Sample records for response spectrum analysis

  1. Piping benchmark problems. Volume 1. Dynamic analysis uniform support motion response spectrum method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bezler, P.; Hartzman, M.; Reich, M.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of benchmark problems and solutions have been developed for verifying the adequacy of computer programs used for dynamic analysis and design of nuclear piping systems by the Response Spectrum Method. The problems range from simple to complex configurations which are assumed to experience linear elastic behavior. The dynamic loading is represented by uniform support motion, assumed to be induced by seismic excitation in three spatial directions. The solutions consist of frequencies, participation factors, nodal displacement components and internal force and moment components. Solutions to associated anchor point motion static problems are not included.

  2. Method of estimating pulse response using an impedance spectrum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrison, John L; Morrison, William H; Christophersen, Jon P; Motloch, Chester G

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical Impedance Spectrum data are used to predict pulse performance of an energy storage device. The impedance spectrum may be obtained in-situ. A simulation waveform includes a pulse wave with a period greater than or equal to the lowest frequency used in the impedance measurement. Fourier series coefficients of the pulse train can be obtained. The number of harmonic constituents in the Fourier series are selected so as to appropriately resolve the response, but the maximum frequency should be less than or equal to the highest frequency used in the impedance measurement. Using a current pulse as an example, the Fourier coefficients of the pulse are multiplied by the impedance spectrum at corresponding frequencies to obtain Fourier coefficients of the voltage response to the desired pulse. The Fourier coefficients of the response are then summed and reassembled to obtain the overall time domain estimate of the voltage using the Fourier series analysis.

  3. Injection Locking Techniques for Spectrum Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gathma, Timothy D.; Buckwalter, James F. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 9209 (United States)

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Wideband spectrum analysis supports future communication systems that reconfigure and adapt to the capacity of the spectral environment. While test equipment manufacturers offer wideband spectrum analyzers with excellent sensitivity and resolution, these spectrum analyzers typically cannot offer acceptable size, weight, and power (SWAP). CMOS integrated circuits offer the potential to fully integrate spectrum analysis capability with analog front-end circuitry and digital signal processing on a single chip. Unfortunately, CMOS lacks high-Q passives and wideband resonator tunability that is necessary for heterodyne implementations of spectrum analyzers. As an alternative to the heterodyne receiver architectures, two nonlinear methods for performing wideband, low-power spectrum analysis are presented. The first method involves injecting the spectrum of interest into an array of injection-locked oscillators. The second method employs the closed loop dynamics of both injection locking and phase locking to independently estimate the injected frequency and power.

  4. Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves Paul C. Liu Abstract. Wavelet spectrum analysis is applied to a set of measured ocean wind waves data collected during the 1990 SWADE {Surface Wave Dynamics Experi- ment) program. The results reveal significantly new and previously unexplored Insights on wave

  5. Ship response using a compact wave spectrum model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linn, Larry Donald

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    characterization of the sea. The next step in determining and evaluating the response characteristics of a design ship rests in the ability to relate the wave energy spectrum to actual ship responses. Through detailed research of the ocean and based upon laws... to spectral width and spectral shape is also studied. The original and compacted wave data bases are then used to excite sets of ship response amplitude operator's (RAO's). The resulting response spectra are examined both statistically and for any...

  6. A Framework for Radio Frequency Spectrum Measurement and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    A Framework for Radio Frequency Spectrum Measurement and Analysis V. Rory Petty ITTC-FY2008-TR allocation and the burgeoning problem of spectrum scarcity have prompted an examination of how the radio frequency spectrum is utilized. The radio frequency spectrum is an important national resource that impacts

  7. Bayesian power spectrum analysis of interferometric data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutter, P M; Malu, Siddarth

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a Bayesian power spectrum and signal map inference engine which can be adapted to interferometric observations of anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background, 21 cm emission line mapping of galactic brightness fluctuations, or 21 cm absorption line mapping of neutral hydrogen in the dark ages. The method uses Gibbs sampling to generate a sampled representation of the power spectrum posterior and the posterior of signal maps given a set of measured visibilities in the uv-plane. We use a mock interferometric CMB observation to demonstrate the validity of this method in the flat-sky approximation when adapted to take into account arbitrary coverage of the uv-plane, mode-mode correlations due to observations on a finite patch, and heteroschedastic visibility errors. The computational requirements scale as O(n_p log n_p) where n_p measures the ratio of the size of the detector array to the inter-detector spacing, meaning that Gibbs sampling is a viable technique for meeting the data analysis require...

  8. Decision Analysis of Dynamic Spectrum Access Rules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juan D. Deaton; Luiz A. DaSilva; Christian Wernz

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A current trend in spectrum regulation is to incorporate spectrum sharing through the design of spectrum access rules that support Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA). This paper develops a decision-theoretic framework for regulators to assess the impacts of different decision rules on both primary and secondary operators. We analyze access rules based on sensing and exclusion areas, which in practice can be enforced through geolocation databases. Our results show that receiver-only sensing provides insufficient protection for primary and co-existing secondary users and overall low social welfare. On the other hand, using sensing information between the transmitter and receiver of a communication link, provides dramatic increases in system performance. The performance of using these link end points is relatively close to that of using many cooperative sensing nodes associated to the same access point and large link exclusion areas. These results are useful to regulators and network developers in understanding in developing rules for future DSA regulation.

  9. Frequency Response Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Kosterev, Dmitry; Dai, T.

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Frequency response has received a lot of attention in recent years at the national level, which culminated in the development and approval of North American Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) BAL-003-1 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard. This report is prepared to describe the details of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Joint Synchronized Information Subcommittee (JSIS) to develop a frequency response analysis tool (FRAT). The document provides the details on the methodology and main features of the FRAT. The tool manages the database of under-frequency events and calculates the frequency response baseline. Frequency response calculations are consistent with frequency response measure (FRM) in NERC BAL-003-1 for an interconnection and balancing authority. The FRAT can use both phasor measurement unit (PMU) data, where available, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data. The tool is also capable of automatically generating NERC Frequency Response Survey (FRS) forms required by BAL-003-1 Standard.

  10. Distance Spectrum Analysis of Third Generation Turbo Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Abstract: Turbo Codes are a class of powerful error correction codes that were introduced in 1993 by a group of researchers from France, which has the performance near the limit of Claude Shannon. After the introduction of turbo codes it has given raise a tremendous research work related to the new coding theory. This paper addresses the performance of Turbo codes by examining the codes ’ distance spectrum. It is well known that error floor occurs in the performance curve of turbo codes at moderate to high signal-to-noise ratio. The cause of error floor is due to the relatively low free distance of the codewords. Several techniques were proposed by researchers to lower the error floor. These techniques are assessed in this paper. To determine the free distance several algorithms were developed by different researchers. In this paper we used one of the recent algorithm to evaluate the distance spectrum of Turbo codes. We concentrate our analysis to measure and explain the distance spectrum of UMTS (Universal Mobile Telecommunication System), cdma2000 and CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) standards Turbo Codes. It is shown that the distance spectrum depends on the code rate, interleaver size and the interleaver type.This distance spectrum of turbo codes can be used to estimate its performance at medium to higher SNR (signal to noise ratio). From our analysis we find out that the distance spectrum is one of the elementary issues using which one can find the optimum architecture of Turbo codes for specific application.

  11. IMPLEMENTING THE STANDARD SPECTRUM METHOD FOR ANALYSIS OF ?-? COINCIDENCE SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biegalski, S.; Flory, Adam E.; Schrom, Brian T.; Ely, James H.; Haas, Derek A.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.

    2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard deconvolution analysis tool (SDAT) algorithms were developed and tested at the University of Texas at Austin. These algorithms utilize the standard spectrum technique for spectral analysis of {beta}-{gamma} coincidence spectra for nuclear explosion monitoring. Work has been conducted under this contract to implement these algorithms into a useable scientific software package with a graphical user interface. Improvements include the ability to read in PHD formatted data, gain matching, and data visualization. New auto-calibration algorithms were developed and implemented based on 137Cs spectra for assessment of the energy vs. channel calibrations. Details on the user tool and testing are included.

  12. Spectrum Occupancy Analysis for Cognitive Radio Zhe Wang and Sana Salous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Spectrum Occupancy Analysis for Cognitive Radio Zhe Wang and Sana Salous School of Engineering frequency strategy has not been able to optimise the spectrum usage. Cognitive Radio could in theory allow spectrum to operate in. Cognitive Radio would hop into unused bands of the radio spectrum and hop out again

  13. Incident spectrum determination for time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, J. P.

    1998-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate characterization of the incident neutron spectrum is an important requirement for precise Rietveld analysis of time-of-flight powder neutron diffraction data. Without an accurate incident spectrum the calculated model for the measured relative intensities of individual Bragg reflections will possess systematic errors. We describe a method for obtaining an accurate numerical incident spectrum using data from a transmitted beam monitor.

  14. THE SPECTRUM AND TERM ANALYSIS OF V II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorne, A. P.; Pickering, J. C.; Semeniuk, J. I., E-mail: j.pickering@imperial.ac.uk [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectrum and extended term analysis of V II are presented. Fourier transform spectrometry was used to record high resolution spectra of singly ionized vanadium in the region 1492-5800 A (67020-17260 cm{sup -1}) with vanadium-neon and vanadium-argon hollow cathode lamps as sources. The wavenumber uncertainty for the center of gravity of the strongest lines is typically 0.002 cm{sup -1}, an improvement of an order of magnitude over previous measurements. Most of the lines exhibit partly resolved hyperfine structure. The V II energy levels in the 1985 compilation of Sugar and Corliss have been confirmed and revised, with the exception of the high-lying 4f levels and eight of the lower levels. Thirty-nine of the additional eighty-five high levels published by Iglesias et al. have also been confirmed and revised, and three of their missing levels have been found. The energy uncertainty of the revised levels has been reduced by about an order of magnitude. In total, 176 even levels and 233 odd levels are presented. Wavenumbers and classifications are given for 1242 V II lines.

  15. Performance Analysis of Dispersed Spectrum Cognitive Radio Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad, Muneer

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    probability of dispersed spectrum cognitive radio systems is derived for two cases: where each channel realization experiences independent and dependent Nakagami-m fading, respectively. In addition, the derivation is extended to include the effects...

  16. Response margins of the dynamic analysis of piping systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.J.; Benda, B.J.; Chuang, T.Y.; Smith, P.D.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is organized as follows: Section 2 describes the three piping systems of the Zion nuclear power plant which formed the basis of the present study. The auxiliary feedwater (AFW) piping from steam generator to containment, the residual heat removal (RHR) and safety injection piping in the auxiliary building, and the reactor coolant loops (RCL) including a portion of the branch lines were analyzed. Section 3 describes the analysis methods and the analyses performed. Section 4 presents the numerical results; the principal results presented as comparisons of response calculated by best estimate time history analysis methods vs. the SRP response spectrum technique. Section 5 draws conclusions from the results. Appendix A contains a brief description of the mathematical models that defined the structures containing the three piping systems. Response from these models provided input to the piping models. Appendix B provides a detailed derivation of the pseudostatic mode approach to the multisupport time history analysis method used in this study.

  17. COBE Data Spatial--Frequency Analysis and CMB Anisotropy Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Brukhanov; D. P. Skulachev; I. A. Strukov; T. V. Konkina

    1995-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the problem of CMB spectrum corruption during Galactic emission removing. A new technique of spatial--frequency data reduction is proposed. The technique gives us a possibility to avoid a spatial harmonics nonorthogonality. The proposed technique is applied to the two-year COBE DMR sky maps. We exclude the harmonics with l=7, 9,13, 23 and 25 as having anomalous statistics noise behavior. One shows that procedure do not give systematic errors, if the data are statistically regular. The spectral parameter of the power spectrum of primordial perturbation $n=1.84 \\pm 0.29$ and quadrupole moment $Q_2=15.22 \\pm 3.0$ are estimated. The power spectrum estimation results are inconsistent with the Harrison-Zel`dovich $n=1$ model with the confidence 99%. It is shown a necessity of an increasing a survey sensitivity to reach a more reliable estimation of the cosmological signal.

  18. Primordial power spectrum: a complete analysis with the WMAP nine-year data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar; Shafieloo, Arman [Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Souradeep, Tarun, E-mail: dhiraj@apctp.org, E-mail: arman@apctp.org, E-mail: tarun@iucaa.ernet.in [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have improved further the error sensitive Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm making it applicable directly on the un-binned measured angular power spectrum of Cosmic Microwave Background observations to reconstruct the form of the primordial power spectrum. This improvement makes the application of the method significantly more straight forward by removing some intermediate stages of analysis allowing a reconstruction of the primordial spectrum with higher efficiency and precision and with lower computational expenses. Applying the modified algorithm we fit the WMAP 9 year data using the optimized reconstructed form of the primordial spectrum with more than 300 improvement in ?{sup 2}{sub eff} with respect to the best fit power-law. This is clearly beyond the reach of other alternative approaches and reflects the efficiency of the proposed method in the reconstruction process and allow us to look for any possible feature in the primordial spectrum projected in the CMB data. Though the proposed method allow us to look at various possibilities for the form of the primordial spectrum, all having good fit to the data, proper error-analysis is needed to test for consistency of theoretical models since, along with possible physical artefacts, most of the features in the reconstructed spectrum might be arising from fitting noises in the CMB data. Reconstructed error-band for the form of the primordial spectrum using many realizations of the data, all bootstrapped and based on WMAP 9 year data, shows proper consistency of power-law form of the primordial spectrum with the WMAP 9 data at all wave numbers. Including WMAP polarization data in to the analysis have not improved much our results due to its low quality but we expect Planck data will allow us to make a full analysis on CMB observations on both temperature and polarization separately and in combination.

  19. A Non-parametric Analysis of the CMB Power Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Miller; Robert C. Nichol; Christopher Genovese; Larry Wasserman

    2001-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature power spectra from the BOOMERANG, MAXIMA, and DASI experiments. We non-parametrically estimate the true power spectrum with no model assumptions. This is a significant departure from previous research which used either cosmological models or some other parameterized form (e.g. parabolic fits). Our non-parametric estimate is practically indistinguishable from the best fit cosmological model, thus lending independent support to the underlying physics that governs these models. We also generate a confidence set for the non-parametric fit and extract confidence intervals for the numbers, locations, and heights of peaks and the successive peak-to-peak height ratios. At the 95%, 68%, and 40% confidence levels, we find functions that fit the data with one, two, and three peaks respectively (0 8 sigma level. If we assume that there are three peaks in the data, we find their locations to be within l_1 = (118,300), l_2 = (377,650), and l_3 = (597,900). We find the ratio of the first peak-height to the second (Delta T_1)/(Delta T_2)^2= (1.06, 4.27) and the second to the third (Delta T_2)/(Delta T_3)^2= (0.41, 2.5). All measurements are for 95% confidence. If the standard errors on the temperature measurements were reduced to a third of what they are currently, as we expect to be achieved by the MAP and Planck CMB experiments, we could eliminate two-peak models at the 95% confidence limit. The non-parametric methodology discussed in this paper has many astrophysical applications.

  20. 294 IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS, VOL. 13, NO. 5, MAY 2009 Analysis of Cognitive Radio Spectrum Access with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Eric Wing-Ming

    294 IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS, VOL. 13, NO. 5, MAY 2009 Analysis of Cognitive Radio Spectrum Member, IEEE Abstract--A new loss model for cognitive radio spectrum access with finite user population the delay performance of a cognitive radio system under various primary traffic loads and spectrum band

  1. Turbulence Spectra from Spectral Lines: Tests of the Velocity Channel Analysis and Velocity Coordinate Spectrum Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chepurnov; A. Lazarian

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbulence is a key element of the dynamics of astrophysical fluids, including those of interstellar medium, clusters of galaxies and circumstellar regions. Turbulent motions induce Doppler shifts of observable emission and absorption lines and this motivates studies of turbulence using precision spectroscopy. We provide high resolution numerical testing of the two promising techniques, namely, Velocity Channel Analysis and Velocity Coordinate Spectrum. We obtain an expression for the shot noise that the discretization of the numerical data entails and successfully test it. We show that numerical resolution required for recovering the underlying turbulent spectrum from observations depend on the spectral index of velocity fluctuations. Thus the low resolution testing may be misleading.

  2. Evidences of high energy protons with energies beyond 0.4 GeV in the solar particle spectrum as responsible for the cosmic rays solar diurnal anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. Navia; C. R. A. Augusto; M. B. Robba; K. H. Tsui

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis on the daily variations of cosmic ray muons with $E_{\\mu}\\geq 0.2 GeV$ based on the data of two directional muon telescopes at sea level and with a rigidity of response to cosmic proton spectrum above 0.4 GV is presented. The analysis covers two months of observations and in 60% of days, abrupt transitions between a low to a high muon intensity and vice-verse is observed, the period of high muon intensity is from $\\sim 8.0h$ up to $\\sim 19.0h$ (local time) and coincides with the period when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines overtake the Earth. This behavior strongly suggest that the high muon intensity is due to a contribution of solar protons (ions) on the muon intensity produced by the galactic cosmic rays, responsible for the low muon intensity. This implies that the solar particle spectrum extends to energies beyond 1 GeV. We show that this picture can explain the solar daily variation origin, and it is a most accurate scenario than the assumption of corotating galactic cosmic ray with the IMF lines, specially in the high rigidity region. Obtained results are consistent with the data reported in others papers. Some aspects on the sensitivity of our muon telescopes are also presented.

  3. Predicting Flaw-Induced Resonance Spectrum Shift with Theoretical Perturbation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Canhai; Sun, Xin

    2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Resonance inspection is an emerging non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique which uses the resonance spectra differences between the good part population and the flawed parts to identify anomalous parts. It was previously established that finite-element (FE)-based modal analysis can be used to predict the resonance spectrum for an engineering scale part with relatively good accuracy. However, FE-based simulations can be time consuming in examining the spectrum shifts induced by all possible structural flaws. This paper aims at developing a computationally efficient perturbation technique to quantify the frequency shifts induced by small structural flaws, based on the FE simulated resonance spectrum for the perfect part. A generic automotive connecting rod is used as the example part for our study. The results demonstrate that the linear perturbation theory provides a very promising way in predicting frequency changes induced by small structural flaws. As the flaw size increases, the discrepancy between the perturbation analysis and the actual FE simulation results increases due to nonlinearity, yet the perturbation analysis is still able to predict the right trend in frequency shift.

  4. Response Predicting LTCC Firing Shrinkage: A Response Surface Analysis Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girardi, Michael; Barner, Gregg; Lopez, Cristie; Duncan, Brent; Zawicki, Larry

    2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) technology is used in a variety of applications including military/space electronics, wireless communication, MEMS, medical and automotive electronics. The use of LTCC is growing due to the low cost of investment, short development time, good electrical and mechanical properties, high reliability, and flexibility in design integration (3 dimensional (3D) microstructures with cavities are possible)). The dimensional accuracy of the resulting x/y shrinkage of LTCC substrates is responsible for component assembly problems with the tolerance effect that increases in relation to the substrate size. Response Surface Analysis was used to predict product shrinkage based on specific process inputs (metal loading, layer count, lamination pressure, and tape thickness) with the ultimate goal to optimize manufacturing outputs (NC files, stencils, and screens) in achieving the final product design the first time. Three (3) regression models were developed for the DuPont 951 tape system with DuPont 5734 gold metallization based on green tape thickness.

  5. Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-6560E Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California and Guidelines The work described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research. #12; #12;Abstract This report reviews the Open Automated Demand Response

  6. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 475, Vol. 44, No. 1, March 2007, pp. 2537 RESPONSE SPECTRAAS A USEFUL DESIGN AND ANALYSIS TOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    vulnerability, and post earthquake estimates of potential damage of buildings. KEYWORDS: Response Spectra. This includes easy to use graphical methods that compare the seismic demand represented by a response spectrum­37 RESPONSE SPECTRAAS A USEFUL DESIGN AND ANALYSIS TOOL FOR PRACTICING STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS Sigmund A. Freeman

  7. Stay or Switch? Analysis and Comparison of Interweave and Underlay Spectrum Access in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    --Cognitive Networks have been proposed to opportunistically discover and exploit licensed spectrum bands, in which, measurements of the utilization of licensed wireless spectrum in fact reveal that the available spectrum this issue, dynamic spectrum access tech- niques have recently been proposed, with cognitive radio (CR

  8. AMI Communication Requirements to Implement Demand-Response: Applicability of Hybrid Spread Spectrum Wireless

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Mark D.; Clements, Samuel L.; Carroll, Thomas E.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    While holistically defining the smart grid is a challenge, one area of interest is demand-response. In 2009, the Department of Energy announced over $4 billion in grant and project funding for the Smart Grid. A significant amount of this funding was allotted to utilities for cost sharing projects to deploy Smart Grid technologies, many of whom have deployed and are deploying advanced metering infrastructure (AMI). AMI is an enabler to increase the efficiency of utilities and the bulk power grid. The bulk electrical system is unique in that it produces electricity as it is consumed. Most other industries have a delay between generation and consumption. This aspect of the power grid means that there must be enough generation capacity to meet the highest demand whereas other industries could over produce during off-peak times. This requires significant investment in generation capacity to cover the few days a year of peak consumption. Since bulk electrical storage doesn't yet exist at scale another way to curb the need for new peak period generation is through demand-response; that is to incentivize consumers (demand) to curtail (respond) electrical usage during peak periods. Of the various methods proposed for enabling demand-response, this paper will focus on the communication requirements for creating an energy market using transactional controls. More specifically, the paper will focus on the communication requirements needed to send the peak period notices and receive the response back from the consumers.

  9. Time Variations of the Superkamiokande Solar Neutrino Flux Data by Rayleigh Power Spectrum Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koushik Ghosh; Probhas Raychaudhuri

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the Rayleigh Power Spectrum Analysis of the solar neutrino flux data from 1) 5-day-long samples from Super-Kamiokande-I detector during the period from June, 1996 to July, 2001; 2) 10 -day-long samples from the same detector during the same period and (3) 45-day long from the same detector during the same period. According to our analysis (1) gives periodicities around 0.25, 23.33, 33.75 and 42.75 months; (2) exhibits periodicities around 0.5, 1.0, 28.17, 40.67 and 52.5 months and (3) shows periodicities around 16.5 and 28.5 months. We have found almost similar periods in the solar flares, sunspot data, solar proton data.

  10. Turbulence Spectra from Doppler-broadened Spectral Lines: Tests of the Velocity Channel Analysis and Velocity Coordinate Spectrum Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chrupnov; A. Lazarian

    2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbulent motions induce Doppler shifts of observable emission and absorption lines motivating studies of turbulence using precision spectroscopy. We provide the numerical testing of the two most promising techniques, Velocity Channel Analysis (VCA) and Velocity Coordinate Spectrum (VCS). We obtain an expression for the shot noise that the discretization of the numerical data entails and successfully test it. We show that the numerical resolution required for recovering the underlying turbulent spectrum from observations depend on the spectral index of velocity fluctuations, which makes low resolution testing misleading. We demonstrate numerically that, dealing with absorption lines, sampling of turbulence along just a dozen directions provides a high quality spectrum with the VCS technique.

  11. Statistical Model Analysis of (n,p) Cross Sections and Average Energy For Fission Neutron Spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odsuren, M.; Khuukhenkhuu, G. [Nuclear Research Center, National University of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia)

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigation of charged particle emission reaction cross sections for fast neutrons is important to both nuclear reactor technology and the understanding of nuclear reaction mechanisms. In particular, the study of (n,p) cross sections is necessary to estimate radiation damage due to hydrogen production, nuclear heating and transmutations in the structural materials of fission and fusion reactors. On the other hand, it is often necessary in practice to evaluate the neutron cross sections of the nuclides for which no experimental data are available.Because of this, we carried out the systematical analysis of known experimental (n,p) and (n,a) cross sections for fast neutrons and observed a systematical regularity in the wide energy interval of 6-20 MeV and for broad mass range of target nuclei. To explain this effect using the compound, pre-equilibrium and direct reaction mechanisms some formulae were deduced. In this paper, in the framework of the statistical model known experimental (n,p) cross sections averaged over the thermal fission neutron spectrum of U-235 are analyzed. It was shown that the experimental data are satisfactorily described by the statistical model. Also, in the case of (n,p) cross sections the effective average neutron energy for fission spectrum of U-235 was found to be around 3 MeV.

  12. Solar Neutrino Rates, Spectrum, and its Moments : an MSW Analysis in the Light of Super-Kamiokande Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srubabati Goswami; Debasish Majumdar; Amitava Raychaudhuri

    2001-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We re-examine MSW solutions of the solar neutrino problem in a two flavor scenario taking (a) the results on total rates and the electron energy spectrum from the 1117-day SuperKamiokande (SK) data and (b) those on total rates from the Chlorine and Gallium experiments. We find that the SMA solution gives the best fit to the total rates data from the different experiments. One new feature of our analysis is the use of the moments of the SK electron spectrum in a $\\chi^2$ analysis. The best-fit to the moments is broadly in agreement with that obtained from a direct fit to the spectrum data and prefers a $\\Delta m^2$ comparable to the SMA fit to the rates but the required mixing angle is larger. In the combined rate and spectrum analysis, apart from varying the normalization of the $^8$B flux as a free parameter and determining its best-fit value we also obtain the best-fit parameters when correlations between the rates and the spectrum data are included and the normalization of the $^8$B flux held fixed at its SSM value. We observe that the correlations between the rates and spectrum data are important and the goodness of fit worsens when these are included. In either case, the best-fit lies in the LMA region.

  13. Analysis of Spectrum Utilization in Suburb Environment Evaluation of Potentials for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    antenna. Our results show that the radio spectrum is not utilized in an optimal manner and that there do in an opportunistic way. Cognitive radio concept for better spectrum utilization is introduced here along allocation. The radio spectrum is assigned or sold to users on long term basis, covering large regions like

  14. Data-Adaptive Wavelets and Multi-Scale Singular Spectrum Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Yiou; D. Sornette; M. Ghil

    1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Using multi-scale ideas from wavelet analysis, we extend singular-spectrum analysis (SSA) to the study of nonstationary time series of length $N$ whose intermittency can give rise to the divergence of their variance. SSA relies on the construction of the lag-covariance matrix C on M lagged copies of the time series over a fixed window width W to detect the regular part of the variability in that window in terms of the minimal number of oscillatory components; here W = M Dt, with Dt the time step. The proposed multi-scale SSA is a local SSA analysis within a moving window of width M fractal or power-law behavior which mimic selected features of certain climatic and geophysical time series. A real application is to the Southern Oscillation index (SOI) monthly values for 1933-1996. Our methodology highlights an abrupt periodicity shift in the SOI near 1960. This abrupt shift between 4 and 3 years supports the Devil's staircase scenario for the El Nino/Southern Oscillation phenomenon.

  15. 2008-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5680E 2008-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response Opportunities in California. · #12;· · · 1.1. Role of the Demand Response Research Center · · · · · · #12;Figure 2: Discovery Process Treatment Facility Controls #12;2.1.2. Automated Demand Response Strategies #12;2.1.3. San Luis Rey

  16. Extreme Response Analysis A. Naess1,2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    NTNU Extreme Response Analysis A. Naess1,2) 1) Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures (CeSOS) 2) Department of Mathematical Sciences Norwegian University of Science and Technology Trondheim, Norway Extreme Response Analysis ­ p. 1/33 #12;NTNU Introduction The approach to extreme value statistics generally

  17. Fluorescence spectrum analysis using Fourier series modeling for Fluorescein solution in Ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadi, Mahasin F

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the fluorescence spectrum for fluorescein solution in ethanol with concentration 1 {\\times} 10-3 mol/liter at different temperatures from room temperature to freezing point of solvent, (T = 153, 183, 223, 253, and 303 K) using liquid nitrogen. Table curve 2D version 5.01 program has been used to determine the fitting curve and fitting equation for each fluorescence spectrum. Fourier series (3 {\\times} 2) was the most suitable fitting equation for all spectra. Theoretical fluorescence spectrum of fluorescein in ethanol at T = 183K was calculated and compared with experimental fluorescence spectrum at the same temperature. There is a good similarity between them.

  18. Spectrum usage models for the analysis, design and simulation of cognitive radio networks.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López Benítez, Miguel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The owned spectrum allocation policy, in use since the early days of modern radio communications, has been proven to effectively control interference among radio communication… (more)

  19. Cosmic microwave background constraints on dark energy dynamics: analysis beyond the power spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabio Giovi; Carlo Baccigalupi; Francesca Perrotta

    2005-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the distribution of the non-Gaussian signal induced by weak lensing on the primary total intensity cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. Our study focuses on the three point statistics exploiting an harmonic analysis based on the CMB bispectrum. By considering the three multipoles as independent variables, we reveal a complex structure of peaks and valleys determined by the re-projection of the primordial acoustic oscillations through the lensing mechanism. We study the dependence of this system on the expansion rate at the epoch in which the weak lensing power injection is relevant, probing the dark energy equation of state at redshift corresponding to the equivalence with matter or higher ($w_\\infty$). We evaluate the impact of the bispectrum observable on the CMB capability of constraining the dark energy dynamics. We perform a maximum likelihood analysis by varying the dark energy abundance, the present equation of state $w_0$ and $w_\\infty$. We show that the projection degeneracy affecting a pure power spectrum analysis in total intensity is broken if the bispectrum is taken into account. For a Planck-like experiment, assuming nominal performance, no foregrounds or systematics, and fixing all the parameters except $w_0$, $w_\\infty$ and the dark energy abundance, a percent and ten percent precision measure of $w_0$ and $w_\\infty$ is achievable from CMB data only. These results indicate that the detection of the weak lensing signal by the forthcoming CMB probes may be relevant to gain insight into the dark energy dynamics at the onset of cosmic acceleration.

  20. Multi-Resolution error analysis of predicted absorption coecients. Method and application to the infrared spectrum of methane at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to the infrared spectrum of methane at high temperature. Ch. Wenger & J. P. Champion Laboratoire to predict the absorption coecient of methane at high temperature involving simultaneously well known lower: Error analysis; absorption coecient; methane; infrared; high temperature; high-resolution; vibration

  1. BAYESIAN RESIDUAL ANALYSIS FOR BINARY RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert, James H.

    of Mathematics and Statistics Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, 43403 USA Siddhartha Chib Olin School of Business Washington University, St. Louis 63130 USA March, 1994 Summary In a binary response

  2. Operator`s guide for VAXGAP, a gamma-ray spectrum analysis package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killian, E.W.; Femec, D.A.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the gamma-ray analysis program VAXGAP, which has continually evolved at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory over a period of several years. It is an integrated suite of computer programs for performing analyses of pulse-height spectra from high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers and assorted support functions. VAXGAP programs operate on Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX computers running the VMS operating system, and were written in VAX FORTRAN and DEC Digital Command Language (DCL). These programs make use of DEC GKS and ReGIS for graphical output on standard terminals and printers, and DEC windows for graphics on workstations and terminals that support the X Window System protocol. This report addresses the use of VAXGAP for data acquisition and control, energy scale calibration, and real-time analyses of background and sample pulse-height spectra. Also addressed are the creation and use efficiency tables and isotope libraries, manipulation of spectrum files and their contents, and graphical display of on-going acquisitions, saved spectra, and mathematical fits to spectral peaks.

  3. Operator's guide for VAXGAP, a gamma-ray spectrum analysis package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killian, E.W.; Femec, D.A.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the gamma-ray analysis program VAXGAP, which has continually evolved at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory over a period of several years. It is an integrated suite of computer programs for performing analyses of pulse-height spectra from high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers and assorted support functions. VAXGAP programs operate on Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX computers running the VMS operating system, and were written in VAX FORTRAN and DEC Digital Command Language (DCL). These programs make use of DEC GKS and ReGIS for graphical output on standard terminals and printers, and DEC windows for graphics on workstations and terminals that support the X Window System protocol. This report addresses the use of VAXGAP for data acquisition and control, energy scale calibration, and real-time analyses of background and sample pulse-height spectra. Also addressed are the creation and use efficiency tables and isotope libraries, manipulation of spectrum files and their contents, and graphical display of on-going acquisitions, saved spectra, and mathematical fits to spectral peaks.

  4. Tsunami response at Wake Island: azimuthal mode analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creswell, Wiltie Austin

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TSUNAMI RESPONSE AT WAKE ISLAND: AZIMUTIIAL MODE ANALYSIS A Thesis by WILTIE AUSTIN CRESWELL III Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1987 Major Subject: Oceanography TSUNAMI RESPONSE AT WAKE ISLAND: AZIMUTHAL MODE ANALYSIS A Thesis by WILTIE AUSTIN CRESWELL III Approved as to style and content by: Andrew C. Vastano (Chairman of Committee) Robert O. Reid (Member) Guy...

  5. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: Power-spectrum analysis of the final dataset and cosmological implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Cole; W. J. Percival; J. A. Peacock; P. Norberg; C. M. Baugh; C. S. Frenk; I. Baldry; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; N. J. G. Cross; G. Dalton; V. R. Eke; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; A. Jenkins; O. Lahav; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; S. Maddox; D. Madgwick; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

    2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a power spectrum analysis of the final 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, employing a direct Fourier method. The sample used comprises 221,414 galaxies with measured redshifts. We investigate in detail the modelling of the sample selection. A new angular mask is derived, based on revisions to the photometric calibration. The redshift selection function is determined by dividing the survey according to rest-frame colour, and deducing a self-consistent treatment of k-corrections and evolution for each population. The covariance matrix for the power-spectrum estimates is determined using two different approaches to the construction of mock surveys which are used to demonstrate that the input cosmological model can be correctly recovered. We are confident that the 2dFGRS power spectrum can be used to infer the matter content of the universe. On large scales, our estimated power spectrum shows evidence for the `baryon oscillations' that are predicted in CDM models. Fitting to a CDM model, assuming a primordial $n_{s}=1$ spectrum, $h=0.72$ and negligible neutrino mass, the preferred parameters are $\\Omega_{M} h = 0.168 \\pm 0.016$ and a baryon fraction $\\Omega_{b} /\\Omega_{M} = 0.185\\pm0.046$ (1$\\sigma$ errors). The value of $\\Omega_{M} h$ is $1\\sigma$ lower than the $0.20 \\pm 0.03$ in our 2001 analysis of the partially complete 2dFGRS. This shift is largely due to the signal from the newly-sampled regions of space, rather than the refinements in the treatment of observational selection. This analysis therefore implies a density significantly below the standard $\\Omega_{M} =0.3$: in combination with CMB data from WMAP, we infer $\\Omega_{M} =0.231\\pm 0.021$. (Abridged.)

  6. Power-spectrum analysis of Super-Kamiokande solar neutrino data, taking into account asymmetry in the error estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Sturrock; J. D. Scargle

    2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this article is to carry out a power-spectrum analysis (based on likelihood methods) of the Super-Kamiokande 5-day dataset that takes account of the asymmetry in the error estimates. Whereas the likelihood analysis involves a linear optimization procedure for symmetrical error estimates, it involves a nonlinear optimization procedure for asymmetrical error estimates. We find that for most frequencies there is little difference between the power spectra derived from analyses of symmetrized error estimates and from asymmetrical error estimates. However, this proves not to be the case for the principal peak in the power spectra, which is found at 9.43 yr-1. A likelihood analysis which allows for a "floating offset" and takes account of the start time and end time of each bin and of the flux estimate and the symmetrized error estimate leads to a power of 11.24 for this peak. A Monte Carlo analysis shows that there is a chance of only 1% of finding a peak this big or bigger in the frequency band 1 - 36 yr-1 (the widest band that avoids artificial peaks). On the other hand, an analysis that takes account of the error asymmetry leads to a peak with power 13.24 at that frequency. A Monte Carlo analysis shows that there is a chance of only 0.1% of finding a peak this big or bigger in that frequency band 1 - 36 yr-1. From this perspective, power spectrum analysis that takes account of asymmetry of the error estimates gives evidence for variability that is significant at the 99.9% level. We comment briefly on an apparent discrepancy between power spectrum analyses of the Super-Kamiokande and SNO solar neutrino experiments.

  7. Photocurrent spectrum study of a quantum dot single-photon detector based on resonant tunneling effect with near-infrared response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, Q. C. [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); An, Z. H., E-mail: anzhenghua@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: luwei@mail.sitp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics and Institute of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Xiong, D. Y.; Zhu, Z. Q. [Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Zhang, B.; Chen, P. P.; Li, T. X.; Lu, W., E-mail: anzhenghua@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: luwei@mail.sitp.ac.cn [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the photocurrent spectrum study of a quantum dot (QD) single-photon detector using a reset technique which eliminates the QD's “memory effect.” By applying a proper reset frequency and keeping the detector in linear-response region, the detector's responses to different monochromatic light are resolved which reflects different detection efficiencies. We find the reset photocurrent tails up to 1.3??m wavelength and near-infrared (?1100?nm) single-photon sensitivity is demonstrated due to interband transition of electrons in QDs, indicating the device a promising candidate both in quantum information applications and highly sensitive imaging applications operating in relative high temperatures (>80?K).

  8. Game Theoretic Analysis of Distributed Spectrum Sharing With Database Xu Chen and Jianwei Huang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    licensed holders of TV spectrum) provide the database with the up-to-date information including TV tower transmission parameters and TV receiver protection requirements. Based on this information, the database location, given the white-space device's transmission parameters such as the transmission power. Although

  9. Roughness-induced Transient Growth: Continuous-spectrum Receptivity and Secondary Instability Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denissen, Nicholas Allen

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 C. Approach and Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 II TRANSIENT GROWTH THEORY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 A. Linearized Equations and Continuous Spectrum . . . . . . 18 B. The Receptivity Problem... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 C. Far Wake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 D. Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 VI CONCLUSIONS AND FUTURE WORK . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 A. Does Path C Exist...

  10. Review of Methods of Power-Spectrum Analysis as Applied to Super-Kamiokande Solar Neutrino Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Sturrock

    2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    To help understand why different published analyses of the Super-Kamiokande solar neutrino data arrive at different conclusions, we have applied six different methods to a standardized problem. The key difference between the various methods rests in the amount of information that each processes. A Lomb-Scargle analysis that uses the mid times of the time bins and ignores experimental error estimates uses the least information. A likelihood analysis that uses the start times, end times, and mean live times, and takes account of the experimental error estimates, makes the greatest use of the available information. We carry out power-spectrum analyses of the Super-Kamiokande 5-day solar neutrino data, using each method in turn, for a standard search band (0 to 50 yr-1). For each method, we also carry out a fixed number (10,000) of Monte-Carlo simulations for the purpose of estimating the significance of the leading peak in each power spectrum. We find that, with one exception, the results of these calculations are compatible with those of previously published analyses. (We are unable to replicate Koshio's recent results.) We find that the significance of the peaks at 9.43 yr-1 and at 43.72 yr-1 increases progressively as one incorporates more information into the analysis procedure.

