along at least one of the liner outer wall and the transition piece outer wall such that the injectors are spaced axially apart along the wall.

  9. Composite armor, armor system and vehicle including armor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Henry S.; Jones, Warren F.; Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Thinnes, Gary L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite armor panels are disclosed. Each panel comprises a plurality of functional layers comprising at least an outermost layer, an intermediate layer and a base layer. An armor system incorporating armor panels is also disclosed. Armor panels are mounted on carriages movably secured to adjacent rails of a rail system. Each panel may be moved on its associated rail and into partially overlapping relationship with another panel on an adjacent rail for protection against incoming ordnance from various directions. The rail system may be configured as at least a part of a ring, and be disposed about a hatch on a vehicle. Vehicles including an armor system are also disclosed.

  10. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  11. Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bawendi, Moungi G.; Sundar, Vikram C.

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties.

  12. A coke oven model including thermal decomposition kinetics of tar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munekane, Fuminori; Yamaguchi, Yukio [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Tanioka, Seiichi [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Sakaide (Japan)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new one-dimensional coke oven model has been developed for simulating the amount and the characteristics of by-products such as tar and gas as well as coke. This model consists of both heat transfer and chemical kinetics including thermal decomposition of coal and tar. The chemical kinetics constants are obtained by estimation based on the results of experiments conducted to investigate the thermal decomposition of both coal and tar. The calculation results using the new model are in good agreement with experimental ones.

  13. Numerical evaluation of propeller noise, including non-linear effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Terence Alan

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University Chairman of Advisor y Commitee: Dr. Kenneth Korkan Using the transonic flow field(s) generated by the NASPROP-E computer code for an eight blade SR3-series propeller, a method is investigated to calculate the total noise values and frequency... in three dimensions, and the influence of the damping on the calculated noise values is investigated. Since the flow field includes the wave systems near the blade surface, the quadr upole noise sour ce term is accounted for as are the monopole...

  14. What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14Russian Nuclear Warheads ArrivesAdministration To Include In

  15. Solving The High Energy Evolution Equation Including Running Coupling Corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javier L. Albacete; Yuri V. Kovchegov

    2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the solution of the nonlinear BK evolution equation with the recently calculated running coupling corrections [hep-ph/0609105, hep-ph/0609090]. Performing a numerical solution we confirm the earlier result of [hep-ph/0408216] that the high energy evolution with the running coupling leads to a universal scaling behavior for the dipole scattering amplitude. The running coupling corrections calculated recently significantly change the shape of the scaling function as compared to the fixed coupling case leading to a considerable increase in the anomalous dimension and to a slow-down of the evolution with rapidity. The difference between the two recent calculations is due to an extra contribution to the evolution kernel, referred to as the subtraction term, which arises when running coupling corrections are included. These subtraction terms were neglected in both recent calculations. We evaluate numerically the subtraction terms for both calculations, and demonstrate that when the subtraction terms are added back to the evolution kernels obtained in the two works the resulting dipole amplitudes agree with each other! We then use the complete running coupling kernel including the subtraction term to find the numerical solution of the resulting full non-linear evolution equation with the running coupling corrections. Again the scaling regime is recovered at very large rapidity.

  16. Cogeneration handbook for the petroleum refining industry. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Handbook deals only with industrial cogeneration, that is, simultaneous production of both heat and electricity at the industrial plant site. The cogenerator has the option of either selling all cogenerated power to the utility while simultaneously purchasing power to satisfy his plant demand, or directly supplying the plant demand with cogenerated power, thus displacing utility-supplied power. This Handbook provides the refinery plant manager or company energy coordinator with a framework for making a preliminary assessment of the feasibility and viability of cogeneration at a particular plant. The handbook is intended to provide an understanding of the potential of several standardized cogeneration systems, as well as their limitations. However, because the decision to cogenerate is very site specific, the handbook cannot provide all of the answers. It does attempt, however, to bring to light the major issues that should be addressed in the decision-making process. The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. 39 figures, 37 tables.

  17. Chemical Spill Response Procedure Initial Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical Spill Response Procedure Initial Response 1. Advise lab occupants of the spill-4500. If not, continue with step 4. Clean-Up 4. Ensure the spill area has adequate ventilation to clear gases is absorbed. If necessary, add more neutralizing powder. 9. If cleaning up a solvent, proceed to step 13. 10

  18. Pulse transmission transmitter including a higher order time derivate filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dress Jr., William B.; Smith, Stephen F.

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for pulse-transmission low-power communication modes are disclosed. A pulse transmission transmitter includes: a clock; a pseudorandom polynomial generator coupled to the clock, the pseudorandom polynomial generator having a polynomial load input; an exclusive-OR gate coupled to the pseudorandom polynomial generator, the exclusive-OR gate having a serial data input; a programmable delay circuit coupled to both the clock and the exclusive-OR gate; a pulse generator coupled to the programmable delay circuit; and a higher order time derivative filter coupled to the pulse generator. The systems and methods significantly reduce lower-frequency emissions from pulse transmission spread-spectrum communication modes, which reduces potentially harmful interference to existing radio frequency services and users and also simultaneously permit transmission of multiple data bits by utilizing specific pulse shapes.

  19. Hydraulic engine valve actuation system including independent feedback control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marriott, Craig D

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydraulic valve actuation assembly may include a housing, a piston, a supply control valve, a closing control valve, and an opening control valve. The housing may define a first fluid chamber, a second fluid chamber, and a third fluid chamber. The piston may be axially secured to an engine valve and located within the first, second and third fluid chambers. The supply control valve may control a hydraulic fluid supply to the piston. The closing control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the second fluid chamber to the supply control valve. The opening control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the supply control valve to the second fluid chamber.

  20. Fuel cell repeater unit including frame and separator plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yamanis, Jean; Hawkes, Justin R; Chiapetta, Jr., Louis; Bird, Connie E; Sun, Ellen Y; Croteau, Paul F

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An example fuel cell repeater includes a separator plate and a frame establishing at least a portion of a flow path that is operative to communicate fuel to or from at least one fuel cell held by the frame relative to the separator plate. The flow path has a perimeter and any fuel within the perimeter flow across the at least one fuel cell in a first direction. The separator plate, the frame, or both establish at least one conduit positioned outside the flow path perimeter. The conduit is outside of the flow path perimeter and is configured to direct flow in a second, different direction. The conduit is fluidly coupled with the flow path.

  1. Copper laser modulator driving assembly including a magnetic compression laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser modulator (10) having a low voltage assembly (12) with a plurality of low voltage modules (14) with first stage magnetic compression circuits (20) and magnetic assist inductors (28) with a common core (91), such that timing of the first stage magnetic switches (30b) is thereby synchronized. A bipolar second stage of magnetic compression (42) is coupled to the low voltage modules (14) through a bipolar pulse transformer (36) and a third stage of magnetic compression (44) is directly coupled to the second stage of magnetic compression (42). The low voltage assembly (12) includes pressurized boxes (117) for improving voltage standoff between the primary winding assemblies (34) and secondary winding (40) contained therein.

  2. Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bates, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Gruzalski, Greg R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Luck, Christopher F. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

  3. Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bates, J.B.; Dudney, N.J.; Gruzalski, G.R.; Luck, C.F.

    1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode. Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between {minus}15 C and 150 C.

  4. Including stereoscopic information in the reconstruction of coronal magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Wiegelmann; T. Neukirch

    2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to include stereoscopic information about the three dimensional structure of flux tubes into the reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field. Due to the low plasma beta in the corona we can assume a force free magnetic field, with the current density parallel to the magnetic field lines. Here we use linear force free fields for simplicity. The method uses the line of sight magnetic field on the photosphere as observational input. The value of $\\alpha$ is determined iteratively by comparing the reconstructed magnetic field with the observed structures. The final configuration is the optimal linear force solution constrained by both the photospheric magnetogram and the observed plasma structures. As an example we apply our method to SOHO MDI/EIT data of an active region. In the future it is planned to apply the method to analyse data from the SECCHI instrument aboard the STEREO mission.

  5. Improving Planck calibration by including frequency-dependent relativistic corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quartin, Miguel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Planck satellite detectors are calibrated in the 2015 release using the "orbital dipole", which is the time-dependent dipole generated by the Doppler effect due to the motion of the satellite around the Sun. Such an effect has also relativistic time-dependent corrections of relative magnitude 10^(-3), due to coupling with the "solar dipole" (the motion of the Sun compared to the CMB rest frame), which are included in the data calibration by the Planck collaboration. We point out that such corrections are subject to a frequency-dependent multiplicative factor. This factor differs from unity especially at the highest frequencies, relevant for the HFI instrument. Since currently Planck calibration errors are dominated by systematics, to the point that polarization data is currently unreliable at large scales, such a correction can in principle be highly relevant for future data releases.

  6. Actuator assembly including a single axis of rotation locking member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quitmeyer, James N.; Benson, Dwayne M.; Geck, Kellan P.

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An actuator assembly including an actuator housing assembly and a single axis of rotation locking member fixedly attached to a portion of the actuator housing assembly and an external mounting structure. The single axis of rotation locking member restricting rotational movement of the actuator housing assembly about at least one axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a first end to the actuator housing assembly about a Y axis and at a 90.degree. angle to an X and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the Y axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a second end to a mounting structure, and more particularly a mounting pin, about an X axis and at a 90.degree. angle to a Y and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the X axis. The actuator assembly is thereby restricted from rotation about the Z axis.

  7. A Case for Including Transactions in OpenMP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, M; Bihari, B L; de Supinski, B R; Wu, P; Michael, M; Liu, Y; Chen, W

    2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Transactional Memory (TM) has received significant attention recently as a mechanism to reduce the complexity of shared memory programming. We explore the potential of TM to improve OpenMP applications. We combine a software TM (STM) system to support transactions with an OpenMP implementation to start thread teams and provide task and loop-level parallelization. We apply this system to two application scenarios that reflect realistic TM use cases. Our results with this system demonstrate that even with the relatively high overheads of STM, transactions can outperform OpenMP critical sections by 10%. Overall, our study demonstrates that extending OpenMP to include transactions would ease programming effort while allowing improved performance.

  8. Facilitating the improved management of waste in South Africa through a national waste information system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godfrey, Linda [CSIR, Natural Resources and the Environment, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)], E-mail: lgodfrey@csir.co.za

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a waste information system (WIS) for a country is more than just about collecting routine data on waste; it is about facilitating the improved management of waste by providing timely, reliable information to the relevant role-players. It is a means of supporting the waste governance challenges facing South Africa - challenges ranging from strategic waste management issues at national government to basic operational challenges at local government. The paper addresses two hypotheses. The first is that the identified needs of government can provide a platform from which to design a national WIS framework for a developing country such as South Africa, and the second is that the needs for waste information reflect greater, currently unfulfilled challenges in the sustainable management of waste. Through a participatory needs analysis process, it is shown that waste information is needed by the three spheres of government, to support amongst others, informed planning and decision-making, compliance monitoring and enforcement, community participation through public access to information, human, infrastructure and financial resource management and policy development. These needs for waste information correspond closely with key waste management challenges currently facing the country. A shift in governments approach to waste, in line with national and international policy, is evident from identified current and future waste information needs. However, the need for information on landfilling remains entrenched within government, possibly due to the poor compliance of landfill sites in South Africa and the problems around the illegal disposal of both general and hazardous waste.

  9. Constraint of gene expression by chromatin remodelling protein CHD4 facilitates lineage specification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O’Shaughnessy-Kirwan, Aoife; Signolet, Jason; Costello, Ita; Gharbi, Sarah; Hendrich, Brian

    2015-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    -295. Nichols, J., Silva, J., Roode, M. and Smith, A. (2009) Suppression of Erk signalling promotes ground state pluripotency in the mouse embryo. Development, 136, 3215-3222. O'Shaughnessy, A. and Hendrich, B. (2013) CHD4 in the DNA-damage response and cell...

  10. Optimal Demand Response Based on Utility Maximization in Power Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Optimal Demand Response Based on Utility Maximization in Power Networks Na Li, Lijun Chen different appliances including PHEVs and batteries and propose a demand response approach based on utility. The utility company can thus use dynamic pricing to coordinate demand responses to the benefit of the overall

  11. Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

  12. DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE FACILITIES INCLUDING NON-METALLIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mr. Herb Duvoisin

    2003-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    CyTerra has leveraged our unique, shallow buried plastic target detection technology developed under US Army contracts into deeper buried subsurface facilities and including nonmetallic pipe detection. This Final Report describes a portable, low-cost, real-time, and user-friendly subsurface plastic pipe detector (LULU- Low Cost Utility Location Unit) that relates to the goal of maintaining the integrity and reliability of the nation's natural gas transmission and distribution network by preventing third party damage, by detecting potential infringements. Except for frequency band and antenna size, the LULU unit is almost identical to those developed for the US Army. CyTerra designed, fabricated, and tested two frequency stepped GPR systems, spanning the frequencies of importance (200 to 1600 MHz), one low and one high frequency system. Data collection and testing was done at a variety of locations (selected for soil type variations) on both targets of opportunity and selected buried targets. We developed algorithms and signal processing techniques that provide for the automatic detection of the buried utility lines. The real time output produces a sound as the radar passes over the utility line alerting the operator to the presence of a buried object. Our unique, low noise/high performance RF hardware, combined with our field tested detection algorithms, represents an important advancement toward achieving the DOE potential infringement goal.

  13. Hydrodynamic Simulation of Supernova Remnants Including Efficient Particle Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donald C. Ellison; Anne Decourchelle; Jean Ballet

    2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of supernova remnants (SNRs) show nonthermal X-rays assumed to be synchrotron emission from shock accelerated TeV electrons. The existence of these TeV electrons strongly suggests that the shocks in SNRs are sources of galactic cosmic rays (CRs). In addition, there is convincing evidence from broad-band studies of individual SNRs and elsewhere that the particle acceleration process in SNRs can be efficient and nonlinear. If SNR shocks are efficient particle accelerators, the production of CRs impacts the thermal properties of the shock heated, X-ray emitting gas and the SNR evolution. We report on a technique that couples nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration, including the backreaction of the accelerated particles on the structure of the forward and reverse shocks, with a hydrodynamic simulation of SNR evolution. Compared to models which ignore CRs, the most important hydrodynamical effects of placing a significant fraction of shock energy into CRs are larger shock compression ratios and lower temperatures in the shocked gas. We compare our results, which use an approximate description of the acceleration process, with a more complete model where the full CR transport equations are solved (i.e., Berezhko et al., 2002), and find excellent agreement for the CR spectrum summed over the SNR lifetime and the evolving shock compression ratio. The importance of the coupling between particle acceleration and SNR dynamics for the interpretation of broad-band continuum and thermal X-ray observations is discussed.

  14. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  15. CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  16. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

  17. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

  18. C -parameter distribution at N 3 LL ' including power corrections

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoang, André H.; Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Mateu, Vicent; Stewart, Iain W.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the e?e? C-parameter distribution using the soft-collinear effective theory with a resummation to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-log prime accuracy of the most singular partonic terms. This includes the known fixed-order QCD results up to O(?3s), a numerical determination of the two-loop nonlogarithmic term of the soft function, and all logarithmic terms in the jet and soft functions up to three loops. Our result holds for C in the peak, tail, and far tail regions. Additionally, we treat hadronization effects using a field theoretic nonperturbative soft function, with moments ?n. To eliminate an O(?QCD) renormalon ambiguity in the soft function, we switch from the MS¯ to a short distance “Rgap” scheme to define the leading power correction parameter ?1. We show how to simultaneously account for running effects in ?1 due to renormalon subtractions and hadron-mass effects, enabling power correction universality between C-parameter and thrust to be tested in our setup. We discuss in detail the impact of resummation and renormalon subtractions on the convergence. In the relevant fit region for ?s(mZ) and ?1, the perturbative uncertainty in our cross section is ? 2.5% at Q=mZ.

