National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for response spectrum analysis

  1. Numerical study of the mode selection in response spectrum analysis-condensed version

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, D.S.

    1986-09-01

    For quality assurance of the dynamic response spectrum analysis, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) recommends retaining all modes below the cutoff frequency at which the spectral acceleration (S/sub a/) returns to the peak zero period acceleration (ZPA). It also suggests that modes accounting for at least 90 percent of the structural masses be included in the analysis. A simple frame-type structure is generated as a baseline frame. Then groups of oscillators representing substructure are added onto the frame to study substructure behavior. A base case is established for each frame by including the specific number of modes used. The tests are conducted by incrementing the number of modes in the response spectrum analyses starting with one mode. The structural response of each modal increment is compared with the base case to identify the efficiency of mode selection method. All three methods are then applied to the MFTF-B Axicell Vacuum Vessel. The responses in critical components of the vessel, such as hangers and foundations, will be analyzed to confirm the accuracy of the selected method.

  2. Method of estimating pulse response using an impedance spectrum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrison, John L; Morrison, William H; Christophersen, Jon P; Motloch, Chester G

    2014-10-21

    Electrochemical Impedance Spectrum data are used to predict pulse performance of an energy storage device. The impedance spectrum may be obtained in-situ. A simulation waveform includes a pulse wave with a period greater than or equal to the lowest frequency used in the impedance measurement. Fourier series coefficients of the pulse train can be obtained. The number of harmonic constituents in the Fourier series are selected so as to appropriately resolve the response, but the maximum frequency should be less than or equal to the highest frequency used in the impedance measurement. Using a current pulse as an example, the Fourier coefficients of the pulse are multiplied by the impedance spectrum at corresponding frequencies to obtain Fourier coefficients of the voltage response to the desired pulse. The Fourier coefficients of the response are then summed and reassembled to obtain the overall time domain estimate of the voltage using the Fourier series analysis.

  3. Power Spectrum Analysis of Bursting Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bair, Wyeth

    108 Chapter 7 Power Spectrum Analysis of Bursting Cells This chapter contains the text from Bair et) About 33% of the cells have a relatively flat power spectrum with a dip at low temporal frequencies. We. For 93% of cells, the shape of the power spectrum did not change dramatically with stimulus conditions

  4. Frequency Response Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Kosterev, Dmitry; Dai, T.

    2014-12-31

    Frequency response has received a lot of attention in recent years at the national level, which culminated in the development and approval of North American Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) BAL-003-1 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard. This report is prepared to describe the details of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Joint Synchronized Information Subcommittee (JSIS) to develop a frequency response analysis tool (FRAT). The document provides the details on the methodology and main features of the FRAT. The tool manages the database of under-frequency events and calculates the frequency response baseline. Frequency response calculations are consistent with frequency response measure (FRM) in NERC BAL-003-1 for an interconnection and balancing authority. The FRAT can use both phasor measurement unit (PMU) data, where available, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data. The tool is also capable of automatically generating NERC Frequency Response Survey (FRS) forms required by BAL-003-1 Standard.

  5. Decision Analysis of Dynamic Spectrum Access Rules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juan D. Deaton; Luiz A. DaSilva; Christian Wernz

    2011-12-01

    A current trend in spectrum regulation is to incorporate spectrum sharing through the design of spectrum access rules that support Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA). This paper develops a decision-theoretic framework for regulators to assess the impacts of different decision rules on both primary and secondary operators. We analyze access rules based on sensing and exclusion areas, which in practice can be enforced through geolocation databases. Our results show that receiver-only sensing provides insufficient protection for primary and co-existing secondary users and overall low social welfare. On the other hand, using sensing information between the transmitter and receiver of a communication link, provides dramatic increases in system performance. The performance of using these link end points is relatively close to that of using many cooperative sensing nodes associated to the same access point and large link exclusion areas. These results are useful to regulators and network developers in understanding in developing rules for future DSA regulation.

  6. Performance Analysis of Dispersed Spectrum Cognitive Radio Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad, Muneer

    2011-02-22

    Dispersed spectrum cognitive radio systems represent a promising approach to exploit the utilization of spectral resources to full extent. Therefore, the performance analysis of such systems is conducted in this research. The Average symbol error...

  7. Rational design spectra for structural reliability assessment using the response spectrum method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Jack W.

    Rational design spectra for structural reliability assessment using the response spectrum method" associated with a structural reliability assessment is a rational choice for a design spectrum. When structural response from any of the spectra for design checks. This observation is used to justify the CMS

  8. A new approach to automatic radiation spectrum analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olmos, P.; Diaz, J.C.; Perez, J.M.; Aguayo, P.; Bru, A.; Garcia-Belmonte, G.; de Pablos, J.L. ); Gomez, P.; Rodellar, V. )

    1991-08-01

    In this paper the application of adaptive methods to the solution of the automatic radioisotope identification problem using the energy spectrum is described. The identification is carried out by means of neural networks, which allow the use of relatively reduced computational structures, while keeping high pattern recognition capability. In this context, it has been found that one of these simple structures, once adequately trained, is quite suitable to identify a given isotope present in a mixture of elements as well as the relative proportions of each identified substance. Preliminary results are good enough to consider these adaptive structures as powerful and simple tools in the automatic spectrum analysis.

  9. Ship response using a compact wave spectrum model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linn, Larry Donald

    1985-01-01

    SHIP RESPONSE USIM6 A COMPACT HAVE SPECTRUH HODEL A Thesis by LARRY DONALD LINN Submitted to the 6raduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject...: Ocean Engineering SHIP RESPONSE USIN6 A COMPACT 'NAVE SPECTRUN MODEL A Thesis by LARRY DONALD LINN Approved as to style and content by: John M. Niedzwec i (Chairman of Committee) Lee L. Lowery (Member) John M. Klinck (Member) Donald Mc...

  10. NMF Matrix Generation Using Probabilistic Spectrum Envelope for Mixed Music Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takiguchi, Tetsuya

    NMF 1 2 2 NMF NMF NMF NMF NMF Matrix Generation Using Probabilistic Spectrum Envelope for Mixed for the analysis, it is hard to build the practical system of the method. The latter approach should cause. At the beginning, a common spectram envelope to an instrument, called a probabilistic spectrum envelope (PSE

  11. Analysis of X chromosome inactivation in autism spectrum disorders Xiaohong Gong1 +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Analysis of X chromosome inactivation in autism spectrum disorders Xiaohong Gong1 + , Elena. + Xiaohong Gong and Elena Bacchelli contributed equally to this work § Dr. Moreno-De-Luca was supported Genetics 2008;(Epub ahe #12;Gong et al. 2 Abstract Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are complex genetic

  12. A study of wind variability in the lower troposphere through power spectrum analysis at mesoscale frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornett, John Sheldon

    1966-01-01

    A STUDY OF WIND VARIABILITY IN THE LOWER TROPOSPHERE THROUGH POWER SPECTRUM ANALYSIS AT MESOSCALE FREQUENCIES A Thesis By JOHN SHELDON CORNETT Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in Partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1966 Major Subject: Meteorology A STUDY OP WIND VARIABILITY IN THE LOWER TROPOSPHERE THROUGH POWER SPECTRUM ANALYSIS AT MESOSCALE FREQUENCIES A Thesis By JOHN SHELDON CORNETT Approved as to style...

  13. Analysis of Pebble-Bed VHTR Spectrum Shifting Capabilities for Advanced Fuel Cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Megan

    2006-07-11

    iii ABSTRACT Analysis of the Pebble-Bed VHTR Spectrum Shifting Capabilities For Advanced Fuel Cycles. (April 2006) Megan L. Pritchard Department of Nuclear Engineering Texas A&M University Research Advisor: Dr. Pavel V. Tsvetkov Department... configuration are their capabilities for spectrum shifting, inherent safety features, autonomous operation, incredibly high burn-up, and higher efficiency. If successful in utilizing minor actinides from spent LWR fuel, there will be a reduced...

  14. Spectral mixture analysis of EELS spectrum-images Nicolas Dobigeon a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    2012 Available online 1 June 2012 Keywords: Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) Spectrum imaging Multivariate statistical analysis Spectral mixture analysis a b s t r a c t Recent advances in detectors energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). SU generally over- comes standard limitations inherent to other

  15. -delayed ?-proton Decay in 56Zn: Analysis of the Charged-particle Spectrum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Orrigo, S.E.A.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Blank, B.; Gelletly, W.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Bilgier, B.; Cceres, L.; et al

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ? decay of the proton-rich Tz = -2 nucleus 56Zn has been reported in a recent publication. A rare and exotic decay mode, ?-de-layed ?-proton decay, has been observed there for the first time in the fp shell. Here, we expand on some of the details of the data analysis, focussing on the charged particle spectrum.

  16. -delayed ?-proton decay in ??Zn: Analysis of the charged-particle spectrum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Orrigo, S. E.A.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Blank, B.; Gelletly, W.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Bilgier, B.; Cceres, L.; et al

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ? decay of the proton-rich Tz = 2 nucleus ??Zn has been reported in a recent publication. A rare and exotic decay mode, ?-de-layed ?-proton decay, has been observed there for the first time in the fp shell. Here, we expand on some of the details of the data analysis, focusing on the charged particle spectrum.

  17. Group Theoretical Analysis of the Vibrational and Electronic Spectrum of Benzene Frank Rioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    Group Theoretical Analysis of the Vibrational and Electronic Spectrum of Benzene Frank Rioux CSB|SJU This tutorial deals with the interpretation of the vibrational and electronic spectra of benzene using group benzene's electrons. The symmetry of the relevant -electron molecular orbitals is determined by examining

  18. Parametric Study of PV Arc-Fault Generation Methods and Analysis of Conducted DC Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parametric Study of PV Arc-Fault Generation Methods and Analysis of Conducted DC Spectrum Jay photovoltaic (PV) direct current (DC) arc- fault detectors use the frequency content of the PV system to detect by different PV arcs in the field. In this investigation, we (a) discuss the differences in establishing

  19. Evidences of high energy protons with energies beyond 0.4 GeV in the solar particle spectrum as responsible for the cosmic rays solar diurnal anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. Navia; C. R. A. Augusto; M. B. Robba; K. H. Tsui

    2007-06-26

    Analysis on the daily variations of cosmic ray muons with $E_{\\mu}\\geq 0.2 GeV$ based on the data of two directional muon telescopes at sea level and with a rigidity of response to cosmic proton spectrum above 0.4 GV is presented. The analysis covers two months of observations and in 60% of days, abrupt transitions between a low to a high muon intensity and vice-verse is observed, the period of high muon intensity is from $\\sim 8.0h$ up to $\\sim 19.0h$ (local time) and coincides with the period when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines overtake the Earth. This behavior strongly suggest that the high muon intensity is due to a contribution of solar protons (ions) on the muon intensity produced by the galactic cosmic rays, responsible for the low muon intensity. This implies that the solar particle spectrum extends to energies beyond 1 GeV. We show that this picture can explain the solar daily variation origin, and it is a most accurate scenario than the assumption of corotating galactic cosmic ray with the IMF lines, specially in the high rigidity region. Obtained results are consistent with the data reported in others papers. Some aspects on the sensitivity of our muon telescopes are also presented.

  20. Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-6560E Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California and Guidelines The work described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research. #12; #12;Abstract This report reviews the Open Automated Demand Response

  1. -delayed ?-proton decay in ??Zn: Analysis of the charged-particle spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orrigo, S. E.A.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Blank, B.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Cceres, L.; Cakirli, R. B.; Fujita, H.; Ganio?lu, E.; Gerbaux, M.; Kozer, H. C.; Kucuk, L.; Kurtukian-Nieto, T.; Popescu, L.; Rogers, A. M.; Susoy, G.; Stodel, C.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Thomas, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ? decay of the proton-rich Tz = 2 nucleus ??Zn has been reported in a recent publication. A rare and exotic decay mode, ?-de-layed ?-proton decay, has been observed there for the first time in the fp shell. Here, we expand on some of the details of the data analysis, focusing on the charged particle spectrum.

  2. Alpha-amylase, cortisol, and pupillary responses to social and non-social dynamic scenes in young children with autism spectrum disorder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Christa J.

    2010-04-27

    The symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) may manifest from deficits in attention/arousal; previous studies found altered autonomic and attentional responses in ASD. We found a larger tonic pupil size (Anderson & Colombo, 2009) and altered...

  3. AMI Communication Requirements to Implement Demand-Response: Applicability of Hybrid Spread Spectrum Wireless

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Mark D.; Clements, Samuel L.; Carroll, Thomas E.

    2011-09-30

    While holistically defining the smart grid is a challenge, one area of interest is demand-response. In 2009, the Department of Energy announced over $4 billion in grant and project funding for the Smart Grid. A significant amount of this funding was allotted to utilities for cost sharing projects to deploy Smart Grid technologies, many of whom have deployed and are deploying advanced metering infrastructure (AMI). AMI is an enabler to increase the efficiency of utilities and the bulk power grid. The bulk electrical system is unique in that it produces electricity as it is consumed. Most other industries have a delay between generation and consumption. This aspect of the power grid means that there must be enough generation capacity to meet the highest demand whereas other industries could over produce during off-peak times. This requires significant investment in generation capacity to cover the few days a year of peak consumption. Since bulk electrical storage doesn't yet exist at scale another way to curb the need for new peak period generation is through demand-response; that is to incentivize consumers (demand) to curtail (respond) electrical usage during peak periods. Of the various methods proposed for enabling demand-response, this paper will focus on the communication requirements for creating an energy market using transactional controls. More specifically, the paper will focus on the communication requirements needed to send the peak period notices and receive the response back from the consumers.

  4. Time Variations of the Superkamiokande Solar Neutrino Flux Data by Rayleigh Power Spectrum Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koushik Ghosh; Probhas Raychaudhuri

    2006-06-05

    We have used the Rayleigh Power Spectrum Analysis of the solar neutrino flux data from 1) 5-day-long samples from Super-Kamiokande-I detector during the period from June, 1996 to July, 2001; 2) 10 -day-long samples from the same detector during the same period and (3) 45-day long from the same detector during the same period. According to our analysis (1) gives periodicities around 0.25, 23.33, 33.75 and 42.75 months; (2) exhibits periodicities around 0.5, 1.0, 28.17, 40.67 and 52.5 months and (3) shows periodicities around 16.5 and 28.5 months. We have found almost similar periods in the solar flares, sunspot data, solar proton data.

  5. Transient Safety Analysis of Fast Spectrum TRU Burning LWRs with Internal Blankets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downar, Thomas; Zazimi, Mujid; Hill, Bob

    2015-01-31

    The objective of this proposal was to perform a detailed transient safety analysis of the Resource-Renewable BWR (RBWR) core designs using the U.S. NRC TRACE/PARCS code system. This project involved the same joint team that has performed the RBWR design evaluation for EPRI and therefore be able to leverage that previous work. And because of their extensive experience with fast spectrum reactors and parfait core designs, ANL was also part the project team. The principal outcome of this project was the development of a state-of-the-art transient analysis capability for GEN-IV reactors based on Monte Carlo generated cross sections and the US NRC coupled code system TRACE/PARCS, and a state-of-the-art coupled code assessment of the transient safety performance of the RBWR.

  6. 2008-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5680E 2008-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response Opportunities in California. #12; 1.1. Role of the Demand Response Research Center #12;Figure 2: Discovery Process Treatment Facility Controls #12;2.1.2. Automated Demand Response Strategies #12;2.1.3. San Luis Rey

  7. Grid Search in Stellar Parameters: a software for spectrum analysis of single stars and binary systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tkachenko, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The currently operating space missions, as well as those that will be launched in the near future, (will) deliver high-quality data for millions of stellar objects. Since the majority of stellar astrophysical applications still (at least partly) rely on spectroscopic data, an efficient tool for the analysis of medium- to high-resolution spectroscopy is needed. We aim at developing an efficient software package for the analysis of medium- to high-resolution spectroscopy of single stars and those in binary systems. The major requirements are that the code has a high performance, represents the state-of-the-art analysis tool, and provides accurate determinations of atmospheric parameters and chemical compositions for different types of stars. We use the method of atmosphere models and spectrum synthesis, which is one of the most commonly used approaches for the analysis of stellar spectra. Our Grid Search in Stellar Parameters (GSSP) code makes use of the OpenMPI implementation, which makes it possible to run in...

  8. A NLTE analysis of the hot subdwarf O star BD+28 4211. II. The optical spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latour, M; Green, E M; Brassard, P

    2015-01-01

    We present the second part of our detailed analysis of the hot sdO and spectroscopic standard star BD+28 4211, in which we focus on the optical spectrum. In the first part of our study, we determined the abundances of some 11 metals detected in the atmosphere of BD+28 4211 using UV spectra of the star and corroborated the fundamental parameters estimated in past studies (Teff $\\sim$ 82,000 K, log g $\\sim$ 6.2, and solar N(He)/N(H)). In this work, we aim at rederiving these secured parameters on the sole basis of high-quality optical spectra. A first grid of non-LTE line-blanketed model atmospheres, including metals with the abundances derived from the UV spectrum, does not give satisfactory results when we apply a standard simultaneous fitting procedure to the observed H and He lines of our optical spectra. The line profiles are not finely reproduced and the resulting effective temperatures, in particular, are too low by $\\sim$10,000 K. We next investigate the probable cause of this failure, that is, the impo...

  9. Singular Spectrum Analysis for astronomical time series: constructing a parsimonious hypothesis test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, G; Kobayashi, S; Ghil, M; Branchesi, M; Guidorzi, C; Stratta, G; Ciszak, M; Marino, F; Ortolan, A

    2015-01-01

    We present a data-adaptive spectral method - Monte Carlo Singular Spectrum Analysis (MC-SSA) - and its modification to tackle astrophysical problems. Through numerical simulations we show the ability of the MC-SSA in dealing with $1/f^{\\beta}$ power-law noise affected by photon counting statistics. Such noise process is simulated by a first-order autoregressive, AR(1) process corrupted by intrinsic Poisson noise. In doing so, we statistically estimate a basic stochastic variation of the source and the corresponding fluctuations due to the quantum nature of light. In addition, MC-SSA test retains its effectiveness even when a significant percentage of the signal falls below a certain level of detection, e.g., caused by the instrument sensitivity. The parsimonious approach presented here may be broadly applied, from the search for extrasolar planets to the extraction of low-intensity coherent phenomena probably hidden in high energy transients.

  10. Using Synchrophasors for Frequency Response Analysis in the Western Interconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosterev, Dmitry; Davies, Donald; Etingov, Pavel V.; Silverstein, Alison; Eto, Joseph H.

    2014-10-19

    Frequency response has received a lot of attention in recent years at the national level, which culminated in the development and approval of NERC BAL-003-1 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard. WECC JSIS, NASPI, BPA, CERTS and PNNL collaborate on the common goals to deliver to the industry applications for frequency response analysis at interconnection, Balancing Authority and individual power plant levels. This paper describes a Frequency Response Analysis Tool that has been used for establishing a frequency response baseline for the Western Interconnection. This paper describes how synchrophasor data is used in for determination of generator characteristics frequency responsive, under load control or baseloaded. This paper also discusses and provides an example of how the frequency response distribution can impact power pick-up on major transmission paths.

  11. Fluorescence spectrum analysis using Fourier series modeling for Fluorescein solution in Ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadi, Mahasin F

    2011-01-01

    We have measured the fluorescence spectrum for fluorescein solution in ethanol with concentration 1 {\\times} 10-3 mol/liter at different temperatures from room temperature to freezing point of solvent, (T = 153, 183, 223, 253, and 303 K) using liquid nitrogen. Table curve 2D version 5.01 program has been used to determine the fitting curve and fitting equation for each fluorescence spectrum. Fourier series (3 {\\times} 2) was the most suitable fitting equation for all spectra. Theoretical fluorescence spectrum of fluorescein in ethanol at T = 183K was calculated and compared with experimental fluorescence spectrum at the same temperature. There is a good similarity between them.

  12. Power spectrum analysis of ionospheric fluctuations with the Murchison Widefield Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Murphy, Tara; Cairns, Iver H; Bell, Martin; Hurley-Walker, Natasha; Morgan, John; Lenc, Emil; Offringa, A R; Feng, L; Hancock, P J; Kaplan, D L; Kudryavtseva, N; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Corey, B E; Deshpande, A A; Emrich, D; Gaensler, B M; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kasper, J C; Kratzenberg, E; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Ord, S M; Prabu, T; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Tingay, S J; Waterson, M; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L

    2015-01-01

    Low-frequency, wide field-of-view (FoV) radio telescopes such as the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) enable the ionosphere to be sampled at high spatial completeness. We present the results of the first power spectrum analysis of ionospheric fluctuations in MWA data, where we examined the position offsets of radio sources appearing in two datasets. The refractive shifts in the positions of celestial sources are proportional to spatial gradients in the electron column density transverse to the line of sight. These can be used to probe plasma structures and waves in the ionosphere. The regional (10-100 km) scales probed by the MWA, determined by the size of its FoV and the spatial density of radio sources (typically thousands in a single FoV), complement the global (100-1000 km) scales of GPS studies and local (0.01-1 km) scales of radar scattering measurements. Our data exhibit a range of complex structures and waves. Some fluctuations have the characteristics of travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs), whi...

  13. A comprehensive meta-analysis of common genetic variants in Autism Spectrum Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warrier, Varun; Chee, Vivienne; Smith, Paula; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-08-20

    Background: Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC) are a group of neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by difficulties in social interaction and communication alongside repetitive and stereotyped behaviours. ASC are heritable, and common genetic...

  14. A multifrequency angular power spectrum analysis of the Leiden polarization surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura La Porta; Carlo Burigana

    2006-06-29

    The Galactic synchrotron emission is expected to be the most relevant source of astrophysical contamination in cosmic microwave background polarization measurements, at least at frequencies 30'. We present a multifrequency analysis of the Leiden surveys, linear polarization surveys covering essentially the Northern Celestial Hemisphere at five frequencies between 408 MHz and 1411 MHz. By implementing specific interpolation methods to deal with these irregularly sampled data, we produced maps of the polarized diffuse Galactic radio emission with pixel size of 0.92 deg. We derived the angular power spectrum (APS) (PI, E, and B modes) of the synchrotron dominated radio emission as function of the multipole, l. We considered the whole covered region and some patches at different Galactic latitudes. By fitting the APS in terms of power laws (C_l = k l^a), we found spectral indices that steepen with increasing frequency: from a = -(1-1.5) at 408 MHz to a = -(2-3) at 1411 MHz for 10 < l < 100 and from a = -0.7 to a = -1.5 for lower multipoles (the exact values depending on the considered sky region and polarization mode). The bulk of this steepening can be interpreted in terms of Faraday depolarization effects. We then considered the APS at various fixed multipoles and its frequency dependence. Using the APSs of the Leiden surveys at 820 MHz and 1411 MHz, we determined possible ranges for the rotation measure, RM, in the simple case of an interstellar medium slab model. Taking also into account the polarization degree at 1.4 GHz, we could break the degeneracy between the identified RM intervals. The most reasonable of them turned out to be RM = 9-17 rad/m^2.

  15. Power-spectrum analysis of Super-Kamiokande solar neutrino data, taking into account asymmetry in the error estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Sturrock; J. D. Scargle

    2006-06-20

    The purpose of this article is to carry out a power-spectrum analysis (based on likelihood methods) of the Super-Kamiokande 5-day dataset that takes account of the asymmetry in the error estimates. Whereas the likelihood analysis involves a linear optimization procedure for symmetrical error estimates, it involves a nonlinear optimization procedure for asymmetrical error estimates. We find that for most frequencies there is little difference between the power spectra derived from analyses of symmetrized error estimates and from asymmetrical error estimates. However, this proves not to be the case for the principal peak in the power spectra, which is found at 9.43 yr-1. A likelihood analysis which allows for a "floating offset" and takes account of the start time and end time of each bin and of the flux estimate and the symmetrized error estimate leads to a power of 11.24 for this peak. A Monte Carlo analysis shows that there is a chance of only 1% of finding a peak this big or bigger in the frequency band 1 - 36 yr-1 (the widest band that avoids artificial peaks). On the other hand, an analysis that takes account of the error asymmetry leads to a peak with power 13.24 at that frequency. A Monte Carlo analysis shows that there is a chance of only 0.1% of finding a peak this big or bigger in that frequency band 1 - 36 yr-1. From this perspective, power spectrum analysis that takes account of asymmetry of the error estimates gives evidence for variability that is significant at the 99.9% level. We comment briefly on an apparent discrepancy between power spectrum analyses of the Super-Kamiokande and SNO solar neutrino experiments.

  16. Thermal Response to DVFS: Analysis with an Intel Pentium M

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keckler, Stephen W.

    Thermal Response to DVFS: Analysis with an Intel Pentium M Heather Hanson Dept. of Electrical in dynamic thermal man- agement. Based on the success of dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) in managing power and energy, DVFS may be a viable option for thermal management, as well. However, publicly

  17. The Journal of Neuroscience, May 1994, 14(5): 2870-2892 Power Spectrum Analysis of Bursting Cells in Area MT in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Christof

    The Journal of Neuroscience, May 1994, 14(5): 2870-2892 Power Spectrum Analysis of Bursting CellsSI distribution and the power spectrum of the vast majority of bursting cells are compatible with the notion, 1992) as well as via bursting cells (Cattaneo et al., 1981 a; Bonds, 1992). We investigate the temporal

  18. The Journal of Neuroscience, May 1994, 74(5): 2870-2892 Power Spectrum Analysis of Bursting Cells in Area MT in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newsome, William

    The Journal of Neuroscience, May 1994, 74(5): 2870-2892 Power Spectrum Analysis of Bursting Cells distribution and the power spectrum of the vast majority of bursting cells are compatible with the notion, 1992) as well as via bursting cells (Cattaneo et al., 1981 a; Bonds, 1992). We investigate the temporal

  19. Responsibility Modelling for Risk Analysis Russell Lock, Tim Storer & Ian Sommerville

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommerville, Ian

    Responsibility Modelling for Risk Analysis Russell Lock, Tim Storer & Ian Sommerville School INTRODUCTION Existing risk analysis techniques commonly focus on the interaction of technical aspects election process. We believe Responsibilities are a natural form of expression for risk analysis within

  20. Analysis of offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZs) for the Rocky Flats Plant. Phase 3, Sitewide spectrum-of-accidents and bounding EPZ analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrocchi, A.J.; Zimmerman, G.A.

    1994-03-14

    During Phase 3 of the EPZ project, a sitewide analysis will be performed applying a spectrum-of-accidents approach to both radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials release scenarios. This analysis will include the MCA but will be wider in scope and will produce options for the State of Colorado for establishing a bounding EPZ that is intended to more comprehensively update the interim, preliminary EPZ developed in Phase 2. EG&G will propose use of a hazards assessment methodology that is consistent with the DOE Emergency Management Guide for Hazards Assessments and other methods required by DOE orders. This will include hazards, accident, safety, and risk analyses. Using this methodology, EG&G will develop technical analyses for a spectrum of accidents. The analyses will show the potential effects from the spectrum of accidents on the offsite population together with identification of offsite vulnerable zones and areas of concern. These analyses will incorporate state-of-the-art technology for accident analysis, atmospheric plume dispersion modeling, consequence analysis, and the application of these evaluations to the general public population at risk. The analyses will treat both radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials and mixtures of both released accidentally to the atmosphere. DOE/RFO will submit these results to the State of Colorado for the State`s use in determining offsite emergency planning zones for the Rocky Flats Plant. In addition, the results will be used for internal Rocky Flats Plant emergency planning.

  1. Review of Methods of Power-Spectrum Analysis as Applied to Super-Kamiokande Solar Neutrino Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Sturrock

    2004-08-02

    To help understand why different published analyses of the Super-Kamiokande solar neutrino data arrive at different conclusions, we have applied six different methods to a standardized problem. The key difference between the various methods rests in the amount of information that each processes. A Lomb-Scargle analysis that uses the mid times of the time bins and ignores experimental error estimates uses the least information. A likelihood analysis that uses the start times, end times, and mean live times, and takes account of the experimental error estimates, makes the greatest use of the available information. We carry out power-spectrum analyses of the Super-Kamiokande 5-day solar neutrino data, using each method in turn, for a standard search band (0 to 50 yr-1). For each method, we also carry out a fixed number (10,000) of Monte-Carlo simulations for the purpose of estimating the significance of the leading peak in each power spectrum. We find that, with one exception, the results of these calculations are compatible with those of previously published analyses. (We are unable to replicate Koshio's recent results.) We find that the significance of the peaks at 9.43 yr-1 and at 43.72 yr-1 increases progressively as one incorporates more information into the analysis procedure.

  2. Green thermoelectrics: Observation and analysis of plant thermoelectric response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goupil, C; Khamsing, A; Apertet, Y; Bouteau, F; Mancuso, S; Patino, R; Lecoeur, Ph

    2015-01-01

    Plants are sensitive to thermal and electrical effects; yet the coupling of both, known as thermoelectricity, and its quantitative measurement in vegetal systems never were reported. We recorded the thermoelectric response of bean sprouts under various thermal conditions and stress. The obtained experimental data unambiguously demonstrate that a temperature difference between the roots and the leaves of a bean sprout induces a thermoelectric voltage between these two points. Basing our analysis of the data on the force-flux formalism of linear response theory, we found that the strength of the vegetal equivalent to the thermoelectric coupling is one order of magnitude larger than that in the best thermoelectric materials. Experimental data also show the importance of the thermal stress variation rate in the plant's electrophysiological response. Therefore, thermoelectric effects are sufficiently important to partake in the complex and intertwined processes of energy and matter transport within plants.

  3. Power spectrum analysis of polarized emission from the Canadian galactic plane survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stutz, R. A.; Rosolowsky, E. W. [University of British Columbia Okanagan, 3333 University Way, Kelowna BC, V1V 1V7 (Canada); Kothes, R.; Landecker, T. L. [National Research Council Canada, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, Box 248, Penticton, BC, V2A 6J9 (Canada)

    2014-05-20

    Angular power spectra are calculated and presented for the entirety of the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey polarization data set at 1.4 GHz covering an area of 1060 deg{sup 2}. The data analyzed are a combination of data from the 100 m Effelsberg Telescope, the 26 m Telescope at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, and the Synthesis Telescope at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, allowing all scales to be sampled down to arcminute resolution. The resulting power spectra cover multipoles from ? ? 60 to ? ? 10{sup 4} and display both a power-law component at low multipoles and a flattening at high multipoles from point sources. We fit the power spectrum with a model that accounts for these components and instrumental effects. The resulting power-law indices are found to have a mode of 2.3, similar to previous results. However, there are significant regional variations in the index, defying attempts to characterize the emission with a single value. The power-law index is found to increase away from the Galactic plane. A transition from small-scale to large-scale structure is evident at b = 9, associated with the disk-halo transition in a 15 region around l = 108. Localized variations in the index are found toward H II regions and supernova remnants, but the interpretation of these variations is inconclusive. The power in the polarized emission is anticorrelated with bright thermal emission (traced by H? emission) indicating that the thermal emission depolarizes background synchrotron emission.

  4. Power Spectrum Analysis of Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Decay-Rate Data: Evidence for Solar Rotational Modulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Sturrock; J. B. Buncher; E. Fischbach; J. T. Gruenwald; D. Javorsek II; J. H. Jenkins; R. H. Lee; J. J. Mattes; J. R. Newport

    2010-10-11

    Evidence for an anomalous annual periodicity in certain nuclear decay data has led to speculation concerning a possible solar influence on nuclear processes. We have recently analyzed data concerning the decay rates of Cl-36 and Si-32, acquired at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), to search for evidence that might be indicative of a process involving solar rotation. Smoothing of the power spectrum by weighted-running-mean analysis leads to a significant peak at frequency 11.18/yr, which is lower than the equatorial synodic rotation rates of the convection and radiative zones. This article concerns measurements of the decay rates of Ra-226 acquired at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. We find that a similar (but not identical) analysis yields a significant peak in the PTB dataset at frequency 11.21/yr, and a peak in the BNL dataset at 11.25/yr. The change in the BNL result is not significant since the uncertainties in the BNL and PTB analyses are estimated to be 0.13/yr and 0.07/yr, respectively. Combining the two running means by forming the joint power statistic leads to a highly significant peak at frequency 11.23/yr. We comment briefly on the possible implications of these results for solar physics and for particle physics.

  5. Baryon spin-flavor structure from an analysis of lattice QCD results of the baryon spectrum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fernando, I.?P.; Goity, J.?L.

    2015-02-01

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU(6) x O(3), where the [56,lP=0?] ground state and excited baryons, and the [56,2+] and [70}},1-] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to order O(1/Nc) and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations,moreas well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. The main conclusion of the analysis is that qualitatively the dominant physical effects are similar for the physical and the lattice QCD baryons.less

  6. A logical analysis of responsibility attribution: emotions, individuals and collectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffrs-Runser, Katia

    .e., praiseworthiness). Examples of this type of emotions are guilt and reproach. Responsibility attribution is also

  7. Analysis of nu(2), nu(4) infarared Hot Bands of (SO3)-S-32-O-16: Resolution of the Puzzle of the nu(1) CARS Spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, James R.; Chrysostom, Engelene; Masiello, Tony; Nibler, Joseph W.; Maki, A. R.; Weber, A. M.; Blake, Thomas A.; Sams, Robert L.

    2002-11-01

    Further analysis of the high-resolution (0.0015 cm(-1) infrared spectrum of S-32(16) 03 has led to the assignment of more than 3100 hot band transitions from the nu(2) and nu(4) levels to the states 2nu(2) (1=0), nu(2) + nu(4) (1=+/-1), and 2nu(4) (1=0, +/-2).

  8. PINS Spectrum Identification Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.J. Caffrey

    2012-03-01

    The Portable Isotopic Neutron SpectroscopyPINS, for shortsystem identifies the chemicals inside munitions and containers without opening them, a decided safety advantage if the fill chemical is a hazardous substance like a chemical warfare agent or an explosive. The PINS Spectrum Identification Guide is intended as a reference for technical professionals responsible for the interpretation of PINS gamma-ray spectra. The guide is divided into two parts. The three chapters that constitute Part I cover the science and technology of PINS. Neutron activation analysis is the focus of Chapter 1. Chapter 2 explores PINS hardware, software, and related operational issues. Gamma-ray spectral analysis basics are introduced in Chapter 3. The six chapters of Part II cover the identification of PINS spectra in detail. Like the PINS decision tree logic, these chapters are organized by chemical element: phosphorus-based chemicals, chlorine-based chemicals, etc. These descriptions of hazardous, toxic, and/or explosive chemicals conclude with a chapter on the identification of the inert chemicals, e.g. sand, used to fill practice munitions.

  9. Broad spectrum solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA); Wu, Junqiao (Richmond, CA); Schaff, William J. (Ithaca, NY)

    2007-05-15

    An alloy having a large band gap range is used in a multijunction solar cell to enhance utilization of the solar energy spectrum. In one embodiment, the alloy is In.sub.1-xGa.sub.xN having an energy bandgap range of approximately 0.7 eV to 3.4 eV, providing a good match to the solar energy spectrum. Multiple junctions having different bandgaps are stacked to form a solar cell. Each junction may have different bandgaps (realized by varying the alloy composition), and therefore be responsive to different parts of the spectrum. The junctions are stacked in such a manner that some bands of light pass through upper junctions to lower junctions that are responsive to such bands.

  10. Global Analysis of Heat Shock Response in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chhabra, S.R.

    2010-01-01

    A novel class of heat and secretion stress-responsive genesas a thermometer of heat stress and modulates the activityenhanced at 60 min of heat stress. From Table 3, it appears

  11. Analysis of Residential Demand Response and Double-Auction Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Chassin, David P.

    2011-10-10

    Demand response and dynamic pricing programs are expected to play increasing roles in the modern Smart Grid environment. While direct load control of end-use loads has existed for decades, price driven response programs are only beginning to be explored at the distribution level. These programs utilize a price signal as a means to control demand. Active markets allow customers to respond to fluctuations in wholesale electrical costs, but may not allow the utility to control demand. Transactive markets, utilizing distributed controllers and a centralized auction can be used to create an interactive system which can limit demand at key times on a distribution system, decreasing congestion. With the current proliferation of computing and communication resources, the ability now exists to create transactive demand response programs at the residential level. With the combination of automated bidding and response strategies coupled with education programs and customer response, emerging demand response programs have the ability to reduce utility demand and congestion in a more controlled manner. This paper will explore the effects of a residential double-auction market, utilizing transactive controllers, on the operation of an electric power distribution system.

  12. A theoretical analysis of proportional counter response versus LET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, George Gerald

    1970-01-01

    ~&r&&Un, the height and position o wh)ch depend on the nucleus emitting the peu Cicles. There is also a deftnite upper . limit of ener?y for Lhe panic)es em(?ted by a nuclide which is clifferen, . for differ&ant nuclides. Experirrnts s?&ow LhaL Rail d&" ays ln a...'lowing this inspection, the beta spectrum for each of the five isotopes was generaL. d and the Ites'I) ts a~e shown in FTGS. 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11. The reduced EET equation wa. . compuLcd for an eI argy range of 0. 01 Ifcy to 1, 2 I'!eV 44hi! h inc1udcs the eneri y...

  13. Micro acoustic spectrum analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schubert, W. Kent; Butler, Michael A.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Anderson, Larry F.

    2004-11-23

    A micro acoustic spectrum analyzer for determining the frequency components of a fluctuating sound signal comprises a microphone to pick up the fluctuating sound signal and produce an alternating current electrical signal; at least one microfabricated resonator, each resonator having a different resonant frequency, that vibrate in response to the alternating current electrical signal; and at least one detector to detect the vibration of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can further comprise a mixer to mix a reference signal with the alternating current electrical signal from the microphone to shift the frequency spectrum to a frequency range that is a better matched to the resonant frequencies of the microfabricated resonators. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer can be designed specifically for portability, size, cost, accuracy, speed, power requirements, and use in a harsh environment. The micro acoustic spectrum analyzer is particularly suited for applications where size, accessibility, and power requirements are limited, such as the monitoring of industrial equipment and processes, detection of security intrusions, or evaluation of military threats.

  14. BIFURCATION ANALYSIS OF A PREDATORPREY SYSTEM WITH NONMONOTONIC FUNCTIONAL RESPONSE #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolkowicz, Gail S. K.

    (x) is concave up for small values of x > 0 as it is for the sigmoidal functional response. We show and the geometry of the system. Examples of the predicted bifurcation curves are also generated numerically using of predator popula tion is assumed to satisfy logistic growth, and so r denotes the intrinsic growth rate

  15. Cost Principles Directives & Procedures Responsible Office: Cost Analysis Effective Date: November 1, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    1 Cost Principles Directives & Procedures Responsible Office: Cost Analysis Effective Date....................................................................................................................... 2 2. Guiding Principles to Determine the Charge of a Cost to a Sponosred Agreement ................................................................................................. 5 5.1. Personnel Costs

  16. Cost Principles Policy Responsible Office: Cost Analysis Effective Date: November 1, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Cost Principles Policy Responsible Office: Cost Analysis Effective Date: November 1, 2013 Last-21, Cost Principles for Educational Institutions and the Cost Accounting Standards Board (CASB)) identify cost accounting policies that must be followed to receive federal awards. These regulations

  17. Analysis of vascular response to systemic heating using the pallid bat wing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendez, Tanya

    2009-05-15

    The objective of this research is to analyze the relationship between environ-mental heat exchange and vascular response in the pallid bat wing during systemicheating and to develop a simplied model of heat transfer for theoretical analysis...

  18. Glucose-Sensitive Inverse Opal Hydrogels: Analysis of Optical Diffraction Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Glucose-Sensitive Inverse Opal Hydrogels: Analysis of Optical Diffraction Response Yun-Ju Lee swelling of the inverse opal hydrogel, which was observed through shifts in the optical diffraction

  19. Scalable, Secure Energy Information Management for Demand-Response Analysis Yogesh Simmhan1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Kai

    Scalable, Secure Energy Information Management for Demand-Response Analysis Yogesh Simmhan1 and optimize energy usage to meet sustainability goals. Managing the energy information lifecycle from, feedback, and query/response interactions, which are transmitted across a widely distributed infrastructure

  20. Stented Artery Biomechanics: A Computational and In Vivo Analysis of Stent Design and Pathobiological Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timmins, Lucas Howard

    2011-08-08

    -1 STENTED ARTERY BIOMECHANICS: A COMPUTATIONAL AND IN VIVO ANALYSIS OF STENT DESIGN AND PATHOBIOLOGICAL RESPONSE A Dissertation by LUCAS HOWARD TIMMINS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2010 Major Subject: Biomedical Engineering STENTED ARTERY BIOMECHANICS: A COMPUTATIONAL AND IN VIVO ANALYSIS OF STENT DESIGN AND PATHOBIOLOGICAL RESPONSE A Dissertation by LUCAS...

  1. The export responsiveness of the Argentine grain export marketing system: a constant market share analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millimet, Scott Alan

    1982-01-01

    THE EXPORT RESPONSIVENESS OF THE ARGENTINE GRAIN EXPORT MARKET NG SYSTEM: A CONSTANT MARKET SHARE ANALYSIS A Thesis by SCOTT ALAN MILLIMET Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Ma) or Subject: Agricultural Economics THE EXPORT RESPONSIVENESS OF THE ARGENTINE GRAIN EXPORT MARKETING SYSTEM: A CONSTANT MARKET SHARE ANALYSIS A Thesis by SCOTT ALAN MILLIMET Approved as to style...