  11. Data analysis method for wind turbine dynamic response testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, T.L.; Hock, S.M.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind Research Branch at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) has developed an efficient data analysis package for personal computer use in response to growing needs of the wind turbine industry and SERI's Cooperative Field Test Program. This new software is used by field test engineers to examine wind turbine performance and loads during testing, as well as by data analysts for detailed post-processing. The Wind Data Analysis Tool Set, WINDATS, has been written as a collection of tools that fall into two general groups. First, the preparatory tools perform subsection, filtering, decimation, preaveraging, scaling, and derivation of new channels. Second, analysis tools are used for mean removal, linear detrending, azimuth averaging and removal, per-rev averaging, binning, and spectral analysis. The input data file can be a standard ASCII file as is generated by most data acquisition software. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Green thermoelectrics: Observation and analysis of plant thermoelectric response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goupil, C; Khamsing, A; Apertet, Y; Bouteau, F; Mancuso, S; Patino, R; Lecoeur, Ph

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plants are sensitive to thermal and electrical effects; yet the coupling of both, known as thermoelectricity, and its quantitative measurement in vegetal systems never were reported. We recorded the thermoelectric response of bean sprouts under various thermal conditions and stress. The obtained experimental data unambiguously demonstrate that a temperature difference between the roots and the leaves of a bean sprout induces a thermoelectric voltage between these two points. Basing our analysis of the data on the force-flux formalism of linear response theory, we found that the strength of the vegetal equivalent to the thermoelectric coupling is one order of magnitude larger than that in the best thermoelectric materials. Experimental data also show the importance of the thermal stress variation rate in the plant's electrophysiological response. Therefore, thermoelectric effects are sufficiently important to partake in the complex and intertwined processes of energy and matter transport within plants.

  13. A fresh look at the seismic spectrum of HD49933: analysis of 180 days of CoRoT photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benomar, O; Campante, T L; Chaplin, W J; García, R A; Gaulme, P; Toutain, T; Verner, G A; Appourchaux, T; Ballot, J; Barban, C; Elsworth, Y; Mathur, S; Mosser, B; Régulo, C; Roxburgh, I W; Auvergne, M; Baglin, A; Catala, C; Michel, E; Samadi, R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar-like oscillations have now been observed in several stars, thanks to ground-based spectroscopic observations and space-borne photometry. CoRoT, which has been in orbit since December 2006, has observed the star HD49933 twice. The oscillation spectrum of this star has proven difficult to interpret. Thanks to a new timeseries provided by CoRoT, we aim to provide a robust description of the oscillations in HD49933, i.e., to identify the degrees of the observed modes, and to measure mode frequencies, widths, amplitudes and the average rotational splitting. Several methods were used to model the Fourier spectrum: Maximum Likelihood Estimators and Bayesian analysis using Markov Chain Monte-Carlo techniques. The different methods yield consistent result, and allow us to make a robust identification of the modes and to extract precise mode parameters. Only the rotational splitting remains difficult to estimate precisely, but is clearly relatively large (several microHz in size).

  14. A theoretical analysis of proportional counter response versus LET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, George Gerald

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    crimlurator settin A computer program rvas devcloned to couple t'ie energy disLribution and IDT equation;. of Lhe five b, rta emitter, : argon-41& krypton-85, iodine-333, xenon-133 and cesium-137, for clcLccror chamber sizes oF 50 cm. v 10 crn. x I c. m.... Fwergy spectrum of the 8 rays from A-gon-41. 18 F'IG. B. Fnezgy spectrum of the 8 rays from Krypton-85. . . FIG. 9. Energ~ spectrum of the 8 rays from Iodine-131. . . 20 FIG. 10. FIG. 11. Energy spectrum of the 8 rays from Xenon-133. . . Energy...

  15. A study of wind variability in the lower troposphere through power spectrum analysis at mesoscale frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornett, John Sheldon

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the theoretical and practical application of the analysis method comes directly from this reference. B. Fundamental Assum tions of Power S ectrum Theor Consider a function of time X(t), such as wind speed, which is generated by a random process. Then the value... of the function X(t) at any particular point in time is a random variable. This random process may or may not have a Gaussian or normal distribution but it is a fundamental assumption (at least in the development of the theory) that the random process...

  16. Baryon spin-flavor structure from an analysis of lattice QCD results of the baryon spectrum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fernando, I P; Goity, J L

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU(6) x O(3), where the [56,l^P=0^+] ground state and excited baryons, and the [56,2^+] and [70}},1^-] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to order 1/Nc} and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations, as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. The main conclusion of the analysis is that qualitatively the dominant physical effects are similar for the physical and the lattice QCD baryons.

  17. Power Spectrum Analysis of Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Decay-Rate Data: Evidence for Solar Rotational Modulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Sturrock; J. B. Buncher; E. Fischbach; J. T. Gruenwald; D. Javorsek II; J. H. Jenkins; R. H. Lee; J. J. Mattes; J. R. Newport

    2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Evidence for an anomalous annual periodicity in certain nuclear decay data has led to speculation concerning a possible solar influence on nuclear processes. We have recently analyzed data concerning the decay rates of Cl-36 and Si-32, acquired at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), to search for evidence that might be indicative of a process involving solar rotation. Smoothing of the power spectrum by weighted-running-mean analysis leads to a significant peak at frequency 11.18/yr, which is lower than the equatorial synodic rotation rates of the convection and radiative zones. This article concerns measurements of the decay rates of Ra-226 acquired at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. We find that a similar (but not identical) analysis yields a significant peak in the PTB dataset at frequency 11.21/yr, and a peak in the BNL dataset at 11.25/yr. The change in the BNL result is not significant since the uncertainties in the BNL and PTB analyses are estimated to be 0.13/yr and 0.07/yr, respectively. Combining the two running means by forming the joint power statistic leads to a highly significant peak at frequency 11.23/yr. We comment briefly on the possible implications of these results for solar physics and for particle physics.

  18. A study of the ground and excited states of Al3 and Al3 Computational analysis of the 488 nm anion photoelectron spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truhlar, Donald G

    A study of the ground and excited states of Al3 and Al3 - . II. Computational analysis of the 488 nm anion photoelectron spectrum and a reconsideration of the Al3 bond dissociation energy Stephen R-lying excited electronic states of Al3 - and Al3 and compared with the available spectroscopic data

  19. PINS Spectrum Identification Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.J. Caffrey

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy—PINS, for short—system identifies the chemicals inside munitions and containers without opening them, a decided safety advantage if the fill chemical is a hazardous substance like a chemical warfare agent or an explosive. The PINS Spectrum Identification Guide is intended as a reference for technical professionals responsible for the interpretation of PINS gamma-ray spectra. The guide is divided into two parts. The three chapters that constitute Part I cover the science and technology of PINS. Neutron activation analysis is the focus of Chapter 1. Chapter 2 explores PINS hardware, software, and related operational issues. Gamma-ray spectral analysis basics are introduced in Chapter 3. The six chapters of Part II cover the identification of PINS spectra in detail. Like the PINS decision tree logic, these chapters are organized by chemical element: phosphorus-based chemicals, chlorine-based chemicals, etc. These descriptions of hazardous, toxic, and/or explosive chemicals conclude with a chapter on the identification of the inert chemicals, e.g. sand, used to fill practice munitions.

  20. Global Analysis of Heat Shock Response in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chhabra, S.R.; He, Q.; Huang, K.H.; Gaucher, S.P.; Alm, E.J.; He,Z.; Hadi, M.Z.; Hazen, T.C.; Wall, J.D.; Zhou, J.; Arkin, A.P.; Singh, A.K.

    2005-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough belongs to a class ofsulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and is found ubiquitously in nature.Given the importance of SRB-mediated reduction for bioremediation ofmetal ion contaminants, ongoing research on D. vulgaris has been in thedirection of elucidating regulatory mechanisms for this organism under avariety of stress conditions. This work presents a global view of thisorganism's response to elevated growth temperature using whole-celltranscriptomics and proteomics tools. Transcriptional response (1.7-foldchange or greater; Z>1.5) ranged from 1,135 genes at 15 min to 1,463genes at 120 min for a temperature up-shift of 13oC from a growthtemperature of 37oC for this organism and suggested both direct andindirect modes of heat sensing. Clusters of orthologous group categoriesthat were significantly affected included posttranslationalmodifications; protein turnover and chaperones (up-regulated); energyproduction and conversion (down-regulated), nucleotide transport,metabolism (down-regulated), and translation; ribosomal structure; andbiogenesis (down-regulated). Analysis of the genome sequence revealed thepresence of features of both negative and positive regulation whichincluded the CIRCE element and promoter sequences corresponding to thealternate sigma factors ?32 and ?54. While mechanisms of heat shockcontrol for some genes appeared to coincide with those established forEscherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, the presence of unique controlschemes for several other genes was also evident. Analysis of proteinexpression levels using differential in-gel electrophoresis suggestedgood agreement with transcriptional profiles of several heat shockproteins, including DnaK (DVU0811), HtpG (DVU2643), HtrA (DVU1468), andAhpC (DVU2247). The proteomics study also suggested the possibility ofposttranslational modifications in the chaperones DnaK, AhpC, GroES(DVU1977), and GroEL (DVU1976) and also several periplasmic ABCtransporters.

  1. Broad spectrum solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA); Wu, Junqiao (Richmond, CA); Schaff, William J. (Ithaca, NY)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An alloy having a large band gap range is used in a multijunction solar cell to enhance utilization of the solar energy spectrum. In one embodiment, the alloy is In.sub.1-xGa.sub.xN having an energy bandgap range of approximately 0.7 eV to 3.4 eV, providing a good match to the solar energy spectrum. Multiple junctions having different bandgaps are stacked to form a solar cell. Each junction may have different bandgaps (realized by varying the alloy composition), and therefore be responsive to different parts of the spectrum. The junctions are stacked in such a manner that some bands of light pass through upper junctions to lower junctions that are responsive to such bands.

  2. Dynamic response analysis of a 900 kW wind turbine subject to ground excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caudillo, Adrian Felix

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    response analysis of wind turbine towers including soil-were attached to the wind turbine tower at 7 locations alongload demands on the wind turbine tower structure. Additional

  3. auditory-evoked response analysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: LBNL-6560E Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California and Guidelines The work described in this report...

  4. Use of Exact Solutions of Wave Propagation Problems to Guide Implementation of Nonlinear Seismic Ground Response Analysis Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?1992?. SUMDES: A nonlinear procedure for response analysisusing ?nite element procedures and incorporating a compliantGround Response Analysis Procedures Annie O. L. Kwok, M.ASCE

  5. Analysis of Residential Demand Response and Double-Auction Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Chassin, David P.

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response and dynamic pricing programs are expected to play increasing roles in the modern Smart Grid environment. While direct load control of end-use loads has existed for decades, price driven response programs are only beginning to be explored at the distribution level. These programs utilize a price signal as a means to control demand. Active markets allow customers to respond to fluctuations in wholesale electrical costs, but may not allow the utility to control demand. Transactive markets, utilizing distributed controllers and a centralized auction can be used to create an interactive system which can limit demand at key times on a distribution system, decreasing congestion. With the current proliferation of computing and communication resources, the ability now exists to create transactive demand response programs at the residential level. With the combination of automated bidding and response strategies coupled with education programs and customer response, emerging demand response programs have the ability to reduce utility demand and congestion in a more controlled manner. This paper will explore the effects of a residential double-auction market, utilizing transactive controllers, on the operation of an electric power distribution system.

  6. ALS Spectrum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011Astudies smartHistory: The First 20ALSALS Spectrum

  7. Nonlinear seismic response analysis of steel-concrete composite frames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbato, Michele

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of nonlinear steel- concrete composite beam ele- ment. ”Tests and analysis of composite beams with incom- pleteElementary Behaviour of Composite Steel and Concrete Struc-

  8. Nonlinear seismic response analysis of steel-concrete composite frames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbato, Michele

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    formulation of nonlinear steel- concrete composite beam ele-Behaviour of Composite Steel and Concrete Struc- turalE. (2001). “Analysis of steel-concrete composite frames with

  9. Power Spectrum Analysis of LMSU (Lomonosov Moscow State University) Nuclear Decay-Rate Data: Further Indication of r-Mode Oscillations in an Inner Solar Tachocline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Sturrock; Alexander G. Parkhomov; Ephraim Fischbach; Jere H. Jenkins

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents a power-spectrum analysis of 2,350 measurements of the $^{90}$Sr/$^{90}$Y decay process acquired over the interval 4 August 2002 to 6 February 2009 at the Lomonosov Moscow State University (LMSU). As we have found for other long sequences of decay measurements, the power spectrum is dominated by a very strong annual oscillation. However, we also find a set of low-frequency peaks, ranging from 0.26 year$^{-1}$ to 3.98 year$^{-1}$, which are very similar to an array of peaks in a power spectrum formed from Mt Wilson solar diameter measurements. The Mt Wilson measurements have been interpreted in terms of r-mode oscillations in a region where the sidereal rotation frequency is 12.08 year$^{-1}$. We find that the LMSU measurements may also be attributed to the same type of r-mode oscillations in a solar region with the same sidereal rotation frequency. We propose that these oscillations occur in an inner tachocline that separates the radiative zone from a more slowly rotating solar core.

  10. Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E.2 Heat pumps . . E.3 Water heaters . parameters v E.4analysis for residential water heater efficiency standards.An evaluation of the water heater load potential for

  11. Analysis of vascular response to systemic heating using the pallid bat wing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendez, Tanya

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to analyze the relationship between environ-mental heat exchange and vascular response in the pallid bat wing during systemicheating and to develop a simplied model of heat transfer for theoretical analysis...

  12. Risk Analysis and Adaptive Response Planning for Water Distribution Systems Contamination Emergency Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasekh, Amin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    are investigated. Pressure-driven hydraulic analysis is performed to simulate the complicated system hydraulics under pressure-deficit conditions. Performance of a novel preventive response action ? injection of food-grade dye directly into drinking water...

  13. The export responsiveness of the Argentine grain export marketing system: a constant market share analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millimet, Scott Alan

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EXPORT RESPONSIVENESS OF THE ARGENTINE GRAIN EXPORT MARKET NG SYSTEM: A CONSTANT MARKET SHARE ANALYSIS A Thesis by SCOTT ALAN MILLIMET Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Ma) or Subject: Agricultural Economics THE EXPORT RESPONSIVENESS OF THE ARGENTINE GRAIN EXPORT MARKETING SYSTEM: A CONSTANT MARKET SHARE ANALYSIS A Thesis by SCOTT ALAN MILLIMET Approved as to style...

  14. Preliminary analysis of fission gas behavior and fuel response during an LMFBR operational transient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.Y.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary presents results obtained from a preliminary analysis of gas behavior and oxide fuel response during an LMFBR operational transient. The DiMelfi and Deitrich model is extrapolated to operational transient regimes to delineate brittle versus ductile fuel response modes. All pertinent parameters necessary for application of the DiMelfi and Deitrich model were obtained from the LIFE-3 code.

  15. AIAA-2003-0867 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF INFLOW AND STRUCTURAL RESPONSE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    AIAA-2003-0867 1 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF INFLOW AND STRUCTURAL RESPONSE DATA FROM THE LIST PROGRAM, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 2 Wind Energy Technology Department, Sandia National is gathering inflow and structural response data on a modified version of the Micon 65/13 wind turbine

  16. Single-wavenumber Representation of Nonlinear Energy Spectrum in Elastic-Wave Turbulence of {F}öppl-von {K}ármán Equation: Energy Decomposition Analysis and Energy Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoto Yokoyama; Masanori Takaoka

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-wavenumber representation of nonlinear energy spectrum, i.e., stretching energy spectrum is found in elastic-wave turbulence governed by the F\\"oppl-von K\\'arm\\'an (FvK) equation. The representation enables energy decomposition analysis in the wavenumber space, and analytical expressions of detailed energy budget in the nonlinear interactions are obtained for the first time in wave turbulence systems. We numerically solved the FvK equation and observed the following facts. Kinetic and bending energies are comparable with each other at large wavenumbers as the weak turbulence theory suggests. On the other hand, the stretching energy is larger than the bending energy at small wavenumbers, i.e., the nonlinearity is relatively strong. The strong correlation between a mode $a_{\\bm{k}}$ and its companion mode $a_{-\\bm{k}}$ is observed at the small wavenumbers. Energy transfer shows that the energy is input into the wave field through stretching-energy transfer at the small wavenumbers, and dissipated through the quartic part of kinetic-energy transfer at the large wavenumbers. A total-energy flux consistent with the energy conservation is calculated directly by using the analytical expression of the total-energy transfer, and the forward energy cascade is observed clearly.

  17. The UV spectrum of nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Zagury

    2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an analysis of the UV spectrum of some nebulae with clearly identified illuminating stars, all observed by the IUE satellite. The data show remarkable properties of the UV spectrum of the nebulae. Each spectrum is the product of the star spectrum and a linear function of 1/lambda. There is no peculiar behaviour in the spectrums at 2200A: no bump created in the spectrum of a nebula and no excess of scattering. When moving away from the star, the surface brightness of a nebula decreases as the inverse of the square of the angular distance to the star. These results can logically be interpreted in terms of scattering of starlight. They imply constant properties of the interstellar grains in the UV and in the directions of space sampled by the nebulae, and probably a strong forward scattering phase function. There is no evidence for any particular type of grain which would specifically extinguish starlight at 2200A. Concerning the UV spectrum of a star, this may imply a revisal of the traditional interpretation of the 2200A bump.

  18. Time-domain Fatigue Response and Reliability Analysis of Offshore Wind Turbines with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    Time-domain Fatigue Response and Reliability Analysis of Offshore Wind Turbines with Emphasis of offshore wind turbines Defense: 09.12.2012 2012 - : Structural Engineer in Det Norske Veritas (DNV) 2007 of the drive train of an on-land wind turbine under dynamic wind loads. The main tasks of this study are to

  19. Analysis of Fish Response to Flows in the 1991 Pasco Flume Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    1 Analysis of Fish Response to Flows in the 1991 Pasco Flume Experiments by James J. Anderson. The hypothesis of the study is that low fish guidance efficiency (FGE) at Columbia River dams may, in part, be due to fish diving when they encounter changes in water velocities. This behavior would cause fish

  20. Seismic Response Analysis of Different Buildings using Time-Invariant and Time-Variant Damping Coefficients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Seismic Response Analysis of Different Buildings using Time- Invariant and Time- Variant Damping@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr Abstract Seismic signals are characterized by strong excitations, short durations, non-linearity and non has been introduced to help in adapting to the seismic signals where the amplitude is damped

  1. An angular power spectrum analysis of the DRAO 1.4 GHz polarization survey: implications for CMB observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Porta, L; Reich, W; Reich, P

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the present analysis is to improve the knowledge of the statistical properties of the Galactic diffuse synchrotron emission, which constrains sensitive CMB anisotropy measurements. We have analysed the new DRAO 1.4 GHz polarization survey together with the Stockert 1.4 GHz total intensity survey and derived the angular power spectra (APSs) of the total intensity, the polarized emission, and their cross-correlation for the entire surveys and for three low-intensity regions. The APSs of the diffuse synchrotron emission are modelled by power laws. For the $E$ and $B$ modes, a slope of $\\alpha \\sim [-3.0,-2.5]$ for the multipole range $\\sim [30,300]$ is found. By the extrapolation of these results to 70 GHz, we can estimate the Galactic synchrotron contamination of CMB anisotropies, and we find results that are compatible with the ones coming from WMAP 3-yr data. In the low-intensity regions, the cosmological primordial B~mode peak at $\\ell \\sim 100$ should be clearly observable for a tensor-to-scalar ...

  2. Temporal and spatial scaling of hydraulic response to recharge in fractured aquifers: Insights from a frequency domain analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Temporal and spatial scaling of hydraulic response to recharge in fractured aquifers: Insights from investigate the hydraulic response to recharge of a fractured aquifer, using a frequency domain approach scaling of hydraulic response to recharge in fractured aquifers: Insights from a frequency domain analysis

  3. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general rules-of-thumb'' for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  4. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general ``rules-of-thumb`` for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  5. Time Variations of the Solar Neutrino Flux Data from Sage and Gallex-Gno Detectors Obtained by Rayleigh Power Spectrum Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koushik Ghosh; Probhas Raychaudhuri

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used Rayleigh power spectrum analysis of the monthly solar neutrino flux data from (1) SAGE detector during the period from 1st January 1990 to 31st December 2000; (2) SAGE detector during the period from April 1998 to December 2001; (3) GALLEX detector during the period from May 1991 to January 1997; (4) GNO detector during the period from May 1998 to December 2001; (5) GALLEX-GNO detector (combined data) from May 1991 to December 2001 and (6) average of the data from GNO and SAGE detectors during the period from May 1998 to December 2001. (1) exhibits periodicity around 1.3, 4.3, 5.5, 6.3, 7.9, 8.7, 15.9, 18.7, 23.9, 32.9 and 48.7 months. (2) shows periodicity around 1.5, 2.9, 4.5, 10.1 months. For (3) we observe periodicity around 1.7, 18.7 and 26.9 months. For (4) periodicity is seen around 3.5, 5.5, 7.7 and 10.5 months. (5) gives periodicity around 1.7, 18.5, 28.5 and 42.1 months while (6) shows periodicity around 4.3, 6.9, 10.3 and 18.1 months. We have found almost similar periods in the solar flares, sunspot data, solar proton data which indicates that the solar activity cycle may be due to the variable character of nuclear energy generation inside the sun.

  6. Input-output Analysis of Quantum Finite-level Systems in Response to Single Photon States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu Pan; Guofeng Zhang; Matthew R. James

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single photon states, which carry quantum information and coherently interact with quantum systems, are vital to the realization of all-optical quantum networks and quantum memory. In this paper we derive the conditions that enable an exact analysis of the response of passive quantum finite-level systems under the weak driving of single photon input. We show that when a class of finite level systems is driven by single photon inputs, expressions for the output states may be derived exactly using linear systems transfer functions. This removes the need for physical approximations such as weak excitation limit in the analysis of quantum nonlinear systems under single photon driving. We apply this theory to the analysis of a single photon switch. The input-output relations are consistent with the existing results in the study of few photon transport through finite-level systems.

  7. NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure describes the NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, which includes analysis and decision support, fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization and deployment. Through deep technical expertise and an unmatched breadth of capabilities, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) leads an integrated approach across the spectrum of renewable energy innovation. From scientific discovery to accelerating market deployment, NREL works in partnership with private industry to drive the transformation of our nation's energy systems. NREL integrates the entire spectrum of innovation, including fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization, and deployment. Our world-class analysis and decision support informs every point on the spectrum. The innovation process at NREL is inter-dependent and iterative. Many scientific breakthroughs begin in our own laboratories, but new ideas and technologies may come to NREL at any point along the innovation spectrum to be validated and refined for commercial use.

  8. Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California and Guidelines to Transition to Industry Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated  Demand  Response  in  Commercial  Buildings.  Demand  Response  Infrastructure  for   Commercial  Buildings.  

  9. Markets during world oil supply crises: an analysis of industry, consumer, and governmental response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erfle, Stephen; Pound, John; Kalt, Joseph

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the response of American markets to supply crises in world oil markets is presented. It addresses four main issues: the efficiency of the operation of American oil markets during oil supply crises; the problems of both economic efficiency and social equity which arise during the American adaptation process; the propriety of the Federal government's past policy responses to these problems; and the relationship between perceptions of the problems caused by world oil crises and the real economic natures of these problems. Specifically, Chapter 1 presents a theoretical discussion of the effects of a world supply disruption on the price level and supply availability of the world market oil to any consuming country including the US Chapter 2 provides a theoretical and empirical analysis of the efficiency of the adaptations of US oil product markets to higher world oil prices. Chapter 3 examines the responses of various groups of US oil firms to the alterations observed in world markets, while Chapter 4 presents a theoretical explanation for the price-lagging behavior exhibited by firms in the US oil industry. Chapter 5 addresses the nature of both real and imagined oil market problems in the US during periods of world oil market transition. (MCW)

  10. THE COMPACT STEEP SPECTRUM AND GHZ PEAKED SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE COMPACT STEEP SPECTRUM AND GHZ PEAKED SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCES Christopher P. O'Dea Space@stsci.edu ABSTRACT I review the radio to X­ray properties of GHz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum The GHz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) radio sources make up significant fractions

  11. SPECTRUM OPPORTUNITY AND INTERFERENCE CONSTRAINT IN OPPORTUNISTIC SPECTRUM ACCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, M. Saif

    of the radio spec- trum? Actual spectrum usage measurements obtained by the FCC's Spectrum Policy Task Force [1SPECTRUM OPPORTUNITY AND INTERFERENCE CONSTRAINT IN OPPORTUNISTIC SPECTRUM ACCESS Qing Zhao@ece.ucdavis.edu ABSTRACT In this paper, we study two important concepts in opportunis- tic spectrum access: spectrum

  12. An Analysis of the Broadband (22-3900 MHz) Radio Spectrum of HB3 (G132.7+1.3): The Detection of Thermal Radio Emission from an Evolved Supernova Remnant?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Urosevic; T. Pannuti; D. Leahy

    2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the broadband radio spectrum (from 22 to 3900 MHz) of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) HB3 (G132.7+1.3). Published observations have revealed that a curvature is present in the radio spectrum of this SNR, indicating that a single synchrotron component appears is insufficient to adequately fit the spectrum. We present here a fit to this spectrum using a combination of a synchrotron component and a thermal bremsstrahlung component. We discuss properties of this latter component and estimate the ambient density implied by the presence of this component to be n \\~ 10 cm^-3. We have also analyzed extracted X-ray spectra from archived {\\it ASCA} GIS observations of different regions of HB3 to obtain independent estimates of the density of the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM). From this analysis, we have derived electron densities of 0.1-0.4 f^-1/2 cm^-3 for the ISM for the three different regions of the SNR, where f is the volume filling factor. By comparing these density estimates with the estimate derived from the thermal bremsstrahlung component, we argue that the radio thermal bremsstrahlung emission is emitted from a thin shell enclosing HB3. The presence of this thermal bremsstrahlung component in the radio spectrum of HB3 suggests that this SNR is in fact interacting with an adjacent molecular cloud associated with the HII region W3. By extension, we argue that the presence of thermal emission at radio wavelengths may be a useful tool for identifying interactions between SNRs and molecular clouds, and for estimating the ambient density near SNRs using radio continuum data.

  13. Analysis of Dose Response for Circulatory Disease After Radiotherapy for Benign Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, Mark P., E-mail: mark.little@nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Kleinerman, Ruth A. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mabuchi, Kiyohiko [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the shape of the dose-response for various circulatory disease endpoints, and modifiers by age and time since exposure. Methods and Materials: This was an analysis of the US peptic ulcer data testing for heterogeneity of radiogenic risk by circulatory disease endpoint (ischemic heart, cerebrovascular, other circulatory disease). Results: There were significant excess risks for all circulatory disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.082 (95% CI 0.031-0.140), and ischemic heart disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.102 (95% CI 0.039-0.174) (both p = 0.01), and indications of excess risk for stroke. There were no statistically significant (p > 0.2) differences between risks by endpoint, and few indications of curvature in the dose-response. There were significant (p < 0.001) modifications of relative risk by time since exposure, the magnitude of which did not vary between endpoints (p > 0.2). Risk modifications were similar if analysis was restricted to patients receiving radiation, although the relative risks were slightly larger and the risk of stroke failed to be significant. The slopes of the dose-response were generally consistent with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in occupationally and medically exposed groups. Conclusions: There were excess risks for a variety of circulatory diseases in this dataset, with significant modification of risk by time since exposure. The consistency of the dose-response slopes with those observed in radiotherapeutically treated groups at much higher dose, as well as in lower dose-exposed cohorts such as the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and nuclear workers, implies that there may be little sparing effect of fractionation of dose or low-dose-rate exposure.

  14. Deduction and Analysis of the Interacting Stress Response Pathways of Metal/Radionuclide-reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma

    2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Title: Deduction and Analysis of the Interacting Stress Response Pathways of Metal/Radionuclide-reducing Bacteria DOE Grant Number: DE-FG02-06ER64205 Principal Investigator: Jizhong (Joe) Zhou (University of Oklahoma) Key members: Zhili He, Aifen Zhou, Christopher Hemme, Joy Van Nostrand, Ye Deng, and Qichao Tu Collaborators: Terry Hazen, Judy Wall, Adam Arkin, Matthew Fields, Aindrila Mukhopadhyay, and David Stahl Summary Three major objectives have been conducted in the Zhou group at the University of Oklahoma (OU): (i) understanding of gene function, regulation, network and evolution of Desulfovibrio vugaris Hildenborough in response to environmental stresses, (ii) development of metagenomics technologies for microbial community analysis, and (iii) functional characterization of microbial communities with metagenomic approaches. In the past a few years, we characterized four CRP/FNR regulators, sequenced ancestor and evolved D. vulgaris strains, and functionally analyzed those mutated genes identified in salt-adapted strains. Also, a new version of GeoChip 4.0 has been developed, which also includes stress response genes (StressChip), and a random matrix theory-based conceptual framework for identifying functional molecular ecological networks has been developed with the high throughput functional gene array hybridization data as well as pyrosequencing data from 16S rRNA genes. In addition, GeoChip and sequencing technologies as well as network analysis approaches have been used to analyze microbial communities from different habitats. Those studies provide a comprehensive understanding of gene function, regulation, network, and evolution in D. vulgaris, and microbial community diversity, composition and structure as well as their linkages with environmental factors and ecosystem functioning, which has resulted in more than 60 publications.

  15. Equilibrium Response and Transient Dynamics Datasets from VEMAP: Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Users of the VEMAP Portal can access input files of numerical data that include monthly and daily files of geographic data, soil and site files, scenario files, etc. Model results from Phase I, the Equilibrium Response datasets, are available through the NCAR anonymous FTP site at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/vresults.html. Phase II, Transient Dynamics, include climate datasets, models results, and analysis tools. Many supplemental files are also available from the main data page at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/datasets.html.

  16. Statistical and risk analysis for the measured and predicted axial response of 100 piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perdomo, Dario

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Committee) cu. Har y M. Coyl (Member) J rey D. Hart (Member) Donald McDonald (Head of Department) May 1986 ABSTRACT Statistical and Risk Analysis for the Measured and Predicted Axial Response of 100 Piles (December 1985) Dario Perdomo, B. S... encouragement and financial support. Sincere thanks are expressed to Dr. Jean-Louis Briaud and Nr. Larry Tucker i'or their guidance and advice throughout the course of this research. The assistance of Dr. Harry Coyle and Dr. Jeffrey Hart are also...

  17. Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Shihui [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Zhou, Wen [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Dam, Phuongan [ORNL; Xu, Ying [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Dice, Lezlee T [ORNL; Davison, Brian H [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 is a capable ethanogenic bacterium with high ethanol productivity and high level of ethanol tolerance. Previous studies indicated that several stress-related proteins and changes in the ZM4 membrane lipid composition may contribute to ethanol tolerance. However, the molecular mechanisms of ethanol stress response have not been elucidated fully. In this study, ethanol stress responses were investigated using systems biology tools. Medium supplementation with an initial 47.3 g/L (6% v/v) ethanol reduced Z. mobilis ZM4 glucose consumption, growth rate and ethanol productivity compared to that of untreated controls. Metabolomic profiling showed that ethanol-treated ZM4 cells accumulated greater amounts of glycerol during the entire fermentation process, which may indicate an important role for this metabolite. A proteomic analysis of early exponential growth identified about one thousand proteins, or approximately 56% of the predicted ZM4 proteome. Proteins related to metabolism and stress response such as chaperones and key regulators were more abundant in the early ethanol stress condition. Transcriptomic studies indicated the response of ZM4 to ethanol is dynamic, complex and involves many genes from all the different functional categories. There were fewer genes significantly differentially expressed in the exponential phase compared to that of stationary phase and early stationary phase. Most down-regulated genes were related to translation and ribosome biogenesis, while the ethanol-upregulated genes were mostly related to cellular processes and metabolism. Correlations among the transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolism were examined and among significantly expressed genes or proteins, we observe higher correlation coefficients when fold-change values are higher. This systems biology study elucidates key Z. mobilis ZM4 metabolites, genes and proteins that form the foundation of its distinctive physiology and its multifaceted response to ethanol stress.

  18. Intelligent Spectrum Sensor Radio.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mian, Omer

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??A cognitive radio is a radio with built-in intelligence that makes it able to utilize the radio frequency spectrum more efficiently by adapting to the… (more)

  19. Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California and Guidelines to Transition to Industry Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to  Automated  Demand   Response  and  the  OpenADR  ®  Automated  Demand  Response  Program.   https://Data  for  Automated  Demand  Response  in  Commercial  

  20. 2008-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response Opportunities in California Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goli, Sasank

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    K.C. Mares, D. Shroyer. 2010. Demand Response andOpen Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Dataand the Role of Automated Demand Response. Lawrence Berkeley

  1. A forced response analysis and application of impact dampers to rotordynamic vibration suppression in a cryogenic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, James Jeffrey

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A FORCED RESPONSE ANALYSIS AND APPLICATION OF IMPACT DAMPERS TO ROTORDYNAMIC VIBRATION SUPPRESSION IN A CRYOGENIC ENVIRONMENT A Thesis by JAMES JEFFREY MOORE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1993 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering A FORCED RESPONSE ANALYSIS AND APPLICATION OF IMPACT DAMPERS TO ROTORDYNAMIC VIBRATION SUPPRESSION IN A CRYOGENIC ENVIRONMENT A Thesis...

  2. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Crowell, John M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  3. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

    1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  4. In Depth Analysis of AVCOAT TPS Response to a Reentry Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titov, E. V.; Kumar, Rakesh; Levin, D. A. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling of the high altitude portion of reentry vehicle trajectories with DSMC or statistical BGK solvers requires accurate evaluation of the boundary conditions at the ablating TPS surface. Presented in this article is a model which takes into account the complex ablation physics including the production of pyrolysis gases, and chemistry at the TPS surface. Since the ablation process is time dependent the modeling of the material response to the high energy reentry flow starts with the solution of the rarefied flow over the vehicle and then loosely couples with the material response. The objective of the present work is to carry out conjugate thermal analysis by weakly coupling a flow solver to a material thermal response model. The latter model solves the one dimensional heat conduction equation accounting for the pyrolysis process that takes place in the reaction zone of an ablative thermal protection system (TPS) material. An estimate of the temperature range within which the pyrolysis reaction (decomposition and volatilization) takes place is obtained from Ref. [1]. The pyrolysis reaction results in the formation of char and the release of gases through the porous charred material. These gases remove additional amount of heat as they pass through the material, thus cooling the material (the process known as transpiration cooling). In the present work, we incorporate the transpiration cooling model in the material thermal response code in addition to the pyrolysis model. The flow in the boundary layer and in the vicinity of the TPS material is in the transitional flow regime. Therefore, we use a previously validated statistical BGK method to model the flow physics in the vicinity of the micro-cracks, since the BGK method allows simulations of flow at pressures higher than can be computed using DSMC.

  5. Parametric Adaptive Spectrum Sensing Framework for Dynamic Spectrum Access Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    - ture for dynamic spectrum sensing. In our approach, the radio learns the statistics of the channel Spectrum Sensing Architecture The proposed PASS architecture enables the radio to adapt its spectrumParametric Adaptive Spectrum Sensing Framework for Dynamic Spectrum Access Networks Dinesh Datla

  6. Spatial and dose–response analysis of fibrotic lung changes after stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevegeniy; Diot, Quentin; Kavanagh, Brian; Schefter, Tracey; Gaspar, Laurie; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is becoming the standard of care for early stage nonoperable lung cancers. Accurate dose–response modeling is challenging for SBRT because of the decreased number of clinical toxicity events. As a surrogate for a clinical toxicity endpoint, studies have proposed to use radiographic changes in follow up computed tomography (CT) scans to evaluate lung SBRT normal tissue effects. The purpose of the current study was to use local fibrotic lung regions to spatially and dosimetrically evaluate lung changes in patients that underwent SBRT.Methods: Forty seven SBRT patients treated at our institution from 2003 to 2009 were used for the current study. Our patient cohort had a total of 148 follow up CT scans ranging from 3 to 48 months post-therapy. Post-treatment scans were binned into intervals of 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 months after the completion of treatment. Deformable image registration was used to align the follow up CT scans with the pretreatment CT and dose distribution. Areas of visible fibrotic changes were contoured. The centroid of each gross tumor volume (GTV) and contoured fibrosis volume was calculated and the fibrosis volume location and movement (magnitude and direction) relative to the GTV and 30 Gy isodose centroid were analyzed. To perform a dose–response analysis, each voxel in the fibrosis volume was sorted into 10 Gy dose bins and the average CT number value for each dose bin was calculated. Dose–response curves were generated by plotting the CT number as a function of dose bin and time posttherapy.Results: Both fibrosis and GTV centroids were concentrated in the upper third of the lung. The average radial movement of fibrosis centroids relative to the GTV centroids was 2.6 cm with movement greater than 5 cm occurring in 11% of patients. Evaluating dose–response curves revealed an overall trend of increasing CT number as a function of dose. The authors observed a CT number plateau at doses ranging from 30 to 50 Gy for the 3, 6, and 12 months posttherapy time points. There was no evident plateau for the dose–response curves generated using data from the 18, 24, 30, and 36 months posttherapy time points.Conclusions: Regions of local fibrotic lung changes in patients that underwent SBRT were evaluated spatially and dosimetrically. The authors found that the average fibrosis movement was 2.6 cm with movement greater than 5 cm possible. Evaluating dose–response curves revealed an overall trend of increasing CT number as a function of dose. Furthermore, our dose–response data also suggest that one of the possible explanations of the CT number plateau effect may be the time posttherapy of the acquired data. Understanding normal tissue dose–response is important for reducing toxicity after SBRT, especially in cases where larger tumors are treated. The methods presented in the current work build on prior quantitative studies and further enhance the understanding of normal lung dose–response after SBRT.