  19. Systems to facilitate reducing flashback/flame holding in combustion systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul (Greer, SC); Kraemer, Gilbert Otto (Greer, SC); Varatharajan, Balachandar (Clifton Park, NY); Yilmaz, Ertan (Albany, NY); Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC)

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for assembling a premixing injector is provided. The method includes providing a centerbody including a center axis and a radially outer surface, and providing an inlet flow conditioner. The inlet flow conditioner includes a radially outer wall, a radially inner wall, and an end wall coupled substantially perpendicularly between the outer wall and the inner wall. Each of the outer wall and the end wall include a plurality of openings defined therein. The outer wall, the inner wall, and the end wall define a first passage therebetween. The method also includes coupling the inlet flow conditioner to the centerbody such that the inlet flow conditioner substantially circumscribes the centerbody, such that the inner wall is substantially parallel to the centerbody outer surface, and such that a second passage is defined between the centerbody outer surface and the inner wall.

  20. Response to Review Comments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kota, S.; Haberl, J.S.; Clayton, M.; Yan, W.

    to discuss any further issues with the editor and the reviewers. Review Comments: The paper is useful in facilitating daylighting simulation: the developed prototype realized automatic building data transfer from Revit to Radiance and Daysim... the geometry information is compared before/after transfer from Revit to Radiance, not the material information. To address this comment, the following description is added to Section X on page Y: “ ESL-PA-14-07-04 ” 4 The authors should pay more...

  1. Microelectromechanical accelerometer with resonance-cancelling control circuit including an idle state

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Dahlon D. (Albuquerque, NM); Thelen, Jr., Donald C. (Bozeman, MT); Campbell, David V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A digital feedback control circuit is disclosed for use in an accelerometer (e.g. a microelectromechanical accelerometer). The digital feedback control circuit, which periodically re-centers a proof mass in response to a sensed acceleration, is based on a sigma-delta (.SIGMA..DELTA.) configuration that includes a notch filter (e.g. a digital switched-capacitor filter) for rejecting signals due to mechanical resonances of the proof mass and further includes a comparator (e.g. a three-level comparator). The comparator generates one of three possible feedback states, with two of the feedback states acting to re-center the proof mass when that is needed, and with a third feedback state being an "idle" state which does not act to move the proof mass when no re-centering is needed. Additionally, the digital feedback control system includes an auto-zero trim capability for calibration of the accelerometer for accurate sensing of acceleration. The digital feedback control circuit can be fabricated using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, bi-CMOS technology or bipolar technology and used in single- and dual-proof-mass accelerometers.

  2. Beacon Training in a Water Maze Can Facilitate and Compete With Subsequent Room Cue Learning in Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Beacon Training in a Water Maze Can Facilitate and Compete With Subsequent Room Cue Learning experiments in which rats completed a water-maze blocking procedure, experimental groups were trained to use location. A Room Test (landmarks and background cues only) showed that Stage 1 training with a fixed

  3. Colloquium Series facilitated by Environmental Health & Safety (402-475-4925) and the Office of Research & Economic Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Colloquium Series facilitated by Environmental Health & Safety (402-475-4925) and the Office or countermeasures Toxicology measures LD50 (lethal dose, 50% of population); generally given with tissue exposed and species tested LDLo (some lethal cases reported) LC50 (lethal concentration in air, 50% of population

  4. Facilitated transport of sodium or potassium chloride across vesicle membranes using a ditopic salt-binding macrobicycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Bradley D.

    Facilitated transport of sodium or potassium chloride across vesicle membranes using a ditopic salt or potassium chloride as a contact ion-pair, is shown to effect- ively transport either salt across vesicle membranes. Sig- nificant transport is observed even when the transporter : phospholipid ratio is as low as 1

  5. Spatially Heterogeneous Dynamics and Dynamic Facilitation in a Model of Viscous Silica Michael Vogel* and Sharon C. Glotzer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Eric R.

    this behavior. The mode coupling theory [1] describes many aspects of dynamical behavior at high T- stood as a simple activated bondbreaking process. Here, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simula- tionsSpatially Heterogeneous Dynamics and Dynamic Facilitation in a Model of Viscous Silica Michael

  6. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

  7. Global implications of Rapid: an international system facilitating inexpensive resource sharing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leon, Lars

    2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    of the system vendor. International implications including copyright, ability to interact with various types of interlibrary loan managing systems, scanning and human interactions will be reviewed. This paper will conclude with an assessment to whether a...

  8. The Food Crises: A quantitative model of food prices including speculators and ethanol conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagi, Marco; Bertrand, Karla Z; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent increases in basic food prices are severely impacting vulnerable populations worldwide. Proposed causes such as shortages of grain due to adverse weather, increasing meat consumption in China and India, conversion of corn to ethanol in the US, and investor speculation on commodity markets lead to widely differing implications for policy. A lack of clarity about which factors are responsible reinforces policy inaction. Here, for the first time, we construct a dynamic model that quantitatively agrees with food prices. The results show that the dominant causes of price increases are investor speculation and ethanol conversion. Models that just treat supply and demand are not consistent with the actual price dynamics. The two sharp peaks in 2007/2008 and 2010/2011 are specifically due to investor speculation, while an underlying upward trend is due to increasing demand from ethanol conversion. The model includes investor trend following as well as shifting between commodities, equities and bonds to take ad...

  9. Collagen Scaffolds Incorporating Select Therapeutic Agents to Facilitate a Reparative Response in a Standardized Hemiresection Defect in the Rat Spinal Cord

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cholas, Rahmatullah

    A multifaceted therapeutic approach involving biomaterial scaffolds, neurotrophic factors, exogenous cells, and antagonists to axon growth inhibitors may ultimately prove necessary for the treatment of defects resulting ...

  10. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior in developing a demand response future. Phase_II_Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IIYi Yuan The goal of the Demand Response Enabling Technology

  11. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

  12. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IEfficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006,Application to Demand Response Energy Pricing” SenSys 2003,

  13. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings”, Lawrencesystems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercial BuildingsDemand Response Test in Large Facilities13 National Conference on Building

  14. Facilitating Oil Industry Access to Federal Lands through Interagency Data Sharing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Jehn; Ben Grunewald

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the environmental and technical data useful to the oil and gas industry and regulatory agencies is now contained in disparate state and federal databases. Delays in coordinating permit approvals between federal and state agencies translate into increased operational costs and stresses for the oil and gas industry. Making federal lease stipulation and area restriction data available on state agency Web sites will streamline a potential lessors review of available leases, encourage more active bidding on unleased federal lands, and give third-party operators independent access to data who otherwise may not have access to lease restrictions and other environmental data. As a requirement of the Energy Policy Conservation Act (EPCA), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is in the process of inventorying oil and natural gas resources beneath onshore federal lands and the extent and nature of any stipulation, restrictions, or impediments to the development of these resources. The EPCA Phase 1 Inventory resulted in a collection of GIS coverage files organized according to numerous lease stipulation reference codes. Meanwhile, state agencies also collect millions of data elements concerning oil and gas operations. Much of the oil and gas data nationwide is catalogued in the Ground Water Protection Council's (GWPC's) successfully completed Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS). The GWPC and the states of Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Montana are implementing a pilot project where BLM lease stipulation data and RBDMS data will be displayed in a GIS format on the Internet. This increased access to data will increase bid activity, help expedite permitting, and encourage exploration on federal lands. Linking environmental, lease stipulation and resource inventory assessment data and making a GIS interface for the data available to industry and other agencies via the internet represents an important step in the GWPC strategy for all oil and gas regulatory e-commerce. The next step beyond mere data sharing for facilitating the permitting process is to make it possible for industry to file those permit applications electronically. This process will involve the use of common XML schemas.

  15. OCAO Computer Refreshment Policy The NOAA CAO is responsible for budgeting and procuring all personal computers and other

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6/20/2007 OCAO Computer Refreshment Policy Purpose: The NOAA CAO is responsible for budgeting and procuring all personal computers and other support computers used by OCAO staff. To facilitate adequate capital planning and clarify acquisition policies, the following Computer Refreshment Policy

  16. School of Engineering Rensselaer nurtures a "low walls" research culture that facilitates strong interactions among faculty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bystroff, Chris

    .Eng., M.S., Ph.D. Research areas include energy sources and systems (power electronics, energy harvesting and theoretical fluid dynamics, aerodynamics, advanced propulsion, experimental gas dynamics, energy conversion, membrane and chromatographic separations, complex fluids, colloids and interfacial phenomena, energy

  17. CRA Comments & Responses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - High-Level Liquid Waste (51105) 11 Response to CRA Comments (92005) Enclosure 1 - Computer Code VerificationTesting (92005) Inventory and Performance Assessment Reports...

  18. GADRAS Detector Response Function.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

  19. Climate Change Response

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Interior Climate Change Response "From the Everglades to the Great Lakes to Alaska and everywhere in between, climate change is a leading threat to natural and cultural...

  20. Demand Response In California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the demand response in California and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Fall meeting, held on November 1-2, 2006 in San Francisco, California.

  1. A Meta-Analysis of Interventions to Facilitate School Reentry for Children with Chronic Health Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canter, Kimberly

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    to ensure that variations of the terms were also identified in the literature search. Upon completion of this search, a secondary search was conducted using the terms cancer, sickle cell anemia, and HIV/AIDS as the first term. This decision was made..., one study featured Sickle Cell Anemia, and one study featured burn injuries. In total, 494 healthy 14 classmates, 176 ill children, and 443 school personnel were included in this analysis. Sample size varied greatly between studies, ranging...

  2. Sensor response rate accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Michael C. (Westmont, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for sensor signal prediction and for improving sensor signal response time, is disclosed. An adaptive filter or an artificial neural network is utilized to provide predictive sensor signal output and is further used to reduce sensor response time delay.

  3. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of the plant heat stress response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Ai-Li; Ding, Yan-Fei; Jiang, Qiong [China Jiliang University, Xueyuan Road 258, Hangzhou 310018 (China)] [China Jiliang University, Xueyuan Road 258, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Zhu, Cheng, E-mail: pzhch@cjlu.edu.cn [China Jiliang University, Xueyuan Road 258, Hangzhou 310018 (China)] [China Jiliang University, Xueyuan Road 258, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? This review elaborates the response networks of heat stress in plants. ? It elaborates proteins responding to heat stress in special physiological period. ? The proteins and pathways have formed a basic network of the heat stress response. ? Achievements of the various technologies are also combined. -- Abstract: High temperature has become a global concern, which seriously affects the growth and production of plants, particularly crops. Thus, the molecular mechanism of the heat stress response and breeding of heat-tolerant plants is necessary to protect food production and ensure crop safety. This review elaborates on the response networks of heat stress in plants, including the Hsf and Hsp response pathways, the response of ROS and the network of the hormones. In addition, the production of heat stress response elements during particular physiological periods of the plant is described. We also discuss the existing problems and future prospects concerning the molecular mechanisms of the heat stress response in plants.

  5. 17 JUNE 27 JUNE 2014 RESPONSIBLE MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    17 JUNE ­ 27 JUNE 2014 SUMMER PROGRAMME RESPONSIBLE MANAGEMENT StudyinEnglish WHILE LIVING Rennes gave me an excellent education on making business sustainable." Morgan Rice Missouri State to create a more sustainable world. PROGRAMME CONTENT the two-week programme includes 30 hours of classroom

  6. Responsive Copolymers for Enhanced Petroleum Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, Charles; Hester, Roger

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this work was to: (1) synthesize responsive, amphiphilic systems; (2) characterize molecular structure and solution behavior; (3) measure rheological properties of the aqueous fluids including behavior in fixed geometry flow profiles and beds; and (4) to tailor polymer compositions for in situ rheology control under simulated reservoir conditions.

  7. Evaluating alternative responses to safeguards alarms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.; McCord, R.K.

    1982-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a quantitative approach to help evaluate and respond to safeguards alarms. These alarms may be generated internally by a facility's safeguards systems or externally by individuals claiming to have stolen special nuclear material (SNM). This approach can be used to identify the most likely cause of an alarm - theft, hoax, or error - and to evaluate alternative responses to alarms. Possible responses include conducting investigations, initiating measures to recover stolen SNM, and replying to external threats. Based on the results of each alarm investigation step, the evaluation revises the likelihoods of possible causes of an alarm, and uses this information to determine the optimal sequence of further responses. The choice of an optimal sequence of responses takes into consideration the costs and benefits of successful thefts or hoaxes. These results provide an analytical basis for setting priorities and developing contingency plans for responding to safeguards alarms.

  8. Centralized and Decentralized Control for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Kirkham, Harold

    2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response has been recognized as an essential element of the smart grid. Frequency response, regulation and contingency reserve functions performed traditionally by generation resources are now starting to involve demand side resources. Additional benefits from demand response include peak reduction and load shifting, which will defer new infrastructure investment and improve generator operation efficiency. Technical approaches designed to realize these functionalities can be categorized into centralized control and decentralized control, depending on where the response decision is made. This paper discusses these two control philosophies and compares their relative advantages and disadvantages in terms of delay time, predictability, complexity, and reliability. A distribution system model with detailed household loads and controls is built to demonstrate the characteristics of the two approaches. The conclusion is that the promptness and reliability of decentralized control should be combined with the predictability and simplicity of centralized control to achieve the best performance of the smart grid.

  9. Frequency Response Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Kosterev, Dmitry; Dai, T.

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Frequency response has received a lot of attention in recent years at the national level, which culminated in the development and approval of North American Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) BAL-003-1 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard. This report is prepared to describe the details of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Joint Synchronized Information Subcommittee (JSIS) to develop a frequency response analysis tool (FRAT). The document provides the details on the methodology and main features of the FRAT. The tool manages the database of under-frequency events and calculates the frequency response baseline. Frequency response calculations are consistent with frequency response measure (FRM) in NERC BAL-003-1 for an interconnection and balancing authority. The FRAT can use both phasor measurement unit (PMU) data, where available, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data. The tool is also capable of automatically generating NERC Frequency Response Survey (FRS) forms required by BAL-003-1 Standard.

  10. Detecting Inaccurate Response Patterns in Korean Military Personality Inventory: An Application of Item Response Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Seunghwa

    2013-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    representing themselves. Much literature has argued that inaccurate responses in personality measures could occur by several reasons including social desirability, poor motivation, deliberate faking, or alignment error, etc (Hulin, Drasow, & Parsons, 1983... in conflict areas so that both mental strength and personality soundness are required for military personnel. Although inaccurate responses in a faking-good manner is more frequent in a personnel selection context, deliberate faking-bad may be another...