  2. Power Spectrum Analysis of LMSU (Lomonosov Moscow State University) Nuclear Decay-Rate Data: Further Indication of r-Mode Oscillations in an Inner Solar Tachocline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Sturrock; Alexander G. Parkhomov; Ephraim Fischbach; Jere H. Jenkins

    2012-03-21

    This article presents a power-spectrum analysis of 2,350 measurements of the $^{90}$Sr/$^{90}$Y decay process acquired over the interval 4 August 2002 to 6 February 2009 at the Lomonosov Moscow State University (LMSU). As we have found for other long sequences of decay measurements, the power spectrum is dominated by a very strong annual oscillation. However, we also find a set of low-frequency peaks, ranging from 0.26 year$^{-1}$ to 3.98 year$^{-1}$, which are very similar to an array of peaks in a power spectrum formed from Mt Wilson solar diameter measurements. The Mt Wilson measurements have been interpreted in terms of r-mode oscillations in a region where the sidereal rotation frequency is 12.08 year$^{-1}$. We find that the LMSU measurements may also be attributed to the same type of r-mode oscillations in a solar region with the same sidereal rotation frequency. We propose that these oscillations occur in an inner tachocline that separates the radiative zone from a more slowly rotating solar core.

  3. Power Spectrum Analysis of LMSU (Lomonosov Moscow State University) Nuclear Decay-Rate Data: Further Indication of r-Mode Oscillations in an Inner Solar Tachocline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturrock, Peter A; Fischbach, Ephraim; Jenkins, Jere H

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a power-spectrum analysis of 2,350 measurements of the $^{90}$Sr/$^{90}$Y decay process acquired over the interval 4 August 2002 to 6 February 2009 at the Lomonosov Moscow State University (LMSU). As we have found for other long sequences of decay measurements, the power spectrum is dominated by a very strong annual oscillation. However, we also find a set of low-frequency peaks, ranging from 0.26 year$^{-1}$ to 3.98 year$^{-1}$, which are very similar to an array of peaks in a power spectrum formed from Mt Wilson solar diameter measurements. The Mt Wilson measurements have been interpreted in terms of r-mode oscillations in a region where the sidereal rotation frequency is 12.08 year$^{-1}$. We find that the LMSU measurements may also be attributed to the same type of r-mode oscillations in a solar region with the same sidereal rotation frequency. We propose that these oscillations occur in an inner tachocline that separates the radiative zone from a more slowly rotating solar core.

  4. Approximate Response Time Analysis of Real-Time Task Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Wang

    that RBF has a speedup factor of 2, and this is tight even for dual-task systems. The speedup factor of IBF approaches infinity and equals 1 when k = 1, implying that the IBF analysis is exact for dual-task systems variable rate-dependent behavior in con- trollers for fuel injection in combustion engines [6] and frame

  5. ALS Spectrum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 News BelowAskedAIKENALSDoctoralALSALSALS Spectrum

  6. Analysis of Long Span Bridge Response to Winds: Building Nexus between Flutter and Buffeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xinzhong

    Analysis of Long Span Bridge Response to Winds: Building Nexus between Flutter and Buffeting Xinzhong Chen1 Abstract: In current bridge aeroelastic analysis frameworks, predictions of flutter the self-excited forces influence bridge dynamics, especially the modal damping, and eventually drive

  7. Response

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Response SEAB Recommendations Related to the Evaluation of New Funding Constructs for Energy R&D in the Department of Energy Introduction Over the past seven years, the Department...

  8. Single-wavenumber Representation of Nonlinear Energy Spectrum in Elastic-Wave Turbulence of {F}ppl-von {K}rmn Equation: Energy Decomposition Analysis and Energy Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoto Yokoyama; Masanori Takaoka

    2014-12-09

    A single-wavenumber representation of nonlinear energy spectrum, i.e., stretching energy spectrum is found in elastic-wave turbulence governed by the F\\"oppl-von K\\'arm\\'an (FvK) equation. The representation enables energy decomposition analysis in the wavenumber space, and analytical expressions of detailed energy budget in the nonlinear interactions are obtained for the first time in wave turbulence systems. We numerically solved the FvK equation and observed the following facts. Kinetic and bending energies are comparable with each other at large wavenumbers as the weak turbulence theory suggests. On the other hand, the stretching energy is larger than the bending energy at small wavenumbers, i.e., the nonlinearity is relatively strong. The strong correlation between a mode $a_{\\bm{k}}$ and its companion mode $a_{-\\bm{k}}$ is observed at the small wavenumbers. Energy transfer shows that the energy is input into the wave field through stretching-energy transfer at the small wavenumbers, and dissipated through the quartic part of kinetic-energy transfer at the large wavenumbers. A total-energy flux consistent with the energy conservation is calculated directly by using the analytical expression of the total-energy transfer, and the forward energy cascade is observed clearly.

  9. Analysis, Optimization, and Implementation of a Hybrid DS/FFH Spread-Spectrum Technique for Smart Grid Communications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M; Ma, Xiao; Killough, Stephen M; Kuruganti, Teja; Smith, Stephen Fulton; Djouadi, Seddik M

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been great interest in using hybrid spread-spectrum (HSS) techniques for commercial applications, particularly in the Smart Grid, in addition to their inherent uses in military communications. This is because HSS can accommodate high data rates with high link integrity, even in the presence of significant multipath effects and interfering signals. A highly useful form of this transmission technique for many types of command, control, and sensing applications is the specific code-related combination of standard direct sequence modulation with fast frequency hopping, denoted hybrid DS/FFH, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time. In this paper, error-probability analyses are performed for a hybrid DS/FFH system over standard Gaussian and fading-type channels, progressively including the effects from wide- and partial-band jamming, multi-user interference, and varying degrees of Rayleigh and Rician fading. In addition, an optimization approach is formulated that minimizes the bit-error performance of a hybrid DS/FFH communication system and solves for the resulting system design parameters. The optimization objective function is non-convex and can be solved by applying the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions. We also present our efforts toward exploring the design, implementation, and evaluation of a hybrid DS/FFH radio transceiver using a single field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Numerical and experimental results are presented under widely varying design parameters to demonstrate the adaptability of the waveform for varied harsh smart grid RF signal environments.

  10. Design and Analysis of Highway Safety Communication Protocol in 5.9 GHz Dedicated Short Range Communication Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengupta, Raja

    Design and Analysis of Highway Safety Communication Protocol in 5.9 GHz Dedicated Short Range among high- way vehicles in the newly-assigned 5.9 GHz Dedicated Short Range Communication (DSRC parameters are found for certain requirements on protocol performance. I. INTRODUCTION DSRC (Dedicated Short

  11. AIAA-2003-0867 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF INFLOW AND STRUCTURAL RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 2 Wind Energy Technology Department, Sandia NationalAIAA-2003-0867 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF INFLOW AND STRUCTURAL RESPONSE DATA FROM THE LIST PROGRAM Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 ABSTRACT The Long-Term Inflow and Structural Test (LIST) program

  12. Time-domain Fatigue Response and Reliability Analysis of Offshore Wind Turbines with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nrvg, Kjetil

    Time-domain Fatigue Response and Reliability Analysis of Offshore Wind Turbines with Emphasis of offshore wind turbines Defense: 09.12.2012 2012 - : Structural Engineer in Det Norske Veritas (DNV) 2007 sector. Wind is one of the most rapidly growing renewable energy sources, as it is clean

  13. A Structural Analysis of Vehicle Design Responses to Corporate Average Fuel Economy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalek, Jeremy J.

    09-0588 A Structural Analysis of Vehicle Design Responses to Corporate Average Fuel Economy Policy, Michalek, and Hendrickson 1 ABSTRACT The U.S. Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) regulations, which aim fuel economy; Energy policy; Oligopolistic market; Mixed logit #12;Shiau, Michalek, and Hendrickson 2 1

  14. A structural analysis of vehicle design responses to Corporate Average Fuel Economy policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalek, Jeremy J.

    A structural analysis of vehicle design responses to Corporate Average Fuel Economy policy Ching 2009 Accepted 29 August 2009 Keywords: Corporate Average Fuel Economy Energy policy Oligopolistic market Game theory Vehicle design a b s t r a c t The US Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE

  15. Analysis of DoseResponse Data in the Presence of ExtraBinomial Variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boos, Dennis

    of several dioxins. Keywords: Empirical variance; Goodness of fit; Logistic regression; Probit analysis,3,7,8tetrabromodibenzopdioxin (TBDD) in C57BL/6N mice (Birnbaum, Morrissey, and Harris, 1990). The responses and examined on gestation day 18. Also plotted in Figure 1 are similar data for 2,3,7,8tetrachlorodibenzopdioxin

  16. Response

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-A Wholesale PowerNatural GasBreakoutResponse SEAB Recommendations

  17. Responsibility

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-A Wholesale PowerNaturalEnergy Response

  18. Use of inelastic analysis to determine the response of packages to puncture accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.; Ludwigsen, J.S.

    1996-08-01

    The accurate analytical determination of the response of radioactive material transportation packages to the hypothetical puncture accident requires inelastic analysis techniques. Use of this improved analysis method recudes the reliance on empirical and approximate methods to determine the safety for puncture accidents. This paper will discuss how inelastic analysis techniques can be used to determine the stresses, strains and deformations resulting from puncture accidents for thin skin materials with different backing materials. A method will be discussed to assure safety for all of these types of packages.

  19. Primordial power spectrum from Planck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhiraj Kumar Hazra; Arman Shafieloo; Tarun Souradeep

    2014-12-18

    Using modified Richardson-Lucy algorithm we reconstruct the primordial power spectrum (PPS) from Planck Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature anisotropy data. In our analysis we use different combinations of angular power spectra from Planck to reconstruct the shape of the primordial power spectrum and locate possible features. Performing an extensive error analysis we found the dip near $\\ell\\sim750-850$ represents the most prominent feature in the data. Feature near $\\ell\\sim1800-2000$ is detectable with high confidence only in 217 GHz spectrum and is apparently consequence of a small systematic as described in the revised Planck 2013 papers. Fixing the background cosmological parameters and the foreground nuisance parameters to their best fit baseline values, we report that the best fit power law primordial power spectrum is consistent with the reconstructed form of the PPS at 2$\\sigma$ C.L. of the estimated errors (apart from the local features mentioned above). As a consistency test, we found the reconstructed primordial power spectrum from Planck temperature data can also substantially improve the fit to WMAP-9 angular power spectrum data (with respect to power-law form of the PPS) allowing an overall amplitude shift of $\\sim2.5\\%$. In this context low-$\\ell$ and 100 GHz spectrum from Planck which have proper overlap in the multipole range with WMAP data found to be completely consistent with WMAP-9 (allowing amplitude shift). As another important result of our analysis we do report the evidence of gravitational lensing through the reconstruction analysis. Finally we present two smooth form of the PPS containing only the important features. These smooth forms of PPS can provide significant improvements in fitting the data (with respect to the power law PPS) and can be helpful to give hints for inflationary model building.

  20. Primordial power spectrum from Planck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar; Shafieloo, Arman; Souradeep, Tarun E-mail: arman@apctp.org

    2014-11-01

    Using modified Richardson-Lucy algorithm we reconstruct the primordial power spectrum (PPS) from Planck Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature anisotropy data. In our analysis we use different combinations of angular power spectra from Planck to reconstruct the shape of the primordial power spectrum and locate possible features. Performing an extensive error analysis we found the dip near ??750850 represents the most prominent feature in the data. Feature near ??18002000 is detectable with high confidence only in 217 GHz spectrum and is apparently consequence of a small systematic as described in the revised Planck 2013 papers. Fixing the background cosmological parameters and the foreground nuisance parameters to their best fit baseline values, we report that the best fit power law primordial power spectrum is consistent with the reconstructed form of the PPS at 2? C.L. of the estimated errors (apart from the local features mentioned above). As a consistency test, we found the reconstructed primordial power spectrum from Planck temperature data can also substantially improve the fit to WMAP-9 angular power spectrum data (with respect to power-law form of the PPS) allowing an overall amplitude shift of ?2.5%. In this context low-? and 100 GHz spectrum from Planck which have proper overlap in the multipole range with WMAP data found to be completely consistent with WMAP-9 (allowing amplitude shift). As another important result of our analysis we do report the evidence of gravitational lensing through the reconstruction analysis. Finally we present two smooth form of the PPS containing only the important features. These smooth forms of PPS can provide significant improvements in fitting the data (with respect to the power law PPS) and can be helpful to give hints for inflationary model building.

  1. Multivariate analysis and prediction of wind turbine response to varying wind field characteristics based on machine learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Multivariate analysis and prediction of wind turbine response to varying wind field characteristics characteristics have a significant impact on the structural response and the lifespan of wind turbines. This paper presents a machine learning approach towards analyzing and predicting the response of wind turbine

  2. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general rules-of-thumb'' for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  3. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general ``rules-of-thumb`` for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  4. Responsibility Modeling for the Sociotechnical Risk Analysis of Coalitions of Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenwood, David

    2011-01-01

    Society is challenging systems engineers by demanding ever more complex and integrated systems. With the rise of cloud computing and systems-of-systems (including cyber-physical systems) we are entering an era where mission critical services and applications will be dependent upon 'coalitions-of-systems'. Coalitions-of-systems (CoS) are a class of system similar to systems-of-systems but they differ in that they interact to further overlapping self-interests rather than an overarching mission. Assessing the sociotechnical risks associated with CoS is an open research question of societal importance as existing risk analysis techniques typically focus on the technical aspects of systems and ignore risks associated with coalition partners reneging on responsibilities or leaving the coalition. We demonstrate that a responsibility modeling based risk analysis approach enables the identification of sociotechnical risks associated with CoS. The approach identifies hazards and associated risks that may arise when re...

  5. Analysis of criticality alarm system response to an accidental criticality outside the cascade process buildings at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negron, S.B.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr.; Dobelbower, M.C. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Neutron dose rates at detector positions within the X-326, X-330, and X-333 buildings were evaluated for an accidental criticality outside of each building. As fissile material bearing equipment and containers are moved to and from each building, the possibility exists for a criticality accident to occur. This analysis demonstrates that a criticality accident which occurs at any position on the access roads alongside a process building can be detected. The detectable area includes all points within the access road boundary along each face of each building. This analysis also demonstrates that the criticality alarm systems of the process buildings will respond to criticality events occurring within the tie lines connecting the process buildings. This analysis was performed using the MCNP Monte Carlo neutron-proton transport code. The radiation source is the neutron leakage spectrum of a critical solution of 4.95 percent enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at a power level corresponding to the ANSI ANS 8.3. Standard minimum accident of concern. The evaluated neutron fluxes were converted to neutron dose rates by use of the Henderson free-in-air response functions. Critical source positions correspond to the farthest source to detector distances on the access roads along each face of the three buildings, and the centerpoint of the building tie lines. This report contains the methodology used for this study, a background on the data used, and a section about the assumptions and limits to all conclusions.

  6. Equilibrium Response and Transient Dynamics Datasets from VEMAP: Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Users of the VEMAP Portal can access input files of numerical data that include monthly and daily files of geographic data, soil and site files, scenario files, etc. Model results from Phase I, the Equilibrium Response datasets, are available through the NCAR anonymous FTP site at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/vresults.html. Phase II, Transient Dynamics, include climate datasets, models results, and analysis tools. Many supplemental files are also available from the main data page at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/datasets.html.

  7. Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Shihui; Pan, Chongle; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Engle, Nancy L; Zhou, Wen; Dam, Phuongan; Xu, Ying; Dice, Lezlee T; Davison, Brian H; Brown, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 is a capable ethanogenic bacterium with high ethanol productivity and high level of ethanol tolerance. Previous studies indicated that several stress-related proteins and changes in the ZM4 membrane lipid composition may contribute to ethanol tolerance. However, the molecular mechanisms of ethanol stress response have not been elucidated fully. In this study, ethanol stress responses were investigated using systems biology tools. Medium supplementation with an initial 47.3 g/L (6% v/v) ethanol reduced Z. mobilis ZM4 glucose consumption, growth rate and ethanol productivity compared to that of untreated controls. Metabolomic profiling showed that ethanol-treated ZM4 cells accumulated greater amounts of glycerol during the entire fermentation process, which may indicate an important role for this metabolite. A proteomic analysis of early exponential growth identified about one thousand proteins, or approximately 56% of the predicted ZM4 proteome. Proteins related to metabolism and stress response such as chaperones and key regulators were more abundant in the early ethanol stress condition. Transcriptomic studies indicated the response of ZM4 to ethanol is dynamic, complex and involves many genes from all the different functional categories. There were fewer genes significantly differentially expressed in the exponential phase compared to that of stationary phase and early stationary phase. Most down-regulated genes were related to translation and ribosome biogenesis, while the ethanol-upregulated genes were mostly related to cellular processes and metabolism. Correlations among the transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolism were examined and among significantly expressed genes or proteins, we observe higher correlation coefficients when fold-change values are higher. This systems biology study elucidates key Z. mobilis ZM4 metabolites, genes and proteins that form the foundation of its distinctive physiology and its multifaceted response to ethanol stress.

  8. An analysis of the x-ray linear dichroism spectrum for NiO thin films grown on vicinal Ag(001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Y.Z.

    2008-01-01

    dichroism spectrum for NiO thin films grown on vicinal Ag(Antiferromagnetic (AFM) NiO thin films are grown epitaxiallyXLD). We find that the NiO AFM spin exhibits an in- plane

  9. Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California and Guidelines to Transition to Industry Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2014-01-01

    to Automated Demand Response and the OpenADR Automated Demand Response Program. https://Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial

  10. 2008-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response Opportunities in California Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goli, Sasank

    2013-01-01

    K.C. Mares, D. Shroyer. 2010. Demand Response andOpen Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Dataand the Role of Automated Demand Response. Lawrence Berkeley

  11. Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California and Guidelines to Transition to Industry Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2014-01-01

    to Automated Demand Response and the OpenADR Automated Demand Response Program. https://2009a. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

  12. Time Variations of the Solar Neutrino Flux Data from Sage and Gallex-Gno Detectors Obtained by Rayleigh Power Spectrum Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koushik Ghosh; Probhas Raychaudhuri

    2006-06-05

    We have used Rayleigh power spectrum analysis of the monthly solar neutrino flux data from (1) SAGE detector during the period from 1st January 1990 to 31st December 2000; (2) SAGE detector during the period from April 1998 to December 2001; (3) GALLEX detector during the period from May 1991 to January 1997; (4) GNO detector during the period from May 1998 to December 2001; (5) GALLEX-GNO detector (combined data) from May 1991 to December 2001 and (6) average of the data from GNO and SAGE detectors during the period from May 1998 to December 2001. (1) exhibits periodicity around 1.3, 4.3, 5.5, 6.3, 7.9, 8.7, 15.9, 18.7, 23.9, 32.9 and 48.7 months. (2) shows periodicity around 1.5, 2.9, 4.5, 10.1 months. For (3) we observe periodicity around 1.7, 18.7 and 26.9 months. For (4) periodicity is seen around 3.5, 5.5, 7.7 and 10.5 months. (5) gives periodicity around 1.7, 18.5, 28.5 and 42.1 months while (6) shows periodicity around 4.3, 6.9, 10.3 and 18.1 months. We have found almost similar periods in the solar flares, sunspot data, solar proton data which indicates that the solar activity cycle may be due to the variable character of nuclear energy generation inside the sun.

  13. NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01

    This brochure describes the NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, which includes analysis and decision support, fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization and deployment. Through deep technical expertise and an unmatched breadth of capabilities, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) leads an integrated approach across the spectrum of renewable energy innovation. From scientific discovery to accelerating market deployment, NREL works in partnership with private industry to drive the transformation of our nation's energy systems. NREL integrates the entire spectrum of innovation, including fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization, and deployment. Our world-class analysis and decision support informs every point on the spectrum. The innovation process at NREL is inter-dependent and iterative. Many scientific breakthroughs begin in our own laboratories, but new ideas and technologies may come to NREL at any point along the innovation spectrum to be validated and refined for commercial use.

  14. DOE responses to Ecology review comments for ``Sampling and analysis plans for the 100-D Ponds voluntary remediation project``

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The Sampling and Analysis Plan describes the sampling and analytical activities which will be performed to support closure of the 100-D Ponds at the Hanford Reservation. This report contains responses by the US Department of Energy to Ecology review for ``Sampling and Analysis Plan for the 100-D Ponds Voluntary Remediation Project.``

  15. Exact Analysis of the Response of Quantum Systems to Two Photons Using a QSDE Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu Pan; Daoyi Dong; Guofeng Zhang

    2015-09-23

    We introduce the quantum differential stochastic equation (QSDE) approach to exactly analyze of the response of quantum systems to a continuous-mode two-photon input. The QSDE description of the two-photon process allows us to integrate the input-output analysis with the quantum network theory, and so the analytical computability of the output state of a general quantum system can be addressed within this framework. We show that the time-domain two-photon output states can be exactly calculated for a large class of quantum systems including passive linear networks, optomechanical oscillators and two-level emitter in waveguide systems. In particular, we propose to utilize the results for the exact simulation of the stimulated emission as well as the study of the scattering of two-mode photon wave packets.

  16. Vibrational assignment and FranckCondon analysis of the mass-analyzed threshold ionization ,,MATI... spectrum of CH2ClI: The effect of strong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Soo

    to a high l and high ml state, which is usually called a ZEKE state. Then, application of electric radiation generated by four-wave mixing is getting popular.911 Recently, we reported the one-photon MATI spectrum of CH2ClI.12 The vibrational fundamentals of CH2ClI+ could be readily identified simply

  17. A meta-analysis of single case research studies on aided augmentative and alternative communication systems with individuals with autism spectrum disorders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganz, Jennifer B.; Earles-Vollrath, Theresa L.; Heath, Amy K.; Parker, Richard; Rispoli, Mandy J.; Duran, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    , with small numbers of participants. The purpose of this investigation was to meta-analyze the single case research on the use of aided AAC with individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Twenty-four single-case studies were analyzed via an effect size...

  18. Sensitivity analysis of reactivity responses using one-dimensional discrete ordinates and three-dimensional Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M. L.; Gehin, J. C.; Clarno, K. T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Bldg. 5700, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6170 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The TSUNAMI computational sequences currently in the SCALE 5 code system provide an automated approach to performing sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for eigenvalue responses, using either one-dimensional discrete ordinates or three-dimensional Monte Carlo methods. This capability has recently been expanded to address eigenvalue-difference responses such as reactivity changes. This paper describes the methodology and presents results obtained for an example advanced CANDU reactor design. (authors)

  19. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Crowell, John M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  20. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

    1985-04-09

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  1. Peaks and Troughs in Helioseismology: The Power Spectrum of Solar Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin S. Rosenthal

    1998-04-15

    I present a matched-wave asymptotic analysis of the driving of solar oscillations by a general localised source. The analysis provides a simple mathematical description of the asymmetric peaks in the power spectrum in terms of the relative locations of eigenmodes and troughs in the spectral response. It is suggested that the difference in measured phase function between the modes and the troughs in the spectrum will provide a key diagnostic of the source of the oscillations. I also suggest a form for the asymmetric line profiles to be used in the fitting of solar power spectra. Finally I present a comparison between the numerical and asymptotic descriptions of the oscillations. The numerical results bear out the qualitative features suggested by the asymptotic analysis but suggest that numerical calculations of the locations of the troughs will be necessary for a quantitative comparison with the observations.

  2. Corporate social responsibility in Brazil : a comparative analysis of two paper companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nascimento, Ana Paula M. do, 1966-

    2004-01-01

    If being socially responsible can result in short or long-term economic benefits, then why do not all companies adopt corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices? This thesis draws on general assumptions from illustrative ...

  3. A threat-rigidity analysis of the Apache Software Foundation's response to reported server security issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapira, Yoav

    2006-01-01

    There exists a broad body of literature documenting organizational responses to competitive threats, including those responses which fit into the threat-rigidity hypothesis. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate how ...

  4. Earthquake Damage Detection in the Imperial County Services Building III: Analysis of Wave Travel Times via Impulse Response Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    1 Earthquake Damage Detection in the Imperial County Services Building III: Analysis of Wave Travel characteristics of the structure, and are not sensitive to local damage. Wave travel times between selected changes in such characteristics of response are potentially more sensitive to local damage. In this paper

  5. Symmetry of Lyapunov spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupalo, D.; Kaganovich, A.S.; Cohen, E.G.D. (Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States))

    1994-03-01

    The symmetry of the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents provides a useful quantitative connection between properties of dynamical systems consisting of N interacting particles coupled to a thermostat, and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. The authors obtain here sufficient conditions for this symmetry and analyze the structure of 1/N corrections ignored in previous studies. The relation of the Lyapunov spectrum symmetry with some other symmetries of dynamical systems is discussed.

  6. Low Overhead Dynamic Spectrum Reallocation in Opportunistic Spectrum Access Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Xiaoming

    -August-University of Goettingen, Germany Email: {tianyu, lwz}@dislab.nju.edu.cn, fu@cs.uni-goettingen.de Abstract-- Opportunistic by sharing spec- trum usage. To make full use of the spectrum holes [2] and achieve a global optimal goal) it consumes extra energy to accomplish the process of spectrum sensing, spectrum choosing, and spectrum

  7. Analysis of a 10% RPS - Response letter summarizing principal conclusions of supplement

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    Transmittal letter for the supplement to the Service Report 'Analysis of a 10% Renewable Portfolio Standard'.

  8. NREL Spectrum of Innovation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    There are many voices calling for a future of abundant clean energy. The choices are difficult and the challenges daunting. How will we get there? The National Renewable Energy Laboratory integrates the entire spectrum of innovation including fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization and deployment. The innovation process at NREL is interdependent and iterative. Many scientific breakthroughs begin in our own laboratories, but new ideas and technologies come to NREL at any point along the innovation spectrum to be validated and refined for commercial use.

  9. NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) : a tool for evaluation of sheltering and evacuation responses following urban nuclear detonations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

    2009-11-01

    The NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories to support the analysis of shelter-evacuate (S-E) strategies following an urban nuclear detonation. This tool can model a range of behaviors, including complex evacuation timing and path selection, as well as various sheltering or mixed evacuation and sheltering strategies. The calculations are based on externally generated, high resolution fallout deposition and plume data. Scenario setup and calculation outputs make extensive use of graphics and interactive features. This software is designed primarily to produce quantitative evaluations of nuclear detonation response options. However, the outputs have also proven useful in the communication of technical insights concerning shelter-evacuate tradeoffs to urban planning or response personnel.

  10. Risk Analysis and Adaptive Response Planning for Water Distribution Systems Contamination Emergency Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasekh, Amin

    2012-10-19

    of terrorism, several aspects of emergency management for WDSs remain at an undeveloped stage. A set of methods is developed to analyze the risk and consequences of WDS contamination events and develop emergency response support tools. Monte Carlo...

  11. Analysis of Trade-Off Between Power Saving and Response Time in Disk Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otoo, Ekow J

    2009-01-01

    of Trade-Off Between Power Saving and Response Time in Diskthe disks are static and power saving can be realized duringopportunities for power saving. To understand the reasoning

  12. Socially Responsible Investing : a comparative analysis of environmental, social, governance, reputational and labor factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramaniam, Arun, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Socially Responsible Investing (SRI) aims to deliver competitive investment returns while fostering social good. It aims achieves its objective by including a firm's corporate social performance (CSP) in its investment d ...

  13. Nonlinear Response and Stability Analysis of Vessel Rolling Motion in Random Waves Using Stochastic Dynamical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Zhiyong

    2012-10-19

    Response and stability of vessel rolling motion with strongly nonlinear softening stiffness will be studied in this dissertation using the methods of stochastic dynamical systems. As one of the most classic stability failure modes of vessel dynamics...

  14. A Database and Meta-Analysis of Ecological Responses to Flow in the South Atlantic Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Davis, Dr, Mary [Southeastern Aquatic Resources Partnership; Kauffman, John [John Kauffman LLC.

    2013-01-01

    Generalized and quantitative relationships between flow and ecology are pivotal to developing environmental flow standards based on socially acceptable ecological conditions. Informing management at regional scales requires compiling sufficient hydrologic and ecological sources of information, identifying information gaps, and creating a framework for hypothesis development and testing. We compiled studies of empirical and theoretical relationships between flow and ecology in the South Atlantic region (SAR) of the United States to evaluate their utility for the development of environmental flow standards. Using database searches, internet searches, and agency contacts, we gathered 186 sources of information that provided a qualitative or quantitative relationship between flow and ecology within states encompassing the SAR. A total of 109 of the 186 sources had sufficient information to support quantitative analyses. Ecological responses to natural changes in flow magnitude, frequency, and duration were highly variable regardless of the direction and magnitude of changes in flow. In contrast, the majority of ecological responses to anthropogenic-induced flow alterations were negative. Fish consistently showed negative responses to anthropogenic flow alterations whereas other ecological groups showed somewhat variable responses (e.g. macroinvertebrates and riparian vegetation) and even positive responses (e.g. algae). Fish and organic matter had sufficient sample sizes to stratify natural flow-ecology relationships by specific flow categories (e.g. high flow, baseflows) or by region (e.g. coastal plain, uplands). After stratifying relationships, we found that significant correlations existed between changes in natural flow and ecological responses. In addition, a regression tree explained 57% of the variation in fish responses to anthropogenic and natural changes in flow. Because of some ambiguity in interpreting the directionality in ecological responses, we utilized ecological gains or losses, where each represents a benefit or reduction to ecosystem services, respectively. Variables explained 49% of the variation in ecological gains and losses for all ecological groups combined. Altogether, our results suggested that the source of flow change and the ecological group of interest played primary roles in determining the direction and magnitude of ecological responses. Furthermore, our results suggest that developing broadly generalized relationships between ecology and changes in flow at a regional scale is unlikely unless relationships are placed within meaningful contexts, such as environmental flow components or by geomorphic setting.

  15. 730 Communications of the Association for Information Systems (Volume 15, 2005) 730-750 Responsible Risk Analysis for Software Development: Creating the Software Development Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Montfort University

    Risk Analysis for Software Development: Creating the Software Development Impact Statement by D. Gotterbarn and S. Rogerson RESPONSIBLE RISK ANALYSIS FOR SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT: CREATING THE SOFTWARE University ABSTRACT Limiting the focus of risk analysis to quantifiable factors and using a narrow

  16. Understanding the Effect of Baseline Modeling Implementation Choices on Analysis of Demand Response Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Addy, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    calculated Weather Underground data Base: Sheds calculatedahead. In the base analysis, we used weather data obtainedANALYSES. Weather Under- ground data Mean Shed using Base

  17. BIFURCATION ANALYSIS OF A PREDATOR-PREY SYSTEM WITH NONMONOTONIC FUNCTIONAL RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Sue Ann

    (x) is concave up for small values of x > 0 as it is for the sigmoidal functional response. We show and the geometry of the system. Examples of the predicted bifurcation curves are also generated numerically using in the absence of predator popula- tion is assumed to satisfy logistic growth, and so r denotes the intrinsic

  18. BIFURCATION ANALYSIS OF A PREDATOR-PREY SYSTEM WITH NONMONOTONIC FUNCTIONAL RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolkowicz, Gail S. K.

    (x) is concave up for small values of x > 0 as it is for the sigmoidal functional response. We show of the system. Examples of the predicted bifurcation curves are also generated numerically using XPPAUT. Our logistic growth, and so r denotes the intrinsic growth rate of the prey population, and K denotes

  19. Response Analysis of the Deepwater Steel Lazy-Wave Riser for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    of a traditional operation unit of a Floating Production Storage Off-loading (FPSO) system with a simple Steel and strength response performance. In this paper, the feasibility, of developing a turret moored FPSO developing an FPSO-SLWR operation unit as feasible. #12;v Table of Contents Abstract

  20. Comparative Analysis of the Large and Small Signal Responses of "AC inductor" and "DC inductor"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " Based Chargers Ilya Zeltser, Student Member, IEEE and Sam Ben-Yaakov, Member, IEEE Abstract-- Two sourcing applications, such as battery chargers, where differences between the average input and output chargers, small-signal response. I. INTRODUCTION The classic method, utilized in most PWM chargers

  1. Responsiveness summary for the engineering evaluation/cost analysis for decontamination at the St. Louis Downtown Site, St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Picel, M.H.; Peterson, J.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Williams, M.J. (Bechtel National, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

    1991-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for conducting remedial actions at the Mallinckrodt Chemical Plant, also referred to as the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS), located in the city of St. Louis, Missouri. Remedial activities at the SLDS are being carried out under DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) as part of the overall cleanup planned for three noncontiguous areas in St. Louis, which are collectively referred to as the St. Louis Site. Potential response action alternatives for managing the contaminated material generated at the SLDS have been evaluated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance for conducting interim actions under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) report was prepared to document this process. On the basis of the analysis presented in the EE/CA, the preferred alternative for the management of contaminated wastes generated by DOE-supported plant activities is the provision of temporary storage capacity, which can be made available by modifying an existing building (i.e., Building 116) at SLDS. This alternative would enable DOE and Mallinckrodt to coordinate efforts to prevent the uncontrolled relocation of contamination and ensure that ultimate site cleanup objectives are not complicated by plant activities implemented by Mallinckrodt. The EE/CA, dated May 1991, was issued to the general public on June 7, 1991, and a public comment period was held from June 7 through July 10, 1991, in accordance with the public participation process identified in CERCLA. Comments on the proposed action were received in writing from the Missouri Department of Health, private citizen Kay Drey, and the EPA Region 7. This responsiveness summary has been prepared to respond to issues identified in these comment letters on the proposed action.

  2. Responsiveness summary for the engineering evaluation/cost analysis for decontamination at the St. Louis Downtown Site, St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Picel, M.H.; Peterson, J.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Williams, M.J. [Bechtel National, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for conducting remedial actions at the Mallinckrodt Chemical Plant, also referred to as the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS), located in the city of St. Louis, Missouri. Remedial activities at the SLDS are being carried out under DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) as part of the overall cleanup planned for three noncontiguous areas in St. Louis, which are collectively referred to as the St. Louis Site. Potential response action alternatives for managing the contaminated material generated at the SLDS have been evaluated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance for conducting interim actions under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) report was prepared to document this process. On the basis of the analysis presented in the EE/CA, the preferred alternative for the management of contaminated wastes generated by DOE-supported plant activities is the provision of temporary storage capacity, which can be made available by modifying an existing building (i.e., Building 116) at SLDS. This alternative would enable DOE and Mallinckrodt to coordinate efforts to prevent the uncontrolled relocation of contamination and ensure that ultimate site cleanup objectives are not complicated by plant activities implemented by Mallinckrodt. The EE/CA, dated May 1991, was issued to the general public on June 7, 1991, and a public comment period was held from June 7 through July 10, 1991, in accordance with the public participation process identified in CERCLA. Comments on the proposed action were received in writing from the Missouri Department of Health, private citizen Kay Drey, and the EPA Region 7. This responsiveness summary has been prepared to respond to issues identified in these comment letters on the proposed action.

  3. The relative use of form 8-k disclosures: a trading response analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLelland, Andrew John

    2004-09-30

    Prior research suggests that the use of accounting information differs substantially by investor class. My analysis extends this line of research to the area of SEC Form 8-K filings. Prior research also provides mixed ...

  4. Statistical and risk analysis for the measured and predicted axial response of 100 piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perdomo, Dario

    1986-01-01

    . , Universidad de los Andes Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Jean-Louis Briaud A statistical analysis of the ultimate load and load-settlement results obtained by Briaud et al(1985) was performed . A risk analy- sis method was also developed to study... the importance of properly selecting safety factors. The data base of 100 piles was statistical- ly analyzed under five different soil categories, and several predic- tion methods were used to study the performance of the risk analysis method. In general...

  5. Who is to blame for Food Bank Britain? An analysis of the geographies of responsibility through the experiences of the Edinburgh food bank community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolley, Felicity

    2014-11-27

    A qualitative analysis of the geographies of responsibility pertaining to the recently reported increases in demand within the food bank system. Interviews were conducted with fifty volunteers and clients from the Edinburgh food bank community...

  6. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN) [London, TN; Dress, William B. (Camas, WA) [Camas, WA

    2010-02-09

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method, includes receiving a hybrid spread spectrum signal including: fast frequency hopping demodulating and direct sequence demodulating a direct sequence spread spectrum signal, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time and each bit is represented by chip transmissions at multiple frequencies.

  7. Modeling and Analysis of The Pressure Die Casting Using Response Surface Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kittur, Jayant K.; Herwadkar, T. V. [KLS Gogte Institute of Technology, Belgaum -590 008, Karnataka (India); Parappagoudar, M. B. [Chhatrapati Shivaji Institute of Technology, Durg (C.G)-491001 (India)

    2010-10-26

    Pressure die casting is successfully used in the manufacture of Aluminum alloys components for automobile and many other industries. Die casting is a process involving many process parameters having complex relationship with the quality of the cast product. Though various process parameters have influence on the quality of die cast component, major influence is seen by the die casting machine parameters and their proper settings. In the present work, non-linear regression models have been developed for making predictions and analyzing the effect of die casting machine parameters on the performance characteristics of die casting process. Design of Experiments (DOE) with Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has been used to analyze the effect of effect of input parameters and their interaction on the response and further used to develop nonlinear input-output relationships. Die casting machine parameters, namely, fast shot velocity, slow shot to fast shot change over point, intensification pressure and holding time have been considered as the input variables. The quality characteristics of the cast product were determined by porosity, hardness and surface rough roughness (output/responses). Design of experiments has been used to plan the experiments and analyze the impact of variables on the quality of casting. On the other-hand Response Surface Methodology (Central Composite Design) is utilized to develop non-linear input-output relationships (regression models). The developed regression models have been tested for their statistical adequacy through ANOVA test. The practical usefulness of these models has been tested with some test cases. These models can be used to make the predictions about different quality characteristics, for the known set of die casting machine parameters, without conducting the experiments.

  8. Analysis of Open Automated Demand Response Deployments in California and Guidelines to Transition to Industry Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghatikar, Girish; Riess, David; Piette, Mary Ann

    2014-01-02

    This report reviews the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) deployments within the territories serviced by California?s investor-owned utilities (IOUs) and the transition from the OpenADR 1.0 specification to the formal standard?OpenADR 2.0. As demand response service providers and customers start adopting OpenADR 2.0, it is necessary to ensure that the existing Automated Demand Response (AutoDR) infrastructure investment continues to be useful and takes advantage of the formal standard and its many benefits. This study focused on OpenADR deployments and systems used by the California IOUs and included a summary of the OpenADR deployment from the U.S. Department of Energy-funded demonstration conducted by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD). Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory collected and analyzed data about OpenADR 1.0 deployments, categorized architectures, developed a data model mapping to understand the technical compatibility of each version, and compared the capabilities and features of the two specifications. The findings, for the first time, provided evidence of the total enabled load shed and average first cost for system enablement in the IOU and SMUD service territories. The OpenADR 2.0a profile specification semantically supports AutoDR system architectures and data propagation with a testing and certification program that promotes interoperability, scaled deployments by multiple vendors, and provides additional features that support future services.

  9. Spectrum Sensing and Reconstruction for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    to explore and exploit the free spectrum. Spectrum analyzer is used to emulate cognitive radio to do spectrum should keep silent; otherwise, cognitive radio can access this spectrum. In this paper, spectrum analyzer- rithm of sensing spectrum and transmission schemes [6]. Pre- viously, spectrum analyzer was controlled

  10. Measurement of accelerator neutron radiation field spectrum by Extended Range Neutron Multisphere Spectrometers and unfolding program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Guanjia; Ma, Zhongjian; Guo, Siming; Yan, Mingyang; Shi, Haoyu; Xu, Chao

    2015-01-01

    This paper described a measurement of accelerator neutron radiation field at a transport beam line of Beijing-TBF. The experiment place was be selected around a Faraday Cup with a graphite target impacted by electron beam at 2.5GeV. First of all, we simulated the neutron radiation experiment by FLUKA. Secondly, we chose six appropriate ERNMS according to their neutron fluence response function to measure the neutron count rate. Then the U_M_G package program was be utilized to unfolding experiment data. Finally, we drew a comparison between the unfolding with the simulation spectrum and made an analysis about the result.

  11. Cosmological parameter analysis including SDSS Ly-alpha forest and galaxy bias: constraints on the primordial spectrum of fluctuations, neutrino mass, and dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. Seljak; A. Makarov; P. McDonald; S. Anderson; N. Bahcall; J. Brinkmann; S. Burles; R. Cen; M. Doi; J. Gunn; Z. Ivezic; S. Kent; R. Lupton; J. Munn; R. Nichol; J. Ostriker; D. Schlegel; M. Tegmark; D. Van den Berk; D. Weinberg; D. York

    2004-07-19

    We combine the constraints from the recent Ly-alpha forest and bias analysis of the SDSS with previous constraints from SDSS galaxy clustering, the latest supernovae, and WMAP . Combining WMAP and the lya we find for the primordial slope n_s=0.98\\pm 0.02. We see no evidence of running, dn/d\\ln k=-0.003\\pm 0.010, a factor of 3 improvement over previous constraints. We also find no evidence of tensors, renergy constraints in models with a fairly general time dependence of dark energy equation of state, finding Omega_lambda=0.72\\pm 0.02, w(z=0.3)=-0.98^{+0.10}_{-0.12}, the latter changing to w(z=0.3)=-0.92^{+0.09}_{-0.10} if tensors are allowed. We find no evidence for variation of the equation of state with redshift, w(z=1)=-1.03^{+0.21}_{-0.28}. These results rely on the current understanding of the lyaf and other probes, which need to be explored further both observationally and theoretically, but extensive tests reveal no evidence of inconsistency among different data sets used here.