  7. Peaks and Troughs in Helioseismology: The Power Spectrum of Solar Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin S. Rosenthal

    1998-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    I present a matched-wave asymptotic analysis of the driving of solar oscillations by a general localised source. The analysis provides a simple mathematical description of the asymmetric peaks in the power spectrum in terms of the relative locations of eigenmodes and troughs in the spectral response. It is suggested that the difference in measured phase function between the modes and the troughs in the spectrum will provide a key diagnostic of the source of the oscillations. I also suggest a form for the asymmetric line profiles to be used in the fitting of solar power spectra. Finally I present a comparison between the numerical and asymptotic descriptions of the oscillations. The numerical results bear out the qualitative features suggested by the asymptotic analysis but suggest that numerical calculations of the locations of the troughs will be necessary for a quantitative comparison with the observations.

  8. Utilization and Fairness in Spectrum Assignment for Opportunistic Spectrum Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Ben Y.

    . INTRODUCTION Wireless devices are becoming ubiquitous, placing increas­ ing stress on the fixed radio spectrum by software defined radio (SDR) technology [5], [15], [23], Open Spectrum allows unlicensed (secondary) users1 Utilization and Fairness in Spectrum Assignment for Opportunistic Spectrum Access Chunyi Peng

  9. Utilization and Fairness in Spectrum Assignment for Opportunistic Spectrum Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almeroth, Kevin C.

    . INTRODUCTION Wireless devices are becoming ubiquitous, placing increas- ing stress on the fixed radio spectrum by software defined radio (SDR) technology [5], [16], [24], Open Spectrum allows unlicensed (secondary) users1 Utilization and Fairness in Spectrum Assignment for Opportunistic Spectrum Access Chunyi Peng

  10. An Approximate Truthfulness Motivated Spectrum Auction for Dynamic Spectrum Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yuanyuan

    Radio Spectrum is a critical but scarce resource for wireless communications. Traditionally of spectrum allocation approach, each licensed user has exclusive right for the allocated spectrum, thus facilities as well as the explosive growth of novel wireless services, the demand for radio spectrum

  11. Efficient Dynamic Spectrum Sharing Through Rate Compensation and Spectrum Handoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Abstract--In this work, we propose a heuristic for dynamic spectrum sharing in cognitive radio networks licensed channels available for opportunistic spectrum access. Each SU is equipped with n wEfficient Dynamic Spectrum Sharing Through Rate Compensation and Spectrum Handoff Adisorn

  12. Radio and Spectrum Management | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Radio and Spectrum Management Radio and Spectrum Management DOE Radio and Spectrum Workshop 43.pdf More Documents & Publications ICAM Workshop Ad Hoc Meetings Spectrum Technology...

  13. NREL Spectrum of Innovation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many voices calling for a future of abundant clean energy. The choices are difficult and the challenges daunting. How will we get there? The National Renewable Energy Laboratory integrates the entire spectrum of innovation including fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization and deployment. The innovation process at NREL is interdependent and iterative. Many scientific breakthroughs begin in our own laboratories, but new ideas and technologies come to NREL at any point along the innovation spectrum to be validated and refined for commercial use.

  14. Corporate social responsibility in Brazil : a comparative analysis of two paper companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nascimento, Ana Paula M. do, 1966-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If being socially responsible can result in short or long-term economic benefits, then why do not all companies adopt corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices? This thesis draws on general assumptions from illustrative ...

  15. A threat-rigidity analysis of the Apache Software Foundation's response to reported server security issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapira, Yoav

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists a broad body of literature documenting organizational responses to competitive threats, including those responses which fit into the threat-rigidity hypothesis. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate how ...

  16. Multivariate analysis and prediction of wind turbine response to varying wind field characteristics based on machine learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    are often described by time-dependent statistical parameters such as mean wind speed, turbulence intensity, mean wind direction and vertical mean wind profile, which depends on the surface roughness (e.g. landMultivariate analysis and prediction of wind turbine response to varying wind field characteristics

  17. Analyzing the temporal variation of wind turbine responses using Gaussian Mixture Model and Gaussian Discriminant Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    1 Analyzing the temporal variation of wind turbine responses using Gaussian Mixture Model characteristics have a significant impact on the structural response and the lifespan of wind turbines. This paper presents a machine learning approach towards analyzing and predicting the response of a wind turbine

  18. Reconnection of vortex filaments and Kolmogorov spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemirovskii, Sergey K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectrum of the 3D velocity field, induced by collapsing vortex filaments is studied. One of the aims of this work is to clarify the appearance of the Kolmogorov type energy spectrum $E(k)\\varpropto k^{-5/3}$, observed in many numerical works on discrete vortex tubes (quantized vortex filaments in quantum fluids). Usually, explaining classical turbulent properties of quantum turbulence, the model of vortex bundles, is used. This model is necessary to mimic the vortex stretching, which is responsible for the energy transfer in classical turbulence. In our consideration we do not appeal to the possible "bundle arrangement" but explore alternative idea that the turbulent spectra appear from singular solution, which describe the collapsing line at moments of reconnection. One more aim is related to an important and intensively discussed topic - a role of hydrodynamic collapse in the formation of turbulent spectra. We demonstrated that the specific vortex filament configuration generated the spectrum $E...

  19. Safety and Response-Time Analysis of an Automotive Accident Assistance Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Stephen

    the following tools: ­ the LTSA model-checker for FSP, and ­ the ipclib response-time analyser for PEPA. We

  20. FREQUENCY HOPPING SPREAD SPECTRUM DIRECT SEQUENCE SPREAD SPECTRUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westall, James M.

    FREQUENCY HOPPING SPREAD SPECTRUM VS. DIRECT SEQUENCE SPREAD SPECTRUM RAYLINK AND RAYTHEON local-area network products, such as Raytheon's RaylinkTM products, use the frequency hopping method

  1. The X-ray Power Density Spectrum of the Seyfert 2 Galaxy NGC 4945: Analysis and Application of the Method of Light Curve Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Martin; /SLAC

    2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of the power density spectrum (PDS) of fluctuations in the X-ray flux from active galactic nuclei (AGN) complements spectral studies in giving us a view into the processes operating in accreting compact objects. An important line of investigation is the comparison of the PDS from AGN with those from galactic black hole binaries; a related area of focus is the scaling relation between time scales for the variability and the black hole mass. The PDS of AGN is traditionally modeled using segments of power laws joined together at so-called break frequencies; associations of the break time scales, i.e., the inverses of the break frequencies, with time scales of physical processes thought to operate in these sources are then sought. I analyze the Method of Light Curve Simulations that is commonly used to characterize the PDS in AGN with a view to making the method as sensitive as possible to the shape of the PDS. I identify several weaknesses in the current implementation of the method and propose alternatives that can substitute for some of the key steps in the method. I focus on the complications introduced by uneven sampling in the light curve, the development of a fit statistic that is better matched to the distributions of power in the PDS, and the statistical evaluation of the fit between the observed data and the model for the PDS. Using archival data on one AGN, NGC 3516, I validate my changes against previously reported results. I also report new results on the PDS in NGC 4945, a Seyfert 2 galaxy with a well-determined black hole mass. This source provides an opportunity to investigate whether the PDS of Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies differ. It is also an attractive object for placement on the black hole mass-break time scale relation. Unfortunately, with the available data on NGC 4945, significant uncertainties on the break frequency in its PDS remain.

  2. Screening potato genotypes for antioxidant activity, identification of the responsible compounds, and differentiating Russet Norkotah strains using AFLP and microsatellite marker analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hale, Anna Louise

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    SCREENING POTATO GENOTYPES FOR ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY, IDENTIFICATION OF THE RESPONSIBLE COMPOUNDS, AND DIFFERENTIATING RUSSET NORKOTAH STRAINS USING AFLP AND MICROSATELLITE MARKER ANALYSIS A Dissertation by ANNA LOUISE HALE... FOR ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY, IDENTIFICATION OF THE RESPONSIBLE COMPOUNDS, AND DIFFERENTIATING RUSSET NORKOTAH STRAINS USING AFLP AND MICROSATELLITE MARKER ANALYSIS A Dissertation by ANNA LOUISE HALE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  3. NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) : a tool for evaluation of sheltering and evacuation responses following urban nuclear detonations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories to support the analysis of shelter-evacuate (S-E) strategies following an urban nuclear detonation. This tool can model a range of behaviors, including complex evacuation timing and path selection, as well as various sheltering or mixed evacuation and sheltering strategies. The calculations are based on externally generated, high resolution fallout deposition and plume data. Scenario setup and calculation outputs make extensive use of graphics and interactive features. This software is designed primarily to produce quantitative evaluations of nuclear detonation response options. However, the outputs have also proven useful in the communication of technical insights concerning shelter-evacuate tradeoffs to urban planning or response personnel.

  4. A meta-analysis of single case research studies on aided augmentative and alternative communication systems with individuals with autism spectrum disorders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganz, Jennifer B.; Earles-Vollrath, Theresa L.; Heath, Amy K.; Parker, Richard; Rispoli, Mandy J.; Duran, Jaime

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavioral outcomes, summary of the results, and overall quality of the research. The teaching method implemented included three categories. Child-led involved Running Head: META-ANALYSIS OF AAC 11 instruction that began only when the child initiated... generally fit the criteria for child-led, however, instruction took place during natural activities (e.g., free play, snack time); the adult did not strictly control access to the stimuli. Teacher-led involved one-on-one instruction in a contrived...

  5. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN) [London, TN; Dress, William B. (Camas, WA) [Camas, WA

    2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method, includes receiving a hybrid spread spectrum signal including: fast frequency hopping demodulating and direct sequence demodulating a direct sequence spread spectrum signal, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time and each bit is represented by chip transmissions at multiple frequencies.

  6. Spectrum Mobility Games Richard Southwell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    by allowing cognitive radio devices to opportunisti- cally access underutilized licensed spectrum while With the unprecedented growth in the number of mobile devices and wireless services, the radio frequency spectrum are widely underutilized. Cognitive radio technology has the great potential to alleviate spectrum scarcity

  7. Socially Responsible Investing : a comparative analysis of environmental, social, governance, reputational and labor factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramaniam, Arun, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Socially Responsible Investing (SRI) aims to deliver competitive investment returns while fostering social good. It aims achieves its objective by including a firm's corporate social performance (CSP) in its investment d ...

  8. The angular power spectrum of NVSS radio galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Blake; Pedro G. Ferreira; Julian Borrill

    2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the angular power spectrum of radio galaxies in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) using two independent methods: direct spherical harmonic analysis and maximum likelihood estimation. The results are consistent and can be understood using models for the spatial matter power spectrum and for the redshift distribution of radio galaxies at mJy flux-density levels. A good fit to the angular power spectrum can only be achieved if radio galaxies possess high bias with respect to mass fluctuations; by marginalizing over the other parameters of the model we derive a 68% confidence interval 1.53 radio galaxies and sigma_8 describes the normalization of the matter power spectrum. Our models indicate that the majority of the signal in the NVSS angular power spectrum is generated at low redshifts. Individual redshifts for the NVSS sources are thus required to alleviate projection effects and probe directly the matter power spectrum on large scales.

  9. Spectrum sharing in cognitive radio networks.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Waqas

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Years of growth in wireless communication services and conservative spectrum allocation policies by government regulators have led to spectrum scarcity. On the other hand, spectrum… (more)

  10. A Database and Meta-Analysis of Ecological Responses to Flow in the South Atlantic Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Davis, Dr, Mary [Southeastern Aquatic Resources Partnership; Kauffman, John [John Kauffman LLC.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generalized and quantitative relationships between flow and ecology are pivotal to developing environmental flow standards based on socially acceptable ecological conditions. Informing management at regional scales requires compiling sufficient hydrologic and ecological sources of information, identifying information gaps, and creating a framework for hypothesis development and testing. We compiled studies of empirical and theoretical relationships between flow and ecology in the South Atlantic region (SAR) of the United States to evaluate their utility for the development of environmental flow standards. Using database searches, internet searches, and agency contacts, we gathered 186 sources of information that provided a qualitative or quantitative relationship between flow and ecology within states encompassing the SAR. A total of 109 of the 186 sources had sufficient information to support quantitative analyses. Ecological responses to natural changes in flow magnitude, frequency, and duration were highly variable regardless of the direction and magnitude of changes in flow. In contrast, the majority of ecological responses to anthropogenic-induced flow alterations were negative. Fish consistently showed negative responses to anthropogenic flow alterations whereas other ecological groups showed somewhat variable responses (e.g. macroinvertebrates and riparian vegetation) and even positive responses (e.g. algae). Fish and organic matter had sufficient sample sizes to stratify natural flow-ecology relationships by specific flow categories (e.g. high flow, baseflows) or by region (e.g. coastal plain, uplands). After stratifying relationships, we found that significant correlations existed between changes in natural flow and ecological responses. In addition, a regression tree explained 57% of the variation in fish responses to anthropogenic and natural changes in flow. Because of some ambiguity in interpreting the directionality in ecological responses, we utilized ecological gains or losses, where each represents a benefit or reduction to ecosystem services, respectively. Variables explained 49% of the variation in ecological gains and losses for all ecological groups combined. Altogether, our results suggested that the source of flow change and the ecological group of interest played primary roles in determining the direction and magnitude of ecological responses. Furthermore, our results suggest that developing broadly generalized relationships between ecology and changes in flow at a regional scale is unlikely unless relationships are placed within meaningful contexts, such as environmental flow components or by geomorphic setting.

  11. A PER-BASELINE, DELAY-SPECTRUM TECHNIQUE FOR ACCESSING THE 21 cm COSMIC REIONIZATION SIGNATURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, Aaron R.; Pober, Jonathan C. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Aguirre, James E.; Moore, David F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Carilli, Christopher L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM (United States); Jacobs, Daniel C. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical challenge in measuring the power spectrum of 21 cm emission from cosmic reionization is compensating for the frequency dependence of an interferometer's sampling pattern, which can cause smooth-spectrum foregrounds to appear unsmooth and degrade the separation between foregrounds and the target signal. In this paper, we present an approach to foreground removal that explicitly accounts for this frequency dependence. We apply the delay transformation introduced in Parsons and Backer to each baseline of an interferometer to concentrate smooth-spectrum foregrounds within the bounds of the maximum geometric delays physically realizable on that baseline. By focusing on delay modes that correspond to image-domain regions beyond the horizon, we show that it is possible to avoid the bulk of smooth-spectrum foregrounds. We map the point-spread function of delay modes to k-space, showing that delay modes that are uncorrupted by foregrounds also represent samples of the three-dimensional power spectrum, and can be used to constrain cosmic reionization. Because it uses only spectral smoothness to differentiate foregrounds from the targeted 21 cm signature, this per-baseline analysis approach relies on spectrally and spatially smooth instrumental responses for foreground removal. For sufficient levels of instrumental smoothness relative to the brightness of interfering foregrounds, this technique substantially reduces the level of calibration previously thought necessary to detect 21 cm reionization. As a result, this approach places fewer constraints on antenna configuration within an array, and in particular, facilitates the adoption of configurations that are optimized for power-spectrum sensitivity. Under these assumptions, we demonstrate the potential for the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) to detect 21 cm reionization at an amplitude of 10 mK{sup 2} near k {approx} 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1} with 132 dipoles in 7 months of observing.

  12. Cosmological parameter analysis including SDSS Ly-alpha forest and galaxy bias: constraints on the primordial spectrum of fluctuations, neutrino mass, and dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. Seljak; A. Makarov; P. McDonald; S. Anderson; N. Bahcall; J. Brinkmann; S. Burles; R. Cen; M. Doi; J. Gunn; Z. Ivezic; S. Kent; R. Lupton; J. Munn; R. Nichol; J. Ostriker; D. Schlegel; M. Tegmark; D. Van den Berk; D. Weinberg; D. York

    2004-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine the constraints from the recent Ly-alpha forest and bias analysis of the SDSS with previous constraints from SDSS galaxy clustering, the latest supernovae, and WMAP . Combining WMAP and the lya we find for the primordial slope n_s=0.98\\pm 0.02. We see no evidence of running, dn/d\\ln k=-0.003\\pm 0.010, a factor of 3 improvement over previous constraints. We also find no evidence of tensors, renergy constraints in models with a fairly general time dependence of dark energy equation of state, finding Omega_lambda=0.72\\pm 0.02, w(z=0.3)=-0.98^{+0.10}_{-0.12}, the latter changing to w(z=0.3)=-0.92^{+0.09}_{-0.10} if tensors are allowed. We find no evidence for variation of the equation of state with redshift, w(z=1)=-1.03^{+0.21}_{-0.28}. These results rely on the current understanding of the lyaf and other probes, which need to be explored further both observationally and theoretically, but extensive tests reveal no evidence of inconsistency among different data sets used here.

  13. Sensitivity analysis of flexible pavement response and AASHTO 2002 design guide for properties of unbound layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masad, Sanaa Ahmad

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    .....................................................................................5 2.1 Introduction.................................................................................................5 2.2 Factors Affecting the Resilient Response of Unbound Layers ...................6 2.3 Triaxial Testing of Resilient... Properties ......................................................7 2.4 Models for Resilient Behavior of Unbound Granular Material .................. 8 2.5 Models for Permanent Deformation of Unbound Granular Material........12 III SENSITIVITY...

  14. The Power Spectrum of Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Einasto

    1998-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the mean power spectrum of galaxies using published power spectra of galaxies and clusters of galaxies. The mean power spectrum has a relatively sharp maximum on scale 120 Mpc (for Hubble constant h=1), followed by an almost exact power-law spectrum of index n = -1.9 toward smaller scales. The power spectrum found from APM 2-D galaxy distribution and from LCRS and IRAS 1.2 Jy surveys is flatter around the maximum. Power spectra of galaxies and matter are similar in shape, we find the bias parameter of galaxies relative to matter 1.3 + - 0.1. We compare the empirical power spectrum of matter with analytical power spectra and show that the primordial power spectrum has a break in amplitude and a spike.

  15. Responsiveness summary for the engineering evaluation/cost analysis for decontamination at the St. Louis Downtown Site, St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Picel, M.H.; Peterson, J.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Williams, M.J. (Bechtel National, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for conducting remedial actions at the Mallinckrodt Chemical Plant, also referred to as the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS), located in the city of St. Louis, Missouri. Remedial activities at the SLDS are being carried out under DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) as part of the overall cleanup planned for three noncontiguous areas in St. Louis, which are collectively referred to as the St. Louis Site. Potential response action alternatives for managing the contaminated material generated at the SLDS have been evaluated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance for conducting interim actions under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) report was prepared to document this process. On the basis of the analysis presented in the EE/CA, the preferred alternative for the management of contaminated wastes generated by DOE-supported plant activities is the provision of temporary storage capacity, which can be made available by modifying an existing building (i.e., Building 116) at SLDS. This alternative would enable DOE and Mallinckrodt to coordinate efforts to prevent the uncontrolled relocation of contamination and ensure that ultimate site cleanup objectives are not complicated by plant activities implemented by Mallinckrodt. The EE/CA, dated May 1991, was issued to the general public on June 7, 1991, and a public comment period was held from June 7 through July 10, 1991, in accordance with the public participation process identified in CERCLA. Comments on the proposed action were received in writing from the Missouri Department of Health, private citizen Kay Drey, and the EPA Region 7. This responsiveness summary has been prepared to respond to issues identified in these comment letters on the proposed action.

  16. Responsiveness summary for the engineering evaluation/cost analysis for decontamination at the St. Louis Downtown Site, St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Picel, M.H.; Peterson, J.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Williams, M.J. [Bechtel National, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for conducting remedial actions at the Mallinckrodt Chemical Plant, also referred to as the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS), located in the city of St. Louis, Missouri. Remedial activities at the SLDS are being carried out under DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) as part of the overall cleanup planned for three noncontiguous areas in St. Louis, which are collectively referred to as the St. Louis Site. Potential response action alternatives for managing the contaminated material generated at the SLDS have been evaluated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance for conducting interim actions under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) report was prepared to document this process. On the basis of the analysis presented in the EE/CA, the preferred alternative for the management of contaminated wastes generated by DOE-supported plant activities is the provision of temporary storage capacity, which can be made available by modifying an existing building (i.e., Building 116) at SLDS. This alternative would enable DOE and Mallinckrodt to coordinate efforts to prevent the uncontrolled relocation of contamination and ensure that ultimate site cleanup objectives are not complicated by plant activities implemented by Mallinckrodt. The EE/CA, dated May 1991, was issued to the general public on June 7, 1991, and a public comment period was held from June 7 through July 10, 1991, in accordance with the public participation process identified in CERCLA. Comments on the proposed action were received in writing from the Missouri Department of Health, private citizen Kay Drey, and the EPA Region 7. This responsiveness summary has been prepared to respond to issues identified in these comment letters on the proposed action.

  17. The relative use of form 8-k disclosures: a trading response analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLelland, Andrew John

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior research suggests that the use of accounting information differs substantially by investor class. My analysis extends this line of research to the area of SEC Form 8-K filings. Prior research also provides mixed evidence on the informativeness...

  18. Spectrum Sensing and Reconstruction for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    Spectrum Sensing and Reconstruction for Cognitive Radio Amanpreet S Saini, Zhen Hu, Robert Qiu with spectrum sensing and spectrum reconstruction under the umbrella of cognitive radio which is the smart radio to explore and exploit the free spectrum. Spectrum analyzer is used to emulate cognitive radio to do spectrum

  19. Development of flight instrumentation and analysis of an aircraft's lateral response to a discrete two-dimensional vertical gust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mask, Russell Lane

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCI~?E May 1973 Major Subject, : Aerospace Engineering D~PK~3lT OF FLIGHT INSTRUMENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF AN AIRCRAFT~S LAIL RESPONSE TO A DISCR TE TN'OWINENSIONAL V&TICAL GUST A Thesis RUSSsLL LANE MASK... DeHavilland DHC 2 'Beaver' STOL aircraft. This is a single engined, high-wing aircraft of all metal construction, Fig. 1. Table 1 pro- vides some quantitative data relating to this aircraft. With the emphasis of this paper directed to the aircraft...

  20. Numerical implementation of shape memory alloy (SMA) constitutive response and structural analysis of active composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qidwai, Muhammad Abu Bakar Siddiq

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ', it transforms into self-accommodated martensite (no net transformation strain). Subsequent application of load isothermally causes the reorientation of martensitic variants resulting in a net transformation strain. This strain, which remains on unloading...-dimensional thermomechanical SMA response. However, not much work is reported in regard to the numerical implementation of three dimensional formulation of shape memory alloy constitutive models. The implementation itself is not fundamentally different fiom any inelastic...

  1. Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California and Guidelines to Transition to Industry Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghatikar, Girish; Riess, David; Piette, Mary Ann

    2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) deployments within the territories serviced by California?s investor-owned utilities (IOUs) and the transition from the OpenADR 1.0 specification to the formal standard?OpenADR 2.0. As demand response service providers and customers start adopting OpenADR 2.0, it is necessary to ensure that the existing Automated Demand Response (AutoDR) infrastructure investment continues to be useful and takes advantage of the formal standard and its many benefits. This study focused on OpenADR deployments and systems used by the California IOUs and included a summary of the OpenADR deployment from the U.S. Department of Energy-funded demonstration conducted by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD). Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory collected and analyzed data about OpenADR 1.0 deployments, categorized architectures, developed a data model mapping to understand the technical compatibility of each version, and compared the capabilities and features of the two specifications. The findings, for the first time, provided evidence of the total enabled load shed and average first cost for system enablement in the IOU and SMUD service territories. The OpenADR 2.0a profile specification semantically supports AutoDR system architectures and data propagation with a testing and certification program that promotes interoperability, scaled deployments by multiple vendors, and provides additional features that support future services.

  2. Evaluation and Sensitivity Analysis of an Ocean Model Response to Hurricane Ivan G. R. HALLIWELL JR.,* L. K. SHAY, AND J. K. BREWSTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    provides the thermal energy for intensification, errors and biases in the ocean compo- nent of coupled TCEvaluation and Sensitivity Analysis of an Ocean Model Response to Hurricane Ivan G. R. HALLIWELL JR December 2009) ABSTRACT An ocean model response to Hurricane Ivan (2004) over the northwest Caribbean Sea

  3. Empirical Analysis of the Spot Market Implications ofPrice-Responsive Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Bartholomew, Emily S.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regardless of the form of restructuring, deregulatedelectricity industries share one common feature: the absence of anysignificant, rapid demand-side response to the wholesale (or, spotmarket) price. For a variety of reasons, most electricity consumers stillpay an average cost based regulated retail tariff held over from the eraof vertical integration, even as the retailers themselves are oftenforced to purchase electricity at volatile wholesale prices set in openmarkets. This results in considerable price risk for retailers, who aresometimes additionally forbidden by regulators from signing hedgingcontracts. More importantly, because end-users do not perceive real-time(or even hourly or daily) fluctuations in the wholesale price ofelectricity, they have no incentive to adjust their consumptionaccordingly. Consequently, demand for electricity is highly inelastic,which together with the non storability of electricity that requiresmarket clearing over very short time steps spawn many other problemsassociated with electricity markets, such as exercise of market power andprice volatility. Indeed, electricity generation resources can bestretched to the point where system adequacy is threatened. Economictheory suggests that even modest price responsiveness can relieve thestress on generation resources and decrease spot prices. To quantify thiseffect, actual generator bid data from the New York control area is usedto construct supply stacks and intersect them with demand curves ofvarious slopes to approximate the effect of different levels of demandresponse. The potential impact of real-time pricing (RTP) on theequilibrium spot price and quantity is then estimated. These resultsindicate the immediate benefits that could be derived from a moreprice-responsive demand providing policymakers with a measure of howprices can be potentially reduced and consumption maintained within thecapability of generation assets.

  4. Scalable, Secure Energy Information Management for Demand-Response Analysis Yogesh Simmhan1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanna, Viktor K.

    , pricing, and demand among utility providers and consumers. While the smart meter infrastructure the events streaming from smart meters through the smart grid, to meaningful analysis and feedback for these decisions comes from diverse sources: smart meters that report near real-time power usage and quality

  5. Site-specific earthquake response analysis for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sykora, D.W.; Davis, J.J.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and operated under contract by Martin Marietta Energy systems, Inc., is located southwest of Paducah, Kentucky. An aerial photograph and an oblique sketch of the plant are shown in Figures 1 and 2, respectively. The fenced portion of the plant consists of 748 acres. This plant was constructed in the 1950`s and is one of only two gaseous diffusion plants in operation in the United States; the other is located near Portsmouth, Ohio. The facilities at PGDP are currently being evaluated for safety in response to natural seismic hazards. Design and evaluation guidelines to evaluate the effects of earthquakes and other natural hazards on DOE facilities follow probabilistic hazard models that have been outlined by Kennedy et al. (1990). Criteria also established by Kennedy et al. (1990) classify diffusion plants as ``moderate hazard`` facilities. The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was tasked to calculate the site response using site-specific design earthquake records developed by others and the results of previous geotechnical investigations. In all, six earthquake records at three hazard levels and four individual and one average soil columns were used.

  6. Reservoir characterization based on tracer response and rank analysis of production and injection rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Refunjol, B.T. [Lagoven, S.A., Pdvsa (Venezuela); Lake, L.W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantification of the spatial distribution of properties is important for many reservoir-engineering applications. But, before applying any reservoir-characterization technique, the type of problem to be tackled and the information available should be analyzed. This is important because difficulties arise in reservoirs where production records are the only information for analysis. This paper presents the results of a practical technique to determine preferential flow trends in a reservoir. The technique is a combination of reservoir geology, tracer data, and Spearman rank correlation coefficient analysis. The Spearman analysis, in particular, will prove to be important because it appears to be insightful and uses injection/production data that are prevalent in circumstances where other data are nonexistent. The technique is applied to the North Buck Draw field, Campbell County, Wyoming. This work provides guidelines to assess information about reservoir continuity in interwell regions from widely available measurements of production and injection rates at existing wells. The information gained from the application of this technique can contribute to both the daily reservoir management and the future design, control, and interpretation of subsequent projects in the reservoir, without the need for additional data.

  7. PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum author responses to request for additional information.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) submitted SAND Report SAND2009-5822 to NRC that documented the incorporation of plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. NRC responded with a Request for Additional Information (RAI), identifying information needed in connection with its review of the application. The purpose of this SAND report is to provide the authors responses to each RAI. SAND Report SAND2010-6106 containing the proposed changes to the Addendum is provided separately.

  8. Estimation of some characteristics of driver responses at freeway entrance ramps by probit analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaMotte, Lynn Roy

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    it does or does not exhibit a given response (usually, "gets killed" ). Each . sub)ect is assumed te have a tolerance s fer the stimulus. If the stimulus is greater than . s the animal responds, if not, the animal does not respond. Associated... - 6a K wx 2 r-P Z Z w(:)x ? (6a' ? x5b) Z wx z zwx2 Z (:)(x-x) + 6 Z Z w or, (22) 6b Z w(w-x) = Z w(x-x)(:) Let y = Y + ? ; y is called the working probit. Then r-P (20) becomes (23) 6a' Z w = E w(y-Y) ZwyaEW 12 from which (24) a' + sa...

  9. Modeling and Analysis of the Role of Fast-Response Energy Storage in the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Han-I

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The large short time-scale variability of renewable energy resources presents significant challenges to the reliable operation of power systems. This variability can be mitigated by deploying fast-ramping generators. However, these generators are costly to operate and produce environmentally harmful emissions. Fast-response energy storage devices, such as batteries and flywheels, provide an environmentally friendly alternative, but are expensive and have limited capacity. To study the environmental benefits of storage, we introduce a slotted-time dynamic residual dc power flow model with the prediction error of the difference between the generation (including renewables) and the load as input and the fast-ramping generation and the storage (charging/discharging) operation as the control variables used to ensure that the demand is satisfied (as much as possible) in each time slot. We assume the input prediction error sequence to be i.i.d. zero-mean random variables. The optimal power flow problem is then formu...

  10. Reconnection of vortex filaments and Kolmogorov spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey K. Nemirovskii

    2014-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectrum of the 3D velocity field, induced by collapsing vortex filaments is studied. One of the aims of this work is to clarify the appearance of the Kolmogorov type energy spectrum $E(k)\\varpropto k^{-5/3}$, observed in many numerical works on discrete vortex tubes (quantized vortex filaments in quantum fluids). Usually, explaining classical turbulent properties of quantum turbulence, the model of vortex bundles, is used. This model is necessary to mimic the vortex stretching, which is responsible for the energy transfer in classical turbulence. In our consideration we do not appeal to the possible "bundle arrangement" but explore alternative idea that the turbulent spectra appear from singular solution, which describe the collapsing line at moments of reconnection. One more aim is related to an important and intensively discussed topic - a role of hydrodynamic collapse in the formation of turbulent spectra. We demonstrated that the specific vortex filament configuration generated the spectrum $E(k)$ close to the Kolmogorov dependence and discussed the reason for this as well as the reason for deviation. We also discuss the obtained results from point of view of the both classical and quantum turbulence.

  11. PROSPECT - A precision oscillation and spectrum experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Langford

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Segmented antineutrino detectors placed near a compact research reactor provide an excellent opportunity to probe short-baseline neutrino oscillations and precisely measure the reactor antineutrino spectrum. Close proximity to a reactor combined with minimal overburden yield a high background environment that must be managed through shielding and detector technology. PROSPECT is a new experimental effort to detect reactor antineutrinos from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The detector will use novel lithium-loaded liquid scintillator capable of neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination and neutron capture tagging. These enhancements improve the ability to identify neutrino inverse-beta decays and reject background events in analysis. Results from these efforts will be covered along with their implications for an oscillation search and a precision spectrum measurement.

  12. PROSPECT - A precision oscillation and spectrum experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Segmented antineutrino detectors placed near a compact research reactor provide an excellent opportunity to probe short-baseline neutrino oscillations and precisely measure the reactor antineutrino spectrum. Close proximity to a reactor combined with minimal overburden yield a high background environment that must be managed through shielding and detector technology. PROSPECT is a new experimental effort to detect reactor antineutrinos from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The detector will use novel lithium-loaded liquid scintillator capable of neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination and neutron capture tagging. These enhancements improve the ability to identify neutrino inverse-beta decays and reject background events in analysis. Results from these efforts will be covered along with their implications for an oscillation search and a precision spectrum measurement.

  13. Utilization and fairness in spectrum assignment for opportunistic spectrum access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, ChunYi; Zheng, Haitao; Zhao, Ben Y

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    985. [4] C AO , L. , AND Z HENG , H. Spectrum allocation in+ [26] Z HAO , J. , Z HENG , H. , AND Y ANG , G. Distributed2005, to appear). [27] Z HENG , H. , AND C AO , L. Device-

  14. Multichannel response analysis on 2D projection views for detection of clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Jun, E-mail: jvwei@umich.edu; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Helvie, Mark A.; Lu, Yao; Zhou, Chuan; Samala, Ravi [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5842 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5842 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a new two-dimensional (2D) multichannel response (MCR) analysis approach for the detection of clustered microcalcifications (MCs) in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Methods: With IRB approval and informed consent, a data set of two-view DBTs from 42 breasts containing biopsy-proven MC clusters was collected in this study. The authors developed a 2D approach for MC detection using projection view (PV) images rather than the reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) DBT volume. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement processing was first applied to each PV to enhance the potential MCs. The locations of MC candidates were then identified with iterative thresholding. The individual MCs were decomposed with Hermite–Gaussian (HG) and Laguerre–Gaussian (LG) basis functions and the channelized Hotelling model was trained to produce the MCRs for each MC on the 2D images. The MCRs from the PVs were fused in 3D by a coincidence counting method that backprojects the MC candidates on the PVs and traces the coincidence of their ray paths in 3D. The 3D MCR was used to differentiate the true MCs from false positives (FPs). Finally a dynamic clustering method was used to identify the potential MC clusters in the DBT volume based on the fact that true MCs of clinical significance appear in clusters. Using two-fold cross validation, the performance of the 3D MCR for classification of true and false MCs was estimated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and the overall performance of the MCR approach for detection of clustered MCs was assessed by free response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) analysis. Results: When the HG basis function was used for MCR analysis, the detection of MC cluster achieved case-based test sensitivities of 80% and 90% at the average FP rates of 0.65 and 1.55 FPs per DBT volume, respectively. With LG basis function, the average FP rates were 0.62 and 1.57 per DBT volume at the same sensitivity levels. The difference in the two sets of basis functions for detection of MCs did not show statistical significance. Conclusions: The authors' experimental results indicate that the MCR approach is promising for the detection of MCs on PV images. The HG or LG basis functions are both effective in characterizing the signal response of MCs using the channelized Hotelling model. The coincidence counting method for fusion of the 2D MCR in 3D is an important step for FP reduction. Further study is underway to improve the MCR approach for microcalcification detection in DBT.

  15. Software Tools for the Analysis of the Photocathode Response of Photomultiplier Vacuum Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabbri, R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The central institute of electronics (ZEA-2) in the Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ) has developed a system to scan the response of the photocathode of photomultiplier tubes (PMT). The PMT sits tight on a supporting structure, while a blue light emitting diode is moved along its surface by two stepper motors, spanning both the x and y coordinates. All the system is located in a light-tight box made by wood. A graphical software was developed in-situ to perform the scan operations under different configurations (e.g., the step size of the scan and the number of measurements per point). During each point measurement the current output generated in the vacuum photomultiplier is processed in sequence by a pre-amplifier (mainly to convert the current signal into a voltage signal), an amplifier, and by an ADC module (typically a CAEN N957). The information of the measurement is saved in files at the end of the scan. Recently, software based on the CERN ROOT and on the Qt libraries was developed to help the user anal...

  16. Parallel Radioisotope Collection and Analysis in Response to the Fukushima Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, Vincent T.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Biegalski, S.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Miley, Harry S.; Morris, Scott J.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two independent air samplers were operated at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in parallel during the collection of samples from the Fukushima reactor releases. One system is an automated aerosol collection and analysis unit, while the other was a manual sampler of higher daily air volume. The samples collected each day showed excellent correlation in radionuclide activity, although some variations were seen. These variations illustrate the reproducibility of the air sample radionuclide measurements made by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty International Monitoring System (IMS) and show a simple way to acquire useful parallel samples for scientific purposes. In particular, a party wishing to have a “copy” of a sample acquired by the verification regime of the treaty could employ this method and have results similar to the IMS station at low cost and even higher sensitivity.

  17. Documentation for A Fortran 90 library for multitaper spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prieto, Germán A.

    Documentation for A Fortran 90 library for multitaper spectrum analysis 1 Introduction The present documentation is for the Fortran 90 Library for multitaper spectral analysis as presented in Prieto, G. A., R. L subroutines In this documentation the main subroutines calls are explained. 3.1 mtspec This subroutine uses

  18. Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Therapeutics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rider, Todd H.

    Currently there are relatively few antiviral therapeutics, and most which do exist are highly pathogen-specific or have other disadvantages. We have developed a new broad-spectrum antiviral approach, dubbed Double-stranded ...

  19. Spectrum of C_heart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spectrum of C_heart where 1 + z + 2\\sqrt{1 - z^2} heart(z)= ------------------------- 3 - z + 2\\sqrt{1 - z^2}. Figure 7.1, page 303, of "Composition Operators on Spaces ...

  20. Supplement analysis for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 2: Comment response document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), prepared a draft Supplement Analysis (SA) for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL-L), in accordance with DOE`s requirements for implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (10 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 1021.314). It considers whether the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (1992 EIS/EIR) should be supplement3ed, whether a new environmental impact statement (EIS) should be prepared, or no further NEPA documentation is required. The SA examines the current project and program plans and proposals for LLNL and SNL-L, operations to identify new or modified projects or operations or new information for the period from 1998 to 2002 that was not considered in the 1992 EIS/EIR. When such changes, modifications, and information are identified, they are examined to determine whether they could be considered substantial or significant in reference to the 1992 proposed action and the 1993 Record of Decision (ROD). DOE released the draft SA to the public to obtain stakeholder comments and to consider those comments in the preparation of the final SA. DOE distributed copies of the draft SA to those who were known to have an interest in LLNL or SNL-L activities in addition to those who requested a copy. In response to comments received, DOE prepared this Comment Response Document.

