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1

EVALUATION OF MODAL COMBINATION METHODS FOR SEISMIC RESPONSE SPECTRUM ANALYSIS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulatory Guide 1.92 ''Combining Modal Responses and Spatial Components in Seismic Response Analysis'' was last revised in 1976. The objective of this project was to re-evaluate the current regulatory guidance for combining modal responses in response spectrum analysis, evaluate recent technical developments, and recommend revisions to the regulatory guidance. This paper describes the qualitative evaluation of modal response combination methods.

MORANTE,R.

1999-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Anti-competitive behaviour in spectrum markets: Analysis and response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The introduction of spectrum trading creates opportunities for operators, singly or jointly, to foreclose entry into downstream markets by accumulating unneeded spectrum holdings. After considering how these issues are treated under administrative methods ... Keywords: Competition law, Spectrum caps, Spectrum management

Martin Cave

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

EVALUATING THE HYDROGEOCHEMICAL RESPONSE OF SPRINGS USING PHASE-PLANE PLOTS AND SINGULAR SPECTRUM ANALYSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An ongoing study is focused on understanding the hydrology and geochemistry of three contaminated, perennial, semi-arid zone springs at a high explosives production facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, in northern New Mexico, USA. Springflow time series were examined using singular spectrum analysis (SSA) to identify the important time-scales affecting flow in the springs. SSA results suggest that springflow has two dominant patterns: a series of low-frequency modes which follow the seasonal and longer-term climate conditions at the site, and a large number of higher frequency modes which display the characteristic ''red noise'' spectrum related to local, short-term weather conditions. Phase-plane plots of {delta}{sup 18}O and spring discharge suggest that high flow conditions are dominated by snowmelt and summer monsoon inputs while low flow conditions can be affected by mixing of fast and slow flow components causing wide variations in {delta}{sup 18}O values. The analysis is being used for development of an efficient strategy for sampling design for environmental monitoring of contaminants that respond to multiple time scales.

B. NEWMAN; C. DUFFY; D. HICKMOTT

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Decision Analysis of Dynamic Spectrum Access Rules  

SciTech Connect

A current trend in spectrum regulation is to incorporate spectrum sharing through the design of spectrum access rules that support Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA). This paper develops a decision-theoretic framework for regulators to assess the impacts of different decision rules on both primary and secondary operators. We analyze access rules based on sensing and exclusion areas, which in practice can be enforced through geolocation databases. Our results show that receiver-only sensing provides insufficient protection for primary and co-existing secondary users and overall low social welfare. On the other hand, using sensing information between the transmitter and receiver of a communication link, provides dramatic increases in system performance. The performance of using these link end points is relatively close to that of using many cooperative sensing nodes associated to the same access point and large link exclusion areas. These results are useful to regulators and network developers in understanding in developing rules for future DSA regulation.

Juan D. Deaton; Luiz A. DaSilva; Christian Wernz

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Auditory pathway responses to parametrized vowels in autism spectrum disorders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by many behavioral symptoms, including delays in social and communicative development. A cluster of symptoms concentrate on speech and language development, especially ...

Bullock, Bennett (Bennett Charles)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Pushover, Response Spectrum and Time History Analyses of Safe Rooms in a Poor Performance Masonry Building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The idea of safe room has been developed for decreasing the earthquake casualties in masonry buildings. The information obtained from the previous ground motions occurring in seismic zones expresses the lack of enough safety of these buildings against earthquakes. For this reason, an attempt has been made to create some safe areas inside the existing masonry buildings, which are called safe rooms. The practical method for making these safe areas is to install some prefabricated steel frames in some parts of the existing structure. These frames do not carry any service loads before an earthquake. However, if a devastating earthquake happens and the load bearing walls of the building are destroyed, some parts of the floors, which are in the safe areas, will fall on the roof of the installed frames and the occupants who have sheltered there will survive. This paper presents the performance of these frames located in a destroying three storey masonry building with favorable conclusions. In fact, the experimental pushover diagram of the safe room located at the ground-floor level of this building is compared with the analytical results and it is concluded that pushover analysis is a good method for seismic performance evaluation of safe rooms. For time history analysis the 1940 El Centro, the 2003 Bam, and the 1990 Manjil earthquake records with the maximum peak accelerations of 0.35g were utilized. Also the design spectrum of Iranian Standard No. 2800-05 for the ground kind 2 is used for response spectrum analysis. The results of time history, response spectrum and pushover analyses show that the strength and displacement capacity of the steel frames are adequate to accommodate the distortions generated by seismic loads and aftershocks properly.

Mazloom, M. [Department of Civil Engineering, Shahid Rajaee University, P.O. Box 16785-163, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

7

Full-spectrum disease response : beyond just the flu.  

SciTech Connect

Why plan beyond the flu: (1) the installation may be the target of bioterrorism - National Laboratory, military base collocated in large population center; and (2) International Airport - transport of infectious agents to the area - Sandia is a global enterprise and staff visit many foreign countries. In addition to the Pandemic Plan, Sandia has developed a separate Disease Response Plan (DRP). The DRP addresses Category A, B pathogens and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The DRP contains the Cities Readiness Initiative sub-plan for disbursement of Strategic National Stockpile assets.

Knazovich, Michael Ward; Cox, Warren B.; Henderson, Samuel Arthur

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Quantitative mobility spectrum analysis (QMSA) for hall characterization of electrons and holes in anisotropic bands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: Bi films, Bi/CdTe superlattices, Si, anisotropic bands, magnetotransport, quantitative mobility spectrum analysis (QMSA), thermoelectric properties

I. Vurgaftman; J. R. Meyer; C. A. Hoffman; S. Cho; J. B. Ketterson; L. Faraone; J. Antoszewski; J. R. Lindemuth

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

BAYESIAN ANGULAR POWER SPECTRUM ANALYSIS OF INTERFEROMETRIC DATA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a Bayesian angular power spectrum and signal map inference engine which can be adapted to interferometric observations of anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), 21 cm emission line mapping of galactic brightness fluctuations, or 21 cm absorption line mapping of neutral hydrogen in the dark ages. The method uses Gibbs sampling to generate a sampled representation of the angular power spectrum posterior and the posterior of signal maps given a set of measured visibilities in the uv-plane. We use a mock interferometric CMB observation to demonstrate the validity of this method in the flat-sky approximation when adapted to take into account arbitrary coverage of the uv-plane, mode-mode correlations due to observations on a finite patch, and heteroschedastic visibility errors. The computational requirements scale as O(n{sub p} log n{sub p}) where n{sub p} measures the ratio of the size of the detector array to the inter-detector spacing, meaning that Gibbs sampling is a promising technique for meeting the data analysis requirements of future cosmology missions.

Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D. [Department of Physics, 1110 West Green Street, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Malu, Siddarth S. [Raman Research Institute, C V Raman Avenue, Bangalore 560080 (India)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Computations of the Response of a Wave Spectrum to a Sudden Change in Wind Direction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of a wind-sea spectrum to a step function change in wind direction is investigated theoretically for a sequence of direction changes ranging from 30° to 180°, in increments of 30°. Two spectral energy balance models are used: the ...

I. R. Young; S. Hasselmann; K. Hasselmann

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Impact induced response spectrum for the safety evaluation of the high flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamic impact to the nearby HFIR reactor vessel caused by heavy load drop is analyzed. The impact calculation is carried out by applying the ABAQUS computer code. An impact-induced response spectrum is constructed in order to evaluate whether the HFIR vessel and the shutdown mechanism may be disabled. For the frequency range less than 10 Hz, the maximum spectral velocity of impact is approximately equal to that of the HFIR seismic design-basis spectrum. For the frequency range greater than 10 Hz, the impact-induced response spectrum is shown to cause no effect to the control rod and the shutdown mechanism. An earlier seismic safety assessment for the HFIR control and shutdown mechanism was made by EQE. Based on EQE modal solution that is combined with the impact-induced spectrum, it is concluded that the impact will not cause any damage to the shutdown mechanism, even while the reactor is in operation. The present method suggests a general approach for evaluating the impact induced damage to the reactor by applying the existing finite element modal solution that has been carried out for the seismic evaluation of the reactor.

Chang, S.J.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

THE SPECTRUM AND TERM ANALYSIS OF V II  

SciTech Connect

The spectrum and extended term analysis of V II are presented. Fourier transform spectrometry was used to record high resolution spectra of singly ionized vanadium in the region 1492-5800 A (67020-17260 cm{sup -1}) with vanadium-neon and vanadium-argon hollow cathode lamps as sources. The wavenumber uncertainty for the center of gravity of the strongest lines is typically 0.002 cm{sup -1}, an improvement of an order of magnitude over previous measurements. Most of the lines exhibit partly resolved hyperfine structure. The V II energy levels in the 1985 compilation of Sugar and Corliss have been confirmed and revised, with the exception of the high-lying 4f levels and eight of the lower levels. Thirty-nine of the additional eighty-five high levels published by Iglesias et al. have also been confirmed and revised, and three of their missing levels have been found. The energy uncertainty of the revised levels has been reduced by about an order of magnitude. In total, 176 even levels and 233 odd levels are presented. Wavenumbers and classifications are given for 1242 V II lines.

Thorne, A. P.; Pickering, J. C.; Semeniuk, J. I., E-mail: j.pickering@imperial.ac.uk [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Analysis of the Pebble-Bed VHTR Spectrum Shifting Capabilities for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-cooled nuclear reactors have been receiving specific attention for Generation IV possibilities due to desired characteristics such as relatively low cost, short construction period, and inherent safety. Attractive inherent characteristics include an inert, single phase helium coolant, refractory coated fuel with high temperature capability and low fission product release, and graphite moderator with high temperature stability and long response times. The passively safe design has a relatively low power density, annular core, large negative temperature coefficient, and passive decay heat removal system. The objective of the U.S. DOE NERI Project is to assess the possibility, advantages and limitations of achieving ultra-long life VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) configurations by utilizing minor actinides as a fuel component. The present analysis takes into consideration and compares capabilities of pebble-bed core designs with various core and reflector configuration to allow spectrum shifting for advanced actinide fuels. Whole-core 3D models for pebble-bed design with multi-heterogeneity treatments in SCALE 5.0 are developed to compare computational results with experiments. Obtained results are in agreement with the available HTR-10 data. By altering the moderator to fuel ratio, a shift in the spectrum is observed. The use of minor actinides as fuel components relies on spectrum shifting capabilities. Actinide fueled VHTR configurations reveal promising performance. With an optimized pebble-bed model, the spectrum shifting abilities are apparent and effects of altered moderator to fuel ratio, and Dancoff factor are investigated. This will lead to a facilitated development of new fuel cycles in support of future operation of Generation IV nuclear energy systems.

Pritchard, Megan; Tsvetkov, Pavel

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

Analysis of Pebble-Bed VHTR Spectrum Shifting Capabilities for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-cooled nuclear reactors have been receiving specific attention for Generation IV possibilities due to desired characteristics such as relatively low cost, short construction period, and inherent safety. Attractive inherent characteristics include an inert, single phase helium coolant, refractory coated fuel with high temperature capability and low fission product release, and graphite moderator with high temperature stability and long response times. The passively safe design has a relatively low power density, annular core, large negative temperature coefficient, and passive decay heat removal system. The objective of the U.S. DOE NERI Project is to assess the possibility, advantages and limitations of achieving ultra-long life VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) configurations by utilizing minor actinides as a fuel component. The present analysis takes into consideration and compares capabilities of pebble-bed core designs with various core and reflector configuration to allow spectrum shifting for advanced actinide fuels. Whole-core 3D models for pebble-bed design with multi-heterogeneity treatments in SCALE 5.0 are developed to compare computational results with experiments. Obtained results are in agreement with the available HTR-10 data. By altering the moderator to fuel ratio, a shift in the spectrum is observed. The use of minor actinides as fuel components relies on spectrum shifting capabilities. Actinide fueled VHTR configurations reveal promising performance. With an optimized pebble-bed model, the spectrum shifting abilities are apparent and effects of altered moderator to fuel ratio, and Dancoff factor are investigated. This will lead to a facilitated development of new fuel cycles in support of future operation of Generation IV nuclear energy systems.