  11. Assessing the Value of Regulation Resources Based on Their Time Response Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Lu, Shuai; Ma, Jian; Nguyen, Tony B.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast responsive regulation resources are potentially more valuable as a power system regulation resource (more efficient) because they allow applying controls at the exact moment and in the exact amount as needed. Faster control is desirable because it facilitates more reliable compliance with the NERC Control Performance Standards at relatively lesser regulation capacity procurements. The current California ISO practices and markets do not provide a differentiation among the regulation resources based on their speed of response (with the exception of some minimum ramping capabilities). Some demand response technologies, including some generation and energy storage resources, can provide quicker control actions. California ISO practices and markets could be updated to welcome more fast regulation resources into the California ISO service area. The project work reported in this work was pursuing the following objectives: • Develop methodology to assess the relative value of generation resources used for regulation and load following California ISO functions • This assessment should be done based on physical characteristics including the ability to quickly change their output following California ISO signals • Evaluate what power is worth on different time scales • Analyze the benefits of new regulation resources to provide effective compliance with the mandatory NERC Control Performance Standards • Evaluate impacts of the newly proposed BAAL and FRR standards on the potential value of fast regulation and distributed regulation resources • Develop a scope for the follow-up projects to pave a road for the new efficient types of balancing resources in California. The work included the following studies: • Analysis of California ISO regulating units characteristics • California ISO automatic generation system (AGC) analysis • California ISO regulation procurement and market analysis • Fast regulation efficiency analysis • Projection of the California ISO load following and regulation requirements into the future • Value of fast responsive resources depending on their ramping capability • Potential impacts of the balancing authority area control error limit (BAAL), which is a part of the newly proposed NERC standard “Balancing Resources and Demand” • Potential impacts of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) frequency responsive reserve (FRR) standard • Recommendations for the next phase of the project. The following main conclusions and suggestions for the future have been made: • The analysis of regulation ramping requirements shows that the regulation system should be able to provide ramps of at least 40-60 MW per minute for a period up to 6 minutes. • Evaluate if changes are needed in the California ISO AGC system to effectively accommodate new types of fast regulation resources and minimize the California ISO regulation procurement. • California ISO may consider creating better market opportunities for and incentives for fast responsive resources. • An additional study of low probability high ramp events can be recommended to the California ISO. • The California ISO may be willing to consider establishing a more relaxed target CPS2 compliance level. • A BAAL-related study can be recommended for the California ISO as soon as more clarity is achieved concerning the actual enforcement of the BAAL standard and its numerical values for the California ISO. The study may involve an assessment of advantages of the distributed frequency-based control for the California ISO system. The market-related issues that arise in this connection can be also investigated. • A FRR-related study can be recommended for the California ISO as soon as more clarity is achieved concerning the actual enforcement of the FRR standard and its numerical values for the California ISO.

  12. Circuit architecture explains functional similarity of bacterial heat shock responses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inoue, Masayo; Trusina, Ala

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat shock response is a stress response to temperature changes and a consecutive increase in amounts of unfolded proteins. To restore homeostasis, cells upregulate chaperones facilitating protein folding by means of transcription factors (TF). We here investigate two heat shock systems: one characteristic to gram negative bacteria, mediated by transcriptional activator sigma32 in E. coli, and another characteristic to gram positive bacteria, mediated by transcriptional repressor HrcA in L. lactis. We construct simple mathematical model of the two systems focusing on the negative feedbacks, where free chaperons suppress sigma32 activation in the former, while they activate HrcA repression in the latter. We demonstrate that both systems, in spite of the difference at the TF regulation level, are capable of showing very similar heat shock dynamics. We find that differences in regulation impose distinct constrains on chaperone-TF binding affinities: the binding constant of free sigma32 to chaperon DnaK, known to...

  13. ARM: Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hodges, Gary; Stoffel, Tom; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Kay, Bev; Habte, Aron; Ritsche, Michael; Morris, Victor; Anderberg, Mary

    Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits

  14. Accident Response Group

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1991-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy for DOE response to accidents and significant incidents involving nuclear weapons or nuclear weapon components. Cancels DOE O 5530.1. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

  15. Improved Radiation Dosimetry/Risk Estimates to Facilitate Environmental Management of Plutonium-Contaminated Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Bobby R.; Tokarskaya, Zoya B.; Zhuntova, Galina V.; Osovets, Sergey V.; Syrchikov, Victor A., Belyaeva, Zinaida D.

    2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes 4 years of research achievements in this Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project. The research described was conducted by scientists and supporting staff at Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI)/Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute (LBERI) and the Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI). All project objectives and goals were achieved. A major focus was on obtaining improved cancer risk estimates for exposure via inhalation to plutonium (Pu) isotopes in the workplace (DOE radiation workers) and environment (public exposures to Pu-contaminated soil). A major finding was that low doses and dose rates of gamma rays can significantly suppress cancer induction by alpha radiation from inhaled Pu isotopes. The suppression relates to stimulation of the body's natural defenses, including immunity against cancer cells and selective apoptosis which removes precancerous and other aberrant cells.

  16. Modification of alkaline pulping to facilitate the isolation of aliphatic acids. Part 1. Sodium hydroxide pretreatment of pine wood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alen, R.; Niemelae, K.; Sjoestroem, E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pretreating pine chips (Pinus sylvestris) with sodium hydroxide prior to the alkaline delignification kraft, kraft-anthraquinone, and soda-anthraquinone) can facilitate the recovery of the carbohydrate degradation products from alkaline pulping liquors. Under suitable pretreatment conditions large amounts of carbohydrate degradation products (alipahtic acids) were formed relative to lignin. The lignin fraction was composed of comparatively low-molecular-weight fragments. Although the delignification was considerably retarded and the yield (based on wood) was decreased by 1-3%, the properties of the resulting pulp were essentially maintained despite pretreatment. Finally, data are given for the composition of aliphatic acids in liquors resulting from pretreatments.

  17. Micellization Coupled with Facilitation of J-Aggregation for Poly(1,3-Cyclohexadiene) - Based Amphiphilic Block Copolymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jiaping [ORNL; Ding, Weiwei [East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China; Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL; Xu, Zhongde [East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China; Yuan, Yizhong [East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-assembly and its influence on the photophysical properties of polystyrene-b-sulfonated poly (1,3-cyclohexadiene) (PS-b-sPCHD) were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), laser light scattering (LLS) technique, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The amphiphilic PS-b-sPCHD copolymers can associate to form micelles with insoluble PS segments as the core surrounded by soluble sPCHD segments in aqueous media. J-aggregation of the chromophores in sPCHD segments is significantly facilitated in the micellization, resulting in a remarkable change in the photophysical properties of PS-b-sPCHD.

  18. A threat-rigidity analysis of the Apache Software Foundation's response to reported server security issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapira, Yoav

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists a broad body of literature documenting organizational responses to competitive threats, including those responses which fit into the threat-rigidity hypothesis. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate how ...

  19. NOAA Workforce Management Office Hiring Process, Roles and Responsibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    guidance and advice on position classification (including PD Library; or ACS for demo positions ­ Assigns duties and responsibilities. If using Position Description (PD) Library or Demonstration Project Automated Classification System (ACS), determines appropriate classification and forwards for HRA

  20. Vehicle Fleet Policy Responsible Administrative Unit: Finance & Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vehicle Fleet Policy Responsible Administrative Unit: Finance & Administration Policy Contact, and established campus vehicle fleet service under Facilities Management operations. The purpose of the fleet vehicles. This policy is applicable to the entire Mines fleet, which includes department vehicles. 2

  1. Removal of Elemental Mercury from a Gas Stream Facilitated by a Non-Thermal Plasma Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Mones

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercury generated from anthropogenic sources presents a difficult environmental problem. In comparison to other toxic metals, mercury has a low vaporization temperature. Mercury and mercury compounds are highly toxic, and organic forms such as methyl mercury can be bio-accumulated. Exposure pathways include inhalation and transport to surface waters. Mercury poisoning can result in both acute and chronic effects. Most commonly, chronic exposure to mercury vapor affects the central nervous system and brain, resulting in neurological damage. The CRE technology employs a series of non-thermal, plasma-jet devices to provide a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by targeting relevant chemical reactions. The technology couples the known chemistry of converting elemental mercury to ionic compounds by mercury-chlorine-oxygen reactions with the generation of highly reactive species in a non-thermal, atmospheric, plasma device. The generation of highly reactive metastable species in a non-thermal plasma device is well known. The introduction of plasma using a jet-injection device provides a means to contact highly reactive species with elemental mercury in a manner to overcome the kinetic and mass-transfer limitations encountered by previous researchers. To demonstrate this technology, WRI has constructed a plasma test facility that includes plasma reactors capable of using up to four plasma jets, flow control instrumentation, an integrated control panel to operate the facility, a mercury generation system that employs a temperature controlled oven and permeation tube, combustible and mercury gas analyzers, and a ductless fume hood designed to capture fugitive mercury emissions. Continental Research and Engineering (CR&E) and Western Research Institute (WRI) successfully demonstrated that non-thermal plasma containing oxygen and chlorine-oxygen reagents could completely convert elemental mercury to an ionic form. These results demonstrate potential the application of this technology for removing elemental mercury from flue gas streams generated by utility boilers. On an absolute basis, the quantity of reagent required to accomplish the oxidation was small. For example, complete oxidation of mercury was accomplished using a 1% volume fraction of oxygen in a nitrogen stream. Overall, the tests with mercury validated the most useful aspect of the CR&E technology: Providing a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by employing a specific plasma reagent to either increase reaction kinetics or promote reactions that would not have occurred under normal circumstances.

  2. Electric utility response to the Clean Air Act Amendments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torrens, I.M.; Platt, J.B. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the actions and planning by electric utilities to meet regulations on nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide emissions. The topics of the article include sulfur dioxide response and options, the fuel, technology and allowance interplay, nitrogen oxides control, continuous emission monitors, air toxics, clean air response tool kit, and the economics of compliance.

  3. BIOLOGICAL SPILLS RESPONSE AND CLEAN-UP POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    materials (including recombinant microorganisms), clinical specimens/tissues, or regulated medical waste spills in that only direct contact with the spilled materials represents a hazard. Access to only level response. Investigators that work at BSL3 or ABSL3 have written response protocols

  4. Response Predicting LTCC Firing Shrinkage: A Response Surface Analysis Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girardi, Michael; Barner, Gregg; Lopez, Cristie; Duncan, Brent; Zawicki, Larry

    2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) technology is used in a variety of applications including military/space electronics, wireless communication, MEMS, medical and automotive electronics. The use of LTCC is growing due to the low cost of investment, short development time, good electrical and mechanical properties, high reliability, and flexibility in design integration (3 dimensional (3D) microstructures with cavities are possible)). The dimensional accuracy of the resulting x/y shrinkage of LTCC substrates is responsible for component assembly problems with the tolerance effect that increases in relation to the substrate size. Response Surface Analysis was used to predict product shrinkage based on specific process inputs (metal loading, layer count, lamination pressure, and tape thickness) with the ultimate goal to optimize manufacturing outputs (NC files, stencils, and screens) in achieving the final product design the first time. Three (3) regression models were developed for the DuPont 951 tape system with DuPont 5734 gold metallization based on green tape thickness.

  5. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

  6. An identification of policies and practices that hinder and facilitate the admission and retention of Hispanics in institutions of higher education 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantu, Linda Valdez

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    and that facilitate or hinder institutions of higher education in the recruitment, admission, retention, and graduation of students, particularly Hispanic students. The researcher utilized the Delphi method to conduct the study. This research method produces a...

  7. Starbucks cups : trash or treasure? : an example of facilitated systems thinking assisting stakeholders in designing their own system to recycle take-away cups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czaika, Ellen Gail

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed methods, action-research study was conducted to assess the efficacy and usefulness of Facilitated Systems Thinking as an intervention for system design in complex, multi-stakeholder systems, especially where the ...

  8. Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris to Alkaline Stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stolyar, S.; He, Q.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.; Borglin, S.E.; Joyner, D.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Stahl, D.A.

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of exponentially growing Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough to pH 10 stress was studied using oligonucleotidemicroarrays and a study set of mutants with genes suggested by microarraydata to be involved in the alkaline stress response deleted. The datashowed that the response of D. vulgaris to increased pH is generallysimilar to that of Escherichia coli but is apparently controlled byunique regulatory circuits since the alternative sigma factors (sigma Sand sigma E) contributing to this stress response in E. coli appear to beabsent in D. vulgaris. Genes previously reported to be up-regulated in E.coli were up-regulated in D. vulgaris; these genes included three ATPasegenes and a tryptophan synthase gene. Transcription of chaperone andprotease genes (encoding ATP-dependent Clp and La proteases and DnaK) wasalso elevated in D. vulgaris. As in E. coli, genes involved in flagellumsynthesis were down-regulated. The transcriptional data also identifiedregulators, distinct from sigma S and sigma E, that are likely part of aD. vulgaris Hildenborough-specific stress response system.Characterization of a study set of mutants with genes implicated inalkaline stress response deleted confirmed that there was protectiveinvolvement of the sodium/proton antiporter NhaC-2, tryptophanase A, andtwo putative regulators/histidine kinases (DVU0331 andDVU2580).

  9. Optimal Demand Response Libin Jiang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimal Demand Response Libin Jiang Steven Low Computing + Math Sciences Electrical Engineering Caltech Oct 2011 #12;Outline Caltech smart grid research Optimal demand response #12;Global trends 1

  10. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffner, Grayson

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While there is general agreement that demand response (DR) is a valued component in a utility resource plan, there is a lack of consensus regarding how to value DR. Establishing the value of DR is a prerequisite to determining how much and what types of DR should be implemented, to which customers DR should be targeted, and a key determinant that drives the development of economically viable DR consumer technology. Most approaches for quantifying the value of DR focus on changes in utility system revenue requirements based on resource plans with and without DR. This ''utility centric'' approach does not assign any value to DR impacts that lower energy and capacity prices, improve reliability, lower system and network operating costs, produce better air quality, and provide improved customer choice and control. Proper valuation of these benefits requires a different basis for monetization. The review concludes that no single methodology today adequately captures the wide range of benefits and value potentially attributed to DR. To provide a more comprehensive valuation approach, current methods such as the Standard Practice Method (SPM) will most likely have to be supplemented with one or more alternative benefit-valuation approaches. This report provides an updated perspective on the DR valuation framework. It includes an introduction and four chapters that address the key elements of demand response valuation, a comprehensive literature review, and specific research recommendations.

  11. Logarithmic transformation of response Logarithmic transformation of response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komarek, Arnost

    Logarithmic transformation of response Logarithmic transformation of response Often, support S of Y is S = (0, ). Logarithm is then one of transformations to consider when trying to obtain a correct (wrong. Model Building 1. Transformation of response #12;Logarithmic transformation of response When does

  12. Responsibility, Moral and Otherwise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Susan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the waters by blurring concerns about depth with debates about the nature and basis of moral demands. Thus, for example, one increasingly popular view understands moral responsibility as accountability for meeting standards we impose on each other... from what is needed for something to be properly attributed to one’s self, I don’t believe that the former kind builds upon the latter, or that it is necessarily deeper. What depth there might be to our status as responsible beings, a depth we...

  13. Systems and methods for measuring a parameter of a landfill including a barrier cap and wireless sensor systems and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kunerth, Dennis C.; Svoboda, John M.; Johnson, James T.