  1. Behavioral Response to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Refueling: A Comparative Analysis of Short- and Long-Term Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Elliot; Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy; Lidicker, Jeffery

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the attitude towards hydrogen fuel cell buses in the CUTEBEHAVIORAL RESPONSE TO HYDROGEN FUEL CELL VEHICLES ANDBEHAVIORAL RESPONSE TO HYDROGEN FUEL CELL VEHICLES AND

  2. Spectrum Clouds: A Session Based Spectrum Trading System for Multi-hop Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latchman, Haniph A.

    of opportunistic using licensed spectrum bands has initiated the spectrum trading in multi-hop cognitive radioSpectrum Clouds: A Session Based Spectrum Trading System for Multi-hop Cognitive Radio Networks in the demand for radio spectrum. In parallel with that, current static spectrum allocation policy of Federal

  3. Spectrum Technology Workshop | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology Workshop Spectrum Technology Workshop Agenda.pdf More Documents & Publications Radio and Spectrum Management Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda...

  4. Spectrum sensing through implementation of USRP2.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aftab, Adnan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Scarcity of the wireless spectrum has led to the development of new techniques for better utilization of the wireless spectrum. Demand for high data rates… (more)

  5. Compressive Spectrum Sensing for Cognitive Radio Networks.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakarmi, Ukash

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Spectrum sensing is the most important part in cognitive radios. Wideband spectrum sensing requires high speed and large data samples. It makes sampling process challenging… (more)

  6. Causality and the Power Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Robinson; Benjamin D. Wandelt

    1995-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We find constraints on the generation of super-causal-horizon energy perturbations from a smooth initial state, under a simple physical scheme. We quantify these constraints by placing the upper limit $\\lambda_c = 3.0 d_H$ on the wavelength at which the power spectrum turns over to $k^4$ behavior. This means that sub-horizon processes can generate significant power on scales further outside the horizon than one might naively expect. The existence of this limit may have important implications for the interpretation of the small scale power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background.

  7. Thermal-spectrum recriticality energetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwinkendorf, K.N.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large computer codes have been created in the past to predict the energy release in hypothetical core disruptive accidents (CDA), postulated to occur in liquid metal reactors (LMR). These codes, such as SIMMER, are highly specific to LMR designs. More recent attention has focused on thermal-spectrum criticality accidents, such as for fuel storage basins and waste tanks containing fissile material. This paper resents results from recent one-dimensional kinetics simulations, performed for a recriticality accident in a thermal spectrum. Reactivity insertion rates generally are smaller than in LMR CDAs, and the energetics generally are more benign. Parametric variation of input was performed, including reactivity insertion and initial temperature.

  8. Spectrum Sensing Techniques in Cognitive Radio Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaweera, Sudharman K.

    1 Spectrum Sensing Techniques in Cognitive Radio Communications Mario Bkassiny*, Yang Li, Georges for CR's. Index Terms-- Cognitive radio, cooperative spectrum sensing, dynamic spectrum access, energy, jayaweera, christos}@ece.unm.edu Abstract-- In this paper, we review some of the recent patents on spectrum

  9. Coalition Formation Games for Collaborative Spectrum Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    demand on the radio spectrum. However, the spectrum resources are scarce and most of them have been already licensed to existing operators. Various studies have shown that the actual licensed spectrum remains unoccupied for large periods [1]. For efficiently exploiting these spectrum holes, cognitive radio

  10. Smart Radio Spectrum Management for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Partha Pratim; Gera, Rishita; Agarwal, Anjali

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's wireless networks are characterized by fixed spectrum assignment policy. The limited available spectrum and the inefficiency in the spectrum usage necessitate a new communication paradigm to exploit the existing wireless spectrum opportunistically. Cognitive radio is a paradigm for wireless communication in which either a network or a wireless node changes its transmission or reception parameters to communicate efficiently avoiding interference with licensed or unlicensed users. In this work, a fuzzy logic based system for spectrum management is proposed where the radio can share unused spectrum depending on some parameters like distance, signal strength, node velocity and availability of unused spectrum. The system is simulated and is found to give satisfactory results.

  11. Junior QA Engineer Intern -14895BR -EH QA Engineers are responsible for facilitating the analysis, evaluation, and testing of firmware across multiple platforms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Junior QA Engineer Intern - 14895BR - EH QA Engineers are responsible for facilitating the analysis, evaluation, and testing of firmware across multiple platforms. · Develop, implement, review ­ C, Java, or other object-oriented programming language acceptable. · Networking experience (L2/L3

  12. Behavioral analysis of sources of occupational stress and responses of middle-level managers in the Gulf Coast petrochemical industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard, H.W.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A behavioral assessment interview procedure was used to identify sources of occupational stress, responses and effectiveness of these responses to stress. Seventy-three middle-level managers in three petrochemical companies in the Texas gulf area were interviewed. Six categories of stress were used to categorize the sources of stress obtained during the interview. The frequencies in sources of stress reported by managers were not significantly different among areas of the plants; however, there were significant differences among companies. The most frequent source of stress for all companies is factors intrinsic to the job. The responses the managers made to sources of stress were categorized. Some of the types of responses were: making new policy, seeking information, and not addressing the problem. Each manager rated the effectiveness of his response in terms of its ability to reduce stress. There is an advantage when subjects list their responses to stress and then rate the effectiveness of each response. In research of this type subjects do not consciously select their best response, but give their most frequent response and then rate its effectiveness. The results of this study indicate that the most frequent response to a source of stress and the most effective response in reducing stress are not always the same. The most frequent response is direct/delayed problem resolution, while the most effective response in reducing stress is prevention. There is a significant difference among the effectiveness ratings of middle-level managers' responses to stress. Not addressing the problem proved to be the least effective response in reducing middle-level managers' stress.

  13. Ion beam energy spectrum calculation via dosimetry data deconvolution.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Sharp, Andrew Clinton (A& M University, College Station, TX)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectrum of a H{sup +} beam generated within the HERMES III accelerator is calculated from dosimetry data to refine future experiments. Multiple layers of radiochromic film are exposed to the beam. A graphic user interface was written in MATLAB to align the film images and calculate the beam's dose depth profile. Singular value regularization is used to stabilize the unfolding and provide the H{sup +} beam's energy spectrum. The beam was found to have major contributions from 1 MeV and 8.5 MeV protons. The HERMES III accelerator is typically used as a pulsed photon source to experimentally obtain photon impulse response of systems due to high energy photons. A series of experiments were performed to explore the use of Hermes III to generate an intense pulsed proton beam. Knowing the beam energy spectrum allows for greater precision in experiment predictions and beam model verification.

  14. Modelling the TSZ power spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, Suman [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shaw, Laurie D [YALE; Nagai, Daisuke [YALE

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure formation in university is a hierarchical process. As universe evolves, tiny density fluctuations that existed in the early universe grows under gravitational instability to form massive large scale structures. The galaxy clusters are the massive viralized objects that forms by accreting smaller clumps of mass until they collapse under their self-gravity. As such galaxy clusters are the youngest objects in the universe which makes their abundance as a function of mass and redshift, very sensitive to dark energy. Galaxy clusters can be detected by measuring the richness in optical waveband, by measuring the X-ray flux, and in the microwave sky using Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect has long been recognized as a powerful tool for detecting clusters and probing the physics of the intra-cluster medium. Ongoing and future experiments like Atacama Cosmology Telescope, the South Pole Telescope and Planck survey are currently surveying the microwave sky to develop large catalogs of galaxy clusters that are uniformly selected by the SZ flux. However one major systematic uncertainties that cluster abundance is prone to is the connection between the cluster mass and the SZ flux. As shown by several simulation studies, the scatter and bias in the SZ flux-mass relation can be a potential source of systematic error to using clusters as a cosmology probe. In this study they take a semi-analytic approach for modeling the intra-cluster medium in order to predict the tSZ power spectrum. The advantage of this approach is, being analytic, one can vary the parameters describing gas physics and cosmology simultaneously. The model can be calibrated against X-ray observations of massive, low-z clusters, and using the SZ power spectrum which is sourced by high-z lower mass galaxy groups. This approach allows us to include the uncertainty in gas physics, as dictated by the current observational uncertainties, while measuring the cosmological parameters using the SZ power spectrum data. The paper is organized as follows. In section 2, after a brief review of the halo model description of the SZ power spectrum, they discuss their model for intra-cluster medium explaining various parameters describing gas physics. In section 3, they explore a subset of parameter space using the current low-z X-ray data of galaxy clusters and mass and redshift dependence of our intra-cluster medium model. In section 4, they explore the parameter dependence of SZ power spectrum and show the agreement of the model with the current SZ power spectrum data from SPT survey.

  15. Three-dimensional Numerical Analysis on Blade Response of Vertical Axis Tidal Current Turbine Under Operational Condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ye; Karri, Naveen K.; Wang, Qi

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tidal power as a large-scale renewable source of energy has been receiving significant attention recently because of its advantages over the wind and other renewal energy sources. The technology used to harvest energy from tidal current is called a tidal current turbine. Though some of the principles of wind turbine design are applicable to tidal current turbines, the design of latter ones need additional considerations like cavitation damage, corrosion etc. for the long-term reliability of such turbines. Depending up on the orientation of axis, tidal current turbines can be classified as vertical axis turbines or horizontal axis turbines. Existing studies on the vertical axis tidal current turbine focus more on the hydrodynamic aspects of the turbine rather than the structural aspects. This paper summarizes our recent efforts to study the integrated hydrodynamic and structural aspects of the vertical axis tidal current turbines. After reviewing existing methods in modeling tidal current turbines, we developed a hybrid approach that combines discrete vortex method -finite element method that can simulate the integrated hydrodynamic and structural response of a vertical axis turbine. This hybrid method was initially employed to analyze a typical three-blade vertical axis turbine. The power coefficient was used to evaluate the hydrodynamic performance, and critical deflection was considered to evaluate the structural reliability. A sensitivity analysis was also conducted with various turbine height-to-radius ratios. The results indicate that both the power output and failure probability increase with the turbine height, suggesting a necessity for optimal design. An attempt to optimize a 3-blade vertical axis turbine design with hybrid method yielded a ratio of turbine height to radius (H/R) about 3.0 for reliable maximum power output.

  16. Towards Cognitive Radio Networks: Spectrum Utilization Measurements in Suburb Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Towards Cognitive Radio Networks: Spectrum Utilization Measurements in Suburb Environment Václav in an opportunistic way. Cognitive radio concept for better spectrum utilization is introduced here along -- Cognitive radio, radio spectrum management, spectrum sensing, spectrum utilization. I. INTRODUCTION

  17. Public safety radios must pool spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehr, William Herndon

    The dynamic-spectrum-access research and development community is maturing technologies that will enable radios to share RF spectrum much more intensively. The adoption of DSA technologies by the public-safety community ...

  18. The acoustic spectrum of alpha Cen A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Bouchy; F. Carrier

    2002-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the analysis of Doppler p-mode observations of the G2V star $\\alpha$ Cen A obtained with the spectrograph CORALIE in May 2001. Thirteen nights of observations have made it possible to collect 1850 radial velocity measurements with a standard deviation of about 1.5 m s$^{-1}$. Twenty-eight oscillation modes have been identified in the power spectrum between 1.8 and 2.9 mHz with amplitudes in the range 12 to 44 cm s$^{-1}$. The average large and small spacing are respectively equal to 105.5 and 5.6 $\\mu$Hz. A comparison with stellar models of $\\alpha$ Cen A is presented.

  19. Detectability of Radio Frequency Interference due to Spread Spectrum Communication Signals using the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    Detectability of Radio Frequency Interference due to Spread Spectrum Communication Signals using-- Analysis of detectability of the kurtosis algorithm for pulsed-sinusoidal Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) has already been performed in detail. The detectability for wide- band spread-spectrum RFI

  20. Beurling spectrum of functions in Banach space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dang Vu Giang

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We are interested in Beurling spectrum of $\\mathbb X-$valued functions with application in functional delay differential equations.

  1. Mokken scale analysis of mental health and wellbeing questionnaire item responses: a nonparametric IRT method in empirical research for applied health researchers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stochl, Jan; Jones, Peter B; Croudace, Tim J

    2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    potentially useful items are rejected because of the shape of their item response functions, with the result that other aspects of scale performance are likely to be compromised to some extent. For ex- ample, reliability estimated from the conforming items may... . No violations of the invariant item ordering requirement are present. We can therefore consider the results of this first ex- emplar Mokken scaling analysis as supportive of a GHQ-12 scale which, within each subscale, satisfies IIO and therefore both subscales...

  2. Spectrum Characterization for Opportunistic Cognitive Radio Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Hüseyin

    1 Spectrum Characterization for Opportunistic Cognitive Radio Systems Tevfik Y¨ucek and H challenging problems in cognitive radio systems. The spectrum of interest needs to be characterized and unused initial network entry is also discussed as a case study. Index Terms-- Cognitive radio, spectrum sensing

  3. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN); Dress, William B. (Camas, WA)

    2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method includes modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control an amplification circuit that provides a gain to the signal. Another method includes: modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control a fast hopping frequency synthesizer; and fast frequency hopping the signal with the fast hopping frequency synthesizer, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time.

  4. Energy Spectrum | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It isInformation Contracts (ESPC) Webinar Jump to:S A Jump to:Spectrum

  5. DCE-MRI defined subvolumes of a brain metastatic lesion by principle component analysis and fuzzy-c-means clustering for response assessment of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farjam, Reza; Tsien, Christina I.; Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, SPC 5010, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5010 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, SPC 5010, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5010 (United States); Cao, Yue, E-mail: yuecao@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, SPC 5010, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5010 (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, SPC 5010, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5010 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Med Inn Building C478, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5842 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2200 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2099 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a pharmacokinetic modelfree framework to analyze the dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data for assessment of response of brain metastases to radiation therapy. Methods: Twenty patients with 45 analyzable brain metastases had MRI scans prior to whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) and at the end of the 2-week therapy. The volumetric DCE images covering the whole brain were acquired on a 3T scanner with approximately 5 s temporal resolution and a total scan time of about 3 min. DCE curves from all voxels of the 45 brain metastases were normalized and then temporally aligned. A DCE matrix that is constructed from the aligned DCE curves of all voxels of the 45 lesions obtained prior to WBRT is processed by principal component analysis to generate the principal components (PCs). Then, the projection coefficient maps prior to and at the end of WBRT are created for each lesion. Next, a pattern recognition technique, based upon fuzzy-c-means clustering, is used to delineate the tumor subvolumes relating to the value of the significant projection coefficients. The relationship between changes in different tumor subvolumes and treatment response was evaluated to differentiate responsive from stable and progressive tumors. Performance of the PC-defined tumor subvolume was also evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in prediction of nonresponsive lesions and compared with physiological-defined tumor subvolumes. Results: The projection coefficient maps of the first three PCs contain almost all response-related information in DCE curves of brain metastases. The first projection coefficient, related to the area under DCE curves, is the major component to determine response while the third one has a complimentary role. In ROC analysis, the area under curve of 0.88 ± 0.05 and 0.86 ± 0.06 were achieved for the PC-defined and physiological-defined tumor subvolume in response assessment. Conclusions: The PC-defined subvolume of a brain metastasis could predict tumor response to therapy similar to the physiological-defined one, while the former is determined more rapidly for clinical decision-making support.

  6. SPARTA: Stable and Efficient Spectrum Access in Next Generation Dynamic Spectrum Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almeroth, Kevin C.

    applications. Using dynamic spectrum access, each node's spectrum usage is inherently unpredictable. Experimental results show that the proposed approach can provide stable spectrum usage while improving its spectrum to each technology/network statically in peak-demand based long-term leases. Overtime, most

  7. Joint Spectrum Allocation and Scheduling for Fair Spectrum Sharing in Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, Satyajayant

    Joint Spectrum Allocation and Scheduling for Fair Spectrum Sharing in Cognitive Radio Wireless University, Tempe, AZ 85287-8809. Email:{misra,xue}@asu.edu Abstract Cognitive radio and Dynamic Spectrum joint spectrum alloca- tion and scheduling problems in cognitive radio wireless networks with the objec

  8. Determination of a mutational spectrum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thilly, William G. (Winchester, MA); Keohavong, Phouthone (Cambridge, MA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of resolving (physically separating) mutant DNA from nonmutant DNA and a method of defining or establishing a mutational spectrum or profile of alterations present in nucleic acid sequences from a sample to be analyzed, such as a tissue or body fluid. The present method is based on the fact that it is possible, through the use of DGGE, to separate nucleic acid sequences which differ by only a single base change and on the ability to detect the separate mutant molecules. The present invention, in another aspect, relates to a method for determining a mutational spectrum in a DNA sequence of interest present in a population of cells. The method of the present invention is useful as a diagnostic or analytical tool in forensic science in assessing environmental and/or occupational exposures to potentially genetically toxic materials (also referred to as potential mutagens); in biotechnology, particularly in the study of the relationship between the amino acid sequence of enzymes and other biologically-active proteins or protein-containing substances and their respective functions; and in determining the effects of drugs, cosmetics and other chemicals for which toxicity data must be obtained.

  9. Study on proliferative responses to host Ia antigens in allogeneic bone marrow chimera in mice: sequential analysis of the reactivity and characterization of the cells involved in the responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwabuchi, K.; Ogasawara, K.; Ogasawara, M.; Yasumizu, R.; Noguchi, M.; Geng, L.; Fujita, M.; Good, R.A.; Onoe, K.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Irradiation bone marrow chimeras were established by reconstitution of lethally irradiated AKR mice with C57BL/10 marrow cells to permit serial analysis of the developing reactivities of lymphocytes from such chimeras, (B10----AKR), against donor, host, or third party antigens. We found that substantial proliferative responses to Ia antigens of the recipient strain and also to third party antigens were generated by the thymocytes obtained from the irradiation chimeras at an early stage after bone marrow reconstitution. The majority of the responding thymocytes had surfaces lacking demonstrable peanut agglutinin receptors and were donor type Thy-1+, Ly-2-, and L3T4+ in both anti-recipient and anti-third party MLR. In anti-host responses, however, Ly-2+ thymocytes seemed to be at least partially involved. This capacity of thymus cells to mount a response to antigens of the recipient strain declined shortly thereafter, whereas the capacity to mount MLR against third party antigens persisted. The spleen cells of (B10----AKR) chimeras at the same time developed a more durable capability to exhibit anti-host reactivities and a permanent capability of reacting to third party allo-antigens. The stimulator antigens were Ia molecules on the stimulator cells in both anti-recipient and anti-third party MLR. The responding splenocytes were of donor origin and most of them had Thy-1+, Ly-1+2-, and L3T4+ phenotype.

  10. SAW correlator spread spectrum receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brocato, Robert W

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) correlator spread-spectrum (SS) receiver is disclosed which utilizes a first demodulation stage with a chip length n and a second demodulation stage with a chip length m to decode a transmitted SS signal having a code length l=n.times.m which can be very long (e.g. up to 2000 chips or more). The first demodulation stage utilizes a pair of SAW correlators which demodulate the SS signal to generate an appropriate code sequence at an intermediate frequency which can then be fed into the second demodulation stage which can be formed from another SAW correlator, or by a digital correlator. A compound SAW correlator comprising two input transducers and a single output transducer is also disclosed which can be used to form the SAW correlator SS receiver, or for use in processing long code length signals.

  11. Power Spectrum of Inflationary Attractors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benedict J. Broy; Diederik Roest; Alexander Westphal

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Inflationary attractors predict the spectral index and tensor-to-scalar ratio to take specific values that are consistent with Planck. An example is the universal attractor for models with a generalised non-minimal coupling, leading to Starobinsky inflation. In this paper we demonstrate that it also predicts a specific relation between the amplitude of the power spectrum and the number of e-folds. The length and height of the inflationary plateau are related via the non-minimal coupling: in a wide variety of examples, the observed power normalisation leads to at least 55 flat e-foldings. Prior to this phase, the inflationary predictions vary and can account for the observational indications of power loss at large angular scales.

  12. Artificial Neural Networks and quadratic Response Surfaces for the functional failure analysis of a thermal-hydraulic passive system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    decay heat removal system of a Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). Keywords: epistemic uncertainties, passive) and quadratic Response Surface (RS) empirical regression models are used as fast-running surrogates of a thermal reactor concepts make use of passive safety features [1], which do not need external input (especially

  13. Spectrum Auction Framework for Access Allocation in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Saswati

    1 Spectrum Auction Framework for Access Allocation in Cognitive Radio Networks Gaurav S. Kasbekar does not exist. Index Terms Cognitive Radio Networks, Spectrum Auctions, Algorithms I. INTRODUCTION, Wireless Meteropolitan Area networks etc., demand for radio spectrum is increasing. Currently, spectrum

  14. Analysis of the Hydrologic Response Associated With Shutdown and Restart of the 200-ZP-1 WMA T Tank Farm Pump-and-Treat System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.

    2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines possible hydrologic effects of pump-and-treat remediation actions and provides a detailed analysis of water-level measurements for selected 200-ZP-1 T Tank Farm pump-and-treat system monitor wells during a recent shutdown (May 1, 2008) and restart activity (June 4, 2008) involving extraction well 299-W11-46. Specifically, this report 1) applies to recently developed methods for removing barometric pressure fluctuations from well water-level measurements to enhance the detection of pump-and-treat system effects at selected monitor wells, 2) analyzes the barometric-corrected well water-level responses to determine large-scale hydraulic properties, and 3) assesses characteristics and conditions that influence hydrologic responses (both laterally and vertically) associated with pump-and-treat systems. The general findings presented in this report have universal application for unconfined and confined aquifer systems.

  15. Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP). Appendix F, remediation analysis with Decision Support Tools (DSTs) for wide-area chemical hazards.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassig, Nancy L. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Pulsipher, Brent A. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Foltz, Greg W.; Hoette, Trisha Marie

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) commissioned an assessment of the Consequence Management (CM) plans in place on military bases for response to a chemical attack. The effectiveness of the CM plans for recovering from chemical incidents was modeled using a multiple Decision Support Tools (DSTs). First, a scenario was developed based on an aerial dispersion of a chemical agent over a wide-area of land. The extent of contamination was modeled with the Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC) tool. Subsequently, the Analyzer for Wide Area Restoration Effectiveness (AWARE) tool was used to estimate the cost and time demands for remediation based on input of contamination maps, sampling and decontamination resources, strategies, rates and costs. The sampling strategies incorporated in the calculation were designed using the Visual Sample Plan (VSP) tool. Based on a gaps assessment and the DST remediation analysis, an Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP) was developed.

  16. Closed loop adaptive control of spectrum-producing step using neural networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, Chi Yung (San Francisco, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics of the plasma in a plasma-based manufacturing process step are monitored directly and in real time by observing the spectrum which it produces. An artificial neural network analyzes the plasma spectrum and generates control signals to control one or more of the process input parameters in response to any deviation of the spectrum beyond a narrow range. In an embodiment, a plasma reaction chamber forms a plasma in response to input parameters such as gas flow, pressure and power. The chamber includes a window through which the electromagnetic spectrum produced by a plasma in the chamber, just above the subject surface, may be viewed. The spectrum is conducted to an optical spectrometer which measures the intensity of the incoming optical spectrum at different wavelengths. The output of optical spectrometer is provided to an analyzer which produces a plurality of error signals, each indicating whether a respective one of the input parameters to the chamber is to be increased or decreased. The microcontroller provides signals to control respective controls, but these lines are intercepted and first added to the error signals, before being provided to the controls for the chamber. The analyzer can include a neural network and an optional spectrum preprocessor to reduce background noise, as well as a comparator which compares the parameter values predicted by the neural network with a set of desired values provided by the microcontroller.

  17. Closed loop adaptive control of spectrum-producing step using neural networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, C.Y.

    1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics of the plasma in a plasma-based manufacturing process step are monitored directly and in real time by observing the spectrum which it produces. An artificial neural network analyzes the plasma spectrum and generates control signals to control one or more of the process input parameters in response to any deviation of the spectrum beyond a narrow range. In an embodiment, a plasma reaction chamber forms a plasma in response to input parameters such as gas flow, pressure and power. The chamber includes a window through which the electromagnetic spectrum produced by a plasma in the chamber, just above the subject surface, may be viewed. The spectrum is conducted to an optical spectrometer which measures the intensity of the incoming optical spectrum at different wavelengths. The output of optical spectrometer is provided to an analyzer which produces a plurality of error signals, each indicating whether a respective one of the input parameters to the chamber is to be increased or decreased. The microcontroller provides signals to control respective controls, but these lines are intercepted and first added to the error signals, before being provided to the controls for the chamber. The analyzer can include a neural network and an optional spectrum preprocessor to reduce background noise, as well as a comparator which compares the parameter values predicted by the neural network with a set of desired values provided by the microcontroller. 7 figs.

  18. The radio spectrum of Sgr A*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang J. Duschl; Harald Lesch

    1994-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the radio spectrum of Sgr A* \\index{Sgr A*, radio spectrum} in the frequency range between $\\approx 1\\,{\\rm GHz}$ and $\\approx 1\\,000\\,{\\rm GHz}$, show that it can be explained by optically thin synchrotron radiation \\index{Sgr A*, synchrotron radiation, optically thin} of relativistic electrons, and point toward a possible correlation between the spectrum of Sgr A* and larger-scale ($\\la 50\\,{\\rm pc}$) radio emission from the Galactic Center \\index{Galactic Center} region.

  19. Proceedings of the IEEE, vol. 97, no. 4, pp. 708-19, April 2009. Sharing Spectrum through Spectrum Policy Reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peha, Jon M.

    Spectrum Policy Reform and Cognitive Radio1 Jon M. Peha Carnegie Mellon University Abstract Traditionally inefficient use of spectrum. Cognitive radio along with software radio, spectrum sensors, mesh networks sharing, spectrum policy, cognitive radio, band manager, unlicensed, etiquette, opportunistic access

  20. Cognitive radio networks for dynamic spectrum management.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Juncheng

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??A fundamental evolution is witnessed in recent research and development of wireless communications: much effort is put on shifting from the current static spectrum management… (more)

  1. Duopoly Competition in Dynamic Spectrum Leasing and Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    --Cognitive radio, spectrum trading, dynamic spectrum leasing, spectrum pricing, multistage dynamic game, subgame to share the spectrum with the licensed primary users. Various dynamic spectrum access mechanisms have been a spectrum owner dynamically transfers and trades the usage right of temporarily unused part of its licensed

  2. Investment and Pricing with Spectrum Uncertainty: A Cognitive Operator's Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    " of licensed bands and dynamically leasing from the spectrum owner. As a result, a C-MVNO can make flexible--Cognitive radio, spectrum trading, spectrum sensing, dynamic spectrum leasing, spectrum pricing, Stackelberg game affecting the normal oper- ation of the spectrum owner who serves the primary (licensed) users. Dynamic

  3. Genetic Analysis of Ca2+ Priming in Arabidopsis Guard Cell Stomatal Closure in Response to the Drought Hormone Abscisic Acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephan, Aaron B.

    2014-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary objective of modern agriculture and biofuel production is to utilize arable land to its fullest potential. However, sub-optimal growing conditions—arising from abiotic stresses such as drought, soil salinity, low humidity, cold, and heat—reduce crop yield and quality. Optimal yield under both stressed and non-stressed conditions requires the plant to activate coping mechanisms at a level commensurate with the severity of the drought stress. The osmotic sensors and associated regulatory mechanisms that initiate drought- and salt-tolerance responses in plants are largely unknown. This research aimed to identify and characterize these initial sensory components.

  4. Analysis of residential, industrial and commercial sector responses to potential electricity supply constraints in the 1990s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Z.J.; Fang, J.M.; Lyke, A.J.; Krudener, J.R.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is considerable debate over the ability of electric generation capacity to meet the growing needs of the US economy in the 1990s. This study provides new perspective on that debate and examines the possibility of power outages resulting from electricity supply constraints. Previous studies have focused on electricity supply growth, demand growth, and on the linkages between electricity and economic growth. This study assumes the occurrence of electricity supply shortfalls in the 1990s and examines the steps that homeowners, businesses, manufacturers, and other electricity users might take in response to electricity outages.

  5. Discrimination between energy transfer and back transfer processes for GaAs host and Er luminescent dopants using electric response analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishii, Masashi, E-mail: ISHII.Masashi@nims.go.jp [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Koizumi, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yasufumi [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Takeda, Yoshikazu [Nagoya Industrial Science Research Institute, Nagoya, Aichi 464-0819 (Japan)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy transfer and back transfer processes of GaAs co-doped with Er and O (GaAs:Er,O) were experimentally distinguished by using a frequency response analysis of the AC photocurrent. The results were achieved by using the difference in the frequency dispersion between (1) the dispersion of the energy transfer, which is triggered by the trapping of free charges in the GaAs host and is represented with the Debye relaxation response and (2) the dispersion of the energy back transfer, which is induced by non-radiative transition of 4f bound electrons in the Er dopants and is described with a Lorentzian. The Debye relaxation response found in GaAs:Er,O provided a charge trapping time that was dependent on temperature, which was well correlated with the thermal quenching property of intense intra-4f-shell luminescence. The spectral shape of the Lorentzian dependence on the temperature was explained with the thermal excitation of Er 4f electrons and release of trapped charges in GaAs. The thermal excitation and release of charges consistently explained the characteristics of weak 4f luminescence in low- and high-temperature regions, respectively.

  6. Residual Energy Spectrum of Solar Wind Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, C H K; Salem, C S; Maruca, B A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has long been known that the energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is not in equipartition. In this paper, we present an analysis of 5 years of Wind data at 1 AU to investigate the reason for this. The residual energy (difference between energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations) was calculated using both the standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) normalization for the magnetic field and a kinetic version, which includes temperature anisotropies and drifts between particle species. It was found that with the kinetic normalization, the fluctuations are closer to equipartition, with a mean normalized residual energy of sigma_r = -0.19 and mean Alfven ratio of r_A = 0.71. The spectrum of residual energy, in the kinetic normalization, was found to be steeper than both the velocity and magnetic field spectra, consistent with some recent MHD turbulence predictions and numerical simulations, having a spectral index close to -1.9. The local properties of residual energy and cros...

  7. Visible Spectrum Incandescent Selective Emitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonsight Inc.

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the work performed was to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel bi-layer selective emitter. Selective emitters are incandescent radiant bodies with emissivities that are substantially larger in a selected part of the radiation spectrum, thereby significantly shifting their radiated spectral distribution from that of a blackbody radiating at the same temperature. The major research objectives involved answering the following questions: (1) What maximum VIS/NIR radiant power and emissivity ratios can be attained at 2650 K? (2) What is the observed emitter body life and how does its performance vary with time? (3) What are the design tradeoffs for a dual heating approach in which both an internally mounted heating coil and electrical resistance self-heating are used? (4) What are the quantitative improvements to be had from utilizing a bi-layer emitter body with a low emissivity inner layer and a partially transmissive outer layer? Two approaches to obtaining selective emissivity were investigated. The first was to utilize large optical scattering within an emitter material with a spectral optical absorption that is much greater within the visible spectrum than that within the NIR. With this approach, an optically thick emitter can radiate almost as if optically thin because essentially, scattering limits the distance below the surface from which significant amounts of internally generated radiation can emerge. The performance of thin emitters was also investigated (for optically thin emitters, spectral emissivity is proportional to spectral absorptivity). These emitters were fabricated from thin mono-layer emitter rods as well as from bi-layer rods with a thin emitter layer mounted on a substrate core. With an initially estimated energy efficiency of almost three times that of standard incandescent bulbs, a number of energy, economic and environmental benefits such as less energy use and cost, reduced CO{sub 2} emissions, and no mercury contamination was initially projected. The work performed provided answers to a number of important questions. The first is that, with the investigated approaches, the maximum sustained emitter efficiencies are about 1.5 times that of a standard incandescent bulb. This was seen to be the case for both thick and thin emitters, and for both mono-layer and bi-layer designs. While observed VIS/NIR ratios represent improvements over standard incandescent bulbs, it does not appear sufficient to overcome higher cost (i.e. up to five times that of the standard bulb) and ensure commercial success. Another result is that high temperatures (i.e. 2650 K) are routinely attainable without platinum electrodes. This is significant for reducing material costs. A novel dual heating arrangement and insulated electrodes were used to attain these temperatures. Another observed characteristic of the emitter was significant grain growth soon after attaining operating temperatures. This is an undesirable characteristic that results in substantially less optical scattering and spectral selectivity, and which significantly limits emitter efficiencies to the values reported. Further work is required to address this problem.

  8. Combined dispersive/interference spectroscopy for producing a vector spectrum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, David J. (Oakland, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of measuring the spectral properties of broadband waves that combines interferometry with a wavelength disperser having many spectral channels to produce a fringing spectrum. Spectral mapping, Doppler shifts, metrology of angles, distances and secondary effects such as temperature, pressure, and acceleration which change an interferometer cavity length can be measured accurately by a compact instrument using broadband illumination. Broadband illumination avoids the fringe skip ambiguities of monochromatic waves. The interferometer provides arbitrarily high spectral resolution, simple instrument response, compactness, low cost, high field of view and high efficiency. The inclusion of a disperser increases fringe visibility and signal to noise ratio over an interferometer used alone for broadband waves. The fringing spectrum is represented as a wavelength dependent 2-d vector, which describes the fringe amplitude and phase. Vector mathematics such as generalized dot products rapidly computes average broadband phase shifts to high accuracy. A Moire effect between the interferometer's sinusoidal transmission and the illumination heterodynes high resolution spectral detail to low spectral detail, allowing the use of a low resolution disperser. Multiple parallel interferometer cavities of fixed delay allow the instantaneous mapping of a spectrum, with an instrument more compact for the same spectral resolution than a conventional dispersive spectrometer, and not requiring a scanning delay.

  9. The precipitation synthesis of broad-spectrum UV absorber nanoceria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nurhasanah, Iis; Sutanto, Heri; Puspaningrum, Nurul Wahyu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Universitas Diponegoro Jl. Prof. Soedarto, S.H, Tembalang Semarang 50275 (Indonesia)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Universitas Diponegoro Jl. Prof. Soedarto, S.H, Tembalang Semarang 50275 (Indonesia)

    2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the possibility of nanoceria as broad-spectrum UV absorber was evaluated. Nanoceria were synthesized by precipitation process from cerium nitrate solution and ammonium hydroxide as precipitant agent. Isopropanol was mixed with water as solvent to prevent hard agglomeration. The structure of resulting nanoceria was characterized by x-ray diffractometer (XRD). The transparency in the visible light and efficiency of protection in UV A region were studied using ultraviolet-visible (UV - Vis) spectrophotometer. The results show that nanoceria possess good tranparency in visible light and high UV light absorption. The critical absorption wavelenght of 368 nm was obtained which is desirable for excellent broad-spectrum protection absorbers. Moreover, analysis of photodegradation nanoceria to methylene blue solution shows poor photocatalytic activity. It indicates that nanoceria suitable for used as UV absorber in personal care products.

  10. Discrete analysis of stochastic NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Sam Tak-Sum

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stochastic NMR is an efficient technique for high field in vivo imaging and spectroscopic studies in cases where the peak rf power required may be prohibitively high for conventional pulsed NMR techniques. This dissertation presents a theoretical analysis of a stochastic NMR method of acquiring spectroscopy data. The spin system is excited with rf pulses where the flip angles or the phases of the pulses are samples of a discrete stochastic process. The method is formulated as a stochastic difference equation which is then converted to ordinary deterministic difference equations describing the input-output cross-correlation, average signal power and signal power spectrum. The solutions of these equations are used to evaluate the stochastic, technique in terms of peak rf power requirement, spectral distortions and signal-to-noise ratio. Experimental results are also presented which verify the results of the discrete analysis. The analysis shows that the maximum signal-to-noise ratio is achieved when the RMS flip angle is approximately the Ernst angle. When the RMS flip angle is below the Ernst angle, the input-output cross-correlation is a good estimate of the FID. Increase of excitation power causes line broadening. In addition, the use of random flip angle, fixed phase excitation causes a notch artifact and non-uniform response across the spectrum both of which are not found in two new types of excitation, the random phase excitation and the random quadrature excitation. The signal power spectrum is also a good estimate of the real spectrum. The approximation of the cross-correlation by a time average causes systematic noise. The amount of systematic noise is found to be significantly reduced when an entire maximum length sequence (MLS) is used for excitation. Noise-like distortion at high power MLS excitation is discovered to be related to the number of feedback paths in the MLS generator. 29 refs., 58 figs.

  11. Survey on Spectrum Utilization in Europe: Measurements, Analyses and Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    major results and comparisons of radio spectrum utilization measurements that have been carried out and physical aspects that will have to be considered in the future radio spectrum management to assure efficient spectrum utilization. Keywords-cognitive radio, dynamic spectrum access, spectrum utilization

  12. Cooperation and Learning in Multiuser Opportunistic Spectrum Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, M. Saif

    for the efficient utilization of the radio frequency spectrum is opportunistic spectrum access (OSA), whereCooperation and Learning in Multiuser Opportunistic Spectrum Access Hua Liu§ , Bhaskar spectrum access net- work where spectrum opportunities are time varying and spatially inhomogeneous

  13. Energy-efficient distributed spectrum sensing with convex optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leus, Geert

    --We consider the problem of distributed spectrum sensing in cognitive radio networks with a central fusion the opportunistic use of such spectrum holes using cognitive radios in order to improve spectrum utilization [2], [3], [4]. A cognitive radio performs spectrum sensing in order to detect spectrum holes and avoids

  14. MAP: Multiauctioneer Progressive Auction for Dynamic Spectrum Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xinbing

    to access the licensed spectrum, and dynamic spectrum access (DSA) is one of the fundamental functions of CR solution according to the length of step. Index Terms--Cognitive radio, dynamic spectrum access, auction from scarcity in spectrum resource and inefficiency in spectrum usage. Cognitive radio (CR) or dynamic

  15. Spectrum Investment with Uncertainty Based on Prospect Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    A secondary operator in a cognitive radio network does not own any spectrum license, so it may acquire operator can either sense for the unused spectrum in a licensed band, or lease spectrum from a spectrum the unused spectrum in a licensed band, and use it to provide services to its users without causing any

  16. ACTION SPECTRUM OF THE "SECOND EMERSON EFFECT"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    at 670 mju in the action spectrum of the "second Emerson effect"' (22, 33), in the green alga Chlorella the fraction of total absorbed light absorbed by the accessory pigments (be it chlorophyll b in Chlorella

  17. Axion isocurvature fluctuations with extremely blue spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasuya, Shinta [Department of Information Science, Kanagawa University, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan); Kawasaki, Masahiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct an axion model for generating isocurvature fluctuations with blue spectrum, n{sub iso}=2-4, which is suggested by recent analyses of admixture of adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations with independent spectral indices, n{sub ad}{ne}n{sub iso}. The distinctive feature of the model is that the spectrum is blue at large scales while scale invariant at small scales. This is naturally realized by the dynamics of the Peccei-Quinn scalar field.