Pritchard, Megan

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

15

Power Spectrum Analysis of the ESP Galaxy Redshift Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the power spectrum of the galaxy distribution in the ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey. We develope a technique to describe the survey window function analytically, and then deconvolve it from the measured power spectrum using a variant of the Lucy method. We test the whole deconvolution procedure on ESP mock catalogues drawn from large N-body simulations, and find that it is reliable for recovering the correct amplitude and shape of $P(k)$ at $k> 0.065 h$ Mpc$^{-1}$. In general, the technique is applicable to any survey composed by a collection of circular fields with arbitrary pattern on the sky, as typical of surveys based on fibre spectrographs. The estimated power spectrum has a well-defined power-law shape $k^n$ with $n\\simeq -2.2$ for $k\\ge 0.2 h$ Mpc$^{-1}$, and a smooth bend to a flatter shape ($n\\simeq -1.6$) for smaller $k$'s. The smallest wavenumber, where a meaningful reconstruction can be performed ($k\\sim 0.06 h$ Mpc$^{-1}$), does not allow us to explore the range of scales where other power spectra seem to show a flattening and hints for a turnover. We also find, by direct comparison of the Fourier transforms, that the estimate of the two-point correlation function $\\xi(s)$ is much less sensitive to the effect of a problematic window function as that of the ESP, than the power spectrum. Comparison to other surveys shows an excellent agreement with estimates from blue-selected surveys. In particular, the ESP power spectrum is virtually indistinguishable from that of the Durham-UKST survey over the common range of $k$'s, an indirect confirmation of the quality of the deconvolution technique applied.

E. Carretti; C. Bertoni; A. Messina; E. Zucca; L. Guzzo

2000-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

16

Extraction and Synchronization of BOLD Spontaneous Oscillations Using Singular Spectrum Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spontaneous cerebral blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) fluctuations are gaining interest in the neurophysiology community. These oscillations are prominent in the low-frequency range with spatiotemporal correlations. From a healthy individual, ... Keywords: BOLD signal, fMRI, singular spectrum analysis

Danilo Menicucci; Angelo Gemignani; Andrea Piarulli; Remo Bedini; Claudio Gentili; Giacomo Handjaras; Sabrina Danti; Mario Guazzelli; Marco Laurino; Paolo Piaggi; Alberto Landi

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Fourier Spectrum Analysis of the New Solar Neutrino Capture Rate Data for the Homestake Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper provides results of the Fourier spectrum analysis of the new Ar-37 production rate data of the Homestake solar neutrino experiment and compares them with results for earlier data, revealing the harmonic content in the Ar-37 production in the Homestake experiment.

H. J. Haubold

1996-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

18

Update of the solar neutrino oscillation analysis with the 766 Ty KamLAND spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the impact of the 766.3 Ty KamLAND spectrum data on the determination of the solar neutrino oscillation parameters. We show that the observed spectrum distortion in the KamLAND experiment firmly establishes $\\Delta m^2_{21}$ to lie in the low-LMA solution region. The high-LMA solution is excluded at more than 4$\\sigma$ by the global solar neutrino and KamLAND spectrum data. The maximal solar neutrino mixing is ruled out at $6\\sigma$ level. The $3\\sigma$ allowed region in the $\\Delta m^2_{21}-\\sin^2\\theta_{12}$ plane is found to be remarkably stable with respect to leaving out the data from one of the solar neutrino experiments from the global analysis. We perform a three flavor neutrino oscillation analysis of the global solar neutrino and KamLAND spectrum data as well. The $3\\sigma$ upper limit on $\\sin^2\\theta_{13}$ is found to be $ \\sin^2\\theta_{13} solar neutrino oscillation parameters are also discussed.

Abhijit Bandyopadhyay; Sandhya Choubey; Srubabati Goswami; S. T. Petcov; D. P. Roy

2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

19

Evidences of high energy protons with energies beyond 0.4 GeV in the solar particle spectrum as responsible for the cosmic rays solar diurnal anisotropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis on the daily variations of cosmic ray muons with $E_{\\mu}\\geq 0.2 GeV$ based on the data of two directional muon telescopes at sea level and with a rigidity of response to cosmic proton spectrum above 0.4 GV is presented. The analysis covers two months of observations and in 60% of days, abrupt transitions between a low to a high muon intensity and vice-verse is observed, the period of high muon intensity is from $\\sim 8.0h$ up to $\\sim 19.0h$ (local time) and coincides with the period when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines overtake the Earth. This behavior strongly suggest that the high muon intensity is due to a contribution of solar protons (ions) on the muon intensity produced by the galactic cosmic rays, responsible for the low muon intensity. This implies that the solar particle spectrum extends to energies beyond 1 GeV. We show that this picture can explain the solar daily variation origin, and it is a most accurate scenario than the assumption of corotating galactic cosmic ray with the IMF lines, specially in the high rigidity region. Obtained results are consistent with the data reported in others papers. Some aspects on the sensitivity of our muon telescopes are also presented.

C. E. Navia; C. R. A. Augusto; M. B. Robba; K. H. Tsui

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

20

Evidences of high energy protons with energies beyond 0.4 GeV in the solar particle spectrum as responsible for the cosmic rays solar diurnal anisotropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis on the daily variations of cosmic ray muons with $E_{\\mu}\\geq 0.2 GeV$ based on the data of two directional muon telescopes at sea level and with a rigidity of response to cosmic proton spectrum above 0.4 GV is presented. The analysis covers two months of observations and in 60% of days, abrupt transitions between a low to a high muon intensity and vice-verse is observed, the period of high muon intensity is from $\\sim 8.0h$ up to $\\sim 19.0h$ (local time) and coincides with the period when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines overtake the Earth. This behavior strongly suggest that the high muon intensity is due to a contribution of solar protons (ions) on the muon intensity produced by the galactic cosmic rays, responsible for the low muon intensity. This implies that the solar particle spectrum extends to energies beyond 1 GeV. We show that this picture can explain the solar daily variation origin, and it is a most accurate scenario than the assumption of corotating galactic cosmic ray wit...

Navia, C E; Robba, M B; Tsui, K H

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The variable X-ray spectrum of Markarian 766 - I. Principal components analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims: We analyse a long XMM-Newton spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 766, using the marked spectral variability on timescales >20ks to separate components in the X-ray spectrum. Methods: Principal components analysis is used to identify distinct emission components in the X-ray spectrum, possible alternative physical models for those components are then compared statistically. Results: The source spectral variability is well-explained by additive variations, with smaller extra contributions most likely arising from variable absorption. The principal varying component, eigenvector one, is found to have a steep (photon index 2.4) power-law shape, affected by a low column of ionised absorption that leads to the appearance of a soft excess. Eigenvector one varies by a factor 10 in amplitude on time-scales of days and appears to have broad ionised Fe K-alpha emission associated with it: the width of the ionised line is consistent with an origin at about 100 gravitational radii. There is also a strong component of near-constant emission that dominates in the low state, whose spectrum is extremely hard above 1 keV, with a soft excess at lower energies, and with a strong edge at Fe K but remarkably little Fe K-alpha emission. Although this component may be explained as relativistically-blurred reflection from the inner accretion disc, we suggest that its spectrum and lack of variability may alternatively be explained as either (i) ionised reflection from an extended region, possibly a disc wind, or (ii) a signature of absorption by a disc wind with a variable covering fraction. Absorption features in the low state may indicate the presence of an outflow.

L. Miller; T. J. Turner; J. N. Reeves; I. M. George; S. B. Kraemer; B. Wingert

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

22

SPECTRUM analysis of multispectral imagery in conjunction with wavelet/KLT data compression  

SciTech Connect

The data analysis program, SPECTRUM, is used for fusion, visualization, and classification of multi-spectral imagery. The raw data used in this study is Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) 7-channel imagery, with 8 bits of dynamic range per channel. To facilitate data transmission and storage, a compression algorithm is proposed based on spatial wavelet transform coding and KLT decomposition of interchannel spectral vectors, followed by adaptive optimal multiband scalar quantization. The performance of SPECTRUM clustering and visualization is evaluated on compressed multispectral data. 8-bit visualizations of 56-bit data show little visible distortion at 50:1 compression and graceful degradation at higher compression ratios. Two TM images were processed in this experiment: a 1024 x 1024-pixel scene of the region surrounding the Chernobyl power plant, taken a few months before the reactor malfunction, and a 2048 x 2048 image of Moscow and surrounding countryside.

Bradley, J.N.; Brislawn, C.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

2008-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response Opportunities in California Industry Title 2008-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response Opportunities in California...

24

Testing and forecasting the time series of the solar activity by singular spectrum analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To study and forecast the solar activity data a quite perspective method of singular spectrum analysis (SSA) is proposed. As known, data of the solar activity are usually presented via the Wolf numbers associated with the effective amount of the sunspots. The advantages and disadvantages of SSA are described by its application to the series of the Wolf numbers. It is shown that the SSA method provides a sufficiently high reliability in the description of the 11-year solar cycle. Moreover, this method is appropriate for revealing more long cycles and forecasting the further solar activity during one and a half of 11-year cycle.

A. Loskutov; I. A. Istomin; K. M. Kuzanyan; O. L. Kotlyarov

2000-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

25

Time Variations of the Superkamiokande Solar Neutrino Flux Data by Rayleigh Power Spectrum Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used the Rayleigh Power Spectrum Analysis of the solar neutrino flux data from 1) 5-day-long samples from Super-Kamiokande-I detector during the period from June, 1996 to July, 2001; 2) 10 -day-long samples from the same detector during the same period and (3) 45-day long from the same detector during the same period. According to our analysis (1) gives periodicities around 0.25, 23.33, 33.75 and 42.75 months; (2) exhibits periodicities around 0.5, 1.0, 28.17, 40.67 and 52.5 months and (3) shows periodicities around 16.5 and 28.5 months. We have found almost similar periods in the solar flares, sunspot data, solar proton data.

Koushik Ghosh; Probhas Raychaudhuri

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

26

AMI Communication Requirements to Implement Demand-Response: Applicability of Hybrid Spread Spectrum Wireless  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While holistically defining the smart grid is a challenge, one area of interest is demand-response. In 2009, the Department of Energy announced over $4 billion in grant and project funding for the Smart Grid. A significant amount of this funding was allotted to utilities for cost sharing projects to deploy Smart Grid technologies, many of whom have deployed and are deploying advanced metering infrastructure (AMI). AMI is an enabler to increase the efficiency of utilities and the bulk power grid. The bulk electrical system is unique in that it produces electricity as it is consumed. Most other industries have a delay between generation and consumption. This aspect of the power grid means that there must be enough generation capacity to meet the highest demand whereas other industries could over produce during off-peak times. This requires significant investment in generation capacity to cover the few days a year of peak consumption. Since bulk electrical storage doesn't yet exist at scale another way to curb the need for new peak period generation is through demand-response; that is to incentivize consumers (demand) to curtail (respond) electrical usage during peak periods. Of the various methods proposed for enabling demand-response, this paper will focus on the communication requirements for creating an energy market using transactional controls. More specifically, the paper will focus on the communication requirements needed to send the peak period notices and receive the response back from the consumers.

Hadley, Mark D.; Clements, Samuel L.; Carroll, Thomas E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

27

Design and Analysis of Hybrid Solar Lighting and Full-Spectrum Solar Energy Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a systems-level design and analysis of a new approach for improving the energy efficiency and affordability of solar energy in buildings, namely, hybrid solar lighting and full-spectrum solar energy systems. By using different portions of the solar spectrum simultaneously for multiple end-use applications in buildings, the proposed system offers unique advantages over other alternatives for using sunlight to displace electricity (conventional topside daylighting and solar technologies). Our preliminary work indicates that hybrid solar lighting, a method of collecting and distributing direct sunlight for lighting purposes, will alleviate many of the problems with passive daylighting systems of today, such as spatial and temporal variability, glare, excess illumination, cost, and energy efficiency. Similarly, our work suggests that the most appropriate use of the visible portion of direct, nondiffuse sunlight from an energy-savings perspective is to displace electric light rather than generate electricity. Early estimates detailed in this paper suggest an anticipated system cost of well under $2.0/Wp and 5-11 {cents}/kWh for displaced and generated electricity in single-story commercial building applications. Based on a number of factors discussed in the paper, including sunlight availability, building use scenarios, time-of-day electric utility rates, cost, and efficacy of the displaced electric lights, the simple payback of this approach in many applications could eventually be well under 5 years.