  12. Video-aided analysis of zebrafish locomotion and anxiety-related behavioral responses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    . Canavello1 , Jonathan M. Cachat1 , Salem I. Elkhayat1 , Brett K. Bartels1 , Peter C. Hart1 , Marco F behaviors that are otherwise highly subjective. This protocol describes method for fast, accurate. The present protocol outlines the video-tracking approach to analysis of zebrafish behavioral phenotypes

  13. Monte-Carlo Simulator and Ancillary Response Generator of Suzaku XRT/XIS System for Spatially Extended Source Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Ishisaki; Y. Maeda; R. Fujimoto; M. Ozaki; K. Ebisawa; T. Takahashi; Y. Ueda; Y. Ogasaka; A. Ptak; K. Mukai; K. Hamaguchi; M. Hirayama; T. Kotani; H. Kubo; R. Shibata; M. Ebara; A. Furuzawa; R. Iizuka; H. Inoue; H. Mori; S. Okada; Y. Yokoyama; H. Matsumoto; H. Nakajima; H. Yamaguchi; N. Anabuki; N. Tawa; M. Nagai; S. Katsuda; K. Hayashida; A. Bamba; E. D. Miller; K. Sato; N. Y. Yamasaki

    2006-10-04

    We have developed a framework for the Monte-Carlo simulation of the X-Ray Telescopes (XRT) and the X-ray Imaging Spectrometers (XIS) onboard Suzaku, mainly for the scientific analysis of spatially and spectroscopically complex celestial sources. A photon-by-photon instrumental simulator is built on the ANL platform, which has been successfully used in ASCA data analysis. The simulator has a modular structure, in which the XRT simulation is based on a ray-tracing library, while the XIS simulation utilizes a spectral "Redistribution Matrix File" (RMF), generated separately by other tools. Instrumental characteristics and calibration results, e.g., XRT geometry, reflectivity, mutual alignments, thermal shield transmission, build-up of the contamination on the XIS optical blocking filters (OBF), are incorporated as completely as possible. Most of this information is available in the form of the FITS (Flexible Image Transport System) files in the standard calibration database (CALDB). This simulator can also be utilized to generate an "Ancillary Response File" (ARF), which describes the XRT response and the amount of OBF contamination. The ARF is dependent on the spatial distribution of the celestial target and the photon accumulation region on the detector, as well as observing conditions such as the observation date and satellite attitude. We describe principles of the simulator and the ARF generator, and demonstrate their performance in comparison with in-flight data.

  14. Site-specific earthquake response analysis for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sykora, D.W.; Davis, J.J.

    1993-08-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and operated under contract by Martin Marietta Energy systems, Inc., is located southwest of Paducah, Kentucky. An aerial photograph and an oblique sketch of the plant are shown in Figures 1 and 2, respectively. The fenced portion of the plant consists of 748 acres. This plant was constructed in the 1950`s and is one of only two gaseous diffusion plants in operation in the United States; the other is located near Portsmouth, Ohio. The facilities at PGDP are currently being evaluated for safety in response to natural seismic hazards. Design and evaluation guidelines to evaluate the effects of earthquakes and other natural hazards on DOE facilities follow probabilistic hazard models that have been outlined by Kennedy et al. (1990). Criteria also established by Kennedy et al. (1990) classify diffusion plants as ``moderate hazard`` facilities. The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was tasked to calculate the site response using site-specific design earthquake records developed by others and the results of previous geotechnical investigations. In all, six earthquake records at three hazard levels and four individual and one average soil columns were used.

  15. Reservoir characterization based on tracer response and rank analysis of production and injection rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Refunjol, B.T.; Lake, L.W.

    1997-08-01

    Quantification of the spatial distribution of properties is important for many reservoir-engineering applications. But, before applying any reservoir-characterization technique, the type of problem to be tackled and the information available should be analyzed. This is important because difficulties arise in reservoirs where production records are the only information for analysis. This paper presents the results of a practical technique to determine preferential flow trends in a reservoir. The technique is a combination of reservoir geology, tracer data, and Spearman rank correlation coefficient analysis. The Spearman analysis, in particular, will prove to be important because it appears to be insightful and uses injection/production data that are prevalent in circumstances where other data are nonexistent. The technique is applied to the North Buck Draw field, Campbell County, Wyoming. This work provides guidelines to assess information about reservoir continuity in interwell regions from widely available measurements of production and injection rates at existing wells. The information gained from the application of this technique can contribute to both the daily reservoir management and the future design, control, and interpretation of subsequent projects in the reservoir, without the need for additional data.

  16. Modeling and Analysis of the Role of Fast-Response Energy Storage in the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Han-I

    2011-01-01

    The large short time-scale variability of renewable energy resources presents significant challenges to the reliable operation of power systems. This variability can be mitigated by deploying fast-ramping generators. However, these generators are costly to operate and produce environmentally harmful emissions. Fast-response energy storage devices, such as batteries and flywheels, provide an environmentally friendly alternative, but are expensive and have limited capacity. To study the environmental benefits of storage, we introduce a slotted-time dynamic residual dc power flow model with the prediction error of the difference between the generation (including renewables) and the load as input and the fast-ramping generation and the storage (charging/discharging) operation as the control variables used to ensure that the demand is satisfied (as much as possible) in each time slot. We assume the input prediction error sequence to be i.i.d. zero-mean random variables. The optimal power flow problem is then formu...

  17. Understanding the Effect of Baseline Modeling Implementation Choices on Analysis of Demand Response Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    University of California, Berkeley; Addy, Nathan; Kiliccote, Sila; Mathieu, Johanna; Callaway, Duncan S.

    2012-06-13

    Accurate evaluation of the performance of buildings participating in Demand Response (DR) programs is critical to the adoption and improvement of these programs. Typically, we calculate load sheds during DR events by comparing observed electric demand against counterfactual predictions made using statistical baseline models. Many baseline models exist and these models can produce different shed calculations. Moreover, modelers implementing the same baseline model can make different modeling implementation choices, which may affect shed estimates. In this work, using real data, we analyze the effect of different modeling implementation choices on shed predictions. We focused on five issues: weather data source, resolution of data, methods for determining when buildings are occupied, methods for aligning building data with temperature data, and methods for power outage filtering. Results indicate sensitivity to the weather data source and data filtration methods as well as an immediate potential for automation of methods to choose building occupied modes.

  18. Statistical analysis of the temporal single-photon response of superconducting nanowire single photon detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Y -H; Zhang, W -J; Zhang, L; Wu, J -J; Chen, S -J; You, L -X; Wang, Z

    2015-01-01

    Counting rate is a key parameter of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPD) and is determined by the current recovery time of an SNSPD after a detection event. We propose a new method to study the transient detection efficiency (DE) and pulse amplitude during the current recovery process by statistically analyzing the single photon response of an SNSPD under photon illumination with a high repetition rate. The transient DE results match well with the DEs deduced from the static current dependence of DE combined with the waveform of a single-photon detection event. This proves that the static measurement results can be used to analyze the transient current recovery process after a detection event. The results are relevant for understanding the current recovery process of SNSPDs after a detection event and for determining the counting rate of SNSPDs.

  19. PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum author responses to request for additional information.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

    2010-09-01

    The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) submitted SAND Report SAND2009-5822 to NRC that documented the incorporation of plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. NRC responded with a Request for Additional Information (RAI), identifying information needed in connection with its review of the application. The purpose of this SAND report is to provide the authors responses to each RAI. SAND Report SAND2010-6106 containing the proposed changes to the Addendum is provided separately.

  20. Response Surface Analysis of Elemental Composition and Energy Properties of Corn Stover During Torrefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Richard D. Boardman; Christopher T. Wright

    2012-02-01

    This research studied the effects of torrefaction temperature (250-250 C) and time (30-120 minutes) on elemental composition and energy properties changes in corn stover. Torrefied material was analyzed for moisture content, moisture-free carbon (%), hydrogen (%), nitrogen (%), sulfur (%), and higher heating value (MJ/kg). Results at 350 C and 120 minutes indicated a steep decrease in moisture content to a final value of about 1.48% - a reduction of about 69%. With respect to carbon content, the increase was about 23%, while hydrogen and sulfur content decreased by about 46.82% and 66.6%, respectively. The hydrogen-to-carbon ratio decreased as torrefaction temperature and time increased, with the lowest value of 0.6 observed at 350 C and 120 minutes. Higher heating value measured at 350 C and 60 minutes increased by about 22% and the maximum degree of carbonization observed was about 1.21. Further, the regression models developed for chemical composition in terms of torrefaction temperature and time adequately described the process with coefficient of determination values (R2) in the range of 0.92-0.99 for the elemental composition and energy properties studied. Response surface plots indicated that increasing both torrefaction temperature and time resulted in decreased moisture content, hydrogen content, and the hydrogen to-carbon ratio, and increased carbon content and higher heating value. This effect was more significant at torrefaction temperatures and times >280 C and >30 minutes.

  1. Software Tools for the Analysis of the Photocathode Response of Photomultiplier Vacuum Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabbri, R

    2013-01-01

    The central institute of electronics (ZEA-2) in the Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ) has developed a system to scan the response of the photocathode of photomultiplier tubes (PMT). The PMT sits tight on a supporting structure, while a blue light emitting diode is moved along its surface by two stepper motors, spanning both the x and y coordinates. All the system is located in a light-tight box made by wood. A graphical software was developed in-situ to perform the scan operations under different configurations (e.g., the step size of the scan and the number of measurements per point). During each point measurement the current output generated in the vacuum photomultiplier is processed in sequence by a pre-amplifier (mainly to convert the current signal into a voltage signal), an amplifier, and by an ADC module (typically a CAEN N957). The information of the measurement is saved in files at the end of the scan. Recently, software based on the CERN ROOT and on the Qt libraries was developed to help the user anal...

  2. Parallel Radioisotope Collection and Analysis in Response to the Fukushima Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, Vincent T.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Biegalski, S.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Miley, Harry S.; Morris, Scott J.

    2013-05-01

    Two independent air samplers were operated at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in parallel during the collection of samples from the Fukushima reactor releases. One system is an automated aerosol collection and analysis unit, while the other was a manual sampler of higher daily air volume. The samples collected each day showed excellent correlation in radionuclide activity, although some variations were seen. These variations illustrate the reproducibility of the air sample radionuclide measurements made by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty International Monitoring System (IMS) and show a simple way to acquire useful parallel samples for scientific purposes. In particular, a party wishing to have a copy of a sample acquired by the verification regime of the treaty could employ this method and have results similar to the IMS station at low cost and even higher sensitivity.

  3. Rapid-response analysis of the Davis-Besse loss-of-feedwater event on June 9, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lime, J.F.; Nassersharif, B.; Boyack, B.E.

    1986-01-01

    At the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), we performed a rapid-response analysis of the loss-of-feedwater (LOFW) event that occurred at the Toledo Edison Davis-Besse plant on June 9, 1985. The initial 831 s of the plant transient were simulated and, in addition, four postulated transients were calculated to determine how the plant would have responded if feedwater had not been restored, and how it would have responded to a feed-and-bleed (FAB) decay-heat removal procedure initiated at different times. The Transient Reactor Analysis Code was used for this analysis. We completed these calculations within a two-week period and provided a report to the NRC 30 days later. Our analysis showed that FAB was a viable decay-heat-removal procedure for the Davis-Besse plant for the initiation times analyzed. With complete LOFW and no alternate decay-heat removal procedure, we calculated that core uncovery would have occurred at about 9200 s. FAB initiated at 8 min and 13 min after complete LOFW, which in the actual LOFW transient occurred 6 min after the initiating event of a main-feedwater pump trip, was successful in that the primary system remained subcooled and water-solid throughout the transient. FAB initiated at 28 min after complete LOFW was considered successful even though it resulted in a loss of subcooling, a net loss in primary inventory, and a slow voiding of the primary system. The core would have remained covered for the nine hours that we estimated for the primary pressure to decrease to the residual-heat-removal pressure.

  4. Supplement analysis for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 2: Comment response document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), prepared a draft Supplement Analysis (SA) for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL-L), in accordance with DOE`s requirements for implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (10 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 1021.314). It considers whether the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (1992 EIS/EIR) should be supplement3ed, whether a new environmental impact statement (EIS) should be prepared, or no further NEPA documentation is required. The SA examines the current project and program plans and proposals for LLNL and SNL-L, operations to identify new or modified projects or operations or new information for the period from 1998 to 2002 that was not considered in the 1992 EIS/EIR. When such changes, modifications, and information are identified, they are examined to determine whether they could be considered substantial or significant in reference to the 1992 proposed action and the 1993 Record of Decision (ROD). DOE released the draft SA to the public to obtain stakeholder comments and to consider those comments in the preparation of the final SA. DOE distributed copies of the draft SA to those who were known to have an interest in LLNL or SNL-L activities in addition to those who requested a copy. In response to comments received, DOE prepared this Comment Response Document.

  5. QCD and the Hagedorn spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas D. Cohen

    2010-03-15

    It is shown that large Nc QCD must have a Hagedorn spectrum (i.e. a spectrum of hadron which grows exponentially with the hadrons mass) provided that certain technical assumptions concerning the applicability of perturbation theory to a certain class of correlation functions apply. The basic argument exploits the interplay of confinement and asymptotic freedom.

  6. Corporate social responsibility (CSR) : responsibility or Innovation? : an analysis of the feedback between CSR activities and the expectations placed upon corporations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Adrian Xavier

    2010-01-01

    This thesis uses case study and interview data to present a framework for analyzing corporate behavior in order to define corporate social responsibility (CSR). It answers the question: Can corporations tie corporate social ...

  7. Atomic spectrum of plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise, J.; Fred, M.; Gutmacher, R.G.

    1984-08-01

    This report contains plutonium wavelengths, energy level classifications, and other spectroscopic data accumulated over the past twenty years at Laboratoire Aime Cotton (LAC) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The primary purpose was term analysis: deriving the energy levels in terms of quantum numbers and electron configurations, and evaluating the Slater-Condon and other parameters from the levels.

  8. PROSPECT - A precision oscillation and spectrum experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Langford

    2014-12-22

    Segmented antineutrino detectors placed near a compact research reactor provide an excellent opportunity to probe short-baseline neutrino oscillations and precisely measure the reactor antineutrino spectrum. Close proximity to a reactor combined with minimal overburden yield a high background environment that must be managed through shielding and detector technology. PROSPECT is a new experimental effort to detect reactor antineutrinos from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The detector will use novel lithium-loaded liquid scintillator capable of neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination and neutron capture tagging. These enhancements improve the ability to identify neutrino inverse-beta decays and reject background events in analysis. Results from these efforts will be covered along with their implications for an oscillation search and a precision spectrum measurement.

  9. PROSPECT - A precision oscillation and spectrum experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01

    Segmented antineutrino detectors placed near a compact research reactor provide an excellent opportunity to probe short-baseline neutrino oscillations and precisely measure the reactor antineutrino spectrum. Close proximity to a reactor combined with minimal overburden yield a high background environment that must be managed through shielding and detector technology. PROSPECT is a new experimental effort to detect reactor antineutrinos from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The detector will use novel lithium-loaded liquid scintillator capable of neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination and neutron capture tagging. These enhancements improve the ability to identify neutrino inverse-beta decays and reject background events in analysis. Results from these efforts will be covered along with their implications for an oscillation search and a precision spectrum measurement.

  10. Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Therapeutics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rider, Todd H.

    Currently there are relatively few antiviral therapeutics, and most which do exist are highly pathogen-specific or have other disadvantages. We have developed a new broad-spectrum antiviral approach, dubbed Double-stranded ...

  11. Spectrum of C_heart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spectrum of C_heart where 1 + z + 2\\sqrt{1 - z^2} heart(z)= ------------------------- 3 - z + 2\\sqrt{1 - z^2}. Figure 7.1, page 303, of "Composition Operators on Spaces...

  12. Lyapunov spectrum of granular gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNamara, Sean; Mareschal, Michel

    2001-06-01

    We calculate and study the Lyapunov spectrum of a granular gas maintained in a steady state by an isokinetic thermostat. Considering restitution coefficients greater than unity allows us to show that the spectra change smoothly and continuously at equilibrium. The shearing instability of the granular gas, however, provokes an abrupt change in the structure of the spectrum. The relationship between various physically relevant quantities and the energy dissipation rate differs from previously studied nonequilibrium steady states.

  13. Analysis of Aquifer Response, Groundwater Flow, and PlumeEvolution at Site OU 1, Former Fort Ord, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Preston D.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Su, Grace W.

    2005-02-24

    This report presents a continuation from Oldenburg et al. (2002) of analysis of the hydrogeology, In-Situ Permeable Flow Sensor (ISPFS) results, aquifer response, and changes in the trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume at Operational Unit 1 (OU 1) adjacent to the former Fritzsche Army Airfield at the former Fort Ord Army Base, located on Monterey Bay in northern Monterey County. Fuels and solvents were burned on a portion of OU 1 called the Fire Drill Area (FDA) during airport fire suppression training between 1962 and 1985. This activity resulted in soil and groundwater contamination in the unconfined A-aquifer. In the late 1980's, soil excavation and bioremediation were successful in remediating soil contamination at the site. Shortly thereafter, a groundwater pump, treat, and recharge system commenced operation. This system has been largely successful at remediating groundwater contamination at the head of the groundwater plume. However, a trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume extends approximately 3000 ft (900 m) to the northwest away from the FDA. In the analyses presented here, we augment our prior work (Oldenburg et al., 2002) with new information including treatment-system totalizer data, recent water-level and chemistry data, and data collected from new wells to discern trends in contaminant migration and groundwater flow that may be useful for ongoing remediation efforts. Some conclusions from the prior study have been modified based on these new analyses, and these are pointed out clearly in this report.

  14. Seismic analysis of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility: soil structure interaction analyses of the Axicell vacuum vessel. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maslenikov, O.R.; Mraz, M.J.; Johnson, J.J.

    1986-03-01

    This report documents the seismic analyses performed by SMA for the MFTF-B Axicell vacuum vessel. In the course of this study we performed response spectrum analyses, CLASSI fixed-base analyses, and SSI analyses that included interaction effects between the vessel and vault. The response spectrum analysis served to benchmark certain modeling differences between the LLNL and SMA versions of the vessel model. The fixed-base analysis benchmarked the differences between analysis techniques. The SSI analyses provided our best estimate of vessel response to the postulated seismic excitation for the MFTF-B facility, and included consideration of uncertainties in soil properties by calculating response for a range of soil shear moduli. Our results are presented in this report as tables of comparisons of specific member forces from our analyses and the analyses performed by LLNL. Also presented are tables of maximum accelerations and relative displacements and plots of response spectra at various selected locations.

  15. Calibration Guide Agilent Technologies ESA Spectrum Analyzers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    Calibration Guide Agilent Technologies ESA Spectrum Analyzers This manual provides documentation periodically. For the latest information about Agilent ESA Spectrum Analyzers, including firmware upgrades

  16. Multi-boson spectrum of the SU(2)-Higgs model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Wurtz; Randy Lewis

    2013-10-03

    Lattice simulations are used to compute the spectrum of energy levels for all angular momentum and parity quantum numbers in the SU(2)-Higgs model, with parameters chosen to match experimental data from the Higgs-W boson sector of the standard model. Creation operators are constructed for all lattice irreducible representations, and a correlation matrix is formed from which the spectrum is extracted using a variational analysis. Many multi-boson states are observed and careful analysis reveals that all are consistent with weakly-interacting Higgs and W bosons.

  17. Three-dimensional Numerical Analysis on Blade Response of Vertical Axis Tidal Current Turbine Under Operational Condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ye; Karri, Naveen K.; Wang, Qi

    2014-04-30

    Tidal power as a large-scale renewable source of energy has been receiving significant attention recently because of its advantages over the wind and other renewal energy sources. The technology used to harvest energy from tidal current is called a tidal current turbine. Though some of the principles of wind turbine design are applicable to tidal current turbines, the design of latter ones need additional considerations like cavitation damage, corrosion etc. for the long-term reliability of such turbines. Depending up on the orientation of axis, tidal current turbines can be classified as vertical axis turbines or horizontal axis turbines. Existing studies on the vertical axis tidal current turbine focus more on the hydrodynamic aspects of the turbine rather than the structural aspects. This paper summarizes our recent efforts to study the integrated hydrodynamic and structural aspects of the vertical axis tidal current turbines. After reviewing existing methods in modeling tidal current turbines, we developed a hybrid approach that combines discrete vortex method -finite element method that can simulate the integrated hydrodynamic and structural response of a vertical axis turbine. This hybrid method was initially employed to analyze a typical three-blade vertical axis turbine. The power coefficient was used to evaluate the hydrodynamic performance, and critical deflection was considered to evaluate the structural reliability. A sensitivity analysis was also conducted with various turbine height-to-radius ratios. The results indicate that both the power output and failure probability increase with the turbine height, suggesting a necessity for optimal design. An attempt to optimize a 3-blade vertical axis turbine design with hybrid method yielded a ratio of turbine height to radius (H/R) about 3.0 for reliable maximum power output.

  18. Behavioral Response to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Refueling: A Comparative Analysis of Short- and Long-Term Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Elliot; Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy; Lidicker, Jeffery

    2008-01-01

    on the attitude towards hydrogen fuel cell buses in the CUTEbus demonstration and hydrogen fuel. Energy Policy, Vol.BEHAVIORAL RESPONSE TO HYDROGEN FUEL CELL VEHICLES AND

  19. Center symmetry and Hagedorn spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the conjecture that large $N_c$ gauge theories have a Hagedorn spectrum, if, and only if, they are confining and posses an explicit or emergent center symmetry. Evidence in support of this conjecture is presented. Many classes of large $N_c$ gauge theories are considered. In all cases, we find that theories for which there exists a strong plausibility argument for a Hagedorn spectrum at large $N_c$ are also believed to be confining and possess either an explicit center symmetric or have a strong plausibility argument for the existence of an emergent center symmetry at large $N_c$. Conversely, all theories we considered which are believed not to have a Hagedorn spectrum at large $N_c$, either were known not to be confining or else were believed to lack an emergent center symmetry. This is consistent with expectations based on the conjecture.

  20. Luminosity Spectrum Reconstruction at Linear Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stphane Poss; Andr Sailer

    2014-04-11

    A good knowledge of the luminosity spectrum is mandatory for many measurements at future e+e- colliders. As the beam-parameters determining the luminosity spectrum cannot be measured precisely, the luminosity spectrum has to be measured through a gauge process with the detector. The measured distributions, used to reconstruct the spectrum, depend on Initial State Radiation, cross-section, and Final State Radiation. To extract the basic luminosity spectrum, a parametric model of the luminosity spectrum is created, in this case the spectrum at the 3 TeV Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The model is used within a reweighting technique to extract the luminosity spectrum from measured Bhabha event observables, taking all relevant effects into account. The centre-of-mass energy spectrum is reconstructed within 5% over the full validity range of the model. The reconstructed spectrum does not result in a significant bias or systematic uncertainty in the exemplary physics benchmark process of smuon pair production.

  1. SM1I.4.pdf CLEO:2015 OSA 2015 Integrated on-chip C-band optical spectrum analyzer using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergman, Keren

    SM1I.4.pdf CLEO:2015 OSA 2015 Integrated on-chip C-band optical spectrum analyzer using dual demonstrate an on-chip optical spectrum analyzer (OSA) using two cascade optical ring resonators. The OSA analysis for terahertz bandwidth. Other chip-scale spectrum analyzers adopt Fabry-Perot cavity filter

  2. ENGR 201 Electrical Fundamentals I Catalog Description: Analysis of linear circuits. Circuit laws and theorems. DC response of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENGR 201 Electrical Fundamentals I Catalog Description: Analysis of linear circuits. Circuit laws and laws Methods of analysis (e.g., nodal, mesh) Circuit theorems Operational amplifiers Capacitors, and apply these for the analysis of dc circuits (ABET outcomes: A, e, m) 4. Analyze circuits made up

  3. Behavioral Response to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Refueling: A Comparative Analysis of Short- and Long-Term Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Elliot; Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy; Lidicker, Jeffery

    2008-01-01

    on the attitude towards hydrogen fuel cell buses in the CUTEDriver Preferences for Fuel Cell Taxis. Energy Policy, vol.RESPONSE TO HYDROGEN FUEL CELL VEHICLES AND REFUELING: A

  4. DCE-MRI defined subvolumes of a brain metastatic lesion by principle component analysis and fuzzy-c-means clustering for response assessment of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farjam, Reza; Tsien, Christina I.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue; Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Med Inn Building C478, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5842; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2200 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2099

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To develop a pharmacokinetic modelfree framework to analyze the dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data for assessment of response of brain metastases to radiation therapy. Methods: Twenty patients with 45 analyzable brain metastases had MRI scans prior to whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) and at the end of the 2-week therapy. The volumetric DCE images covering the whole brain were acquired on a 3T scanner with approximately 5 s temporal resolution and a total scan time of about 3 min. DCE curves from all voxels of the 45 brain metastases were normalized and then temporally aligned. A DCE matrix that is constructed from the aligned DCE curves of all voxels of the 45 lesions obtained prior to WBRT is processed by principal component analysis to generate the principal components (PCs). Then, the projection coefficient maps prior to and at the end of WBRT are created for each lesion. Next, a pattern recognition technique, based upon fuzzy-c-means clustering, is used to delineate the tumor subvolumes relating to the value of the significant projection coefficients. The relationship between changes in different tumor subvolumes and treatment response was evaluated to differentiate responsive from stable and progressive tumors. Performance of the PC-defined tumor subvolume was also evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in prediction of nonresponsive lesions and compared with physiological-defined tumor subvolumes. Results: The projection coefficient maps of the first three PCs contain almost all response-related information in DCE curves of brain metastases. The first projection coefficient, related to the area under DCE curves, is the major component to determine response while the third one has a complimentary role. In ROC analysis, the area under curve of 0.88 0.05 and 0.86 0.06 were achieved for the PC-defined and physiological-defined tumor subvolume in response assessment. Conclusions: The PC-defined subvolume of a brain metastasis could predict tumor response to therapy similar to the physiological-defined one, while the former is determined more rapidly for clinical decision-making support.

  5. Non-Cooperative Spectrum Access -- The Dedicated vs. Free Spectrum Choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannathan, Krishna Prasanna

    We consider a dynamic spectrum access system in which Secondary Users (SUs) choose to either acquire dedicated spectrum or to use spectrum-holes (white spaces) which belong to Primary Users (PUs). The trade-off incorporated ...

  6. Study on proliferative responses to host Ia antigens in allogeneic bone marrow chimera in mice: sequential analysis of the reactivity and characterization of the cells involved in the responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwabuchi, K.; Ogasawara, K.; Ogasawara, M.; Yasumizu, R.; Noguchi, M.; Geng, L.; Fujita, M.; Good, R.A.; Onoe, K.

    1987-01-01

    Irradiation bone marrow chimeras were established by reconstitution of lethally irradiated AKR mice with C57BL/10 marrow cells to permit serial analysis of the developing reactivities of lymphocytes from such chimeras, (B10----AKR), against donor, host, or third party antigens. We found that substantial proliferative responses to Ia antigens of the recipient strain and also to third party antigens were generated by the thymocytes obtained from the irradiation chimeras at an early stage after bone marrow reconstitution. The majority of the responding thymocytes had surfaces lacking demonstrable peanut agglutinin receptors and were donor type Thy-1+, Ly-2-, and L3T4+ in both anti-recipient and anti-third party MLR. In anti-host responses, however, Ly-2+ thymocytes seemed to be at least partially involved. This capacity of thymus cells to mount a response to antigens of the recipient strain declined shortly thereafter, whereas the capacity to mount MLR against third party antigens persisted. The spleen cells of (B10----AKR) chimeras at the same time developed a more durable capability to exhibit anti-host reactivities and a permanent capability of reacting to third party allo-antigens. The stimulator antigens were Ia molecules on the stimulator cells in both anti-recipient and anti-third party MLR. The responding splenocytes were of donor origin and most of them had Thy-1+, Ly-1+2-, and L3T4+ phenotype.

  7. IMPULSE RESPONSE ANALYSIS OF THE VAN NUYS 7-STORY HOTEL DURING 11 EARTHQUAKES AND EARTHQUAKE DAMAGE DETECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    propagating waves are measured in the Van Nuys 7- story hotel, located in the Los Angeles metropolitan area response data from 11 earthquakes over a period of 24 years are analyzed. Changes in wave travel times). Also, wave travel times are used to estimate the fundamental fixed-base frequency of the building, 1f

  8. Agilent AN 1318 Optimizing Spectrum Analyzer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    Agilent AN 1318 Optimizing Spectrum Analyzer Measurement Speed Application Note Agilent ESA-E Series #12;2 Why speed matters The measurement speed of your spectrum analyzer can significantly affect for the spectrum analyzer to warm up to make calibrated measurements. R&D finally receives the new project

  9. Analysis of trip item non-response bias in the Houston-Galveston area council household travel surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamble, Arthur F

    1997-01-01

    Information obtained through the collection and analysis of origin-destination travel surveys is used to develop trip rate information for input to travel demand models. Three major sources of systematic error can exist relative to typical sample...

  10. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN); Dress, William B. (Camas, WA)

    2010-02-02

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method includes modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control an amplification circuit that provides a gain to the signal. Another method includes: modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control a fast hopping frequency synthesizer; and fast frequency hopping the signal with the fast hopping frequency synthesizer, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time.

  11. Multi-Channel Reliability and Spectrum Usage in Real Homes: Empirical Studies for Home-Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Chenyang

    passive spectrum analysis across the entire 2.4 GHz band over seven days in each apartment. We find technology can be used to easily and inexpensively retrofit existing apartments and households without

  12. Determination of a mutational spectrum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thilly, William G. (Winchester, MA); Keohavong, Phouthone (Cambridge, MA)

    1991-01-01

    A method of resolving (physically separating) mutant DNA from nonmutant DNA and a method of defining or establishing a mutational spectrum or profile of alterations present in nucleic acid sequences from a sample to be analyzed, such as a tissue or body fluid. The present method is based on the fact that it is possible, through the use of DGGE, to separate nucleic acid sequences which differ by only a single base change and on the ability to detect the separate mutant molecules. The present invention, in another aspect, relates to a method for determining a mutational spectrum in a DNA sequence of interest present in a population of cells. The method of the present invention is useful as a diagnostic or analytical tool in forensic science in assessing environmental and/or occupational exposures to potentially genetically toxic materials (also referred to as potential mutagens); in biotechnology, particularly in the study of the relationship between the amino acid sequence of enzymes and other biologically-active proteins or protein-containing substances and their respective functions; and in determining the effects of drugs, cosmetics and other chemicals for which toxicity data must be obtained.

  13. Validating Oscillations and Delayed Auditory Responses as Translational Biomarkers of Autism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushman, Frederic

    Validating Oscillations and Delayed Auditory Responses as Translational Biomarkers of Autism) has hindered pathophysiological investiga- tion and treatment development for autism spectrum be more directly related to the abnormal neural dynamics of autism spectrum disorders. This study assessed

  14. Genetic Analysis of Ca2+ Priming in Arabidopsis Guard Cell Stomatal Closure in Response to the Drought Hormone Abscisic Acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephan, Aaron B.

    2014-11-30

    A primary objective of modern agriculture and biofuel production is to utilize arable land to its fullest potential. However, sub-optimal growing conditionsarising from abiotic stresses such as drought, soil salinity, low humidity, cold, and heatreduce crop yield and quality. Optimal yield under both stressed and non-stressed conditions requires the plant to activate coping mechanisms at a level commensurate with the severity of the drought stress. The osmotic sensors and associated regulatory mechanisms that initiate drought- and salt-tolerance responses in plants are largely unknown. This research aimed to identify and characterize these initial sensory components.

  15. Analysis of residential, industrial and commercial sector responses to potential electricity supply constraints in the 1990s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Z.J.; Fang, J.M.; Lyke, A.J.; Krudener, J.R.

    1986-09-01

    There is considerable debate over the ability of electric generation capacity to meet the growing needs of the US economy in the 1990s. This study provides new perspective on that debate and examines the possibility of power outages resulting from electricity supply constraints. Previous studies have focused on electricity supply growth, demand growth, and on the linkages between electricity and economic growth. This study assumes the occurrence of electricity supply shortfalls in the 1990s and examines the steps that homeowners, businesses, manufacturers, and other electricity users might take in response to electricity outages.

  16. Closed loop adaptive control of spectrum-producing step using neural networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, C.Y.

    1998-11-24

    Characteristics of the plasma in a plasma-based manufacturing process step are monitored directly and in real time by observing the spectrum which it produces. An artificial neural network analyzes the plasma spectrum and generates control signals to control one or more of the process input parameters in response to any deviation of the spectrum beyond a narrow range. In an embodiment, a plasma reaction chamber forms a plasma in response to input parameters such as gas flow, pressure and power. The chamber includes a window through which the electromagnetic spectrum produced by a plasma in the chamber, just above the subject surface, may be viewed. The spectrum is conducted to an optical spectrometer which measures the intensity of the incoming optical spectrum at different wavelengths. The output of optical spectrometer is provided to an analyzer which produces a plurality of error signals, each indicating whether a respective one of the input parameters to the chamber is to be increased or decreased. The microcontroller provides signals to control respective controls, but these lines are intercepted and first added to the error signals, before being provided to the controls for the chamber. The analyzer can include a neural network and an optional spectrum preprocessor to reduce background noise, as well as a comparator which compares the parameter values predicted by the neural network with a set of desired values provided by the microcontroller. 7 figs.

  17. Closed loop adaptive control of spectrum-producing step using neural networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, Chi Yung (San Francisco, CA)

    1998-01-01

    Characteristics of the plasma in a plasma-based manufacturing process step are monitored directly and in real time by observing the spectrum which it produces. An artificial neural network analyzes the plasma spectrum and generates control signals to control one or more of the process input parameters in response to any deviation of the spectrum beyond a narrow range. In an embodiment, a plasma reaction chamber forms a plasma in response to input parameters such as gas flow, pressure and power. The chamber includes a window through which the electromagnetic spectrum produced by a plasma in the chamber, just above the subject surface, may be viewed. The spectrum is conducted to an optical spectrometer which measures the intensity of the incoming optical spectrum at different wavelengths. The output of optical spectrometer is provided to an analyzer which produces a plurality of error signals, each indicating whether a respective one of the input parameters to the chamber is to be increased or decreased. The microcontroller provides signals to control respective controls, but these lines are intercepted and first added to the error signals, before being provided to the controls for the chamber. The analyzer can include a neural network and an optional spectrum preprocessor to reduce background noise, as well as a comparator which compares the parameter values predicted by the neural network with a set of desired values provided by the microcontroller.

  18. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 403, 342352 (2010) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2009.16118.x A new analysis of the short-duration, hard-spectrum GRB 051103,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    2010-01-01

    Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 403, 342352 (2010) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2009.16118.x A new analysis Park Amsterdam, Kruislaan 403, 1098 SJ, Amsterdam 12Department of Physics, University of Warwick

  19. Does Response to Induction Chemotherapy Predict Survival for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer? Secondary Analysis of RTOG 8804/8808

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAleer, Mary Frances; Moughan, Jennifer M.S.; Byhardt, Roger W.; Cox, James D.; Sause, William T.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Induction chemotherapy (ICT) improves survival compared with radiotherapy (RT) alone in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LANSCLC) patients with good prognostic factors. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is superior to ICT followed by RT. The question arises whether ICT response predicts the outcome of patients subsequently treated with CCRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Between 1988 and 1992, 194 LANSCLC patients were treated prospectively with ICT (two cycles of vinblastine and cisplatin) and then CCRT (cisplatin plus 63 Gy for 7 weeks) in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 8804 trial (n = 30) or ICT and then RT (60 Gy/6 wk) on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 8808 trial (n = 164). Of the 194 patients, 183 were evaluable and 141 had undergone a postinduction assessment. The overall survival (OS) of those with complete remission (CR) or partial remission (PR) was compared with that of patients with stable disease (SD) or progressive disease (PD) after ICT. Results: Of the 141 patients, 6, 30, 99, and 6 had CR, PR, SD, and PD, respectively. The log-rank test showed a significant difference (p <0.0001) in OS when the response groups were compared (CR/PR vs. SD/PD). On univariate and multivariate analyses, a trend was seen toward a response to ICT with OS (p = 0.097 and p = 0.06, respectively). A squamous histologic type was associated with worse OS on univariate and multivariate analyses (p = 0.031 and p = 0.018, respectively). SD/PD plus a squamous histologic type had a hazard ratio of 2.25 vs. CR/PR plus a nonsquamous histologic type (p = 0.007) on covariate analysis. Conclusion: The response to ICT was associated with a significant survival difference when the response groups were compared. A response to ICT showed a trend toward, but was not predictive of, improved OS in LANSCLC patients. Patients with SD/PD after ICT and a squamous histologic type had the poorest OS. These data suggest that patients with squamous LANSCLC might benefit from immediate RT or CCRT.

  20. SAW correlator spread spectrum receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brocato, Robert W

    2014-04-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) correlator spread-spectrum (SS) receiver is disclosed which utilizes a first demodulation stage with a chip length n and a second demodulation stage with a chip length m to decode a transmitted SS signal having a code length l=n.times.m which can be very long (e.g. up to 2000 chips or more). The first demodulation stage utilizes a pair of SAW correlators which demodulate the SS signal to generate an appropriate code sequence at an intermediate frequency which can then be fed into the second demodulation stage which can be formed from another SAW correlator, or by a digital correlator. A compound SAW correlator comprising two input transducers and a single output transducer is also disclosed which can be used to form the SAW correlator SS receiver, or for use in processing long code length signals.

  1. Semantic Responsibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toribio, Josefa

    2002-01-01

    In this paper I attempt to develop a notion of responsibility (semantic responsibility) that is to the notion of belief what epistemic responsibility is to the notion of justification. 'Being semantically responsible' ...

  2. Maximizing available spectrum for cognitive radios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Shridhar Mubaraq

    2009-01-01

    V. Saligrama, Robust Energy Efficient Cooperative SpectrumV. Saligrama, Robust Energy Efficient Cooperative Spectrumusing cooperative sensing to gather as much energy in the

  3. Subject Responses to Electrochromic Windows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clear, Robert; Inkarojrit, Vorapat; Lee, Eleanor

    2006-01-01

    1, 2006. LBNL-57125 Subject responses to electrochromicUSA Abstract Forty-three subjects worked in a private office3-60%. Analysis of subject responses and physical data

  4. The Subatomic Particle Mass Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Oldershaw

    2010-09-20

    Representative members of the subatomic particle mass spectrum in the 100 MeV to 7,000 MeV range are retrodicted to a first approximation using the Kerr solution of General Relativity. The particle masses appear to form a restricted set of quantized values of a Kerr-based angular momentum-mass relation: m = (sqrt n)(M), where values of n are a set of discrete integers and M is a revised Planck mass. A fractal paradigm manifesting global discrete self-similarity is critical to a proper determination of M, which differs from the conventional Planck mass by roughly 19 orders of magnitude. This exceedingly simple and generic mass equation retrodicts the masses of a representative set of 27 well-known particles with an average relative error of 1.6%. A more rigorous mass formula, which includes the total spin angular momentum rule of Quantum Mechanics, the canonical spin values of the particles, and the dimensionless rotational parameter of the Kerr angular momentum-mass relation, is able to retrodict the masses of the 8 dominant baryons in the 900 MeV to 1700 MeV range at the 99.7% level, on average.

  5. Residual Energy Spectrum of Solar Wind Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, C H K; Salem, C S; Maruca, B A

    2013-01-01

    It has long been known that the energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is not in equipartition. In this paper, we present an analysis of 5 years of Wind data at 1 AU to investigate the reason for this. The residual energy (difference between energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations) was calculated using both the standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) normalization for the magnetic field and a kinetic version, which includes temperature anisotropies and drifts between particle species. It was found that with the kinetic normalization, the fluctuations are closer to equipartition, with a mean normalized residual energy of sigma_r = -0.19 and mean Alfven ratio of r_A = 0.71. The spectrum of residual energy, in the kinetic normalization, was found to be steeper than both the velocity and magnetic field spectra, consistent with some recent MHD turbulence predictions and numerical simulations, having a spectral index close to -1.9. The local properties of residual energy and cros...

  6. Electron Ionization Mass Spectrum of Tellurium Hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Richard A.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Peterson, James M.; Govind, Niranjan; Andersen, Amity; Abrecht, David G.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Ballou, Nathan E.

    2015-05-18

    The first electron ionization mass spectrum of tellurium hexafluoride (TeF6) is reported. The starting material was produced by direct fluorination of Te metal or TeO2 with nitrogen trifluoride. Formation of TeF6 was confirmed through cryogenic capture of the tellurium fluorination product and analysis through Raman spectroscopy. The eight natural abundance isotopes were observed for each of the set of fragment ions: TeF5+, TeF4+ TeF3+, TeF2+, TeF1+, and Te+, Te2+. A trend in increasing abundance was observed for the even fluoride bearing ions: TeF1+ < TeF3+ < TeF5+, and a decreasing abundance was observed for the even fragment series: Te(0)+ > TeF2+ > TeF4+ > TeF6+, with the molecular ion TeF6+ not observed at all. Density functional theory based electronic structure calculations were used to calculate optimized ground state geometries of these gas phase species and their relative stabilities explain the trends in the data and the lack of observed signal for TeF6+.