  18. Mass Spectrum, Actons and Cosmological Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Kozlov; I. V. Volovich

    2006-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    It is suggested that the properties of the mass spectrum of elementary particles could be related with cosmology. Solutions of the Klein-Gordon equation on the Friedmann type manifold with the finite action are constructed. These solutions (actons) have a discrete mass spectrum. We suggest that such solutions could select a universe from cosmological landscape. In particular the solutions with the finite action on de Sitter space are investigated.

  19. The vibrational Raman spectrum of CS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballard, Harold Noble

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE VIBRATIONAL RAMAN SPECTRUM OF CSp A Thesis By HAROLD NOBLE BALLARD Approved as to style and content by Chairman o| Committee THE VIBRATIONAL RAMAN SPECTRUM OF CS2 HAROLD NOBLE BALLARD A Thesis Suhmitted to the Graduate School... in the procurement of necessary equipment. SECTION I: INTRODUCTION. SECTION II: CLASSICAL THEORY OF RAHAM SCATTERING . SECTION III: THEORY OF NORMAL VIBRATIONS AND VIBRATIONAL WAVE EQUATIONS. A, Morsel Vibrations B. Vibrational Wave Eqnation and lhergy Levels...

  20. Optimal Classifier Based Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Wireless Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannatham, Aditya K.

    Optimal Classifier Based Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Wireless Systems Siddharth Sharma tolerance. General Terms Algorithms, Theory, Reliability. Keywords Cognitive Radio; Cooperative Spectrum Cognitive radio (CR) networks have been proposed as a revolutionary breakthrough to enhance spectrum

  1. SciTech Connect: Broad Spectrum Photoelectrochemical Diodes for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Broad Spectrum Photoelectrochemical Diodes for Solar Hydrogen Generation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Broad Spectrum Photoelectrochemical Diodes for Solar Hydrogen...

  2. Observations of the high frequency range of the wave spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prevosto, M. [IFREMER, Plouzane (France); Krogstad, H.E. [SINTEF Industrial Mathematics, Trondheim (Norway); Barstow, S. [OCEANOR, Trondheim (Norway); Guedes Soares, C. [Technical Univ. of Lisbon, Lisboa (Portugal)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper takes a new look at the high frequency range of the wave spectrum. The analysis is based on data sets from two recent field campaigns offshore Portugal and Crete carried out in the MAST II WAVEMOD project, data from the WADIC experiment in the North Sea, and deep sea data from Haltenbanken and Voeringplataaet offshore Norway. In addition, the authors also show spectra obtained by spectral inversion of ERS-1 SAR imagery. The influence and calibration of wave measuring instrumentation and the use of wavenumber spectra when comparing spectra from shallow water is emphasized.

  3. GADRAS Detector Response Function.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

  4. Analysis of supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle control strategies and dynamic response for Generation IV Reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of specific control strategies and dynamic behavior of the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle has been extended to the two reactor types selected for continued development under the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative; namely, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) and the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). Direct application of the standard S-CO{sub 2} recompression cycle to the VHTR was found to be challenging because of the mismatch in the temperature drop of the He gaseous reactor coolant through the He-to-CO{sub 2} reactor heat exchanger (RHX) versus the temperature rise of the CO{sub 2} through the RHX. The reference VHTR features a large temperature drop of 450 C between the assumed core outlet and inlet temperatures of 850 and 400 C, respectively. This large temperature difference is an essential feature of the VHTR enabling a lower He flow rate reducing the required core velocities and pressure drop. In contrast, the standard recompression S-CO{sub 2} cycle wants to operate with a temperature rise through the RHX of about 150 C reflecting the temperature drop as the CO{sub 2} expands from 20 MPa to 7.4 MPa in the turbine and the fact that the cycle is highly recuperated such that the CO{sub 2} entering the RHX is effectively preheated. Because of this mismatch, direct application of the standard recompression cycle results in a relatively poor cycle efficiency of 44.9%. However, two approaches have been identified by which the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can be successfully adapted to the VHTR and the benefits of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle, especially a significant gain in cycle efficiency, can be realized. The first approach involves the use of three separate cascaded S-CO{sub 2} cycles. Each S-CO{sub 2} cycle is coupled to the VHTR through its own He-to-CO{sub 2} RHX in which the He temperature is reduced by 150 C. The three respective cycles have efficiencies of 54, 50, and 44%, respectively, resulting in a net cycle efficiency of 49.3 %. The other approach involves reducing the minimum cycle pressure significantly below the critical pressure such that the temperature drop in the turbine is increased while the minimum cycle temperature is maintained above the critical temperature to prevent the formation of a liquid phase. The latter approach also involves the addition of a precooler and a third compressor before the main compressor to retain the benefits of compression near the critical point with the main compressor. For a minimum cycle pressure of 1 MPa, a cycle efficiency of 49.5% is achieved. Either approach opens up the door to applying the SCO{sub 2} cycle to the VHTR. In contrast, the SFR system typically has a core outlet-inlet temperature difference of about 150 C such that the standard recompression cycle is ideally suited for direct application to the SFR. The ANL Plant Dynamics Code has been modified for application to the VHTR and SFR when the reactor side dynamic behavior is calculated with another system level computer code such as SAS4A/SYSSYS-1 in the SFR case. The key modification involves modeling heat exchange in the RHX, accepting time dependent tabular input from the reactor code, and generating time dependent tabular input to the reactor code such that both the reactor and S-CO{sub 2} cycle sides can be calculated in a convergent iterative scheme. This approach retains the modeling benefits provided by the detailed reactor system level code and can be applied to any reactor system type incorporating a S-CO{sub 2} cycle. This approach was applied to the particular calculation of a scram scenario for a SFR in which the main and intermediate sodium pumps are not tripped and the generator is not disconnected from the electrical grid in order to enhance heat removal from the reactor system thereby enhancing the cooldown rate of the Na-to-CO{sub 2} RHX. The reactor side is calculated with SAS4A/SASSYS-1 while the S-CO{sub 2} cycle is calculated with the Plant Dynamics Code with a number of iterations over a timescale of 500 seconds. It is found that the RHX u

  5. Hardening Neutron Spectrum for Advanced Actinides Transmutation Experiments in the ATR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. S. Chang; R. G. Ambrosek

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most effective method for transmuting long-lived isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products is in a fast neutron spectrum reactor. In the absence of a fast rest reactor in the United States, initial irradiation testing of candidate fuels can be performed in a thermal test reactor that has been modified to produce a test region with a hardened neutron spectrum. Such a test facility, with a spectrum similar but somewhat softer than that of the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), has been constructed in the INEEL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The radial fission power distribution of the actinide fuel pin, which is an important parameter in fission gas released modelling, needs to be accurately predicted and the hardened neturon spectrum in the ATR and the LMFBR fast neutron spectrum is compared. The comparison analyses in this study are peformed using MCWO, a well-developed tool that couples the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the isotope depletion and build-up code ORIGEN-2. MCWO analysis yields time-dependent and neutron-spectrum-dependent minor actinide and Pu concentrations and detailed radial fission power profile calculations for a typical fast reactor (LMFBR) neutron spectrum and the hardened neturon spectrum test region in the ATR. The MCWO-calculated results indicate that the cadmium basket used in the advanced fuel test assembly in the ATR can effectively depress the linear heat generation rate in the experimental fuels and harden the neutron spectrum in the test region.

  6. The Power Spectrum of Rich Clusters of Galaxies on Large Spatial Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helen Tadros; George Efstathiou; Gavin Dalton

    1997-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the redshift-space power spectrum, $P(k)$, of rich clusters of galaxies based on an automated cluster catalogue selected from the APM Galaxy Survey. We find that $P(k)$ can be approximated by a power law, $P(k)\\proptok^{n}$, with $n\\approx-1.6$ over the wavenumber range $0.04\\hrspectrum has the same shape as the power spectra measured for optical and IRAS galaxies. This is consistent with a simple linear bias model in which different tracers have the same power spectrum as that of the mass distribution but shifted in amplitude by a constant biasing factor. On larger scales, the power spectrum of APM clusters flattens and appears to turn over on a scale $k \\sim 0.03\\hmpcrev$. We compare the power spectra estimated from simulated APM cluster catalogues to those estimated directly from cubical N-body simulation volumes and find that the APM cluster survey should give reliable estimates of the true power spectrum at wavenumbers $k \\simgt 0.02\\hmpcrev$. These results suggest that the observed turn-over in the power spectrum may be a real feature of the cluster distribution and that we have detected the transition to a near scale-invariant power spectrum implied by observations of anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation. The scale of the turn-over in the cluster power spectrum is in good agreement with the scale of the turn-over observed in the power spectrum of APM galaxies.

  7. Analytical energy spectrum for hybrid mechanical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honghua Zhong; Qiongtao Xie; Xiwen Guan; Murray T. Batchelor; Kelin Gao; Chaohong Lee

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the energy spectrum for hybrid mechanical systems described by non-parity-symmetric quantum Rabi models. A set of analytical solutions in terms of the confluent Heun functions and their analytical energy spectrum are obtained. The analytical energy spectrum includes regular and exceptional parts, which are both confirmed by direct numerical simulation. The regular part is determined by the zeros of the Wronskian for a pair of analytical solutions. The exceptional part is relevant to the isolated exact solutions and its energy eigenvalues are obtained by analyzing the truncation conditions for the confluent Heun functions. By analyzing the energy eigenvalues for exceptional points, we obtain the analytical conditions for the energy-level-crossings, which correspond to two-fold energy degeneracy.

  8. $N$-boson spectrum from a Discrete Scale Invariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kievsky; N. K. Timofeyuk; M. Gattobigio

    2014-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the analysis of the $N$-boson spectrum computed using a soft two-body potential the strength of which has been varied in order to cover an extended range of positive and negative values of the two-body scattering length $a$ close to the unitary limit. The spectrum shows a tree structure of two states, one shallow and one deep, attached to the ground-state of the system with one less particle. It is governed by an unique universal function, $\\Delta(\\xi)$, already known in the case of three bosons. In the three-particle system the angle $\\xi$, determined by the ratio of the two- and three-body binding energies $E_3/E_2=\\tan^2\\xi$, characterizes the Discrete Scale Invariance of the system. Extending the definition of the angle to the $N$-body system as $E_N/E_2=\\tan^2\\xi$, we study the $N$-boson spectrum in terms of this variable. The analysis of the results, obtained for up to $N=16$ bosons, allows us to extract a general formula for the energy levels of the system close to the unitary limit. Interestingly, a linear dependence of the universal function as a function of $N$ is observed at fixed values of $a$. We show that the finite-range nature of the calculations results in the range corrections that generate a shift of the linear relation between the scattering length $a$ and a particular form of the universal function. We also comment on the limits of applicability of the universal relations.

  9. Blue running of the primordial tensor spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinn-Ouk Gong

    2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the possibility of positive spectral index of the power spectrum of the primordial tensor perturbation produced during inflation in the light of the detection of the B-mode polarization by the BICEP2 collaboration. We find a blue tilt is in general possible when the slow-roll parameter decays rapidly. We present two known examples in which a positive spectral index for the tensor power spectrum can be obtained. We also briefly discuss other consistency tests for further studies on inflationary dynamics.

  10. 1 Spectrum Sharing Games of Network Operators and Cognitive Radios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bencsáth, Boldizsár

    Contents 1 Spectrum Sharing Games of Network Operators and Cognitive Radios Mohammad Hossein advances in radio technology, the spectrum regulators have opened some parts of the available spectrum operators and cognitive radios. Because of the dynamic nature of spectrum sharing, it is difficult

  11. Robust Performance of Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    1 Robust Performance of Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks Shimin Gong, Ping Wang) in cognitive radio networks requires SUs to be spectrum aware and know which spectrum bands are occupied by PUs and reduces the system sensitivity on decision variables. Index Terms Cognitive radio network, spectrum

  12. Reputation Aware Collaborative Spectrum Sensing for Mobile Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Cliff C.

    Reputation Aware Collaborative Spectrum Sensing for Mobile Cognitive Radio Networks Abstract ­ The task of spectrum sensing for Dynamic Spectrum Access in Cognitive Radio Networks (CRNs) is very of Cognitive Radio (CR) operation is the opportunistic utilization of licensed spectrum bands by the Secondary

  13. Cryptographic Link Signatures for Spectrum Usage Authentication in Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Wenliang "Kevin"

    Cryptographic Link Signatures for Spectrum Usage Authentication in Cognitive Radio Xi Tan, Kapil frequency spectrum was inefficiently utilized. To fully use these spectrums, cognitive radio networks have of cognitive radio is to enable the current fixed spectrum channels assigned by Federal Communica- tions

  14. Toward Secure Distributed Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Toward Secure Distributed Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks Ruiliang Chen, Jung}@vt.edu Abstract Cognitive radio (CR) is a revolutionary technology that promises to alleviate the spectrum shortage problem and to bring about remarkable improvement in spectrum utilization. Spectrum sensing is one

  15. SAMER: Spectrum Aware Mesh Routing in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Songwu

    SAMER: Spectrum Aware Mesh Routing in Cognitive Radio Networks SHORT PAPER Ioannis Pefkianakis1 in licensed bands, to meet the increasing demand for radio spectrum. The new open spectrum operation--Cognitive Radio, Spectrum Aware Routing I. INTRODUCTION Cognitive radio networks (CORNET) are an emerging multihop

  16. Energy-efficient spectrum sensing for cognitive sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leus, Geert

    spectrum. Traditionally, radio spectrum allocation has been based on exclusive, licensed use of portions for newer wireless net- works and applications. Radio spectrum measurements [13] however indicate that large portions of spectrum licensed to wireless systems remain under-utilized. Consequently there is a growing

  17. Scheduling Heterogeneous Wireless Systems for Efficient Spectrum Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Lichun; Liao, Shenghui

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radio approach for usage of the Virtual Unlicensed Spectrum (CORVUS) system exploits unoccupied licensed

  18. Distributed Routing, Relay Selection, and Spectrum Allocation in Cognitive and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melodia, Tommaso

    of the existing radio spectrum. Based on the reported evidence that static licensed spectrum allocation results--Throughput maximization is a key challenge in cognitive radio ad hoc networks, where the availability of local spectrum radio networks, dynamic spectrum allocation, routing, cross-layer de- sign. I. INTRODUCTION The need

  19. A Survey on Dynamic Spectrum Access Techniques for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garhwal, Anita

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cognitive radio (CR) is a new paradigm that utilizes the available spectrum band. The key characteristic of CR system is to sense the electromagnetic environment to adapt their operation and dynamically vary its radio operating parameters. The technique of dynamically accessing the unused spectrum band is known as Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA). The dynamic spectrum access technology helps to minimize unused spectrum bands. In this paper, main functions of Cognitive Radio (CR) i.e. spectrum sensing, spectrum management, spectrum mobility and spectrum sharing are discussed. Then DSA models are discussed along with different methods of DSA such as Command and Control, Exclusive-Use, Shared Use of Primary Licensed User and Commons method. Game-theoretic approach using Bertrand game model, Markovian Queuing Model for spectrum allocation in centralized architecture and Fuzzy logic based method are also discussed and result are shown.

  20. Analysis of genes regulated by the peroxide response regulator PerR in Borrelia burgdorferi using real-time RT-PCR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swingle, Kristen Lynn

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    encodes a peroxide response regulator (PerR) which regulates gene expression in response to oxidative stress in other organisms. Several borrelial genes with homology to known oxidative stress genes, and the pathogenesis-associated gene dbpA, contain...

  1. EARS (Enhancing Access to the Radio Spectrum) PROGRAM: The radio spectrum is a finite but exceedingly valuable natural resource that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cetiner, Bedri A.

    EARS (Enhancing Access to the Radio Spectrum) PROGRAM: The radio spectrum is a finite communications, among a multitude of others. During the last two decades, the use of the radio spectrum has on the topic of Enhancing Access to the Radio Spectrum. The charge to the workshop was "to identify

  2. Adaptive, full-spectrum solar energy system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Earl, Dennis D.

    2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An adaptive full spectrum solar energy system having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one hybrid luminaire, at least one hybrid photobioreactor, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator, each hybrid luminaire, and each hybrid photobioreactor. A lighting control system operates each component.

  3. Economic Viability of Dynamic Spectrum Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    and Economics Lab Department of Information Engineering The Chinese University of Hong Kong #12;#12;1 EconomicEconomic Viability of Dynamic Spectrum Management Jianwei Huang Network Communications efficiently. Successful im- plementation of DSM is not a pure engineering issue. It is also a complicated

  4. Green Wireless Cognition: Future Efficient Spectrum Sharing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    Underwater Vehicles The project aims to develop an unmanned fully autonomous under water vehicles (UWV Spectrum Wireless Sensor in Underwater Networks * Bell's Law of Computer Classes formulated by Gordon Bell the challenges of underwater communications by an integration of sensor and multihop networks. Human

  5. Instruments and Methods Singular spectrum analysis and envelope detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John

    such as Radan (Geophysical Survey Systems Inc.) or Haescan (Roadscanners Oy). In glaciological research

  6. Reliable self-powered highly spectrum-selective ZnO ultraviolet photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, H. [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Shan, C. X., E-mail: shancx@ciomp.ac.cn, E-mail: binghuili@163.com; Li, B. H., E-mail: shancx@ciomp.ac.cn, E-mail: binghuili@163.com; Shen, D. Z. [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Xuan, B. [Key Laboratory of Optical System Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Optical System Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China)

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet photodetectors (PDs) have been fabricated from p-ZnO:(Li,N)/n-ZnO structures in this Letter. The PDs can operate without any external power supply and show response only to a very narrow spectrum range. The self-power character of the devices is due to the built-in electric field in the p-n junctions that can separate the photogenerated electrons and holes while the high spectrum-selectivity has been attributed to the filter effect of the neutral region in the ZnO:(Li,N) layer. The performance of the self-powered highly spectrum-selective PDs degrades little after five months, indicating their good reliability.

  7. Methods and apparatuses using filter banks for multi-carrier spread-spectrum signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moradi, Hussein; Farhang, Behrouz; Kutsche, Carl A

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A transmitter includes a synthesis filter bank to spread a data symbol to a plurality of frequencies by encoding the data symbol on each frequency, apply a common pulse-shaping filter, and apply gains to the frequencies such that a power level of each frequency is less than a noise level of other communication signals within the spectrum. Each frequency is modulated onto a different evenly spaced subcarrier. A demodulator in a receiver converts a radio frequency input to a spread-spectrum signal in a baseband. A matched filter filters the spread-spectrum signal with a common filter having characteristics matched to the synthesis filter bank in the transmitter by filtering each frequency to generate a sequence of narrow pulses. A carrier recovery unit generates control signals responsive to the sequence of narrow pulses suitable for generating a phase-locked loop between the demodulator, the matched filter, and the carrier recovery unit.

  8. Methods and apparatuses using filter banks for multi-carrier spread-spectrum signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moradi, Hussein; Farhang, Behrouz; Kutsche, Carl A

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A transmitter includes a synthesis filter bank to spread a data symbol to a plurality of frequencies by encoding the data symbol on each frequency, apply a common pulse-shaping filter, and apply gains to the frequencies such that a power level of each frequency is less than a noise level of other communication signals within the spectrum. Each frequency is modulated onto a different evenly spaced subcarrier. A demodulator in a receiver converts a radio frequency input to a spread-spectrum signal in a baseband. A matched filter filters the spread-spectrum signal with a common filter having characteristics matched to the synthesis filter bank in the transmitter by filtering each frequency to generate a sequence of narrow pulses. A carrier recovery unit generates control signals responsive to the sequence of narrow pulses suitable for generating a phase-locked loop between the demodulator, the matched filter, and the carrier recovery unit.

  9. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  10. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  11. Changes in the halo formation rates due to features in the primordial spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhiraj Kumar Hazra

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Features in the primordial scalar power spectrum provide a possible roadway to describe the outliers at the low multipoles in the WMAP data. Apart from the CMB angular power spectrum, these features can also alter the matter power spectrum and, thereby, the formation of the large scale structure. Carrying out a complete numerical analysis, we investigate the effects of primordial features on the formation rates of the halos. We consider a few different inflationary models that lead to features in the scalar power spectrum and an improved fit to the CMB data, and analyze the corresponding imprints on the formation of halos. Performing a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis with the WMAP seven year data and the SDSS halo power spectrum from LRG DR7 for the models of our interest, we arrive at the parameter space of the models allowed by the data. We illustrate that, inflationary potentials, such as the quadratic potential with sinusoidal modulations and the axion monodromy model, which generate certain repeated, oscillatory features in the inflationary perturbation spectrum, do not induce a substantial difference in the number density of halos at their best fit values, when compared with, say, a nearly scale invariant spectrum as is generated by the standard quadratic potential. However, we find that the number density and the formation rates of halos change by about 13-22% for halo masses ranging over 10^4-10^14 solar mass, for potential parameters that lie within 2-sigma around the best fit values arrived at from the aforesaid joint constraints. We briefly discuss the implications of our results.

  12. First observations of the second solar spectrum with spatial resolution at the Lunette Jean Rsch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    First observations of the second solar spectrum with spatial resolution at the Lunette Jean Rösch analysis is achieved before transmission to the spectrograph by a flat mirror at 45° (Fig. 1). Therefore at the secondary focus F2 where the slit of the spectrograph is located, according to the magnification lens

  13. First observations of the second solar spectrum with spatial resolution at the Lunette Jean Rsch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demoulin, Pascal

    First observations of the second solar spectrum with spatial resolution at the Lunette Jean Rösch. Polarization analysis is achieved before transmission to the spectrograph by a flat mirror at 45° (Fig. 1 at the secondary focus F2 where the slit of the spectrograph is located, according to the magnification lens

  14. Changes in the halo formation rates due to features in the primordial spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Features in the primordial scalar power spectrum provide a possible roadway to describe the outliers at the low multipoles in the WMAP data. Apart from the CMB angular power spectrum, these features can also alter the matter power spectrum and, thereby, the formation of the large scale structure. Carrying out a complete numerical analysis, we investigate the effects of primordial features on the formation rates of the halos. We consider a few different inflationary models that lead to features in the scalar power spectrum and an improved fit to the CMB data, and analyze the corresponding imprints on the formation of halos. Performing a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis with the WMAP seven year data and the SDSS halo power spectrum from LRG DR7 for the models of our interest, we arrive at the parameter space of the models allowed by the data. We illustrate that, inflationary potentials, such as the quadratic potential with sinusoidal modulations and the axion monodromy model, which generate certain repeated, o...

  15. The host galaxies of Compact Steep Spectrum and Gigahertz-Peaked Spectrum radio sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Holt

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I will review some of the developments in studies of the host galaxy properties of Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) and GigaHertz-Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio sources. In contrast to previous reviews structured around observational technique, I will discuss the host galaxy properties in terms of morphology, stellar content and warm gas properties and discuss how compact, young radio-loud AGN are key objects for understanding galaxy evolution.

  16. Structural building response review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The integrity of a nuclear power plant during a postulated seismic event is required to protect the public against radiation. Therefore, a detailed set of seismic analyses of various structures and equipment is performed while designing a nuclear power plant. This report describes the structural response analysis method, including the structural model, soil-structure interaction as it relates to structural models, methods for seismic structural analysis, numerical integration methods, methods for non-seismic response analysis approaches for various response combinations, structural damping values, nonlinear response, uncertainties in structural properties, and structural response analysis using random properties. The report describes the state-of-the-art in these areas for nuclear power plants. It also details the past studies made at Sargent and Lundy to evaluate different alternatives and the conclusions reached for the specific purposes that those studies were intended. These results were incorporated here because they fall into the general scope of this report. The scope of the present task does not include performing new calculations.

  17. Velocity coordinate spectrum: geometrical aspects of observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chepurnov; A. Lazarian

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a technique of obtaining turbulence power spectrum using spectral line data along the velocity coordinate, which we refer to as Velocity Coordinate Spectrum (VCS). We formalize geometrical aspects of observation through a single factor, "geometric term". We find that all variety of particular observational configurations can be described using correspondent variants of this term, which we explicitly calculate. This allows us to obtain asymptotics for both parallel lines of sight and crossing lines of sight. The latter case is especially important for studies of turbulence within diffuse ISM in Milky Way. For verification of our results, we use direct calculation of VCS spectra, while the numerical simulations are presented in a companion paper.

  18. Quantized black holes, their spectrum and radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khriplovich, I. B. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)], E-mail: khriplovich@inp.nsk.su

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Under quite natural general assumptions, the following results are obtained. The maximum entropy of a quantized surface is demonstrated to be proportional to the surface area in the classical limit. The general structure of the horizon spectrum is found. In the special case of loop quantum gravity, the value of the Barbero-Immirzi parameter is found. The discrete spectrum of thermal radiation of a black hole fits the Wien profile. The natural widths of the lines are much smaller than the distances between them. The total intensity of the thermal radiation is estimated. If the density of quantized primordial black holes is close to the present upper limit on the dark-matter density in our Solar system, the sensitivity of modern detectors is close to that necessary for detecting this radiation.

  19. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Casey, D. T. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Frenje, J. A. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Gatu Johnson, M. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Seguin, F. H. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Li, C. K. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Petrasso, R. D. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Glebov, V. Yu. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Katz, J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Magoon, J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Sangster, T. C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Shoup, M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Ulreich, J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Ashabranner, R. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bionta, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carpenter, A. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Felker, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Khater, H. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacKinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McKernan, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moran, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yeoman, M. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zacharias, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leeper, R. J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fletcher, K. [State Univ. of New York at Geneseo, NY (United States); Farrell, M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Jasion, D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Kilkenny, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Paguio, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, iontemperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  20. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  1. Observation of the Ankle and Evidence for a High-Energy Break in the Cosmic Ray Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The High Resolution Fly's Eye Collaboration

    2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the cosmic ray spectrum at energies above $10^{17}$ eV using the two air fluorescence detectors of the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment operating in monocular mode. We describe the detector, PMT and atmospheric calibrations, and the analysis techniques for the two detectors. We fit the spectrum to models describing galactic and extragalactic sources. Our measured spectrum gives an observation of a feature known as the ``ankle'' near $3\\times 10^{18}$ eV, and strong evidence for a suppression near $6\\times 10^{19}$ eV.

  2. Spectrum and Charge Ratio of Vertical Cosmic Ray Muons up to Momenta of 2.5 TeV/c

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmelling, M.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; Hashim, N.O.; /Kenyatta U. Coll.; Grupen, C.; /Siegen U.; Luitz, S.; /SLAC; Maciuc, F.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; Mailov, A.; /Siegen U.; Muller, A.-S.; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.; Sander, H.-G.; /Mainz U., Inst. Phys.; Schmeling, S.; /CERN; Tcaciuc, R.; /Siegen U.; Wachsmuth, H.; /CERN; Zuber, K.; /Dresden, Tech. U.

    2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The ALEPH detector at LEP has been used to measure the momentum spectrum and charge ratio of vertical cosmic ray muons underground. The sea-level cosmic ray muon spectrum for momenta up to 2.5 TeV/c has been obtained by correcting for the overburden of 320 meter water equivalent (mwe). The results are compared with Monte Carlo models for air shower development in the atmosphere. From the analysis of the spectrum the total flux and the spectral index of the cosmic ray primaries is inferred. The charge ratio suggests a dominantly light composition of cosmic ray primaries with energies up to 10{sup 15} eV.

  3. A day in the life of the RF spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooley, James E. (James Edward)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a misguided perception that RF spectrum space is fully allocated and fully used though even a superficial study of actual spectrum usage by measuring local RF energy shows it largely empty of radiation. Traditional ...

  4. Enhancing spectrum utilization through cooperation and cognition in wireless systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul, Hariharan Shankar, 1975-

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have seen a proliferation of wireless technologies and devices in recent years. The resulting explosion of wireless demand has put immense pressure on available spectrum. Improving spectrum utilization is therefore ...

  5. 1569003080 1 Characterization of Spectrum Activities in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xin

    interference, and policy performance with local and cooperative sensing. We analyze the collected data. Jung is with the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, The University of California, Davis and dynamic spectrum policies, including regulation recommendations, secondary market spectrum leasing rulings

  6. Centralized Collaborative Compressed Sensing of Wideband Spectrum for Cognitive Radios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Centralized Collaborative Compressed Sensing of Wideband Spectrum for Cognitive Radios Hessam, spectrum sensing, cognitive radio, distri- bution discontinuities, algebraic detection, wideband. I technique for cognitive radio systems which combines algebraic tools and compressive sampling techniques

  7. KALMAN FILTER WITH PHASE SPECTRUM COMPENSATION ALGORITHM FOR SPEECH ENHANCEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KALMAN FILTER WITH PHASE SPECTRUM COMPENSATION ALGORITHM FOR SPEECH ENHANCEMENT Stephen So, Kamil K with a recent speech enhancement technique, called the phase spectrum compen- sation procedure, or PSC. More-- Kalman filter, phase spectrum compensation (PSC), speech enhancement 1. INTRODUCTION The Kalman filter

  8. Sequential Detection based Cooperative Spectrum Sensing Algorithms in Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Vinod

    Sequential Detection based Cooperative Spectrum Sensing Algorithms in Cognitive Radio Arun considers the problem of Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks. For this we use a recently developed is not experienced by our algorithm. Keywords-Cognitive Radio, Cooperative Spectrum Sensing, Decentralized Sequential

  9. Competitive Interference-aware Spectrum Access in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Competitive Interference-aware Spectrum Access in Cognitive Radio Networks Jocelyne Elias, Fabio studies the spectrum access problem in cognitive radio networks from a game theoretical perspective. Finally, we provide numerical results of the proposed spectrum access game in several cognitive radio

  10. High Throughput Spectrum-aware Routing for Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Ben Y.

    High Throughput Spectrum-aware Routing for Cognitive Radio Networks Ashwin Sampath, Lei Yang, Lili, wireless nodes equipped with cognitive radios [11] do not operate on statically as- signed spectrum who own the spectrum, e.g. analog TV broadcast stations. Such flexibility means cognitive radios can

  11. Spectrum Leasing via Distributed Cooperation in Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    Spectrum Leasing via Distributed Cooperation in Cognitive Radio Igor Stanojev1 , Osvaldo Simeone1 for cognitive radio. I. INTRODUCTION Cognitive radio is a debated new paradigm for efficient spectrum or unlicensed model [1], requires secondary users to first sense the radio environment in search of spectrum

  12. Spectrum Leasing via Distributed Cooperation in Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simeone, Osvaldo

    Spectrum Leasing via Distributed Cooperation in Cognitive Radio Igor Stanojev1, Osvaldo Simeone1 for cognitive radio. I. INTRODUCTION Cognitive radio is a debated new paradigm for efficient spectrum or unlicensed model [1], requires secondary users to first sense the radio environment in search of spectrum

  13. Censored Truncated Sequential Spectrum Sensing for Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leus, Geert

    1 Censored Truncated Sequential Spectrum Sensing for Cognitive Radio Networks Sina Maleki Geert Leus Abstract Reliable spectrum sensing is a key functionality of a cognitive radio network. Cooperative spectrum sensing improves the detection reliability of a cognitive radio system but also increases

  14. Collaborative Spectrum Sensing from Sparse Observations in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Wotao

    1 Collaborative Spectrum Sensing from Sparse Observations in Cognitive Radio Networks Jia (Jasmine for the implementation of cognitive radio. Collaborative spectrum sensing among the cognitive radio nodes is expected to improve the ability of checking complete spectrum usage. Due to hardware limitations, each cognitive radio

  15. Binary Consensus for Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mostofi, Yasamin

    Binary Consensus for Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks Shwan Ashrafi, Cooperative Spectrum Sensing. I. INTRODUCTION Cognitive Radio (CR), introduced by Mitola [1], is expected). As such, cognitive radio emerged as a possible solution by trying to use the spectrum holes and thus

  16. Demonstration of Real-time Spectrum Sensing for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    Demonstration of Real-time Spectrum Sensing for Cognitive Radio Zhe Chen, Nan Guo, and Robert C sensing detects the availability of the radio frequency spectrum in a real-time fashion, which is essen Cognitive radio (CR) has been put forward to make effi- cient use of scarce radio frequency spectrum

  17. Two Phase Spectrum Sharing for Frequency-Agile Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Dong S.

    1 Two Phase Spectrum Sharing for Frequency-Agile Radio Networks Zhenhua Feng and Yaling Yang of modern radios. We solve a joint spectrum sharing and end-to-end rate control problems for general technologies (e.g. software defined radio and cognitive radios) enable more flexible spectrum access through

  18. Throughput Enhancing Cooperative Spectrum Sensing Strategies for Cognitive Radios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    Throughput Enhancing Cooperative Spectrum Sensing Strategies for Cognitive Radios Kyounghwan Lee growth of wireless services continues to accelerate the exhaustion of usable radio spectrum. The radio channels licensed to the primary users. A main chal- lenge in this case is to design a spectrum sensing

  19. Quickest Spectrum Detection Using Hidden Markov Model for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    Quickest Spectrum Detection Using Hidden Markov Model for Cognitive Radio Zhe Chen, Zhen Hu, Robert and recognition under the umbrella of cognitive radio. In the procedure of spectrum recognition, a frequency) opened free white space spectrum on November 4, 2008 [1]. Cognitive radio has been put forward as a more

  20. Partial Cooperation for Spectrum Sharing in Cognitive Radio Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Partial Cooperation for Spectrum Sharing in Cognitive Radio Network Lok Man Law1, Fen Hou2, Jianwei that many licensed radio spectrums are heavily under-utilized. Cognitive radio technology can improve spectrum, without affecting the normal communications of the primary licensed users. In cognitive radio

  1. Partial Cooperation for Spectrum Sharing in Cognitive Radio Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    that many licensed radio spectrums are heavily under-utilized. Cognitive radio technology can improve spectrum, without affecting the normal communications of the primary licensed users. In cognitive radioPartial Cooperation for Spectrum Sharing in Cognitive Radio Network Lok Man Law1, Fen Hou2, Jianwei

  2. Competition and bargaining in wireless networks with spectrum leasing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    which have bought a license, giving them the exclusive right to use a fixed part of the radio spectrum a license which gives it the right to use spectrum, while the MVNO is a Secondary Operator (SO), which leases a fraction of the spectrum licensed to the PO. The SO is assumed to have deployed a new technology

  3. ICST Transactions Preprint Cooperation Scheme For Distributed Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    ICST Transactions Preprint Cooperation Scheme For Distributed Spectrum Sensing In Cognitive Radio, Philadelphia, PA 19122 Abstract Spectrum sensing is an essential phase in cognitive radio networks (CRNs). It enables secondary users (SUs) to access licensed spectrum, which is temporarily not occupied

  4. Robust Distributed Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unlicensed radios to operate in licensed spectrum, provided no harmful interference is expe- riencedRobust Distributed Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks Ruiliang Chen, Jung-Min Park {rlchen, jungmin, kgbian}@vt.edu Abstract--Distributed spectrum sensing (DSS) enables a Cog- nitive Radio

  5. Cognitive Radio Networks: How much Spectrum Sharing is Optimal?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jafar, Syed A.

    Cognitive Radio Networks: How much Spectrum Sharing is Optimal? Sudhir Srinivasa and Syed Ali Jafar the traditional `divide and set aside' approach to spectrum regulation ensures that the licensed (primary) users periodically monitors the radio spectrum, intelligently detects occupancy in the different frequency bands

  6. Spread-spectrum Cognitive Networking: Distributed Channelization and Routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melodia, Tommaso

    Mainstream cognitive radio proposals focus on opportunistic access to the licensed spectrum where the primary. Moreover, in cognitive radio networks with multi-hop communication requirements, spectrum occupancy or secondary users. In this way, the secondary users share the licensed spectrum with the primary users

  7. Ensuring Trustworthy Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ensuring Trustworthy Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks Ruiliang Chen and Jung-Min Park to coexist with incumbent users in licensed spectrum bands without inducing interference to incumbent--Cognitive Radio, Spectrum Sensing, Primary User Emulation Attack, Location Verification. I. INTRODUCTION The need

  8. Neutrino mass spectrum and neutrinoless double beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus; H. Päs; A. Y. Smirnov

    2000-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The relations between the effective Majorana mass of the electron neutrino, $m_{ee}$, responsible for neutrinoless double beta decay, and the neutrino oscillation parameters are considered. We show that for any specific oscillation pattern $m_{ee}$ can take any value (from zero to the existing upper bound) for normal mass hierarchy and it can have a minimum for inverse hierarchy. This means that oscillation experiments cannot fix in general $m_{ee}$. Mass ranges for $m_{ee}$ can be predicted in terms of oscillation parameters with additional assumptions about the level of degeneracy and the type of hierarchy of the neutrino mass spectrum. These predictions for $m_{ee}$ are systematically studied in the specific schemes of neutrino mass and flavor which explain the solar and atmospheric neutrino data. The contributions from individual mass eigenstates in terms of oscillation parameters have been quantified. We study the dependence of $m_{ee}$ on the non-oscillation parameters: the overall scale of the neutrino mass and the relative mass phases. We analyze how forthcoming oscillation experiments will improve the predictions for $m_{ee}$. On the basis of these studies we evaluate the discovery potential of future \\znbb decay searches. The role \\znbb decay searches will play in the reconstruction of the neutrino mass spectrum is clarified. The key scales of $m_{ee}$, which will lead to the discrimination among various schemes are: $m_{ee} \\sim 0.1$ eV and $m_{ee} \\sim 0.005$ eV.

  9. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 8. Additional analysis in response to peer review recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contents: Introduction; Combustion Engineering; Air Dispersion and Deposition Modeling; Accident Analysis; Exposure Assessment; Toxicology; and Ecological Risk Assessment.

  10. ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLOR ENERGY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byard D. Wood

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports solar light from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a large core polymer fiber optic. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of solar lighting and electric lighting. A benchmark prototype system has been developed to evaluate the HSL system. Sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. A secondary mirror consisting of eight planar-segmented mirrors directs the visible part of the spectrum to eight fibers (receiver) and subsequently to eight luminaires. This results in about 8,200 lumens incident at each fiber tip. Each fiber can illuminate about 16.7 m{sup 2} (180 ft{sup 2}) of office space. The IR spectrum is directed to a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) array to produce electricity. During this reporting period, the project team made advancements in the design of the second generation (Alpha) system. For the Alpha system, the eight individual 12 mm fibers have been replaced with a centralized bundle of 3 mm fibers. The TRNSYS Full-Spectrum Solar Energy System model has been updated and new components have been added. The TPV array and nonimaging device have been tested and progress has been made in the fiber transmission models. A test plan was developed for both the high-lumen tests and the study to determine the non-energy benefits of daylighting. The photobioreactor team also made major advancements in the testing of model scale and bench top lab-scale systems.