    2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of measuring a parameter of a landfill including a cap, without passing wires through the cap, includes burying a sensor apparatus in the landfill prior to closing the landfill with the cap; providing a reader capable of communicating with the sensor apparatus via radio frequency (RF); placing an antenna above the barrier, spaced apart from the sensor apparatus; coupling the antenna to the reader either before or after placing the antenna above the barrier; providing power to the sensor apparatus, via the antenna, by generating a field using the reader; accumulating and storing power in the sensor apparatus; sensing a parameter of the landfill using the sensor apparatus while using power; and transmitting the sensed parameter to the reader via a wireless response signal. A system for measuring a parameter of a landfill is also provided.

  14. SBIR/STTR Phase I Release 1 Award Winners Announced, Includes...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Release 1 Award Winners Announced, Includes Four Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects SBIRSTTR Phase I Release 1 Award Winners Announced, Includes Four Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects...

  15. DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees Stakeholders:...

  16. Position Summary: The Director of Graduate Recruiting and Program Development will have primary responsibility for a number of activities in the Office of Research and Graduate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Position Summary: The Director of Graduate Recruiting and Program Development will have primary) that facilitate graduate education at WVUHSC. This individual will have primary responsibility for review and Dillon on other key activities that support and enhance all graduate education programs of the health

  17. General Responsibilities and Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The material presented in this guide provides suggestions and acceptable ways of implementing DOE M 435.1-1 and should not be viewed as additional or mandatory requirements. The objective of the guide is to ensure that responsible individuals understand what is necessary and acceptable for implementing the requirements of DOE M 435.1-1.

  18. The Journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc. -Anesthesiology Fulltext: Volume 82(1) January 1995 p 308-309 What Is a "Replication"? Epinephrine Facilitation of Learning under Anesthesia.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinberger, Norman M.

    (1) January 1995 p 308-309 What Is a "Replication"? Epinephrine Facilitation of Learning under Anesthesia. 1(1)January 1995pp 308-309 What Is a "Replication"? Epinephrine Facilitation of Learning under Anesthesia to replicate the findings of Weinberger et al. [2] that epinephrine facilitates learning under anesthesia. El

  19. This is an electronic version of the article published in: Veermans, K.H., Van Joolingen, W.R., & Jong, T. de (2006). Use of Heuristics to Facilitate Scientific Discovery Learning in a Simulation Learning Environment in a Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .R., & Jong, T. de (2006). Use of Heuristics to Facilitate Scientific Discovery Learning in a Simulation to Facilitate Scientific Discovery Learning in a Simulation Learning Environment in a Physics Domain Koen support in facilitating discovery learning through simulation-based learning. The study compares the use

  20. Progress toward Producing Demand-Response-Ready Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Sastry, Chellury

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes several historical and ongoing efforts to make small electrical demand-side devices like home appliances more responsive to the dynamic needs of electric power grids. Whereas the utility community often reserves the word demand response for infrequent 2 to 6 hour curtailments that reduce total electrical system peak load, other beneficial responses and ancillary services that may be provided by responsive electrical demand are of interest. Historically, demand responses from the demand side have been obtained by applying external, retrofitted, controlled switches to existing electrical demand. This report is directed instead toward those manufactured products, including appliances, that are able to provide demand responses as soon as they are purchased and that require few, or no, after-market modifications to make them responsive to needs of power grids. Efforts to be summarized include Open Automated Demand Response, the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturer standard CHA 1, a simple interface being developed by the U-SNAP Alliance, various emerging autonomous responses, and the recent PinBus interface that was developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  1. Disruptions, loads, and dynamic response of ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, B.; Riemer, B.; Sayer, R.; Strickler, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Barabaschi, P.; Ioki, K.; Johnson, G.; Shimizu, K.; Williamson, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany). International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Team

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma disruptions and the resulting electromagnetic loads are critical to the design of the vacuum vessel and in-vessel components of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). This paper describes the status of plasma disruption simulations and related analysis, including the dynamic response of the vacuum vessel and in-vessel components, stresses and deflections in the vacuum vessel, and reaction loads in the support structures.

  2. NM's Flying 40 List Includes CHTM Start-Up By Stefi Weisburd June 23, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    -ups including Sandia Systems, Inc., Semiconductor Bridge Technology, Gratings, Inc., Zia Laser, Inc., K

  3. Method of enhancing radiation response of radiation detection materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method of increasing radiation response of a radiation detection material for a given radiation signal by first pressurizing the radiation detection material. Pressurization may be accomplished by any means including mechanical and/or hydraulic. In this application, the term "pressure" includes fluid pressure and/or mechanical stress.

  4. Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

  5. Method and apparatus for controlling hybrid powertrain system in response to engine temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martini, Ryan D; Spohn, Brian L; Lehmen, Allen J; Cerbolles, Teresa L

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for controlling a hybrid powertrain system including an internal combustion engine includes controlling operation of the hybrid powertrain system in response to a preferred minimum coolant temperature trajectory for the internal combustion engine.

  6. Oil spill response resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muthukrishnan, Shankar

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and development program. Title VIII concerns the amendments to the Trans Alaska Pipeline System Act. Title I deals with probably the most important part of OPA-90 ? liability and compensation. Claim procedures, federal authority, financial responsibility... minimum. LITERATURE REVIEW From the time that oil was discovered, drilled and transported, oil spills have been occurring. As long as crude oils and petroleum products are transported across the seas by ships or pipelines, there is the risk of spillage...

  7. Structural response synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozisik, H.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The open loop control technique of predicting a conditioned input signal based on a specified output response for a second order system has been analyzed both analytically and numerically to gain a firm understanding of the method. Differences between this method of control and digital closed loop control using pole cancellation were investigated as a follow up to previous experimental work. Application of the technique to diamond turning using a fast tool is also discussed.

  8. Load responsive hydrodynamic bearing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalsi, Manmohan S. (Houston, TX); Somogyi, Dezso (Sugar Land, TX); Dietle, Lannie L. (Stafford, TX)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A load responsive hydrodynamic bearing is provided in the form of a thrust bearing or journal bearing for supporting, guiding and lubricating a relatively rotatable member to minimize wear thereof responsive to relative rotation under severe load. In the space between spaced relatively rotatable members and in the presence of a liquid or grease lubricant, one or more continuous ring shaped integral generally circular bearing bodies each define at least one dynamic surface and a plurality of support regions. Each of the support regions defines a static surface which is oriented in generally opposed relation with the dynamic surface for contact with one of the relatively rotatable members. A plurality of flexing regions are defined by the generally circular body of the bearing and are integral with and located between adjacent support regions. Each of the flexing regions has a first beam-like element being connected by an integral flexible hinge with one of the support regions and a second beam-like element having an integral flexible hinge connection with an adjacent support region. A least one local weakening geometry of the flexing region is located intermediate the first and second beam-like elements. In response to application of load from one of the relatively rotatable elements to the bearing, the beam-like elements and the local weakening geometry become flexed, causing the dynamic surface to deform and establish a hydrodynamic geometry for wedging lubricant into the dynamic interface.

  9. Experimental and theoretical studies of spectral alteration in ultrasonic waves resulting from nonlinear elastic response in rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.A.; McCall, K.R.; Meegan, G.D. Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments in rock show a large nonlinear elastic wave response, far greater than that of gases, liquids and most other solids. The large response is attributed to structural defects in rock including microcracks and grain boundaries. In the earth, a large nonlinear response may be responsible for significant spectral alteration at amplitudes and distances currently considered to be well within the linear elastic regime.

  10. Development and Field-Testing of a Study Protocol, including a Web-Based Occupant Survey Tool, for Use in Intervention Studies of Indoor Environmental Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Spears, Michael; Fisk, William J.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed and pilot-tested an overall protocol for intervention studies to evaluate the effects of indoor environmental changes in office buildings on the health symptoms and comfort of occupants. The protocol includes a web-based survey to assess the occupant's responses, as well as specific features of study design and analysis. The pilot study, carried out on two similar floors in a single building, compared two types of ventilation system filter media. With support from the building's Facilities staff, the implementation of the filter change intervention went well. While the web-based survey tool worked well also, low overall response rates (21-34percent among the three work groups included) limited our ability to evaluate the filter intervention., The total number of questionnaires returned was low even though we extended the study from eight to ten weeks. Because another simultaneous study we conducted elsewhere using the same survey had a high response rate (>70percent), we conclude that the low response here resulted from issues specific to this pilot, including unexpected restrictions by some employing agencies on communication with occupants.

  11. Sensitivity of piping seismic responses to input factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connell, W.J.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the sensitivity of peak dynamic seismic responses to input parameters. The responses have been modeled and calculated for the Zion Unit 1 plant as part of a seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) performed by the US NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). The SSMRP was supported by the US NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Two sensitivity topics motivated the study. The first is the sensitivity of piping response to the mean value of piping damping. The second is the sensitivity of all the responses to the earthquake and model input parameters including soil, structure and piping parameters; this information is required for another study, the sensitivity of the plant system response (in terms of risk) to these dynamic input parameters and to other input factors. We evaluate the response sensitivities by performing a linear regression analysis (LRA) of the computer code SMACS. With SMACS we have a detailed model of the Zion plant and of the important dynamic processes in the soil, structures and piping systems. The qualitative results change with the location of the individual response. Different responses are in locations where the many potential influences have different effectiveness. The results give an overview of the complexity of the seismic dyanmic response of a plant. Within the diversity trends are evident in the influences of the input variables on the responses.

  12. Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authoritie...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and Accountabilities Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and...

  13. Abstract --Due to the potentially large number of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) demand response, distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei

    to accurately estimate the transients caused by demand response is especially important to analyze the stability of the system under different demand response strategies, where dynamics on time scales of seconds to minutes demand response. The aggregated model efficiently includes statistical information of the population

  14. A performance study of ceramic candle filters in Kenya including tests for coliphage removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franz, Amber, 1982-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 80% of all diseases in the developing world are caused by contaminated water (GDRC, 1999). In response to this crisis, decentralized point-of-use systems, such as ceramic candle filters, have emerged as viable ...

  15. Invoke Privacy of Directory Information Directory Information at Western Michigan University includes the following: student's name,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    Invoke Privacy of Directory Information Directory Information at Western Michigan University designated below will be held as confidential by Western Michigan University until I notify the Office Western Michigan University responsible for list/information already printed, published, or available

  16. CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to RCUK Large Facilities Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to RCUK Large Facilities Roadmap December 2007 Page 1 of 4 RCUK Large Facilities Roadmap Response by the Wellcome Trust December 2007 1. The Wellcome Trust is pleased to have the opportunity to feed into the process of prioritising the RCUK Large Facilities Roadmap

  17. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (Phase I). Project IV. Structural building response; Structural Building Response Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Healey, J.J.; Wu, S.T.; Murga, M.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Phase I effort of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) being performed by the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the basic objective of Subtask IV.1 (Structural Building Response Review) is to review and summarize current methods and data pertaining to seismic response calculations particularly as they relate to the objectives of the SSMRP. This material forms one component in the development of the overall computational methodology involving state of the art computations including explicit consideration of uncertainty and aimed at ultimately deriving estimates of the probability of radioactive releases due to seismic effects on nuclear power plant facilities.

  18. A continuum constitutive model for the mechanical behavior of woven fabrics including slip and failure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Michael J. (Michael James), 1978-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Woven fabrics are used in many applications, including ballistic armors and fabric-reinforced composites. Advances in small-scale technologies are enabling new applications including fabrics with embedded electronics, ...

  19. SBIR/STTR Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells SBIRSTTR Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells October 31, 2014 - 12:05pm Addthis The 2015 Small Business...

  20. Demand Response: Load Management Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs...

  1. Demand Response in the West: Lessons for States and Provinces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas C. Larson; Matt Lowry; Sharon Irwin

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 This paper is submitted in fulfillment of DOE Grant No. DE-FG03-015F22369 on the experience of western states/provinces with demand response (DR) in the electricity sector. Demand-side resources are often overlooked as a viable option for meeting load growth and addressing the challenges posed by the region's aging transmission system. Western states should work together with utilities and grid operators to facilitate the further deployment of DR programs which can provide benefits in the form of decreased grid congestion, improved system reliability, market efficiency, price stabilization, hedging against volatile fuel prices and reduced environmental impacts of energy production. This report describes the various types of DR programs; provides a survey of DR programs currently in place in the West; considers the benefits, drawbacks and barriers to DR; and presents lessons learned and recommendations for states/provinces.

  2. Long-Term Hydrologic Responses To Shrub Removal In A SW Texas Rangeland: Using Soil Chloride To Estimate Deep Drainage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barre, David Anthony

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    LONG-TERM HYDROLOGIC RESPONSES TO SHRUB REMOVAL IN A SW TEXAS RANGELAND: USING SOIL CHLORIDE TO ESTIMATE DEEP DRAINAGE A Thesis by DAVID ANTHONY BARRE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... of the study were to identify those biotic and abiotic factors facilitating deep drainage and to examine differences in recharge for the years following clearing of natural shrub vegetation. Soil chloride was examined to estimate long-term recharge rates...

  3. Response Resources Demonstration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingof Enhanced Dr. JuliaPOINTRespond to theResponse

  4. Responses for Public Release

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingof Enhanced Dr.ResponseEnergyfor Public Release

  5. Assessment of Demand Response Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for PGE and Pacific Power Prepared for: Portland January 15, 2004 K:\\Projects\\2003-53 (PGE,PC) Assess Demand Response\\Report\\Revised Report_011504.doc #12;#12;quantec Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for I-1 PGE and Pacific Power I. Introduction

  6. 189USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRSP13. 2000 Abstract.--New computer technologies facilitate the storage, retrieval,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for an immediate action program. In response to this demand, the USDA Forest Service's Arizona Water Program and implementing watershed management practices, educators when learning about hy- drologic processes, and decisionmakers when selecting the best course of action from a set of alternatives. Data sets from the Beaver

  7. Photovoltaic Device Including A Boron Doping Profile In An I-Type Layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Liyou (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic cell for use in a single junction or multijunction photovoltaic device, which includes a p-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon, an i-type layer of an amorphous semiconductor compound including silicon, and an n-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon formed on the i-type layer. The i-type layer including an undoped first sublayer formed on the p-type layer, and a boron-doped second sublayer formed on the first sublayer.

  8. PREPAREDNESS Taking Responsibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulte, Oliver

    it is important to practice plans through regular drills including walk through procedures, announced drills they can assist you Quick Information on How without causing injury. Best to Assist You x How to practice says. x How to get involved in the planning process. x How to create, review and practice plans. x Why

  9. Deep-Diving Cetaceans of the Gulf of Mexico : : Acoustic Ecology and Response to Natural and Anthropogenic Forces Including the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merkens, Karlina Paul

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.4.1 Seasonal and Oil-spill related trends . . 2.4.2 Diel1.4 The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill . . . . 1.5 DataOil Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure

  10. John L. LaBrecque is Lead of the Earth Surface and Interior Focus Area within NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Dr. LaBrecque's responsibilities include the development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    NI-SAR synthetic aperture radar mission. These missions address a broad scope of scientific, and satellites. Among his achievements were scientific collaborations resulting in the calibration

  11. Exact evaluation of the quadratic longitudinal response function for an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layden, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Percival, D. J. [Defence Science and Technology Organisation, P.O. Box 1500, Edinburgh, SA 5111 (Australia)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The quadratic longitudinal response function describes the second-order nonlinear response of a plasma to electrostatic wave fields. An explicit expression for this function in the weak-turbulence regime requires the evaluation of velocity-space integrals involving the velocity distribution function and various resonant denominators. Previous calculations of the quadratic longitudinal response function were performed by approximating the resonant denominators to facilitate the integration. Here, we evaluate these integrals exactly for a non-relativistic collisionless unmagnetized isotropic Maxwellian plasma in terms of generalized plasma dispersion functions, and correct certain aspects of expressions previously derived for these functions. We show that in the appropriate limits the exact expression reduces to the approximate form used for interactions between two fast waves and one slow wave, such as the electrostatic decay of Langmuir waves into Langmuir waves and ion sound waves, and the scattering of Langmuir waves off thermal ions.