  7. Quasicrystals with discrete support and spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nir Lev; Alexander Olevskii

    2015-09-08

    We proved recently that a measure on R, whose support and spectrum are both uniformly discrete sets, must have a periodic structure. Here we show that this is not the case if the support and the spectrum are just discrete closed sets.

  8. Non-cooperative Spectrum Access The Dedicated vs. Free Spectrum Choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zussman, Gil

    Non-cooperative Spectrum Access The Dedicated vs. Free Spectrum Choice Krishna Jagannathan MIT 77 consider a dynamic spectrum access system in which Secondary Users (SUs) choose to either acquire dedicated dedicated bands to SUs. Finally, we extend the scope to a scenario with multi- ple PUs, show that the band

  9. Analysis of Flow Cytometry DNA Damage Response Protein Activation Kinetics Following X-rays and High Energy Iron Nuclei Exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Universities Space Research Association; Chappell, Lori J.; Whalen, Mary K.; Gurai, Sheena; Ponomarev, Artem; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Pluth, Janice M.

    2010-12-15

    We developed a mathematical method to analyze flow cytometry data to describe the kinetics of {gamma}H2AX and pATF2 phosphorylations ensuing various qualities of low dose radiation in normal human fibroblast cells. Previously reported flow cytometry kinetic results for these DSB repair phospho-proteins revealed that distributions of intensity were highly skewed, severely limiting the detection of differences in the very low dose range. Distributional analysis reveals significant differences between control and low dose samples when distributions are compared using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Radiation quality differences are found in the distribution shapes and when a nonlinear model is used to relate dose and time to the decay of the mean ratio of phosphoprotein intensities of irradiated samples to controls. We analyzed cell cycle phase and radiation quality dependent characteristic repair times and residual phospho-protein levels with these methods. Characteristic repair times for {gamma}H2AX were higher following Fe nuclei as compared to X-rays in G1 cells (4.5 {+-} 0.46 h vs 3.26 {+-} 0.76 h, respectively), and in S/G2 cells (5.51 {+-} 2.94 h vs 2.87 {+-} 0.45 h, respectively). The RBE in G1 cells for Fe nuclei relative to X-rays for {gamma}H2AX was 2.05 {+-} 0.61 and 5.02 {+-} 3.47, at 2 h and 24-h postirradiation, respectively. For pATF2, a saturation effect is observed with reduced expression at high doses, especially for Fe nuclei, with much slower characteristic repair times (>7 h) compared to X-rays. RBEs for pATF2 were 0.66 {+-} 0.13 and 1.66 {+-} 0.46 at 2 h and 24 h, respectively. Significant differences in {gamma}H2AX and pATF2 levels comparing irradiated samples to control were noted even at the lowest dose analyzed (0.05 Gy) using these methods of analysis. These results reveal that mathematical models can be applied to flow cytometry data to uncover important and subtle differences following exposure to various qualities of low dose radiation.

  10. Cosmological parameters from lensing power spectrum and bispectrum tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Takada; Bhuvnesh Jain

    2005-07-20

    We examine how lensing tomography with the bispectrum and power spectrum can constrain cosmological parameters and the equation of state of dark energy. Our analysis uses the full information at the two- and three-point level from angular scales of a few degrees to 5 arcminutes (50 < l < 3000), which will be probed by lensing surveys. We use all triangle configurations, cross-power spectra and bispectra constructed from up to three redshift bins with photometric redshifts, and relevant covariances in our analysis. We find that the parameter constraints from bispectrum tomography are comparable to those from power spectrum tomography. Combining the two improves parameter accuracies by a factor of three due to their complementarity. For the dark energy parameterization w(a) = w0 + wa(1-a), the marginalized errors from lensing alone are sigma(w0) = 0.03 fsky^{-1/2} and sigma(wa) = 0.1 fsky^{-1/2}. We show that these constraints can be further improved when combined with measurements of the cosmic microwave background or Type Ia supernovae. The amplitude and shape of the mass power spectrum are also shown to be precisely constrained. We use hyper-extended perturbation theory to compute the nonlinear lensing bispectrum for dark energy models. Accurate model predictions of the bispectrum in the moderately nonlinear regime, calibrated with numerical simulations, will be needed to realize the parameter accuracy we have estimated. Finally, we estimate how well the lensing bispectrum can constrain a model with primordial non-Gaussianity.

  11. Methods and apparatuses for self-generating fault-tolerant keys in spread-spectrum systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moradi, Hussein; Farhang, Behrouz; Subramanian, Vijayarangam

    2015-12-15

    Self-generating fault-tolerant keys for use in spread-spectrum systems are disclosed. At a communication device, beacon signals are received from another communication device and impulse responses are determined from the beacon signals. The impulse responses are circularly shifted to place a largest sample at a predefined position. The impulse responses are converted to a set of frequency responses in a frequency domain. The frequency responses are shuffled with a predetermined shuffle scheme to develop a set of shuffled frequency responses. A set of phase differences is determined as a difference between an angle of the frequency response and an angle of the shuffled frequency response at each element of the corresponding sets. Each phase difference is quantized to develop a set of secret-key quantized phases and a set of spreading codes is developed wherein each spreading code includes a corresponding phase of the set of secret-key quantized phases.

  12. Methods and apparatuses for self-generating fault-tolerant keys in spread-spectrum systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moradi, Hussein; Farhang, Behrouz; Subramanian, Vijayarangam

    2015-12-22

    Self-generating fault-tolerant keys for use in spread-spectrum systems are disclosed. At a communication device, beacon signals are received from another communication device and impulse responses are determined from the beacon signals. The impulse responses are circularly shifted to place a largest sample at a predefined position. The impulse responses are converted to a set of frequency responses in a frequency domain. The frequency responses are shuffled with a predetermined shuffle scheme to develop a set of shuffled frequency responses. A set of phase differences is determined as a difference between an angle of the frequency response and an angle of the shuffled frequency response at each element of the corresponding sets. Each phase difference is quantized to develop a set of secret-key quantized phases and a set of spreading codes is developed wherein each spreading code includes a corresponding phase of the set of secret-key quantized phases.

  13. Combined dispersive/interference spectroscopy for producing a vector spectrum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, David J. (Oakland, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A method of measuring the spectral properties of broadband waves that combines interferometry with a wavelength disperser having many spectral channels to produce a fringing spectrum. Spectral mapping, Doppler shifts, metrology of angles, distances and secondary effects such as temperature, pressure, and acceleration which change an interferometer cavity length can be measured accurately by a compact instrument using broadband illumination. Broadband illumination avoids the fringe skip ambiguities of monochromatic waves. The interferometer provides arbitrarily high spectral resolution, simple instrument response, compactness, low cost, high field of view and high efficiency. The inclusion of a disperser increases fringe visibility and signal to noise ratio over an interferometer used alone for broadband waves. The fringing spectrum is represented as a wavelength dependent 2-d vector, which describes the fringe amplitude and phase. Vector mathematics such as generalized dot products rapidly computes average broadband phase shifts to high accuracy. A Moire effect between the interferometer's sinusoidal transmission and the illumination heterodynes high resolution spectral detail to low spectral detail, allowing the use of a low resolution disperser. Multiple parallel interferometer cavities of fixed delay allow the instantaneous mapping of a spectrum, with an instrument more compact for the same spectral resolution than a conventional dispersive spectrometer, and not requiring a scanning delay.

  14. Is Biochemical Response More Important Than Duration of Neoadjuvant Hormone Therapy Before Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer? An Analysis of the 3- Versus 8-Month Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, Abraham, E-mail: aalexander3@bccancer.bc.c [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Crook, Juanita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Jones, Stuart [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Malone, Shawn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Regional Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Bowen, Julie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northeastern Ontario Regional Cancer Center, Sudbury, ON (Canada); Truong, Pauline; Pai, Howard; Ludgate, Charles [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To ascertain whether biochemical response to neoadjuvant androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) before radiotherapy (RT), rather than duration, is the critical determinant of benefit in the multimodal treatment of localized prostate cancer, by comparing outcomes of subjects from the Canadian multicenter 3- vs 8-month trial with a pre-RT, post-hormone PSA (PRPH-PSA) <=0.1 ng/ml vs those >0.1 ng/ml. Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2001, 378 men with localized prostate cancer were randomized to 3 or 8 months of neoadjuvant ADT before RT. On univariate analysis, survival indices were compared between those with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml vs >0.1 ng/ml, for all patients and subgroups, including treatment arm, risk group, and gleason Score. Multivariate analysis identified independent predictors of outcome. Results: Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was significantly higher for those with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml compared with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml (55.3% vs 49.4%, p = 0.014). No difference in survival indices was observed between treatment arms. There was no difference in bDFS between patients in the 3- and 8-month arms with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml nor those with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml. bDFS was significantly higher for high-risk patients with PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml compared with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml (57.0% vs 29.4%, p = 0.017). Multivariate analysis identified PRPH-PSA (p = 0.041), Gleason score (p = 0.001), initial PSA (p = 0.025), and T-stage (p = 0.003), not ADT duration, as independent predictors of outcome. Conclusion: Biochemical response to neoadjuvant ADT before RT, not duration, appears to be the critical determinant of benefit in the setting of combined therapy. Individually tailored ADT duration based on PRPH-PSA would maximize therapeutic gain, while minimizing the duration of ADT and its related toxicities.

  15. Quantum algorithm for obtaining the energy spectrum of a physical system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hefeng Wang; S. Ashhab; Franco Nori

    2012-06-21

    We present a polynomial-time quantum algorithm for obtaining the energy spectrum of a physical system, i.e. the differences between the eigenvalues of the system's Hamiltonian, provided that the spectrum of interest contains at most a polynomially increasing number of energy levels. A probe qubit is coupled to a quantum register that represents the system of interest such that the probe exhibits a dynamical response only when it is resonant with a transition in the system. By varying the probe's frequency and the system-probe coupling operator, any desired part of the energy spectrum can be obtained. The algorithm can also be used to deterministically prepare any energy eigenstate. As an example, we have simulated running the algorithm and obtained the energy spectrum of the water molecule.

  16. GADRAS Detector Response Function.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

  17. Non-Fourier Motion in The Fourier Spectrum Steven S. Beauchemin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beauchemin, Steven S.

    Non-Fourier Motion in The Fourier Spectrum Steven S. Beauchemin GRASP Laboratory Department, image motion analysis in the fre- quency domain is performed according to the Motion From Fourier Coe- Fourier motion. This type of motion includes phenom- ena relevant to motion analysis such as translucency

  18. The frequency spectrum of the Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lang, Andrew S.I.D. [Computer Science and Mathematics Department, Oral Roberts University, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74171 (United States)

    2005-10-01

    The frequency spectrum of the Casimir effect between parallel plates is studied. Calculations are performed for both the massless scalar field and the electromagnetic field cases, first using a spectral weight function, and then via the Fourier transform of the renormalized expectation of the Casimir energy-momentum operator. The Casimir force is calculated using the spectrum for two plates which are perfectly transparent in a frequency band. The result of this calculation suggests a way to detect the frequency spectrum of the Casimir effect.

  19. Analysis of supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle control strategies and dynamic response for Generation IV Reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-04-12

    The analysis of specific control strategies and dynamic behavior of the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle has been extended to the two reactor types selected for continued development under the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative; namely, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) and the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). Direct application of the standard S-CO{sub 2} recompression cycle to the VHTR was found to be challenging because of the mismatch in the temperature drop of the He gaseous reactor coolant through the He-to-CO{sub 2} reactor heat exchanger (RHX) versus the temperature rise of the CO{sub 2} through the RHX. The reference VHTR features a large temperature drop of 450 C between the assumed core outlet and inlet temperatures of 850 and 400 C, respectively. This large temperature difference is an essential feature of the VHTR enabling a lower He flow rate reducing the required core velocities and pressure drop. In contrast, the standard recompression S-CO{sub 2} cycle wants to operate with a temperature rise through the RHX of about 150 C reflecting the temperature drop as the CO{sub 2} expands from 20 MPa to 7.4 MPa in the turbine and the fact that the cycle is highly recuperated such that the CO{sub 2} entering the RHX is effectively preheated. Because of this mismatch, direct application of the standard recompression cycle results in a relatively poor cycle efficiency of 44.9%. However, two approaches have been identified by which the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can be successfully adapted to the VHTR and the benefits of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle, especially a significant gain in cycle efficiency, can be realized. The first approach involves the use of three separate cascaded S-CO{sub 2} cycles. Each S-CO{sub 2} cycle is coupled to the VHTR through its own He-to-CO{sub 2} RHX in which the He temperature is reduced by 150 C. The three respective cycles have efficiencies of 54, 50, and 44%, respectively, resulting in a net cycle efficiency of 49.3 %. The other approach involves reducing the minimum cycle pressure significantly below the critical pressure such that the temperature drop in the turbine is increased while the minimum cycle temperature is maintained above the critical temperature to prevent the formation of a liquid phase. The latter approach also involves the addition of a precooler and a third compressor before the main compressor to retain the benefits of compression near the critical point with the main compressor. For a minimum cycle pressure of 1 MPa, a cycle efficiency of 49.5% is achieved. Either approach opens up the door to applying the SCO{sub 2} cycle to the VHTR. In contrast, the SFR system typically has a core outlet-inlet temperature difference of about 150 C such that the standard recompression cycle is ideally suited for direct application to the SFR. The ANL Plant Dynamics Code has been modified for application to the VHTR and SFR when the reactor side dynamic behavior is calculated with another system level computer code such as SAS4A/SYSSYS-1 in the SFR case. The key modification involves modeling heat exchange in the RHX, accepting time dependent tabular input from the reactor code, and generating time dependent tabular input to the reactor code such that both the reactor and S-CO{sub 2} cycle sides can be calculated in a convergent iterative scheme. This approach retains the modeling benefits provided by the detailed reactor system level code and can be applied to any reactor system type incorporating a S-CO{sub 2} cycle. This approach was applied to the particular calculation of a scram scenario for a SFR in which the main and intermediate sodium pumps are not tripped and the generator is not disconnected from the electrical grid in order to enhance heat removal from the reactor system thereby enhancing the cooldown rate of the Na-to-CO{sub 2} RHX. The reactor side is calculated with SAS4A/SASSYS-1 while the S-CO{sub 2} cycle is calculated with the Plant Dynamics Code with a number of iterations over a timescale of 500 seconds. It is found that the RHX u

  20. Power Allocation and Spectrum Sharing in Wireless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teneketzis, Demosthenis

    Power Allocation and Spectrum Sharing in Wireless Networks: An Implementation Theory Approach Ali problems that arise in wireless communication networks. 1.1 Chapter Organization The chapter is organized

  1. Power Spectrum Analyses of Nuclear Decay Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javorsek, D; Lasenby, R N; Lasenby, A N; Buncher, J B; Fischbach, E; Gruenwald, J T; Hoft, A W; Horan, T J; Jenkins, J H; Kerford, J L; Lee, R H; Longman, A; Mattes, J J; Morreale, B L; Morris, D B; Mudry, R N; Newport, J R; O'Keefe, D; Petrelli, M A; Silver, M A; Stewart, C A; Terry, B; 10.1016/j.astropartphys.2010.06.011

    2010-01-01

    We provide the results from a spectral analysis of nuclear decay data displaying annually varying periodic fluctuations. The analyzed data were obtained from three distinct data sets: 32Si and 36Cl decays reported by an experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), 56Mn decay reported by the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), but also performed at BNL, and 226Ra decay reported by an experiment performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. All three data sets exhibit the same primary frequency mode consisting of an annual period. Additional spectral comparisons of the data to local ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, Earth-Sun distance, and their reciprocals were performed. No common phases were found between the factors investigated and those exhibited by the nuclear decay data. This suggests that either a combination of factors was responsible, or that, if it was a single factor, its effects on the decay rate experiments are n...

  2. Measurement Guide and Programming PSA and ESA Series Spectrum Analyzers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    Measurement Guide and Programming Examples PSA and ESA Series Spectrum Analyzers This manual information about Agilent Technologies PSA and ESA spectrum analyzers, including firmware upgrades

  3. Baryon Spectrum from Superconformal Quantum Mechanics and its...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Baryon Spectrum from Superconformal Quantum Mechanics and its Light-Front Holographic Embedding Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Baryon Spectrum from Superconformal...

  4. Baryon Spectrum from Superconformal Quantum Mechanics and its...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Baryon Spectrum from Superconformal Quantum Mechanics and its Light-Front Holographic Embedding Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Baryon Spectrum from...

  5. Reliability-based calibration of design seismic response spectra and structural acceptance criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Jack W.

    Reliability-based calibration of design seismic response spectra and structural acceptance criteria: Earthquake engineering design requires an evaluation of the structure's reliability over future seismic loads alternate "explicit" check, which commonly specifies a design spectrum and associated structural response

  6. Optimal finite alphabet sources over partial response channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Deepak

    2004-11-15

    We present a serially concatenated coding scheme for partial response channels. The encoder consists of an outer irregular LDPC code and an inner matched spectrum trellis code. These codes are shown to offer considerable ...

  7. Guidelines for Documentation of Autism Spectrum Disorders Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) includes autism, Asperger syndrome, and pervasive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    Guidelines for Documentation of Autism Spectrum Disorders Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) includes autism, Asperger syndrome, and pervasive developmental disorder. ASDs are characterized generally

  8. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  9. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  10. The QCD spectrum with three quark flavors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claude Bernard; Tom Burch; Thomas A. DeGrand; Saumen Datta; Carleton DeTar; Steven Gottlieb; Urs M. Heller; Kostas Orginos; Robert Sugar; Doug Toussaint

    2001-05-29

    We present results from a lattice hadron spectrum calculation using three flavors of dynamical quarks - two light and one strange, and quenched simulations for comparison. These simulations were done using a one-loop Symanzik improved gauge action and an improved Kogut-Susskind quark action. The lattice spacings, and hence also the physical volumes, were tuned to be the same in all the runs to better expose differences due to flavor number. Lattice spacings were tuned using the static quark potential, so as a byproduct we obtain updated results for the effect of sea quarks on the static quark potential. We find indications that the full QCD meson spectrum is in better agreement with experiment than the quenched spectrum. For the 0++ (a0) meson we see a coupling to two pseudoscalar mesons, or a meson decay on the lattice.

  11. Making waves on CMB power spectrum and inflaton dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Kawasaki; Fuminobu Takahashi; Tomo Takahashi

    2004-11-11

    We discuss cosmic microwave background anisotropies in models with an unconventional primordial power spectrum. In particular, we consider an initial power spectrum with some ``spiky'' corrections. Interestingly, such a primordial power spectrum generates ``wavy'' structure in the CMB angular power spectrum.

  12. ANALYZER BASICS WHAT IS AN FFT SPECTRUM ANALYZER?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    ANALYZER BASICS 2-1 WHAT IS AN FFT SPECTRUM ANALYZER? The SR760 FFT Spectrum Analyzer takes a time on a spectrum analyzer, the harmonic frequencies and amplitudes are displayed with amazing clarity. Another just the total noise amplitude. On a spectrum analyzer, the noise as a function of frequency

  13. User's/Programmer's Reference Core Spectrum Analyzer Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    User's/Programmer's Reference Volume 1 Core Spectrum Analyzer Functions ESA Series Spectrum. For the latest information about Agilent Technologies ESA Spectrum Analyzers, including firmware upgrades and used under license. NOTE If the ESA Spectrum Analyzer experiences a rapid "power down / power up

  14. Quickest Spectrum Detection Using Hidden Markov Model for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    signal and GSM signal are measured using a Spectrum Analyzer (SA). These acquired data are used to trainQuickest Spectrum Detection Using Hidden Markov Model for Cognitive Radio Zhe Chen, Zhen Hu, Robert--The prerequisite of accessing white spectrum is to find and locate it. Our work deals with spectrum detection

  15. MAP: Multiauctioneer Progressive Auction for Dynamic Spectrum Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xinbing

    networks. Market-driven spectrum auction has been recognized as an effective way to achieve DSA spectrum bands from POs for their services. However, conventional spectrum auction designs are restricted within the scenario of single auctioneer. In this paper, we study the spectrum auction with multiple

  16. Blue running of the primordial tensor spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Jinn-Ouk

    2014-07-01

    We examine the possibility of positive spectral index of the power spectrum of the primordial tensor perturbation produced during inflation in the light of the detection of the B-mode polarization by the BICEP2 collaboration. We find a blue tilt is in general possible when the slow-roll parameter decays rapidly. We present two known examples in which a positive spectral index for the tensor power spectrum can be obtained. We also briefly discuss other consistency tests for further studies on inflationary dynamics.

  17. Gravitational wave energy spectrum of hyperbolic encounters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo De Vittori; Philippe Jetzer; Antoine Klein

    2012-07-23

    The emission of gravitational waves is studied for a system of massive objects interacting on hyperbolic orbits within the quadrupole approximation following the work of Capozziello et al. Here we focus on the derivation of an analytic formula for the energy spectrum of the emitted waves. We checked numerically that our formula is in agreement with the two limiting cases for which results were already available: for the eccentricity {\\epsilon} = 1, the parabolic case whose spectrum was computed by Berry and Gair, and the large {\\epsilon} limit with the formula given by Turner.

  18. Blue running of the primordial tensor spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinn-Ouk Gong

    2014-07-09

    We examine the possibility of positive spectral index of the power spectrum of the primordial tensor perturbation produced during inflation in the light of the detection of the B-mode polarization by the BICEP2 collaboration. We find a blue tilt is in general possible when the slow-roll parameter decays rapidly. We present two known examples in which a positive spectral index for the tensor power spectrum can be obtained. We also briefly discuss other consistency tests for further studies on inflationary dynamics.

  19. Gravitational wave energy spectrum of hyperbolic encounters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Vittori, Lorenzo; Klein, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    The emission of gravitational waves is studied for a system of massive objects interacting on hyperbolic orbits within the quadrupole approximation following the work of Capozziello et al. Here we focus on the derivation of an analytic formula for the energy spectrum of the emitted waves. We checked numerically that our formula is in agreement with the two limiting cases for which results were already available: for the eccentricity {\\epsilon} = 1, the parabolic case whose spectrum was computed by Berry and Gair, and the large {\\epsilon} limit with the formula given by Turner.

  20. The Future of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    The Future of Autism Spectrum Disorders A.R. El-Khattabi Biochemistry 118 Doug Brutlag #12;Background Autism is a Pervasive Developmental Disorder that results from damage to the central nervous exists Significant increase in autism genetics research Sporadic forms of autistic disorder, as well

  1. Spectrum Characterization for Opportunistic Cognitive Radio Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Hseyin

    transmission parameters of primary users. The primary users are identified by matching the a priory information, the a priory information about the transmission properties of possible primary users, such as transmission better use of available natural re- sources, i.e. the spectrum [1]. The two challenging tasks

  2. Getting Started Guide ESA Series Spectrum Analyzers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    Getting Started Guide ESA Series Spectrum Analyzers This manual provides documentation yourself with the symbols and their meaning before operating this analyzer. WARNING Warning denotes, if not correctly performed or adhered to, could result in damage to or destruction of the analyzer. Do not proceed

  3. Dynamic Spectrum Management for Green DSL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    this `green DSL' approach, we quantify the power-rate trade-off for different practical settings with some1 Dynamic Spectrum Management for Green DSL Paschalis Tsiaflakisa, , Yung Yib , Mung Chiangc , Marc the total power has become a main target, as IT power consumption has been identified as a significant

  4. Dynamic Spectrum Management for Green DSL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, Mung

    to as `green DSL'. Using this `green DSL' approach, we quantify the power-rate trade-off for different1 Dynamic Spectrum Management for Green DSL Paschalis Tsiaflakisa,, Yung Yib, Mung Chiangc, Marc. However, recently, reducing the total power has become a main target, as IT power consumption has been

  5. DYNAMIC SPECTRUM ACCESS IN COGNITIVE RADIO NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Jonathan

    , the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has con- trolled the radio frequency energy spectrum. They license resources. The basic idea is to let people use licensed frequencies, pro- vided they can guarantee interference perceived by the primary license holders will be minimal. With advances in software and cognitive

  6. Green Wireless Cognition: Future Efficient Spectrum Sharing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    Green Wireless Cognition: Future Efficient Spectrum Sharing Prof. Basem Shihada MCSE 1 2nd Annual and applications will live in the cloud. Users can access them anytime, anywhere. Ubiquitous highspeed wireless connectivity is a must. Dense, smallrange wireless access points (AP) will become more important than today

  7. Economic Viability of Dynamic Spectrum Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    Economic Viability of Dynamic Spectrum Management Jianwei Huang Network Communications and Economics Lab Department of Information Engineering The Chinese University of Hong Kong #12;#12;1 Economic economic and policy issue, as it affects the interests of wireless end-users, com- mercial wireless service

  8. Adaptive, full-spectrum solar energy system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Earl, Dennis D.

    2003-08-05

    An adaptive full spectrum solar energy system having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one hybrid luminaire, at least one hybrid photobioreactor, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator, each hybrid luminaire, and each hybrid photobioreactor. A lighting control system operates each component.

  9. Auction-based Spectrum Sharing Jianwei Huang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Randall

    formulate an iterative and distributed bid updating algorithm, and specify conditions under which users wish to purchase a local, relatively short-term data service. The spectrum to be used may efficient multiplexing of data streams from different sources corresponding to different applications

  10. Methods and apparatuses using filter banks for multi-carrier spread-spectrum signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moradi, Hussein; Farhang, Behrouz; Kutsche, Carl A

    2014-10-14

    A transmitter includes a synthesis filter bank to spread a data symbol to a plurality of frequencies by encoding the data symbol on each frequency, apply a common pulse-shaping filter, and apply gains to the frequencies such that a power level of each frequency is less than a noise level of other communication signals within the spectrum. Each frequency is modulated onto a different evenly spaced subcarrier. A demodulator in a receiver converts a radio frequency input to a spread-spectrum signal in a baseband. A matched filter filters the spread-spectrum signal with a common filter having characteristics matched to the synthesis filter bank in the transmitter by filtering each frequency to generate a sequence of narrow pulses. A carrier recovery unit generates control signals responsive to the sequence of narrow pulses suitable for generating a phase-locked loop between the demodulator, the matched filter, and the carrier recovery unit.

  11. Methods and apparatuses using filter banks for multi-carrier spread-spectrum signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moradi, Hussein; Farhang, Behrouz; Kutsche, Carl A

    2014-05-20

    A transmitter includes a synthesis filter bank to spread a data symbol to a plurality of frequencies by encoding the data symbol on each frequency, apply a common pulse-shaping filter, and apply gains to the frequencies such that a power level of each frequency is less than a noise level of other communication signals within the spectrum. Each frequency is modulated onto a different evenly spaced subcarrier. A demodulator in a receiver converts a radio frequency input to a spread-spectrum signal in a baseband. A matched filter filters the spread-spectrum signal with a common filter having characteristics matched to the synthesis filter bank in the transmitter by filtering each frequency to generate a sequence of narrow pulses. A carrier recovery unit generates control signals responsive to the sequence of narrow pulses suitable for generating a phase-locked loop between the demodulator, the matched filter, and the carrier recovery unit.

  12. Power Spectrum Analyses of Nuclear Decay Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Javorsek II; P. A. Sturrock; R. N. Lasenby; A. N. Lasenby; J. B. Buncher; E. Fischbach; J. T. Gruenwald; A. W. Hoft; T. J. Horan; J. H. Jenkins; J. L. Kerford; R. H. Lee; A. Longman; J. J. Mattes; B. L. Morreale; D. B. Morris; R. N. Mudry; J. R. Newport; D. O'Keefe; M. A. Petrelli; M. A. Silver; C. A. Stewart; B. Terry

    2010-07-06

    We provide the results from a spectral analysis of nuclear decay data displaying annually varying periodic fluctuations. The analyzed data were obtained from three distinct data sets: 32Si and 36Cl decays reported by an experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), 56Mn decay reported by the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), but also performed at BNL, and 226Ra decay reported by an experiment performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. All three data sets exhibit the same primary frequency mode consisting of an annual period. Additional spectral comparisons of the data to local ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, Earth-Sun distance, and their reciprocals were performed. No common phases were found between the factors investigated and those exhibited by the nuclear decay data. This suggests that either a combination of factors was responsible, or that, if it was a single factor, its effects on the decay rate experiments are not a direct synchronous modulation. We conclude that the annual periodicity in these data sets is a real effect, but that further study involving additional carefully controlled experiments will be needed to establish its origin.

  13. Standard Neutrino Spectrum from B-8 Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John N. Bahcall; E. Lisi; D. E. Alburger; L. De Braeckeleer; S. J. Freedman; J. Napolitano

    1996-04-19

    We present a systematic evaluation of the shape of the neutrino energy spectrum produced by beta-decay of $^8$B. We place special emphasis on determining the range of uncertainties permitted by existing laboratory data and theoretical ingredients (such as forbidden and radiative corrections). We review and compare the available experimental data on the $^8$B$(\\beta^+){}^8$Be$(2\\alpha)$ decay chain. We analyze the theoretical and experimental uncertainties quantitatively. We give a numerical representation of the best-fit (standard-model) neutrino spectrum, as well as two extreme deviations from the standard spectrum that represent the total (experimental and theoretical) effective $\\pm3\\sigma$ deviations. Solar neutrino experiments that are currently being developed will be able to measure the shape of the $^8$B neutrino spectrum above about 5 MeV. An observed distortion of the $^8$B solar neutrino spectrum outside the range given in the present work could be considered as evidence, at an effective significance level greater than three standard deviations, for physics beyond the standard electroweak model. We use the most recent available experimental data on the Gamow--Teller strengths in the $A=37$ system to calculate the $^8$B neutrino absorption cross section on chlorine: $\\sigma_{\\rm Cl}=(1.14\\pm0.11)\\times10^{-42}$~cm$^2$ ($\\pm3\\sigma$ errors). The chlorine cross section is also given as a function of the neutrino energy. The $^8$B neutrino absorption cross section in gallium is $\\sigma_{\\rm Ga}=(2.46^{+2.1}_{-1.1})\\times10^{-42}$ cm$^2$ ($\\pm3\\sigma$ errors).

  14. Two-photon excitation of atoms by ultrashort electromagnetic pulses in a discrete spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Astapenko, Valery

    2015-01-01

    The present work is dedicated to the theoretical analysis of two-photon excitation of atoms in a discrete energy spectrum by ultrashort electromagnetic pulses of femto- and subfemtosecond ranges of durations. As examples, excitation of hydrogen and sodium atoms from the ground state to excited states with a zero orbital moment is considered.

  15. Changes in the halo formation rates due to features in the primordial spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar, E-mail: dhiraj@apctp.org [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India)

    2013-03-01

    Features in the primordial scalar power spectrum provide a possible roadway to describe the outliers at the low multipoles in the WMAP data. Apart from the CMB angular power spectrum, these features can also alter the matter power spectrum and, thereby, the formation of the large scale structure. Carrying out a complete numerical analysis, we investigate the effects of primordial features on the formation rates of the halos. We consider a few different inflationary models that lead to features in the scalar power spectrum and an improved fit to the CMB data, and analyze the corresponding imprints on the formation of halos. Performing a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis with the WMAP seven year data and the SDSS halo power spectrum from LRG DR7 for the models of our interest, we arrive at the parameter space of the models allowed by the data. We illustrate that, inflationary potentials, such as the quadratic potential with sinusoidal modulations and the axion monodromy model, which generate certain repeated, oscillatory features in the inflationary perturbation spectrum, do not induce a substantial difference in the number density of halos at their best fit values, when compared with, say, a nearly scale invariant spectrum as is generated by the standard quadratic potential. However, we find that the number density and the formation rates of halos change by about 1322% for halo masses ranging over 10{sup 4}10{sup 14} M{sub s}un, for potential parameters that lie within 2-? around the best fit values arrived at from the aforesaid joint constraints. We briefly discuss the implications of our results.

  16. Characterizing the DNA damage response by cell tracking algorithms and cell features classification using high-content time-lapse analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Georgescu, Walter; Osseiran, Alma; Rojec, Maria; Liu, Yueyong; Bombrun, Maxime; Tang, Jonathan; Costes, Sylvain V.; Huen, Michael Shing-Yan

    2015-06-24

    Traditionally, the kinetics of DNA repair have been estimated using immunocytochemistry by labeling proteins involved in the DNA damage response (DDR) with fluorescent markers in a fixed cell assay. However, detailed knowledge of DDR dynamics across multiple cell generations cannot be obtained using a limited number of fixed cell time-points. Here we report on the dynamics of 53BP1 radiation induced foci (RIF) across multiple cell generations using live cell imaging of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) expressing histone H2B-GFP and the DNA repair protein 53BP1-mCherry. Using automatic extraction of RIF imaging features and linear programming techniques, we were ablemoreto characterize detailed RIF kinetics for 24 hours before and 24 hours after exposure to low and high doses of ionizing radiation. High-content-analysis at the single cell level over hundreds of cells allows us to quantify precisely the dose dependence of 53BP1 protein production, RIF nuclear localization and RIF movement after exposure to X-ray. Using elastic registration techniques based on the nuclear pattern of individual cells, we could describe the motion of individual RIF precisely within the nucleus. We show that DNA repair occurs in a limited number of large domains, within which multiple small RIFs form, merge and/or resolve with random motion following normal diffusion law. Large foci formation is shown to be mainly happening through the merging of smaller RIF rather than through growth of an individual focus. We estimate repair domain sizes of 7.5 to 11 m2 with a maximum number of ~15 domains per MCF10A cell. This work also highlights DDR which are specific to doses larger than 1 Gy such as rapid 53BP1 protein increase in the nucleus and foci diffusion rates that are significantly faster than for spontaneous foci movement. We hypothesize that RIF merging reflects a "stressed" DNA repair process that has been taken outside physiological conditions when too many DSB occur at once. High doses of ionizing radiation lead to RIF merging into repair domains which in turn increases DSB proximity and misrepair. Such finding may therefore be critical to explain the supralinear dose dependence for chromosomal rearrangement and cell death measured after exposure to ionizing radiation.less

  17. Characterizing the DNA damage response by cell tracking algorithms and cell features classification using high-content time-lapse analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Georgescu, Walter; Osseiran, Alma; Rojec, Maria; Liu, Yueyong; Bombrun, Maxime; Tang, Jonathan; Costes, Sylvain V.; Huen, Michael Shing-Yan

    2015-06-24

    Traditionally, the kinetics of DNA repair have been estimated using immunocytochemistry by labeling proteins involved in the DNA damage response (DDR) with fluorescent markers in a fixed cell assay. However, detailed knowledge of DDR dynamics across multiple cell generations cannot be obtained using a limited number of fixed cell time-points. Here we report on the dynamics of 53BP1 radiation induced foci (RIF) across multiple cell generations using live cell imaging of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) expressing histone H2B-GFP and the DNA repair protein 53BP1-mCherry. Using automatic extraction of RIF imaging features and linear programming techniques, we were able to characterize detailed RIF kinetics for 24 hours before and 24 hours after exposure to low and high doses of ionizing radiation. High-content-analysis at the single cell level over hundreds of cells allows us to quantify precisely the dose dependence of 53BP1 protein production, RIF nuclear localization and RIF movement after exposure to X-ray. Using elastic registration techniques based on the nuclear pattern of individual cells, we could describe the motion of individual RIF precisely within the nucleus. We show that DNA repair occurs in a limited number of large domains, within which multiple small RIFs form, merge and/or resolve with random motion following normal diffusion law. Large foci formation is shown to be mainly happening through the merging of smaller RIF rather than through growth of an individual focus. We estimate repair domain sizes of 7.5 to 11 m2 with a maximum number of ~15 domains per MCF10A cell. This work also highlights DDR which are specific to doses larger than 1 Gy such as rapid 53BP1 protein increase in the nucleus and foci diffusion rates that are significantly faster than for spontaneous foci movement. We hypothesize that RIF merging reflects a "stressed" DNA repair process that has been taken outside physiological conditions when too many DSB occur at once. High doses of ionizing radiation lead to RIF merging into repair domains which in turn increases DSB proximity and misrepair. Such finding may therefore be critical to explain the supralinear dose dependence for chromosomal rearrangement and cell death measured after exposure to ionizing radiation.

  18. Joint Spectrum Allocation and Scheduling for Fair Spectrum Sharing in Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, Satyajayant

    unlicensed wireless users (a.k.a secondary users) to sense and access the under-utilized spectrum opportunistically even if it is licensed, as long as the licensed wireless users (a.k.a primary users

  19. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 475, Vol. 44, No. 1, March 2007, pp. 2537 RESPONSE SPECTRAAS A USEFUL DESIGN AND ANALYSIS TOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 475, Vol. 44, No. 1, March 2007, pp. 25 vulnerability, and post earthquake estimates of potential damage of buildings. KEYWORDS: Response Spectra, Building Codes, Performance-Based Design, Seismic Vulnerability, Earthquake Intensity INTRODUCTION

  20. Functional analysis of p53 N-terminal phosphorylation and C-terminal multiple posttranslational modifications in regulating p53 responses to DNA damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Lijin

    2006-01-01

    C. W. , and Appella, E. DNA damage activates p53 through aby ATM in Response to DNA Damage. Science 133.Shieh, S. Y. ,Y. , and Prives, C. DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of

  1. Power spectrum for inflation models with quantum and thermal noises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnei O. Ramos; L. A. da Silva

    2013-03-25

    We determine the power spectrum for inflation models covering all regimes from cold (isentropic) to warm (nonisentropic) inflation. We work in the context of the stochastic inflation approach, which can nicely describe both types of inflationary regimes concomitantly. A throughout analysis is carried out to determine the allowed parameter space for simple single field polynomial chaotic inflation models that is consistent with the most recent cosmological data from the nine-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and in conjunction with other observational cosmological sources. We present the results for both the amplitude of the power spectrum, the spectral index and for the tensor to scalar curvature perturbation amplitude ratio. We briefly discuss cases when running is present. Despite single field polynomial-type inflaton potential models be strongly disfavored, or even be already ruled out in their simplest versions in the case of cold inflation, this is not the case for nonisentropic inflation models in general (warm inflation in particular), though higher order polynomial potentials (higher than quartic order) tend to become less favorable also in this case, presenting a much smaller region of parameter space compatible with the recent observational cosmological data. Our findings also remain valid in face of the recently released Planck results.

  2. Power spectrum for inflation models with quantum and thermal noises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos, Rudnei O.; Silva, L.A. da, E-mail: rudnei@uerj.br, E-mail: las.leandro@gmail.com [Departamento de Fsica Terica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-03-01

    We determine the power spectrum for inflation models covering all regimes from cold (isentropic) to warm (nonisentropic) inflation. We work in the context of the stochastic inflation approach, which can nicely describe both types of inflationary regimes concomitantly. A throughout analysis is carried out to determine the allowed parameter space for simple single field polynomial chaotic inflation models that is consistent with the most recent cosmological data from the nine-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and in conjunction with other observational cosmological sources. We present the results for both the amplitude of the power spectrum, the spectral index and for the tensor to scalar curvature perturbation amplitude ratio. We briefly discuss cases when running is present. Despite single field polynomial-type inflaton potential models be strongly disfavored, or even be already ruled out in their simplest versions in the case of cold inflation, this is not the case for nonisentropic inflation models in general (warm inflation in particular), though higher order polynomial potentials (higher than quartic order) tend to become less favorable also in this case, presenting a much smaller region of parameter space compatible with the recent observational cosmological data.

  3. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Casey, D. T. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Frenje, J. A. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Gatu Johnson, M. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Seguin, F. H. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Li, C. K. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Petrasso, R. D. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Glebov, V. Yu. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Katz, J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Magoon, J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Sangster, T. C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Shoup, M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Ulreich, J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Ashabranner, R. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bionta, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carpenter, A. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Felker, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Khater, H. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacKinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McKernan, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moran, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yeoman, M. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zacharias, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leeper, R. J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fletcher, K. [State Univ. of New York at Geneseo, NY (United States); Farrell, M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Jasion, D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Kilkenny, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Paguio, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, iontemperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  4. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; et al

    2013-04-18

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, iontemperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describesmoreab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.less

  5. Quantum-classical correspondence in response theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kryvohuz, Maksym

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, theoretical analysis of correspondence between classical and quantum dynamics is studied in the context of response theory. Thesis discusses the mathematical origin of time-divergence of classical response ...

  6. Power Spectrum in Krein Space Quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Mohsenzadeh; S. Rouhani; M. V. Takook

    2008-11-06

    The power spectrum of scalar field and space-time metric perturbations produced in the process of inflation of universe, have been presented in this paper by an alternative approach to field quantization namely, Krein space quantization [1,2]. Auxiliary negative norm states, the modes of which do not interact with the physical world, have been utilized in this method. Presence of negative norm states play the role of an automatic renormalization device for the theory.

  7. Real-time emission spectrum of a hybrid atom-optomechanical cavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imran M. Mirza

    2015-04-02

    We theoretically investigate the real-time emission spectrum of a two-level atom coupled to an optomechanical cavity (OMC). Using quantum trajectory approach we obtain the single-photon time-dependent spectrum in this hybrid system where the influence of a strong atom-cavity coupling and a strong optomechanical interaction are studied. We find a dressed state picture can explain the spectra by predicting the exact peak locations as well as the relative peak heights. In our analysis we also include the effect of mechanical losses (under weak mechanical damping limit) and single-photon loss through spontaneous emission from the two-level emitter.