Muhs, J.D.

2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

28

Solar Neutrino Rates, Spectrum, and its Moments : an MSW Analysis in the Light of Super-Kamiokande Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We re-examine MSW solutions of the solar neutrino problem in a two flavor scenario taking (a) the results on total rates and the electron energy spectrum from the 1117-day SuperKamiokande (SK) data and (b) those on total rates from the Chlorine and Gallium experiments. We find that the SMA solution gives the best fit to the total rates data from the different experiments. One new feature of our analysis is the use of the moments of the SK electron spectrum in a $\\chi^2$ analysis. The best-fit to the moments is broadly in agreement with that obtained from a direct fit to the spectrum data and prefers a $\\Delta m^2$ comparable to the SMA fit to the rates but the required mixing angle is larger. In the combined rate and spectrum analysis, apart from varying the normalization of the $^8$B flux as a free parameter and determining its best-fit value we also obtain the best-fit parameters when correlations between the rates and the spectrum data are included and the normalization of the $^8$B flux held fixed at its SSM value. We observe that the correlations between the rates and spectrum data are important and the goodness of fit worsens when these are included. In either case, the best-fit lies in the LMA region.

Srubabati Goswami; Debasish Majumdar; Amitava Raychaudhuri

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

29

Spectrum shape-analysis techniques applied to the Hanford Tank Farms spectral gamma logs  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-ray spectra acquired with high-energy resolution by the spectral gamma logging systems (SGLSs) at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Tank Farms, Richland, Washington, are being analyzed for spectral shape characteristics. These spectral shapes, together with a conventional peak-area analysis, enable an analyst not only to identify the gamma-emitting species but also to determine in many instances its spatial distribution around a borehole and to identify the presence of the bremsstrahlung-producing contaminant {sup 90}Sr. The analysis relies primarily on the results of computer simulations of gamma spectra from the predominant radionuclide {sup 137}Cs for various spatial distributions. This log analysis methodology has evolved through an examination of spectral features from spectral logs taken at the SX, BY, and U Tank Farms at the Hanford Site. Initial results determined with this technique show it is possible, in most cases, to distinguish between concentrations of {sup 137}Cs. Work is continuing by experimentally measuring shape factors, incorporating spectrum shape processing in routine log analysis, and extending the techniques to additional radionuclides.

Wilson, R.D.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Response Predicting LTCC Firing Shrinkage: A Response Surface Analysis Study  

SciTech Connect

The Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) technology is used in a variety of applications including military/space electronics, wireless communication, MEMS, medical and automotive electronics. The use of LTCC is growing due to the low cost of investment, short development time, good electrical and mechanical properties, high reliability, and flexibility in design integration (3 dimensional (3D) microstructures with cavities are possible)). The dimensional accuracy of the resulting x/y shrinkage of LTCC substrates is responsible for component assembly problems with the tolerance effect that increases in relation to the substrate size. Response Surface Analysis was used to predict product shrinkage based on specific process inputs (metal loading, layer count, lamination pressure, and tape thickness) with the ultimate goal to optimize manufacturing outputs (NC files, stencils, and screens) in achieving the final product design the first time. Three (3) regression models were developed for the DuPont 951 tape system with DuPont 5734 gold metallization based on green tape thickness.

Girardi, Michael; Barner, Gregg; Lopez, Cristie; Duncan, Brent; Zawicki, Larry

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

31

Fluorescence spectrum analysis using Fourier series modeling for Fluorescein solution in Ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured the fluorescence spectrum for fluorescein solution in ethanol with concentration 1 {\\times} 10-3 mol/liter at different temperatures from room temperature to freezing point of solvent, (T = 153, 183, 223, 253, and 303 K) using liquid nitrogen. Table curve 2D version 5.01 program has been used to determine the fitting curve and fitting equation for each fluorescence spectrum. Fourier series (3 {\\times} 2) was the most suitable fitting equation for all spectra. Theoretical fluorescence spectrum of fluorescein in ethanol at T = 183K was calculated and compared with experimental fluorescence spectrum at the same temperature. There is a good similarity between them.

Hadi, Mahasin F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Cosmic microwave background constraints on dark energy dynamics: analysis beyond the power spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the distribution of the non-Gaussian signal induced by weak lensing on the primary total intensity cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. Our study focuses on the three point statistics exploiting an harmonic analysis based on the CMB bispectrum. By considering the three multipoles as independent variables, we reveal a complex structure of peaks and valleys determined by the re-projection of the primordial acoustic oscillations through the lensing mechanism. We study the dependence of this system on the expansion rate at the epoch in which the weak lensing power injection is relevant, probing the dark energy equation of state at redshift corresponding to the equivalence with matter or higher ($w_\\infty$). We evaluate the impact of the bispectrum observable on the CMB capability of constraining the dark energy dynamics. We perform a maximum likelihood analysis by varying the dark energy abundance, the present equation of state $w_0$ and $w_\\infty$. We show that the projection degeneracy affecting a pure power spectrum analysis in total intensity is broken if the bispectrum is taken into account. For a Planck-like experiment, assuming nominal performance, no foregrounds or systematics, and fixing all the parameters except $w_0$, $w_\\infty$ and the dark energy abundance, a percent and ten percent precision measure of $w_0$ and $w_\\infty$ is achievable from CMB data only. These results indicate that the detection of the weak lensing signal by the forthcoming CMB probes may be relevant to gain insight into the dark energy dynamics at the onset of cosmic acceleration.

Fabio Giovi; Carlo Baccigalupi; Francesca Perrotta

2004-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

33

Power Spectrum Analysis of Mount-Wilson Solar Diameter Measurements: Evidence for Solar Internal R-mode Oscillations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents a power-spectrum analysis of 39,024 measurements of the solar diameter made at the Mount Wilson Observatory from 1968.670 to 1997.965. This power spectrum contains a number of very strong peaks. We find that eight of these peaks agree closely with the frequencies of r-mode oscillations for a region of the Sun where the sidereal rotation frequency is 12.08 year$^{-1}$. We estimate that there is less than one chance in ten to the sixth power of finding this pattern by chance.

Sturrock, Peter A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

On Determining the Spectrum of Primordial Inhomogeneity from the COBE DMR Sky Maps: II. Results of Two Year Data Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new technique of Fourier analysis on a cut sky (Gorski, 1994) has been applied to the two year COBE DMR sky maps. The Bayesian power spectrum estimation results are consistent with the Harrison-Zel'dovich n=1 model. The maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters of the power spectrum of primordial perturbations are n=1.22 (1.02) and Q_{rms-PS}=17 (20) uK including (excluding) the quadrupole anisotropy. The marginal likelihood function on n renders n=1.10 \\pm 0.32 (0.87 \\pm 0.36).

K. M. Gorski; G. Hinshaw; A. J. Banday; C. L. Bennett; E. L. Wright; A. Kogut; G. F. Smoot; P. Lubin

1994-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

ALS Spectrum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectrum Print Begun in 2007, ALS Spectrum is a publication that encapsulates the same type of information contained in the ALS Activity Report but in a short, readable,...

36

Power-spectrum analysis of Super-Kamiokande solar neutrino data, taking into account asymmetry in the error estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is to carry out a power-spectrum analysis (based on likelihood methods) of the Super-Kamiokande 5-day dataset that takes account of the asymmetry in the error estimates. Whereas the likelihood analysis involves a linear optimization procedure for symmetrical error estimates, it involves a nonlinear optimization procedure for asymmetrical error estimates. We find that for most frequencies there is little difference between the power spectra derived from analyses of symmetrized error estimates and from asymmetrical error estimates. However, this proves not to be the case for the principal peak in the power spectra, which is found at 9.43 yr-1. A likelihood analysis which allows for a "floating offset" and takes account of the start time and end time of each bin and of the flux estimate and the symmetrized error estimate leads to a power of 11.24 for this peak. A Monte Carlo analysis shows that there is a chance of only 1% of finding a peak this big or bigger in the frequency band 1 - 36 yr-1 (the widest band that avoids artificial peaks). On the other hand, an analysis that takes account of the error asymmetry leads to a peak with power 13.24 at that frequency. A Monte Carlo analysis shows that there is a chance of only 0.1% of finding a peak this big or bigger in that frequency band 1 - 36 yr-1. From this perspective, power spectrum analysis that takes account of asymmetry of the error estimates gives evidence for variability that is significant at the 99.9% level. We comment briefly on an apparent discrepancy between power spectrum analyses of the Super-Kamiokande and SNO solar neutrino experiments.

P. A. Sturrock; J. D. Scargle

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Strong-coupling analysis of QED{sub 3} for excitation spectrum broadening in the undoped high-temperature superconductors  

SciTech Connect

Theory of quantum electrodynamics in three spatial-time dimensions is applied to the two-dimensional S=1/2 quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet in order to investigate a doped hole in high-temperature superconductors. Strong coupling analysis of the U(1) gauge field interaction is carried out to describe spectral broadening observed in the undoped compounds. It is found that the fermionic quasiparticle spectrum is of Gaussian form with the width about 3J, with J being the superexchange interaction energy. The energy shift of the spectrum is on the order of the quasiparticle bandwidth, which suggests that the system is in the strong coupling regime with respect to the gauge field interaction describing the phase fluctuations about the {pi}-flux state.

Morinari, T. [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

ALS Spectrum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS Spectrum Print Begun in 2007, ALS Spectrum is a publication that encapsulates the same type of information contained in the ALS Activity Report but in a short, readable,...

39

Review of Methods of Power-Spectrum Analysis as Applied to Super-Kamiokande Solar Neutrino Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To help understand why different published analyses of the Super-Kamiokande solar neutrino data arrive at different conclusions, we have applied six different methods to a standardized problem. The key difference between the various methods rests in the amount of information that each processes. A Lomb-Scargle analysis that uses the mid times of the time bins and ignores experimental error estimates uses the least information. A likelihood analysis that uses the start times, end times, and mean live times, and takes account of the experimental error estimates, makes the greatest use of the available information. We carry out power-spectrum analyses of the Super-Kamiokande 5-day solar neutrino data, using each method in turn, for a standard search band (0 to 50 yr-1). For each method, we also carry out a fixed number (10,000) of Monte-Carlo simulations for the purpose of estimating the significance of the leading peak in each power spectrum. We find that, with one exception, the results of these calculations are compatible with those of previously published analyses. (We are unable to replicate Koshio's recent results.) We find that the significance of the peaks at 9.43 yr-1 and at 43.72 yr-1 increases progressively as one incorporates more information into the analysis procedure.

P. A. Sturrock

2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

40

Analysis of Distribution Level Residential Demand Response  

SciTech Connect

Control of end use loads has existed in the form of direct load control for decades. Direct load control systems allow a utility to interrupt power to a medium to large size commercial or industrial customer a set number of times a year. With the current proliferation of computing resources and communications systems the ability to extend the direct load control systems now exists. Demand response systems now have the ability to not only engage commercial and industrial customers, but also the individual residential customers. Additionally, the ability exists to have automated control systems which operate on a continual basis instead of the traditional load control systems which could only be operated a set number of times a year. These emerging demand response systems have the capability to engage a larger portion of the end use load and do so in a more controlled manner. This paper will examine the impact that demand response systems have on the operation of an electric power distribution system.

Schneider, Kevin P.; Fuller, Jason C.; Chassin, David P.

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Analysis of Timescales of Response of a Simple Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed analysis is made of various analytic solutions to a 0D climate model coupled to an upwelling diffusion ocean model. In particular, the responses to impulse, step-function, exponential, and linear forcings are addressed. The coupled ...

Robert E. Dickinson; Kimberly J. Schaudt

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources Speaker(s): Johanna Mathieu Date: April 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Sila...