  12. Predictions versus measurements of turbocharger nonlinear dynamic response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivadeneira, Juan Carlos

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    for predicting the dynamic shaft response of automotive turbochargers (TCs) supported on floating ring bearings. Waterfall spectra of measured shaft motions at the compressor and turbine ends of a test TC rotor evidences a complex response, showing synchronous...) structural model for the linear and nonlinear analyses includes lumped masses for the compressor and turbine wheels and the thrust collar. The mass imbalance distribution on the TC rotor is estimated from the test data using a procedure derived from the two...

  13. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor passive safety system response to postulated events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M. C.; Wright, R. F. [Westinghouse Electric Company, 600 Cranberry Woods Drive (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor. This paper is part of a series of four describing the design and safety features of the Westinghouse SMR. This paper focuses in particular upon the passive safety features and the safety system response of the Westinghouse SMR. The Westinghouse SMR design incorporates many features to minimize the effects of, and in some cases eliminates the possibility of postulated accidents. The small size of the reactor and the low power density limits the potential consequences of an accident relative to a large plant. The integral design eliminates large loop piping, which significantly reduces the flow area of postulated loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs). The Westinghouse SMR containment is a high-pressure, compact design that normally operates at a partial vacuum. This facilitates heat removal from the containment during LOCA events. The containment is submerged in water which also aides the heat removal and provides an additional radionuclide filter. The Westinghouse SMR safety system design is passive, is based largely on the passive safety systems used in the AP1000{sup R} reactor, and provides mitigation of all design basis accidents without the need for AC electrical power for a period of seven days. Frequent faults, such as reactivity insertion events and loss of power events, are protected by first shutting down the nuclear reaction by inserting control rods, then providing cold, borated water through a passive, buoyancy-driven flow. Decay heat removal is provided using a layered approach that includes the passive removal of heat by the steam drum and independent passive heat removal system that transfers heat from the primary system to the environment. Less frequent faults such as loss of coolant accidents are mitigated by passive injection of a large quantity of water that is readily available inside containment. An automatic depressurization system is used to reduce the reactor pressure in a controlled manner to facilitate the passive injection. Long-term decay heat removal is accomplished using the passive heat removal systems augmented by heat transfer through the containment vessel to the environment. The passive injection systems are designed so that the fuel remains covered and effectively cooled throughout the event. Like during the frequent faults, the passive systems provide effective cooling without the need for ac power for seven days following the accident. Connections are available to add additional water to indefinitely cool the plant. The response of the safety systems of the Westinghouse SMR to various initiating faults has been examined. Among them, two accidents; an extended station blackout event, and a LOCA event have been evaluated to demonstrate how the plant will remain safe in the unlikely event that either should occur. (authors)

  14. Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saffer, Shelley (Sam) I.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a final report of the DOE award DE-SC0001132, Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation. This document describes the achievements of the goals, and resulting research made possible by this award.

  15. RCUK India timeline Since 2008 RCUK India has facilitated over 80 million of UK-India research funding, with 7 different research funders in India.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berzins, M.

    health and crop sciences. UK partner: BBSRC India partner: DBT Solar Energy Two multimillion poundRCUK India timeline Since 2008 RCUK India has facilitated over £80 million of UK-India research ENERGY CLIMATE CHANGE Department of Science and Technology (DST) Science Bridges Three multimillion pound

  16. Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Botkin, Jonathan (El Cerrito, CA); Graves, Simon (Berkeley, CA); Danning, Matt (Oakland, CA); Culligan, Matthew (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

  17. Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

  18. Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assempbled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting regions of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

  19. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

  20. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

  1. Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

  2. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

  3. Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McParland, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, Lawrenceand Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, LBNLCommercial and Residential Demand Response Overview of the

  4. Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.for Automated Demand Response. Technical Document to

  5. Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, Clifford

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,technical support from the Demand Response Research Center (

  6. Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Roger

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    integrating HECO and Hawaii Energy demand response relatedpotential. Energy efficiency and demand response efforts areBoth  energy  efficiency  and  demand  response  should  

  7. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sector, the demand response potential of California buildinga demand response event prohibit a building’s participationdemand response strategies in California buildings are

  8. Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings DavidStrategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings Davidadjusted for demand response in commercial buildings. The

  9. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response Systems National Conference on BuildingDemand Response Systems National Conference on BuildingDemand Response Systems National Conference on Building

  10. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In terms of demand response capability, building operatorsautomated demand response and improve building energy andand demand response features directly into building design

  11. New records of the Cryphonectriaceae from southern Africa including Latruncellus aurorae gen. sp. nov.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New records of the Cryphonectriaceae from southern Africa including Latruncellus aurorae gen. sp, Latruncellus aurorae gen. sp. nov., is described from Galpinia transvaalica (Lythraceae, Myrtales) in Swazi

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Biofuels and Sustainability: Acknowledging Challenges and Confronting MisconceptionsQuantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG EmissionsJennifer B....

  13. SBIR/STTR FY15 Phase 2 Awards Announced-Includes Hydrogen Production...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Phase 2 Release 1 Awards, including three Office of Science projects focusing on hydrogen production from electrolysis and hydrogen systems supporting fuel cell electric...

  14. Grades 9 12 Scope and Sequence for Climate Change Compendium Topic Lesson Included

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Lesson Included AAAS Standards NSES Standards NCGE Standards Background Warming 10: e 3, 4, 8 Theoretical section attached What Effect Does Climate

  15. ORISE: REAC/TS Symposium to include sessions on the Fukushima...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MEDIA ADVISORY: REACTS International Symposium to include sessions on the Fukushima crisis FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Aug. 31, 2011 FY11-42 Who: Radiation Emergency Assistance Center...

  16. Dynamics in Behavioral Response to a Fuel Cell Vehicle Fleet and Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Martin, Elliot; Lipman, Timothy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the FCV and hydrogen infrastructure over time and canvalued the FCV and hydrogen infrastructure (including range,response to FCV and hydrogen infrastructure questions among

  17. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

  18. Dynamic modeling of three-phase upflow fixed-bed reactor including pore diffusion C. Julcoura

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Dynamic modeling of three-phase upflow fixed-bed reactor including pore diffusion C. Julcoura , R-phase upflow fixed-bed reactor are investigated using a non-isothermal heterogeneous model including gas not limiting, so that the simplest model predicts accurately the transient reactor behavior. Keywords: fixed-bed

  19. A bottom-up analysis of including aviation within theEU's Emissions Trading Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    A bottom-up analysis of including aviation within theEU's Emissions Trading Scheme Alice Bows-up analysis of including aviation within the EU's Emissions Trading Scheme Alice Bows & Kevin Anderson Tyndall's emissions trading scheme. Results indicate that unless the scheme adopts both an early baseline year

  20. What are the symptoms of flu? Symptoms include sudden onset of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Randy

    What are the symptoms of flu? · Symptoms include sudden onset of: o fever/chills o cough o muscle lasting 5 or more days (measured with a thermometer; 37.0 Celsius is normal) · Coughing up blood that improve but then return with fever and worse cough Those in high risk groups including pregnant women

  1. Research Activities Web Technologies Web Technologies include procedures that are used in order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouras, Christos

    Research Activities ­ Web Technologies Web Technologies include procedures that are used in order to enhance the services that are offered by the World Wide Web. They include both services that can be presented directly to the users of the World Wide Web and services that are transparent to the end user

  2. Mathematical optimization of a flexible job shop problem including preventive maintenance and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patriksson, Michael

    1 Mathematical optimization of a flexible job shop problem including preventive maintenance as the scheduling problem includes limited availability of fixtures and preventive maintenance planning periodicity, a number of preventive maintenance activities need to be carried out in some of the resources

  3. Life Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case of vertical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Life Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case The article presents the application of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to a complete sanitation system including of water sanitation systems may be done using the LCA approach (Life Cycle Assessment). Indeed

  4. 2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW), INCLUDING NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS (NRP),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    1 2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW), INCLUDING NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS #12;2 2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW), INCLUDING NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS-recycled plastics (NRP). The study presented in this Report is based on 2011 data, compiled in the EEC 2013 Survey

  5. Magnetothermoelectric Response from Holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mike Blake; Aristomenis Donos; Nakarin Lohitsiri

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note we study the effects of a magnetic field on transport using holographic models with broken translational invariance. We show that, after carefully subtracting off non-trivial magnetisation currents, it is possible to express the DC transport currents of the boundary theory in terms of properties of a black hole horizon. This allows us to obtain simple analytic expressions for the electrical, thermoelectric and heat conductivity tensors. Our results apply to both isotropic and anisotropic models, including holographic Q-lattices and to certain theories where translational invariance is broken by linear sources for axions.

  6. Oil spill response resources 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muthukrishnan, Shankar

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be proven that there was gross negligence on their part while they were responding to the spill. Criminal penalties under OPA-90 for failure to notify, violation of vessel inspection, manning, and operation requirements have made OPA-90 a real powerful... of the ecosystem. The size of the ecosystem is an important consideration. It is not microscopic, but is large enough to include the major plant and animal communities (Harm 1991). Consideration of the overall, long-term impact of a particular spill must take...

  7. FERC sees huge potential for demand response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The FERC study concludes that U.S. peak demand can be reduced by as much as 188 GW -- roughly 20 percent -- under the most aggressive scenario. More moderate -- and realistic -- scenarios produce smaller but still significant reductions in peak demand. The FERC report is quick to point out that these are estimates of the potential, not projections of what could actually be achieved. The main varieties of demand response programs include interruptible tariffs, direct load control (DLC), and a number of pricing schemes.

  8. Ultrafast Photovoltaic Response in Ferroelectric Nanolayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daranciang, Dan

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that light drives large-amplitude structural changes in thin films of the prototypical ferroelectric PbTiO3 via direct coupling to its intrinsic photovoltaic response. Using time-resolved x-ray scattering to visualize atomic displacements on femtosecond timescales, photoinduced changes in the unit-cell tetragonality are observed. These are driven by the motion of photogenerated free charges within the ferroelectric and can be simply explained by a model including both shift and screening currents, associated with the displacement of electrons first antiparallel to and then parallel to the ferroelectric polarization direction.

  9. Systems including catalysts in porous zeolite materials within a reactor for use in synthesizing hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rolllins, Harry W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Petkovic, Lucia M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  10. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rollins, Harry W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Petkovic, Lucia M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  11. Systems and strippable coatings for decontaminating structures that include porous material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID); Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT); Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

  12. Demand Response: Load Management Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs... V. Residential Discussion Points Demand Response Definition of load management per energy efficiency rule 25.181: ? Load control activities that result in a reduction in peak demand, or a shifting of energy usage from a peak to an off...

  13. Demand Response and Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response & Energy Efficiency International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations ESL-IC-09-11-05 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 2 ?Less than 5... for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 5 What is Demand Response? ?The temporary reduction of electricity demanded from the grid by an end-user in response to capacity shortages, system reliability events, or high wholesale...

  14. Emergency Response Health Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mena, RaJah [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis; Pemberton, Wendy [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis; Beal, William [Remote Sensing Laboratory at Andrews

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health; however, there are major differences between health physics for research or occupational safety and health physics during a large-scale radiological emergency. The deployment of a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) monitoring and assessment team to Japan in the wake of the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant yielded a wealth of lessons on these difference. Critical teams (CMOC (Consequence Management Outside the Continental U.S.) and CMHT (Consequence Management Home Team) ) worked together to collect, compile, review, and analyze radiological data from Japan to support the response needs of and answer questions from the Government of Japan, the U.S. military in Japan, the U.S. Embassy and U.S. citizens in Japan, and U.S. citizens in America. This paper addresses the unique challenges presented to the health physicist or analyst of radiological data in a large-scale emergency. A key lesson learned was that public perception and the availability of technology with social media requires a diligent effort to keep the public informed of the science behind the decisions in a manner that is meaningful to them.

  15. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    37 3.8.1. Impacts of DR programs on Wholesale MarketPrice Response on Wholesale Markets.in Organized Wholesale Markets .19

  16. Demand Response Technology Roadmap A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    workshop agendas, presentation materials, and transcripts. For the background to the Demand Response Technology Roadmap and to make use of individual roadmaps, the reader is...

  17. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pepco.6: Comparison of SCE, BGE and Pepco Maryland AMI Business3.6.2. Maryland: BGE and Pepco In response to the federal

  18. Demand Response Technology Roadmap M

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between May 2014 and February 2015. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Demand Response Executive Sponsor Team decided upon the scope of the project in May. Two subsequent...

  19. Unmanned and Unattended Response Capability for Homeland Defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BENNETT, PHIL C.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis was conducted of the potential for unmanned and unattended robotic technologies for forward-based, immediate response capabilities that enables access and controlled task performance. The authors analyze high-impact response scenarios in conjunction with homeland security organizations, such as the NNSA Office of Emergency Response, the FBI, the National Guard, and the Army Technical Escort Unit, to cover a range of radiological, chemical and biological threats. They conducted an analysis of the potential of forward-based, unmanned and unattended robotic technologies to accelerate and enhance emergency and crisis response by Homeland Defense organizations. Response systems concepts were developed utilizing new technologies supported by existing emerging threats base technologies to meet the defined response scenarios. These systems will pre-position robotic and remote sensing capabilities stationed close to multiple sites for immediate action. Analysis of assembled systems included experimental activities to determine potential efficacy in the response scenarios, and iteration on systems concepts and remote sensing and robotic technologies, creating new immediate response capabilities for Homeland Defense.

  20. Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, Clifford

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature-based demand response in buildings that havedemand response advantages of global zone temperature setup in buildings

  1. Electrical machines and assemblies including a yokeless stator with modular lamination stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qu, Ronghai; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumar; Carl, Jr., Ralph James; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya; Lopez, Fulton Jose

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical machine includes a rotor with an inner rotor portion and an outer rotor portion, and a double-sided yokeless stator. The yokeless stator includes modular lamination stacks and is configured for radial magnetic flux flow. The double-sided yokeless stator is concentrically disposed between the inner rotor portion and the outer rotor portion of the electrical machine. Examples of particularly useful embodiments for the electrical machine include wind turbine generators, ship propulsion motors, switch reluctance machines and double-sided synchronous machines.