  8. Measurement and fitting of spectrum and pulse shapes of a liquid methane moderator at IPNS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, J.M.; Robinson, R.A.; Taylor, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    We have measured the absolute intensity, and the energy spectrum, and the pulse shapes as function of neutron energy for the IPNS liquid CH/sub 4/ F moderator, at 108 K. We have fitted the spectrum, corrected for attenuation by aluminum in the beam, using a new cutoff function and fitted the pulse shapes to a new function which is the sum of two decaying exponentials, convoluted with a gaussian, and determined the wavelength variation of the parameters. We present here the results of a preliminary analysis.

  9. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-01-01

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  10. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-04-01

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  11. Acoustic phonon spectrum and thermal transport in nanoporous alumina arrays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kargar, Fariborz; Ramirez, Sylvester; Debnath, Bishwajit; Malekpour, Hoda; Lake, Roger; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2015-10-28

    We report results of a combined investigation of thermal conductivity and acoustic phonon spectra in nanoporous alumina membranes with the pore diameter decreasing from D=180 nm to 25 nm. The samples with the hexagonally arranged pores were selected to have the same porosity Ø ?13%. The Brillouin-Mandelstam spectroscopy measurements revealed bulk-like phonon spectrum in the samples with D=180-nm pores and spectral features, which were attributed to spatial confinement, in the samples with 25-nm and 40-nm pores. The velocity of the longitudinal acoustic phonons was reduced in the samples with smaller pores. As a result, analysis of the experimental data andmorecalculated phonon dispersion suggests that both phonon-boundary scattering and phonon spatial confinement affect heat conduction in membranes with the feature sizes Dless

  12. NEAR-MILLIMETER SPECTRUM OF THE MICROWAVE BACKGROUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woody, D.P.

    2013-01-01

    +o, 14 z2.06 Table 3. Microwave Measurements of the CMBMILLIMETER SPECTRUM OF THE MICROWAVE BACKGROUND D. P. WoodyMILLIMETER SPECTRUM OF THE MICROWAVE BACKGROUND D. P. Woody1

  13. Enhancing spectrum utilization through cooperation and cognition in wireless systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul, Hariharan Shankar, 1975-

    2013-01-01

    We have seen a proliferation of wireless technologies and devices in recent years. The resulting explosion of wireless demand has put immense pressure on available spectrum. Improving spectrum utilization is therefore ...

  14. Spectral-Fluctuations Test of the Quark-Model Baryon Spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez-Ramirez, C.; Relano, A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-02-09

    We study the low-lying baryon spectrum (up to 2.2 GeV) provided by experiments and different quark models using statistical tools which allow us to postulate the existence of missing levels in spectra. We confirm that the experimental spectrum is compatible with random matrix theory, the paradigmatic model of quantum chaos, and we find that the quark models are more similar to a Poisson distribution, which is not compatible with what should be expected in a correlated spectrum. From our analysis it stems that the spectral fluctuation properties of quark-model spectra are incompatible with experimental data. This result can be used to enlighten the problem of missing resonances.

  15. Analyzing the Multiwavelength Spectrum and Variability of BL Lacertae During the July 1997 Outburst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Boettcher; S. D. Bloom

    1999-10-26

    The multiwavelength spectrum of BL Lacertae during its July 1997 outburst is analyzed in terms of different variations of the homogeneous leptonic jet model for the production of high-energy radiation from blazars. We find that a two-component gamma-ray spectrum, consisting of a synchrotron self-Compton and an external Compton component, is required in order to yield an acceptable fit to the broadband spectrum. Our analysis indicates that in BL Lac, unlike other BL Lac objects, the broad emission line region plays an important role for the high-energy emission. Several alternative blazar jet models are briefly discussed. In the appendix, we describe the formalism in which the process of Comptonization of reprocessed accretion disk photons is treated in the previously developed blazar jet simulation code which we use.

  16. Improving earthquake source spectrum estimation using multitaper techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prieto, Germn A.

    2007-01-01

    65 Uncertainties in earthquake source spectrum estimation1. Earthquake physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. Static and dynamic earthquake parameters 2. Scaling of

  17. Multicarrier orthogonal spread-spectrum (MOSS) data communications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN); Dress, William B. (Camas, WA)

    2008-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for multicarrier orthogonal spread-spectrum (MOSS) data communication. A method includes individually spread-spectrum modulating at least two of a set of orthogonal frequency division multiplexed carriers, wherein the resulting individually spread-spectrum modulated at least two of a set of orthogonal frequency division multiplexed carriers are substantially mutually orthogonal with respect to both frequency division multiplexing and spread-spectrum modulation.

  18. LWA Equipment RF Emissions: Spectrum Analyzers and Ylva Pihlstrm, UNM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    1 LWA Equipment RF Emissions: Spectrum Analyzers and Laptops Ylva Pihlstrm, UNM 8/27/06 Summary I be used at the LWDA site during standard VLA operations. Two brands of spectrum analyzers and laptop are therefore considered typical of spectrum analyzers and laptops. The results of the measurements suggest

  19. Designing Truthful Spectrum Double Auctions with Local Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Designing Truthful Spectrum Double Auctions with Local Markets Wei Wang, Student Member, IEEE, Ben pieces in the market. We design a spectrum double auction that incorporates such locality in spectrum markets, while keeping the auction economically robust and computationally efficient. Our designs

  20. Truthful Auction Mechanisms with Performance Guarantee in Secondary Spectrum Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiang-Yang

    is to design truthful auction mechanisms that maximize either the overall social efficiency of new users (a.k.a buyers) or the revenue of the spectrum owner (a.k.a seller). Given that the optimal conflict methods is spectrum auction, which gives incentive for a spectrum owner (a.k.a seller) to sublease

  1. Cryptographic Link Signatures for Spectrum Usage Authentication in Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Wenliang "Kevin"

    Cryptographic Link Signatures for Spectrum Usage Authentication in Cognitive Radio Xi Tan, Kapil the usage of the spectrum to avoid interference with the primary user. However, achieving a trustworthy this attack, there should be a way to authenticate primary users' spectrum usage. We propose a method

  2. Analysis of bias voltage dependent spectral response in Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P/Ga{sub 0.99}In{sub 0.01}As/Ge triple junction solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sogabe, Tomah Ogura, Akio; Okada, Yoshitaka

    2014-02-21

    Spectral response measurement plays great role in characterizing solar cell device because it directly reflects the efficiency by which the device converts the sunlight into an electrical current. Based on the spectral response results, the short circuit current of each subcell can be quantitatively determined. Although spectral response dependence on wavelength, i.e., the well-known external quantum efficiency (EQE), has been widely used in characterizing multijunction solar cell and has been well interpreted, detailed analysis of spectral response dependence on bias voltage (SR ?V{sub bias}) has not been reported so far. In this work, we have performed experimental and numerical studies on the SR??V{sub bias} for Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P/Ga{sub 0.99}In{sub 0.01}As/Ge triple junction solar cell. Phenomenological description was given to clarify the mechanism of operation matching point variation in SR??V{sub bias} measurements. The profile of SR?V{sub bias} curve was explained in detail by solving the coupled two-diode current-voltage characteristic transcend formula for each subcell.

  3. Quantum chaos? Genericity and nongenericity in the MHD spectrum of nonaxisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Dewar; B. G. Kenny; C. Nuehrenberg; T. Tatsuno; B. F. McMillan

    2006-08-31

    The eigenmode spectrum is a fundamental starting point for the analysis of plasma stability and the onset of turbulence, but the characterization of the spectrum even for the simplest plasma model, ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), is not fully understood. This is especially true in configurations with no continuous geometric symmetry, such as a real tokamak when the discrete nature of the external magnetic field coils is taken into account, or the alternative fusion concept, the stellarator, where axisymmetry is deliberately broken to provide a nonzero winding number (rotational transform) on each invariant torus of the magnetic field line dynamics (assumed for present purposes to be an integrable Hamiltonian system). Quantum (wave) chaos theory provides tools for characterizing the spectrum statistically, from the regular spectrum of the separable case (integrable semiclassical dynamics) to that where the semiclassical ray dynamics is so chaotic that no simple classification of the individual eigenvalues is possible (quantum chaos). The MHD spectrum exhibits certain nongeneric properties, which we show, using a toy model, to be understable from the number-theoretic properties of the asymptotic spectrum in the limit of large toroidal and poloidal mode (quantum) numbers when only a single radial mode number is retained. Much more realistically, using the ideal MHD code CAS3D, we have constructed a data set of several hundred growth-rate eigenvalues for an interchange-unstable three-dimensional stellarator equilibrium with a rather flat, nonmonotonic rotational transform profile. Statistical analysis of eigenvalue spacings shows evidence of generic quantum chaos, which we attribute to the mixing effect of having a large number of radial mode numbers.

  4. The Power Spectrum of Rich Clusters of Galaxies on Large Spatial Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tadros, H; Dalton, G B; Tadros, Helen; Efstathiou, George; Dalton, Gavin

    1997-01-01

    We present an analysis of the redshift-space power spectrum, $P(k)$, of rich clusters of galaxies based on an automated cluster catalogue selected from the APM Galaxy Survey. We find that $P(k)$ can be approximated by a power law, $P(k)\\proptok^{n}$, with $n\\approx-1.6$ over the wavenumber range $0.04\\hrspectrum has the same shape as the power spectra measured for optical and IRAS galaxies. This is consistent with a simple linear bias model in which different tracers have the same power spectrum as that of the mass distribution but shifted in amplitude by a constant biasing factor. On larger scales, the power spectrum of APM clusters flattens and appears to turn over on a scale $k \\sim 0.03\\hmpcrev$. We compare the power spectra estimated from simulated APM cluster catalogues to those estimated directly from cubical N-body simulation volumes and find that the APM cluster survey should give reliable estimates of the true power spectrum at ...

  5. Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO{sub 2} take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry`s response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

  6. Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and oxides of nitrogen (NO[sub x]) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO[sub 2] take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry's response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

  7. 8Li electron spectrum versus 8B neutrino spectrum: implications for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Jonkmans; I. S. Towner; B. Sur

    1998-02-25

    The sensitivity of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) to measure the shape of the recoil electron spectrum in the charged-current reaction of $^{8}$B solar neutrinos interacting with deuterium can be improved if the results of a $^{8}$Li beta-decay calibration experiment are included in the test. We calculate an improvement in sensitivity, under certain idealistic assumptions, of about a factor of 2, sufficient to resolve different neutrino-oscillation solutions to the solar-neutrino problem. We further examine the role of recoil and radiative corrections on both the $^{8}$B neutrino spectrum and the $^{8}$Li electron spectrum and conclude that the influence of these effects on the ratio of the two spectra as measured by SNO is very small.

  8. ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLOR ENERGY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byard D. Wood

    2004-04-01

    This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports solar light from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a large core polymer fiber optic. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of solar lighting and electric lighting. A benchmark prototype system has been developed to evaluate the HSL system. Sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. A secondary mirror consisting of eight planar-segmented mirrors directs the visible part of the spectrum to eight fibers (receiver) and subsequently to eight luminaires. This results in about 8,200 lumens incident at each fiber tip. Each fiber can illuminate about 16.7 m{sup 2} (180 ft{sup 2}) of office space. The IR spectrum is directed to a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) array to produce electricity. During this reporting period, the project team made advancements in the design of the second generation (Alpha) system. For the Alpha system, the eight individual 12 mm fibers have been replaced with a centralized bundle of 3 mm fibers. The TRNSYS Full-Spectrum Solar Energy System model has been updated and new components have been added. The TPV array and nonimaging device have been tested and progress has been made in the fiber transmission models. A test plan was developed for both the high-lumen tests and the study to determine the non-energy benefits of daylighting. The photobioreactor team also made major advancements in the testing of model scale and bench top lab-scale systems.

  9. The power spectrum of the circular noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Mller

    2005-09-30

    The circular noise is important in connection to Mach's principle, and also as a possible probe of the Unruh effect. In this letter the power spectrum of the detector following the Trocheries-Takeno motion in the Minkowski vacuum is analytically obtained in the form of an infinite series. A mean distribution function and corresponding energy density are obtained for this particular detected noise. The analogous of a non constant temperature distribution is obtained. And in the end, a brief discussion about the equilibrium configuration is given.

  10. Frequency spectrum analyzer with phase-lock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boland, Thomas J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1984-01-01

    A frequency-spectrum analyzer with phase-lock for analyzing the frequency and amplitude of an input signal is comprised of a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) which is driven by a ramp generator, and a phase error detector circuit. The phase error detector circuit measures the difference in phase between the VCO and the input signal, and drives the VCO locking it in phase momentarily with the input signal. The input signal and the output of the VCO are fed into a correlator which transfers the input signal to a frequency domain, while providing an accurate absolute amplitude measurement of each frequency component of the input signal.

  11. A New Solar Irradiance Reference Spectrum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries PrintA New Solar Irradiance Reference Spectrum

  12. Distributed Cooperative Spectrum Sensing for Overlay Self-organizing Dynamic Cognitive Radios Network Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chih-Kai

    2012-01-01

    and K. Yao, Energy-based Cooperative Spectrum Sensing forof distributed energy-based cooperative spectrum sensingwe focus on the energy-based cooperative spectrum sensing

  13. On Statistical Analysis of the Pattern of Evolution of Perceived Emotions Induced by Hindustani Music- A Study Based on Listener Responses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Midya, Vishal; Manna, Srijita; Sengupta, Ranjan

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to find the underlying pattern of how perception of emotions has evolved in India. Here Hindustani Music has been used as a reference frame for tracking the changing perception of emotions. It has been found that different emotions perceived from Hindustani Music form a particular sequential pattern when their corresponding pitch periods are analyzed using the standard deviations and mean successive squared differences.This sequential pattern of emotions coincides with their corresponding sequential pattern of tempos or average number of steady states. On the basis of this result we further found that the range of perception of emotions has diminished significantly these days compared to what it was before. The proportion of responses for the perceived emotions like Anger, Serenity, Romantic and Sorrow has also decreased to a great extent than what it was previously. The proportion of responses for the perceived emotion Anxiety has increased phenomenally. Both standard deviation...

  14. The Optical Spectrum of the Vela Pulsar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. P. Mignani; S. Zharikov; P. A. Caraveo

    2007-07-13

    Our knowledge of the optical spectra of Isolated Neutron Stars (INSs) is limited by their intrinsic faintness. Among the fourteen optically identified INSs, medium resolution spectra have been obtained only for a handful of objects. No spectrum has been published yet for the Vela pulsar (PSR B0833-45), the third brightest (V=23.6) INS with an optical counterpart. Optical multi-band photometry underlines a flat continuum.In this work we present the first optical spectroscopy observations of the Vela pulsar, performed in the 4000-11000 A spectral range.Our observations have been performed at the ESO VLT using the FORS2 instrument. The spectrum of the Vela pulsar is characterized by a flat power-law (alpha = -0.04 +/- 0.04), which compares well with the values obtained from broad-band photometry. This confirms, once more, that the optical emission of Vela is entirely of magnetospheric origin. The comparison between the optical spectral indeces of rotation-powered INSs does not show evidence for a spectral evolution suggesting that, as in the X-rays, the INS aging does not affect the spectral properties of the magnetospheric emission. At the same time, the optical spectral indeces are found to be nearly always flatter then the X-rays ones, clearly suggesting a general spectral turnover at lower energies.

  15. The scalar bi-spectrum in the Starobinsky model: the equilateral case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Jrme [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR7095-CNRS, Universit Pierre et Marie Curie, 98bis boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Sriramkumar, L., E-mail: jmartin@iap.fr, E-mail: sriram@physics.iitm.ac.in [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India)

    2012-01-01

    While a featureless, nearly scale invariant, primordial scalar power spectrum fits the most recent Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data rather well, certain features in the spectrum are known to lead to a better fit to the data (although, the statistical significance of such results remains an open issue). In the inflationary scenario, one or more periods of deviations from slow roll are necessary in order to generate features in the scalar perturbation spectrum. Over the last couple of years, it has been recognized that such deviations from slow roll inflation can also result in reasonably large non-Gaussianities. The Starobinsky model involves the canonical scalar field and consists of a linear inflaton potential with a sudden change in the slope. The change in the slope causes a brief period of departure from slow roll which, in turn, results in a sharp rise in power, along with a burst of oscillations in the scalar spectrum for modes that leave the Hubble radius just before and during the period of fast roll. The hallmark of the Starobinsky model is that it allows the scalar power spectrum to be evaluated analytically in terms of the three parameters that describe the model, viz. the two slopes that describe the potential on either side of the discontinuity and the Hubble scale at the time when the field crosses the discontinuity. In this work, we evaluate the bi-spectrum of the scalar perturbations in the Starobinsky model in the equilateral limit. Remarkably, we find that, just as the power spectrum, all the different contributions to the the bi-spectrum too can be evaluated completely analytically and expressed in terms of the three paramaters that describe the model. We show that the quantity f{sub NL}, which characterizes the extent of non-Gaussianity, can be expressed purely in terms of the ratio of the two slopes on either side of the discontinuity in the potential. Further, we find that, for certain values of the parameters, f{sub NL} in the Starobinsky model can be as large as the mean value that has been arrived at from the analysis of the recent CMB data. We also demonstrate that the usual hierarchy of contributions to the bi-spectrum can be altered for certain values of the parameters. Altogether, we find that the Starobinsky model represents a unique scenario wherein, even when the slow roll conditions are violated, the background, the perturbations as well as the corresponding two and three point correlation functions can be evaluated completely analytically. As a consequence, the Starobinsky model can also be used to calibrate numerical codes aimed at computing the non-Gaussianities.

  16. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Starke, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

  17. Response Elements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-07-11

    The Guide provides acceptable methods for meeting the requirement of DOE O 151.1C for response elements that respond or contribute to response as needed in an emergency. Supersedes DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-5, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-6.

  18. Enhancing tidal harmonic analysis: Robust (hybrid L1 ) solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Enhancing tidal harmonic analysis: Robust (hybrid L1 =L2 ) solutions Keith E. Leffler , David A 24 February 2008 Accepted 28 April 2008 Keywords: Tides Tidal analysis Harmonic analysis Robust is calculated from the power spectrum of the residual, a calculation that filters broad spectrum noise

  19. Matching Hagedorn mass spectrum with Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Pok Man; Redlich, Krzysztof; Sasaki, Chihiro

    2015-01-01

    Based on recent Lattice QCD (LQCD) results obtained at finite temperature, we discuss modeling of the hadronic phase of QCD in the framework of Hadron Resonance Gas (HRG) with discrete and continuous mass spectra. We focus on fluctuations of conserved charges, and show how a common limiting temperature can be used to constrain the Hagedorn exponential mass spectrum in different sectors of quantum number, through a matching of HRG and LQCD. For strange baryons, the extracted spectra are found to be consistent with all known and expected states listed by the Particle Data Group (PDG). The strange-mesonic sector, however, requires additional states in the intermediate mass range beyond that embodied in the database.

  20. Matching Hagedorn mass spectrum with Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pok Man Lo; Micha? Marczenko; Krzysztof Redlich; Chihiro Sasaki

    2015-07-23

    Based on recent Lattice QCD (LQCD) results obtained at finite temperature, we discuss modeling of the hadronic phase of QCD in the framework of Hadron Resonance Gas (HRG) with discrete and continuous mass spectra. We focus on fluctuations of conserved charges, and show how a common limiting temperature can be used to constrain the Hagedorn exponential mass spectrum in different sectors of quantum number, through a matching of HRG and LQCD. For strange baryons, the extracted spectra are found to be consistent with all known and expected states listed by the Particle Data Group (PDG). The strange-mesonic sector, however, requires additional states in the intermediate mass range beyond that embodied in the database.

  1. Symmetry and Dirac points in graphene spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory Berkolaiko; Andrew Comech

    2015-04-23

    Existence and stability of Dirac points in the dispersion relation of operators periodic with respect to the hexagonal lattice is investigated for different sets of additional symmetries. The following symmetries are considered: rotation by $2\\pi/3$ and inversion, rotation by $2\\pi/3$ and horizontal reflection, inversion or reflection with weakly broken rotation symmetry, and the case where no Dirac points arise: rotation by $2\\pi/3$ and vertical reflection. All proofs are based on symmetry considerations and are elementary in nature. In particular, existence of degeneracies in the spectrum is proved by a transplantation argument (which is deduced from the (co)representation of the relevant symmetry group). The conical shape of the dispersion relation is obtained from its invariance under rotation by $2\\pi/3$. Persistence of conical points when the rotation symmetry is weakly broken is proved using a geometric phase in one case and parity of the eigenfunctions in the other.

  2. Smoothing spline primordial power spectrum reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolyn Sealfon; Licia Verde; Raul Jimenez

    2005-11-01

    We reconstruct the shape of the primordial power spectrum (PPS) using a smoothing spline. Our adapted smoothing spline technique provides a complementary method to existing efforts to search for smooth features in the PPS, such as a running spectral index. With this technique we find no significant indication with WMAP first-year data that the PPS deviates from Harrison-Zeldovich and no evidence for loss of power on large scales. We also examine the effect on the cosmological parameters of the additional PPS freedom. Smooth variations in the PPS are not significantly degenerate with other cosmological parameters, but the spline reconstruction greatly increases the errors on the optical depth and baryon fraction.

  3. Strong ''Quantum'' Chaos in the Global Ballooning Mode Spectrum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    formalism a chaotic Hamiltonian billiard problem. The minimum width of the toroidal Fourier spectrum needed for resolving toroidally localized ballooning modes with a global...

  4. Red and blue tilted tensor spectrum from Gibbons-Hawking temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subhendra Mohanty; Akhilesh Nautiyal

    2015-01-09

    The scale invariant scalar and tensor perturbations, which are predicted from inflation, are eigenmodes in the conformal coordinates. The 'out' observer in the de Sitter space observes a thermal spectrum with a Gibbons-Hawking temperature $H/2\\pi$ of these 'Bunch-Davies' particles. The tensor power spectrum observed in experiments can have an imprint of the Gibbons-Hawking thermal distribution due to the mode mixing between 'in' state conformal coordinates and the coordinate frame of the observer. We find that the the Bunch-Davies modes appear as thermal modes to the asymptotic Minkowski observer in the future and the power spectrum of the gravitational waves is blue-tilted with a spectral index $n_T \\sim 1$ even in the standard slow-roll inflation. On the other hand if the coordinate frame of the observer is taken to be static coordinates, the tensor spectrum is red-tilted with $n_T\\sim -1$. A likelihood analysis shows and find the best fit values of the slow-roll parameters for both cases. We find that the blue-tilted tensor gives a better fit and reconciles the PLANCK upper bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, $r <0.11$ with BICEP2 measurement of $r=0.2$. This supports the idea of particle production due to the mode mixing between the initial Bunch-Davies vacuum modes and the asymptotic Minkowski vacuum of the post-inflation universe.

  5. Water vapor in the spectrum of the extrasolar planet HD 189733b. II. The eclipse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crouzet, Nicolas; McCullough, Peter R.; Deming, Drake; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2014-11-10

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets are crucial to infer the composition and properties of their atmospheres. HD 189733b is one of the most extensively studied exoplanets and is a cornerstone for hot Jupiter models. In this paper, we report the dayside emission spectrum of HD 189733b in the wavelength range 1.1-1.7 ?m obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in spatial scan mode. The quality of the data is such that even a straightforward analysis yields a high-precision Poisson noise-limited spectrum: the median 1? uncertainty is 57 ppm per 0.02 ?m bin. We also build a white-light curve correcting for systematic effects and derive an absolute eclipse depth of 96 39 ppm. The resulting spectrum shows marginal evidence for water vapor absorption, but can also be well explained by a blackbody spectrum. However, the combination of these WFC3 data with previous Spitzer photometric observations is best explained by a dayside atmosphere of HD 189733b with no thermal inversion and a nearly solar or subsolar H{sub 2}O abundance in a cloud-free atmosphere. Alternatively, this apparent subsolar abundance may be the result of clouds or hazes that future studies need to investigate.

  6. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

  7. SPECTRUM OF THE MICROWAVE BACKGROUND RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, P.L.

    2010-01-01

    analysis of the data on the microwave background radiationmillimeter spec trum of the microwave background. Ap. J.i 0.06 Technique Averaged Microwave Reference Woo. 'y and

  8. Apparatus for synthesis of a solar spectrum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO)

    1993-01-01

    A xenon arc lamp and a tungsten filament lamp provide light beams that together contain all the wavelengths required to accurately simulate a solar spectrum. Suitable filter apparatus selectively direct visible and ultraviolet light from the xenon arc lamp into two legs of a trifurcated randomized fiber optic cable. Infrared light selectively filtered from the tungsten filament lamp is directed into the third leg of the fiber optic cable. The individual optic fibers from the three legs are brought together in a random fashion into a single output leg. The output beam emanating from the output leg of the trifurcated randomized fiber optic cable is extremely uniform and contains wavelengths from each of the individual filtered light beams. This uniform output beam passes through suitable collimation apparatus before striking the surface of the solar cell being tested. Adjustable aperture apparatus located between the lamps and the input legs of the trifurcated fiber optic cable can be selectively adjusted to limit the amount of light entering each leg, thereby providing a means of "fine tuning" or precisely adjusting the spectral content of the output beam. Finally, an adjustable aperture apparatus may also be placed in the output beam to adjust the intensity of the output beam without changing the spectral content and distribution of the output beam.

  9. Tolerance Analysis of Flexible Assemblies Using Finite Element and Spectral Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolerance Analysis of Flexible Assemblies Using Finite Element and Spectral Analysis ADCATS Report the autocorrelation function from frequency spectrum analysis to model random surface variations. Finite element BACKGROUND LITERATURE REVIEW 5 3 STATISTICAL TOLERANCE ANALYSIS USING FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS 3.1 Assumptions

  10. Just enough inflation: power spectrum modifications at large scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cicoli, Michele [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Universit di Bologna, via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Downes, Sean [Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Dutta, Bhaskar [Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); Pedro, Francisco G.; Westphal, Alexander, E-mail: mcicoli@ictp.it, E-mail: ssdownes@phys.ntu.edu.tw, E-mail: dutta@physics.tamu.edu, E-mail: francisco.pedro@desy.de, E-mail: alexander.westphal@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Theory Group, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-12-01

    We show that models of 'just enough' inflation, where the slow-roll evolution lasted only 50- 60 e-foldings, feature modifications of the CMB power spectrum at large angular scales. We perform a systematic analytic analysis in the limit of a sudden transition between any possible non-slow-roll background evolution and the final stage of slow-roll inflation. We find a high degree of universality since most common backgrounds like fast-roll evolution, matter or radiation-dominance give rise to a power loss at large angular scales and a peak together with an oscillatory behaviour at scales around the value of the Hubble parameter at the beginning of slow-roll inflation. Depending on the value of the equation of state parameter, different pre-inflationary epochs lead instead to an enhancement of power at low ?, and so seem disfavoured by recent observational hints for a lack of CMB power at ??<40. We also comment on the importance of initial conditions and the possibility to have multiple pre-inflationary stages.

  11. Placing Fusion in the spectrum of energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Placing Fusion in the spectrum of energy development programs Niek Lopes Cardozo #12;Niek Lopes Cardozo, Placing fusion in the energy development spectrum Put fusion in same plot with other energy to other energy sources in development. This comparison should be based on an existing representation

  12. "Light" or the Electromagnetic spectrum www.nasa.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    #12;"Light" or the Electromagnetic spectrum www.nasa.gov #12;Diffraction and Light When passed Nasa.gov #12;The Visible Spectrum violet 380-420 nm indigo 420-450 nm blue 450-495 nm green 495-570 nm, Blue, or green Cones concentrated at the center Rods at outside of eye www.nasa.gov #12;Cone

  13. Outage Performance of the Primary Service in Spectrum Sharing Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikomeroglu, Halim

    Outage Performance of the Primary Service in Spectrum Sharing Networks Mohammad G. Khoshkholgh, we utilize stochastic geometry to analyze the primary service (PS) outage performance for spectrum) parameters and wireless environment on the PS outage probability are analyzed. We further obtain a closed

  14. Clustered Hybrid Energy-aware cooperative Spectrum Sensing (CHESS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Benedetto, Maria-Gabriella

    Clustered Hybrid Energy-aware cooperative Spectrum Sensing (CHESS) Luca De Nardis, Daniele algorithm for energy- efficient and reliable spectrum sensing in a cognitive network. The algorithm relies on cooperation between secondary devices, that organize themselves in clusters defined according to both sensing

  15. Pressure Calibration by the Infrared Absorption Spectrum of Mineral Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Pressure Calibration by the Infrared Absorption Spectrum of Mineral Oil H. Child, Kenyon College effect is seen in the infrared absorption spectrum of mineral oil. The frequency of two peaks increases as pressure is applied to the mineral oil. At a pressure of about 1 kbar (100 MPa), both peaks are distinct

  16. Supporting Dynamic Spectrum Access in Heterogeneous LTE+ Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luiz A. DaSilva; Ryan E. Irwin; Mike Benonis

    2012-08-01

    As early as 2014, mobile network operators spectral capac- ity is expected to be overwhelmed by the demand brought on by new devices and applications. With Long Term Evo- lution Advanced (LTE+) networks likely as the future one world 4G standard, network operators may need to deploy a Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA) overlay in Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets) to extend coverage, increase spectrum efficiency, and increase the capacity of these networks. In this paper, we propose three new management frameworks for DSA in an LTE+ HetNet: Spectrum Accountability Client, Cell Spectrum Management, and Domain Spectrum Man- agement. For these spectrum management frameworks, we define protocol interfaces and operational signaling scenar- ios to support cooperative sensing, spectrum lease manage- ment, and alarm scenarios for rule adjustment. We also quan- tify, through integer programs, the benefits of using DSA in an LTE+ HetNet, that can opportunistically reuse vacant TV and GSM spectrum. Using integer programs, we consider a topology using Geographic Information System data from the Blacksburg, VA metro area to assess the realistic benefits of DSA in an LTE+ HetNet.

  17. The charmed and bottom meson spectrum from lattice NRQCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randy Lewis; R. M. Woloshyn

    2000-10-02

    The mass spectrum of S and P-wave mesons containing a single heavy quark has been computed using quenched lattice nonrelativistic QCD. Numerical results have been obtained at first, second and third order in the heavy quark expansion, so convergence can be discussed. The computed spectrum of charmed and bottom mesons is compared to existing model calculations and experimental data.

  18. Heavy-light meson spectrum with and without NRQCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randy Lewis; R. M. Woloshyn

    2000-10-02

    Results for the spectrum of S and P-wave charmed mesons are obtained in the quenched approximation from a tadpole-improved anisotropic gauge field action and a D234 quark action. This is compared to the spectrum obtained from an NRQCD charm quark and a D234 light antiquark. NRQCD results for bottom mesons are also discussed.

  19. Fidelity spectrum and phase transitions of quantum systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacramento, P. D.; Vieira, V. R. [Departamento de Fisica and CFIF, Instituto Superior Tecnico, TU Lisbon, Avenida Rovisco Pais, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Paunkovic, N. [SQIG-Instituto de Telecomunicacoes, IST, TU Lisbon, Avenida Rovisco Pais, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-12-15

    Quantum fidelity between two density matrices F({rho}{sub 1},{rho}{sub 2}) is usually defined as the trace of the operator F={radical}({radical}({rho}{sub 1}){rho}{sub 2}{radical}({rho}{sub 1})). We study the logarithmic spectrum of this operator, which we denote by the fidelity spectrum, in the cases of the XX spin chain in a magnetic field, a magnetic impurity inserted in a conventional superconductor, and a bulk superconductor at finite temperature. When the density matrices are equal, {rho}{sub 1}={rho}{sub 2}, the fidelity spectrum reduces to the entanglement spectrum. We find that the fidelity spectrum can be a useful tool in giving a detailed characterization of the different phases of many-body quantum systems.

  20. Design and Analysis on a Cryogenic Current Amplifier with a Superconducting Microwave Resonator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okazaki, Yuma

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new type of cryogenic current amplifiers, in which low-frequency power spectrum of current can be measured through a measurement of microwave response of a superconducting resonant circuit shunted by a series array of Josephson junctions. From numerical analysis on the equivalent circuit, the numerical value of the input-referred current noise of the proposed amplifier is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than the noise floor measured with the conventional cryogenic current amplifiers based on high-electron-mobility transistors or superconducting quantum interference devices. Our proposal can open new avenues for investigating low-temperature solid-state devices that require lower noise and wider bandwidth power spectrum measurements of current.

  1. A Bayesian approach to power-spectrum significance estimation, with application to solar neutrino data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Sturrock

    2008-09-01

    The usual procedure for estimating the significance of a peak in a power spectrum is to calculate the probability of obtaining that value or a larger value by chance, on the assumption that the time series contains only noise (e.g. that the measurements were derived from random samplings of a Gaussian distribution). However, it is known that one should regard this P-Value approach with caution. As an alternative, we here examine a Bayesian approach to estimating the significance of a peak in a power spectrum. This approach requires that we consider explicitly the hypothesis that the time series contains a periodic signal as well as noise. The challenge is to identify a probability distribution function for the power that is appropriate for this hypothesis. We propose what seem to be reasonable conditions to require of this function, and then propose a simple function that meets these requirements. We also propose a consistency condition, and check to see that our function satisfies this condition. We find that the Bayesian significance estimates are considerably more conservative than the conventional estimates. We apply this procedure to three recent analyses of solar neutrino data: (a) bimodality of GALLEX data; (b) power spectrum analysis of Super-Kamiokande data; and (c) the combined analysis of radiochemical neutrino data and irradiance data.

  2. The Nuclear Spectrum of M87

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. I. Tsvetanov; G. F. Hartig; H. C. Ford; G. A. Kriss; M. A. Dopita; L. L. Dressel; R. J. Harms

    1998-01-06

    The nuclear spectrum of M87 covering the Ly_a-H_a wavelength range was obtained with the HST Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) trough a 0.21 arcsec aperture. Contrary to some previous claims, a single power law (F(nu)~nu^(-a)) can not reproduce the observed continuum shape and at least a broken power law is require for a good fit (a = 1.75 and 1.41 shortward and longward of the break at ~4500 A). We detect a set of broad (FWHM ~ 400 km/s) absorption lines arising in the gas associated with M87. These are only lines from neutral and very low ionization species blueshifted by ~150 km/s relative to the M87 systemic velocity, indicating a net gas outflow and turbulence. The excitation sensitive emission line ratios suggest that shocks may be the dominant energy supplier. The nuclear source in M87 is significantly variable. From the FOS target acquisition data, we have established that the flux from the optical nucleus varies by a factor ~2 on time scales of ~2.5 months and by as much as 25% over 3 weeks, and remains unchanged (<2.5%) on time scales of ~1 day. These timescales limit the physical size of the emitting region to a few hundred gravitational radii. The variability, combined with other observed spectral properties, strongly suggest that M87 is intrinsically of BL Lac type but is viewed at an angle too large to reveal the classical BL Lac properties.

  3. Patterns of autism spectrum symptomatology in individuals with Down syndrome without comorbid autism spectrum disorder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Channell, Marie Moore; Phillips, B. Allyson; Loveall, Susan J.; Conners, Frances A.; Bussanich, Paige M.; Klinger, Laura Grofer

    2014-04-07

    BioMed Centr Commons Attribution License (http://creativec reproduction in any medium, provided the or Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.or unless otherwise stated.Open Access m symptomatology in drome without disorder all1,4, Frances A Conners.... Behavioral phenotype of individuals with Down syndrome. Ment Retard Dev Disabil Res Rev. 2000;6:8495. 5. Klinger LG, Dawson G, Burner K, Crisler M. Autism spectrum disorder. In: Mash EJ, Barkley RA, editors. Child psychopathology. 3rd ed. New York: Guilford...

  4. Quasinormal mode spectrum of a Kerr black hole in the eikonal limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, Sam R. [School of Mathematics, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-15

    It is well established that the response of a black hole to a generic perturbation is characterized by a spectrum of damped resonances, called quasinormal modes; and that, in the limit of large angular momentum (l>>1), the quasinormal mode frequency spectrum is related to the properties of unstable null orbits. In this paper we develop an expansion method to explore the link. We obtain new closed-form approximations for the lightly damped part of the spectrum in the large-l regime. We confirm that, at leading order in l, the resonance frequency is linked to the orbital frequency, and the resonance damping to the Lyapunov exponent, of the relevant null orbit. We go somewhat further than previous studies to establish (i) a spin-dependent correction to the frequency at order 1/l for equatorial (m={+-}l) modes, and (ii) a new result for polar modes (m=0). We validate the approach by testing the closed-form approximations against frequencies obtained numerically with Leaver's method.

  5. First results on Cosmic Ray electron spectrum below 20 GeV from the Fermi LAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pesce-Rollins, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Designed to be a successor of the previous flown space based gamma ray detectors, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) is also an electron detector. Taking advantage of its capability to separate electromagnetic and hadronic signals it is possible to accurately measure the Cosmic Ray electron spectrum. The spectra of primary cosmic ray electrons below 20 GeV is influenced by many local effects such as solar modulation and the geomagnetic cutoff. For energies below a few GeV it is possible to observe the albedo population of electrons which are controlled by the local magnetic field. In this paper we present the LAT electron analysis in particular event selection and validation as well as the first results on the measurement of the electron spectrum below 20 GeV.

  6. Crosstalk Compensation for a Rapid, Higher Resolution Impedance Spectrum Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; David M. Rose; William H. Morrison; Chester G. Motloch

    2012-03-01

    Batteries and other energy storage devices are playing larger roles in various industries (e.g., military, automotive, electric utilities, etc.) as the U.S. seeks to reduce its dependence on foreign energy resources. As such, there exists a significant need for accurate, robust state-of-health assessment techniques. Present techniques tend to focus on simple, passive monitoring of voltage and current at a given ambient temperature. However, this approach has the disadvantage of ignoring key elements of health, that is, changes in resistance growth and power fade. Impedance spectroscopy is considered a useful laboratory tool in gauging changes in the resistance and power performance, but it has not been widely considered as an onboard diagnostic tool due to the length of time required to complete the measurement. Cross-Talk Compensation (CTC) is a novel approach that enables rapid, high resolution impedance spectra measurements using a hardware platform that could be designed as an embedded system. This input signal consists of a sum-of-sines excitation current that has a known frequency spread and a duration of one period of the lowest frequency. The voltage response is then captured at a sufficiently fast sample rate. Previously developed rapid impedance spectrum measurement techniques either required a longer excitation signal or a sum-of-sines signal that was separated by harmonic frequencies to reduce or eliminate, respectively, the cross-talk interference in the calculated results. The distinct advantage of CTC, however, is that non-harmonic frequencies can now be included within the excitation signal while still keeping the signal duration at one period of the lowest frequency. Since the frequency spread of the input signal is known, the crosstalk interference between sinusoidal signals within the sum-of-sines at a given frequency of interest can be pre-determined and assigned to an error matrix. Consequently, the real and imaginary components of the impedance at each frequency of interest can be calculated using simple linear algebra based on the error matrix and measured response from the energy storage device given the excitation signal. Analytical validation of CTC over a frequency range between 2000 and 0.1 Hz (i.e., a ten-second input signal duration) was performed using a standardized battery lumped parameter model. The results indicated that the CTC was able to successfully resolve more than 45 frequencies within a sum-of-sines excitation signal, whereas previous techniques could only resolve up to 15 frequencies. A simplified derivation of the CTC technique and its corresponding analytical validation studies using the lumped-parameter model will be presented.

  7. Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems Importance of dimming New wireless controls technologies Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives Provide up-to-date information

  8. PyRAT (python radiography analysis tool): overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Jerawan C; Temple, Brian A; Buescher, Kevin L

    2011-01-14

    PyRAT was developed as a quantitative tool for robustly characterizing objects from radiographs to solve problems such as the hybrid nonlinear inverse problem. The optimization software library that was used is the nonsmooth optimization by MADS algorithm (NOMAD). Some of PyRAT's features are: (1) hybrid nonlinear inverse problem with calculated x-ray spectrum and detector response; (2) optimization based inversion approach with goal of identifying unknown object configurations - MVO problem; (3) using functionalities of Python libraries for radiographic image processing and analysis; (4) using the Tikhonov regularization method of linear inverse problem to recover partial information of object configurations; (5) using a priori knowledge of problem solutions to define feasible region and discrete neighbor for the MVO problem - initial data analysis + material library {yields} a priori knowledge; and (6) using the NOMAD (C++ version) software in the object.

  9. Linear response to long wavelength fluctuations using curvature simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias Baldauf; Uro Seljak; Leonardo Senatore; Matias Zaldarriaga

    2015-11-04

    We study the local response to long wavelength fluctuations in cosmological $N$-body simulations, focusing on the matter and halo power spectra, halo abundance and non-linear transformations of the density field. The long wavelength mode is implemented using an effective curved cosmology and a mapping of time and distances. The method provides an alternative, most probably more precise, way to measure the isotropic halo biases. Limiting ourselves to the linear case, we find generally good agreement between the biases obtained from the curvature method and the traditional power spectrum method at the level of a few percent. We also study the response of halo counts to changes in the variance of the field and find that the slope of the relation between the responses to density and variance differs from the naive derivation assuming a universal mass function by 18%. This has implications for measurements of the amplitude of local non-Gaussianity using scale dependent bias. We also analyze the halo power spectrum and halo-dark matter cross-spectrum response to long wavelength fluctuations and derive second order halo bias from it, as well as the super-sample variance contribution to the galaxy power spectrum covariance matrix.