43

Beyond Design Basis Events Analysis and Response Information | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Beyond Design Basis Events Analysis Beyond Design Basis Events Analysis and Response Information Beyond Design Basis Events Analysis and Response Information September 19-20, 2012 Beyond Design Basis Events Analysis and Response Information DOE's Safety Bulletin No. 2011-01, Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis, March 2011 DOE's Nuclear Safety Workshop Newsletter, June 2011 2011 Nuclear Safety Workshop Presentations, June 2011 Transmittal Memorandum, Report on Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events, September 2011 Review of Requirements and Capabilities for Analyzing and Responding to Beyond Design Basis Events, August 2011 NRC Report - Recommendations for Enhancing Reactor Safety in the 21st Century; The Near-Term Task Force Review of Insights from the

44

Singular Spectrum Analysis of Nonstationary Tidal Currents Applied to ADCP Data from the Northeast Brazilian Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of new tools for the analysis of nonstationary currents, including tidal currents, has been the subject of recent research. In this work a method for studies of nonstationary barotropic or baroclinic currents based on empirical ...

Marcio L. Vianna; Viviane V. Menezes

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Prediction of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation based on non-linear analysis and spectrum and bispectrum features of the heart rate variability signal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an effective paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) prediction algorithm is presented, which is based on analysis of the heart rate variability (HRV) signal. The proposed method consists of a preprocessing step for QRS detection and HRV ... Keywords: Bispectrum, Heart rate variability, Non-linear analysis, Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, Prediction, Spectrum, Support vector machines

Maryam Mohebbi; Hassan Ghassemian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Perspective on Beyond Design Basis Event Analysis and Response | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Perspective on Beyond Design Basis Event Analysis and Response Perspective on Beyond Design Basis Event Analysis and Response Perspective on Beyond Design Basis Event Analysis and Response September 20, 2012 Presenter: John Schwenker, Nuclear Safety Manager for Liquid Operations, Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Site Topics Covered: Waste Tanks can contain up to 1.3 Millions Gallons of highly radioactive waste (sludge, salt, supernate). Type III/IIIA Waste Tank Structures and berms are PC-3 Qualified. Tanks may fail in a Beyond Design Basis Seismic Event. Waste could flow above ground to streams and rivers. Unmitigated Tank Explosion exceeds offsite Evaluation Guidelines Hydrogen gas can be trapped in the sludge and saltcake structure. Seismic Event can cause a prompt release of trapped hydrogen. It is not physically practical to install a ventilation system that

47

Power Spectrum Analysis of Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Decay-Rate Data: Evidence for Solar Rotational Modulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence for an anomalous annual periodicity in certain nuclear decay data has led to speculation concerning a possible solar influence on nuclear processes. We have recently analyzed data concerning the decay rates of Cl-36 and Si-32, acquired at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), to search for evidence that might be indicative of a process involving solar rotation. Smoothing of the power spectrum by weighted-running-mean analysis leads to a significant peak at frequency 11.18/yr, which is lower than the equatorial synodic rotation rates of the convection and radiative zones. This article concerns measurements of the decay rates of Ra-226 acquired at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. We find that a similar (but not identical) analysis yields a significant peak in the PTB dataset at frequency 11.21/yr, and a peak in the BNL dataset at 11.25/yr. The change in the BNL result is not significant since the uncertainties in the BNL and PTB analyses are estimated to be 0.13/yr and 0.07/yr, respectively. Combining the two running means by forming the joint power statistic leads to a highly significant peak at frequency 11.23/yr. We comment briefly on the possible implications of these results for solar physics and for particle physics.

P. A. Sturrock; J. B. Buncher; E. Fischbach; J. T. Gruenwald; D. Javorsek II; J. H. Jenkins; R. H. Lee; J. J. Mattes; J. R. Newport

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

48

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources Speaker(s): Johanna Mathieu Date: April 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Sila Kiliccote While the traditional goal of an electric power system has been to control supply to fulfill demand, the demand-side can play an active role in power systems via Demand Response (DR). Recent DR programs have focused on peak load reduction in commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities). We present a regression-based baseline model, which allows us to quantify DR performance. We use this baseline model to understand the performance of C&I facilities participating in an automated dynamic pricing DR program in California. In this program, facilities are

49

Broad spectrum solar cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alloy having a large band gap range is used in a multijunction solar cell to enhance utilization of the solar energy spectrum. In one embodiment, the alloy is In.sub.1-xGa.sub.xN having an energy bandgap range of approximately 0.7 eV to 3.4 eV, providing a good match to the solar energy spectrum. Multiple junctions having different bandgaps are stacked to form a solar cell. Each junction may have different bandgaps (realized by varying the alloy composition), and therefore be responsive to different parts of the spectrum. The junctions are stacked in such a manner that some bands of light pass through upper junctions to lower junctions that are responsive to such bands.

Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA); Wu, Junqiao (Richmond, CA); Schaff, William J. (Ithaca, NY)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

PINS Spectrum Identification Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy—PINS, for short—system identifies the chemicals inside munitions and containers without opening them, a decided safety advantage if the fill chemical is a hazardous substance like a chemical warfare agent or an explosive. The PINS Spectrum Identification Guide is intended as a reference for technical professionals responsible for the interpretation of PINS gamma-ray spectra. The guide is divided into two parts. The three chapters that constitute Part I cover the science and technology of PINS. Neutron activation analysis is the focus of Chapter 1. Chapter 2 explores PINS hardware, software, and related operational issues. Gamma-ray spectral analysis basics are introduced in Chapter 3. The six chapters of Part II cover the identification of PINS spectra in detail. Like the PINS decision tree logic, these chapters are organized by chemical element: phosphorus-based chemicals, chlorine-based chemicals, etc. These descriptions of hazardous, toxic, and/or explosive chemicals conclude with a chapter on the identification of the inert chemicals, e.g. sand, used to fill practice munitions.

A.J. Caffrey

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Assessing the Performance of an Ensemble Forecast System in Predicting the Magnitude and the Spectrum of Analysis and Forecast Uncertainties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of an ensemble to capture the magnitude and spectrum of uncertainty in a local linear space spanned by the ensemble perturbations is assessed. Numerical experiments are carried out with a reduced resolution 2004 version of the model ...

Elizabeth Satterfield; Istvan Szunyogh

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Cambio : a file format translation and analysis application for the nuclear response emergency community.  

SciTech Connect

Cambio is an application intended to automatically read and display any spectrum file of any format in the world that the nuclear emergency response community might encounter. Cambio also provides an analysis capability suitable for HPGe spectra when detector response and scattering environment are not well known. Why is Cambio needed: (1) Cambio solves the following problem - With over 50 types of formats from instruments used in the field and new format variations appearing frequently, it is impractical for every responder to have current versions of the manufacturer's software from every instrument used in the field; (2) Cambio converts field spectra to any one of several common formats that are used for analysis, saving valuable time in an emergency situation; (3) Cambio provides basic tools for comparing spectra, calibrating spectra, and isotope identification with analysis suited especially for HPGe spectra; and (4) Cambio has a batch processing capability to automatically translate a large number of archival spectral files of any format to one of several common formats, such as the IAEA SPE or the DHS N42. Currently over 540 analysts and members of the nuclear emergency response community worldwide are on the distribution list for updates to Cambio. Cambio users come from all levels of government, university, and commercial partners around the world that support efforts to counter terrorist nuclear activities. Cambio is Unclassified Unlimited Release (UUR) and distributed by internet downloads with email notifications whenever a new build of Cambio provides for new formats, bug fixes, or new or improved capabilities. Cambio is also provided as a DLL to the Karlsruhe Institute for Transuranium Elements so that Cambio's automatic file-reading capability can be included at the Nucleonica web site.

Lasche, George P.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Power Spectrum Analysis of LMSU (Lomonosov Moscow State University) Nuclear Decay-Rate Data: Further Indication of r-Mode Oscillations in an Inner Solar Tachocline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents a power-spectrum analysis of 2,350 measurements of the $^{90}$Sr/$^{90}$Y decay process acquired over the interval 4 August 2002 to 6 February 2009 at the Lomonosov Moscow State University (LMSU). As we have found for other long sequences of decay measurements, the power spectrum is dominated by a very strong annual oscillation. However, we also find a set of low-frequency peaks, ranging from 0.26 year$^{-1}$ to 3.98 year$^{-1}$, which are very similar to an array of peaks in a power spectrum formed from Mt Wilson solar diameter measurements. The Mt Wilson measurements have been interpreted in terms of r-mode oscillations in a region where the sidereal rotation frequency is 12.08 year$^{-1}$. We find that the LMSU measurements may also be attributed to the same type of r-mode oscillations in a solar region with the same sidereal rotation frequency. We propose that these oscillations occur in an inner tachocline that separates the radiative zone from a more slowly rotating solar core.

Peter A. Sturrock; Alexander G. Parkhomov; Ephraim Fischbach; Jere H. Jenkins

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

54

Analysis of residual spectra and the monopole spectrum for 3 K blackbody radiation by means of non-extensive thermostatistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze residual spectra of 3 K blackbody radiation (CMB) using non-extensive thermostatistics with a parameter q-1. The limits of |q-1|<1.2x10^{-5} and the temperature fluctuation |delta T|<(1.6-4.3)x10^{-5} are smaller than those by Tsallis et al. Moreover, analyzing the monopole spectrum by a formula including the chemical potential mu, we obtain the limits |q-1|<2.3x10^{-5} and |mu|<1.6x10^{-4}. |q-1| is comparable with the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect y.

Minoru Biyajima; Takuya Mizoguchi

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

55

Analysis of residual spectra and the monopole spectrum for 3 K blackbody radiation by means of non-extensive thermostatistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze residual spectra of 3 K blackbody radiation (CMB) using non-extensive thermostatistics with a parameter q-1. The limits of |q-1|<1.2x10^{-5} and the temperature fluctuation |delta T|<(1.6-4.3)x10^{-5} are smaller than those by Tsallis et al. Moreover, analyzing the monopole spectrum by a formula including the chemical potential mu, we obtain the limits |q-1|<2.3x10^{-5} and |mu|<1.6x10^{-4}. |q-1| is comparable with the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect y.

Biyajima, Minoru

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comes to demand response is FERC is own worst enemy? Tech.9.1-2 (1986), pp. 5–18. [46] FERC. A national assessment of09-demand-response.pdf. [47] FERC. National action plan on

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A proteomic analysis of drought and salt stress responsive proteins of different sorghum varieties.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This study reports on a proteomic analysis of sorghum proteomes in response to salt and hyperosmotic stresses. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) in combination with… (more)

Ngara, Rudo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Risk decision analysis in emergency response: A method based on cumulative prospect theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency response of a disaster is generally a risk decision-making problem with multiple states. In emergency response analysis, it is necessary to consider decision-maker's (DM's) psychological behavior such as reference dependence, loss aversion ... Keywords: Cumulative prospect theory (CPT), Emergency response, Ranking, Risk decision-making

Yang Liu, Zhi-Ping Fan, Yao Zhang

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Built-In Self-Test of Field Programmable Analog Arrays based on Transient Response Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work a strategy for testing analog networks, known as Transient Response Analysis Method, is applied to test the Configurable Analog Blocks (CABs) of Field Programmable Analog Arrays (FPAAs). In this method the Circuit Under Test (CUT) is programmed ... Keywords: Analog built-in self-test, FPAA, Transient response analysis

T. R. Balen; J. V. Calvano; M. S. Lubaszewski; M. Renovell

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Analysis of Residential Demand Response and Double-Auction Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response and dynamic pricing programs are expected to play increasing roles in the modern Smart Grid environment. While direct load control of end-use loads has existed for decades, price driven response programs are only beginning to be explored at the distribution level. These programs utilize a price signal as a means to control demand. Active markets allow customers to respond to fluctuations in wholesale electrical costs, but may not allow the utility to control demand. Transactive markets, utilizing distributed controllers and a centralized auction can be used to create an interactive system which can limit demand at key times on a distribution system, decreasing congestion. With the current proliferation of computing and communication resources, the ability now exists to create transactive demand response programs at the residential level. With the combination of automated bidding and response strategies coupled with education programs and customer response, emerging demand response programs have the ability to reduce utility demand and congestion in a more controlled manner. This paper will explore the effects of a residential double-auction market, utilizing transactive controllers, on the operation of an electric power distribution system.

Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Chassin, David P.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Relations Between Job Analysis Questionnaire Responses and Incumbent Characteristics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? A properly conducted job analysis can aid in the development of selection tests, performance appraisals, job evaluations, compensation systems, and training programs. Federal court… (more)

Meredith, Ronnie

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Analysis of time response of lossy multiconductor transmission line networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract —Systems are considered consisting of an arbitrary number of multiconductor transmission lines joined and terminated by arbitrary linear networks. The fines are assumed to be Iossy, with frequency-dependent parameters. The system is analyzed in the frequency domain, and the inverse Fourier transform is used to obtain tbe time-domain response.

Antonije R. Djordjevic; Tapan; K. Sarkar; Senior Member

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Analysis of new experimental data on the {sup 160}Dy spectrum with the symplectic interacting vector boson model  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of the recently obtained experimental data for a lot of collective states of {sup 160}Dy is presented. Classification of the low-lying states with positive parity 0{sup +},2{sup +},4{sup +},6{sup +} is performed. The energies of rotational high-spin states of the ground, S,{gamma} and two negative-parity bands are described in the framework of the interacting vector boson model. The energies of the bands are reproduced with high accuracy using only one set of model parameters for all bands. A more detailed investigation of the results is performed by calculation and comparison with experiment of the high-order odd-even staggering effects between states from different pairs of bands.

Solnyshkin, A.A.; Burov, V.V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Garistov, V.P. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, BAS, Sofia (Bulgaria); Georgieva, A.; Ganev, H. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, BAS, Sofia (Bulgaria)

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Mesoscale Precipitation Fields. Part I: Statistical Analysis and Hydrologic Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical objective analysis (SOA) scheme was developed to adjust estimates of rainfall accumulation from the WSR-88D in central Oklahoma using rain gauge measurements from the Oklahoma Mesonetwork. Statistical parameters of these rainfall ...

Augusto J. Pereira Fo.Kenneth C. Crawford

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Time-domain Fatigue Response and Reliability Analysis of Offshore Wind Turbines with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-domain based simulation model of 750 kW land-based wind turbine Gear contact fatigue analysis of a wind of 750 kW land-based wind turbine Gear contact fatigue analysis of a wind turbine drive train under response and reliability analysis #12;Time domain based simulation model of 750 kW land-based wind turbine

Nørvåg, Kjetil

66

Europium-152 depth profile of a stone bridge pillar exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb: /sup 152/Eu activities for analysis of the neutron spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The /sup 152/Eu activity depth profile of a granite pillar of the Motoyasu bridge located 132 m from the Hiroshima atomic bomb hypocenter was assessed. The pillars each measured 82 cm in depth, 82 cm in width and 193 cm in height. One of the pillars was bored and 6.8-cm-diameter core samples were removed and cut into 2-cm-thick disks. Two gamma rays of /sup 152/Eu, 122 keV and 344 keV, in each disk were measured using a low background, gamma-ray spectrometer, and the activity distribution was determined as a function of depth in the granite. A concentration of stable Eu in the granite was determined by activation analysis. The specific radioactivity of /sup 152/Eu and /sup 154/Eu at the pillar surface was determined to have been 117 and 24 Bq per mg Eu, respectively, at the time of detonation. The value of /sup 152/Eu agrees within 20% of that calculated by Loewe. The depth profile of /sup 152/Eu in granite demonstrates a distinct difference from the estimates made only by thermal neutrons. Present data provide valuable information for the analysis of the neutron spectrum of the Hiroshima atomic bomb and its intensity.

Hasai, H.; Iwatani, K.; Shizuma, K.; Hoshi, M.; Yokoro, K.; Sawada, S.; Kosako, T.; Morishima, H.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Pulsar Emission Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emission spectrum is calculated for a weak axisymmetric pulsar. Also calculated are the observed spectrum, efficiency, and the observed efficiency. The underlying flow of electrons and positrons turns out to be curiously intricate.

Gruzinov, Andrei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Responsibilities for support of beam line controls, data acquisition, and data analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intra-Laboratory Memo Intra-Laboratory Memo ANL-26A (3-06) 2010 March 22 FROM: Pete R. Jemian, Group Leader, AES Beam line Controls and Data Acquisition SUBJECT: Responsibilities for support of beam line controls, data acquisition, and data analysis Responsibilities for support of beam line controls, data acquisition, and data analysis This document provides guidelines defining the responsibilities for the software and hardware support of controls, data acquisition, and data analysis at APS beam lines. It has been created in direct response to a specific question from one of the APS/XSD/XOR sectors but is generalized for all beam lines managed by APS/XSD/XOR. The following table lists the basic responsibilities. Brief descriptions of the activities are provided after the table.

69

Breaks in presence in virtual environments: An analysis of blood flow velocity responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the techniques used to monitor variations in presence during a virtual reality experience is the analysis of breaks in presence (BIPs). Previous studies have monitored peripheral physiological responses during BIPs in order to find a characteristic ...

Beatriz Rey; Vera Parkhutik; Mariano Alcañiz

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Proteome Analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi Response to Environmental Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examined global changes in protein expression in the B31 strain of Borrelia burgdorferi, in response to two environmental cues (pH and temperature) chosen for their reported similarity to those encountered at different stages of the organism’s life cycle. Multidimensional nano-liquid chromatographic separations coupled with tandem mass spectrometry were used to examine the array of proteins (i.e., the proteome) of B. burgdorferi for different pH and temperature culture conditions. Changes in pH and temperature elicited in vitro adaptations of this spirochete known to cause Lyme disease and led to alterations in protein expression that are associated with increased microbial pathogenesis. We identified 1031 proteins that represent 59% of the annotated genome of B. burgdorferi and elucidated a core proteome of 414 proteins that were present in all environmental conditions investigated. Observed changes in protein abundances indicated varied replicon usage, as well as proteome functional distributions between the in vitro cell culture conditions. Surprisingly, the pH and temperature conditions that mimicked B. burgdorferi residing in the gut of a fed tick showed a marked reduction in protein diversity. Additionally, the results provide us with leading candidates for exploring how B. burgdorferi adapts to and is able to survive in a wide variety of environmental conditions and lay a foundation for planned in situ studies of B. burgdorferi isolated from the tick midgut and infected animals.

Angel, Thomas E.; Luft, Benjamin J.; Yang, Xiaohua; Nicora, Carrie D.; Camp, David G.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

71

NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure describes the NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, which includes analysis and decision support, fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization and deployment. Through deep technical expertise and an unmatched breadth of capabilities, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) leads an integrated approach across the spectrum of renewable energy innovation. From scientific discovery to accelerating market deployment, NREL works in partnership with private industry to drive the transformation of our nation's energy systems. NREL integrates the entire spectrum of innovation, including fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization, and deployment. Our world-class analysis and decision support informs every point on the spectrum. The innovation process at NREL is inter-dependent and iterative. Many scientific breakthroughs begin in our own laboratories, but new ideas and technologies may come to NREL at any point along the innovation spectrum to be validated and refined for commercial use.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

THE ZEEMAN SPECTRUM OF SCANDIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hundred lines in the solar spectrum. Fraunhofer was thea list of over 15,000 solar spectrum lines, measured and

Lulu, Bruce Alan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Time Variations of the Solar Neutrino Flux Data from Sage and Gallex-Gno Detectors Obtained by Rayleigh Power Spectrum Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used Rayleigh power spectrum analysis of the monthly solar neutrino flux data from (1) SAGE detector during the period from 1st January 1990 to 31st December 2000; (2) SAGE detector during the period from April 1998 to December 2001; (3) GALLEX detector during the period from May 1991 to January 1997; (4) GNO detector during the period from May 1998 to December 2001; (5) GALLEX-GNO detector (combined data) from May 1991 to December 2001 and (6) average of the data from GNO and SAGE detectors during the period from May 1998 to December 2001. (1) exhibits periodicity around 1.3, 4.3, 5.5, 6.3, 7.9, 8.7, 15.9, 18.7, 23.9, 32.9 and 48.7 months. (2) shows periodicity around 1.5, 2.9, 4.5, 10.1 months. For (3) we observe periodicity around 1.7, 18.7 and 26.9 months. For (4) periodicity is seen around 3.5, 5.5, 7.7 and 10.5 months. (5) gives periodicity around 1.7, 18.5, 28.5 and 42.1 months while (6) shows periodicity around 4.3, 6.9, 10.3 and 18.1 months. We have found almost similar periods in the solar flares, sunspot data, solar proton data which indicates that the solar activity cycle may be due to the variable character of nuclear energy generation inside the sun.

Koushik Ghosh; Probhas Raychaudhuri

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

74

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

75

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

SciTech Connect

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Crowell, John M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Frequency response analysis of fluid control systems for parabolic-trough solar collectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A linearized steady-state frequency response is derived for parabolic-trough collectors and for connecting piping that can be used in standard gain-phase analyses to evaluate system stability and closed-loop frequency response. The frequency-response characteristics of a typical collector string and piping are used in a gain-phase analysis to get some insight into the effect on system stability of various system parameters such as controller gain, sensor and controller-time constants, and sensor location.

Schindwolf, R.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

The Theoretical, Discrete, and Actual Response of the Barnes Objective Analysis Scheme for One- and Two-Dimensional Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the response of the Barnes objective analysis scheme as a function of wavenumber or wavelength and extends previous work in two primary areas. First, the first- and second-pass theoretical response functions for continuous two-...

Patricia M. Pauley; Xiaihua Wu

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Damped response analysis of nonlinear cushion systems by a linearization method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic loading often plays a critical role in the functional performance and mechanical reliability of packaged components and devices. The prediction of the drop-impact response of the structural element of electronic components becomes one of the ... Keywords: Cushion buffer, Dynamic loading, Local linearization method, Nonlinear analysis, Packaged products, Viscous damping model

Yuqi Wang; K. H. Low

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Frequency response analysis of fluid control systems for parabolic trough solar collectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous studies of solar collector fluid control systems have utilized computer simulations of collector and piping dynamics to evaluate stability and response characteristics. To obtain reasonable simulation accuracy requires substantial computer memory and time, and is well beyond the capability of small desk-top computers. Here a linearized steady state frequency response is derived for parabolic trough collectors and for connecting piping, which can be used in standard gain-phase analyses to evaluate system stability and closed loop frequency response. The frequency response characteristics of a typical collector string and piping are used in a gain-phase analysis to get some insight into the effect on system stability of various system parameters such as controller gain, sensor and controller time constants, and sensor location.

Schindwolf, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Transient Response of the Hadley Centre Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model to Increasing Carbon Dioxide. Part III: Analysis of Global-Mean Response Using Simple Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The roles of surface, atmospheric, and oceanic feedbacks in controlling the global-mean transient response of a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model to increasing carbon dioxide are investigated. The analysis employs a four-box ...

J. M. Murphy

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general rules-of-thumb'' for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

Trudnowski, D.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general ``rules-of-thumb`` for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

Trudnowski, D.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Multivariate analysis and prediction of wind turbine response to varying wind field characteristics based on machine learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multivariate analysis and prediction of wind turbine response to varying wind field characteristics characteristics have a significant impact on the structural response and the lifespan of wind turbines. This paper presents a machine learning approach towards analyzing and predicting the response of wind turbine

Stanford University

84

Live Cell Imaging and in situ analysis of cellular responses to DNA doublestrand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Live Cell Imaging and in situ analysis of cellular responses to DNA double- Live Cell Imaging and in situ analysis of cellular responses to DNA double- strand breaks in mammalian cells. David J. Chen Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas TX 75390 The integrity of the human genome is constantly threatened by internal as well as external factors with the propensity to cause DNA damage. Of the various types of DNA damage that can occur within the mammalian cell nucleus, the DNA double strand break (DSB) is perhaps the most dangerous. Estimates put the number of endogenous DSBs anywhere between 10-100 per nucleus per day. A direct link between DSBs and cancer has been surmised by researchers based upon the fact that many cancer-predisposition

85

Spectrum Policy Seminar | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectrum Policy Seminar Spectrum Policy Seminar Slide show from FCC's Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau's presenation on spectrum policy. Spectrum Policy Seminar More...