  11. Spectrum tailoring of the neutron energy spectrum in the context of delayed neutron detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koehler, William E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Steve J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Nathan P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fensin, Mike L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the purpose of measuring plutonium mass in spent fuel, a delayed neutron instrument is of particular interest since, if properly designed, the delayed neutron signal from {sup 235}U is significantly stronger than the signature from {sup 239}Pu or {sup 241}Pu. A key factor in properly designing a delayed neutron instrument is to minimize the fission of {sup 238}U. This minimization is achieved by keeping the interrogating neutron spectrum below {approx} 1 MeV. In the context of spent fuel measurements it is desirable to use a 14 MeV (deuterium and tritium) neutron generator for economic reasons. Spectrum tailoring is the term used to describe the inclusion of material between the 14 MeV neutrons and the interrogated object that lower the neutron energy through nuclear reactions and moderation. This report quantifies the utility of different material combination for spectrum tailoring.

  12. Model independent foreground power spectrum estimation using WMAP 5-year data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Tuhin; Souradeep, Tarun [IUCAA, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune-411007 (India); Saha, Rajib [IUCAA, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune-411007 (India); Jet Propulsion Laboratory, M/S 169-327, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, U.P, 208016 (India); Jain, Pankaj [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, U.P, 208016 (India)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we propose and implement on WMAP 5 yr data a model independent approach of foreground power spectrum estimation for multifrequency observations of the CMB experiments. Recently, a model independent approach of CMB power spectrum estimation was proposed by Saha et al. 2006. This methodology demonstrates that the CMB power spectrum can be reliably estimated solely from WMAP data without assuming any template models for the foreground components. In the current paper, we extend this work to estimate the galactic foreground power spectrum using the WMAP 5 yr maps following a self-contained analysis. We apply the model independent method in harmonic basis to estimate the foreground power spectrum and frequency dependence of combined foregrounds. We also study the behavior of synchrotron spectral index variation over different regions of the sky. We use the full sky Haslam map as an external template to increase the degrees of freedom, while computing the synchrotron spectral index over the frequency range from 408 MHz to 94 GHz. We compare our results with those obtained from maximum entropy method foreground maps, which are formed in pixel space. We find that relative to our model independent estimates maximum entropy method maps overestimate the foreground power close to galactic plane and underestimates it at high latitudes.

  13. Wide-cross whole-genome radiation hybrid (WWRH) mapping and identification of cold-responsive genes using oligo-gene microarray analysis in cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Wenxiang

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    that the WWRH mapping method can be used to map the cotton genome, and that this method complements traditional linkage mapping approaches. The second part of this research focused on the identification of cold-responsive genes using spotted oligo...

  14. The Optical Spectrum of the Vela Pulsar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. P. Mignani; S. Zharikov; P. A. Caraveo

    2007-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Our knowledge of the optical spectra of Isolated Neutron Stars (INSs) is limited by their intrinsic faintness. Among the fourteen optically identified INSs, medium resolution spectra have been obtained only for a handful of objects. No spectrum has been published yet for the Vela pulsar (PSR B0833-45), the third brightest (V=23.6) INS with an optical counterpart. Optical multi-band photometry underlines a flat continuum.In this work we present the first optical spectroscopy observations of the Vela pulsar, performed in the 4000-11000 A spectral range.Our observations have been performed at the ESO VLT using the FORS2 instrument. The spectrum of the Vela pulsar is characterized by a flat power-law (alpha = -0.04 +/- 0.04), which compares well with the values obtained from broad-band photometry. This confirms, once more, that the optical emission of Vela is entirely of magnetospheric origin. The comparison between the optical spectral indeces of rotation-powered INSs does not show evidence for a spectral evolution suggesting that, as in the X-rays, the INS aging does not affect the spectral properties of the magnetospheric emission. At the same time, the optical spectral indeces are found to be nearly always flatter then the X-rays ones, clearly suggesting a general spectral turnover at lower energies.

  15. Spectrum Management for Cognitive Radio based on Genetics Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Santosh Kumar; Pathak, Vibhakar; Roy, Dr Krishna Chandra

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrum scarceness is one of the major challenges that the present world is facing. The efficient use of existing licensed spectrum is becoming most critical as growing demand of the radio spectrum. Different researches show that the use of licensed are not utilized inefficiently. It has been also shown that primary user does not use more than 70% of the licensed frequency band most of the time. Many researchers are trying to found the techniques that efficiently utilize the under-utilized licensed spectrum. One of the approaches is the use of "Cognitive Radio". This allows the radio to learn from its environment, changing certain parameters. Based on this knowledge the radio can dynamically exploit the spectrum holes in the licensed band of the spectrum. This paper w i l l focus on the performance of spectrum allocation technique, based on popular meta-heuristics Genetics Algorithm and analyzing the performance of this technique using Mat Lab.

  16. Adaptive transmission schemes of cognitive radio for dynamic spectrum access using wavelets and multiwavelets.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manju Mathew.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Electromagnetic spectrum is a natural resource and at present its use is regulated by fixed spectrum assignment policy. That is, spectrum is assigned to license… (more)

  17. Quantum-classical correspondence in response theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kryvohuz, Maksym

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, theoretical analysis of correspondence between classical and quantum dynamics is studied in the context of response theory. Thesis discusses the mathematical origin of time-divergence of classical response ...

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  20. Chapter 9: Photovoltaic DevicesChapter 9: Photovoltaic Devices Solar energy spectrumSolar energy spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jianfang

    Chapter 9: Photovoltaic DevicesChapter 9: Photovoltaic Devices Solar energy spectrumSolar energy Solar Energy? · Clean · Nearly unlimited PHYS5320 Chapter Nine 3 #12;S l ll l t PHYS5320 Chapter Nine 4 Solar cell plant #12;Cars powered by photovoltaic devices PHYS5320 Chapter Nine 5 #12;Solar Energy

  1. Expanding the solar spectrum used by photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Min; Blankenship, R. E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A limiting factor for photosynthetic organisms is their light-harvesting efficiency, that is the efficiency of their conversion of light energy to chemical energy. Small modifications or variations of chlorophylls allow photosynthetic organisms to harvest sunlight at different wavelengths. Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms usually utilize only the visible portion of the solar spectrum. The cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina carries out oxygenic photosynthesis but contains mostly chlorophyll d and only traces of chlorophyll a. Chlorophyll d provides a potential selective advantage because it enables Acaryochloris to use infrared light (700–750 nm) that is not absorbed by chlorophyll a. Recently, an even more red-shifted chlorophyll termed chlorophyll f has been reported. Here, we discuss using modified chlorophylls to extend the spectral region of light that drives photosynthetic organisms.

  2. Symmetry and Dirac points in graphene spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory Berkolaiko; Andrew Comech

    2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Existence and stability of Dirac points in the dispersion relation of operators periodic with respect to the hexagonal lattice is investigated for different sets of additional symmetries. The following symmetries are considered: rotation by $2\\pi/3$ and inversion, rotation by $2\\pi/3$ and horizontal reflection, inversion or reflection with weakly broken rotation symmetry, and the case where no Dirac points arise: rotation by $2\\pi/3$ and vertical reflection. All proofs are based on symmetry considerations and are elementary in nature. In particular, existence of degeneracies in the spectrum is proved by a transplantation argument (which is deduced from the (co)representation of the relevant symmetry group). The conical shape of the dispersion relation is obtained from its invariance under rotation by $2\\pi/3$. Persistence of conical points when the rotation symmetry is weakly broken is proved using a geometric phase in one case and parity of the eigenfunctions in the other.

  3. Measures of the glottal source spectrum.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreiman, Jody; Gerratt, Bruce R; Antoñanzas-Barroso, Norma

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. K. , & Antoñanzas- Barroso, N. (1985). Measures of88. Javkin, H. , Antoñanzas-Barroso, N. , & Maddieson, I. (B. R. , & Antoñanzas-Barroso, N. (2006). Analysis and

  4. Interference suppression in spread-spectrum networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sui, Haichang

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G. Proakis, “Analysis of a MISO pre- BLAST-DFE technique forpre-BLAST-DFE technique for MISO channels with decentralized

  5. On Spectrum Selection Games in Cognitive Radio Ilaria Malanchini, Matteo Cesana, Nicola Gatti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gatti, Nicola

    On Spectrum Selection Games in Cognitive Radio Networks Ilaria Malanchini, Matteo Cesana, Nicola to evalu- ate spectrum management functionalities in Cognitive Radio Net- works. The spectrum selection environment, consequently exploiting under-utilized spectrum portions. The motivation for cognitive radio

  6. Abstract--Flexible spectrum sharing is widely seen to be important feature for the future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    systems. Efficient implementation of spectrum sharing requires novel radio resource management (RRM the spectrum sharing with systems using other radio access technologies. The proposed architecture provides. Index Terms -- Beyond 3G systems, flexible spectrum use, radio resource management, spectrum sharing

  7. Spectrum Sensing via Universal Source Coding Jithin K. Sreedharan and Vinod Sharma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Vinod

    (Cognitive Radios) to identify the primary (licensed) user's spectrum usage via spectrum sensing. Given. These algorithms are motivated from spectrum sensing application in Cognitive Radios. Universal sequential Radios using universal codes is also considered. Keywords- Cognitive Radio, Spectrum Sensing, Sequential

  8. Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and oxides of nitrogen (NO[sub x]) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO[sub 2] take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry's response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

  9. Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO{sub 2} take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry`s response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

  10. High gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara, David

    2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    During contract # DE-FG02-ER83545, Parallax Research, Inc. developed a High gain, Fast Scan Broad Spectrum Parallel beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for use on Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM). This new spectrometer allows very fast high resolution elemental analysis of samples in an electron microscope. By comparison to previous WDS spectrometers, it can change from one energy position to another very quickly and has an extended range compared to some similar products.

  11. Measurement of intensities of bands in the electronic absorption spectrum of chlorine dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapp, Thomas Louis

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy levels are derived, Twelve bands in the electronic absorption spectrum of chlorine dioxide between the wavelengths 4250 R and 5250 R were photographed and measured. Of these twelve, the vibrational energy levels calculated for nine of them... Calculation of Vibrational Energy Levels . . . . , 35 Estimation of Errors . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . 38 CONCLUSIONS Conolusions ~ ~ ~ 47 B IBLI QGRAFEZ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 48 ~INTRGDUGT10 Analysis of thc rotational structure of the chlorine dioxide...

  12. Application of a Virtual Reactivity Feedback Control Loop in Non-Nuclear Testing of a Fast Spectrum Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Al, 35812 (United States); Forsbacka, Matthew [NASA Headquarters, 300 E St. S, Washington, DC 20465 (United States)

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a compact, fast-spectrum reactor, reactivity feedback is dominated by core deformation at elevated temperature. Given the use of accurate deformation measurement techniques, it is possible to simulate nuclear feedback in non-nuclear electrically heated reactor tests. Implementation of simulated reactivity feedback in response to measured deflection is being tested at the Nasa Marshall Space Flight Center Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF). During tests of the SAFE-100 reactor prototype, core deflection was monitored using a high resolution camera. 'Virtual' reactivity feedback was accomplished by applying the results of Monte Carlo calculations (MCNPX) to core deflection measurements; the computational analysis was used to establish the reactivity worth of various core deformations. The power delivered to the SAFE-100 prototype was then adjusted accordingly via kinetics calculations. The work presented in this paper will demonstrate virtual reactivity feedback as core power was increased from 1 kWt to 10 kWt, held approximately constant at 10 kWt, and then allowed to decrease based on the negative thermal reactivity coefficient. (authors)

  13. Power spectrum of the fluctuation of Chebyshev's prime counting function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boon Leong Lan; Shaohen Yong

    2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The one-sided power spectrum of the fluctuation of Chebyshev's weighted prime counting function is numerically estimated based on samples of the fluctuating function of different sizes. The power spectrum is also estimated analytically for large frequency based on Riemann hypothesis and the exact formula for the fluctuating function in terms of all the non-trivial Riemann zeroes. Our analytical estimate is consistent with our numerical estimate of a 1/f^2 power spectrum.

  14. On the essential spectrum of certain non-commutative oscillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parmeggiani, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.parmeggiani@unibo.it; Venni, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.venni@unibo.it [Department of Mathematics, University of Bologna, Piazza di Porta S.Donato 5, 40126 Bologna (Italy)] [Department of Mathematics, University of Bologna, Piazza di Porta S.Donato 5, 40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We show here that the spectrum of the family of non-commutative harmonic oscillators Q{sub (?,?)}{sup w}(x,D) for ?,??R{sub +} in the range ?? = 1 is [0, +?) and is entirely essential spectrum. The previous existing results concern the case ?? > 1 (case in which Q{sub (?,?)}{sup w}(x,D) is globally elliptic with a discrete spectrum whose qualitative properties are being extensively studied), and ours therefore extend the picture to the range of parameters ?? ? 1.

  15. Bright and fast voltage reporters across the visible spectrum via electrochromic FRET (eFRET)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Peng; Douglass, Adam D; Hochbaum, Daniel R; Brinks, Daan; Werley, Christopher A; Harrison, D Jed; Campbell, Robert E; Cohen, Adam E

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a palette of brightly fluorescent genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) with excitation and emission peaks spanning the visible spectrum, sensitivities from 6 - 10% Delta F/F per 100 mV, and half-maximal response times from 1 - 7 ms. A fluorescent protein is fused to an Archaerhodopsin-derived voltage sensor. Voltage-induced shifts in the absorption spectrum of the rhodopsin lead to voltage-dependent nonradiative quenching of the appended fluorescent protein. Through a library screen, we identified linkers and fluorescent protein combinations which reported neuronal action potentials in cultured rat hippocampal neurons with a single-trial signal-to-noise ratio from 6.6 to 11.6 in a 1 kHz imaging bandwidth at modest illumination intensity. The freedom to choose a voltage indicator from an array of colors facilitates multicolor voltage imaging, as well as combination with other optical reporters and optogenetic actuators.

  16. Spectrum of the volume integral operator of electromagnetic scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil V. Budko; Alexander B. Samokhin

    2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrum of the volume integral operator of the three-dimensional electromagnetic scattering is analyzed. The operator has both continuous essential spectrum, which dominates at lower frequencies, and discrete eigenvalues, which spread out at higher ones. The explicit expression of the operator's symbol provides exact outline of the essential spectrum for any inhomogeneous anisotropic scatterer with Holder continuous constitutive parameters. Geometrical bounds on the location of discrete eigenvalues are derived for various physical scenarios. Numerical experiments demonstrate good agreement between the predicted spectrum of the operator and the eigenvalues of its discretized version.

  17. age spectrum epidemiology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a young supernova. We associate this break with the phenomenon of synchrotron aging of radiating electrons. From the break in the spectrum we calculate the magnetic field...

  18. auditory neuropathy spectrum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of symptoms concentrate on speech and language development, especially ... Bullock, Bennett (Bennett Charles) 2010-01-01 3 Multisensory integration in autism spectrum disorders:...

  19. Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums) to locate high temperature ground anomalies in Colorado. Confirm heat flow potential with on-site surveys to drill...

  20. An hybrid Tykhonov method for neutron spectrum unfolding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Besida

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An hybrid iterative Tykhonov regularization approach with an accelerating algorithm is considered. This method is illustrated by two neutron spectrum unfoldings measured with a Bonner Sphere system.

  1. Wideband and Narrowband Spectrum Sensing Methods Using Software Defined Radios.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stegman, Jason Karl

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The ability to accurately sense the surrounding wireless spectrum, without having any prior information about the type of signals present, is an important aspect for… (more)

  2. Spectrum hole identification and exploitation in cognitive radio networks.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vamsi Krishna Tumuluru.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Cognitive radio networks are envisaged as the solution for effective spectrum management for the future communications. In a cognitive radio network, the unlicensed users are… (more)

  3. Priority Queuing Based Spectrum sensing Methodology in Cognitive Radio Network.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [email protected; /* */, Sajid

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Radio spectrum is becoming scarce resource due to increase in the usage of wireless communication devices. However studies have revealed that most of the allotted… (more)

  4. Post-WMAP Assessment of Infrared Cutoff in the Primordial Spectrum from Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rita Sinha; Tarun Souradeep

    2006-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) measurements indicate that there is power deficiency of the CMB anisotropies at large scales compared with the $\\Lambda$CDM model. We have investigated the possibility of explaining such effects by a class of primordial power spectra which have infrared cutoffs close to the horizon scale. The primordial power spectrum recovered by direct deconvolution of the observed CMB angular spectrum indicates that the data prefers a sharp infrared cutoff with a localized excess (bump) just above the cutoff. We have been motivated to assess plausible extensions of simplest inflationary scenarios which readily accommodate similar form of infrared cutoff. We carry out a complete Bayesian analysis of the parameter space using {\\it Markov Chain Monte Carlo} technique with such a class of primordial power spectra. We show that primordial power spectrum that have features such as an infrared cutoff followed by a subsequent excess in power give better fit to the observed data compared to a nearly scale-invariant power law or power spectrum with just a monotonic infrared cutoff. However, there is substantial room for improvement in the match to data and calls for exploration of other mechanisms that may lead to infrared cutoff even closer to that recovered by direct deconvolution approach.

  5. Red and blue tilted tensor spectrum from Gibbons-Hawking temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subhendra Mohanty; Akhilesh Nautiyal

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The scale invariant scalar and tensor perturbations, which are predicted from inflation, are eigenmodes in the conformal coordinates. The 'out' observer in the de Sitter space observes a thermal spectrum with a Gibbons-Hawking temperature $H/2\\pi$ of these 'Bunch-Davies' particles. The tensor power spectrum observed in experiments can have an imprint of the Gibbons-Hawking thermal distribution due to the mode mixing between 'in' state conformal coordinates and the coordinate frame of the observer. We find that the the Bunch-Davies modes appear as thermal modes to the asymptotic Minkowski observer in the future and the power spectrum of the gravitational waves is blue-tilted with a spectral index $n_T \\sim 1$ even in the standard slow-roll inflation. On the other hand if the coordinate frame of the observer is taken to be static coordinates, the tensor spectrum is red-tilted with $n_T\\sim -1$. A likelihood analysis shows and find the best fit values of the slow-roll parameters for both cases. We find that the blue-tilted tensor gives a better fit and reconciles the PLANCK upper bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r <0.11$ with BICEP2 measurement of $r=0.2$. This supports the idea of particle production due to the mode mixing between the initial Bunch-Davies vacuum modes and the asymptotic Minkowski vacuum of the post-inflation universe.

  6. THE SUBMILLIMETER POLARIZATION SPECTRUM OF M17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng Lingzhen; Jimenez-Serra, Izaskun [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bennett, Charles L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Chapman, Nicholas L.; Novak, Giles [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Chuss, David T. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Vaillancourt, John E., E-mail: lingzhen@cfa.harvard.edu [SOFIA Science Center, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232-11, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present 450 {mu}m polarimetric observations of the M17 molecular cloud obtained with the SHARP polarimeter at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. Across the observed region, the magnetic field orientation is consistent with previous submillimeter and far-infrared polarization measurements. Our observations are centered on a region of the molecular cloud that has been compressed by stellar winds from a cluster of OB stars. We have compared these new data with previous 350 {mu}m polarimetry and find an anti-correlation between the 450 and 350 {mu}m polarization magnitude ratio and the ratio of 21 cm to 450 {mu}m intensity. The polarization ratio is lower near the east end of the studied region where the cloud is exposed to stellar winds and radiation. At the west end of the region, the polarization ratio is higher. We interpret the varying polarization spectrum as evidence supporting the radiative alignment torque model for grain alignment, implying higher alignment efficiency in the region that is exposed to a higher anisotropic radiation field.

  7. Apparatus for synthesis of a solar spectrum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A xenon arc lamp and a tungsten filament lamp provide light beams that together contain all the wavelengths required to accurately simulate a solar spectrum. Suitable filter apparatus selectively direct visible and ultraviolet light from the xenon arc lamp into two legs of a trifurcated randomized fiber optic cable. Infrared light selectively filtered from the tungsten filament lamp is directed into the third leg of the fiber optic cable. The individual optic fibers from the three legs are brought together in a random fashion into a single output leg. The output beam emanating from the output leg of the trifurcated randomized fiber optic cable is extremely uniform and contains wavelengths from each of the individual filtered light beams. This uniform output beam passes through suitable collimation apparatus before striking the surface of the solar cell being tested. Adjustable aperture apparatus located between the lamps and the input legs of the trifurcated fiber optic cable can be selectively adjusted to limit the amount of light entering each leg, thereby providing a means of "fine tuning" or precisely adjusting the spectral content of the output beam. Finally, an adjustable aperture apparatus may also be placed in the output beam to adjust the intensity of the output beam without changing the spectral content and distribution of the output beam.

  8. IONIZED OUTFLOWS FROM COMPACT STEEP SPECTRUM SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan; Kewley, Lisa, E-mail: hsshih@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: lisa.kewley@anu.edu.au [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive outflows are known to exist, in the form of extended emission-line regions (EELRs), around about one-third of powerful FR II radio sources. We investigate the origin of these EELRs by studying the emission-line regions around compact-steep-spectrum (CSS) radio galaxies that are younger (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} yr old) versions of the FR II radio galaxies. We have searched for and analyzed the emission-line regions around 11 CSS sources by taking integral field spectra using Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on Gemini North. We fit the [O III] {lambda}5007 line and present the velocity maps for each detected emission-line region. We find, in most cases, that the emission-line regions have multi-component velocity structures with different velocity dispersions and/or flux distributions for each component. The velocity gradients of the emission-line gas are mostly well aligned with the radio axis, suggesting a direct causal link between the outflowing gas and the radio jets. The complex velocity structure may be a result of different driving mechanisms related to the onset of the radio jets. We also present the results from the line-ratio diagnostics we used to analyze the ionization mechanism of the extended gas, which supports the scenario where the emission-line regions are ionized by a combination of active galactic nucleus radiation and shock excitation.

  9. Analysis of Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared Spectrum and Assignment of Vibrational Fundamentals of Analysis of Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared...

  10. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

  11. Response Elements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide provides acceptable methods for meeting the requirement of DOE O 151.1C for response elements that respond or contribute to response as needed in an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-5, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-6.

  12. Supporting Dynamic Spectrum Access in Heterogeneous LTE+ Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luiz A. DaSilva; Ryan E. Irwin; Mike Benonis

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As early as 2014, mobile network operators’ spectral capac- ity is expected to be overwhelmed by the demand brought on by new devices and applications. With Long Term Evo- lution Advanced (LTE+) networks likely as the future one world 4G standard, network operators may need to deploy a Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA) overlay in Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets) to extend coverage, increase spectrum efficiency, and increase the capacity of these networks. In this paper, we propose three new management frameworks for DSA in an LTE+ HetNet: Spectrum Accountability Client, Cell Spectrum Management, and Domain Spectrum Man- agement. For these spectrum management frameworks, we define protocol interfaces and operational signaling scenar- ios to support cooperative sensing, spectrum lease manage- ment, and alarm scenarios for rule adjustment. We also quan- tify, through integer programs, the benefits of using DSA in an LTE+ HetNet, that can opportunistically reuse vacant TV and GSM spectrum. Using integer programs, we consider a topology using Geographic Information System data from the Blacksburg, VA metro area to assess the realistic benefits of DSA in an LTE+ HetNet.

  13. CENSORED TRUNCATED SEQUENTIAL SPECTRUM SENSING FOR COGNITIVE RADIO NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leus, Geert

    interference to the primary user and the false alarm rate controls the loss in spectrum utilization. The ideal Leus Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands E is con- sidered as an energy saving approach for a cooperative spectrum sensing system. In order

  14. The QCD string spectrum and conformal field theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keisuke Jimmy Juge; Julius Kuti; Colin Morningstar

    2002-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The low energy excitation spectrum of the critical Wilson surface is discussed between the roughening transition and the continuum limit of lattice QCD. The fine structure of the spectrum is interpreted within the framework of two-dimensional conformal field theory.

  15. The Impact of Frequency-Agility on Dynamic Spectrum Sharing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almeroth, Kevin C.

    The Impact of Frequency-Agility on Dynamic Spectrum Sharing Lili Cao, Lei Yang and Haitao Zheng}@cs.ucsb.edu Abstract-- Designed to adapt spectrum usage on-the-fly, frequency-agile radios can drastically improve complexity. This motivates us to understand when and why having higher degree of frequency-agility helps

  16. Modeling of combustion noise spectrum from turbulent premixed flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modeling of combustion noise spectrum from turbulent premixed flames Y. Liu, A. P. Dowling, T. D, Nantes, France 2321 #12;Turbulent combustion processes generate sound radiation due to temporal changes, this temporal correlation and its role in the modeling of combustion noise spectrum are studied by analyzing

  17. atmospheric energy spectrum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmospheric energy spectrum First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 High-energy spectrum and...

  18. : Correlation-Based Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (CORN)2 : Correlation-Based Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks Dongyue Xue is referred to as cognitive radio networks (CRNs) [2]. Based on the ambient spectrum information, cognitive for cognitive radio networks to minimize energy consumption. A sensing quality metric is defined as a measure

  19. Denial-of-Service Attacks on Dynamic Spectrum Access Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subbalakshmi , K.P. "Suba"

    radios was opportunistic utilization of licensed spec- trum bands. Traditionally, the spectrum has been Abstract-- Cognitive radio technologies have emerged as a platform to solve the problem of spectrum scarcity for wire- less applications since cognitive radios have the potential to utilize the idle licensed

  20. Cognitive UWB-OFDM: Combining Ultrawideband with Opportunistic Spectrum Usage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Hüseyin

    wireless world, the number of radio systems increases every day, and efficient spectrum usage becomes problem, cognitive radio proposes an opportunistic spectrum usage approach [3], in which frequency bands that are not being used by their primary (licensed) users are utilized by cognitive radios. Both UWB and cognitive

  1. Coupled multiphase flow and closure analysis of repository response to waste-generated gas at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeze, G.A.; Larson, K.W. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Davies, P.B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A long-term assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository performance must consider the impact of gas generation resulting from the corrosion and microbial degradation of the emplaced waste. A multiphase fluid flow code, TOUGH2/EOS8, was adapted to model the processes of gas generation, disposal room creep closure, and multiphase (brine and gas) fluid flow, as well as the coupling between the three processes. System response to gas generation was simulated with a single, isolated disposal room surrounded by homogeneous halite containing two anhydrite interbeds, one above and one below the room. The interbeds were assumed to have flow connections to the room through high-permeability, excavation-induced fractures. System behavior was evaluated by tracking four performance measures: (1) peak room pressure; (2) maximum brine volume in the room; (3) total mass of gas expelled from the room; and (4) the maximum gas migration distance in an interbed. Baseline simulations used current best estimates of system parameters, selected through an evaluation of available data, to predict system response to gas generation under best-estimate conditions. Sensitivity simulations quantified the effects of parameter uncertainty by evaluating the change in the performance measures in response to parameter variations. In the sensitivity simulations, a single parameter value was varied to its minimum and maximum values, representative of the extreme expected values, with all other parameters held at best-estimate values. Sensitivity simulations identified the following parameters as important to gas expulsion and migration away from a disposal room: interbed porosity; interbed permeability; gas-generation potential; halite permeability; and interbed threshold pressure. Simulations also showed that the inclusion of interbed fracturing and a disturbed rock zone had a significant impact on system performance.

  2. Just enough inflation: power spectrum modifications at large scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Cicoli; Sean Downes; Bhaskar Dutta; Francisco G. Pedro; Alexander Westphal

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that models of `just enough' inflation, where the slow-roll evolution lasted only $50-60$ e-foldings, feature modifications of the CMB power spectrum at large angular scales. We perform a systematic and model-independent analysis of any possible non-slow-roll background evolution prior to the final stage of slow-roll inflation. We find a high degree of universality since most common backgrounds like fast-roll evolution, matter or radiation-dominance give rise to a power loss at large angular scales and a peak together with an oscillatory behaviour at scales around the value of the Hubble parameter at the beginning of slow-roll inflation. Depending on the value of the equation of state parameter, different pre-inflationary epochs lead instead to an enhancement of power at low-$\\ell$, and so seem disfavoured by recent observational hints for a lack of CMB power at $\\ell\\lesssim 40$. We also comment on the importance of initial conditions and the possibility to have multiple pre-inflationary stages.

  3. 11d Electric-Magnetic Duality and the Dbrane Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamoli Chaudhuri

    2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the gedanken calculation of the pair correlation function of spatially-separated macroscopic string solitons in strongly coupled type IIA string/M theory, with the macroscopic strings wrapping the eleventh dimension. The supergravity limit of this correlation function with well-separated, pointlike macroscopic strings corresponds to having also taken the IIA string coupling constant to zero. Thus, the pointlike limit of the gedanken correlation function can be given a precise worldsheet description in the 10D weakly-coupled type IIA string theory, analysed by us in hep-th/0007056 [Nucl. Phys. B591 (2000) 243]. The requisite type IIA string amplitude is the supersymmetric extension of the worldsheet formulation of an off-shell closed string tree propagator in bosonic string theory, a 1986 analysis due to Cohen, Moore, Nelson, and Polchinski. We point out that the evidence for pointlike sources of the zero-form field strength provided by our worldsheet results clarifies that the electric-magnetic duality in the Dirichlet-brane spectrum of type II string theories is eleven-dimensional.

  4. Analysis of biases due to survey non response in the French National Travel Survey 2007-08 ROUX, Sophie; ARMOOGUM, Jimmy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , Sophie; ARMOOGUM, Jimmy 12 th WCTR, July 11-15, 2010 ­ Lisbon, Portugal 1 ANALYSIS OF BIASES DUE.roux@inrets.fr ARMOOGUM Jimmy Institut national de recherche sur les transports et leur sécurité (INRETS) Département Grand cedex Tel : +33 (0)1.45.92.55.79 jimmy.armoogum@inrets.fr ABSTRACT While nonresponse results

  5. A Simple Sequential Spectrum Sensing Scheme for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin, Yan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cognitive radio that supports a secondary and opportunistic access to licensed spectrum shows great potential to dramatically improve spectrum utilization. Spectrum sensing performed by secondary users to detect unoccupied spectrum bands, is a key enabling technique for cognitive radio. This paper proposes a truncated sequential spectrum sensing scheme, namely the sequential shifted chi-square test (SSCT). The SSCT has a simple test statistic and does not rely on any deterministic knowledge about primary signals. As figures of merit, the exact false-alarm probability is derived, and the miss-detection probability as well as the average sample number (ASN) are evaluated by using a numerical integration algorithm. Corroborating numerical examples show that, in comparison with fixed-sample size detection schemes such as energy detection, the SSCT delivers considerable reduction on the ASN while maintaining a comparable detection performance.

  6. Integrated ‘omics analysis for studying the microbial community response to a pH perturbation of a cellulose-degrading bioreactor culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boaro, Amy A.; Kim, Young-Mo; Konopka, Allan; Callister, Stephen J.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated ‘omics have been used on pure cultures and co-cultures, yet they have not been applied to complex microbial communities to examine questions of perturbation response. In this study, we used integrated ‘omics to measure the perturbation response of a cellulose-degrading bioreactor community fed with microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel). We predicted that a pH decrease by addition of a pulse of acid would reduce microbial community diversity and temporarily reduce reactor function such as cellulose degradation. However, 16S rDNA pyrosequencing results revealed increased alpha diversity in the microbial community after the perturbation, and a persistence of the dominant community members over the duration of the experiment. Proteomics results showed a decrease in activity of proteins associated with Fibrobacter succinogenes two days after the perturbation followed by increased protein abundances six days after the perturbation. The decrease in cellulolytic activity suggested by the proteomics was confirmed by the accumulation of Avicel in the reactor. Metabolomics showed a pattern similar to that of the proteome, with amino acid production decreasing two days after the perturbation and increasing after six days. This study demonstrated that community ‘omics data provides valuable information about the interactions and function of anaerobic cellulolytic community members after a perturbation.

  7. Exact Outage Probability Analysis for Relay-aided Underlay Cognitive Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    --Outage probability, cognitive radio, spectrum shar- ing, underlay, QoS, primary system, secondary system. I. INTRODUCTION In response to the ever-growing stress put on the wireless spectrum medium, cognitive radio (CR secondary (unlicensed) users (SUs) to share the same licensed spectrum band with the primary users (PUs

  8. A Bayesian approach to power-spectrum significance estimation, with application to solar neutrino data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Sturrock

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The usual procedure for estimating the significance of a peak in a power spectrum is to calculate the probability of obtaining that value or a larger value by chance, on the assumption that the time series contains only noise (e.g. that the measurements were derived from random samplings of a Gaussian distribution). However, it is known that one should regard this P-Value approach with caution. As an alternative, we here examine a Bayesian approach to estimating the significance of a peak in a power spectrum. This approach requires that we consider explicitly the hypothesis that the time series contains a periodic signal as well as noise. The challenge is to identify a probability distribution function for the power that is appropriate for this hypothesis. We propose what seem to be reasonable conditions to require of this function, and then propose a simple function that meets these requirements. We also propose a consistency condition, and check to see that our function satisfies this condition. We find that the Bayesian significance estimates are considerably more conservative than the conventional estimates. We apply this procedure to three recent analyses of solar neutrino data: (a) bimodality of GALLEX data; (b) power spectrum analysis of Super-Kamiokande data; and (c) the combined analysis of radiochemical neutrino data and irradiance data.

  9. Crosstalk Compensation for a Rapid, Higher Resolution Impedance Spectrum Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; David M. Rose; William H. Morrison; Chester G. Motloch

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Batteries and other energy storage devices are playing larger roles in various industries (e.g., military, automotive, electric utilities, etc.) as the U.S. seeks to reduce its dependence on foreign energy resources. As such, there exists a significant need for accurate, robust state-of-health assessment techniques. Present techniques tend to focus on simple, passive monitoring of voltage and current at a given ambient temperature. However, this approach has the disadvantage of ignoring key elements of health, that is, changes in resistance growth and power fade. Impedance spectroscopy is considered a useful laboratory tool in gauging changes in the resistance and power performance, but it has not been widely considered as an onboard diagnostic tool due to the length of time required to complete the measurement. Cross-Talk Compensation (CTC) is a novel approach that enables rapid, high resolution impedance spectra measurements using a hardware platform that could be designed as an embedded system. This input signal consists of a sum-of-sines excitation current that has a known frequency spread and a duration of one period of the lowest frequency. The voltage response is then captured at a sufficiently fast sample rate. Previously developed rapid impedance spectrum measurement techniques either required a longer excitation signal or a sum-of-sines signal that was separated by harmonic frequencies to reduce or eliminate, respectively, the cross-talk interference in the calculated results. The distinct advantage of CTC, however, is that non-harmonic frequencies can now be included within the excitation signal while still keeping the signal duration at one period of the lowest frequency. Since the frequency spread of the input signal is known, the crosstalk interference between sinusoidal signals within the sum-of-sines at a given frequency of interest can be pre-determined and assigned to an error matrix. Consequently, the real and imaginary components of the impedance at each frequency of interest can be calculated using simple linear algebra based on the error matrix and measured response from the energy storage device given the excitation signal. Analytical validation of CTC over a frequency range between 2000 and 0.1 Hz (i.e., a ten-second input signal duration) was performed using a standardized battery lumped parameter model. The results indicated that the CTC was able to successfully resolve more than 45 frequencies within a sum-of-sines excitation signal, whereas previous techniques could only resolve up to 15 frequencies. A simplified derivation of the CTC technique and its corresponding analytical validation studies using the lumped-parameter model will be presented.

  10. Spectrum and structure of complexes of HCl with s-tetrazine. [s-tetrazine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynam, C.A.; Morter, C.; Young, L.; Levy, D.H.

    1987-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Complexes of s-tetrazine with HCl have been prepared in a supersonic free-jet expansion, and their spectra have been observed by laser-induced fluorescence. Rotational structure has been observed in the electronic spectrum, and analysis of this structure has allowed the determination of the geometries of the complexes. The one-to-one complex tetrazine-HCl has a planar structure with the hydrogen of the HCl hydrogen bonded to the lone pair of the tetrazine nitrogen atom. A vibrational feature in the fluorescence excitation spectrum displaced 26 cm/sup -1/ from the origin transition has been assigned as an overtone of a nontotally symmetric out-of-plane bend of the HCl. In the complex tetrazine-(HCl)/sub 2/, the second HCl molecule bonds to the HCl, not directly to the tetrazine ring.

  11. Lyman Alpha Flux Power Spectrum and Its Covariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu Zhan; Romeel Dave; Daniel Eisenstein; Neal Katz

    2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the flux power spectrum and its covariance using simulated Lyman alpha forests. We find that pseudo-hydro techniques are good approximations of hydrodynamical simulations at high redshift. However, the pseudo-hydro techniques fail at low redshift because they are insufficient for characterizing some components of the low-redshift intergalactic medium, notably the warm-hot intergalactic medium. Hence, to use the low-redshift Lyman alpha flux power spectrum to constrain cosmology, one would need realistic hydrodynamical simulations. By comparing one-dimensional mass statistics with flux statistics, we show that the nonlinear transform between density and flux quenches the fluctuations so that the flux power spectrum is much less sensitive to cosmological parameters than the one-dimensional mass power spectrum. The covariance of the flux power spectrum is nearly Gaussian. As such, the uncertainties of the underlying mass power spectrum could still be large, even though the flux power spectrum can be precisely determined from a small number of lines of sight.

  12. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

  13. The fractal dimension of the spectrum of quasiperiodical schrodinger operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Marin

    2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the fractal dimension of the spectrum of a quasiperiodical Schrodinger operator associated to a sturmian potential. We consider potential defined with irrationnal number verifying a generic diophantine condition. We recall how shape and box dimension of the spectrum is linked to the irrational number properties. In the first place, we give general lower bound of the box dimension of the spectrum, true for all irrational numbers. In the second place, we improve this lower bound for almost all irrational numbers. We finally recall dynamical implication of the first bound.