  10. Dark energy and non-linear power spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang Gyu Biern; Jinn-Ouk Gong

    2015-06-29

    We investigate the effects of homogeneous general dark energy on the non-linear matter perturbation in fully general relativistic context. The equation for the density contrast contains even at linear order new contributions which are non-zero for general dark energy. Taking into account the next-leading-order corrections, we derive the total power spectrum in real and redshift spaces. We find that the observable galaxy power spectrum deviates from the LambdaCDM spectrum, which is nearly identical to that in the Einstein-de Sitter universe, and the relative difference is about 10% on a scale of the baryon acoustic oscillations.

  11. Impact of quantum entanglement on spectrum of cosmological fluctuations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanno, Sugumi

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the effect of entanglement between two causally separated open charts in de Sitter space on the spectrum of vacuum fluctuations. We consider a free massive scalar field, and construct the reduced density matrix by tracing out the vacuum state for one of the open charts, as recently derived by Maldacena and Pimentel. We formulate the mean-square vacuum fluctuations by using the reduced density matrix and show that the scale invariant spectrum of massless scalar field is realized on small scales. On the other hand, we find that the quantum entanglement affects the shape of the spectrum on large scales comparable to or greater than the curvature radius.

  12. Figure 11 shows the reference irradiance spectrum proposed by Thuillier et al Figure 12 shows the Kitt Peak absolute irradiance spectrum smoothed using a 0.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    Figure 11 shows the reference irradiance spectrum proposed by Thuillier et al (2004). Figure 12 shows the Kitt Peak absolute irradiance spectrum smoothed using a 0.5 nm triangular bandpass irradiance spectrum subjectively normalized to the Thuillier et al irradiance spectrum. I recommend

  13. Why Urban Mass Demand Responsive Transport? Jani-Pekka Jokinen, Teemu Sihvola, Esa Hyytia and Reijo Sulonen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyyti, Esa

    Why Urban Mass Demand Responsive Transport? Jani-Pekka Jokinen, Teemu Sihvola, Esa Hyyti that a large-scale demand responsive system is the missing element from the spectrum of the urban transport. In each case, we are able to give sound arguments why a mass demand responsive transport (DRT) service can

  14. All-particle primary energy spectrum in the 3-200 PeV energy range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Garyaka; R. M. Martirosov; S. V. Ter-Antonyan; A. D. Erlykin; N. M. Nikolskaya; Y. A. Gallant; L. W. Jones; J. Procureur

    2008-08-10

    We present all-particle primary cosmic-ray energy spectrum in the 3-200 PeV energy range obtained by a multi-parametric event-by-event evaluation of the primary energy. The results are obtained on the basis of an expanded EAS data set detected at mountain level (700 g/cm^2) by the GAMMA experiment. The energy evaluation method has been developed using the EAS simulation with the SIBYLL interaction model taking into account the response of GAMMA detectors and reconstruction uncertainties of EAS parameters. Nearly unbiased (energy estimations regardless of a primary nuclear mass with an accuracy of about 15-10% in the 3-200 PeV energy range respectively are attained. An irregularity ('bump') in the spectrum is observed at primary energies of ~74 PeV. This bump exceeds a smooth power-law fit to the data by about 4 standard deviations. Not rejecting stochastic nature of the bump completely, we examined the systematic uncertainties of our methods and conclude that they cannot be responsible for the observed feature.

  15. Using the stress response to monitor process control: pathways to more effective bioremediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2010-01-01

    of temperature elicit the heat shock stress response thathttp:vimss.lbl.gov). The heat shock stress response, havingstudies show that heat shock stress analysis can be applied

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes. The 8.2-Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.

  17. A Narrower Spectrum for a Wider View of Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wider View of Matter July 9, 2014 Bookmark and Share Ultra-high-resolution dispersive optics of the new inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) spectrometer (top) and IXS spectrum of...

  18. Exploring speech therapy games with children on the autism spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Picard, Rosalind W.

    Individuals on the autism spectrum often have difficulties producing intelligible speech with either high or low speech rate, and atypical pitch and/or amplitude affect. In this study, we present a novel intervention towards ...

  19. Lessons from participatory design with adolescents on the autism spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Picard, Rosalind W.

    Participatory user interface design with adolescent users on the autism spectrum presents a number of unique challenges and opportunities. Through our work developing a system to help autistic adolescents learn to recognize ...

  20. Emotion Regulation in Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, James J.

    Emotion Regulation in Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder Andrea C. Samson group- matched typically developing (TD) controls completed a Reactivity and Regulation Situation Task. This task assesses emotional reactivity and spontaneous use of emotion regulation strategies (problem

  1. An evaluation of the fast-mixed spectrum reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Wee Tee

    1980-01-01

    An independent evaluation of the neutronic characteristics of a gas-cooled fast-mixed spectrum reactor (FMSR) core design has been performed. A benchmark core configuration for an early FMSR design was provided by Brookhaven ...

  2. Bearing estimation techniques for improved performance spread spectrum receivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, John S

    The main topic of this thesis is the use of bearing estimation techniques combined with multiple antenna elements for spread spectrum receivers. The motivation behind this work is twofold: firstly, this type of receiver structure may offer...

  3. Predicting an ultraviolet-tetraherz double resonance spectrum of formaldehyde

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenn, Emily E. (Emily Elizabeth)

    2006-01-01

    In preparation for performing a triple resonance experiment to study the Rydberg states of calcium monofluoride (CaF), a double resonance spectrum of formaldehyde will be recorded. A dye laser will populate a level in ...

  4. Department of Energy to Host Spectrum Policy Seminar for the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    more information to the utility sector on spectrum policy issues in light of the role wireless communications will surely play in the deployment of smart grid technologies. At this...

  5. The spatio-temporal spectrum of turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    di Leoni, P Clark; Mininni, P D

    2015-01-01

    Identification and extraction of vortical structures and of waves in a disorganized flow is a mayor challegen in the study of turbulence. We present a study of the spatio-temporal behavior of turbulent flows in the presence of different restitutive forces. We show how to compute and analyze the spatio-temporal spectrum from data stemming from numerical simulations and from laboratory experiments. Four cases are considered: homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, rotating turbulence, stratified turbulence, and water wave turbulence. For homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of random sweeping. For rotating and for stratified turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of the waves, quantification of the energy in the waves and in the turbulent eddies, and identification of physical mechanisms such as Doppler shift and wave absorption in critical layers. Finally, in water wave turbulence the spectrum shows a transition from gravity-capillary waves to bound waves as the amplit...

  6. Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Interaction of Symptoms and Executive Skills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Robb Nelson

    2012-02-14

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) are one form of neurodevelopmental disruption that negatively impacts the integration of perceptual, affective and neuroregulatory mechanisms of typical development. Individuals with ASDs categorically demonstrate...

  7. Light quark spectrum with improved gauge and fermion actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MILC Collaboration; Claude Bernard; Tom DeGrand; Carleton DeTar; Steven Gottlieb; Urs M. Heller; Jim Hetrick; Craig McNeile; Kari Rummukainen; Bob Sugar; Doug Toussaint; Matthew Wingate

    1997-11-08

    We report on a study of the light quark spectrum using an improved gauge action and both Kogut-Susskind and Naik quark actions. We have studied six different lattice spacings, corresponding to plaquette couplings ranging from 6.8 to 7.9, with five to six quark masses per coupling. We compare the two quark actions in terms of the spectrum and restoration of flavor symmetry. We also compare these results with those from the conventional action.

  8. Location of the essential spectrum in curved quantum layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krej?i?k, David; Lu, Zhiqin

    2014-08-15

    We consider the Dirichlet Laplacian in tubular neighbourhoods of complete non-compact Riemannian manifolds immersed in the Euclidean space. We show that the essential spectrum coincides with the spectrum of a planar tube provided that the second fundamental form of the manifold vanishes at infinity and the transport of the cross-section along the manifold is asymptotically parallel. For low dimensions and codimension, the result applies to the location of propagating states in nanostructures under physically natural conditions.

  9. MEASURING THE JET POWER OF FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO QUASARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shabala, S. S.; Santoso, J. S.; Godfrey, L. E. H.

    2012-09-10

    We use frequency-dependent position shifts of flat-spectrum radio cores to estimate the kinetic power of active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets. We find a correlation between the derived jet powers and AGN narrow-line luminosity, consistent with the well-known relation for radio galaxies and steep spectrum quasars. This technique can be applied to intrinsically weak jets even at high redshift.

  10. Loads Analysis of Several Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A. N.; Jonkman, J. M.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive dynamic-response analysis of six offshore floating wind turbine concepts.

  11. The tensor bi-spectrum in a matter bounce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debika Chowdhury; V. Sreenath; L. Sriramkumar

    2015-07-28

    Matter bounces are bouncing scenarios wherein the universe contracts as in a matter dominated phase at early times. Such scenarios are known to lead to a scale invariant spectrum of tensor perturbations just as de Sitter inflation does. In this work, we examine if the tensor bi-spectrum can discriminate between the inflationary and the bouncing scenarios. Using the Maldacena formalism, we analytically evaluate the tensor bi-spectrum in a matter bounce for an arbitrary triangular configuration of the wavevectors. We show that, over scales of cosmological interest, the non-Gaussianity parameter $h_{_{\\rm NL}}$ that characterizes the amplitude of the tensor bi-spectrum is quite small when compared to the corresponding values in de Sitter inflation. During inflation, the amplitude of the tensor perturbations freeze on super-Hubble scales, a behavior that results in the so-called consistency condition relating the tensor bi-spectrum and the power spectrum in the squeezed limit. In contrast, in the bouncing scenarios, the amplitude of the tensor perturbations grow strongly as one approaches the bounce, which suggests that the consistency condition will not be valid in such situations. We explicitly show that the consistency relation is indeed violated in the matter bounce. We discuss the implications of the results.

  12. The tensor bi-spectrum in a matter bounce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chowdhury, Debika; Sriramkumar, L

    2015-01-01

    Matter bounces are bouncing scenarios wherein the universe contracts as in a matter dominated phase at early times. Such scenarios are known to lead to a scale invariant spectrum of tensor perturbations just as de Sitter inflation does. In this work, we examine if the tensor bi-spectrum can discriminate between the inflationary and the bouncing scenarios. Using the Maldacena formalism, we analytically evaluate the tensor bi-spectrum in a matter bounce for an arbitrary triangular configuration of the wavevectors. We show that, over scales of cosmological interest, the non-Gaussianity parameter $h_{_{\\rm NL}}$ that characterizes the amplitude of the tensor bi-spectrum is quite small when compared to the corresponding values in de Sitter inflation. During inflation, the amplitude of the tensor perturbations freeze on super-Hubble scales, a behavior that results in the so-called consistency condition relating the tensor bi-spectrum and the power spectrum in the squeezed limit. In contrast, in the bouncing scenari...

  13. High Resolution Irradiance Spectrum from 300 to 1000 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert L. Kurucz

    2006-05-01

    The FTS scans that made up the Kitt Peak Solar Flux Atlas by Kurucz, Furenlid, Brault, and Testerman (1984) have been re-reduced. An approximate telluric atmospheric model was determined for each FTS scan. Large-scale features produced by O3 and O2 dimer were computed and divided out. The solar continuum level was found by fitting a smooth curve to high points in each scan. The scans were normalized to the fitted continuum to produce a residual flux spectrum for each FTS scan. The telluric line spectrum was computed using HITRAN and other line data for H2O, O2, and CO2. The line parameters were adjusted for an approximate match to the observed spectra. The scans were divided by the computed telluric spectra to produce residual irradiance spectra. Artifacts from wavelength mismatches, deep lines, etc, were removed by hand and replaced by linear interpolation. Overlapping scans were fitted together to make a continuous spectrum from 300 to 1000 nm. All the above steps were iterative. The monochromatic error varies from 0.1 to 1.0 percent. The residual spectrum was calibrated two different ways: First by normalizing it to the continuum of theoretical solar model ASUN (Kurucz 1992), and second, by degrading the spectrum to the resolution of the observed irradiance (Thuillier et al. 2004) to determine a normalization function that was then applied to the high resolution spectrum.

  14. Power spectrum sensitivity of raster-scanned CMB experiments in the presence of 1/f noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Crawford

    2007-09-24

    We investigate the effects of 1/f noise on the ability of a particular class of Cosmic Microwave Background experiments to measure the angular power spectrum of temperature anisotropy. We concentrate on experiments that operate primarily in raster-scan mode and develop formalism that allows us to calculate analytically the effect of 1/f noise on power spectrum sensitivity for this class of experiments and determine the benefits of raster-scanning at different angles relative to the sky field versus scanning at only a single angle (cross-linking versus not cross-linking). We find that the sensitivity of such experiments in the presence of 1/f noise is not significantly degraded at moderate spatial scales (l ~ 100) for reasonable values of scan speed and 1/f knee. We further find that the difference between cross-linked and non-cross-linked experiments is small in all cases and that the non-cross-linked experiments are preferred from a raw sensitivity standpoint in the noise-dominated regime -- i.e., in experiments in which the instrument noise is greater than the sample variance of the target power spectrum at the scales of interest. This analysis does not take into account systematic effects.

  15. On the possibility of blue tensor spectrum within single field inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fu Cai; Jinn-Ouk Gong; Shi Pi; Emmanuel N. Saridakis; Shang-Yu Wu

    2014-12-23

    We present a series of theoretical constraints on the potentially viable inflation models that might yield a blue spectrum for primordial tensor perturbations. By performing a detailed dynamical analysis we show that, while there exists such possibility, the corresponding phase space is strongly bounded. Our result implies that, in order to achieve a blue tilt for inflationary tensor perturbations, one may either construct a non-canonical inflation model delicately, or study the generation of primordial tensor modes beyond the standard scenario of single slow-roll field.

  16. 46 NA iEEE SpEctrum AuguSt 2010 spectrum.ieee.org On 1 June 2009,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavi, Krishna

    to the ground by krishna m. kavi viktorkoen #12;AuguSt 2010 iEEE SpEctrum iNt 47spectrum.ieee.org #12;48 NA and flight- control surfaces. Such information has enabled analysts to infer the causes of most crashes and no steps to prevent similar failures in the future. The black box may be the greatest single invention

  17. THE LOW-FREQUENCY RADIO CATALOG OF FLAT-SPECTRUM SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massaro, F.; Giroletti, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Cowperthwaite, Philip S.; Masetti, N.; Tosti, G.; Funk, S.

    2014-07-01

    A well known property of the ?-ray sources detected by Cos-B in the 1970s, by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory in the 1990s, and recently by the Fermi observations is the presence of radio counterparts, particularly for those associated with extragalactic objects. This observational evidence is the basis of the radio-?-ray connection established for the class of active galactic nuclei known as blazars. In particular, the main spectral property of the radio counterparts associated with ?-ray blazars is that they show a flat spectrum in the GHz frequency range. Our recent analysis dedicated to search blazar-like candidates as potential counterparts for the unidentified ?-ray sources allowed us to extend the radio-?-ray connection in the MHz regime. We also showed that blazars below 1 GHz maintain flat radio spectra. Thus, on the basis of these new results, we assembled a low-frequency radio catalog of flat-spectrum sources built by combining the radio observations of the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey and of the Westerbork in the southern hemisphere catalog with those of the NRAO Very Large Array Sky survey (NVSS). This could be used in the future to search for new, unknown blazar-like counterparts of ?-ray sources. First, we found NVSS counterparts of Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope radio sources, and then we selected flat-spectrum radio sources according to a new spectral criterion, specifically defined for radio observations performed below 1 GHz. We also described the main properties of the catalog listing 28,358 radio sources and their logN-logS distributions. Finally, a comparison with the Green Bank 6 cm radio source catalog was performed to investigate the spectral shape of the low-frequency flat-spectrum radio sources at higher frequencies.

  18. Theoretical rotation-vibration spectrum of thioformaldehyde

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yachmenev, Andrey; Polyak, Iakov; Thiel, Walter

    2013-11-28

    We present a variational calculation of the first comprehensive T = 300 K rovibrational line list for thioformaldehyde, H{sub 2}CS. It covers 41?809 rovibrational levels for states up to J{sub max} = 30 with vibrational band origins up to 5000 cm{sup ?1} and provides the energies and line intensities for 547?926 transitions from the ground vibrational state to these levels. It is based on our previously reported accurate ab initio potential energy surface and a newly calculated ab initio dipole moment surface. Minor empirical adjustments are made to the ab initio equilibrium geometry to reduce systematic errors in the predicted intra-band rotational energy levels. The rovibrational energy levels and transition intensities are computed variationally by using the methods implemented in the computer program TROVE. Transition wavelengths and intensities are found to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. The present calculations correctly reproduce the observed resonance effects, such as intensity borrowing, thus reflecting the high accuracy of the underlying ab initio surfaces. We report a detailed analysis of several vibrational bands, especially those complicated by strong Coriolis coupling, to facilitate future laboratory assignments.

  19. Power spectrum of post-inflationary primordial magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hector J. Hortua; Leonardo Castaeda

    2014-12-16

    The origin of large scale magnetic fields is one of the most puzzling topics in cosmology and astrophysics. It is assumed that the observed magnetic fields result from the amplification of an initial field produced in the early universe. In this paper we compute the exact power spectrum of magnetic fields created after inflation best known as post inflationary magnetic fields, using the first order cosmological perturbation theory. Our treatment differs from others works because we include an infrared cutoff which encodes only causal modes in the spectrum. The cross-correlation between magnetic energy density with Lorentz force and the anisotropic part of the electromagnetic field are exactly computed. We compare our results with previous works finding agreement in cases where the ratio between lower and upper cutoff is very small. However, we found that spectrum is strongly affected when this ratio is greater than 0.2. Moreover, the effect of a post inflationary magnetic field with a lower cutoff on the angular power spectrum in the temperature distribution of CMB was also exactly calculated. The main feature is a shift of the spectrum's peak as function of the infrared cutoff, therefore analyzing this effect we could infer the value of this cutoff and thus constraining the primordial magnetic fields generation models.

  20. The X-ray Spectrum of Cyg X-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Done; P. T. Zycki; D. A. Smith

    2001-11-27

    The spectra of disc accreting neutron stars generally show complex curvature, and individual components from the disc, boundary layer and neutron star surface cannot be uniquely identified. Here we show that much of the confusion over the spectral form derives from inadequate approximations for comptonization and for the iron line. There is an intrinsic low energy cutoff in comptonised spectra at the seed photon energy. It is very important to model this correctly in neutron star systems as these have expected seed photon temperatures (from either the neutron star surface, inner disc or self-absorbed cyclotron) of ~1 keV, clearly within the observed X-ray energy band. There is also reflected continuum emission which must accompany the observed iron line, which distorts the higher energy spectrum. We illustrate these points by a reanalysis of the GINGA spectra of Cyg X-2 at all points along its Z track, and show that the spectrum can be well fit by models in which the low energy spectrum is dominated by the disc, while the higher energy spectrum is dominated by comptonised emission from the boundary layer, together with its reflected spectrum from a relativistically smeared, ionised disc.

  1. The effect of topography on the wavelet response of seismic arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Shuhail, Abdullatif Abdulrahman

    1993-01-01

    Analyzing seismic arrays using their responses to wavelets provides a more convenient and direct method of analysis than using their conventional time-harmonic responses. In this study, the effect of topography on the wavelet response of seismic...

  2. A.O. Smith Corporation Response to Preliminary Plan for Retrospective...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A.O. Smith Corporation Response to Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis of A.O. Smith Corporation Response to Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis of A.O. Smith...

  3. Impressions of the Meson Spectrum: Hybrids & Exotics, present and future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennington, M R

    2015-01-01

    It has long been expected that the spectrum of hadrons in QCD would be far richer and extensive than experiment has so far revealed. While there have been experimental hints of this richness for some time, it is really only in the last few years that dramatic progress has been seen in the exploration both experimentally and in calculations on the lattice. Precision studies enabled by new technology both with detectors and high performance computations are converging on an understanding of the spectrum in strong coupling QCD. These methodologies are laying the foundation for a decade of potential discovery that electro and photoproduction experiments at Jefferson Lab, which when combined with key results on $B$ and charmonium decays from both $e^+e^-$ and $pp$ colliders, should turn mere impressions of the light meson spectrum into a high definition picture.

  4. Technology Options for a Fast Spectrum Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. Wachs; R. W. King; I. Y. Glagolenko; Y. Shatilla

    2006-06-01

    Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory has evaluated technology options for a new fast spectrum reactor to meet the fast-spectrum irradiation requirements for the USDOE Generation IV (Gen IV) and Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) programs. The US currently has no capability for irradiation testing of large volumes of fuels or materials in a fast-spectrum reactor required to support the development of Gen IV fast reactor systems or to demonstrate actinide burning, a key element of the AFCI program. The technologies evaluated and the process used to select options for a fast irradiation test reactor (FITR) for further evaluation to support these programmatic objectives are outlined in this paper.

  5. Effects of halo substructure on the power spectrum and bispectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derek Dolney; Bhuvnesh Jain; Masahiro Takada

    2004-09-22

    We study the effects of halo substructure and a distribution in the concentration parameter of haloes on large-scale structure statistics. The effects on the power spectrum and bispectrum are studied on the smallest scales accessible from future surveys. We compare halo-model predictions with results based on N-body simulations, but also extend our predictions to 10-kpc scales which will be probed by future simulations. We find that weak-lensing surveys proposed for the coming decade can probe the power spectrum on small enough scales to detect substructure in massive haloes. We discuss the prospects of constraining the mass fraction in substructure in view of partial degeneracies with parameters such as the tilt and running of the primordial power spectrum.

  6. Impressions of the Meson Spectrum: Hybrids & Exotics, present and future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Pennington

    2015-09-08

    It has long been expected that the spectrum of hadrons in QCD would be far richer and extensive than experiment has so far revealed. While there have been experimental hints of this richness for some time, it is really only in the last few years that dramatic progress has been seen in the exploration both experimentally and in calculations on the lattice. Precision studies enabled by new technology both with detectors and high performance computations are converging on an understanding of the spectrum in strong coupling QCD. These methodologies are laying the foundation for a decade of potential discovery that electro and photoproduction experiments at Jefferson Lab, which when combined with key results on $B$ and charmonium decays from both $e^+e^-$ and $pp$ colliders, should turn mere impressions of the light meson spectrum into a high definition picture.

  7. THE 3 ?m SPECTRUM OF JUPITER's IRREGULAR SATELLITE HIMALIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M. E. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rhoden, A. R., E-mail: mbrown@caltech.edu, E-mail: Alyssa.Rhoden@jhuapl.edu [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We present a medium resolution spectrum of Jupiter's irregular satellite Himalia covering the critical 3?m spectral region. The spectrum shows no evidence for aqueously altered phyllosilicates, as had been suggested from the tentative detection of a 0.7?m absorption, but instead shows a spectrum strikingly similar to the C/CF type asteroid 52 Europa. 52 Europa is the prototype of a class of asteroids generally situated in the outer asteroid belt between less distant asteroids which show evidence for aqueous alteration and more distant asteroids which show evidence for water ice. The spectral match between Himalia and this group of asteroids is surprising and difficult to reconcile with models of the origin of the irregular satellites.

  8. Gravitational wave energy spectrum of a parabolic encounter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher P. L. Berry; Jonathan R. Gair

    2010-11-18

    We derive an analytic expression for the energy spectrum of gravitational waves from a parabolic Keplerian binary by taking the limit of the Peters and Matthews spectrum for eccentric orbits. This demonstrates that the location of the peak of the energy spectrum depends primarily on the orbital periapse rather than the eccentricity. We compare this weak-field result to strong-field calculations and find it is reasonably accurate (~10%) provided that the azimuthal and radial orbital frequencies do not differ by more than ~10%. For equatorial orbits in the Kerr spacetime, this corresponds to periapse radii of rp > 20M. These results can be used to model radiation bursts from compact objects on highly eccentric orbits about massive black holes in the local Universe, which could be detected by LISA.

  9. Riser response to directional seas / by Gerard Lewis McCoy III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCoy, Gerard Lewis

    1985-01-01

    . Riser Properties. Page 36 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Riser Response to a Unidirectional Wave 2. Riser Response to a Directional Sea . 3. Directional Energy Spectrum . Page 23 4. Displacement Ranges for API Comparison- 500 ft Depth. . . . 37 5... not exhibit as much directional spread as shorter period waves. Seas Fig. 2. Riser Response to a Directional Sea of low energy content usually exhibit a large amount of directional spread; thus, the largest impact for directional seas representation...

  10. The high-energy gamma-ray fluence and energy spectrum of GRB 970417a from observations with Milagrito

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; M. M. Gonzalez Sanchez; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; S. Klein; I. Leonor; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; F. W. Samuelson; B. Shen; A. Shoup; C. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

    2002-07-06

    Evidence of TeV emission from GRB970417a has been previously reported using data from the Milagrito detector. Constraints on the TeV fluence and the energy spectrum are now derived using additional data from a scaler system that recorded the rate of signals from the Milagrito photomultipliers. This analysis shows that if emission from GRB970417a has been observed, it must contain photons with energies above 650 GeV. Some consequences of this observation are discussed.

  11. The high-energy gamma-ray fluence and energy spectrum of GRB 970417a from observations with Milagrito

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Snchez, M M G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Klein, S; Leonor, I; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Nmethy, P; Ryan, J M; Samuelson, F W; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, C; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Tmer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    2003-01-01

    Evidence of TeV emission from GRB970417a has been previously reported using data from the Milagrito detector. Constraints on the TeV fluence and the energy spectrum are now derived using additional data from a scaler system that recorded the rate of signals from the Milagrito photomultipliers. This analysis shows that if emission from GRB970417a has been observed, it must contain photons with energies above 650 GeV. Some consequences of this observation are discussed.

  12. Method of detecting system function by measuring frequency response

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrison, John L.; Morrison, William H.; Christophersen, Jon P.; Motloch, Chester G.

    2013-01-08

    Methods of rapidly measuring an impedance spectrum of an energy storage device in-situ over a limited number of logarithmically distributed frequencies are described. An energy storage device is excited with a known input signal, and a response is measured to ascertain the impedance spectrum. An excitation signal is a limited time duration sum-of-sines consisting of a select number of frequencies. In one embodiment, magnitude and phase of each frequency of interest within the sum-of-sines is identified when the selected frequencies and sample rate are logarithmic integer steps greater than two. This technique requires a measurement with a duration of one period of the lowest frequency. In another embodiment, where selected frequencies are distributed in octave steps, the impedance spectrum can be determined using a captured time record that is reduced to a half-period of the lowest frequency.

  13. A Survey of Spectrum Utilization in Chicago John T. MacDonald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The spectrum range falls in the range of 960-2500 MHz. Using test equipment, the electromagnetic energy Occupancy Plots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 4 Spectrum Occupancy or Spectrum Efficiency? 10 5 activity on the urban campus of IIT. Shared Spectrum had performed several similar studies at other

  14. Power-Spectrum Analyses of Super-Kamiokande Solar Neutrino Data: Variability and its Implications for Solar Physics and Neutrino Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Sturrock; D. O. Caldwell; J. D. Scargle; M. S. Wheatland

    2005-08-08

    There have been conflicting claims as to whether or not power-spectrum analysis of the Super-Kamiokande solar neutrino data yields evidence of variability. Comparison of these claims is complicated by the fact that the relevant articles may use different datasets, different methods of analysis, and different procedures for significance estimation. The purpose of this article is to clarify the role of power spectrum analysis. To this end, we analyze only the Super-Kamiokande 5-day dataset, and we use a standard procedure for significance estimation proposed by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration. We then analyze this dataset, with this method of significance estimation, using six methods of power spectrum analysis. We find that the significance of the principal peak in the power spectrum (that at 9.43 yr-1with a depth of modulation of 7%) shows a clear correlation with the amount and relevance of the information being processed, as would be expected if there were a real signal in the data. The significance level reaches 99.3% for one method of analysis. We discuss, in terms of sub-dominant processes, possible neutrino-physics interpretations of the apparent variability of the Super-Kamiokande measurements, and we suggest steps that could be taken to resolve the question of variability of the solar neutrino flux.

  15. Energy Spectrum of Superfluid Turbulence without Normal Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsunehiko Araki; Makoto Tsubota; Sergey K. Nemirovskii

    2002-09-03

    The energy spectrum of the superfluid turbulence without the normal fluid is studied numerically under the vortex filament model. Time evolution of the Taylor-Green vortex is calculated under the full nonlocal Biot-Savart law. It is shown that for kenergy spectrum is very similar to the Kolmogorov's -5/3 law which is the most important statistical property of the conventional turbulence, where k is the wave number of the Fourier component of the velocity field and 1 the average intervortex spacing. The vortex length distribution becomes to obey a scaling property reflecting the self-similarity of the tangle.

  16. IS THE GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY SPECTRUM CONSTANT IN TIME?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichler, David; Kumar, Rahul; Pohl, Martin E-mail: rahuliitk@gmail.com

    2013-06-01

    The hypothesis is considered that the present, local Galactic cosmic-ray spectrum is, due to source intermittency, softer than average over time and over the Galaxy. Measurements of muogenic nuclides underground could provide an independent measurement of the time-averaged spectrum. Source intermittency could also account for the surprising low anisotropy reported by the IceCube Collaboration. Predictions for Galactic emission of ultrahigh-energy (UHE) quanta, such as UHE gamma rays and neutrinos, might be higher or lower than previously estimated.

  17. Rank-ordered Multifractal Spectrum for Intermittent Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Chang; Cheng-chin Wu

    2007-12-27

    We describe a new method that is both physically explicable and quantitatively accurate in describing the multifractal characteristics of intermittent events based on groupings of rank-ordered fluctuations. The generic nature of such rank-ordered spectrum leads it to a natural connection with the concept of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. We demonstrate this technique using results obtained from a 2D MHD simulation. The calculated spectrum suggests a crossover from the near Gaussian characteristics of small amplitude fluctuations to the extreme intermittent state of large rare events.

  18. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNEX Q HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE #12;ANNEX Q - HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE 03/10/2014 v.2.0 Page Q-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex Q: Hazardous Materials Emergency Response, and contents within, is a guide to how the University conducts a response specific to a hazardous materials

  19. EMERGENCY RESPONSE EVACUATION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND EVACUATION PLAN #12;Emergency Response and Evacuation Plan June 2010 i EMERGENCY RESPONSE PHONE NUMBERS 2 PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING FIRE OR OTHER EMERGENCIES 3 RESPONSIBILITIES (EMPLOYEE/SUPERVISOR) 4 EMERGENCY EVACUATION PROCEDURES OVERVIEW 5 PROCEDURES FOR EVACUATING MOBILITY

  20. Single-Spin Spectrum-Analyzer for a Strongly Coupled Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlomi Kotler; Nitzan Akerman; Yinnon Glickman; Roee Ozeri

    2012-08-20

    A qubit can be used as a sensitive spectrum analyzer of its environment. Here we show how the problem of spectral analysis of noise induced by a strongly coupled environment can be solved for discrete spectra. Our analytical model shows non-linear signal dependence on noise power, as well as possible frequency mixing, both are inherent to quantum evolution. This model enabled us to use a single trapped ion as a sensitive probe for strong, non-Gaussian, discrete magnetic field noise. To overcome ambiguities arising from the non-linear character of strong noise, we develop a three step noise characterization scheme: peak identification, magnitude identification and fine-tuning. Finally, we compare experimentally equidistant versus Uhrig pulse schemes for spectral analysis. The method is readily available to any quantum probe which can be coherently manipulated.

  1. The Effects of a Dynamic Spectrum Access Overlay in LTE-Advanced Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juan D. Deaton; Ryan E. lrwin; Luiz A. DaSilva

    2011-05-01

    As early as 2014, wireless network operators spectral capacity will be overwhelmed by a data tsunami brought on by new devices and applications. To augment spectral capacity, operators could deploy a Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA) overlay. In the light of the many planned Long Term Evolution (LTE) network deployments, the affects of a DSA overlay have not been fully considered into the existing LTE standards. Coalescing many different aspects of DSA, this paper develops the Spectrum Accountability (SA) framework. The SA framework defines specific network element functionality, protocol interfaces, and signaling flow diagrams for LTE to support service requests and enforce rights of responsibilities of primary and secondary users, respectively. We also include a network simulation to quantify the benefits of using DSA channels to augment capacity. Based on our simulation we show that, network operators can benefit up to %40 increase in operating capacity when sharing DSA bands to augment spectral capacity. With our framework, this paper could serve as an guide in developing future LTE network standards that include DSA.

  2. On the Soft Limit of the Large Scale Structure Power Spectrum: UV Dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathias Garny; Thomas Konstandin; Rafael A. Porto; Laura Sagunski

    2015-08-25

    We derive a non-perturbative equation for the large scale structure power spectrum of long-wavelength modes. Thereby, we use an operator product expansion together with relations between the three-point function and power spectrum in the soft limit. The resulting equation encodes the coupling to ultraviolet (UV) modes in two time-dependent coefficients, which may be obtained from response functions to (anisotropic) parameters, such as spatial curvature, in a modified cosmology. We argue that both depend weakly on fluctuations deep in the UV. As a byproduct, this implies that the renormalized leading order coefficient(s) in the effective field theory (EFT) of large scale structures receive most of their contribution from modes close to the non-linear scale. Consequently, the UV dependence found in explicit computations within standard perturbation theory stems mostly from counter-term(s). We confront a simplified version of our non-perturbative equation against existent numerical simulations, and find good agreement within the expected uncertainties. Our approach can in principle be used to precisely infer the relevance of the leading order EFT coefficient(s) using small volume simulations in an `anisotropic separate universe' framework. Our results suggest that the importance of these coefficient(s) is a $\\sim 10 \\%$ effect, and plausibly smaller.

  3. Detecting Inaccurate Response Patterns in Korean Military Personality Inventory: An Application of Item Response Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Seunghwa

    2013-07-27

    inaccurate responses results in the selection of inappropriate personnel or allows enlistment dodgers to avoid their military duty. This study conducted IRT-based person-fit analysis with the dichotomous military dataset in the Korean Military Personality...

  4. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gehrke, Robert J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Putnam, Marie H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Killian, E. Wayne (Idaho Falls, ID); Helmer, Richard G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kynaston, Ronnie L. (Blackfoot, ID); Goodwin, Scott G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, Larry O. (Pocatello, ID)

    1993-01-01

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and .gamma.-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2000 keV), as well as high-energy .gamma. rays (>1 MeV). A 8192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The .gamma.-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge .gamma.-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and .gamma.-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the .gamma.-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  5. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gehrke, R.J.; Putnam, M.H.; Killian, E.W.; Helmer, R.G.; Kynaston, R.L.; Goodwin, S.G.; Johnson, L.O.

    1993-04-27

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and [gamma]-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2,000 keV), as well as high-energy [gamma] rays (>1 MeV). A 8,192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The [gamma]-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge [gamma]-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and [gamma]-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the [gamma]-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  6. Branching fraction and photon energy spectrum for b -> s gamma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Zhao, X.

    2001-12-01

    We have measured the branching fraction and photon energy spectrum for the radiative penguin process b --> s gamma. We find B(b --> s gamma) = (3.21 +/- 0.43 +/- 0.27(-0.10)(+0.18)) x 10(-4), where the errors are statistical, ...

  7. Introduction Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a developmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    Introduction Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability affecting 1 in 68, as there are not adequate data systems to monitor that population. As of December 2014, the Autism Treatment Assistance and 2025. U.S. Facts and Statistics The Centers for Disease Control estimates autism prevalence at 1

  8. Wireless spread-spectrum telesensor chip with synchronous digital architecture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F.; Turner, Gary W.; Wintenberg, Alan L.; Emery, Michael Steven

    2005-03-08

    A fully integrated wireless spread-spectrum sensor incorporating all elements of an "intelligent" sensor on a single circuit chip is capable of telemetering data to a receiver. Synchronous control of all elements of the chip provides low-cost, low-noise, and highly robust data transmission, in turn enabling the use of low-cost monolithic receivers.

  9. Cooperative Distributed Sequential Spectrum Jithin K S and Vinod Sharma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Vinod

    of Electrical Communication Engineering Indian Institute of Science Bangalore 560012, India Email: {jithin 600036, India Email: ee07b028@smail.iitm.ac.in Abstract--We consider cooperative spectrum sensing for cog collects observations, makes a local decision or a summary statistic and sends to a fusion node to make

  10. Collaborative Compressive Spectrum Sensing in a UAV Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kung, H. T.

    Collaborative Compressive Spectrum Sensing in a UAV Environment Hsieh-Chung Chen, H. T. Kung, Dario sensing with multiple sensing nodes in a UAV environment. The ground nodes in our scheme sense to a nearby UAV in the air. The UAV performs decoding on the received measurements; it decodes information

  11. Energy spectrum of black holes : a new view

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhishek Majhi

    2015-12-22

    Energy of a black hole is usually quantized by invoking some area quantization scheme after expressing the energy in terms of the horizon area. However, in this approach one has to quantize the local and asymptotic energy of the black hole separately and the two results do not manifest any physical correspondence with each other. Here, as opposed to this practice, we find the unique energy spectrum of black holes by adopting a top-down approach. The physical links among the underlying quantum theory, statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of the black hole horizon play the central role in determining the energy spectrum. The energy spectrum that we obtain, explicitly reveals the correspondence between asymptotic and local observations through the presence of the surface gravity of the horizon as a parameter in the spectrum, rather than being expressed as a function of area and consequently getting quantized in the usual approach. Thus, our result presents a new view as far as black hole energy quantization is concerned. The calculations are performed using the quantum geometric description of black hole horizons as laid down by loop quantum gravity.

  12. Cost Constrained Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    collection and energy calculation at each secondary user) as well as the transmission cost (forwarding energy.e., collecting samples for local energy calculation and transmitting energy statistic to fusion center. I for various factors that contribute to the cost incurred by spectrum sensing. In this paper, we study energy

  13. Synthetic Spectrum Methods for Three-Dimensional Supernova Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. C. Thomas

    2003-10-21

    Current observations stimulate the production of fully three-dimensional explosion models, which in turn motivates three-dimensional spectrum synthesis for supernova atmospheres. We briefly discuss techniques adapted to address the latter problem, and consider some fundamentals of line formation in supernovae without recourse to spherical symmetry. Direct and detailed extensions of the technique are discussed, and future work is outlined.

  14. Butterfly Floquet Spectrum in Driven SU(2) Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Jiao [Temasek Laboratories, National University of Singapore, 117542 (Singapore); Department of Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Gong Jiangbin [Department of Physics and Center of Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117542 (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, Singapore 117597 (Singapore)

    2009-06-19

    The Floquet spectrum of a class of driven SU(2) systems is shown to display a butterfly pattern with multifractal properties. The level crossing between Floquet states of the same parity or different parities is studied. The results are relevant to studies of fractal statistics, quantum chaos, coherent destruction of tunneling, and the validity of mean-field descriptions of Bose-Einstein condensates.

  15. Multiple Access Channel Optimal Spectrum Balancing for Upstream DSL Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -- Crosstalk, digital subscriber lines (DSL), dy- namic spectrum management (DSM), multiple access channel (MAC), decision feedback equalization. I. INTRODUCTION THE increasing demand for high speed services forces DSL coordination at the transmitter side and/or the receiver side, the crosstalk can be cancelled which leads

  16. Revenue Management for Cognitive Spectrum Underlay Networks: An Interference Elasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    to the large body of work on uplink power control with pricing for CDMA networks (e.g., [5][10] and a recent a total received interference power constraint at the primary user's receiver. The transmission power1 Revenue Management for Cognitive Spectrum Underlay Networks: An Interference Elasticity

  17. Energy-Constrained Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    Energy-Constrained Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks Xinxin Feng 1 duration to strike a balance between energy consumption and system throughput. We focus on a cooperative is an impor- tant issue in Cognitive Radio (CR) networks, which could greatly affect energy efficiency

  18. Exponential frequency spectrum and Lorentzian pulses in magnetized plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Troy

    Exponential frequency spectrum and Lorentzian pulses in magnetized plasmas D. C. Pace,a M. Shi, J the confinement magnetic field in a large plasma column are found to exhibit a broadband turbulence that displays-Alfvn waves. The experiments are performed in the Large Plasma Device LAPD-U W. Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci

  19. Secondary Spectrum Auctions for Symmetric and Submodular Bidders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiat, Amos

    in wireless networks. In this scenario, n commu- nication requests need to be allocated to k available Interference, Mech- anism Design, Spectrum Auctions 1. INTRODUCTION The development of wireless networks or monetary goals in a market with self-interested participants having private information. Interest

  20. THE MINIMUM FREE ENERGY FOR CONTINUOUS SPECTRUM MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deseri, Luca

    THE MINIMUM FREE ENERGY FOR CONTINUOUS SPECTRUM MATERIALS L. DESERI AND J.M. GOLDEN Abstract. A general closed expression is given for the isothermal minimum free energy of a linear viscoelastic states [6] are uniquely related to histories and the work function is the maximum free energy

  1. Continuous fine-grained arm action recognition using motion spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continuous fine-grained arm action recognition using motion spectrum mixture models Xi Zhao, it is necessary to recognise the fine-grained arm action during user interactions with other people or objects. A method to recognise a set of arm actions on a fine-grained level (e.g. checking the wristband, drinking

  2. Emission spectrum of soft massless states from heavy superstring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichi Kawamoto; Toshihiro Matsuo

    2013-06-05

    We calculate emission rates of various bosonic/fermionic soft massless states of open/closed superstring from an ensemble of a highly excited open/closed superstring in the flat background. The resulting spectrum shows thermal distributions at the Hagedorn temperature. We find greybody factors for each process and observe their relation to the ones from blackholes.