86

Analysis of criticality alarm system response to an accidental criticality outside the cascade process buildings at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

Neutron dose rates at detector positions within the X-326, X-330, and X-333 buildings were evaluated for an accidental criticality outside of each building. As fissile material bearing equipment and containers are moved to and from each building, the possibility exists for a criticality accident to occur. This analysis demonstrates that a criticality accident which occurs at any position on the access roads alongside a process building can be detected. The detectable area includes all points within the access road boundary along each face of each building. This analysis also demonstrates that the criticality alarm systems of the process buildings will respond to criticality events occurring within the tie lines connecting the process buildings. This analysis was performed using the MCNP Monte Carlo neutron-proton transport code. The radiation source is the neutron leakage spectrum of a critical solution of 4.95 percent enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at a power level corresponding to the ANSI ANS 8.3. Standard minimum accident of concern. The evaluated neutron fluxes were converted to neutron dose rates by use of the Henderson free-in-air response functions. Critical source positions correspond to the farthest source to detector distances on the access roads along each face of the three buildings, and the centerpoint of the building tie lines. This report contains the methodology used for this study, a background on the data used, and a section about the assumptions and limits to all conclusions.

Negron, S.B.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr.; Dobelbower, M.C. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Peaks and Troughs in Helioseismology: The Power Spectrum of Solar Oscillations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present a matched-wave asymptotic analysis of the driving of solar oscillations by a general localised source. The analysis provides a simple mathematical description of the asymmetric peaks in the power spectrum in terms of the relative locations of eigenmodes and troughs in the spectral response. It is suggested that the difference in measured phase function between the modes and the troughs in the spectrum will provide a key diagnostic of the source of the oscillations. I also suggest a form for the asymmetric line profiles to be used in the fitting of solar power spectra. Finally I present a comparison between the numerical and asymptotic descriptions of the oscillations. The numerical results bear out the qualitative features suggested by the asymptotic analysis but suggest that numerical calculations of the locations of the troughs will be necessary for a quantitative comparison with the observations.

Colin S. Rosenthal

1998-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

88

Analysis of pressure tests through the use of instantaneous source response concepts  

SciTech Connect

A general method of analysis for pressure transient tests is presented. This technique is based on the pressure response of an instantaneous source and it provides a mean to compute the first and second derivatives of the influence function (unit flow rate response) of the well-reservoir system. This information is basic in identifying the flow regimes occurring during the test. This method eliminates the effect of producing time on pressure buildup data. An explicit and stable procedure is discussed to compute both the derivatives of the influence function and the initial reservoir pressure. This technique is suitable for DST and Repeat Formation Tests as well as for pressure buildup and fall off tests with long shut in period; variable flow rate before shut in can be taken into account. Examples of application are presented.

Cinco-Ley, H.; Kuchuk, F.; Ayoub, J.; Ayestaran, L.; Samaniego, V.F.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Analysis of Dose Response for Circulatory Disease After Radiotherapy for Benign Disease  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the shape of the dose-response for various circulatory disease endpoints, and modifiers by age and time since exposure. Methods and Materials: This was an analysis of the US peptic ulcer data testing for heterogeneity of radiogenic risk by circulatory disease endpoint (ischemic heart, cerebrovascular, other circulatory disease). Results: There were significant excess risks for all circulatory disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.082 (95% CI 0.031-0.140), and ischemic heart disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.102 (95% CI 0.039-0.174) (both p = 0.01), and indications of excess risk for stroke. There were no statistically significant (p > 0.2) differences between risks by endpoint, and few indications of curvature in the dose-response. There were significant (p < 0.001) modifications of relative risk by time since exposure, the magnitude of which did not vary between endpoints (p > 0.2). Risk modifications were similar if analysis was restricted to patients receiving radiation, although the relative risks were slightly larger and the risk of stroke failed to be significant. The slopes of the dose-response were generally consistent with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in occupationally and medically exposed groups. Conclusions: There were excess risks for a variety of circulatory diseases in this dataset, with significant modification of risk by time since exposure. The consistency of the dose-response slopes with those observed in radiotherapeutically treated groups at much higher dose, as well as in lower dose-exposed cohorts such as the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and nuclear workers, implies that there may be little sparing effect of fractionation of dose or low-dose-rate exposure.

Little, Mark P., E-mail: mark.little@nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Kleinerman, Ruth A. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mabuchi, Kiyohiko [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Equilibrium Response and Transient Dynamics Datasets from VEMAP, the Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Users of the VEMAP Portal can access input files of numerical data that include monthly and daily files of geographic data, soil and site files, scenario files, etc. Model results from Phase I, the Equilibrium Response datasets, are available through the NCAR anonymous FTP site at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/vresults.html. Phase II, Transient Dynamics, include climate datasets, models results, and analysis tools. Many supplemental files are also available from the main data page at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/datasets.html.

91

Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress responses  

SciTech Connect

Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 is a capable ethanogenic bacterium with high ethanol productivity and high level of ethanol tolerance. Previous studies indicated that several stress-related proteins and changes in the ZM4 membrane lipid composition may contribute to ethanol tolerance. However, the molecular mechanisms of ethanol stress response have not been elucidated fully. In this study, ethanol stress responses were investigated using systems biology tools. Medium supplementation with an initial 47.3 g/L (6% v/v) ethanol reduced Z. mobilis ZM4 glucose consumption, growth rate and ethanol productivity compared to that of untreated controls. Metabolomic profiling showed that ethanol-treated ZM4 cells accumulated greater amounts of glycerol during the entire fermentation process, which may indicate an important role for this metabolite. A proteomic analysis of early exponential growth identified about one thousand proteins, or approximately 56% of the predicted ZM4 proteome. Proteins related to metabolism and stress response such as chaperones and key regulators were more abundant in the early ethanol stress condition. Transcriptomic studies indicated the response of ZM4 to ethanol is dynamic, complex and involves many genes from all the different functional categories. There were fewer genes significantly differentially expressed in the exponential phase compared to that of stationary phase and early stationary phase. Most down-regulated genes were related to translation and ribosome biogenesis, while the ethanol-upregulated genes were mostly related to cellular processes and metabolism. Correlations among the transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolism were examined and among significantly expressed genes or proteins, we observe higher correlation coefficients when fold-change values are higher. This systems biology study elucidates key Z. mobilis ZM4 metabolites, genes and proteins that form the foundation of its distinctive physiology and its multifaceted response to ethanol stress.

Yang, Shihui [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Zhou, Wen [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Dam, Phuongan [ORNL; Xu, Ying [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Dice, Lezlee T [ORNL; Davison, Brian H [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

2008-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response Opportunities in California Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K.C. Mares, D. Shroyer. 2010. Demand Response andOpen Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Dataand the Role of Automated Demand Response. Lawrence Berkeley

Goli, Sasank

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Model-independent WIMP Scattering Responses and Event Rates: A Mathematica Package for Experimental Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The community's reliance on simplified descriptions of WIMP-nucleus interactions reflects the absence of analysis tools that integrate general theories of dark matter with standard treatments of nuclear response functions. To bridge this gap, we have constructed a public-domain Mathematica package for WIMP analyses based on our effective theory formulation. Script inputs are 1) the coefficients of the effective theory, through which one can characterize the low-energy consequences of arbitrary ultraviolet theories of WIMP interactions; and 2) one-body density matrices for commonly used targets, the most compact description of the relevant nuclear physics. The generality of the effective theory expansion guarantees that the script will remain relevant as new ultraviolet theories are explored; the use of density matrices to factor the nuclear physics from the particle physics will allow nuclear structure theorists to update the script as new calculations become available, independent of specific particle-physics contexts. The Mathematica package outputs the resulting response functions (and associated form factors) and also the differential event rate, once a galactic WIMP velocity profile is specified, and thus in its present form provides a complete framework for experimental analysis. The Mathematica script requires no a priori knowledge of the details of the non-relativistic effective field theory or nuclear physics, though the core concepts are reviewed here and in arXiv:1203.3542.

Nikhil Anand; A. Liam Fitzpatrick; W. C. Haxton

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

94

Wave Dynamic Analysis of the Seismic Response of a Reinforced Concrete Building  

SciTech Connect

This paper evaluates the response of the seven-story instrumented building, Holiday Inn Hotel, during the 1994 Northridge earthquake through the wave propagation dynamic analysis. The building has been instrumented during other earthquakes, the most important of these was the 1971 San Fernando earthquake, where the building was located only 22 [km] from the epicenter and didn't showing structural damage. From the accelerograms analysis is detected the propagation of Rayleigh and soil waves in the building, where the first has a polarized particle motion on a vertical plane and the second has a coupled particle motion in the horizontal plane. Both waves impose their frequencies to the building response, whose fundamental frequency (1.4 [Hz] according to ambient vibration test) is less than the frequencies of the identified waves. Due to the impact that these observations have in the seismic design of buildings, as a first attempt, a simple method is proposed to estimate the drift produced by the propagation of a Rayleigh wave in buildings.

Astroza, Rodrigo [Faculty of Engineering, University of Los Andes, Santiago (Chile); Saragoni, G. Rodolfo [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

95

Discrete multiwavelength spectrum created  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supramolecular structure of polymer blends Supramolecular structure of polymer blends * Macroscale self-similarity of rocks * Structure of colloidal crystals and alloys * Hydration of cement pastes * Aggregation in colloidal dispersions * Self-assembling of polymers * Mesoscopic structure of natural composites * Structure of granular powders * Morphology of colloidal reinforcing fillers * Structure and morphology of complex fluids * Rheology and morphology of hydrogels 06-G01637F/gim Moderator Decoupled poisoned hydrogen Source- detector distance 30 m Focusing premono- chromator Cooper mosaic Cu(111) crystals Monochro- mator and analyzer Si(220) channel-cut, triple-bounce crystals Bragg angle 70° Wavelength spectrum 4 Bragg

96

Estimating the Observed Atmospheric Response to SST Anomalies: Maximum Covariance Analysis, Generalized Equilibrium Feedback Assessment, and Maximum Response Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three multivariate statistical methods to estimate the influence of SST or boundary forcing on the atmosphere are discussed. Lagged maximum covariance analysis (MCA) maximizes the covariance between the atmosphere and prior SST, thus favoring ...

Claude Frankignoul; Nadine Chouaib; Zhengyu Liu

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

A COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST DATA. II. E{sub p} EVOLUTION PATTERNS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE OBSERVED SPECTRUM-LUMINOSITY RELATIONS  

SciTech Connect

We present a time-resolved spectral analysis of 51 long and 11 short bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed with the Fermi/Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor, paying special attention to E{sub p} evolution within each burst. Among eight single-pulse long GRBs, five show an evolution from hard to soft, while three show intensity tracking. The multi-pulse long GRBs have more complicated patterns. Statistically, the hard-to-soft evolution pulses tend to be more asymmetric than the intensity-tracking ones, with a steeper rising wing than the falling wing. Short GRBs have E{sub p} tracking intensity exclusively with the 16 ms time-resolution analysis. We performed a simulation analysis and suggest that for at least some bursts, the late intensity-tracking pulses could be a consequence of overlapping hard-to-soft pulses. However, the fact that the intensity-tracking pattern exists in the first pulse of the multi-pulse long GRBs and some single-pulse GRBs, suggests that intensity tracking is an independent component, which may operate in some late pulses as well. For the GRBs with measured redshifts, we present a time-resolved E{sub p} - L{sub {gamma},iso} correlation analysis and show that the scatter of the correlation is comparable to that of the global Amati/Yonetoku relation. We discuss the predictions of various radiation models regarding E{sub p} evolution, as well as the possibility of a precessing jet in GRBs. The data pose a great challenge to each of these models, and hold the key to unveiling the physics behind GRB prompt emission.