  14. The Broadband Spectrum of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandon Wolfe; Fulvio Melia

    2007-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine whether nonthermal protons energized during a cluster merger are simultaneously responsible for the Coma cluster's diffuse radio flux (via secondary decay) and the departure of its intra-cluster medium (ICM) from a thermal profile via Coulomb collisions between the quasithermal electrons and the hadrons. Rather than approximating the influence of nonthermal proton/thermal electron collisions as extremely rare events which cause an injection of nonthermal, power-law electrons (the `knock-on' approximation), we self-consistently solve (to our knowledge, for the first time) the covariant kinetic equations for the two populations. The electron population resulting from these collisions is out of equilibrium, yet not a power law, and importantly displays a higher bremsstrahlung radiative efficiency than a pure power law. Observations with GLAST will test this model directly.

  15. On the Performance of Dimension Estimation-based Spectrum Sensing for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    On the Performance of Dimension Estimation-based Spectrum Sensing for Cognitive Radio Bassem Zayen-day spectrum allocation and spectrum use suggests that radio spectrum shortage could be overcome by allowing immediate local spectrum availability. A new class of radios that is able to reliably sense the spectral

  16. A Performance Study of Kullback-Leibler Distance-based Spectrum Sensing Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    -day spectrum allocation and spectrum use suggests that radio spectrum shortage could be overcome by allowing immediate local spectrum availability. A new class of radios that is able to reliably sense the spectral1 A Performance Study of Kullback-Leibler Distance-based Spectrum Sensing Algorithm Bassem Zayen

  17. Joint Transport, Routing and Spectrum Sharing Optimization for Wireless Networks with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Dong S.

    on the spectrum agility of modern radios which can configure both the central frequency and spectrum width and cognitive radios) enable more flexible spectrum access through spectrum sensing and dy- namic that the amount/width of spectrum band of radio channels can also be configured dynamically. For examples, in Wi

  18. A Game Theoretic Approach for Medium Access of Open Spectrum in Cognitive Radios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

    A Game Theoretic Approach for Medium Access of Open Spectrum in Cognitive Radios Madhusudhan R broadcast [2]. The U.S. DARPA Next Generation Com- open spectrum for spectrum agile radios that use spectrum radios. Spectrum funding Program (FP6) of the European Union are working agile radios operate in parts

  19. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SYSTEMS, MAN, AND CYBERNETICS PART B 1 Spectrum Sharing in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xinbing

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SYSTEMS, MAN, AND CYBERNETICS ­ PART B 1 Spectrum Sharing in Cognitive Radio of radio frequency spectrum. In this paper, we consider the problem of spectrum sharing among primary (or Terms--Cognitive radio, spectrum sensing, spectrum sharing, game theory, Nash equilibrium. I

  20. DECENTRALIZED COGNITIVE MAC FOR DYNAMIC SPECTRUM ACCESS Qing Zhao, Lang Tong, and Ananthram Swami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, M. Saif

    - prove spectrum efficiency through time- and space-dependent spectrum sharing among coexisting radio and region, a portion of the spectrum to a radio access network for its exclusive use. As such, white space to exploit the instantaneous spectrum availability by opening licensed spectrum to secondary users. The idea

  1. 1203caref1 http://www.spectrum.ieee.org/spectrum/dec03/departments/1203caref... 1 of 1 12/7/03 1:47 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stetten, George

    1203caref1 http://www.spectrum.ieee.org/spectrum/dec03/departments/1203caref... 1 of 1 12/7/03 1 #12;Resources: Careers http://www.spectrum.ieee.org/spectrum/dec03/departments/1203care... 2 of 4 12, Stetten designed a radio telemetric egg that could sense the range of temperatures experienced under

  2. CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Workforce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    account of in workforce planning. The importance of integrating academic training with clinical trainingCONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Workforce of the Healthcare Science Workforce Modernising Scientific Careers: The Next Steps Response by the Wellcome Trust

  3. Feasibility of fissile mass assay of spent nuclear fuel using {sup 252}Cf-source-driven frequency-analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattingly, J.K.; Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility was evaluated using MCNP-DSP, an analog Monte Carlo transport cod to simulate source-driven measurements. Models of an isolated Westinghouse 17x17 PWR fuel assembly in a 1500-ppM borated water storage pool were used. In the models, the fuel burnup profile was represented using seven axial burnup zones, each with isotopics estimated by the PDQ code. Four different fuel assemblies with average burnups from fresh to 32 GWd/MTU were modeled and analyzed. Analysis of the fuel assemblies was simulated by inducing fission in the fuel using a {sup 252}Cf source adjacent to the assembly and correlating source fissions with the response of a bank of {sup 3}He detectors adjacent to the assembly opposite the source. This analysis was performed at 7 different axial positions on each of the 4 assemblies, and the source-detector cross-spectrum signature was calculated for each of these 28 simulated measurements. The magnitude of the cross-spectrum signature follows a smooth upward trend with increasing fissile material ({sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu) content, and the signature is independent of the concentration of spontaneously fissioning isotopes (e.g., {sup 244}Cm) and ({alpha},n) sources. Furthermore, the cross-spectrum signature is highly sensitive to changes in fissile material content. This feasibility study indicated that the signature would increase {similar_to}100% in response to an increase of only 0.1 g/cm{sup 3} of fissile material.

  4. Quantifier rank spectrum of L-infinity-omega

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerman, Nathaniel Leedom

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Part A we will study the quantifier rank spectrum of sentences of L!1,!. We will show that there are scattered sentences with models of arbitrarily high but bounded quantifier rank. We will also consider the case of ...

  5. An evaluation of the fast-mixed spectrum reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Wee Tee

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An independent evaluation of the neutronic characteristics of a gas-cooled fast-mixed spectrum reactor (FMSR) core design has been performed. A benchmark core configuration for an early FMSR design was provided by Brookhaven ...

  6. When do tracer particles dominate the Lyapunov spectrum?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre Gaspard; Henk van Beijeren

    2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamical instability is studied in a deterministic dynamical system of Hamiltonian type composed of a tracer particle in a fluid of many particles. The tracer and fluid particles are hard balls (disks, in two dimensions, or spheres, in three dimensions) undergoing elastic collisions. The dynamical instability is characterized by the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents. The tracer particle is shown to dominate the Lyapunov spectrum in the neighborhoods of two limiting cases: the Lorentz-gas limit in which the tracer particle is much lighter than the fluid particles and the Rayleigh-flight limit in which the fluid particles have a vanishing radius and form an ideal gas. In both limits, a gap appears in the Lyapunov spectrum between the few largest Lyapunov exponents associated with the tracer and the rest of the Lyapunov spectrum.

  7. Optimal Channel Probing and Transmission Scheduling for Opportunistic Spectrum Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Nicholas B.

    In this study, we consider optimal opportunistic spectrum access (OSA) policies for a transmitter in a multichannel wireless system, where a channel can be in one of multiple states. In such systems, the transmitter typically ...

  8. The Redshift Distribution of Flat-Spectrum Radio Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Munoz; E. E. Falco; C. S. Kochanek; J. Lehar; E. Mediavilla

    2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The redshift distribution of flat-spectrum radio sources with 5 GHz flux densities S>5 mJy is a key component in using current radio lens surveys to probe the cosmological model. We have constructed the first flat-spectrum radio sample in the flux density range 3-20 mJy. Our new sample has 33 sources; we have determined the redshifts of 14 of these (42% complete). The low mean redshift, ~0.75, of our faintest sample needs to be confirmed by further observations to improve the sample completeness. We also increased the redshift completeness of several surveys of brighter flat-spectrum sources. While the mean redshift, ~1.1 of flat-spectrum samples fainter than 1 Jy is nearly constant, the fraction of the sources identifiable as quasars steadily drops from ~80% to ~10% as the flux density of the sources decreases.

  9. Low frequency radio spectrum and spectral turnover of LS 5039

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sagar Godambe; Subir Bhattacharyya; Nilay Bhatt; Manojendu Choudhury

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    LS 5039, a possible black hole x-ray binary, was recently observed with Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope. The observed spectrum presented here shows that the spectrum is inverted at the low frequency. When combined with the archival data with orbital phase similar to the present observations, it shows a clear indication of a spectral turnover. The combined data are fitted with a broken power-law and the break frequency signifies a possible spectral turnover of the spectrum around 964 MHz. Truly simultaneous observations in radio wavelength covering a wide range of frequencies are required to fix the spectrum and the spectral turn over which will play a crucial role in developing a deeper understanding of the radio emitting jet in LS 5039.

  10. SPECTRUM INTERPOLATOR FOR THE ELODIE LIBRARY Ph. Prugniel1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 SPECTRUM INTERPOLATOR FOR THE ELODIE LIBRARY Ph. Prugniel1 , M. Koleva1,2 , P. Ocvirk2 , D. Le-US; Valdes et al. (2004)) and Miles (Sanchez-Blazquez et al., 2006). The best theoreti- cal libraries

  11. Area spectrum of the D-dimensional de Sitter spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lopez-Ortega

    2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of the quantum area spectrum of a black hole horizon by means of its asymptotic quasinormal frequencies has been explored recently. We believe that for D-dimensional de Sitter horizon we must study if the idea works. Thus taking into account the local description of the thermodynamics of horizons proposed by Padmanabhan and the results of Hod, Kunstatter, and Maggiore we study the area spectrum of the D-dimensional de Sitter horizon.

  12. MEASURING THE JET POWER OF FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO QUASARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shabala, S. S.; Santoso, J. S. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Godfrey, L. E. H. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia)

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We use frequency-dependent position shifts of flat-spectrum radio cores to estimate the kinetic power of active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets. We find a correlation between the derived jet powers and AGN narrow-line luminosity, consistent with the well-known relation for radio galaxies and steep spectrum quasars. This technique can be applied to intrinsically weak jets even at high redshift.

  13. Terahertz bandwidth integrated radio frequency spectrum analyzer via nonlinear optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrera, Marcello; Pasquazi, Alessia; Peccianti, Marco; Clerici, Matteo; Caspani, Lucia; Chu, Sai T; Little, Brent E; Morandotti, Roberto; Moss, David J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an integrated all-optical radio frequency spectrum analyzer based on a ~ 4cm long doped silica glass waveguide, with a bandwidth greater than 2.5 THz. We use this device to characterize the intensity power spectrum of ultrahigh repetition rate mode-locked lasers at repetition rates up to 400 GHz, and observe dynamic noise related behavior not observable with other techniques.

  14. A Wavelet Approach to Wideband Spectrum Sensing for Cognitive Radios Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Zhi "Gerry"

    A Wavelet Approach to Wideband Spectrum Sensing for Cognitive Radios Zhi Tian Department. The proposed sensing techniques provide an effective radio sensing architecture to identify and locate spectrum static spectrum allocation, fixed radio functions, and limited network coordination between mobile

  15. Spectral analysis for evaluation of myocardial tracers for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesman, Ronald H.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Marshall, Robert C.

    2000-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetic analysis of dynamic tracer data is performed with the goal of evaluating myocardial radiotracers for cardiac nuclear medicine imaging. Data from experiments utilizing the isolated rabbit heart model are acquired by sampling the venous blood after introduction of a tracer of interest and a reference tracer. We have taken the approach that the kinetics are properly characterized by an impulse response function which describes the difference between the reference molecule (which does not leave the vasculature) and the molecule of interest which is transported across the capillary boundary and is made available to the cell. Using this formalism we can model the appearance of the tracer of interest in the venous output of the heart as a convolution of the appearance of the reference tracer with the impulse response. In this work we parameterize the impulse response function as the sum of a large number of exponential functions whose predetermined decay constants form a spectrum, and each is required only to have a nonnegative coefficient. This approach, called spectral analysis, has the advantage that it allows conventional compartmental analysis without prior knowledge of the number of compartments which the physiology may require or which the data will support.

  16. IMPROVED SPECTRAL RESPONSE OF SILICONE ENCAPSULANTED PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPROVED SPECTRAL RESPONSE OF SILICONE ENCAPSULANTED PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULES Nick E. Powell 1* , Byung the benefit of using optically superior silicone encapsulant materials over the incumbent ethylene vinyl in the UV region of the solar spectrum. Single cell mini-modules were prepared using two different

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropic power spectrum Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    power spectrum Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anisotropic power spectrum Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Random Scattering and...

  18. Improving spectrum sensing and multiuser cooperation in wireless cognitive radio networks.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Chengqi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Nowadays wireless spectrum resource is more and more scarce because most wireless spectrum bands have been allocated to licensed users, however measurements show that many… (more)

  19. Performance of Cognitive Radio Spectrum Access with Intra- and Inter-Handoff.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Yong; Ngoga, Said; Erman, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Opportunistic spectrum access (OSA) is a technology that allows unlicensed users to access spectrum holes and to provide so efficient use of radio resources. Most… (more)

  20. A power line impedance spectrum analyzer using real-time digital signal processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margolis, Michael G

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    . The subscript on each source corresponds to the harmonic generated by that source and all sources were set to an amplitude of O. lmA. The output files obtained from a transient analysis were then transferred to Matlab, and impedance spectrums were generated... Harmonic Number Figure 12 Simulated lmH Load Next the power network was simulated both with and without the attachment of the non-linear load. The voltage across the linear load was measured and plotted in the frequency domain using Matlab. Figure 13...

  1. Observations of the high-frequency range of the wave spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prevosto, M. [IFREMER, Plouzane (France); Krogstad, H.E. [SINTEF Industrial Mathematics, Trondheim (Norway); Barstow, S.F. [OCEANOR, Trondheim (Norway); Guedes Soares, C. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper takes a new look at the high-frequency range of the wave spectrum. The analysis is based on data sets from two recent field campaigns offshore Portugal and Crete carried out in the MAST II WAVEMOD project, data from the WADIC experiment in the North Sea, and deep-sea data from Haltenbanken and Voeringplataaet offshore Norway. In addition, the authors also show spectra obtained by spectral inversion of ERS-1 SAR imagery. The influence and calibration of wave-measuring instrumentation and the use of wavenumber spectra when comparing spectra from shallow water is emphasized.

  2. On the possibility of blue tensor spectrum within single field inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fu Cai; Jinn-Ouk Gong; Shi Pi; Emmanuel N. Saridakis; Shang-Yu Wu

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a series of theoretical constraints on the potentially viable inflation models that might yield a blue spectrum for primordial tensor perturbations. By performing a detailed dynamical analysis we show that, while there exists such possibility, the corresponding phase space is strongly bounded. Our result implies that, in order to achieve a blue tilt for inflationary tensor perturbations, one may either construct a non-canonical inflation model delicately, or study the generation of primordial tensor modes beyond the standard scenario of single slow-roll field.

  3. Presidential responsiveness to public opinion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaughn, Justin Scott

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    the project markedly, and Dr. Paul Kellstedt patiently indulged my persistent questions about elementary aspects of time-series analysis and the nuances of the public mood measure. Kurt Ritter, Ed Portis and Cary Nederman also demonstrated generous amounts... PRESIDENCY ................71 Presidential-Congressional Action: A Literature Review ..............71 Presidential Responsiveness and Congressional Roll Call Votes...75 Data...

  4. The X-ray Spectrum of Cyg X-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Done; P. T. Zycki; D. A. Smith

    2001-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectra of disc accreting neutron stars generally show complex curvature, and individual components from the disc, boundary layer and neutron star surface cannot be uniquely identified. Here we show that much of the confusion over the spectral form derives from inadequate approximations for comptonization and for the iron line. There is an intrinsic low energy cutoff in comptonised spectra at the seed photon energy. It is very important to model this correctly in neutron star systems as these have expected seed photon temperatures (from either the neutron star surface, inner disc or self-absorbed cyclotron) of ~1 keV, clearly within the observed X-ray energy band. There is also reflected continuum emission which must accompany the observed iron line, which distorts the higher energy spectrum. We illustrate these points by a reanalysis of the GINGA spectra of Cyg X-2 at all points along its Z track, and show that the spectrum can be well fit by models in which the low energy spectrum is dominated by the disc, while the higher energy spectrum is dominated by comptonised emission from the boundary layer, together with its reflected spectrum from a relativistically smeared, ionised disc.

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous genotoxic responses Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    response. Generally, toxicity testing agreed with expectations based on chemical analysis... the genotoxic response, among which PAHs and dioxins are prominent. The three...

  6. Technology Options for a Fast Spectrum Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. Wachs; R. W. King; I. Y. Glagolenko; Y. Shatilla

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory has evaluated technology options for a new fast spectrum reactor to meet the fast-spectrum irradiation requirements for the USDOE Generation IV (Gen IV) and Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) programs. The US currently has no capability for irradiation testing of large volumes of fuels or materials in a fast-spectrum reactor required to support the development of Gen IV fast reactor systems or to demonstrate actinide burning, a key element of the AFCI program. The technologies evaluated and the process used to select options for a fast irradiation test reactor (FITR) for further evaluation to support these programmatic objectives are outlined in this paper.

  7. Spectrum of second-harmonic radiation generated from incoherent light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stabinis, A.; Pyragaite, V.; Tamosauskas, G.; Piskarskas, A. [Department of Quantum Electronics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Avenue 9, Building 3, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the development of the theory of second-harmonic generation by an incoherent pump with broad angular and frequency spectra. We show that spatial as well as temporal walk-off effects in a nonlinear crystal result in angular dispersion of the second-harmonic radiation. We demonstrate that the acceptance angle in second-harmonic generation by incoherent light is caused by the width of the pump angular spectrum and the resulting angular dispersion of second-harmonic radiation but does not depend on crystal length. In this case the frequency spectrum of second-harmonic radiation is determined by its angular dispersion and the pump angular spectrum. The theory is supported by an experiment in which a LiIO{sub 3} crystal was pumped by a tungsten halogen lamp.

  8. Measuring theta12 Despite an Uncertain Reactor Neutrino Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciuffoli, Emilio; Grassi, Marco; Zhang, Xinmin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently discovered 5 MeV bump highlights that the uncertainty in the reactor neutrino spectrum is far greater than some theoretical estimates. Medium baseline reactor neutrino experiments will deliver by far the most precise ever measurements of theta12. However, as a result of the bump, such a determination of theta12 using the theoretical spectrum would yield a value of sin^2(2theta12) which is more than 1% higher than the true value. We show that by using recent measurements of the reactor neutrino spectrum the precision of a measurement of theta12 at a medium baseline reactor neutrino experiment can be improved appreciably. We estimate this precision as a function of the 9Li spallation background veto efficiency and dead time.

  9. The Cosmic Microwave Background: Beyond the Power Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Kamionkowski

    1998-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Much recent work on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) has focussed on the angular power spectrum of temperature anisotropies and particularly on the recovery of cosmological parameters from acoustic peaks in the power spectrum. However, there is more that can conceivably be done with CMB measurements. Here I briefly survey a few such ideas: cross-correlation with other cosmic backgrounds as a probe of the density of the Universe; CMB polarization as a gravitational-wave detector; secondary anisotropies and the ionization history of the Universe; tests of alternative-gravity theories; polarization, the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, and cosmic variance; and tests for a neutrino mass.

  10. Rank-ordered Multifractal Spectrum for Intermittent Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Chang; Cheng-chin Wu

    2007-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new method that is both physically explicable and quantitatively accurate in describing the multifractal characteristics of intermittent events based on groupings of rank-ordered fluctuations. The generic nature of such rank-ordered spectrum leads it to a natural connection with the concept of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. We demonstrate this technique using results obtained from a 2D MHD simulation. The calculated spectrum suggests a crossover from the near Gaussian characteristics of small amplitude fluctuations to the extreme intermittent state of large rare events.

  11. Tilting the Primordial Power Spectrum with Bulk Viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James E. Lidsey

    1993-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the context of the cold dark matter model, current observations suggest that inflationary models which generate a tilted primordial power spectrum with negligible gravitational waves provide the most promising mechanism for explaining large scale clustering. The general form of the inflationary potential which produces such a spectrum is a hyperbolic function and is interpreted physically as a bulk viscous stress contribution to the energy-momentum of a perfect baryotropic fluid. This is equivalent to expanding the equation of state as a truncated Taylor series. Particle physics models which lead to such a potential are discussed.

  12. Loads Analysis of Several Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A. N.; Jonkman, J. M.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a comprehensive dynamic-response analysis of six offshore floating wind turbine concepts.

  13. Ontology-based Spectrum Access Policies for Policy-based Cognitive Radios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ontology-based Spectrum Access Policies for Policy-based Cognitive Radios Behnam Bahrak, Jung radios (CRs) need to be able to cope with the constantly changing spectrum environment, evolving spectrum, to alleviate the spectrum shortage problem. The cognitive radio is seen as one of the key technologies

  14. A Coalition Formation Game for Energy-efficient Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Vincent

    A Coalition Formation Game for Energy-efficient Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio to realize spectrum reuse and increase the spectrum efficiency in cognitive radio networks (CRNs]. As for spectrum sensing, each SU is required to sense the radio environment within its operating range to find

  15. A Contracts-based Approach for Spectrum Sharing Among Cognitive Radios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Contracts-based Approach for Spectrum Sharing Among Cognitive Radios Dileep M. Kalathil spectrum, sharing of spectrum through new paradigms such as cognitive radio sensing, as well Departments University of Southern California rahul.jain @ usc.edu Abstract--Development of dynamic spectrum

  16. A major radio outburst in III Zw 2 with an extremely inverted, millimeterpeaked spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falcke, Heino

    A major radio outburst in III Zw 2 with an extremely inverted, millimeter­peaked spectrum Heino ABSTRACT III Zw 2 is a spiral galaxy with an optical spectrum and faint extended radio structure typical­band radio spectrum between 1.4 and 666 GHz shows a textbook­like synchrotron spectrum peaking at 43 GHz

  17. Proportional and Double Imitation Rules for Spectrum Access in Cognitive Radio Networks$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Proportional and Double Imitation Rules for Spectrum Access in Cognitive Radio Networks$ Stefano as a promising paradigm to enable more efficient spectrum utilization. Spectrum access models in cognitive radio-scale cognitive radio net- works from an evolutionary game theoretic angle. We formulate the spectrum access

  18. Asymmetric Cooperative Communications Based Spectrum Leasing via Auctions in Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaweera, Sudharman K.

    1 Asymmetric Cooperative Communications Based Spectrum Leasing via Auctions in Cognitive Radio for dynamic spectrum sharing (DSS) in cognitive radio networks (CRN's). In this paper, we propose a new way--Cognitive radios, cooperative communications, distributed dynamic spectrum leasing, dynamic spectrum access

  19. Dimension Estimation-based Spectrum Sens-ing for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    Dimension Estimation-based Spectrum Sens- ing for Cognitive Radio Bassem Zayen and Aawatif Hayar. Introduction The discrepancy between current-day spectrum allocation and spectrum use sug- gests that radio mean that radios could find and adapt to any immediate local spectrum availability. A new class

  20. On Performance Evaluation of Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    On Performance Evaluation of Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks Gang Xiong evaluation for energy-detection based cooperative spectrum sens- ing in cognitive radio networks. Three to exploit under- utilized spectrum and enhance spectrum efficiency. In cog- nitive radio networks, secondary

  1. Whether and When to Share: Spectrum Sensing as An Evolutionary Game

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    }@temple.edu Abstract--Cooperative spectrum sensing is an efficient sensing scheme for cognitive radio networks (CRNs), spectrum sensing, game theory, USRP testbed. I. INTRODUCTION Cognitive radio networks (CRNs) [1] enable secondary users (SUs) to utilize the licensed spectrum when primary users (PUs) are not using it. Spectrum

  2. The high-energy gamma-ray fluence and energy spectrum of GRB 970417a from observations with Milagrito

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Sánchez, M M G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Klein, S; Leonor, I; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Samuelson, F W; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, C; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evidence of TeV emission from GRB970417a has been previously reported using data from the Milagrito detector. Constraints on the TeV fluence and the energy spectrum are now derived using additional data from a scaler system that recorded the rate of signals from the Milagrito photomultipliers. This analysis shows that if emission from GRB970417a has been observed, it must contain photons with energies above 650 GeV. Some consequences of this observation are discussed.

  3. The high-energy gamma-ray fluence and energy spectrum of GRB 970417a from observations with Milagrito

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; M. M. Gonzalez Sanchez; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; S. Klein; I. Leonor; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; F. W. Samuelson; B. Shen; A. Shoup; C. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

    2002-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Evidence of TeV emission from GRB970417a has been previously reported using data from the Milagrito detector. Constraints on the TeV fluence and the energy spectrum are now derived using additional data from a scaler system that recorded the rate of signals from the Milagrito photomultipliers. This analysis shows that if emission from GRB970417a has been observed, it must contain photons with energies above 650 GeV. Some consequences of this observation are discussed.

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis naa radioisotope Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the in vivo quantification of additional peaks (including NAA... .0293 ppm) in vivo. Spectrum Analysis All the acquired spectra were analyzed using LCModel 3. In vitro......

  5. 8Li electron spectrum versus 8B neutrino spectrum Implications for measuring solar neutrinos with a heavy water detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonkmans, G; Sur, B

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sensitivity of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) to measure the shape of the recoil electron spectrum in the charged-current reaction of $^{8}$B solar neutrinos interacting with deuterium can be improved if the results of a $^{8}$Li beta-decay calibration experiment are included in the test. We calculate an improvement in sensitivity, under certain idealistic assumptions, of about a factor of 2, sufficient to resolve different neutrino-oscillation solutions to the solar-neutrino problem. We further examine the role of recoil and radiative corrections on both the $^{8}$B neutrino spectrum and the $^{8}$Li electron spectrum and conclude that the influence of these effects on the ratio of the two spectra as measured by SNO is very small.

  6. Power-Spectrum Analyses of Super-Kamiokande Solar Neutrino Data: Variability and its Implications for Solar Physics and Neutrino Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Sturrock; D. O. Caldwell; J. D. Scargle; M. S. Wheatland

    2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been conflicting claims as to whether or not power-spectrum analysis of the Super-Kamiokande solar neutrino data yields evidence of variability. Comparison of these claims is complicated by the fact that the relevant articles may use different datasets, different methods of analysis, and different procedures for significance estimation. The purpose of this article is to clarify the role of power spectrum analysis. To this end, we analyze only the Super-Kamiokande 5-day dataset, and we use a standard procedure for significance estimation proposed by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration. We then analyze this dataset, with this method of significance estimation, using six methods of power spectrum analysis. We find that the significance of the principal peak in the power spectrum (that at 9.43 yr-1with a depth of modulation of 7%) shows a clear correlation with the amount and relevance of the information being processed, as would be expected if there were a real signal in the data. The significance level reaches 99.3% for one method of analysis. We discuss, in terms of sub-dominant processes, possible neutrino-physics interpretations of the apparent variability of the Super-Kamiokande measurements, and we suggest steps that could be taken to resolve the question of variability of the solar neutrino flux.

  7. Investigation of the influence of the neutron spectrum in determinations of integral cross-section ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.L.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ratio measurements are routinely employed in studies of neutron interaction processes in order to generate new differential cross-section data or to test existing differential cross-section information through examination of the corresponding response in integral neutron spectra. Interpretation of such data requires that careful attention be given to details of the neutron spectra involved in these measurements. Two specific tasks are undertaken in the present investigation: (1) Using perturbation theory, a formula is derived which permits one to relate the ratio measured in a realistic quasimonoenergetic spectrum to the desired pure monoenergetic ratio. This expression involves only the lowest-order moments of the neutron energy distribution and corresponding parameters which serve to characterize the energy dependence of the differential cross sections, quantities which can generally be estimated with reasonable precision from the uncorrected data or from auxiliary information. (2) Using covariance methods, a general formalism is developed for calculating the uncertainty of a measured integral cross-section ratio which involves an arbitrary neutron spectrum. This formalism is employed to further examine the conditions which influence the sensitivity of such measured ratios to details of the neutron spectra and to their uncertainties. Several numerical examples are presented in this report in order to illustrate these principles, and some general conclusion are drawn concerning the development and testing of neutron cross-section data by means of ratio experiments. 16 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  8. Cascade atom in high-Q cavity: The spectrum for non-Markovian decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Dalton; B. M. Garraway

    2007-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The spontaneous emission spectrum for a three level cascade configuration atom in a single mode high-Q cavity coupled to a zero temperature reservoir of continuum external modes is determined from the atom-cavity mode master equation using the quantum regression theorem. Initially the atom is in its upper state and the cavity mode empty of photons. Following Glauber, the spectrum is defined via the response of a detector atom. Spectra are calculated for the detector located inside the cavity (case A), outside the cavity end mirror (Case B-end emission), or placed for emission out the side of the cavity (Case C). The spectra for case A and case B are found to be essentially the same. In all the cases the predicted lineshapes are free of instrumental effects and only due to cavity decay. Spectra are presented for intermediate and strong coupling regime situations (where both atomic transitions are resonant with the cavity frequency), for cases of non-zero cavity detuning, and for cases where the two atomic transition frequencies differ. The spectral features for Cases B(A) and C are qualitatively similar, with six spectral peaks for resonance cases and eight for detuned cases. These general features of the spectra can be understood via the dressed atom model. However, Case B and C spectra differ in detail, with the latter exhibiting a deep spectral hole at the cavity frequency due to quantum interference effects.

  9. The Effects of a Dynamic Spectrum Access Overlay in LTE-Advanced Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juan D. Deaton; Ryan E. lrwin; Luiz A. DaSilva

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As early as 2014, wireless network operators spectral capacity will be overwhelmed by a data tsunami brought on by new devices and applications. To augment spectral capacity, operators could deploy a Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA) overlay. In the light of the many planned Long Term Evolution (LTE) network deployments, the affects of a DSA overlay have not been fully considered into the existing LTE standards. Coalescing many different aspects of DSA, this paper develops the Spectrum Accountability (SA) framework. The SA framework defines specific network element functionality, protocol interfaces, and signaling flow diagrams for LTE to support service requests and enforce rights of responsibilities of primary and secondary users, respectively. We also include a network simulation to quantify the benefits of using DSA channels to augment capacity. Based on our simulation we show that, network operators can benefit up to %40 increase in operating capacity when sharing DSA bands to augment spectral capacity. With our framework, this paper could serve as an guide in developing future LTE network standards that include DSA.

  10. Short range spread-spectrum radiolocation system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (Loudon, TN)

    2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A short range radiolocation system and associated methods that allow the location of an item, such as equipment, containers, pallets, vehicles, or personnel, within a defined area. A small, battery powered, self-contained tag is provided to an item to be located. The tag includes a spread-spectrum transmitter that transmits a spread-spectrum code and identification information. A plurality of receivers positioned about the area receive signals from a transmitting tag. The position of the tag, and hence the item, is located by triangulation. The system employs three different ranging techniques for providing coarse, intermediate, and fine spatial position resolution. Coarse positioning information is provided by use of direct-sequence code phase transmitted as a spread-spectrum signal. Intermediate positioning information is provided by the use of a difference signal transmitted with the direct-sequence spread-spectrum code. Fine positioning information is provided by use of carrier phase measurements. An algorithm is employed to combine the three data sets to provide accurate location measurements.

  11. Cost Constrained Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    networks considering its system level cost that accounts for the local processing cost of sensing (sample collection and energy calculation at each secondary user) as well as the transmission cost (forwarding energy for various factors that contribute to the cost incurred by spectrum sensing. In this paper, we study energy

  12. On the Characteristics of Spectrum-Agile Communication Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xin

    services. Enabled by regulatory changes and radio technologies advances, opportunistic usage of the white basis. Such usage is being enabled by regulatory policy initiatives and radio technology advances. First downtown Washington, DC, where both governmental and commercial spectrum usage are intensive [10

  13. NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation: Issue 3 (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly magazine is dedicated to stepping beyond the technical journals to reveal NREL's vital work in a real-world context for our stakeholders. Continuum provides insights into the latest and most impactful clean energy innovations, while spotlighting those talented researchers and unique facilities that make it all happen. This edition focuses on the NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation.

  14. Sequential Bandwidth and Power Auctions for Spectrum Sharing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    user's power). Although the worst-case efficiency loss can be significant, numerical results1 Sequential Bandwidth and Power Auctions for Spectrum Sharing Junjik Bae, Eyal Beigman, Randall resource (bandwidth or power) among compet- ing transmitters. The resource is assumed to be managed

  15. Interference Characterization and Spectrum Sharing in Large Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikomeroglu, Halim

    SUs willing to utilize the spectrum band of the PU. The aggregate inter- ference power received fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Electrical and Computer Engineering Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Electrical and Computer Engineering (OCIECE) Department of Systems

  16. DSASim: A simulation framework for dynamic spectrum allocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turgut, Damla

    School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of Central Florida Orlando, FL 32816 cable or satellite. Another reason is that some services such as public safety are usually allocated and many others leave the spectrum inefficiently allocated. Recently, researchers and manufacturers have

  17. Placing Fusion in the spectrum of energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exponential growth phase: energy production irrelevant My observations based on this graph. · First of all: since the exponential growth stops at typically 1% of the final capacity, the energy production during is irrelevant for energy production. #12;Niek Lopes Cardozo, Placing fusion in the energy development spectrum

  18. GEOMETRIC OPTICS AND THE BOTTOM OF THE SPECTRUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melrose, Richard

    GEOMETRIC OPTICS AND THE BOTTOM OF THE SPECTRUM Richard B. Melrose Massachusetts Institute is examined using geometric optics. General conditions on the geometry of an alge­ bra of vector fields OE 1 \\Gamma! Y 1 OE 2 \\Gamma! Y 2 ; / = OE 2 ffi OE 1 : Here both OE 1 : @X \\Gamma! Y 1 and OE 2 : Y

  19. "Light" or the Electromagnetic spectrum www.nasa.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    (absorbed then emitted light) · About the solar atmosphere · About comet tails · About our galaxy · About#12;"Light" or the Electromagnetic spectrum www.nasa.gov #12;Diffraction and Light · When passed through a prism or grating, light is separated into its component wavelengths · This looks like a rainbow

  20. Synthetic Spectrum Methods for Three-Dimensional Supernova Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. C. Thomas

    2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Current observations stimulate the production of fully three-dimensional explosion models, which in turn motivates three-dimensional spectrum synthesis for supernova atmospheres. We briefly discuss techniques adapted to address the latter problem, and consider some fundamentals of line formation in supernovae without recourse to spherical symmetry. Direct and detailed extensions of the technique are discussed, and future work is outlined.

  1. I. What is electromagnetic radiation and the electromagnetic spectrum?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitko, Michael L.

    i­1 I. What is electromagnetic radiation and the electromagnetic spectrum? What do light, X effects on matter. This "stuff" is called electromagnetic radiation, because it travels (radiates) and has electrical and magnetic effects. Electromagnetic radiation is the means for many of our interactions

  2. Spectrum Sharing and Privacy: A Research Agenda Janine S. Hiller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the National Broadband Plan and in the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology report security and privacy implications for these possible new designs. Security and privacy become especially government, including military, users and fixed satellite service licensees--share spectrum with Secondary

  3. SIC (MUltiple SIgnal Classification) CSP (Cross-power Spectrum Phase)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takiguchi, Tetsuya

    2ch CSP ( ) 1 MU- SIC (MUltiple SIgnal Classification) CSP (Cross- power Spectrum Phase) [1, 2, 3, 4] [5, 6] [7, 8, 9, 10] [7] CSP CSP [8] [9] CSP [10] Estimation of talker's head orientation based (Kobe univ.) [11] 2ch CSP CSP CSP CSP 2 CSP GCC-PHAT (Generalized Cross- Correlation PHAse Transform

  4. Sequence Detection Algorithms for Dynamic Spectrum Access Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laneman, J. Nicholas

    Laneman, and Glenn J. Bradford Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame E acknowledged that the traditional static allo- cation of wireless bandwidth by governmental regulators. Classical physical (PHY) layer spectrum sensing approaches for a non-cooperating SU, such as coherent

  5. High-Diversity Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pleite, Alfonso Cano

    High-Diversity Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks Guobing Li1,2, Alfonso Cano2 and Shihua Zhu1 1 School of Elect. and Info. Engr., Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi-mails: {gbli, szhu}@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; alfonso@umn.edu Abstract--This paper develops a cooperative scheme among

  6. Electron energy-loss spectrum of nanowires G. F. Bertsch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertsch George F.

    Electron energy-loss spectrum of nanowires G. F. Bertsch Institute of Nuclear Theory and Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 Received 8 May 1998 The electronic properties of nanoscale-size fibers can be studied by electron energy-loss spectroscopy with electron beams that pass near the fiber

  7. anisotropy energy spectrum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anisotropy energy spectrum First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Ultra High Energy Cosmic...

  8. Code design based on metric-spectrum and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papadimitriou, Panayiotis D.

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduced nested search methods to design (n, k) block codes for arbitrary channels by optimizing an appropriate metric spectrum in each iteration. For a given k, the methods start with a good high rate code, say k/(k + 1), and successively...

  9. AIAA-2001-0025 SPECTRUM FATIGUE LIFETIME AND RESIDUAL STRENGTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on a typical fiberglass laminate configuration turbine blade fiberglass material has been undertaken under at various fractions of the lifetime turbine blade materials.. are consistent with the residual strength of fiberglass spectrum have been studied. Data have been obtained for materials produce results that may

  10. Hemodynamic Evoked Response NIRS data analysis GUI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , as well as other intellectual property laws and treaties. HomER is licensed, not given away or sold. PMI toolbox. Parts of this software are based on the PMI toolbox software copyrighted by The Massachusetts General Hospital and John Stott. The original license terms of the PMI toolbox software distribution

  11. Derivation of the Blackbody Radiation Spectrum from a Natural Maximum-Entropy Principle Involving Casimir Energies and Zero-Point Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timothy H. Boyer

    2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    By numerical calculation, the Planck spectrum with zero-point radiation is shown to satisfy a natural maximum-entropy principle whereas alternative choices of spectra do not. Specifically, if we consider a set of conducting-walled boxes, each with a partition placed at a different location in the box, so that across the collection of boxes the partitions are uniformly spaced across the volume, then the Planck spectrum correspond to that spectrum of random radiation (having constant energy kT per normal mode at low frequencies and zero-point energy (1/2)hw per normal mode at high frequencies) which gives maximum uniformity across the collection of boxes for the radiation energy per box. The analysis involves Casimir energies and zero-point radiation which do not usually appear in thermodynamic analyses. For simplicity, the analysis is presented for waves in one space dimension.

  12. Transverse electric scattering on inhomogeneous objects: spectrum of integral operator and preconditioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zouros, Grigorios P

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The domain integral equation method with its FFT-based matrix-vector products is a viable alternative to local methods in free-space scattering problems. However, it often suffers from the extremely slow convergence of iterative methods, especially in the transverse electric (TE) case with large or negative permittivity. We identify the nontrivial essential spectrum of the pertaining integral operator as partly responsible for this behavior, and the main reason why a normally efficient deflating preconditioner does not work. We solve this problem by applying an explicit multiplicative regularizing operator, which transforms the system to the form `identity plus compact', yet allows the resulting matrix-vector products to be carried out at the FFT speed. Such a regularized system is then further preconditioned by deflating an apparently stable set of eigenvalues with largest magnitudes, which results in a robust acceleration of the restarted GMRES under constraint memory conditions.