  3. Physical retrieval of surface emissivity spectrum from hyperspectral infrared radiances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    Physical retrieval of surface emissivity spectrum from hyperspectral infrared radiances Jun Li,1 emissivity. Using constant or inaccurate surface emissivities typically results in large temperature and moisture profile errors, particularly over semi-arid or arid areas where the variation in emissivity

  4. Universal Spectrum for Atmospheric Suspended Particulates: Comparison with Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2011-08-25

    Atmospheric flows exhibit self-similar fractal space-time fluctuations on all space-time scales in association with inverse power law distribution for power spectra of meteorological parameters such as wind, temperature, etc., and thus implies long-range correlations, identified as self-organized criticality generic to dynamical systems in nature. A general systems theory based on classical statistical physical concepts developed by the author visualizes the fractal fluctuations to result from the coexistence of eddy fluctuations in an eddy continuum, the larger scale eddies being the integrated mean of enclosed smaller scale eddies. The model satisfies the maximum entropy principle and predicts that the probability distributions of component eddy amplitudes and the corresponding variances (power spectra) are quantified by the same universal inverse power law distribution which is a function of the golden mean. Atmospheric particulates are held in suspension by the vertical velocity distribution (spectrum). The atmospheric particulate size spectrum is derived in terms of the model predicted universal inverse power law characterizing atmospheric eddy spectrum. Model predicted spectrum is in agreement with the following four experimentally determined data sets: (i) CIRPAS mission TARFOX_WALLOPS_SMPS aerosol size distributions (ii) CIRPAS mission ARM-IOP (Ponca City, OK) aerosol size distributions (iii) SAFARI 2000 CV-580 (CARG Aerosol and Cloud Data) cloud drop size distributions and (iv) TWP-ICE (Darwin, Australia) rain drop size distributions.

  5. The Cost of Free Spectrum Th`anh Nguyen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Randall

    with another Service Provider (SP), posing a steep barrier to entry.3 Adding new entrants to the marketThe Cost of Free Spectrum Th`anh Nguyen , Hang Zhou, Randall Berry, Michael Honig , Rakesh Vohra on minimum delivered price, given by the weighted sum of the price of the ser- vice and a congestion cost

  6. NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation: Issue 3 (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    This quarterly magazine is dedicated to stepping beyond the technical journals to reveal NREL's vital work in a real-world context for our stakeholders. Continuum provides insights into the latest and most impactful clean energy innovations, while spotlighting those talented researchers and unique facilities that make it all happen. This edition focuses on the NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation.

  7. The Quiescent Spectrum of the AM CVn star CP Eri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul J. Groot; Gijs Nelemans; Danny Steeghs; Tom Marsh

    2001-08-01

    We used the 6.5m MMT to obtain a spectrum of the AM CVn star CP Eri in quiescence. The spectrum is dominated by He I emission lines, which are clearly double peaked with a peak-to-peak separation of ~1900 km/s. The spectrum is similar to that of the longer period AM CVn systems GP Com and CE 315, linking the short and the long period AM CVn systems. In contrast with GP Com and CE 315, the spectrum of CP Eri does not show a central 'spike' in the line profiles, but it does show lines of SiII in emission. The presence of these lines indicates that the material being transferred is of higher metallicity than in GP Com and CE 315, which, combined with the low proper motion of the system, probably excludes a halo origin of the progenitor of CP Eri. We constrain the primary mass to M_1>0.27 M_sun and the orbital inclination to 33 degr < i < 80 degr. The presence of the He I lines in emission opens up the possibility for phase resolved spectroscopic studies which allows a determination of the system parameters and a detailed study of helium accretion disks under highly varying circumstances.

  8. SIC (MUltiple SIgnal Classification) CSP (Cross-power Spectrum Phase)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takiguchi, Tetsuya

    2ch CSP ( ) 1 MU- SIC (MUltiple SIgnal Classification) CSP (Cross- power Spectrum Phase) [1, 2, 3, 4] [5, 6] [7, 8, 9, 10] [7] CSP CSP [8] [9] CSP [10] Estimation of talker's head orientation based (Kobe univ.) [11] 2ch CSP CSP CSP CSP 2 CSP GCC-PHAT (Generalized Cross- Correlation PHAse Transform

  9. Spectrum-based Health Monitoring for Self-Adaptive Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piel, ric

    the diagnosis in sync with the currently observed health state of the system. (4) We assess our proposed for the continuous health information. Section V presents the case study. Section VI discusses related work, and sec and assesses the utility of Spectrum-based Fault Localisation (SFL) combined with automatic health moni- toring

  10. Solar neutrinos results and oscillation analysis from SuperKamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    Kamiokande is presented. The precise measurement of the solar neutrino enegy spectrum is one of the most important keyHE.4.1.12 Solar neutrinos results and oscillation analysis from SuperKamiokande Y. Koshio 1Mozumi Kamioka, Gifu 5061205, Japan Abstract The results of the solar neutrino spectrum measurement in Super

  11. ECOLOGIC REGRESSION ANALYSIS AND THE STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF AIR QUALITY ON MORTALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selvin, S.

    2014-01-01

    Orcutt, An empirical analysis of air pollution dose-responseIf ecologic regression analysis of air quality and mortality

  12. Analytic spectrum of relic gravitational waves modified by neutrino free streaming and dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. X. Miao; Y. Zhang

    2007-03-23

    We include the effect of neutrino free streaming into the spectrum of relic gravitational waves (RGWs) in the currently accelerating universe. For the realistic case of a varying fractional neutrino energy density and a non-vanishing derivative of mode function at the neutrino decoupling, the integro-differential equation of RGWs is solved by a perturbation method for the period from the neutrino decoupling to the matter-dominant stage. Incorporating it to the analytic solution of the whole history of expansion of the universe, the analytic solution of GRWs is obtained, evolving from the inflation up to the current acceleration. The resulting spectrum of GRWs covers the whole range of frequency $(10^{-19}\\sim 10^{10})$Hz, and improves the previous results. It is found that the neutrino free-streaming causes a reduction of the spectral amplitude by $\\sim 20%$ in the range $(10^{-16}\\sim 10^{-10})$ Hz, and leaves the other portion of the spectrum almost unchanged. This agrees with the earlier numerical calculations. Examination is made on the difference between the accelerating and non-accelerating models, and our analysis shows that the ratio of the spectral amplitude in accelerating $\\Lambda$CDM model over that in CDM model is $\\sim 0.7$, and within the various accelerating models of $\\Omega_{\\Lambda}> \\Omega_m $ the spectral amplitude is proportional to $ \\Omega_m/\\Omega_{\\Lambda}$ for the whole range of frequency. Comparison with LIGO S5 Runs Sensitivity shows that RGWs are not yet detectable by the present LIGO, and in the future LISA may be able to detect RGWs in some inflationary models.

  13. Supervisory Program Analysis Officer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will be responsible for the program analysis and evaluation of all activities which fall within the purview of the Office. The incumbent directs a moderate...

  14. TECHNICAL STANDARDS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PurposeThis procedure describes the responsibilities of persons who are charged with implementing the DOE Technical Standards Program.

  15. Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response Assessment INTRODUCTION This appendix provides more detail on some of the topics raised in Chapter 4, "Demand Response" of the body of the Plan. These topics include 1. The features, advantages and disadvantages of the main options for stimulating demand response (price mechanisms

  16. Avoiding the blue spectrum and the fine-tuning of initial conditions in hybrid inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastien Clesse; Jonathan Rocher

    2009-04-20

    Hybrid inflation faces two well-known problems: the blue spectrum of the non-supersymmetric version of the model and the fine-tuning of the initial conditions of the fields leading to sufficient inflation to account for the standard cosmological problems. They are investigated by studying the exact two-fields dynamics instead of assuming slow-roll. When the field values are restricted to be less than the reduced Planck mass, a non-negligible part of the initial condition space (around 15% depending on potential parameters) leads to successful inflation. Most of it is located outside the usual inflationary valley and organized in continuous patterns instead of being isolated as previously found. Their existence is explained and their properties are studied. This shows that no excessive fine-tuning is required for successful hybrid inflation. Moreover, by extending the initial condition space to planckian-like or super-planckian values, inflation becomes generically sufficiently long and can produce a red-tilted scalar power spectrum due to slow-roll violations. The robustness of these properties is confirmed by conducting our analysis on three other models of hybrid-type inflation in various framework: "smooth" and "shifted" inflation in SUSY and SUGRA, and "radion assisted" gauge inflation. A high percentage of successful inflation for smooth hybrid inflation (up to 80%) is observed.

  17. Caustic structures in the spectrum of x-ray Compton scattering off electrons driven by a short intense laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seipt, D; Fritzsche, S; Kampfer, B

    2015-01-01

    We study the Compton scattering of x-rays off electrons that are driven by a relativistically intense short optical laser pulse. The frequency spectrum of the laser-assisted Compton radiation shows a broad plateau in the vicinity of the laser-free Compton line due to a nonlinear mixing between x-ray and laser photons. Special emphasis is placed on how the shape of the short assisting laser pulse affects the spectrum of the scattered x-rays. In particular, we observe sharp peak structures in the plateau region, whose number and locations are highly sensitive to the laser pulse shape. These structures are interpreted as spectral caustics by using a semiclassical analysis of the laser-assisted QED matrix element.

  18. FLUCTUATION DYNAMO AT FINITE CORRELATION TIMES AND THE KAZANTSEV SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, Pallavi; Subramanian, Kandaswamy, E-mail: palvi@iucaa.ernet.in [IUCAA, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

    2014-08-20

    Fluctuation dynamos are generic to astrophysical systems. The only analytical model of the fluctuation dynamo is the Kazantsev model which assumes a velocity field that is delta-correlated in time. We derive a generalized model of fluctuation dynamos with finite correlation time, ?, using renovating flows. For ? ? 0, we recover the standard Kazantsev equation for the evolution of longitudinal magnetic correlation, M{sub L} . To the next order in ?, the generalized equation involves third and fourth spatial derivatives of M{sub L} . It can be recast to one with at most second derivatives of M{sub L} using the Landau-Lifschitz approach. Remarkably, we then find that the magnetic power spectrum remains the Kazantsev spectrum of M(k)?k {sup 3/2}, in the large k limit, independent of ?.

  19. The Euclidean Spectrum of Kaplan's Lattice Chiral Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yigal Shamir

    1992-12-10

    We consider the (2n+1)-dimensional euclidean Dirac operator with a mass term that looks like a domain wall, recently proposed by Kaplan to describe chiral fermions in $2n$ dimensions. In the continuum case we show that the euclidean spectrum contains {\\it no} bound states with non-zero momentum. On the lattice, a bound state spectrum without energy gap exists only if $m$ is fine tuned to some special values, and the dispersion relation does not describe a relativistic fermion. In spite of these peculiarities, the fermionic propagator {\\it has} the expected (1/p-slash) pole on the domain wall. But there may be a problem with the phase of the fermionic determinant at the non-perturbative level.

  20. Analyzing the Power Spectrum of the Little Bangs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnes Mocsy; Paul Sorensen

    2011-01-10

    In this talk we discuss the analogy between data from heavy-ion collisions and the Cosmic Microwave Background. We identify p_T correlations data as the heavy-ion analogy to the CMB and extract a power-spectrum from the heavy-ion data. We define the ratio of the final state power-spectrum to the initial coordinate-space eccentricity as the transfer-function. From the transfer-function we find that higher $n$ terms are suppressed and we argue that the suppression provides information on length scales like the mean-free-path. We make a rough estimate of the mean-free-path and find that it is larger than estimates based on the centrality dependence of v_2.

  1. Toward the excited isoscalar meson spectrum from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Guo, Peng; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2013-11-18

    We report on the extraction of an excited spectrum of isoscalar mesons using lattice QCD. Calculations on several lattice volumes are performed with a range of light quark masses corresponding to pion masses down to about ~400 MeV. The distillation method enables us to evaluate the required disconnected contributions with high statistical precision for a large number of meson interpolating fields. We find relatively little mixing between light and strange in most JPC channels; one notable exception is the pseudoscalar sector where the approximate SU(3)F octet, singlet structure of the ?, ?' is reproduced. We extract exotic JPC states, identifiedmoreas hybrid mesons in which an excited gluonic field is coupled to a color-octet qqbar pair, along with non-exotic hybrid mesons embedded in a qq-like spectrum.less

  2. Spectrum of supernova neutrinos in ultra-pure scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lujan-Peschard, C.; Pagliaroli, G.; Vissani, F., E-mail: carolup@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: giulia.pagliaroli@lngs.infn.it, E-mail: francesco.vissani@lngs.infn.it [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, INFN, Assergi (AQ) (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    There is a great interest in measuring the non-electronic component of neutrinos from core collapse supernovae by observing, for the first time, also neutral-current reactions. In order to assess the physics potential of the ultra-pure scintillators in this respect, we study the entire expected energy spectrum in the Borexino, KamLAND and SNO+ detectors. We examine the various sources of uncertainties in the expectations, and in particular, those due to specific detector features and to the relevant cross sections. We discuss the possibility to identify the different neutrino flavors, and we quantify the effect of confusion, due to other components of the energy spectrum, overlapped with the neutral-current reactions of interest.

  3. The Spectrum and Effective Action of SUSY Gluodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. R. Farrar; G. Gabadadze; M. Schwetz

    1998-09-04

    We study the low-energy spectrum of SUSY gluodynamics using the generating functional for Green's functions of composite fields. Two dual formulations of the generating functional approach are given. Masses of the bound states are calculated and mixing patterns are discussed. Mass splittings of pure gluonic states, in the case when supersymmetry is softly broken, are consistent with predictions of conventional Yang-Mills theory. The results can be tested in lattice simulations of the SUSY Yang-Mills model.

  4. Does one observe chiral symmetry restoration in baryon spectrum?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. D. Cohen; L. Ya. Glozman

    2002-01-25

    It has recently been suggested that the parity doublet structure seen in the spectrum of highly excited baryons may be due to effective chiral symmetry restoration for these states. We review the recent developments in this field. We demonstrate with a simple quantum-mechanical example that it is a very natural property of quantum systems that a symmetry breaking effect which is important for the low-lying spectrum of the system, can become unimportant for the highly-lying states; the highly lying states reveal a multiplet structure of nearly degenerate states. Using the well established concepts of quark-hadron duality, asymptotic freedom in QCD and validity of the operator product expansion in QCD we show that the spectral densities obtained with the local currents that are connected to each other via chiral transformations, very high in the spectrum must coincide. Hence effects of spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry in QCD vacuum that are crucially important for the low-lying spectra, become irrelevant for the highly-lying states. Then to the extent that identifiable hadronic resonances still exist in the continuum spectrum at high excitations this implies that the highly excited hadrons must fall into multiplets associated with the representations of the chiral group. We demonstrate that this is indeed the case for meson spectra in the large $N_c$ limit. All possible parity-chiral multiplets are classified for baryons and it is demonstrated that the existing data on highly excited $N$ and $\\Delta$ states at masses of 2 GeV and higher is consistent with approximate chiral symmetry restoration. However new experimental studies are needed to achieve any definitive conclusions.

  5. Spectrum Sharing in Cognitive Radio Systems Under Outage Probablility Constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Pei Li

    2011-02-22

    is one, i.e., CR beamforming is optimal under PU outage constraints. Finally, a heuristic algorithm is proposed to provide a suboptimal solution to our MBIP problem by e ciently (in polynomial time) solving a particularly-constructed convex problem. v... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 f. Karush-Kuhn-Tucker Optimality Conditions . . . 18 III COGNITIVE SPECTRUM SHARING WITH OUTAGE PROB- ABILITY CONSTRAINT : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 20 A. System and Signal Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 B...

  6. Geometry and Dynamics of Emergent Spacetime from Entanglement Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroaki Matsueda

    2015-08-03

    We examine geometry and dynamics of classical spacetime derived from entanglement spectrum. The spacetime is a kind of canonical parameter space defined by the Fisher information metric. As a concrete example, we focus on the spectrum for free fermions in spatially one dimension. The spectrum has exponential family form like thermal probability distribution owing to mixed-state feature emerging from truncation of environmental degrees of freedom. In this case, the Fisher metric is given by the second derivative of the Hessian potential that can be identified with the entanglement entropy. We emphasize that the canonical parameters are nontrivial functions of partial system size by the truncation, filling fraction of fermions, and time. Then, the precise determination of this nontrivial mapping is necessary to derive the functional form of the Hessian potential that leads to correct entanglement entropy scaling. By this potential, we find that the emergent geometry becomes anti-de Sitter spacetime with imaginary time, and a radial axis as well as spacetime coordinates appears spontaneously. We also find that the information of the UV limit of the original free fermions lives in the boundary of the anti-de Sitter spacetime. These findings strongly suggest that the Hessian potential for free fermions has enough geometrical meaning associated with gauge-gravity correspondence. Furthermore, some deformation of the spectrum near the conformal fixed point is mapped onto spacetime dynamics. The fluctuation of the entanglement entropy embedded into the spacetime behaves like free scaler field, and the dynamics is described by the Einstein equation with a negative cosmological constant. Therefore, the Einstein equation can be regarded as the equation of original quantum state.

  7. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray e+ plus e- spectrum from 20 GeV to 1 TeV with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermi/LAT Collaboration

    2009-04-30

    Designed as a high-sensitivity gamma-ray observatory, the Fermi Large Area Telescope is also an electron detector with a large acceptance exceeding 2m^2 sr at 300 GeV. Building on the gamma-ray analysis, we have developed an efficient electron detection strategy which provides sufficient background rejection for measurement of the steeply-falling electron spectrum up to 1 TeV. Our high precision data show that the electron spectrum falls with energy as E^(-3.0) and does not exhibit prominent spectral features. Interpretations in terms of a conventional diffusive model as well as a potential local extra component are briefly discussed.

  8. On the omnipresent background gamma radiation of the continuous spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Banjanac; D. Maleti?; D. Jokovi?; N. Veselinovi?; A. Dragi?; V. Udovi?i?; I. Ani?in

    2013-05-14

    The background spectrum of a germanium detector, shielded from the radiations arriving from the lower and open for the radiations arriving from the upper hemisphere is studied, both in a ground level and in an underground laboratory. It is established that the continuous portion of this background spectrum is mostly due to the radiations that arrive from the upper hemisphere of the continuous spectrum similar to the instrumental one. The intensity of this radiation of an average energy of about 120 keV is estimated to about 8000 photons/m2s 2\\pi srad in a ground level laboratory, and to about 5000 photons/m2s 2\\pi srad at the depth of 25 m.w.e. Rough estimates of the dose that it contributes to the skin are about 1.5 nSv/h and 1 nSv/h respectively. Simulations by GEANT4 and CORSIKA demonstrate that this radiation is both of cosmic and terrestrial origin, mixed in proportion that still has to be determined.

  9. On the omnipresent background gamma radiation of the continuous spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banjanac, R; Jokovi?, D; Veselinovi?, N; Dragi?, A; Udovi?i?, V; Ani?in, I

    2013-01-01

    The background spectrum of a germanium detector, shielded from the radiations arriving from the lower and open for the radiations arriving from the upper hemisphere is studied, both in a ground level and in an underground laboratory. It is established that the continuous portion of this background spectrum is mostly due to the radiations that arrive from the upper hemisphere of the continuous spectrum similar to the instrumental one. The intensity of this radiation of an average energy of about 120 keV is estimated to about 8000 photons/m2s 2\\pi srad in a ground level laboratory, and to about 5000 photons/m2s 2\\pi srad at the depth of 25 m.w.e. Rough estimates of the dose that it contributes to the skin are about 1.5 nSv/h and 1 nSv/h respectively. Simulations by GEANT4 and CORSIKA demonstrate that this radiation is both of cosmic and terrestrial origin, mixed in proportion that still has to be determined.

  10. Photoabsorption spectrum of helium trimer cationTheoretical modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalus, Ren [Centre of Excellence IT4Innovations and Department of Applied Mathematics, VSB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava (Czech Republic)] [Centre of Excellence IT4Innovations and Department of Applied Mathematics, VSB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava (Czech Republic); Karlick, Frantiek [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials and Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palack University, T?. 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic)] [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials and Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palack University, T?. 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Lepetit, Bruno [Laboratoire Collisions Agrgats Ractivit, IRSAMC and UMR5589 du CNRS, Universit de Toulouse, UPS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)] [Laboratoire Collisions Agrgats Ractivit, IRSAMC and UMR5589 du CNRS, Universit de Toulouse, UPS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Paidarov, Ivana [J. Heyrovsk Institute of Physical Chemistry, ASCR, v.v.i., Dolejkova 3, 182 23 Praha (Czech Republic)] [J. Heyrovsk Institute of Physical Chemistry, ASCR, v.v.i., Dolejkova 3, 182 23 Praha (Czech Republic); Gadea, Florent Xavier [Laboratoire de Chimie et de Physique Quantiques, IRSAMC and UMR5626 du CNRS, Universit de Toulouse, UPS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)] [Laboratoire de Chimie et de Physique Quantiques, IRSAMC and UMR5626 du CNRS, Universit de Toulouse, UPS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2013-11-28

    The photoabsorption spectrum of He{sub 3}{sup +} is calculated for two semiempirical models of intracluster interactions and compared with available experimental data reported in the middle UV range [H. Haberland and B. von Issendorff, J. Chem. Phys. 102, 8773 (1995)]. Nuclear delocalization effects are investigated via several approaches comprising quantum samplings using either exact or approximate (harmonic) nuclear wavefunctions, as well as classical samplings based on the Monte Carlo methodology. Good agreement with the experiment is achieved for the model by Knowles et al., [Mol. Phys. 85, 243 (1995); Mol. Phys. 87, 827 (1996)] whereas the model by Calvo et al., [J. Chem. Phys. 135, 124308 (2011)] exhibits non-negligible deviations from the experiment. Predictions of far UV absorption spectrum of He{sub 3}{sup +}, for which no experimental data are presently available, are reported for both models and compared to each other as well as to the photoabsorption spectrum of He{sub 2}{sup +}. A simple semiempirical point-charge approximation for calculating transition probabilities is shown to perform well for He{sub 3}{sup +}.

  11. Gamma-ray burst spectrum with decaying magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Xiaohong; Bai, Jinming [Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, 650011 Kunming (China); Li, Zhuo [Department of Astronomy and Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu, Xuewen; Zhang, Bin-bin; Mszros, Peter, E-mail: zhaoxh@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: zhuo.li@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In the internal shock model for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the synchrotron spectrum from the fast cooling electrons in a homogeneous downstream magnetic field (MF) is too soft to produce the low-energy slope of GRB spectra. However, the MF may decay downstream with distance from the shock front. Here we show that the synchrotron spectrum becomes harder if electrons undergo synchrotron and inverse-Compton cooling in a decaying MF. To reconcile this with the typical GRB spectrum with low-energy slope ?F {sub ?}??, the postshock MF decay time must be comparable to the cooling time of the bulk electrons (corresponding to a MF decaying length typically of ?10{sup 5} skin depths); that the inverse-Compton cooling should dominate synchrotron cooling after the MF decay time; and/or that the MF decays with comoving time roughly as B?t {sup 1.5}. An internal shock synchrotron model with a decaying MF can account for the majority of GRBs with low-energy slopes not harder than ?{sup 4/3}.

  12. FlexibleSUSY -- A spectrum generator generator for supersymmetric models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Athron; Jae-hyeon Park; Dominik Stckinger; Alexander Voigt

    2015-03-18

    We introduce FlexibleSUSY, a Mathematica and C++ package, which generates a fast, precise C++ spectrum generator for any SUSY model specified by the user. The generated code is designed with both speed and modularity in mind, making it easy to adapt and extend with new features. The model is specified by supplying the superpotential, gauge structure and particle content in a SARAH model file; specific boundary conditions e.g. at the GUT, weak or intermediate scales are defined in a separate FlexibleSUSY model file. From these model files, FlexibleSUSY generates C++ code for self-energies, tadpole corrections, renormalization group equations (RGEs) and electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) conditions and combines them with numerical routines for solving the RGEs and EWSB conditions simultaneously. The resulting spectrum generator is then able to solve for the spectrum of the model, including loop-corrected pole masses, consistent with user specified boundary conditions. The modular structure of the generated code allows for individual components to be replaced with an alternative if available. FlexibleSUSY has been carefully designed to grow as alternative solvers and calculators are added. Predefined models include the MSSM, NMSSM, E$_6$SSM, USSM, R-symmetric models and models with right-handed neutrinos.

  13. Computation of the spectrum of spatial Lyapunov exponents for the spatially extended beam-plasma systems and electron-wave devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hramov, Alexander E. [Faculty of Nonlinear Processes, Saratov State University, Astrakhanskaya str., 83, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation); Saratov State Technical University, Politechnicheskaja str., 77, Saratov 410054 (Russian Federation); Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Maximenko, Vladimir A.; Moskalenko, Olga I. [Faculty of Nonlinear Processes, Saratov State University, Astrakhanskaya str., 83, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation)

    2012-08-15

    The spectrum of Lyapunov exponents is powerful tool for the analysis of the complex system dynamics. In the general framework of nonlinear dynamics, a number of the numerical techniques have been developed to obtain the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents for the complex temporal behavior of the systems with a few degree of freedom. Unfortunately, these methods cannot be applied directly to analysis of complex spatio-temporal dynamics of plasma devices which are characterized by the infinite phase space, since they are the spatially extended active media. In the present paper, we propose the method for the calculation of the spectrum of the spatial Lyapunov exponents (SLEs) for the spatially extended beam-plasma systems. The calculation technique is applied to the analysis of chaotic spatio-temporal oscillations in three different beam-plasma model: (1) simple plasma Pierce diode, (2) coupled Pierce diodes, and (3) electron-wave system with backward electromagnetic wave. We find an excellent agreement between the system dynamics and the behavior of the spectrum of the spatial Lyapunov exponents. Along with the proposed method, the possible problems of SLEs calculation are also discussed. It is shown that for the wide class of the spatially extended systems, the set of quantities included in the system state for SLEs calculation can be reduced using the appropriate feature of the plasma systems.

  14. Primary proton spectrum in the energy range $5-10^3$ TeV from the sea level muon spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Lagutin; A. G. Tyumentsev; A. V. Yushkov

    2005-07-07

    Primary proton spectrum in the energy range $5-10^3$ TeV is reconstructed from the sea level muon spectrum with the use of QGSJET01 and SYBILL2.1 interaction models. Heavier nuclei are taken in accordance with the direct measurements data, 100% uncertainty in helium flux is accounted for. The obtained proton intensity strongly contradicts to the available data of balloon experiments, exceeding them at the least by 100% for QGSJET01. This discrepancy is due to the combined effect of primary nucleon flux underestimation in the direct measurements and incorrect description of extensive air shower development. In the latter case it is required earlier shower development and harder spectra of secondary pions and kaons in comparison with QGSJET01. This conclusion is in agreement with the obtained by the KASCADE group on the basis of events rate study.

  15. Bifurcation of Nonlinear Bloch Waves from the Spectrum in the Gross-Pitaevskii Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Dohnal; Hannes Uecker

    2015-09-07

    We rigorously analyze the bifurcation of so called nonlinear Bloch waves (NLBs) from the spectrum in the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation with a periodic potential, in arbitrary space dimensions. These are solutions which can be expressed as finite sums of quasi-periodic functions, and which in a formal asymptotic expansion are obtained from solutions of the so called algebraic coupled mode equations. Here we justify this expansion by proving the existence of NLBs and estimating the error of the formal asymptotics. The analysis is illustrated by numerical bifurcation diagrams, mostly in 2D. In addition, we illustrate some relations of NLBs to other classes of solutions of the GP equation, in particular to so called out--of--gap solitons and truncated NLBs.

  16. Nonlinear modulation of the HI power spectrum on ultra-large scales. I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umeh, Obinna; Santos, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Intensity mapping of the neutral hydrogen brightness temperature promises to provide a three-dimensional view of the universe on very large scales. Nonlinear effects are typically thought to alter only the small-scale power, but we show how they can bias the extraction of cosmological information contained in the power spectrum on ultra-large scales. For linear perturbations to remain valid on large scales, we need to renormalize perturbations at higher order. In the case of intensity mapping, the second-order contribution to clustering from weak lensing dominates nonlinear contribution at high redshift. Renormalization modifies the mean brightness temperature and therefore the evolution bias. It also introduces a term that mimics white noise. These effects can influence forecasting analysis on ultra-large scales.

  17. C Copyright 2008 Agilent Technologies Agilent 4396B Network/Spectrum/Impedance Analyzer Function Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    C Copyright 2008 Agilent Technologies Agilent 4396B Network/Spectrum/Impedance Analyzer Function Technologies Agilent 4396B Network/Spectrum/Impedance Analyzer Function Reference Manual Change Agilent Part No

  18. CMB anisotropy power spectrum using linear combinations of WMAP maps Rajib Saha,1,2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Souradeep, Tarun

    CMB anisotropy power spectrum using linear combinations of WMAP maps Rajib Saha,1,2,3 Simon Prunet year WMAP data by Saha et al. 2006. All previous estimates of the power spectrum of the CMB are based

  19. 26 INT IEEE SpEcTrum aprIl 2009 www.spectrum.ieee.org aprIl 2009 IEEE SpEcTrum INT 27www.spectrum.ieee.org26 INT IEEE SpEcTrum aprIl 2009 www.spectrum.ieee.org aprIl 2009 IEEE SpEcTrum INT 27www.spectrum.ieee.org zebra-tailed lizard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Daniel I.

    .spectrum.ieee.org A zebra-tailed lizard stands on a bed of tiny glass beads and shifts its weight. The beads slip underfoot, and the many other types of terrain it may face in the des- ert. In the lab, the bed of glass beads stands in for desert sand, and by blowing air through it or packing it down, we can make the ground looser or more

  20. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-01-01

    Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities

  1. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response Spinning Reserve

  2. Demand Response Programs for Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response Programs for Oregon Utilities Public Utility Commission May 2003 Public Utility ....................................................................................................................... 1 Types of Demand Response Programs............................................................................ 3 Demand Response Programs in Oregon

  3. ON THE HOPF RING FOR A SYMPLECTIC ORIENTED SPECTRUM VASSILY GORBUNOV, NIGEL RAY, AND PAUL TURNER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Nige

    ]. To any spectrum G we may associate an -spectrum {G r : r 2 Z} by choosing G * *rto be the space analogues, to which we ho* *pe to return elsewhere. There are natural spectrum maps by the initiality of S, and j is the forgetful map* *. Every complex orientation may be symplectified using j. T

  4. Correction To the Formula For the Total Frequency Integral of the Ion Velocity Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Killian, Thomas C.

    Correction To the Formula For the Total Frequency Integral of the Ion Velocity Spectrum Trevor integral of the ion velocity spectrum is incorrect, while the equation for the spectrum itself is correct, there are slightly different forms of this equation running around in which camera corrections and spatial integrals

  5. A Coalition Formation Game for Energy-efficient Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Vincent

    A Coalition Formation Game for Energy-efficient Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio). In this paper, we study energy-efficient cooperative multi-channel spectrum sensing in CRNs. We first propose a cooperative spectrum sensing and accessing (CSSA) scheme for all the secondary users (SUs). The SUs

  6. C Copyright 2007 Agilent Technologies Agilent 4396B Network/Spectrum/Impedance Analyzer Task Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    C Copyright 2007 Agilent Technologies Agilent 4396B Network/Spectrum/Impedance Analyzer Task . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 To Display Dual Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 To Select the Spectrum Analyzer Mode. n Foreign substance or liquid has fallen into the instrument. #12;#12;Agilent 4396B Network/Spectrum

  7. The ESA family of spectrum analyzers have proven and guaranteed performance with the flexibility to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    The ESA family of spectrum analyzers have proven and guaranteed performance with the flexibility- mance on a mid-performance spectrum analyzer. Industry best typical performance Warm up time: 5Hz) -136 dBc/Hz (1 MHz) Agilent ESA Series Spectrum Analyzers Data Sheet a. Add 20LogN for frequencies > 6

  8. Specmaster: A Simple Spectrum Monitoring Tool Brian Hicks, Paul Ray (NRL), Nagini Paravastu (ASEE/NRL),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    spectrum analyzer 3. An Agilent 87104B low-loss multiport coaxial RF switch (4-to-1) 4. A National Spectrum Analyzer Agilent 87104B Multiport Coaxial Switch Windows XP Based Laptop Running Specmaster with the E4440A spectrum analyzer (GPIB) and a GUI generator. Only a minimum of training and familiarization

  9. Specmaster: A Simple Spectrum Monitoring Tool Brian Hicks, Paul Ray (NRL), Nagini Paravastu (ASEE/NRL),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    an Agilent 44xx series spectrum analyzer, select from multiple antenna inputs using a low loss RF switch 2. An Agilent E4440A spectrum analyzer 3. An Agilent 87104B low-loss multiport coaxial RF switch (4 Spectrum Analyzer Agilent 87104B Multiport Coaxial Switch Windows XP Based Laptop Running Specmaster

  10. Spectrum-Sensing Opportunistic Wireless Relay Networks: Outage and Diversity Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    cooperatively sense the spectrum and help the designated cognitive relay node. I. INTRODUCTION The demand for radio spectrum is continuing to grow with new emerging applications and further market penetration-utilization of the spectrum that is in high demand [1]. In a more flexible scenario, one can envision that the licensed

  11. Fourier transform microwave spectrum of the propane-water complex: A prototypical water-hydrophobe system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Fourier transform microwave spectrum of the propane-water complex: A prototypical water) The Fourier transform microwave spectrum of the propane-water complex (C3H,-H,O) has been observed and analyzed. This spectrum includes transitions assigned to propane complexed with both the ortho and para

  12. PRODUCT OF POWER SPECTRUM AND GROUP DELAY FUNCTION FOR SPEECH RECOGNITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRODUCT OF POWER SPECTRUM AND GROUP DELAY FUNCTION FOR SPEECH RECOGNITION Donglai Zhu and Kuldip K by Murthy and Gadde [6] for speech recognition. In this paper, we propose to use the product of the power. In this paper, we define the product spectrum as the product of the power spectrum and the GDF. It combines

  13. Lyapunov spectrum of a relativistic stochastic flow in the Poincare Camille Tardif

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Lyapunov spectrum of a relativistic stochastic flow in the Poincare group. Camille Tardif March 8, 2013 Abstract We determine the Lyapunov spectrum and stable manifolds of some stochastic flowsevy processes in Lie groups. Poincare group. Lyapunov spectrum. Hyperbolic dynamics. AMS Subject Classification

  14. Spectrum flattening of white OLED with photonic crystal patterned capping layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wai, Ping-kong Alexander

    OLED (ITE-WOLEDs) structure to simultaneously enhance the light extraction efficiency and to flattenSpectrum flattening of white OLED with photonic crystal patterned capping layer Feng Li, P. K. A to enhance the extraction and flatten the spectrum of white organic light-emitting diode. Spectrum

  15. Multivariate statistics applications in scanning transmission electron microscopy X-ray spectrum imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parish, Chad M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A modern scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) fitted with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) system can quickly and easily produce spectrum image (SI) datasets containing so much information (hundreds to thousands of megabytes) that they cannot be comprehensively interrogated by a human analyst. Therefore, advanced mathematical techniques are needed to glean materials science and engineering insight into the processing-structure-properties relationship of the examined material from the SI data. This review will discuss recent advances in the application of multivariate statistical analysis (MVSA) methods to STEM-EDS SI experiments. In particular, the fundamental mathematics of principal component analysis (PCA) and related methods are reviewed, and advanced methods such as multivariate curve resolution (MCR) are discussed. The applications of PCA and MCR-based techniques to solve difficult materials science problems, such as the analysis of a particle fully embedded in a matrix phase are discussed, as well as confounding effects such as rank deficiency that can confuse the results of MVSA computations. Possible future advances and areas in need of study are also mentioned.

  16. An HST COS 'SNAPSHOT' spectrum of the K supergiant ? Vel (K4Ib-II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G. [NASA/GSFC Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ayres, Thomas R. [University of Colorado, CASA, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Harper, Graham M. [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Kober, Gladys; Nielsen, Krister E.; Wahlgren, Glenn M., E-mail: Kenneth.G.Carpenter@nasa.gov [Deptartment of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    We present a far-ultraviolet spectrum of the K4 Ib-II supergiant ? Vel obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope's Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) as a part of the SNAPshot program 'SNAPing coronal iron' (GO 11687). The observation covers a wavelength region (1326-1467 ) not previously recorded for ? Vel at a spectral resolving power of R ? 20,000 and displays strong emission and absorption features, superposed on a bright chromospheric continuum. Fluorescent excitation is responsible for much of the observed emission, mainly powered by strong H I Ly? and the O I (UV 2) triplet emission near ?1304. The molecular CO and H{sub 2} fluorescences are weaker than in the early-K giant ? Boo while the Fe II and Cr II lines, also pumped by H I Ly?, are stronger in ? Vel. This pattern of relative line strengths between the two stars is explained by the lower iron-group element abundance in ? Boo, which weakens that star's Fe II and Cr II emission without reducing the molecular fluorescences. The ? Vel spectrum shows fluorescent Fe II, Cr II, and H{sub 2} emission similar to that observed in the M supergiant ? Ori, but more numerous well-defined narrow emissions from CO. The additional CO emissions are visible in the spectrum of ? Vel since that star does not have the cool, opaque circumstellar shells that surround ? Ori and produce broad circumstellar CO (A-X) band absorptions that hide those emissions in the cooler star. The presence of Si IV emission in ? Vel indicates a ?8 10{sup 4} K plasma that is mixed into the cooler chromosphere. Evidence of the stellar wind is seen in the C II ??1334,1335 lines and in the blueshifted Fe II and Ni II wind absorption lines. Line modeling using Sobolev with Exact Integration for the C II lines indicates a larger terminal velocity (?45 versus ?30 km s{sup 1}) and turbulence (?27 versus <21 km s{sup 1}) with a more quickly accelerating wind (? = 0.35 versus 0.7) at the time of this COS observation in 2010 than derived from Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph data obtained in 1994. The Fe II and Ni II absorptions are blueshifted by 7.6 km s{sup 1} relative to the chromospheric emission, suggesting formation in lower levels of the accelerating wind and their widths indicate a higher turbulence in the ? Vel wind compared to ? Ori.

  17. Magnetically Responsive Photonic Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yongxing

    2011-01-01

    Crystals Introduction Colloidal crystals, typically self-NIPAM gel built with a colloidal crystal template composed2.6 (A) Photographs of colloidal crystals formed in response

  18. Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE`s proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates.

  19. Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress responses Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol...

  20. REVISING THE HALOFIT MODEL FOR THE NONLINEAR MATTER POWER SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Ryuichi [Faculty of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, 3 bunkyo-cho, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan); Sato, Masanori [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Nishimichi, Takahiro; Taruya, Atsushi; Oguri, Masamune [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU, WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2012-12-20

    Based on a suite of state-of-the-art high-resolution N-body simulations, we revisit the so-called halofit model as an accurate fitting formula for the nonlinear matter power spectrum. While the halofit model has frequently been used as a standard cosmological tool to predict the nonlinear matter power spectrum in a universe dominated by cold dark matter, its precision has been limited by the low resolution of N-body simulations used to determine the fitting parameters, suggesting the necessity of an improved fitting formula at small scales for future cosmological studies. We run high-resolution N-body simulations for 16 cosmological models around the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe best-fit cosmological parameters (one-, three-, five-, and seven-year results), including dark energy models with a constant equation of state. The simulation results are used to re-calibrate the fitting parameters of the halofit model so as to reproduce small-scale power spectra of the N-body simulations, while keeping the precision at large scales. The revised fitting formula provides an accurate prediction of the nonlinear matter power spectrum in a wide range of wavenumbers (k {<=} 30 h Mpc{sup -1}) at redshifts 0 {<=} z {<=} 10, with 5% precision for k {<=} 1 h Mpc{sup -1} at 0 {<=} z {<=} 10 and 10% for 1 {<=} k {<=} 10 h Mpc{sup -1} at 0 {<=} z {<=} 3. We discuss the impact of the improved halofit model on weak-lensing power spectra and correlation functions, and show that the improved model better reproduces ray-tracing simulation results.

  1. Primordial power spectrum of tensor perturbations in Finsler spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin Li; Sai Wang

    2015-08-16

    We first investigate the gravitational wave in the flat Finsler spacetime. In the Finslerian universe, we derive the perturbed gravitational field equation with tensor perturbations. The Finslerian background spacetime breaks rotational symmetry and induces parity violation. Then we obtain the modified primordial power spectrum of tensor perturbations. The parity violation feature requires that the anisotropic effect contributes to $TT,TE,EE,BB$ angular correlation coefficients with $l'=l+1$ and $TB,EB$ with $l'=l$. The numerical results show that the anisotropic contributions to angular correlation coefficients depend on $m$, and $TE$ and $ET$ angular correlation coefficients are different.

  2. Energy spectrum of ultra high energy cosmic rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ioana C. Maris; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2008-08-12

    The construction of the southern site of the Pierre Auger Observatory is almost completed. Three independent measurements of the flux of the cosmic rays with energies larger than 1 EeV have been performed during the construction phase. The surface detector data collected until August 2007 have been used to establish a flux suppression at the highest energies with a 6 sigma significance. The observations of cosmic rays by the fluorescence detector allowed the extension of the energy spectrum to lower energies, where the efficiency of the surface detector is less than 100% and a change in the spectral index is expected.