  2. BWR transient analysis using neutronic / thermal hydraulic coupled codes including uncertainty quantification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartmann, C.; Sanchez, V. [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT), Inst. for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology INR, Hermann-vom-Helmholtz-Platz-1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Tietsch, W. [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Mannheim (Germany); Stieglitz, R. [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT), Inst. for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology INR, Hermann-vom-Helmholtz-Platz-1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The KIT is involved in the development and qualification of best estimate methodologies for BWR transient analysis in cooperation with industrial partners. The goal is to establish the most advanced thermal hydraulic system codes coupled with 3D reactor dynamic codes to be able to perform a more realistic evaluation of the BWR behavior under accidental conditions. For this purpose a computational chain based on the lattice code (SCALE6/GenPMAXS), the coupled neutronic/thermal hydraulic code (TRACE/PARCS) as well as a Monte Carlo based uncertainty and sensitivity package (SUSA) has been established and applied to different kind of transients of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). This paper will describe the multidimensional models of the plant elaborated for TRACE and PARCS to perform the investigations mentioned before. For the uncertainty quantification of the coupled code TRACE/PARCS and specifically to take into account the influence of the kinetics parameters in such studies, the PARCS code has been extended to facilitate the change of model parameters in such a way that the SUSA package can be used in connection with TRACE/PARCS for the U and S studies. This approach will be presented in detail. The results obtained for a rod drop transient with TRACE/PARCS using the SUSA-methodology showed clearly the importance of some kinetic parameters on the transient progression demonstrating that the coupling of a best-estimate coupled codes with uncertainty and sensitivity tools is very promising and of great importance for the safety assessment of nuclear reactors. (authors)

  3. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Kathan, David

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Empirical evidence concerning demand response (DR) resources is needed in order to establish baseline conditions, develop standardized methods to assess DR availability and performance, and to build confidence among policymakers, utilities, system operators, and stakeholders that DR resources do offer a viable, cost-effective alternative to supply-side investments. This paper summarizes the existing contribution of DR resources in U.S. electric power markets. In 2008, customers enrolled in existing wholesale and retail DR programs were capable of providing ~;;38,000 MW of potential peak load reductions in the United States. Participants in organized wholesale market DR programs, though, have historically overestimated their likely performance during declared curtailments events, but appear to be getting better as they and their agents gain experience. In places with less developed organized wholesale market DR programs, utilities are learning how to create more flexible DR resources by adapting legacy load management programs to fit into existing wholesale market constructs. Overall, the development of open and organized wholesale markets coupled with direct policy support by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has facilitated new entry by curtailment service providers, which has likely expanded the demand response industry and led to product and service innovation.

  4. Legal protection for the red squirrel The red squirrel is included in Schedules 5 and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    circumstances, permit actions that would otherwise be illegal. These include: · The act was the incidental, there is also a licensing system, which can permit activities that would otherwise be offences for certain

  5. Diffractive laser beam homogenizer including a photo-active material and method of fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bayramian, Andy J; Ebbers, Christopher A; Chen, Diana C

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of manufacturing a plurality of diffractive optical elements includes providing a partially transmissive slide, providing a first piece of PTR glass, and directing first UV radiation through the partially transmissive slide to impinge on the first piece of PTR glass. The method also includes exposing predetermined portions of the first piece of PTR glass to the first UV radiation and thermally treating the exposed first piece of PTR glass. The method further includes providing a second piece of PTR glass and directing second UV radiation through the thermally treated first piece of PTR glass to impinge on the second piece of PTR glass. The method additionally includes exposing predetermined portions of the second piece of PTR glass to the second UV radiation, thermally treating the exposed second piece of PTR glass, and repeating providing and processing of the second piece of PTR glass using additional pieces of PTR glass.

  6. Electrode assemblies, plasma apparatuses and systems including electrode assemblies, and methods for generating plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C; Grandy, Jon D; Detering, Brent A; Zuck, Larry D

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrode assemblies for plasma reactors include a structure or device for constraining an arc endpoint to a selected area or region on an electrode. In some embodiments, the structure or device may comprise one or more insulating members covering a portion of an electrode. In additional embodiments, the structure or device may provide a magnetic field configured to control a location of an arc endpoint on the electrode. Plasma generating modules, apparatus, and systems include such electrode assemblies. Methods for generating a plasma include covering at least a portion of a surface of an electrode with an electrically insulating member to constrain a location of an arc endpoint on the electrode. Additional methods for generating a plasma include generating a magnetic field to constrain a location of an arc endpoint on an electrode.

  7. Recovery Boiler Modeling: An Improved Char Burning Model Including Sulfate Reduction and Carbon Removal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grace, T. M.; Wag, K. J.; Horton, R. R.; Frederick, W. J.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an improved model of char burning during black liquor combustion that is capable of predicting net rates of sulfate reduction to sulfide as well as carbon burnup rates. Enhancements include a proper ...

  8. Abstract Successful transformation of plant tissue using Agrobacterium relies on several factors including bacterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finer, John J.

    Abstract Successful transformation of plant tissue using Agrobacterium relies on several factors including bacterial infection, host recognition, and transformation competency of the target tissue particle bombardment, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of this tissue has not been demonstrated. We

  9. Planning, Execution, and Analysis of the Meridian UAS Flight Test Program Including System and Parameter Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom, Jonathan

    2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Master Thesis is to present the flight test procedures, planning, and analysis including system identification, parameter identification, and drag calculations of the Meridian UAS. The system identification is performed using...

  10. Automated solar collector installation design including ability to define heterogeneous design preferences

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre-defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives. Embodiments may also include definition of one or more design apertures, each of which may correspond to boundaries in which solar collector layouts should comply with distinct sets of user-defined design preferences. Distinct apertures may provide heterogeneous regions of collector layout according to the user-defined design preferences.

  11. Automated solar collector installation design including ability to define heterogeneous design preferences

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre -defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives. Embodiments may also include definition of one or more design apertures, each of which may correspond to boundaries in which solar collector layouts should comply with distinct sets of user-defined design preferences. Distinct apertures may provide heterogeneous regions of collector layout according to the user-defined design preferences.

  12. Including risk in stated-preference economic valuations: Experiments on choices for marine recreation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Leah R.

    . All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Stated-preference valuation methods use hypothetical scenariosIncluding risk in stated-preference economic valuations: Experiments on choices for marine xxx Keywords: Choice experiments Diving Economic valuation Fishing Hypothetical bias Recreation Risk

  13. Departmental Radiological Emergency Response Assets

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the DOE/NNSA national radiological emergency response assets and capabilities and Nuclear Emergency Support Team assets. Cancels DOE O 5530.1A, DOE O 5530.2, DOE O 5530.3, DOE O 5530.4, and DOE O 5530.5.

  14. ERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    changes or incentives.' (FERC) · `Changes in electric use by demand-side resources from their normalERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles Senior Analyst, Market Design & Development, ERCOT Whitacre thermostats -- Other DLC Possible triggers: Real-time prices, congestion management, 4CP response paid

  15. N Springs expedited response action proposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since signing the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) in 1989, the parties to the agreement have recognized the need to modify the approach to conducting investigations, studies, and cleanup actions at Hanford. To implement this approach, the parties have jointly developed the Hanford Past-Practice Strategy. The strategy defines a non-time-critical expedited response action (ERA) as a response action ``needed to abate a threat to human health or welfare or the environment where sufficient time exists for formal planning prior to initiation of response. In accordance with the past-practice strategy, DOE proposes to conduct an ERA at the N Springs, located in the Hanford 100 N Area, to substantially reduce the strontium-90 transport into the river through the groundwater pathway. The purpose of this ERA proposal is to provide sufficient information to select a preferred alternative at N Springs. The nature of an ERA requires that alternatives developed for the ERA be field ready; therefore, all the technologies proposed for the ERA should be capable of addressing the circumstances at N Springs. A comparison of these alternatives is made based on protectiveness, cost, technical feasibility, and institutional considerations to arrive at a preferred alternative. Following the selection of an alternative, a design phase will be conducted; the design phase will include a detailed look at design parameters, performance specifications, and costs of the selected alternative. Testing will be conducted as required to generate design data.

  16. High-energy scattering in the saturation regime including running coupling and rare fluctuation effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang Wenchang [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, D-33501 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytic form of the asymptotic behavior of the S matrix in the saturation regime including the running coupling is obtained. To get this result, we solve the Balitsky and Kovchegov-Weigert evolution equations in the saturation regime, which include running coupling corrections. We study also the effect of rare fluctuations on top of the running coupling. We find that the rare fluctuations are less important in the running coupling case as compared to the fixed coupling case.

  17. High energy scattering in the saturation regime including running coupling and rare fluctuation effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenchang Xiang

    2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytic result for the $S$-matrix in the saturation regime including the running coupling is obtained. To get this result we solve the Balitsky and Kovchegov-Weigert evolution equations in the saturation regime, which include running coupling corrections. We study also the effect of rare fluctuations on top of the running coupling. We find that the rare fluctuations are less important in the running coupling case as compared to the fixed coupling case.

  18. A tropomyosin-related kinase B ligand is required for ERK activation, long-term synaptic facilitation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Shiv K.

    A tropomyosin-related kinase B ligand is required for ERK activation, long-term synaptic of BDNF to the TrkB receptor initiates a wide range of downstream signaling events, including ERK in Aplysia, and that this enhancing effect of BDNF in LTF induction requires ERK signaling (Fig. 1A and ref

  19. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the results from the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve the electric grid reliability and manage electricity costs. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. We refer to this as Auto-DR. The evaluation of the control and communications must be properly configured and pass through a set of test stages: Readiness, Approval, Price Client/Price Server Communication, Internet Gateway/Internet Relay Communication, Control of Equipment, and DR Shed Effectiveness. New commissioning tests are needed for such systems to improve connecting demand responsive building systems to the electric grid demand response systems.

  20. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Kiliccote, Sila; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Wikler, Greg; Prijyanonda, Joe; Chiu, Albert

    2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response (DR) can be defined as actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies and congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, or market conditions raise supply costs. California utilities have offered price and reliability DR based programs to customers to help reduce electric peak demand. The lack of knowledge about the DR programs and how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs, as is the lack of automation of DR systems. Most DR activities are manual and require people to first receive notifications, and then act on the information to execute DR strategies. Levels of automation in DR can be defined as follows. Manual Demand Response involves a labor-intensive approach such as manually turning off or changing comfort set points at each equipment switch or controller. Semi-Automated Demand Response involves a pre-programmed demand response strategy initiated by a person via centralized control system. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. The receipt of the external signal initiates pre-programmed demand response strategies. We refer to this as Auto-DR (Piette et. al. 2005). Auto-DR for commercial and industrial facilities can be defined as fully automated DR initiated by a signal from a utility or other appropriate entity and that provides fully-automated connectivity to customer end-use control strategies. One important concept in Auto-DR is that a homeowner or facility manager should be able to 'opt out' or 'override' a DR event if the event comes at time when the reduction in end-use services is not desirable. Therefore, Auto-DR is not handing over total control of the equipment or the facility to the utility but simply allowing the utility to pass on grid related information which then triggers facility defined and programmed strategies if convenient to the facility. From 2003 through 2006 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) developed and tested a series of demand response automation communications technologies known as Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In 2007, LBNL worked with three investor-owned utilities to commercialize and implement Auto-DR programs in their territories. This paper summarizes the history of technology development for Auto-DR, and describes the DR technologies and control strategies utilized at many of the facilities. It outlines early experience in commercializing Auto-DR systems within PG&E DR programs, including the steps to configure the automation technology. The paper also describes the DR sheds derived using three different baseline methodologies. Emphasis is given to the lessons learned from installation and commissioning of Auto-DR systems, with a detailed description of the technical coordination roles and responsibilities, and costs.

  1. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase one¡¯s risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on applications of NEOTRANS2, indicate that nonlinear threshold-type, dose-response relationships for excess stochastic effects (problematic nonlethal mutations, neoplastic transformation) should be expected after exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma rays or gamma rays in combination with high-LET alpha radiation. Similar thresholds are expected for low-dose-rate low-LET beta irradiation. We attribute the thresholds to low-dose, low-LET radiation induced protection against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations. The protection is presumed mainly to involve selective elimination of problematic cells via apoptosis. Low-dose, low-LET radiation is presumed to trigger wide-area cell signaling, which in turn leads to problematic bystander cells (e.g., mutants, neoplastically transformed cells) selectively undergoing apoptosis. Thus, this protective bystander effect leads to selective elimination of problematic cells (a tissue cleansing process in vivo). However, this protective bystander effects is a different process from low-dose stimulation of the immune system. Low-dose, low-LET radiation stimulation of the immune system may explain why thresholds for inducing excess cancer appear much larger (possibly more than 100-fold larger) than thresholds for inducing excess mutations and neoplastic transformations, when the dose rate is low. For ionizing radiation, the current risk assessment paradigm is such that the relative risk (RR) is always ¡Ý 1, no matter how small the dose. Our research results indicate that for low-dose or low-dose-rate, low-LET irradiation, RR < 1 may be more the rule than the exception. Directly tied to the current RR paradigm are the billion-dollar cleanup costs for radionuclide-contaminated DOE sites. Our research results suggest that continued use of the current RR paradigm for which RR ¡Ý 1 could cause more harm than benefit to society (e.g., by spreading unwarranted fear about phantom excess risks associated with low-dose low-LET radiation). Such phantom risks also may arise from risk assessments conducted for com

  2. Residential Real-time Price Response Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Chassin, David P.; Fuller, Jason C.; Pratt, Robert G.

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The electric industry is gaining experience with innovative price responsive demand pilots and limited roll-outs to customers. One of these pilots is investigating real-time pricing signals to engage end-use systems and local distributed generation and storage in a distributed optimization process. Attractive aspects about the approach include strong scalability characteristics, simplified interfaces between automation devices, and the adaptability to integrate a wide variety of devices and systems. Experience in this nascent field is revealing a rich array of for engineering decisions and the application of complexity theory. To test the decisions, computer simulations are used to reveal insights about design, demand elasticity, and the limits of response (including consumer fatigue). Agent-based approaches lend themselves well in the simulation to modeling the participation and interaction of each piece of equipment on a distribution feeder. This paper discusses rate design and simulation experiences at the distribution feeder level where consumers and their HVAC systems and water heaters on a feeder receive real-time pricing signals.

  3. Current Trends in Gamma Ray Detection for Radiological Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

    2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies.

  4. Extended Response to Weir and Smith Sven E. Wilson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Tony R.

    Extended Response to Weir and Smith Sven E. Wilson Brigham Young University Benjamin L. Howell University Phone: (801) 422-9018 Email: sven@byu.edu #12;2 Abstract Evidence provided by Weir and Smith and a variety of regression models (including that of Weir and Smith). In particular, our pooled regression

  5. LEED Demand Response Credit: A Plan for Research towards Implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the need and methods for commercial building sector involvement in demand response (DR). We summarize, including architects, engineers, consultants, contractors, and building owners and managers. Finally, we in the US increased the focus on the need for flexible demand-side resources to address four major

  6. Tsovaltzi, D., Weinberger, A., Scheuer, O., Dragon, T. & McLaren, B.M., (2012). Argument diagrams in Facebook: Facilitating the formation of scientifically sound opinions. In: A. Ra-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaren, Bruce Martin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Facebook: Facilitating the formation of scientifically sound opinions. In: A. Ra- venscroft, S. Lindstaedt in Facebook: Facilitating the Formation of Scientifically Sound Opinions Dimitra Tsovaltzi, Armin Weinberger Dimitra.tsovalzi@mx.uni-saarland.de Students use Facebook to organize their classroom experiences [1

  7. Plutonium Reclamation Facility incident response project progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austin, B.A.