  13. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: The power spectrum and the matter content of the universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Will J. Percival; Carlton M. Baugh; Joss Bland-Hawthorn; Terry Bridges; Russell Cannon; Shaun Cole; Matthew Colless; Chris Collins; Warrick Couch; Gavin Dalton; Roberto De Propris; Simon P. Driver; George Efstathiou; Richard S. Ellis; Carlos S. Frenk; Karl Glazebrook; Carole Jackson; Ofer Lahav; Ian Lewis; Stuart Lumsden; Steve Maddox; Stephen Moody; Peder Norberg; John A. Peacock; Bruce A. Peterson; Will Sutherland; Keith Taylor

    2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey has now measured in excess of 160000 galaxy redshifts. This paper presents the power spectrum of the galaxy distribution, calculated using a direct FFT-based technique. We argue that, within the k-space region 0.02spectrum should be close to that of the linear density perturbations convolved with the window function of the survey. This window function and its convolving effect on the power spectrum estimate are analyzed in detail. By convolving model spectra, we are able to fit the power-spectrum data and provide a measure of the matter content of the universe. Our results show that models containing baryon oscillations are mildly preferred over featureless power spectra. Analysis of the data yields 68% confidence limits on the total matter density times the Hubble parameter \\Omega_m h = 0.20 +/- 0.03, and the baryon fraction \\Omega_b/\\Omega_m = 0.15 +/- 0.07, assuming scale-invariant primordial fluctuations.

  14. altered immune responses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vivo imaging of immune cell dynamics in skin in response to zinc-oxide nanoparticle exposure Boppart, Stephen 158 Transcriptomic Analysis of Host Immune and Cell Death...

  15. antitumor immune response: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vivo imaging of immune cell dynamics in skin in response to zinc-oxide nanoparticle exposure Boppart, Stephen 143 Transcriptomic Analysis of Host Immune and Cell Death...

  16. antiviral immune response: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vivo imaging of immune cell dynamics in skin in response to zinc-oxide nanoparticle exposure Boppart, Stephen 155 Transcriptomic Analysis of Host Immune and Cell Death...

  17. acquired immune response: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vivo imaging of immune cell dynamics in skin in response to zinc-oxide nanoparticle exposure Boppart, Stephen 152 Transcriptomic Analysis of Host Immune and Cell Death...

  18. antitumor immune responses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vivo imaging of immune cell dynamics in skin in response to zinc-oxide nanoparticle exposure Boppart, Stephen 143 Transcriptomic Analysis of Host Immune and Cell Death...

  19. antiviral immune responses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vivo imaging of immune cell dynamics in skin in response to zinc-oxide nanoparticle exposure Boppart, Stephen 155 Transcriptomic Analysis of Host Immune and Cell Death...

  20. activated immune response: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vivo imaging of immune cell dynamics in skin in response to zinc-oxide nanoparticle exposure Boppart, Stephen 176 Transcriptomic Analysis of Host Immune and Cell Death...

  1. adaptive immune response: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vivo imaging of immune cell dynamics in skin in response to zinc-oxide nanoparticle exposure Boppart, Stephen 205 Transcriptomic Analysis of Host Immune and Cell Death...

  2. acquired immune responses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vivo imaging of immune cell dynamics in skin in response to zinc-oxide nanoparticle exposure Boppart, Stephen 152 Transcriptomic Analysis of Host Immune and Cell Death...

  3. adaptive immune responses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vivo imaging of immune cell dynamics in skin in response to zinc-oxide nanoparticle exposure Boppart, Stephen 205 Transcriptomic Analysis of Host Immune and Cell Death...

  4. automated worm response: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a means to accurately model the early phase Bagchi, Saurabh 11 Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization...

  5. Semi-classical signal analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taous-Meriem Laleg-Kirati; Emmanuelle Crépeau; Michel Sorine

    2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This study introduces a new signal analysis method called SCSA, based on a semi-classical approach. The main idea in the SCSA is to interpret a pulse-shaped signal as a potential of a Schr\\"odinger operator and then to use the discrete spectrum of this operator for the analysis of the signal. We present some numerical examples and the first results obtained with this method on the analysis of arterial blood pressure waveforms.

  6. Method of detecting system function by measuring frequency response

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrison, John L.; Morrison, William H.; Christophersen, Jon P.; Motloch, Chester G.

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of rapidly measuring an impedance spectrum of an energy storage device in-situ over a limited number of logarithmically distributed frequencies are described. An energy storage device is excited with a known input signal, and a response is measured to ascertain the impedance spectrum. An excitation signal is a limited time duration sum-of-sines consisting of a select number of frequencies. In one embodiment, magnitude and phase of each frequency of interest within the sum-of-sines is identified when the selected frequencies and sample rate are logarithmic integer steps greater than two. This technique requires a measurement with a duration of one period of the lowest frequency. In another embodiment, where selected frequencies are distributed in octave steps, the impedance spectrum can be determined using a captured time record that is reduced to a half-period of the lowest frequency.

  7. The CHANDRA HETGS X-ray Grating Spectrum of Eta Car

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. F. Corcoran; J. H. Swank; R. Petre; K. Ishibashi; K. Davidson; L. Townsley; R. Smith; S. White; R. Viotti; A. Damineli

    2001-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Eta Car may be the most massive and luminous star in the Galaxy and is suspected to be a massive, colliding wind binary system. The CHANDRA X-ray observatory has obtained a calibrated, high-resolution X-ray spectrum of the star uncontaminated by the nearby extended soft X-ray emisssion. Our 89 ksec CHANDRA observation with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) shows that the hot gas near the star is non-isothermal. The temperature distribution may represent the emission on either side of the colliding wind bow shock, effectively ``resolving'' the shock. If so, the pre-shock wind velocities are ~ 700 and ~ 1800 km/s in our analysis, and these velocities may be interpreted as the terminal velocities of the winds from Eta Car and from the hidden companion star. The forbidden-to-intercombination (f/i) line ratios for the He-like ions of S, Si and Fe are large, indicating that the line forming region lies far from the stellar photosphere. The iron fluorescent line at 1.93 Angstrom, first detected by ASCA, is clearly resolved from the thermal iron line in the CHANDRA grating spectrum. The Fe fluorescent line is weaker in our CHANDRA observation than in any of the ASCA spectra. The CHANDRA observation also provides an uninterrupted high-time resolution lightcurve of the stellar X-ray emission from Eta Car and suggests that there was no significant, coherent variability during the CHANDRA observation. The Eta Car CHANDRA grating spectrum is unlike recently published X-ray grating spectra of single massive stars in significant ways and is generally consistent with colliding wind emission in a massive binary.

  8. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 59, NO. 4, MAY 2010 1779 Voice-Service Capacity Analysis for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Hai

    of the licensed spectrum. An opportunistic (or cognitive) spectrum access approach has been proposed to allow usage of the wireless spectrum can be achieved while allowing the primary users to enjoy their licensed Analysis for Cognitive Radio Networks Ping Wang, Member, IEEE, Dusit Niyato, Member, IEEE, and Hai Jiang

  9. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gehrke, R.J.; Putnam, M.H.; Killian, E.W.; Helmer, R.G.; Kynaston, R.L.; Goodwin, S.G.; Johnson, L.O.

    1993-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and [gamma]-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2,000 keV), as well as high-energy [gamma] rays (>1 MeV). A 8,192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The [gamma]-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge [gamma]-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and [gamma]-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the [gamma]-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  10. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gehrke, Robert J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Putnam, Marie H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Killian, E. Wayne (Idaho Falls, ID); Helmer, Richard G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kynaston, Ronnie L. (Blackfoot, ID); Goodwin, Scott G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, Larry O. (Pocatello, ID)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and .gamma.-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2000 keV), as well as high-energy .gamma. rays (>1 MeV). A 8192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The .gamma.-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge .gamma.-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and .gamma.-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the .gamma.-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  11. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNEX Q HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE #12;ANNEX Q - HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE 03/10/2014 v.2.0 Page Q-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex Q: Hazardous Materials Emergency Response, and contents within, is a guide to how the University conducts a response specific to a hazardous materials

  12. Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems ­ Importance of dimming ­ New wireless controls technologies · Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives · Provide up-to-date information

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis emerging trends Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 22 Energy Analysis Department Demand Response National Trends:Demand Response National Trends Summary: Energy Analysis Department...

  14. Toward the excited isoscalar meson spectrum from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Edwards, Robert G. [JLAB; Dudek, Jozef J. [JLAB, Old Dominion U.; Thomas, Christopher Edward [Trinity College, Dublin; Guo, Peng [Indiana U.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the extraction of an excited spectrum of isoscalar mesons using lattice QCD. Calculations on several lattice volumes are performed with a range of light quark masses corresponding to pion masses down to about ~400 MeV. The distillation method enables us to evaluate the required disconnected contributions with high statistical precision for a large number of meson interpolating fields. We find relatively little mixing between light and strange in most JPC channels; one notable exception is the pseudoscalar sector where the approximate SU(3)F octet, singlet structure of the ?, ?' is reproduced. We extract exotic JPC states, identified as hybrid mesons in which an excited gluonic field is coupled to a color-octet qqbar pair, along with non-exotic hybrid mesons embedded in a qqbar-like spectrum.

  15. Studying 21cm power spectrum with one-point statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimabukuro, Hayato; Takahashi, Keitaro; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Ichiki, Kiyotomo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The redshifted 21cm line signal from neutral hydrogens is a promising tool to probe the cosmic dawn and the epoch of reionization (EoR). Ongoing and future low-frequency radio experiments are expected to detect its fluctuations, especially through the power spectrum. In this paper, we give a physical interpretation of the time evolution of the power spectrum of the 21cm brightness temperature fluctuations, which can be decomposed into dark matter density, spin temperature and neutral fraction of hydrogen fluctuations. From the one-point statistics of the fluctuations, such as variance and skewness, we find that the peaks and dips in the time evolution are deeply related to X-ray heating of the intergalactic gas, which controls the spin temperature. We suggest the skewness of the brightness temperature distribution is a key observable to identify the onset of X-ray heating.

  16. Closed String Thermodynamics and a Blue Tensor Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert H. Brandenberger; Ali Nayeri; Subodh P. Patil

    2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The BICEP-2 team has reported the detection of primordial cosmic microwave background B-mode polarization, with hints of a suppression of power at large angular scales relative to smaller scales. Provided that the B-mode polarization is due to primordial gravitational waves, this might imply a blue tilt of the primordial gravitational wave spectrum. Such a tilt would be incompatible with standard inflationary models, although it was predicted some years ago in the context of a mechanism that thermally generates the primordial perturbations through a Hagedorn phase of string cosmology. The purpose of this note is to encourage greater scrutiny of the data with priors informed by a model that is immediately falsifiable, but which \\textit{predicts} features that might be favoured by the data-- namely a blue tensor tilt with an induced and complimentary red tilt to the scalar spectrum, with a naturally large tensor to scalar ratio that relates to both.

  17. Gravitational waves from a curvaton model with blue spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Kitajima, Naoya; Yokoyama, Shuichiro, E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: nk610@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: shu@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the gravitational wave background induced by the first order scalar perturbations in the curvaton models. We consider the quadratic and axion-like curvaton potential which can generate the blue-tilted power spectrum of curvature perturbations on small scales and derive the maximal amount of gravitational wave background today. We find the power spectrum of the induced gravitational wave background has a characteristic peak at the frequency corresponding to the scale reentering the horizon at the curvaton decay, in the case where the curvaton does not dominate the energy density of the Universe. We also find the enhancement of the amount of the gravitational waves in the case where the curvaton dominates the energy density of the Universe. Such induced gravitational waves would be detectable by the future space-based gravitational wave detectors or pulsar timing observations.

  18. Spectrum of Perturbations in Anisotropic Inflationary Universe with Vector Hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burak Himmetoglu

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We study both the background evolution and cosmological perturbations of anisotropic inflationary models supported by coupled scalar and vector fields. The models we study preserve the U(1) gauge symmetry associated with the vector field, and therefore do not possess instabilities associated with longitudinal modes (which instead plague some recently proposed models of vector inflation and curvaton). We first intoduce a model in which the background anisotropy slowly decreases during inflation; we then confirm the stability of the background solution by studying the quadratic action for all the perturbations of the model. We then compute the spectrum of the $h_{\\times}$ gravitational wave polarization. The spectrum we find breaks statistical isotropy at the largest scales and reduces to the standard nearly scale invariant form at small scales. We finally discuss the possible relevance of our results to the large scale CMB anomalies.

  19. Avoiding the blue spectrum and the fine-tuning of initial conditions in hybrid inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastien Clesse; Jonathan Rocher

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid inflation faces two well-known problems: the blue spectrum of the non-supersymmetric version of the model and the fine-tuning of the initial conditions of the fields leading to sufficient inflation to account for the standard cosmological problems. They are investigated by studying the exact two-fields dynamics instead of assuming slow-roll. When the field values are restricted to be less than the reduced Planck mass, a non-negligible part of the initial condition space (around 15% depending on potential parameters) leads to successful inflation. Most of it is located outside the usual inflationary valley and organized in continuous patterns instead of being isolated as previously found. Their existence is explained and their properties are studied. This shows that no excessive fine-tuning is required for successful hybrid inflation. Moreover, by extending the initial condition space to planckian-like or super-planckian values, inflation becomes generically sufficiently long and can produce a red-tilted scalar power spectrum due to slow-roll violations. The robustness of these properties is confirmed by conducting our analysis on three other models of hybrid-type inflation in various framework: "smooth" and "shifted" inflation in SUSY and SUGRA, and "radion assisted" gauge inflation. A high percentage of successful inflation for smooth hybrid inflation (up to 80%) is observed.

  20. The energy production rate & the generation spectrum of UHECRs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boaz Katz; Ran Budnik; Eli Waxman

    2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive simple analytic expressions for the flux and spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic-rays (UHECRs) predicted in models where the CRs are protons produced by extra-Galactic sources. For a power-law scaling of the CR production rate with redshift and energy, d\\dot{n} /dE\\propto E^-\\alpha (1+z)^m, our results are accurate at high energy, E>10^18.7 eV, to better than 15%, providing a simple and straightforward method for inferring d\\dot{n}/dE from the observed flux at E. We show that current measurements of the UHECR spectrum, including the latest Auger data, imply E^2d\\dot{n}/dE(z=0)=(0.45\\pm0.15)(\\alpha-1) 10^44 erg Mpc^-3 yr^-1 at E<10^19.5 eV with \\alpha roughly confined to 2\\lesseq\\alpha<2.7. The uncertainty is dominated by the systematic and statistic errors in the experimental determination of individual CR event energy, (\\Delta E/E)_{sys} (\\Delta E/E)_{stat} ~20%. At lower energy, d\\dot{n}/dE is uncertain due to the unknown Galactic contribution. Simple models in which \\alpha\\simeq 2 and the transition from Galactic to extra-Galactic sources takes place at the "ankle", E ~10^19 eV, are consistent with the data. Models in which the transition occurs at lower energies require a high degree of fine tuning and a steep spectrum, \\alpha\\simeq 2.7, which is disfavored by the data. We point out that in the absence of accurate composition measurements, the (all particle) energy spectrum alone cannot be used to infer the detailed spectral shapes of the Galactic and extra-Galactic contributions.

  1. Spectrum of Initial Perturbations in Open and Closed Inflationary Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Starobinsky

    1996-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrum of initial scalar and tensor perturbations created during an inflationary stage producing a closed or open FRW universe now is discussed. In the closed case, the CMB temperature anisotropy ${\\Delta T/T}$ generated by scalar perturbations is enhanced for low multipoles. It is argued that in the open case there is no suppression of low multipoles. A possibility of the existence of a preferred space direction in the open case is noted.

  2. The Fractal Dimension of the Spectrum of the Fibonacci Hamiltonian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Damanik; Mark Embree; Anton Gorodetski; Serguei Tcheremchantsev

    2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spectrum of the Fibonacci Hamiltonian and prove upper and lower bounds for its fractal dimension in the large coupling regime. These bounds show that as $\\lambda \\to \\infty$, $\\dim (\\sigma(H_\\lambda)) \\cdot \\log \\lambda$ converges to an explicit constant ($\\approx 0.88137$). We also discuss consequences of these results for the rate of propagation of a wavepacket that evolves according to Schr\\"odinger dynamics generated by the Fibonacci Hamiltonian.

  3. Hydrogen-atom spectrum under a minimal-length hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandor Benczik; Lay Nam Chang; Djordje Minic; Tatsu Takeuchi

    2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectrum of the Coulomb potential with minimal length commutation relations $[X_i, P_j] = i\\hbar\\{\\delta_{ij}(1+\\beta P^2) + \\beta'P_iP_j\\}$ is determined both numerically and perturbatively for arbitrary values of $\\beta'/\\beta$ and angular momenta $\\ell$. The constraint on the minimal length scale from precision hydrogen spectroscopy data is of order of a few GeV$\

  4. FlexibleSUSY -- A spectrum generator generator for supersymmetric models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Athron; Jae-hyeon Park; Dominik Stöckinger; Alexander Voigt

    2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce FlexibleSUSY, a Mathematica and C++ package, which generates a fast, precise C++ spectrum generator for any SUSY model specified by the user. The generated code is designed with both speed and modularity in mind, making it easy to adapt and extend with new features. The model is specified by supplying the superpotential, gauge structure and particle content in a SARAH model file; specific boundary conditions e.g. at the GUT, weak or intermediate scales are defined in a separate FlexibleSUSY model file. From these model files, FlexibleSUSY generates C++ code for self-energies, tadpole corrections, renormalization group equations (RGEs) and electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) conditions and combines them with numerical routines for solving the RGEs and EWSB conditions simultaneously. The resulting spectrum generator is then able to solve for the spectrum of the model, including loop-corrected pole masses, consistent with user specified boundary conditions. The modular structure of the generated code allows for individual components to be replaced with an alternative if available. FlexibleSUSY has been carefully designed to grow as alternative solvers and calculators are added. Predefined models include the MSSM, NMSSM, E$_6$SSM, USSM, R-symmetric models and models with right-handed neutrinos.

  5. Photoabsorption spectrum of helium trimer cation—Theoretical modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalus, René [Centre of Excellence IT4Innovations and Department of Applied Mathematics, VSB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava (Czech Republic)] [Centre of Excellence IT4Innovations and Department of Applied Mathematics, VSB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava (Czech Republic); Karlický, František [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials and Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacký University, T?. 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic)] [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials and Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacký University, T?. 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Lepetit, Bruno [Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats Réactivité, IRSAMC and UMR5589 du CNRS, Université de Toulouse, UPS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)] [Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats Réactivité, IRSAMC and UMR5589 du CNRS, Université de Toulouse, UPS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Paidarová, Ivana [J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry, ASCR, v.v.i., Dolejškova 3, 182 23 Praha (Czech Republic)] [J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry, ASCR, v.v.i., Dolejškova 3, 182 23 Praha (Czech Republic); Gadea, Florent Xavier [Laboratoire de Chimie et de Physique Quantiques, IRSAMC and UMR5626 du CNRS, Université de Toulouse, UPS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)] [Laboratoire de Chimie et de Physique Quantiques, IRSAMC and UMR5626 du CNRS, Université de Toulouse, UPS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The photoabsorption spectrum of He{sub 3}{sup +} is calculated for two semiempirical models of intracluster interactions and compared with available experimental data reported in the middle UV range [H. Haberland and B. von Issendorff, J. Chem. Phys. 102, 8773 (1995)]. Nuclear delocalization effects are investigated via several approaches comprising quantum samplings using either exact or approximate (harmonic) nuclear wavefunctions, as well as classical samplings based on the Monte Carlo methodology. Good agreement with the experiment is achieved for the model by Knowles et al., [Mol. Phys. 85, 243 (1995); Mol. Phys. 87, 827 (1996)] whereas the model by Calvo et al., [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 124308 (2011)] exhibits non-negligible deviations from the experiment. Predictions of far UV absorption spectrum of He{sub 3}{sup +}, for which no experimental data are presently available, are reported for both models and compared to each other as well as to the photoabsorption spectrum of He{sub 2}{sup +}. A simple semiempirical point-charge approximation for calculating transition probabilities is shown to perform well for He{sub 3}{sup +}.

  6. Chemical Spill Response Procedure Initial Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical Spill Response Procedure Initial Response 1. Advise lab occupants of the spill such as quantity spilled and chemical name. Risk Assessment 3. Conduct an initial risk assessment to determine if to the chemical spill. This link can be found at the bottom of the Campus Security homepage, http

  7. OVERVIEW ON BNL ASSESSMENT OF SEISMIC ANALYSIS METHODS FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED NPP STRUCTURES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XU,J.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C.; GRAVES, H.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under the sponsorship of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), to determine the applicability of established soil-structure interaction analysis methods and computer programs to deeply embedded and/or buried (DEB) nuclear power plant (NPP) structures. This paper provides an overview of the BNL study including a description and discussions of analyses performed to assess relative performance of various SSI analysis methods typically applied to NPP structures, as well as the importance of interface modeling for DEB structures. There are four main elements contained in the BNL study: (1) Review and evaluation of existing seismic design practice, (2) Assessment of simplified vs. detailed methods for SSI in-structure response spectrum analysis of DEB structures, (3) Assessment of methods for computing seismic induced earth pressures on DEB structures, and (4) Development of the criteria for benchmark problems which could be used for validating computer programs for computing seismic responses of DEB NPP structures. The BNL study concluded that the equivalent linear SSI methods, including both simplified and detailed approaches, can be extended to DEB structures and produce acceptable SSI response calculations, provided that the SSI response induced by the ground motion is very much within the linear regime or the non-linear effect is not anticipated to control the SSI response parameters. The BNL study also revealed that the response calculation is sensitive to the modeling assumptions made for the soil/structure interface and application of a particular material model for the soil.

  8. Methods for preparing comparative standards and field samples for neutron activation analysis of soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasgow, D.C.; Dyer, F.F.; Robinson, L.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the more difficult problems associated with comparative neutron activation analysis (CNAA) is the preparation of standards which are tailor-made to the desired irradiation and counting conditions. Frequently, there simply is not a suitable standard available commercially, or the resulting gamma spectrum is convoluted with interferences. In a recent soil analysis project, the need arose for standards which contained about 35 elements. In response, a computer spreadsheet was developed to calculate the appropriate amount of each element so that the resulting gamma spectrum is relatively free of interferences. Incorporated in the program are options for calculating all of the irradiation and counting parameters including activity produced, necessary flux/bombardment time, counting time, and appropriate source-to-detector distance. The result is multi-element standards for CNAA which have optimal concentrations. The program retains ease of use without sacrificing capability. In addition to optimized standard production, a novel soil homogenization technique was developed which is a low cost, highly efficient alternative to commercially available homogenization systems. Comparative neutron activation analysis for large scale projects has been made easier through these advancements. This paper contains details of the design and function of the NAA spreadsheet and innovative sample handling techniques.

  9. An indirect transmission measurement-based spectrum estimation method for computed tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Wei; Schafer, Sebastian; Royalty, Kevin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of an x-ray spectrum can greatly influence imaging and related tasks. In practice, due to the pile-up effect of the detector, it's difficult to directly measure the spectrum of a CT scanner using an energy resolved detector. An alternative solution is to estimate the spectrum using transmission measurements with a step phantom or other CT phantom. In this work, we present a new spectrum estimation method based on indirect transmission measurement and model spectra mixture approach. The estimated x-ray spectrum was expressed as weighted summation of a set of model spectra, which can significantly reduce the degrees of freedom (DOF) of the spectrum estimation problem. Next, an estimated projection can be calculated with the assumed spectrum. By iteratively updating the unknown weights, we minimized the difference between the estimated projection data and the raw projection data. The final spectrum was calculated with these calibrated weights and the model spectra. Both simulation and experim...

  10. The Spectrum of the Kinematic Dynamo Operator for an Ideally Conducting Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery-Smith, Stephen

    The Spectrum of the Kinematic Dynamo Operator for an Ideally Conducting Fluid dynamo operator and of the corresponding group it generates for an ideally conducting fluid, 2001 Abstract The spectrum of the kinematic dynamo operator

  11. EMERGENCY RESPONSE FOR HOMELAND SECURITY: LESSONS LEARNED AND THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    EMERGENCY RESPONSE FOR HOMELAND SECURITY: LESSONS LEARNED AND THE NEED FOR ANALYSIS Larson, R;Emergency Response for Homeland Security: Lessons Learned and the Need for Analysis By Richard C. Larson. In this section, we are particularly concerned with `lessons learned' and with recurring decisions that must

  12. Computation of the spectrum of spatial Lyapunov exponents for the spatially extended beam-plasma systems and electron-wave devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander E. Hramov; Alexey A. Koronovskii; Vladimir A. Maximenko; Olga I. Moskalenko

    2013-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectrum of Lyapunov exponents is powerful tool for the analysis of the complex system dynamics. In the general framework of nonlinear dynamical systems a number of the numerical technics have been developed to obtain the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents for the complex temporal behavior of the systems with a few degree of freedom. Unfortunately, these methods can not apply directly to analysis of complex spatio-temporal dynamics in plasma devices which are characterized by the infinite phase space, since they are the spatially extended active media. In the present paper we propose the method for the calculation of the spectrum of the spatial Lyapunov exponents (SLEs) for the spatially extended beam-plasma systems. The calculation technique is applied to the analysis of chaotic spatio-temporal oscillations in three different beam-plasma model: (1) simple plasma Pierce diode, (2) coupled Pierce diodes, and (3) electron-wave system with backward electromagnetic wave. We find an excellent agreement between the system dynamics and the behavior of the spectrum of the spatial Lyapunov exponents. Along with the proposed method, the possible problems of SLEs calculation are also discussed. It is shown that for the wide class of the spatially extended systems the set of quantities included in the system state for SLEs calculation can be reduced using the appropriate feature of the plasma systems.

  13. 364 IEEE JOURNAL ON SELECTED AREAS IN COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 31, NO. 3, MARCH 2013 Censored Truncated Sequential Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leus, Geert

    of the licensed electromag- netic spectrum [1]. Cognitive radios opportunistically share the spectrum while Sequential Spectrum Sensing for Cognitive Radio Networks Sina Maleki and Geert Leus Abstract--Reliable spectrum sensing is a key functionality of a cognitive radio network. Cooperative spectrum sensing improves

  14. CHEMILUMINESCENT CHEMI-IONIZATION: Ar* + Ca AND THE CaAr+ EMISSION SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Dennis C.; Winn, John S.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flowing afterglow chemiluminescence apparatus has been used to analyze visible fluorescence in the Ar* ({sup 3}P{sub 2}{sup o}) + Ca ({sup 1}S{sub 0}) reaction. The rate constants for production of Ca{sup +} ({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}{sup o}) and Ca{sup +} ({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}{sup o}) were measured to be 1.6 x 10{sup -10} cm{sup 3}-molecule{sup -1} sec{sup -1} and 3.2 x 10{sup -11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} sec{sup -1}, respectively. These results demonstrate a transfer of the total electronic angular momentum polarization in Ar* tothe excited ion levels. The molecular band spectrum of the associative ionization product CaAr{sup +} (A{sup 2}{Pi}) was observed. Molecular fluorescence constituted 14% of the total fluorescence from all ion products. This spectrum was analyzed with a model (exp-Z4) potential, yielding, for the ground state, {Chi}{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}, R{sub e} = 2.8 {angstrom}, {omega}''{sub e} = 87 cm{sup -1}, and D''{sub e} = 1000 cm{sup -1}, and, for the A{sup 2}{Pi} state, R{sub e} = 2.6 {angstrom}, {omega}'{sub e} = 200 cm{sup -1}, and D'{sub e} = 4900 cm{sup -1}. The nascent internal state distribution in CaAr{sup +} is found to consist of a fairly narrow range of high vibrational levels. The analysis of spectra from chemiluminescent reaction is a well established technique for elucidating the product state distributions of elementary processes. In this paper, they use the analysis of the chemiluminescent chemi-ionization reactions between metastable argon atoms and calcium atoms to expose the dynamics of associative ionization (AI) and to measure the branching ratios for chemi-ionization into more than one product channel.

  15. CAMECO SPECTRUM 2013 January 2013 College of Engineering University Of Saskatchewan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    CAMECO SPECTRUM 2013 January 2013 College of Engineering University Of Saskatchewan Room 1C03.2, College of Engineering · University of Saskatchewan 57 Campus Drive · Saskatoon, SK · S7N 5A9 spectrum SPECTRUM 2013 January 2013 College of Engineering University Of Saskatchewan Room 1C03.2, College

  16. The infrared spectrum of cyclic-N3: Theoretical prediction Dmitri Babikov1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    The infrared spectrum of cyclic-N3: Theoretical prediction Dmitri Babikov1,a and Brian K. Kendrick2 the first calculations of the infrared absorption spectrum of cyclic-N3. Accurate vibrational energies in the 10­25 mD range. The most intense part of the infrared absorption spectrum is observed in the deep

  17. NF3: UV absorption spectrum temperature dependence and the atmospheric and climate forcing implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackman, Charles H.

    NF3: UV absorption spectrum temperature dependence and the atmospheric and climate forcing absorption spectrum, s(l,T), was measured at 16 wavelengths between 184.95 and 250 nm at temperatures between. Including the UV absorption spectrum temperature dependence increased the stratospheric photolysis lifetime

  18. THE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRUM OF THE BROWN DWARF GLIESE 229B T. R. GEBALLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Gregory C.

    THE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRUM OF THE BROWN DWARF GLIESE 229B T. R. GEBALLE Joint Astronomy Centre, 660 vapor. Water and methane are both shown to be strong absorbers in the near-infrared spectrum. (1995) obtained a low-resolution ( / 2 150) near-infrared (1­2.5 m) spectrum of Gl 229B and found

  19. Spectrum-Sensing Opportunistic Wireless Relay Networks: Outage and Diversity Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    Lee Aylin Yener Wireless Communications and Networking Laboratory Electrical Engineering Department cooperatively sense the spectrum and help the designated cognitive relay node. I. INTRODUCTION The demand. Currently, the radio spectrum is regulated and the licensed spectrum bands are not "shared". On the other

  20. Optimal Spectrum Sharing for Multi-hop Software Defined Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Y. Thomas

    Optimal Spectrum Sharing for Multi-hop Software Defined Radio Networks Y. Thomas Hou Yi Shi Hanif D. The uneven size of bands in the radio spectrum prompts the need of further division into sub the required network-wide radio spectrum resource for a set of user sessions. Since such problem formulation

  1. Computer Networks 00 (2012) 120 Spectrum Access Policy Reasoning for Policy-Based Cognitive Radios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    }@vt.edu Abstract Cognitive radio (CR) is one of the key enabling technologies for opportunistic spectrum sharing. In such a spec- trum sharing paradigm, radios access spectrum opportunistically by identifying the under. Keywords: Spectrum access policy, cognitive radio, policy reasoner, binary decision diagram, policy algebra

  2. Competitive Sharing of the Spectrum in Cognitive Radio Network: A Market Equilibrium Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Competitive Sharing of the Spectrum in Cognitive Radio Network: A Market Equilibrium Framework of pricing the spectrum usage in a cognitive radio network. In such a network, where licensed/primary users radio spectrum allocation scheme requires that the telecommunication industry's regulator (for example

  3. Opportunistic Spectrum Scheduling for Mobile Cognitive Radio Networks in White Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Opportunistic Spectrum Scheduling for Mobile Cognitive Radio Networks in White Space Li Zhang, Kai of secondary users, carefully scheduling the spectrum allocation in cognitive radio networks operating on white in an opportunistic manner, this paper studies how to schedule the spectrum assignment for mobile cognitive radio

  4. SUBJECT: Effective Date: Policy Number: Radio Frequency Spectrum 12-15-10 4-011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glebov, Leon

    SUBJECT: Effective Date: Policy Number: Radio Frequency Spectrum 12-15-10 4-011 Supersedes: Page. POLICY STATEMENT: Radio frequency spectrum is a critical resource that must be managed to eliminate be approved by UCF Computer Services & Telecommunications to provide spectrum coordination and avoid radio

  5. TRIESTE: A Trusted Radio Infrastructure for Enforcing SpecTrum Etiquettes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Wenyuan

    1 TRIESTE: A Trusted Radio Infrastructure for Enforcing SpecTrum Etiquettes Wenyuan Xu Pandurang presents a framework, known as TRIESTE (Trusted Radio Infrastructure for Enforcing SpecTrum Etiquettes), which can ensure that radio devices are only able to access/use the spectrum in a manner that conforms

  6. ROSA: Distributed Joint Routing and Dynamic Spectrum Allocation in Cognitive Radio Ad Hoc Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melodia, Tommaso

    ROSA: Distributed Joint Routing and Dynamic Spectrum Allocation in Cognitive Radio Ad Hoc Networks opportunistic spectrum access and dynamic routing algorithm for cognitive radio networks is proposed, called Keywords Cognitive Radio Networks, routing, dynamic spectrum allocation, cross-layer design 1. INTRODUCTION

  7. Cooperative Spectrum Sensing and Localiza-tion in Cognitive Radio Systems using Com-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    Cooperative Spectrum Sensing and Localiza- tion in Cognitive Radio Systems using Com- pressed features in cog- nitive radio systems (CRS): spectrum sensing and location awareness in a single compressed implementing a cognitive radio system. The major problem for spectrum sensing arises in wideband radio, when

  8. Quickest Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Husheng Li, Chengzhi Li and Huaiyu Dai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Huaiyu

    1 Quickest Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Husheng Li, Chengzhi Li and Huaiyu Dai Abstract spectrum sensing in secondary radio systems without data fusion centers. Performance is evaluated using to detect the primary radio signal. The fundamental limits of spectrum sensing are discussed in [15] while

  9. Imitation-based Spectrum Access Policy for CSMA/CA-based Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupechoux, Marceau

    1 Imitation-based Spectrum Access Policy for CSMA/CA-based Cognitive Radio Networks Stefano Iellamo spectrum access protocols in cognitive radio networks. Second, evolutionary game theory provides is particularly suited in decentralized environments as cognitive radio networks. We formulate the spectrum access

  10. A Graphical Framework for Spectrum Modeling and Decision Making in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    1 A Graphical Framework for Spectrum Modeling and Decision Making in Cognitive Radio Networks occupancies in cognitive radio networks. It is known that there exist correlations of spectrum occupancies for the inference and decision problems related to spectrum ac- tivities in cognitive radio networks. Bayesian

  11. An Auction Framework for Spectrum Allocation with Interference Constraint in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupechoux, Marceau

    1 An Auction Framework for Spectrum Allocation with Interference Constraint in Cognitive Radio for cognitive radio networks to allow unlicensed secondary users (SUs) to share the available spectrum problem of designing efficient spectrum allocation mechanism for cogni- tive radio networks. We consider

  12. Nine Regimes of Radio Spectrum Management: A 4-Step Decision Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Nine Regimes of Radio Spectrum Management: A 4-Step Decision Guide Gérard POGOREL Ecole Nationale N°65 April 2007 Summary Diverse radio spectrum management regimes are defined according to 4 levels in the next decade. The generally accepted view is that this will provoke an increased need for radio spectrum

  13. Cooperative Robust Sequential Detection Algorithms for Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Vinod

    Cooperative Robust Sequential Detection Algorithms for Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Arun consider the problem of Spectrum Sensing in Cogni- tive Radio Networks. In our previous work we have algorithm. We also analyze these algorithms theoretically. Keywords-Cognitive Radio, Cooperative Spectrum

  14. Reward and Risk for Opportunistic Spectrum Accessing in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latchman, Haniph A.

    Reward and Risk for Opportunistic Spectrum Accessing in Cognitive Radio Networks Miao Pan, Yang--Cognitive Radio technology releases the spectrum from shackles of authorized licenses and facilitates the trading spectrum utilization, cognitive radio technology allows the secondary users (SUs) to opportunistically

  15. Spectrum Management of Cognitive Radio Using Multi-agent Reinforcement Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meleis, Waleed

    Spectrum Management of Cognitive Radio Using Multi-agent Reinforcement Learning Cheng Wu spectrum management can signif- icantly reduce the interference to the licensed users, while maintaining: Spectrum Management of Cognitive Radio Using Multi-agent Reinforcement Learning, C. Wu, K. Chowdhury, M. D

  16. Auction Mechanism for Spectrum Allocation and Profit Sharing Sung Hyun Chun and Richard J. La

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La, Richard J.

    is an operator that provides mobile communication services without its own licensed spectrum and necessary flexible use of spectrum is based on Cognitive Radio (CR) [14], which is being con- sidered as a candidate for the spectrum. There are several proposed solutions to ensuring that CR users do not interfere with licensed

  17. Optimal Myopic Sensing and Dynamic Spectrum Access in Cognitive Radio Networks with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaweera, Sudharman K.

    1 Optimal Myopic Sensing and Dynamic Spectrum Access in Cognitive Radio Networks with Low primary channels that are licensed to primary users. We consider a group of SU's with limited spectrum. Index Terms--Cognitive radios, dynamic spectrum access (DSA), Markov chains, partially observable Markov

  18. A Distributed Framework with a Novel Pricing Model for Enabling Dynamic Spectrum Access for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikomeroglu, Halim

    years. Wireless Service Providers (WSPs) have been investing heavily in the licensed spectrum to satisfy this ever increasing demand, thus making the scarce radio spectrum a very expensive resource. Underutilization of the radio spectrum in both spatial and temporal domains, indi- cating the inefficient usage

  19. Distributed Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks with Fairness Consideration: Efficiency of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuen, Chau

    Distributed Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks with Fairness Consideration: Efficiency the spectrum of the licensed users. The licensed users are called primary users and the users of the cognitive radio network are called secondary users. Spectrum sensing is a crucial function for cognitive radio

  20. Spectrum auction with interference constraint for cognitive radio networks with multiple primary and secondary users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupechoux, Marceau

    Spectrum auction with interference constraint for cognitive radio networks with multiple primary shown the benefits of cognitive radio technologies to improve the flexibility and efficiency of spectrum (SUs) to share the available spectrum of licensed primary users (PUs) fairly and efficiently, subject