  3. Statistical Tools for Analyzing the Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. Hague; B. R. Becker; M. S. Gold; J. A. J. Matthews

    2008-08-20

    In this paper un-binned statistical tools for analyzing the cosmic ray energy spectrum are developed and illustrated with a simulated data set. The methods are designed to extract accurate and precise model parameter estimators in the presence of statistical and systematic energy errors. Two robust methods are used to test for the presence of flux suppression at the highest energies: the Tail-Power statistic and a likelihood ratio test. Both tests give evidence of flux suppression in the simulated data. The tools presented can be generalized for use on any astrophysical data set where the power-law assumption is relevant and can be used to aid observational design.

  4. On the Power Spectrum Density of Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motoko Suzuki; Masahiro Morikawa; Izumi Joichi

    2001-04-13

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are known to have short-time variability and power-law behavior with the index -1.67 in the power spectrum density. Reanalyzing the expanded data, we have found a) the power-law comes from the global profile of the burst and not from the self-similar shots nor rapid fluctuations in the luminosity profile. b) The power indices vary from burst to burst and the value -1.67 is given simply as the mean value of the distribution; there is no systematic correlation among GRBs to yield the power law.

  5. State densities and spectrum fluctuations: Information propagation in complex nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, J.B.; Kota, V.K.B.

    1988-01-01

    At excitation energies in nuclei where the state density is unambiguously defined there is a sharp separation between the smoothed spectrum (which defines the density) and fluctuations about it which have recently been studied with a view to understanding some aspects of quantum chaos. We briefly review these two complementary subjects, paying special attention to: the role of the effective interaction in determining the density; the calculation of interacting-particle state and level densities, and of expectation values of interesting operators; the information about the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction which is carried both by the density and the fluctuations. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Higher derivatives and power spectrum in effective single field inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinn-Ouk Gong; Min-Seok Seo; Spyros Sypsas

    2015-03-10

    We study next-to-leading corrections to the effective action of the curvature perturbation obtained by integrating out the coupled heavy isocurvature perturbation. These corrections result from including higher order derivative operators, weighted by the mass scale of the heavy physics, in the effective theory expansion. We find that the correction terms are suppressed by the ratio of the Hubble parameter to the heavy mass scale. The corresponding corrections to the power spectrum of the curvature perturbation are presented for a simple illustrative example.

  7. Testing the Rastall's theory using matter power spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. M. Batista; J. C. Fabris; M. Hamani Daouda

    2010-04-26

    The Rastall's theory is a modification of the General Relativity theory leading to a different expression for the conservation law in the matter sector compared with the usual one. It has been argued recently that such a theory may have applications to the dark energy problem, since a pressureless fluid may lead to an accelerated universe. In the present work we confront the Rastall's theory with the power spectrum data. The results indicate a configuration that essentially reduces the Rastall's theory to General Relativity, unless the non-usual conservation law refers to a scalar field, situation where other configurations are eventually possible.

  8. Higgs and W boson spectrum from lattice simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Wurtz; Randy Lewis

    2013-10-01

    The spectrum of energy levels is computed for all available angular momentum and parity quantum numbers in the SU(2)-Higgs model, with parameters chosen to match experimental data from the Higgs-W boson sector of the standard model. Several multi-boson states are observed, with and without linear momentum, and all are consistent with weakly-interacting Higgs and W bosons. The creation operators used in this study are gauge-invariant so, for example, the Higgs operator is quadratic rather than linear in the Lagrangian's scalar field.

  9. Spectrum Sciences Decision and Data Handling Issues | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVESDepartmentSpecial Report: OAS-RA-10-01SpecialSpectrum

  10. ORIGINAL PAPER Cortical Variability in the Sensory-Evoked Response in Autism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behrmann, Marlene

    ORIGINAL PAPER Cortical Variability in the Sensory-Evoked Response in Autism Sarah M. Haigh David York 2014 Abstract Previous findings have shown that individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD-functioning adults with autism. Participants were presented with visual, somatosensory and auditory stimuli

  11. Inferred cosmic-ray spectrum from ${\\it Fermi}$-LAT $\\gamma$-ray observations of the Earth's limb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :,; Ajello, M; Albert, A; Allafort, A; Baldini, L; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Bottacini, E; Bouvier, A; Brandt, T J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chaves, R C G; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Dalton, M; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; Di Venere, L; Silva, E do Couto e; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Gomez-Vargas, G A; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hayashi, K; Hewitt, J W; Horan, D; Hou, X; Hughes, R E; Inoue, Y; Jackson, M S; Jogler, T; Jhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Kawano, T; Kndlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rain, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ritz, S; Roth, M; Schaal, M; Schulz, A; Sgr, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strong, A W; Takahashi, H; Takeuchi, Y; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Tronconi, V; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Werner, M; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yang, Z

    2014-01-01

    Recent accurate measurements of cosmic-ray (CR) species by ATIC-2, CREAM, and PAMELA reveal an unexpected hardening in the proton and He spectra above a few hundred GeV, a gradual softening of the spectra just below a few hundred GeV, and a harder spectrum of He compared to that of protons. These newly-discovered features may offer a clue to the origin of high-energy CRs. We use the ${\\it Fermi}$ Large Area Telescope observations of the $\\gamma$-ray emission from the Earth's limb for an indirect measurement of the local spectrum of CR protons in the energy range $\\sim 90~$GeV-$6~$TeV (derived from a photon energy range $15~$GeV-$1~$TeV). Our analysis shows that single power law and broken power law spectra fit the data equally well and yield a proton spectrum with index $2.68 \\pm 0.04$ and $2.61 \\pm 0.08$ above $\\sim 200~$GeV, respectively.

  12. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  13. Responsive classroom management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stough, Laura

    2008-01-01

    stream_source_info Responsive classroom management.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 9 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Responsive classroom management.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  14. Fermi large area telescope detection of a break in the gamma-ray spectrum of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Yajie; Funk, Stefan; Lande, Joshua; Tibaldo, Luigi [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Jhannesson, Glauger [Science Institute, University of Iceland, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Uchiyama, Yasunobu, E-mail: yuanyj@stanford.edu, E-mail: funk@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: joshualande@gmail.com, E-mail: uchiyama@slac.stanford.edu [3-34-1 Nishi-Ikebukuro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8501 (Japan)

    2013-12-20

    We report on observations of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A in the energy range from 100 MeV to 100 GeV using 44 months of observations from the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. We perform a detailed spectral analysis of this source and report on a low-energy break in the spectrum at 1.72{sub ?0.89}{sup +1.35} GeV. By comparing the results with models for the gamma-ray emission, we find that hadronic emission is preferred for the GeV energy range.

  15. The Transit Transmission Spectrum of a Cold Gas Giant Planet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalba, Paul A; Fortney, Jonathan J; Hedman, Matthew M; Nicholson, Philip D; Veyette, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    We use solar occultations observed by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer aboard the Cassini Spacecraft to extract the 1 to 5 micron transmission spectrum of Saturn, as if it were a transiting exoplanet. We detect absorption from methane, ethane, acetylene, aliphatic hydrocarbons, and possibly carbon monoxide with peak-to-peak features of up to 90 parts-per-million despite the presence of ammonia clouds. We also find that atmospheric refraction, as opposed to clouds or haze, determines the minimum altitude that could be probed during mid-transit. Self-consistent exoplanet atmosphere models show good agreement with Saturn's transmission spectrum but fail to reproduce a large absorption feature near 3.4 microns likely caused by gaseous ethane and a C-H stretching mode of an unknown aliphatic hydrocarbon. This large feature is located in one of the Spitzer Space Telescope bandpasses and could alter interpretations of transmission spectra if not properly modeled. The large signal in Saturn's transmission...

  16. Structure formation and CMBR anisotropy spectrum in the inflessence model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Sen; V. F. Cardone; S. Capozziello; A. Troisi

    2006-07-25

    The inflessence model has recently been proposed in an attempt to explain both early inflation and present day accelerated expansion within a single mechanism. The model has been successfully tested against the Hubble diagram of Type Ia Supernovae, the shift parameter, and the acoustic peak parameter. As a further mandatory test, we investigate here structure formation in the inflessence model determining the evolution of matter density contrast $\\delta \\equiv \\delta \\rho_M/\\rho_M$ in the linear regime. We compare the growth factor $D(a) \\equiv \\delta/a$ and the growth index $f(z) \\equiv d\\ln{\\delta}/d\\ln{a}$ to these same quantities for the successful concordance $\\Lambda$CDM model with a particular emphasis on the role of the inflessence parameters $(\\gamma, z_Q)$. We also evaluate the anisotropy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) to check whether the inflessence model may be in agreement with the observations. We find that, for large values of $(\\gamma, z_Q)$, structure formation proceeds in a similar way to that in the $\\Lambda$CDM scenario, and it is also possible to nicely fit the CMBR spectrum.

  17. Warped Supersymmetric Unification with Non-Unified Superparticle Spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomura, Yasunori; Tucker-Smith, David; Tweedie, Brock

    2004-03-16

    We present a new supersymmetric extension of the standard model. The model is constructed in warped space, with a unified bulk symmetry broken by boundary conditions on both the Planck and TeV branes. In the supersymmetric limit, the massless spectrum contains exotic colored particles along with the particle content of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). Nevertheless, the model still reproduces the MSSM prediction for gauge coupling unification and does not suffer from a proton decay problem. The exotic states acquire masses from supersymmetry breaking, making the model completely viable, but thereis still the possibility that these states will be detected at the LHC. The lightest of these states is most likely A_5^XY, the fifth component of the gauge field associated with the broken unified symmetry. Because supersymmetry is broken on the SU(5)-violating TeV brane, the gaugino masses generated at the TeV scale are completely independent of one another. We explore some of the unusual features that the superparticle spectrum might have as a consequence.

  18. Power spectrum and non-Gaussianities in anisotropic inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dey, Anindya; Kovetz, Ely D.; Paban, Sonia E-mail: elykovetz@gmail.com

    2014-06-01

    We study the planar regime of curvature perturbations for single field inflationary models in an axially symmetric Bianchi I background. In a theory with standard scalar field action, the power spectrum for such modes has a pole as the planarity parameter goes to zero. We show that constraints from back reaction lead to a strong lower bound on the planarity parameter for high-momentum planar modes and use this bound to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio of the anisotropic power spectrum in the CMB, which in turn places an upper bound on the Hubble scale during inflation allowed in our model. We find that non-Gaussianities for these planar modes are enhanced for the flattened triangle and the squeezed triangle configurations, but show that the estimated values of the f{sub NL} parameters remain well below the experimental bounds from the CMB for generic planar modes (other, more promising signatures are also discussed). For a standard action, f{sub NL} from the squeezed configuration turns out to be larger compared to that from the flattened triangle configuration in the planar regime. However, in a theory with higher derivative operators, non-Gaussianities from the flattened triangle can become larger than the squeezed configuration in a certain limit of the planarity parameter.

  19. Blue tensor spectrum from particle production during inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukohyama, Shinji; Namba, Ryo; Peloso, Marco; Shiu, Gary E-mail: ryo.namba@ipmu.jp E-mail: shiu@physics.wisc.edu

    2014-08-01

    We discuss a mechanism of particle production during inflation that can result in a blue gravitational wave (GW) spectrum, compatible with the BICEP2 result and with the r<0.11 limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio at the Planck pivot scale. The mechanism is based on the production of vector quanta from a rolling pseudo-scalar field. Both the vector and the pseudo-scalar are only gravitationally coupled to the inflaton, to keep the production of inflaton quanta at an unobservable level (the overproduction of non-gaussian scalar perturbations is a generic difficulty for mechanisms that aim to generate a visible GW signal from particle production during inflation). This mechanism can produce a detectable amount of GWs for any inflationary energy scale. The produced GWs are chiral and non-gaussian; both these aspects can be tested with large-scale polarization data (starting from Planck). We study how to reconstruct the pseudo-scalar potential from the GW spectrum.

  20. The Spectrum and Accurate Location of GRS 1758-258

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. A. Heindl; D. M. Smith

    2001-07-24

    We observed the "micro-quasar" GRS 1758-258 four times with Chandra. Two HRC-I observations were made in 2000 September-October spanning an intermediate-to-hard spectral transition (identified with RXTE). Another HRC-I and an ACIS/HETGS observation were made in 2001 March following a hard-to-soft transition to a very low flux state. The accurate position (J2000) of the X-ray source is RA= 18 01 12.40, Dec= -25 44 36.0 (90% confidence radius = 0".6), consistent with the purported variable radio counterpart. All images are consistent with GRS 1758-258 being a point source, indicating that any bright jet is less than ~1 light-month in projected length, assuming a distance of 8.5 kpc. The March spectrum is well-fit with a multi-color disk-blackbody with an inner temperature of 0.50+/-0.01 keV, interstellar absorption of nH = (1.59 +/- 0.05)x10^22 cm^-2, and (un-absorbed) 1-10 keV luminosity of (4.5x10^36)(D/8.5kpc)^2 ergs/sec. No narrow emission lines are apparent in the spectrum and upper limits to line equivalent widths are given.

  1. Blue Tensor Spectrum from Particle Production during Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinji Mukohyama; Ryo Namba; Marco Peloso; Gary Shiu

    2014-07-25

    We discuss a mechanism of particle production during inflation that can result in a blue gravitational wave (GW) spectrum, compatible with the BICEP2 result and with the r < 0.11 limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio at the Planck pivot scale. The mechanism is based on the production of vector quanta from a rolling pseudo-scalar field. Both the vector and the pseudo-scalar are only gravitationally coupled to the inflaton, to keep the production of inflaton quanta at an unobservable level (the overproduction of non-gaussian scalar perturbations is a generic difficulty for mechanisms that aim to generate a visible GW signal from particle production during inflation). This mechanism can produce a detectable amount of GWs for any inflationary energy scale. The produced GWs are chiral and non-gaussian; both these aspects can be tested with large-scale polarization data (starting from Planck). We study how to reconstruct the pseudo-scalar potential from the GW spectrum.

  2. Delayed neutron energy spectrum measurements of actinide waste isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comfort, Christopher M.

    1998-01-01

    was irradiated using the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR). Three proton recoil detectors, operating individually, in conjunction with MCNP calculated response functions, were used to measure the delayed neutron energy spectra of each isotope...

  3. SECOND SEASON QUIET OBSERVATIONS: MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION POWER SPECTRUM AT 95 GHz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Araujo, D.; Dumoulin, R. N.; Newburgh, L. B.; Zwart, J. T. L. [Department of Physics and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Department of Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chinone, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Cleary, K.; Reeves, R. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd M/C 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Monsalve, R.; Bustos, R. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Naess, S. K.; Eriksen, H. K. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Wehus, I. K. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Bronfman, L. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Church, S. E. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology and Department of Physics, Stanford University, Varian Physics Building, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Dickinson, C. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gaier, T., E-mail: ibuder@uchicago.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Collaboration: QUIET Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) has observed the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 43 and 95 GHz. The 43 GHz results have been published in a previous paper, and here we report the measurement of CMB polarization power spectra using the 95 GHz data. This data set comprises 5337 hr of observations recorded by an array of 84 polarized coherent receivers with a total array sensitivity of 87 {mu}K{radical}s. Four low-foreground fields were observed, covering a total of {approx}1000 deg{sup 2} with an effective angular resolution of 12.'8, allowing for constraints on primordial gravitational waves and high signal-to-noise measurements of the E-modes across three acoustic peaks. The data reduction was performed using two independent analysis pipelines, one based on a pseudo-C {sub l} (PCL) cross-correlation approach, and the other on a maximum-likelihood (ML) approach. All data selection criteria and filters were modified until a predefined set of null tests had been satisfied before inspecting any non-null power spectrum. The results derived by the two pipelines are in good agreement. We characterize the EE, EB, and BB power spectra between l = 25 and 975 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with {Lambda}CDM, while the BB power spectrum is consistent with zero. Based on these measurements, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r = 1.1{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} (r < 2.8 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the ML pipeline, and r = 1.2{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} (r < 2.7 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the PCL pipeline. In one of the fields, we find a correlation with the dust component of the Planck Sky Model, though the corresponding excess power is small compared to statistical errors. Finally, we derive limits on all known systematic errors, and demonstrate that these correspond to a tensor-to-scalar ratio smaller than r = 0.01, the lowest level yet reported in the literature.

  4. Second Season QUIET Observations: Measurements of the CMB Polarization Power Spectrum at 95 GHz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Araujo, D.; Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Chinone, Y.; Cleary, K.; Dumoulin, R.N.; Kusaka, A.; Monsalve, R.; ss, S.K.N\\ae; Newburgh, L.B.; /Columbia U., CBA /Princeton U. /Caltech

    2012-07-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) has observed the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 43 and 95GHz. The 43-GHz results have been published in QUIET Collaboration et al. (2011), and here we report the measurement of CMB polarization power spectra using the 95-GHz data. This data set comprises 5337 hours of observations recorded by an array of 84 polarized coherent receivers with a total array sensitivity of 87 {mu}K{radical}s. Four low-foreground fields were observed, covering a total of {approx} 1000 square degrees with an effective angular resolution of 12'.8, allowing for constraints on primordial gravitational waves and high-signal-to-noise measurements of the E-modes across three acoustic peaks. The data reduction was performed using two independent analysis pipelines, one based on a pseudo-C{ell} (PCL) cross-correlation approach, and the other on a maximum-likelihood (ML) approach. All data selection criteria and filters were modified until a predefined set of null tests had been satisfied before inspecting any non-null power spectrum. The results derived by the two pipelines are in good agreement. We characterize the EE, EB and BB power spectra between {ell} = 25 and 975 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with {Lambda}CDM, while the BB power spectrum is consistent with zero. Based on these measurements, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r = 1.1{sup +0.9}{sub -0.8} (r < 2.8 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the ML pipeline, and r = {sup +0.9}{sub -0.8} (r < 2.7 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the PCL pipeline. In one of the fields, we find a correlation with the dust component of the Planck Sky Model, though the corresponding excess power is small compared to statistical errors. Finally, we derive limits on all known systematic errors, and demonstrate that these correspond to a tensor-to-scalar ratio smaller than r = 0.01, the lowest level yet reported in the literature.

  5. Frequency response enhancement of optical injection-locked lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Erwin K.; Sung, Hyuk-Kee; Wu, Ming-C.

    2008-01-01

    by an electrical spectrum analyzer (ESA). In order toeither an optical spectrum analyzer (OSA) or a photodetector

  6. Method of detecting system function by measuring frequency response

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrison, John L. (Butte, MT); Morrison, William H. (Manchester, CT); Christophersen, Jon P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-04-03

    Real-time battery impedance spectrum is acquired using a one-time record. Fast Summation Transformation (FST) is a parallel method of acquiring a real-time battery impedance spectrum using a one-time record that enables battery diagnostics. An excitation current to a battery is a sum of equal amplitude sine waves of frequencies that are octave harmonics spread over a range of interest. A sample frequency is also octave and harmonically related to all frequencies in the sum. The time profile of this signal has a duration that is a few periods of the lowest frequency. The voltage response of the battery, average deleted, is the impedance of the battery in the time domain. Since the excitation frequencies are known and octave and harmonically related, a simple algorithm, FST, processes the time record by rectifying relative to the sine and cosine of each frequency. Another algorithm yields real and imaginary components for each frequency.

  7. Spatial Variation of the X-ray spectrum of the Crab Nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Mori; D. N. Burrows; J. J. Hester; G. G. Pavlov; S. Shibata; H. Tsunemi

    2004-05-21

    We present spectral analysis of the Crab Nebula obtained with the {\\it Chandra} X-ray observatory. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by a power-law whose index varies across the nebula. The variation can be discussed in terms of the particle injection from the pulsar in two different directions: the equatorial plane containing the torus and the symmetry axis along the jet. In the equatorial plane, spectra within the torus are the hardest, with photon index $\\alpha \\approx 1.9$, and are almost independent of the surface brightness. At the periphery of the torus, the spectrum gradually softens in the outer, lower surface brightness regions, up to $\\alpha \\approx 3.0$. This indicates that synchrotron losses become significant to X-ray emitting particles at the outer boundary of the torus. We discuss the nature of the torus, incorporating information from observations at other wavelengths. Spectral variations are also seen within the southern jet. The core of the jet is the hardest with $\\alpha \\approx$ 2.0, and the outer sheath surrounding the core becomes softer with $\\alpha$ up to 2.5 at the outermost part. Based on the similarity between the spectra of the jet core and the torus, we suggest that the electron spectra of the particles injected from the pulsar are also similar in these two different directions. The brightness ratio between the near and far sides of the torus can be explained by Doppler boosting and relativistic aberration; however, the observed ratio cannot be derived from the standard weakly magnetized pulsar wind model. We also found a site where an optical filament comprised of supernova ejecta is absorbing the soft X-ray emission ($<$ 2 keV).

  8. Tailoring the Neutron Spectrum from a 14-MeV Neutron Generator to Approximate a Spontaneous-Fission Spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Simpson; David Chichester

    2011-06-01

    Many applications of neutrons for non-invasive measurements began with isotopic sources such as AmBe or Cf-252. Political factors have rendered AmBe undesirable in the United States and other countries, and the supply of Cf-252 is limited and significantly increasing in price every few years. Compact and low-power deuterium-tritium (DT) electronic neutron generators can often provide sufficient flux, but the 14-MeV neutron spectrum is much more energetic (harder) than an isotopic neutron source. A series of MCNP simulations were run to examine the extent to which the 14-MeV DT neutron spectrum could be softened through the use of high-Z and low-Z materials. Some potential concepts of operation require a portable neutron generator system, so the additional weight of extra materials is also a trade-off parameter. Using a reference distance of 30 cm from the source, the average neutron energy can be lowered to be less than that of either AmBe or Cf-252, while obtaining an increase in flux at the reference distance compared to a bare neutron generator. This paper discusses the types and amounts of materials used, the resulting neutron spectra, neutron flux levels, and associated photon production.

  9. Mass spectrum analysis of K- pi+ from the semileptonic decay D+ --> K- pi+ mu+ nu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massafferri Rodrigues, Andre

    2004-03-01

    The Higgs mechanism preserves the gauge symmetries of the Standard Model while giving masses to the W, Z bosons. Supersymmetry, which protects the Higgs boson mass scale from quantum corrections, predicts at least 5 Higgs bosons, none of which has been directly observed. This thesis presents a search for neutral Higgs bosons, produced in association with bottom quarks. The production rate is greatly enhanced at large values of the Supersymmetric parameter tan {beta}. High-energy p{bar p} collision data, collected from Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron using the D0 detector, are analyzed. In the absence of a signal, values of tan {beta} > 80-120 are excluded at 95% Confidence Level (C.L.), depending on the (CP-odd) neutral Higgs boson mass (studied from 100 to 150 GeV/c{sup 2}).

  10. Multiscale structural analysis of mouse lingual myoarchitecture employing diffusion spectrum magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelward, Bevin

    structural autocorrelation TPM , respectively. Mesoscale myofi- ber tracts were generated by alignment the properties of the respective ODFs and the virtual super- imposition of the distributed mesoscale myofiber tracts. The identifi- cation of a mesoscale anatomical construct, which specifically links

  11. Integrative analysis of heterogeneous genomic datasets to discover genetic etiology of autism spectrum disorders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazeen, Sumaiya

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the genetic background of complex diseases is crucial to medical research, with implications to diagnosis, treatment and drug development. As molecular approaches to this challenge are time consuming and ...

  12. Analysis of the Pebble-Bed VHTR Spectrum Shifting Capabilities for Advanced Fuel Cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Megan; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2009-09-30

    1.00E+06 energy (eV) f l u x p e r u n i t l e t h a r g y 0 to 1 0.33 to 1 0.75 to 1 2 to 1 4 to 1 Figure 5 Fig. 5. Neutron flux per unit lethargy as a function of energy at 393 K for various fuel loadings. In order to verify the use of any... at the three specified temperatures. 18 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 0.0001 0.01 1 100 10000 1000000 100000000 energy (eV) f l u x p e r u n i t l e t h a r g y 300K 523K 1000K Figure 6 Fig 6. Neutron flux per unit lethargy as a function of energy for 0...

  13. ({lambda}, p) Spectrum Analysis in p+A Interactions at 10 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aslanyan, P. Zh.; Emelyanenko, V. N.

    2007-06-13

    Experimental data from the 2m propane bubble chamber have been analyzed for exotic baryon states search. A number of peculiarities were found in the effective mass spectra of: {lambda}{pi}+({sigma}*+(1382),PDG), {lambda}p and {lambda}pp subsystems. A few events detected on the photographs of the propane bubble chamber exposed to a 10 GeV/c proton beam, were interpreted as S=-2 H0 light(

  14. Testing and Analysis of Low Cost Composite Materials Under Spectrum Loading and High Cycle Fatigue Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    papers cited are available through the Sandia National Laboratories website: www.sandia.gov/Renewable_Energy/wind_energy-year experimental study of low- cost composite materials for wind turbine blades. Wind turbines are subjected to 109 in and potential interactions between failure modes. Wind turbine design codes typically assume a Miner's rule

  15. Spectrum analysis of motion parallax in a 3D cluttered scene and application to egomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langer, Michael

    surfaces and hence multiple depths. Psychophysical stud- ies have shown that human observers can estimate their direction of heading in such scenes.13 A canonical natural example of a 3D cluttered scene is the woods. Helmholtz observed that, from a fixed vantage point in the woods and using one eye only, an observer has

  16. Analysis of the violet absorption spectrum of chlorine dioxide and calculation of molecular constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Eddie

    1950-01-01

    gave the best melting point and % crystallinity results using boron trifluoride diethyl etherate as the cationic initiator....

  17. AHRI Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AHRI Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis These comments are submitted by the Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) in response to the U.S....

  18. A Fast Gridded Method for the Estimation of the Power Spectrum of the CMB from Interferometer Data with Application to the Cosmic Background Imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. T. Myers; C. R. Contaldi; J. R. Bond; U. -L. Pen; D. Pogosyan; S. Prunet; J. L. Sievers; B. S. Mason; T. J. Pearson; A. C. S. Readhead; M. C. Shepherd

    2002-05-23

    We describe an algorithm for the extraction of the angular power spectrum of an intensity field, such as the cosmic microwave background (CMB), from interferometer data. This new method, based on the gridding of interferometer visibilities in the aperture plane followed by a maximum likelihood solution for bandpowers, is much faster than direct likelihood analysis of the visibilities, and deals with foreground radio sources, multiple pointings, and differencing. The gridded aperture-plane estimators are also used to construct Wiener-filtered images using the signal and noise covariance matrices used in the likelihood analysis. Results are shown for simulated data. The method has been used to determine the power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background from observations with the Cosmic Background Imager, and the results are given in companion papers.

  19. The Responsibilities of Engineers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Justin Douglas 1978-

    2012-12-06

    Knowledge of the responsibilities of engineers is key to answering ethical questions about the work of engineers, because the decisions made by engineers often have ethical dimensions and implications. Engineers develop and implement technologies...

  20. Response Resources Demonstration

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    be in New York City as opposed to Westchester for the fuel cell. New York City has higher electricity prices and higher demand response payments available. Also it wasn't clear if...

  1. PHY and MAC Layer Design of Hybrid Spread Spectrum Based Smart Meter Network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuruganti, Phani Teja

    2012-01-01

    The smart grid is a combined process of revitalizing the traditional power grid applications and introducing new applications to improve the efficiency of power generation, transmission and distribution. This can be achieved by leveraging advanced communication and networking technologies. Therefore the selection of the appropriate communication technology for different smart grid applications has been debated a lot in the recent past. After comparing different possible technologies, a recent research study has arrived at a conclusion that the 3G cellular technology is the right choice for distribution side smart grid applications like smart metering, advanced distribution automation and demand response management system. In this paper, we argue that the current 3G/4G cellular technologies are not an appropriate choice for smart grid distribution applications and propose a Hybrid Spread Spectrum (HSS) based Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) as one of the alternatives to 3G/4G technologies. We present a preliminary PHY and MAC layer design of a HSS based AMI network and evaluate their performance using matlab and NS2 simulations. Also, we propose a time hierarchical scheme that can significantly reduce the volume of random access traffic generated during blackouts and the delay in power outage reporting.

  2. Responsibility, Incompetence, and Psychopathy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brink, David O.

    2013-04-30

    that is significantly more demanding than a recognitional standard, especially if we focus on basic morality and the criminal law. The fair opportunity conception of responsibility seems to require only a recognitional capacity and perhaps a gradeability capacity... that is significantly more demanding than a recognitional standard, especially if we focus on basic morality and the criminal law. The fair opportunity conception of responsibility seems to require only a recognitional capacity and perhaps a gradeability capacity...

  3. Conductance and absolutely continuous spectrum of 1D samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Bruneau; Vojkan Jaki?; Yoram Last; Claude-Alain Pillet

    2015-04-27

    We characterize the absolutely continuous spectrum of the one-dimensional Schr\\"odinger operators $h=-\\Delta+v$ acting on $\\ell^2(\\mathbb{Z}_+)$ in terms of the limiting behavior of the Landauer-B\\"uttiker and Thouless conductances of the associated finite samples. The finite sample is defined by restricting $h$ to a finite interval $[1,L]\\cap\\mathbb{Z}_+$ and the conductance refers to the charge current across the sample in the open quantum system obtained by attaching independent electronic reservoirs to the sample ends. Our main result is that the conductances associated to an energy interval $I$ are non-vanishing in the limit $L\\to\\infty$ iff ${\\rm sp}_{\\rm ac}(h)\\cap I=\\emptyset$. We also discuss the relationship between this result and the Schr\\"odinger Conjecture.

  4. Discriminating chaotic and stochastic dynamics through the permutation spectrum test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulp, C. W.; Zunino, L.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new heuristic symbolic tool for unveiling chaotic and stochastic dynamics: the permutation spectrum test. Several numerical examples allow us to confirm the usefulness of the introduced methodology. Indeed, we show that it is robust in situations in which other techniques fail (intermittent chaos, hyperchaotic dynamics, stochastic linear and nonlinear correlated dynamics, and deterministic non-chaotic noise-driven dynamics). We illustrate the applicability and reliability of this pragmatic method by examining real complex time series from diverse scientific fields. Taking into account that the proposed test has the advantages of being conceptually simple and computationally fast, we think that it can be of practical utility as an alternative test for determinism.

  5. Cool covered sky-splitting spectrum-splitting FK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohedano, Rubn; Chaves, Julio; Falicoff, Waqidi; Hernandez, Maikel; Sorgato, Simone; Miano, Juan C.; Benitez, Pablo; Buljan, Marina

    2014-09-26

    Placing a plane mirror between the primary lens and the receiver in a Fresnel Khler (FK) concentrator gives birth to a quite different CPV system where all the high-tech components sit on a common plane, that of the primary lens panels. The idea enables not only a thinner device (a half of the original) but also a low cost 1-step manufacturing process for the optics, automatic alignment of primary and secondary lenses, and cell/wiring protection. The concept is also compatible with two different techniques to increase the module efficiency: spectrum splitting between a 3J and a BPC Silicon cell for better usage of Direct Normal Irradiance DNI, and sky splitting to harvest the energy of the diffuse radiation and higher energy production throughout the year. Simple calculations forecast the module would convert 45% of the DNI into electricity.

  6. The microlocal spectrum condition, initial value formulations and background independence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Stottmeister; Thomas Thiemann

    2015-04-09

    We analyze the implications of the microlocal spectrum/Hadamard condition for states in a (linear) quantum field theory on a globally hyperbolic spacetime $M$ in the context of a (distributional) initial value formulation. More specifically, we work in a $3+1$-split $M\\cong\\mathbb{R}\\times\\Sigma$ and give a bound, independent of the spacetime metric, on the wave front sets of the initial data for a quasi-free Hadamard state in the quantum field theory defined by a normally hyperbolic differential operator $P$ acting in a vector bundle $E\\stackrel{\\pi}{\\rightarrow}M$. This aims at a possible way to apply the concept of Hadamard states within approaches to quantum field theory/gravity relying on a Hamiltonian formulation, potentially without a (classical) background metric $g$.

  7. Contribution of domain wall networks to the CMB power spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazanu, A; Shellard, E P S

    2015-01-01

    We use three domain wall simulations from the radiation era to the late time dark energy domination era based on the PRS algorithm to calculate the energy-momentum tensor components of domain wall networks in an expanding universe. Unequal time correlators in the radiation, matter and cosmological constant epochs are calculated using the scaling regime of each of the simulations. The CMB power spectrum of a network of domain walls is determined. The first ever quantitative constraint for the domain wall surface tension is obtained using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method; an energy scale of domain walls of 0.93 MeV, which is close but below the Zel'dovich bound, is determined.

  8. Spinning Reserve From Responsive Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.J.

    2003-04-08

    Responsive load is the most underutilized reliability resource available to the power system today. It is currently not used at all to provide spinning reserve. Historically there were good reasons for this, but recent technological advances in communications and controls have provided new capabilities and eliminated many of the old obstacles. North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC), Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Northeast Power Coordinating Council (NPCC), New York State Reliability Council (NYSRC), and New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) rules are beginning to recognize these changes and are starting to encourage responsive load provision of reliability services. The Carrier ComfortChoice responsive thermostats provide an example of these technological advances. This is a technology aimed at reducing summer peak demand through central control of residential and small commercial air-conditioning loads. It is being utilized by Long Island Power Authority (LIPA), Consolidated Edison (ConEd), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E). The technology is capable of delivering even greater response in the faster spinning reserve time frame (while still providing peak reduction). Analysis of demand reduction testing results from LIPA during the summer of 2002 provides evidence to back up this claim. It also demonstrates that loads are different from generators and that the conventional wisdom, which advocates for starting with large loads as better ancillary service providers, is flawed. The tempting approach of incrementally adapting ancillary service requirements, which were established when generators were the only available resources, will not work. While it is easier for most generators to provide replacement power and non-spinning reserve (the slower response services) than it is to supply spinning reserve (the fastest service), the opposite is true for many loads. Also, there is more financial reward for supplying spinning reserve than for supplying the other reserve services as a result of the higher spinning reserve prices. The LIPAedge program (LIPA's demand reduction program using Carrier ComfortChoice thermostats) provides an opportunity to test the use of responsive load for spinning reserve. With potentially 75 MW of spinning reserve capability already installed, this test program can also make an important contribution to the capacity needs of Long Island during the summer of 2003. Testing could also be done at ConEd ({approx}30 MW), SCE ({approx}15 MW), and/or SDG&E ({approx}15 MW). This paper is divided into six chapters. Chapter 2 discusses the contingency reserve ancillary services, their functions in supporting power system reliability, and their technical requirements. It also discusses the policy and tariff requirements and attempts to distinguish between ones that are genuinely necessary and ones that are artifacts of the technologies that were historically used to provide the services. Chapter 3 discusses how responsive load could provide contingency reserves (especially spinning reserve) for the power system. Chapter 4 specifically discusses the Carrier ComfortChoice responsive thermostat technology, the LIPAedge experience with that technology, and how the technology could be used to supply spinning reserve. Chapter 5 discusses a number of unresolved issues and suggests areas for further research. Chapter 6 offers conclusions and recommendations.

  9. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum and Composition from 10^{17} to 10^{18.3} eV Using a Hybrid Fluorescence Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Abu-Zayyad; K. Belov; D. J. Bird; J. Boyer; Z. Cao; M. Catanese; G. F. Chen; R. W. Clay; C. E. Covault; H. Y. Dai; B. R. Dawson; J. W. Elbert; B. E. Fick; L. F. Fortson; J. W. Fowler; K. G. Gibbs; M. A. K. Glasmacher; K. D. Green; Y. Ho; A. Huang; C. C. Jui; M. J. Kidd; D. B. Kieda; B. C. Knapp; S. Ko; C. G. Larsen; W. Lee; E. C. Loh; E. J. Mannel; J. Matthews; J. N. Matthews; B. J. Newport; D. F. Nitz; R. A. Ong; K. M. Simpson; J. D. Smith; D. Sinclair; P. Sokolsky; P. Sommers; C. Song; J. K. K. Tang; S. B. Thomas; J. .van der Velde; L. R. Wiencke; C. R. Wilkinson; S. Yoshida; X. Z. Zhang

    2000-10-31

    We study the spectrum and average mass composition of cosmic rays with primary energies between 10^{17} eV and 10^{18} eV using a hybrid detector consisting of the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) prototype and the MIA muon array. Measurements have been made of the change in the depth of shower maximum as a function of energy. A complete Monte Carlo simulation of the detector response and comparisons with shower simulations leads to the conclusion that the cosmic ray intensity is changing f rom a heavier to a lighter composition in this energy range. The spectrum is consistent with earlier Fly's Eye measurements and supports the previously found steepening near 4 \\times 10^{17} eV .

  10. Air quality modeling for emergency response applications. [MATHEW; ADPIC; FEM3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Chan, S.T.; Knox, J.B.; Dickerson, M.H.; Lange, R.

    1985-12-01

    The three-dimensional diagnostic wind field model (MATHEW) and the particle-in-cell transport and diffusion model (ADPIC) are used by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) for real-time assessments of the consequences from accidental releases of radioactivity into the atmosphere. For the dispersion of hazardous heavier-than-air gases, a time-dependent, three-dimensional finite element model (FEM3) is used. These models have been evaluated extensively against a wide spectrum of field experiments involving the release of chemically inert tracers or heavier-than-air gases. The results reveal that the MATHEW/ADPIC models are capable of simulating the spatial and temporal distributions of tracer concentration to within a factor of 2 for 50% of the measured tracer concentrations for near surface releases in relatively flat terrain and within a factor of 2 for 20% of the comparisons for elevated releases in complex terrain. The FEM3 model produces quite satisfactory simulations of the spatial and temporal distributions of heavier-than-air gases, typically within a kilometer of the release point. The ARAC consists of a centralized computerized emergency response system that is capable of supporting up to 100 sites and providing real-time predictions of the consequence of transportation accidents that may occur anywhere. It utilizes pertinent accident information, local and regional meteorology, and terrain as input to the MATHEW/ADPIC models for the consequence analysis. It has responded to over 150 incidents and exercises over the past decade.

  11. Spelling it Out: The Design, Delivery, and Placement of Delayed Echolalic Utterances by a Child with an Autistic Spectrum Disorder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stribling, Penny; Rae, John; Dickerson, Paul; Dautenhahn, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    Autistic Spectrum Disorder Penny Stribling, John Rae, Paulthe writing of this paper. Penny Stribling (Lecturer), John

  12. Experimental spectrum of reactor antineutrinos and spectra of main fissile isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinev, V. V., E-mail: vsinev@pcbai10.inr.ruhep.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    Within the period between the years 1988 and 1990, the spectrum of positrons from the inverse-beta-decay reaction on a proton was measured at the Rovno atomic power plant in the course of experiments conducted there. The measured spectrum has the vastest statistics in relation to other neutrino experiments at nuclear reactors and the lowest threshold for positron detection. An experimental reactor-antineutrino spectrum was obtained on the basis of this positron spectrum and was recommended as a reference spectrum. The spectra of individual fissile isotopes were singled out from the measured antineutrino spectrum. These spectra can be used to analyze neutrino experiments performed at nuclear reactors for various compositions of the fuel in the reactor core.

  13. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01

    No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

  14. U.S. Department of Energy Responses to Public Comments on the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    referred to hereafter as the Draft Evaluation. Responses to Public Comments on Draft Vessels Evaluation More Documents & Publications EIS-0337-SA-01: Supplement Analysis WVDP...

  15. Seismic bridge response modification due to degradation of viscous dampers performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graziotti, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring of Isolated Bridges: Parametric Analysis of theidentification procedure for bridge structures with energyUCSD. Cendron. (2008). Bridge response modification due to

  16. An Energy Efficient Cognitive Radio System with Quantized Soft Sensing and Duration Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    An Energy Efficient Cognitive Radio System with Quantized Soft Sensing and Duration Analysis Abdul.shihada}@kaust.edu.sa Abstract--In this paper, an energy efficient cognitive radio system is proposed. The proposed design--Spectrum sharing, Energy efficiency, Spectrum sensing, Resource allocation, I. INTRODUCTION Carbon dioxide

  17. Associations of Parent-Child Psychosocial Informant Discrepancy in Young Adults on the Autism Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapp, Steven Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    and mathematicians. Journal of Autism and Developmentalinternalizing behaviors in ASD. Autism Research, 3, 101-112.abilities in adults with autism spectrum disorder. European

  18. Risperidone use in autism spectrum disorders: A retrospective review of a clinic-referred patient population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemmon, ME; Lemmon, ME; Gregas, M; Gregas, M; Jeste, SS

    2011-01-01

    for clinical drug trials in autism. CNS Spectr. 2004;9:in school- age children with autism spectrum disorder. Am JRisperidone in children with autism and serious behavioral

  19. 2012-2013 Keywords: Routing and spectrum allocation (RSA), flexible optical networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varvarigo, Emmanouel "Manos"

    , "Conserving Transmission Power in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks" #12;), flexible optical networks WDM (FWDM) . (RSA) (RWA). FWDM Matlab. 2: Keywords: Routing and spectrum allocation (RSA), flexible optical networks

  20. Recipient luminophoric mediums having narrow spectrum luminescent materials and related semiconductor light emitting devices and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LeToquin, Ronan P; Tong, Tao; Glass, Robert C

    2014-12-30

    Light emitting devices include a light emitting diode ("LED") and a recipient luminophoric medium that is configured to down-convert at least some of the light emitted by the LED. In some embodiments, the recipient luminophoric medium includes a first broad-spectrum luminescent material and a narrow-spectrum luminescent material. The broad-spectrum luminescent material may down-convert radiation emitted by the LED to radiation having a peak wavelength in the red color range. The narrow-spectrum luminescent material may also down-convert radiation emitted by the LED into the cyan, green or red color range.