Lu Ruijing; Wei Junjie; Liang Enwei; Lue Lianzhong [Department of Physics and GXU-NAOC Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Zhang Binbin [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Lue Houjun; Zhang Bing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Lei Weihua, E-mail: lew@gxu.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

98

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant project Preliminary Safety Analysis Report comment response records  

SciTech Connect

The initial draft version of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) was issued for review and comment on July 17, 1989, and was designated as Revision A. Following resolution of comments arising from the Revision A review, the PSAR was revised as a final draft. This version, which was designated as HWVP PSAR, Revision B, was issued for review and comment on July 16, 1990. The PSAR was again revised as Revision O following the resolution of the Revision B comments. The HWVP PSAR, Revision O, was approved by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) on May 21, 1991, and issued as WHC-EP-0250, Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Preliminary Safety Analysis Report to the Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). While Westinghouse Hanford organizations were reviewing the drafts of the HWVP PSAR (i.e., Revisions A and B), a parallel review was being performed by the DOE-RL on both versions. This supporting document provides a summary of the PSAR Comment Response Databases for the Westinghouse Hanford and DOE-RL reviews of HWVP PSAR, Revisions A and B. This document also provides copies of all the closed-out Review Comment Records (RCR) submitted by these organizations. 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Herborn, D.I.; Campbell, L.M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Federal Spectrum Management at the National Telecommunications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Slides from National Telecommunications and Information Administration's presentation on Federal spectrum management. Federal Spectrum Management at the National...

100

Geomagnetic Temporal Spectrum Catherine Constable 1 GEOMAGNETIC TEMPORAL SPECTRUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geomagnetic Temporal Spectrum Catherine Constable ­1 GEOMAGNETIC TEMPORAL SPECTRUM Catherine: +1 858 534 8090 For the Encyclopedia of Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism Editors, David Gubbins and Emilio Herrera-Bervera for Encyclopedia of Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism, July 7, 2005 #12;Geomagnetic

Constable, Catherine G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Sensitivity analysis of reactivity responses using one-dimensional discrete ordinates and three-dimensional Monte Carlo methods  

SciTech Connect

The TSUNAMI computational sequences currently in the SCALE 5 code system provide an automated approach to performing sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for eigenvalue responses, using either one-dimensional discrete ordinates or three-dimensional Monte Carlo methods. This capability has recently been expanded to address eigenvalue-difference responses such as reactivity changes. This paper describes the methodology and presents results obtained for an example advanced CANDU reactor design. (authors)

Williams, M. L.; Gehin, J. C.; Clarno, K. T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Bldg. 5700, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6170 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Ecosystem health at the texas coastal bend: a spatial analysis of exposure and response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation investigated locational risks to ecosystem health associated with proximity to industrial complexes. The study was performed at the behest of ranchers and citizens living and working down-prevailing wind from the Formosa Plastics, Inc. and ALCOA facilities located in Calhoun County, Texas. Concerns expressed were for potential genotoxicity resulting from exposure to complex chemical mixtures released by the facilities. Exposure assessment of the marine environment was performed with sediments and oysters from Lavaca Bay being analyzed. Numerous chemicals were found to be present at concentrations considered likely to result in adverse responses in exposed populations. Bayesian geostatistical analysis was performed to determine if the concentrations were affected by a spatial process. Mercury and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were the most notable of the chemicals found to be present at elevated concentrations and affected by a spatial process. Evaluation of maps generated from spatial modeling revealed that proximity to ALCOA resulted in elevated risks for exposure to harmful concentrations of pollutants. Genotoxicity was measured in two sentinel species. Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) were utilized for evaluation of the marine environment and cattle (Bos taurus and Bos taurus crossbred cattle) were chosen for evaluation of the terrestrial environment. Chromosomal aberration analysis was performed on oyster hematocytes. Analysis of the results failed to demonstrate the presence of an important generalized spatial process but some specific locations close to the ALCOA plant had elevations in this measure of genotoxicity. Stress as measured by the lysosomal destabilization assay was also performed on oyster hematocytes. These results were found to be affected by a significant spatial process with the highest degree of destabilization occurring in close proximity to ALCOA. Genotoxicity in cattle was evaluated with the single cell gel electrophoresis assay and chromosomal aberration analysis. Bayesian geostatistical analyis revealed the presence of important spatial processes. DNA-protein cross-linkage was the most notable with a strong indication of increased damage down-prevailing wind from the industrial complexes. Results indicated that proximity to industrial facilities increased the risk for harmful exposures, genotoxicity, and lysosomal destabilization.

Bissett, Wesley Thurlow, Jr.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Ecosystem health at the Texas coastal bend: a spatial analysis of exposure and response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation investigated locational risks to ecosystem health associated with proximity to industrial complexes. The study was performed at the behest of ranchers and citizens living and working down-prevailing wind from the Formosa Plastics, Inc. and ALCOA facilities located in Calhoun County, Texas. Concerns expressed were for potential genotoxicity resulting from exposure to complex chemical mixtures released by the facilities. Exposure assessment of the marine environment was performed with sediments and oysters from Lavaca Bay being analyzed. Numerous chemicals were found to be present at concentrations considered likely to result in adverse responses in exposed populations. Bayesian geostatistical analysis was performed to determine if the concentrations were affected by a spatial process. Mercury and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were the most notable of the chemicals found to be present at elevated concentrations and affected by a spatial process. Evaluation of maps generated from spatial modeling revealed that proximity to ALCOA resulted in elevated risks for exposure to harmful concentrations of pollutants. Genotoxicity was measured in two sentinel species. Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) were utilized for evaluation of the marine environment and cattle (Bos taurus and Bos taurus crossbred cattle) were chosen for evaluation of the terrestrial environment. Chromosomal aberration analysis was performed on oyster hematocytes. Analysis of the results failed to demonstrate the presence of an important generalized spatial process but some specific locations close to the ALCOA plant had elevations in this measure of genotoxicity. Stress as measured by the lysosomal destabilization assay was also performed on oyster hematocytes. These results were found to be affected by a significant spatial process with the highest degree of destabilization occurring in close proximity to ALCOA. Genotoxicity in cattle was evaluated with the single cell gel electrophoresis assay and chromosomal aberration analysis. Bayesian geostatistical analyis revealed the presence of important spatial processes. DNA-protein cross-linkage was the most notable with a strong indication of increased damage down-prevailing wind from the industrial complexes. Results indicated that proximity to industrial facilities increased the risk for harmful exposures, genotoxicity, and lysosomal destabilization.

Bissett, Wesley Thurlow, Jr.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Predict flare noise and spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predicting flare combustion noise is important to ensure the flare is a certain distance from inhabited areas. Generally, it not feasible to increase the stack height to lower the overall noise at a particular point. This article shows how to calculate flare noise including spectrum considerations. Depending on the spectrum, a lower power noise source may sound louder than a higher power source.

Leite, O.C. (Pilgrim Steel Co., Glassboro, NJ (US))

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Dynamic spectrum management using GA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thousands of equipments of the wireless network and the mobile devices are widely used and the demand of dynamic spectrum resources is significantly growing. How to maximize the social utility in modern technique becomes an important issue. In this paper, ... Keywords: Shannon utility, background interference, crosstalk, dynamic spectrum management, genetic algorithm

Ping-Liang Chen; Chia-Liang Peng; Shin-Jia Chen; Yu-Cheng Lin

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

NREL: Innovation Spectrum Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovation Spectrum Innovation Spectrum Te xt version The scope of NREL's capabilities emulates the nature of the innovation process itself. Moving new technologies from initial concept to commercial application requires a breadth of expertise across the innovation spectrum, encompassing: Fundamental science Market-relevant research Systems integration Testing and validation Commercialization Deployment The NREL innovation spectrum is highly interactive within the laboratory and across other research institutions and private industry. NREL provides the scientific and analytical leadership to guide the innovation process, contributing knowledge and expertise at each stage. Innovation Success Stories Learn more about the spectrum of clean energy innovation and how NREL is creating a future of sustainable energy systems based on clean,

107

Corporate social responsibility in Brazil : a comparative analysis of two paper companies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If being socially responsible can result in short or long-term economic benefits, then why do not all companies adopt corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices? This thesis draws on general assumptions from illustrative ...

Nascimento, Ana Paula M. do, 1966-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

A threat-rigidity analysis of the Apache Software Foundation's response to reported server security issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There exists a broad body of literature documenting organizational responses to competitive threats, including those responses which fit into the threat-rigidity hypothesis. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate how ...

Shapira, Yoav

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

THE SUBMILLIMETER SPECTRUM OF GLYCOLALDEHYDE  

SciTech Connect

Glycolaldehyde (HOCH{sub 2}CHO) is a sugar-related interstellar prebiotic molecule that has been detected in two star-forming regions, Sgr B2(N) and G31.41+0.31. Glycolaldehyde is suspected to form from photodissociation-driven ice chemistry, and therefore can be used to trace complex organic chemistry in interstellar environments. The relative abundance of glycolaldehyde to its structural isomers, methyl formate (HCOOCH{sub 3}) and acetic acid (CH{sub 3}COOH), can be used to constrain astrochemical models. Given its central role in the complex chemistry of the interstellar medium, glycolaldehyde has been suggested as a prime molecular target for upcoming high-frequency molecular line searches using new far-infrared observatories. In particular, glycolaldehyde is a target for the Herschel Space Observatory HEXOS Key Program, which is conducting spectral line surveys of the Sgr B2(N) and Orion KL star-forming regions across the entire HIFI band. Laboratory investigation of glycolaldehyde in the HIFI frequency range is required before its lines can be identified in these spectra. We have therefore acquired the laboratory spectrum of glycolaldehyde in selected frequency ranges across the submillimeter range. We present here the laboratory spectral analysis of the ground vibrational state of glycolaldehyde up to 1.2 THz.

Carroll, P. Brandon; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L. [Department of Chemistry, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Drouin, Brian J., E-mail: pbcarro@emory.ed, E-mail: susanna.widicus.weaver@emory.ed, E-mail: brian.j.drouin@jpl.nasa.go [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A cost-based analysis of intrusion detection system configuration under active or passive response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the joint decisions of IDS configuration and alarm investigation capacity under active and passive responses. In active response, alarm events are blocked immediately, whereas alarm events are allowed to access the information assets ... Keywords: IDS configuration, Information security, Intrusion response, Investigation capacity

Wei T. Yue; Metin Çakany?ld?r?m

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Transient response of the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere model to increasing carbon dioxide. Part 3: Analysis of global-mean response using simple models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The roles of surface, atmospheric, and oceanic feedbacks in controlling the global-mean transient response of a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (AOGCM) to increasing carbon dioxide are investigated. The analysis employs a four-box energy balance model (EBM) and an oceanic box-diffusion model (BDM) both tuned to the simulated general circulation model response. The land-sea contrast in the surface warming is explained almost entirely by the shortwave radiative feedbacks associated with changes in cloud and surface albedo. The oceanic thermal inertia delays the response; however, the initial delay is enhanced by increases in Anarctic sea-ice cover, which substantially reduce the effective climate sensitivity of the model in the first half of the 75-year experiment. When driven by the observed anthropogenic greenhouse forcing from the pre-industrial period to present day, the energy balance model overestimates the warming observed over land. However, inclusion of the direct forcing due to anthropogenic tropospheric sulphate aerosol eliminates the land/sea contrast in the response at 1990, leaving the simulated warming over land slightly below the observed value, although the rapid warming observed during the 1980s is well reproduced. The vertical penetration of the oceanic response is small below 1000 m. Within the top 1000 m the effective diffusivities are substantially enhanced by reduced convection and thermohaline overturning, driven by increased precipitation minus evaporation at high latitudes. These changes in ocean heat transport become significant after year 30, whereupon the effective oceanic heat capacity increases substantially, although this increase is partially offset by the effect of changes in the sea-ice margin.

Murphy, J.M. [Meteorological Office, Bracknell, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

A Bayesian sensitivity analysis applied to an Agent-based model of bird population response to landscape change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural land management has important impacts on land use and vegetation that can rapidly induce ecosystem change. Birds are often used as indicators of such impacts of landscape change on ecosystems. However, predicting the response of birds to ... Keywords: ALMaSS, Agent-based model, BACCO, Emulator, Land use policy, Meta-model, Sensitivity analysis, Set-aside removal, Skylarks, Uncertainty

Hazel R. Parry, Christopher J. Topping, Marc C. Kennedy, Nigel D. Boatman, Alistair W. A. Murray

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

NREL: Innovation Spectrum - NREL Spectrum of Innovation Video (Text  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectrum of Innovation Video (Text Version) Spectrum of Innovation Video (Text Version) Below is the text version of the NREL Spectrum of Innovation video. "...renewable energy is a national imperative..." "...This breakthrough technology will..." "...we are still looking for an innovative material that will..." "...we need a study to determine..." "...the right people need to work together..." "...competing priorities mean we cannot..." There are many voices calling for a future of abundant, clean energy. The choices are many...and the challenges are daunting. How will we get there? The National Renewable Energy Laboratory integrates the entire spectrum of innovation, including Fundamental Science, Market-Relevant Research, Systems Integration, Testing and Validation, Commercialization, and

114

Time resolved neutron spectrum measurements at the Mirror Fusion Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

An advanced neutron diagnostic system has been developed for spectrum measurements on MFTF. Its collimated field of view allows spatially resolved neutron spectrum measurements. The 10 Mhz pulse height analysis and particle identification capability allow spectrum measurements in intervals as short as 10 ms. These capabilities will be used for space and time resolved determinations of ion energy from measurements of neutron Doppler width.