    1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides status of Hanford activities in response to process deficiencies highlighted during and in response to the May 14, 1997, explosion at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility. This report provides specific response to the August 4, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary which requested a progress report, in 120 days, on activities associated with reassessing the known and evaluating new vulnerabilities (chemical and radiological) at facilities that have been shut down, are in standby, are being deactivated or have otherwise changed their conventional mode of operation in the last several years. In addition, this report is intended to provide status on emergency response corrective activities as requested in the memorandum from the Secretary on August 28, 1997. Status is also included for actions requested in the second August 28, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary, regarding timely notification of emergencies.

  8. Preliminary report on operational guidelines developed for use in emergency preparedness and response to a radiological dispersal device incident.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, C.; Cheng, J.-J.; Kamboj, S.; Domotor, S.; Wallo, A.; Environmental Science Division; DOE

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents preliminary operational guidelines and supporting work products developed through the interagency Operational Guidelines Task Group (OGT). The report consolidates preliminary operational guidelines, all ancillary work products, and a companion software tool that facilitates their implementation into one reference source document. The report is intended for interim use and comment and provides the foundation for fostering future reviews of the operational guidelines and their implementation within emergency preparedness and response initiatives in the event of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) incident. The report principally focuses on the technical derivation and presentation of the operational guidelines. End-user guidance providing more details on how to apply these operational guidelines within planning and response settings is being considered and developed elsewhere. The preliminary operational guidelines are categorized into seven groups on the basis of their intended application within early, intermediate, and long-term recovery phases of emergency response. We anticipate that these operational guidelines will be updated and refined by interested government agencies in response to comments and lessons learned from their review, consideration, and trial application. This review, comment, and trial application process will facilitate the selection of a final set of operational guidelines that may be more or less inclusive of the preliminary operational guidelines presented in this report. These and updated versions of the operational guidelines will be made available through the OGT public Web site (http://ogcms.energy.gov) as they become finalized for public distribution and comment.

  9. Improving Emergency Response and Human-Robotic Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David I. Gertman; David J. Bruemmer; R. Scott Hartley

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preparedness for chemical, biological, and radiological/nuclear incidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs) includes the deployment of well trained emergency response teams. While teams are expected to do well, data from other domains suggests that the timeliness and accuracy associated with incident response can be improved through collaborative human-robotic interaction. Many incident response scenarios call for multiple, complex procedure-based activities performed by personnel wearing cumbersome personal protective equipment (PPE) and operating under high levels of stress and workload. While robotic assistance is postulated to reduce workload and exposure, limitations associated with communications and the robot’s ability to act independently have served to limit reliability and reduce our potential to exploit human –robotic interaction and efficacy of response. Recent work at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) on expanding robot capability has the potential to improve human-system response during disaster management and recovery. Specifically, increasing the range of higher level robot behaviors such as autonomous navigation and mapping, evolving new abstractions for sensor and control data, and developing metaphors for operator control have the potential to improve state-of-the-art in incident response. This paper discusses these issues and reports on experiments underway intelligence residing on the robot to enhance emergency response.

  10. Deep Demand Response: The Case Study of the CITRIS Building at the University of California-Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culler, David E.

    Deep Demand Response: The Case Study of the CITRIS Building at the University of California quality. We have made progress towards achieving deep demand response of 30% reduction of peak loads modeling expertise), and UC Berkeley (related demand response research including distributed wireless

  11. Fabrication of contacts for silicon solar cells including printing burn through layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, David S; Kaydanova, Tatiana; Miedaner, Alexander; Curtis, Calvin J; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for fabricating a contact (240) for a solar cell (200). The method includes providing a solar cell substrate (210) with a surface that is covered or includes an antireflective coating (220). For example, the substrate (210) may be positioned adjacent or proximate to an outlet of an inkjet printer (712) or other deposition device. The method continues with forming a burn through layer (230) on the coating (220) by depositing a metal oxide precursor (e.g., using an inkjet or other non-contact printing method to print or apply a volume of liquid or solution containing the precursor). The method includes forming a contact layer (240) comprising silver over or on the burn through layer (230), and then annealing is performed to electrically connect the contact layer (240) to the surface of the solar cell substrate (210) through a portion of the burn through layer (230) and the coating (220).

  12. Force measuring valve assemblies, systems including such valve assemblies and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeWall, Kevin George (Pocatello, ID); Garcia, Humberto Enrique (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael George (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include stroking a valve member and measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke. Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include measuring a force acting on a valve member in the presence of fluid flow over a period of time and evaluating at least one of the frequency of changes in the measured force over the period of time and the magnitude of the changes in the measured force over the period of time to identify the presence of an anomaly in a fluid flow and, optionally, its estimated location. Methods of evaluating a valve condition may include directing a fluid flow through a valve while stroking a valve member, measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke, and comparing the measured force to a reference force. Valve assemblies and related systems are also disclosed.

  13. Ratepayer-Funded Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    supplies facilitation services, includes energy efficiency in addition to smart grid, demand response, and distributed generation topics. The Western Governors' Association's...

  14. Summary of comments received at workshop on use of a Site Specific Advisory Board (SSAB) to facilitate public participation in decommissioning cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caplin, J.; Padge, G.; Smith, D.; Wiblin, C. [Advanced Systems Technology, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an enhanced participatory rulemaking to establish radiological criteria for the decommissioning of NRC-licensed facilities. As part of this rulemaking, On August 20, 1994 the NRC published a proposed rule for public comment. Paragraph 20.1406(b) of the proposed rule would require that the licensee convene a Site Specific Advisory Board (SSAB) if the licensee proposed release of the site for restricted use after decommissioning. To encourage comment the NRC held a workshop on the subject of $SABs on December 6, 7, and 8, 1994. This report summarizes the 567 comments categorized from the transcript of the workshop. The commenters at the workshop generally supported public participation in decommissioning cases. Many participants favored promulgating requirements in the NRC`s rules. Some industry participants favored relying on voluntary exchanges between the public and the licensees. Many participants indicated that a SSAB or something functionally equivalent is needed in controversial decommissioning cases, but that some lesser undertaking can achieve meaningful public participation in other cases. No analysis or response to the comments is included in this report.

  15. FROM PROPERTY LEASE TO PROPERTY TRANSFER - TAKING THE STEPS TO FACILITATE SITE CLOSURE USING THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S 10 CFR 770 PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cusick, Lesley T.; Hart, Patricia W.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    While implementing a successful leasing program for land and facilities at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Operations Office in Oak Ridge, TN, the Department is now transitioning from a leasing program to one of title transfer. The program, called ''Reindustrialization'', is the result of a visionary idea to enable the use of excess resources to meet a community's needs in the wake of continued DOE downsizing. An established process included within the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act, tailored to meet DOE-ORO's objectives, was used to lease. Title transfer, using DOE's new 10 CFR 770 process, is being undertaken to meet a DOE-HQs directive to close the ORO facility where Reindustrialization is taking place. Title transfer is a key component of the closure effort. However, the process for title transfer is new, it is a DOE process, and it has not yet been completed for any facilities in the DOE complex. Making the transition from a known to an unknown has created opportunities in program design, as well as implementation, coordination and acceptance challenges in a variety of areas, and a host of lessons learned and learning.

  16. Sighting optics including an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crandall, David Lynn (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One embodiment of sighting optics according to the teachings provided herein may include a front sight and a rear sight positioned in spaced-apart relation. The rear sight includes an optical element having a first focal length and a second focal length. The first focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a distance separating the optical element and the front sight and the second focal length is selected so that it is about equal to a target distance. The optical element thus brings into simultaneous focus, for a user, images of the front sight and the target.

  17. Combinatorial evaluation of systems including decomposition of a system representation into fundamental cycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oliveira, Joseph S. (Richland, WA); Jones-Oliveira, Janet B. (Richland, WA); Bailey, Colin G. (Wellington, NZ); Gull, Dean W. (Seattle, WA)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One embodiment of the present invention includes a computer operable to represent a physical system with a graphical data structure corresponding to a matroid. The graphical data structure corresponds to a number of vertices and a number of edges that each correspond to two of the vertices. The computer is further operable to define a closed pathway arrangement with the graphical data structure and identify each different one of a number of fundamental cycles by evaluating a different respective one of the edges with a spanning tree representation. The fundamental cycles each include three or more of the vertices.

  18. Tone signal generator for producing multioperator tone signals using an operator circuit including a waveform generator, a selector and an enveloper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dong, Q.; Jenkins, M.V.; Bernadas, S.R.

    1997-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A frequency modulation (FM) tone signal generator for generating a FM tone signal is disclosed. The tone signal generator includes a waveform generator having a plurality of wave tables, a selector and an enveloper. The waveform generator furnishes a waveform signal in response to a phase angle address signal. Each wave table stores a different waveform. The selector selects one of the wave tables in response to a plurality of selection signals such that the selected wave table largely provides the waveform signal upon being addressed largely by the phase angle address signal. Selection of the selected wave table varies with each selection signal. The enveloper impresses an envelope signal on the waveform signal. The envelope signal is used as a carrier or modulator for generating the FM tone signal. 17 figs.

  19. Grassland/atmosphere response to changing climate: Coupling regional and local scales. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughenour, M.B.; Kittel, T.G.F.; Pielke, R.A.; Eastman, J.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the study were: to evaluate the response of grassland ecosystems to atmospheric change at regional and site scales, and to develop multiscaled modeling systems to relate ecological and atmospheric models with different spatial and temporal resolutions. A menu-driven shell was developed to facilitate use of models at different temporal scales and to facilitate exchange information between models at different temporal scales. A detailed ecosystem model predicted that C{sub 3} temperate grasslands wig respond more strongly to elevated CO{sub 2} than temperate C{sub 4} grasslands in the short-term while a large positive N-PP response was predicted for a C{sub 4} Kenyan grassland. Long-term climate change scenarios produced either decreases or increases in Colorado plant productivity (NPP) depending on rainfall, but uniform increases in N-PP were predicted in Kenya. Elevated CO{sub 2} is likely to have little effect on ecosystem carbon storage in Colorado while it will increase carbon storage in Kenya. A synoptic climate classification processor (SCP) was developed to evaluate results of GCM climate sensitivity experiments. Roughly 80% agreement was achieved with manual classifications. Comparison of lx and 2xCO{sub 2} GCM Simulations revealed relatively small differences.

  20. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005 Motegi,National Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005Demand Response and Commissioning Mary Ann Piette, David S.

  1. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12: Market Impacts of Price Responsive Load in PJM and ISO-44 Figure 15: PJM Synchronized Reserve Scheduled MW:particularly those in PJM’s service territory, have begun

  2. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring in an Agent-Based Smart Home, Proceedings of theConference on Smart Homes and Health Telematics, September,Smart Meter Motion sensors Figure 1: Schematic of the Demand Response Electrical Appliance Manager in a Home.

  3. Selective hydrogenation in trickle-bed reactor. Experimental and modelling including partial wetting.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    reactor; selective hydrogenation; trickle-bed modelling. 1. Introduction Fixed-bed reactors with down1/12 Selective hydrogenation in trickle-bed reactor. Experimental and modelling including partial / ENSIACET 118 route de Narbonne 31077 TOULOUSE cedex Abstract A steady state model of a trickle bed reactor

  4. Zirconium and Hafnium--2004 85. references that include a section mark () are found in the internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -mineral sand operations at Green cove Springs, fL; Stony creek, Va; and from its new mine in Lulaton, Ga. iluka of domestic mining operations. of the two domestic zircon producers, which have four mining and processing's florida operations included a dry mining mobile concentrator and a heavy-mineral sands processing plant

  5. A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Münster, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität

    A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the membrane K Freiburg Germany A dynamic two-phase flow model for proton exchange mem- brane (PEM) fuel cells and the species concentrations. In order to describe the charge transport in the fuel cell the Poisson equations

  6. Satellite characterization of urban aerosols: Importance of including hygroscopicity and mixing state in the retrieval algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite characterization of urban aerosols: Importance of including hygroscopicity and mixing the sensitivity of the calculated optical properties of urban aerosols to (1) hygroscopicity and (2) internal of satellite retrievals of aerosol optical thickness (t) and aerosol effective radius (reff). State

  7. Vertebrates are animals with a backbone and include mammals, birds and fishes. Considering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Vertebrates are animals with a backbone and include mammals, birds and fishes. Considering roughly three quarters of the earth is covered in water it should be no surprise that fish are the most numerous vertebrates in the world. According to the Florida Museum of Natural History there are about 28,000 known fish

  8. Solar-wind magnetosphere coupling, including relativistic electron energization, during high-speed streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Larry

    Solar-wind­ magnetosphere coupling, including relativistic electron energization, during high. If this inference is correct, and if it is chorus that energizes the relativistic electrons, then high-speed solar-speed solar wind streams, and fluxes of relativistic electrons observed at geosynchronous orbit enhance

  9. EARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCES This major includes a spectrum of disciplines focused on understanding the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Anna I.

    EARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCESEARTH SCIENCES This major includes a spectrum of disciplines focused this understanding to read the record of earth history written in rocks and sediments, and on developing models by humans. Opportunities for Students Sigma Gamma Epsilon: The Omega Chapter of the national honorary earth

  10. Process, including PSA and membrane separation, for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA); He, Zhenjie (Fremont, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons. The process includes a pressure swing adsorption step, a compression/cooling step and a membrane separation step. The membrane step relies on achieving a methane/hydrogen selectivity of at least about 2.5 under the conditions of the process.

  11. Primal-Dual Interior Point Method Applied to the Short Term Hydroelectric Scheduling Including a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, Aurélio R. L.

    that minimizes losses in the transmission and costs in the generation of a hydroelectric power system, formulated such perturbing parameter. Keywords-- Hydroelectric power system, Network flow, Predispatch, Primal-dual interiorPrimal-Dual Interior Point Method Applied to the Short Term Hydroelectric Scheduling Including

  12. A TURBINE RESEARCH FACILITY TO STUDY TIP DESENSITIZATION INCLUDING COOLING FLOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camci, Cengiz

    CC-1 A TURBINE RESEARCH FACILITY TO STUDY TIP DESENSITIZATION INCLUDING COOLING FLOWS Cengiz Camci with the description of the Axial Flow Turbine Research Facility (AFTRF) installed at the Turbomachinery Laboratory of the Pennsylvania State University. The AFTRF is a single-stage cold flow turbine specifically designed for studying

  13. Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Federal workers with a safe and healthful workplace. Cancels DOE O 440.1A. Certified 6/17/2011. Canceled by DOE O 440.1B Chg 1.

  14. MAC-Kaust Project P1 CO2 Sequestration Modeling of CO2 sequestration including parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turova, Varvara

    MAC-Kaust Project P1 ­ CO2 Sequestration Modeling of CO2 sequestration including parameter identification and numerical simulation M. Brokate, O. A. PykhteevHysteresis aspects of CO2 sequestration modeling K-H. Hoffmann, N. D. Botkin Objectives and methods of CO2 sequestration There is a popular belief

  15. Security and Access Policy Security of and access to campus facilities, including campus residences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Security and Access Policy Security of and access to campus facilities, including campus residences facilities. Residence halls are secured 24 hours a day. Over extended breaks, the doors of all residence halls will be secured around the clock. Some facilities may have individual hours, which may vary

  16. Rocky Mountain NP, Colorado Nitrogen emissions from a variety of human made sources, including ammonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    sources. Sources of human made or excess atmospheric nitrogen include power plants, vehicle exhaust, oil are working with industry to reduce significant sources of nitrogen emissions. The State of Colorado will use at CSU is focused on identifying and refining voluntary best management practices (BMPs) for agricultural

  17. Annual Summer Forages for West Texas Including Brown Mid-Rib (BMR) and Photoperiod Sensitive Forages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Annual Summer Forages for West Texas Including Brown Mid-Rib (BMR) and Photoperiod Sensitive palatability for livestock (grazed or baled). 1999 and 2000 results from Texas AgriLife-Amarillo determined higher seed costs with BMR forages. At modest seeding rates many of the regional Texas High Plains

  18. CURB APPEAL: The importance of the "front porch" Universities, including SMU, hope athletic success influences application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    CURB APPEAL: The importance of the "front porch" Universities, including SMU, hope athletic success influences application numbers and campus culture Chris Dell, Sports Editor, cdell@smu.edu Issue date: 5 and wealthy donors pump millions each year into important athletic programs. SMU's donors raised Gerald J

  19. What measures climate? A variety of variables including their variability and extreme values determine climate for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    climate zones? The sun is the ultimate power source for the climate "machine". The uneven distribution conditions. Typical variables to consider are temperature (maximum, miniumum), precipitation (includes rain, sleet, snow, hail, etc), sunlight/cloudiness, wind, humidity, ice cover, sea temperature, etc... Many

  20. Learn more about the summer course which includes a 3 week trip to South Africa.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Learn more about the summer course which includes a 3 week trip to South Africa. The program an introduction to the historical and the con- temporary South Africa as well as at least one post trip meeting@binghamton.edu or Josephine Allen at jaallen@binghamton.edu. Destination South Africa - Summer Course 2012 February 28th

  1. et al. and others that simple manipulation of F-actin--including treatment with latrun-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    homeostasis after engagement of the T cell receptor. Negative regulators of Arp2/3 that control F768 et al. and others that simple manipulation of F-actin--including treatment with latrun- culin (13, 14). On this basis, a simple model can be conceived in which coronin-1 reduces the efficiency

  2. ECOVILLAGE FACTS The complex includes 50 apartments (18 original and 32 new)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    radiant floor heating o Structurally insulated panels (SIPs) · In additional to individual garden plots of the Ecovillage apartments include: o solar tubes and compact fluorescent lighting o low-flow toilets, community gatherings o Kitchen o Playroom o Dryers for Ecovillage residents o Solar water heater o Solar

  3. low-density particles include spheres with silicate cores and organic mantles, carbonaceous spheres,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    low-density particles include spheres with silicate cores and organic mantles, carbonaceous spheres is primarily a single silicate with a mantle-core structure, whereas the others are complex aggregates of various micrometer- to nanometer-size phases such as oxides, metal, and sulfides, in addition to silicate

  4. INDIUM--2003 36.1 References that include a section mark () are found in the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Crews, statistical assistant, and the world production table was prepared by Glenn J. Wallace energy savings, various national governments have targeted solid-state technologies, which include light-emitting diodes (LEDs), for increased research funding and development. A proposal for a program to fund solid

  5. A wave equation including leptons and quarks for the standard model of quantum physics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A wave equation including leptons and quarks for the standard model of quantum physics in Clifford-m@orange.fr August 27, 2014 Abstract A wave equation with mass term is studied for all particles and an- tiparticles of color and antiquarks u and d. This wave equation is form invariant under the Cl 3 group generalizing

  6. OPTIMAL OPERATION OF AN INTEGRATED ENERGY PARK INCLUDING FOSSIL FUEL POWER GENERATION,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    OPTIMAL OPERATION OF AN INTEGRATED ENERGY PARK INCLUDING FOSSIL FUEL POWER GENERATION, CO2 CAPTURE AND WIND A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RESOURCES ENGINEERING OF STANFORD UNIVERSITY of Master of Science in Energy Resources Engineering. (Louis J. Durlofsky) Principal Co-Adviser I certify

  7. Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Food Science (Includes Pre-Medical/Dental Option)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Food Science (Includes Pre-Medical/Dental Option) Suggested General/Organic Chemistry 4 ____ CHM 1230 Chem Prin Laboratory 1 _____ CHM 1250 Gen/Org Chem Lab 1 (287) 5 _____ CHM 2280 Chemical/Anal Principles 3 ____ CHM 2220 Organic Chemistry 3 _____ CHM 2290

  8. A macroscopic 1D model for shape memory alloys including asymmetric behaviors and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanelli, Ulisse

    A macroscopic 1D model for shape memory alloys including asymmetric behaviors and transformation behavior of shape memory alloys (SMAs) has been widely growing in last years because of the in- creasing reproduce main macroscopic SMA behaviors (i.e., superelasticity and shape-memory effect), with- out however

  9. Time-dependent model for diluted magnetic semiconductors including band structure and confinement effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Time-dependent model for diluted magnetic semiconductors including band structure and confinement dynamics in confined diluted magnetic semiconductors induced by laser. The hole-spin relaxation process light-induced magnetization dynamics in ferro- magnetic films and in diluted magnetic semiconductors DMS

  10. Decay of correlations for flows with unbounded roof function, including the infinite horizon planar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decay of correlations for flows with unbounded roof function, including the infinite horizon planar for studying nonuniformly hyperbolic flows with unbounded roof functions. In particular, we establish the decay of other classes of flows with unbounded roof functions. For geometric Lorenz attractors (in- cluding

  11. Decay of correlations for flows with unbounded roof function, including the infinite horizon planar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decay of correlations for flows with unbounded roof function, including the infinite horizon planar for studying nonuniformly hyperbolic flows with unbounded roof functions. In particular, we establish the decay of other classes of flows with unbounded roof functions. For geometric Lorenz attractors (in­ cluding

  12. TITANIUM--2002 79.1 References that include a section mark () are found in the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TITANIUM--2002 79.1 1 References that include a section mark (§) are found in the Internet References Cited section. TITANIUM By Joseph Gambogi Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Robin C, international data coordinator. International Corp., Monico Alloys, Inc., SMP Co., and Wogen Titanium Ltd

  13. TITANIUM--2003 78.1 References that include a section mark () are found in the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TITANIUM--2003 78.1 1 References that include a section mark (§) are found in the Internet References Cited section. TITANIUM By Joseph Gambogi Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Robin C status to imports of unwrought titanium from Russia and Kazakhstan. Kazakhstan's Ust-Kamenogorsk Titanium

  14. Motivation and Introduction Titanium alloys, including commercially pure Ti (cp-Ti), are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    Motivation and Introduction Titanium alloys, including commercially pure Ti (cp-Ti), are important-Isothermal Microstructure Evolution in Titanium Patrick Hrickoa,c, Yanzhou Jib, Todd Palmera,c and Long-Qing Chenb a. The energy functional f incorporates a double-well function and the temperature-dependent Gibb's free energy

  15. www.astmh.org world (hyperendemicity), including Puerto Rico. DENV-1 was introduced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    122 www.astmh.org world (hyperendemicity), including Puerto Rico. DENV-1 was introduced and became isolates were sequenced from Puerto Rico from 1981-1998, along with 17 envelope genes from other parts of the Caribbean during the same time frame. The Puerto Rico samples all fall into the American genotype and DENV-1

  16. Power Flow Analysis Algorithm for Islanded LV Microgrids Including Distributed Generator Units with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhary, Sanjay

    Power Flow Analysis Algorithm for Islanded LV Microgrids Including Distributed Generator Units With larger portion of growing electricity demand which is being fed through distributed generation (DG power system. Being able to operate in both grid-connected and islanded mode, a microgrid manages

  17. 38th COSPAR Scientific Assembly 2010 Space Plasmas in the Solar System, including Planetary Magnetospheres (D)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    38th COSPAR Scientific Assembly 2010 Space Plasmas in the Solar System, including Planetary Agency, Kanagawa, Japan Satoshi Kasahara, kshr@stp.isas.jaxa.jp Institute of Space and Astronautical.retino@oeaw.ac.at Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz, Austria Rumi Nakamura, rumi

  18. RESIDENTIAL INVESTMENTS: 2005-2009 (Includes student housing and seniors' housing.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    RESIDENTIAL INVESTMENTS: 2005-2009 (Includes student housing and seniors' housing.) 1 The Loft Senior Centre, 435 Cumberland Seniors residential 8 The Edge Artist Village Phase 1, 611 Main New condo 9 Waterfront New condo 14 Neeginan Village: Phase 1, 155 Higgins New residential - student rental 15 Sky

  19. Coupling time decoding and trajectory decoding using a target-included model in the motor cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Wei

    Coupling time decoding and trajectory decoding using a target-included model in the motor cortex Communicated by D. Erdogmus Available online 27 December 2011 Keywords: Neural decoding Motor cortex Target made within the last decade in motor cortical decoding that predicts movement behaviors from population

  20. A range of soil amendments including diammonium phosphate fertilizer (DAP), municipal biosolids (BS), biosolids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    biosolids (BS), biosolids compost, and Al- and Fe-based water treatment residuals were tested on Pb-, Zn for the first season, with the highest growth in the treatments that included compost and biosolids). Application of municipal biosolids in combination with a lime source has also been shown to reduce th

  1. Digital Arts The digital arts major offers coursework on a range of topics including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miles, Will

    Florida's growing digital media industry and world-famous tourism industry. Our relationshipDigital Arts The digital arts major offers coursework on a range of topics including image in these departments should consider the digital arts minor as a way to investigate the creative applications

  2. On pore-fluid viscosity and the wave properties of saturated granular materials including marine sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckingham, Michael

    interactions. Designated the VGS theory, the new model returns dispersion curves that differ mildly from those sediments Michael J. Buckinghama Marine Physical Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University granular material, such as a marine sediment, is extended to include the effects of the viscosity

  3. Determining Spatial and Temporal Inputs of Freshwater, Including Submarine Groundwater Discharge,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    of freshwater into the bay. A second model using Sr2+ /Ca2+ ratios was developed to discern fresh groundwater. Florida . Submarine groundwater discharge Introduction The timing and sources of freshwater deliveryDetermining Spatial and Temporal Inputs of Freshwater, Including Submarine Groundwater Discharge

  4. Accounting for the Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namboodiri, Vinod

    Accounting for the Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Devices Pavel.S.A vinod.namboodiri@wichita.edu ABSTRACT In light of the increased awareness of global energy consumption the share of energy consumption due to these equipment over the years, these have rarely characterized

  5. TUNGSTEN--2003 79.1 References that include a section mark () are found in the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockpile (NDS) and increases in stocks held by U.S. industry. No U.S. tungsten mine production was reported reported in 2001. Salient U.S. tungsten statistics and world tungsten concentrate production for 2003TUNGSTEN--2003 79.1 1 References that include a section mark (§) are found in the Internet

  6. Evaluation of Response Time in Ethernet-based Automation Systems Galle Marsal, Bruno Denis, Jean-Marc Faure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    design of automation systems including this kind of industrial Ethernet networks. 1. Introduction ManyEvaluation of Response Time in Ethernet-based Automation Systems Gaëlle Marsal, Bruno Denis, Jean@eit.uni-kl.de Abstract This paper presents a method to assess response time of automation system architectures including

  7. Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

  8. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mares, K.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

  9. Examining Uncertainty in Demand Response Baseline Models and Variability in Automated Response to Dynamic Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand response and energy ef?ciency in commercial buildings,”building control strategies and techniques for demand response,”building electricity use with application to demand response,”

  10. Final Report - Facilitating Wind Energy: Addressing Challenges around Visual Impacts, Noise, Credible Data, and Local Benefits through Creative Stakeholder Engagement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Kate; Field, Patrick; Fierman, Elizabeth; Raab, Jonathan; Susskind, Lawrence

    2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The project team consisting of the Consensus Building Institute, Inc., Raab Associates, Ltd., and the MIT-Harvard Program on Negotiation created a model and set of tools for building the capacity of state officials to effectively collaborate with diverse stakeholders in advancing wind development policy formation, wind facility siting, and transmission policy and siting. The model was used to enhance the ability of state officials to advance wind development in their states. Training was delivered in Cambridge, MA, in Spring 2011. The training and associated materials, including a Wind Energy Workbook, website, and simulations, is available for ongoing and widespread dissemination throughout the US.

  11. Analysis of P-wave seismic response for fracture detection: modelling and case studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Yungui

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses a few specific issues in the use of wide azimuth P-wave seismic data for fracture detection based on numerical modelling and real data. These issues include the seismic response of discrete fractures, ...

  12. Subverting value hierarchies : essays on the causes and responses to shifts in demand for authenticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahl, Oliver (Oliver Douglas)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation includes three essays on the causes and responses to shifts in demand for authenticity. In the first chapter, I answer the question: why do previously cast-off products, practices, or styles abruptly ...

  13. Socially Responsible Investing : a comparative analysis of environmental, social, governance, reputational and labor factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramaniam, Arun, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Socially Responsible Investing (SRI) aims to deliver competitive investment returns while fostering social good. It aims achieves its objective by including a firm's corporate social performance (CSP) in its investment d ...

  14. Relative Roles of Climate Sensitivity and Forcing in Defining the Ocean Circulation Response to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Jeffery R.

    The response of the ocean’s meridional overturning circulation (MOC) to increased greenhouse gas forcing is examined using a coupled model of intermediate complexity, including a dynamic 3D ocean subcomponent. Parameters ...

  15. The Responses of Selected Garden Roses (Rosa x Hybrida) to Drought and Salt Stresses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Xiaoya

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    their growth and physiological responses under drought and salt stress conditions. Four experiments were conducted to evaluate 25 garden rose cultivars, including 22 Earth-Kind® rose cultivars. In Expt. 1, four garden roses were subjected to two watering...

  16. Mechanisms of transcriptional activation of estrogen responsive genes in breast cancer cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chien-Cheng

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Estrogen receptor (ER) acts as a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes. The genomic mechanisms of ER action include ligand-induced dimerization of ER which binds estrogen responsive elements (EREs...

  17. Mechanisms of transcriptional activation of estrogen responsive genes in breast cancer cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chien-Cheng

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Estrogen receptor (ER) acts as a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes. The genomic mechanisms of ER action include ligand-induced dimerization of ER which binds estrogen responsive elements (EREs...

  18. Synthesis of a hydrogel-based vaccine to mimic dendritic cell responses to pathogens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Siddhartha, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Live or attenuated pathogens are the basis of many successful vaccines due in part to the orchestrated response of dendritic cells (DCs) triggered by these immunizations, which includes (1) DC and DC precursor attraction ...

  19. Cytochrome P450 Drives a HIF-Regulated Behavioral Response to Reoxygenation by C. elegans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Dengke

    Oxygen deprivation followed by reoxygenation causes pathological responses in many disorders, including ischemic stroke, heart attacks, and reperfusion injury. Key aspects of ischemia-reperfusion can be modeled by a ...

  20. Page 1 of 2 This document stipulates the responsibilities of principal investigators in managing their sponsored

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Page 1 of 2 I. Purpose This document stipulates the responsibilities of principal investigators in managing their sponsored projects. II. Policy Statement The PI has overall responsibility for the technical and fiscal management of a sponsored project, including staying within funding limits, adhering to reporting