Slaughter, D.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Application of Prony analysis to the determination of modal content and equivalent models for measured power system response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prony analysis is an emerging methodology that extends Fourier analysis by directly estimating the frequency, damping, strength, and relative phase of the modal components present in a recorded signal. This paper extends earlier work that concentrated upon power system planning applications, for stability program outputs. In this paper results are presented for modal analysis and detailed model construction based upon response data obtained through large-scale tests of the western U.S. power system. BPA's optimal modeling program, SYSFIT, is used to supplement the measurements.

Hauer, J.F. (Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (US))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Finite element response sensitivity and reliability analysis of Soil-Foundation-Structure-Interaction (SFSI) systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of Concrete Gravity Dams. ” A Report on Researchysis of Concrete Gravity Dams. ” Proc. Seventh InternationalAnalysis of Concrete Gravity Dams Accounting for Both System

Gu, Quan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Analysis of the Costs of a Backlog Project in Response to Recommendation 2 of the 2004 Archives and History Office Program Review Committee Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of the Costs of a Backlog Project in Response to Recommendation 2 of the 2004 Archives and History Office Program Review Committee Report

O'Hara, Laura

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Observation of the submillimeter cosmic background spectrum  

SciTech Connect

An experimental measurement of the spectrum of the submillimeter cosmic background radiation is described. The experiment consists of measuring the night sky emission at an altitude of 39 km, correcting for the atmospheric molecular line emission, and placing limits on the contamination from sources of continuum radiation such as the apparatus itself and the earth. The observations were made on 24 July 1974 using a fully calibrated liquid-helium-cooled balloon- borne spectrophotometer. Important features of the apparatus include a cooled antenna, a polarizing interferometer, and a germanium bolometric detector. The characterization of the spectrophotometer includes the large angle response and emission of the antenna. The calibration of the instrument and corrections to the observed sky spectrum are based on measurements made during the flight. A simple model of the molecular line emission is used to determine the atmospheric contribution. The resulting spectrum covers the frequency range from 4 to 17 cm$sup -1$ and establishes that the cosmic background radiation follows the high frequency quantum cutoff for a 3K blackbody. A blackbody temperature of 2.99/sub -.$sub 14$/$sup +$.$sup 07$/K is deduced from our data. The present status of the cosmic background observations, which span more than three decades in frequency, is analyzed and it is concluded that they are all consistent with a blackbody temperature of 2.90 +- .04K (+- 1 SIGMA). This firmly supports the Big Bang cosmological model of the universe. (auth)

Woody, D.P.

1975-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

119

2008-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response Opportunities in California Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

facilities – These involved sub- metering the electricityon literature survey, sub-metering analysis, survey results

Goli, Sasank

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Lyapunov spectrum of granular gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We calculate and study the Lyapunov spectrum of a granular gas maintained in a steady state by an isokinetic thermostat. Considering restitution coefficients greater than unity allows us to show that the spectra change smoothly and continuously at equilibrium. The shearing instability of the granular gas, however, provokes an abrupt change in the structure of the spectrum. The relationship between various physically relevant quantities and the energy dissipation rate differs from previously studied nonequilibrium steady states.

McNamara, Sean; Mareschal, Michel

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Analysis of LMFBR primary system response to an HCDA using an Eulerian computer code  

SciTech Connect

Applications of an Eulerian code to predict the response of LMFBR containment and primary piping systems to hypothetical core disruptive accidents (HCDA), and to analyze sodium spillage problems, are described. The computer code is an expanded version of the ICECO code. Sample problems are presented for slug impact and sodium spillage, dynamics of the HCDA bubbles, and response of a piping loop. (JWR)

Chang, Y.W.; Wang, C.Y.; Chu, H.Y.; Abdel-Moneim, M.T.; Gvildys, J.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Cross-Power Spectrum and Its Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cross-power spectrum is a quadratic estimator between two maps that can provide unbiased estimate of the underlying power spectrum of correlated signals, which is therefore used for extracting the power spectrum in the WMAP data. In this letter we discuss the limit of cross-power spectrum and derive the residual from uncorrelated signal, which is the source of error in power spectrum extraction. We also employed cross-power spectrum to extract window functions from extragalactic point sources.

Chiang, Lung-Yih

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Analysis of a 10-Percent RPS - Response letter summarizing principal conclusions of supplement  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Transmittal letter for the supplement to the Service Report 'Analysis of a 10-Percent RenewablePortfolio Standard'

Alan Beamon

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) : a tool for evaluation of sheltering and evacuation responses following urban nuclear detonations.  

SciTech Connect

The NUclear EVacuation Analysis Code (NUEVAC) has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories to support the analysis of shelter-evacuate (S-E) strategies following an urban nuclear detonation. This tool can model a range of behaviors, including complex evacuation timing and path selection, as well as various sheltering or mixed evacuation and sheltering strategies. The calculations are based on externally generated, high resolution fallout deposition and plume data. Scenario setup and calculation outputs make extensive use of graphics and interactive features. This software is designed primarily to produce quantitative evaluations of nuclear detonation response options. However, the outputs have also proven useful in the communication of technical insights concerning shelter-evacuate tradeoffs to urban planning or response personnel.

Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Evaluation and Sensitivity Analysis of an Ocean Model Response to Hurricane Ivan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ocean model response to Hurricane Ivan (2004) over the northwest Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico is evaluated to guide strategies for improving performance during strong forcing events in a region with energetic ocean features with the ...

G. R. Halliwell Jr.; L. K. Shay; J. K. Brewster; W. J. Teague

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Socially Responsible Investing : a comparative analysis of environmental, social, governance, reputational and labor factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Socially Responsible Investing (SRI) aims to deliver competitive investment returns while fostering social good. It aims achieves its objective by including a firm's corporate social performance (CSP) in its investment d ...

Balasubramaniam, Arun, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Dynamical Analysis of the Boundary Layer and Surface Wind Responses to Mesoscale SST Perturbations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamical response of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) to mesoscale sea surface temperature (SST) perturbations is investigated over the Agulhas Return Current during winter from a 1-month, high-resolution, three-dimensional ...

Larry W. O’Neill; Steven K. Esbensen; Nicolai Thum; Roger M. Samelson; Dudley B. Chelton

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Empirical Analysis of the Spot Market Implications of Price-Responsive Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CA, USA. Siddiqui, AS (2004), “Price-Elastic Demand inand Demand Response in Electricity Markets,” CSEM Working Paper CSEM-WP-105, University of California Energy Institute, Berkeley, CA, USA.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Bartholomew, Emily S.; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Sea Ice and Current Response to the Wind: A Vector Regressional Analysis Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe a two-dimensional (vector) regressional model for examining the anisotropic response of ice drift and ocean current velocity (“drift velocity”) to surface wind forcing. Illustration of the method is limited to sea ice ...

Alexander B. Rabinovich; Georgy V. Shevchenko; Richard E. Thomson

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Customer Response to Electricity Prices: Information to Support Wholesale Price Forecasting and Market Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding customer response to electricity price changes is critical to profitably managing a retail business, designing efficient wholesale power markets, and forecasting power prices for valuation of long-lived generating assets. This report packages the collective results of dozens of price response studies for use by forward price forecasters and power market analysts in forecasting loads, revenues, and the benefits of time-varying prices more accurately. In specific, the report describes key mea...

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

131

Dose-response analysis of infants prenatally exposed to methyl mercury: An application of a single compartment model to single-strand hair analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method of estimating fetal exposure is used in a dose-response analysis of data from the 1971 outbreak of methyl mercury poisoning in rural Iraq. An X-ray fluorescence instrument for the measurement of single strands of human hair was employed to obtain longitudinal profiles recapitulating fetal exposure. Logit and hockey-stick models as well as nonparametric smoothing are used to describe data on delayed development and central nervous system abnormality.

Cox, C.; Clarkson, T.W.; Marsh, D.O.; Amin-Zaki, L.; Tikriti, S.; Myers, G.G. (Univ. of Rochester School of Medicine, New York, NY (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A Database and Meta-Analysis of Ecological Responses to Flow in the South Atlantic Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Generalized and quantitative relationships between flow and ecology are pivotal to developing environmental flow standards based on socially acceptable ecological conditions. Informing management at regional scales requires compiling sufficient hydrologic and ecological sources of information, identifying information gaps, and creating a framework for hypothesis development and testing. We compiled studies of empirical and theoretical relationships between flow and ecology in the South Atlantic region (SAR) of the United States to evaluate their utility for the development of environmental flow standards. Using database searches, internet searches, and agency contacts, we gathered 186 sources of information that provided a qualitative or quantitative relationship between flow and ecology within states encompassing the SAR. A total of 109 of the 186 sources had sufficient information to support quantitative analyses. Ecological responses to natural changes in flow magnitude, frequency, and duration were highly variable regardless of the direction and magnitude of changes in flow. In contrast, the majority of ecological responses to anthropogenic-induced flow alterations were negative. Fish consistently showed negative responses to anthropogenic flow alterations whereas other ecological groups showed somewhat variable responses (e.g. macroinvertebrates and riparian vegetation) and even positive responses (e.g. algae). Fish and organic matter had sufficient sample sizes to stratify natural flow-ecology relationships by specific flow categories (e.g. high flow, baseflows) or by region (e.g. coastal plain, uplands). After stratifying relationships, we found that significant correlations existed between changes in natural flow and ecological responses. In addition, a regression tree explained 57% of the variation in fish responses to anthropogenic and natural changes in flow. Because of some ambiguity in interpreting the directionality in ecological responses, we utilized ecological gains or losses, where each represents a benefit or reduction to ecosystem services, respectively. Variables explained 49% of the variation in ecological gains and losses for all ecological groups combined. Altogether, our results suggested that the source of flow change and the ecological group of interest played primary roles in determining the direction and magnitude of ecological responses. Furthermore, our results suggest that developing broadly generalized relationships between ecology and changes in flow at a regional scale is unlikely unless relationships are placed within meaningful contexts, such as environmental flow components or by geomorphic setting.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Davis, Dr, Mary [Southeastern Aquatic Resources Partnership; Kauffman, John [John Kauffman LLC.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Fault tree analysis and fuzzy expert systems: Early warning and emergency response of landfill operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we argue that Early Warning Systems for engineering facilities can be developed by combining and integrating existing technologies and theories. As example, we present an efficient integration of fuzzy expert systems, fault tree analysis ... Keywords: Accidents, Early Warning System, Expert systems, Fault tree analysis, Fuzzy logic, Landfills, Operational problems, Possibility theory, Public Access to Environmental Information

I. M. Dokas; D. A. Karras; D. C. Panagiotakopoulos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Smart Radio Spectrum Management for Cognitive Radio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today's wireless networks are characterized by fixed spectrum assignment policy. The limited available spectrum and the inefficiency in the spectrum usage necessitate a new communication paradigm to exploit the existing wireless spectrum opportunistically. Cognitive radio is a paradigm for wireless communication in which either a network or a wireless node changes its transmission or reception parameters to communicate efficiently avoiding interference with licensed or unlicensed users. In this work, a fuzzy logic based system for spectrum management is proposed where the radio can share unused spectrum depending on some parameters like distance, signal strength, node velocity and availability of unused spectrum. The system is simulated and is found to give satisfactory results.

Bhattacharya, Partha Pratim; Gera, Rishita; Agarwal, Anjali

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Residential response to price changes in natural gas service: A short-run analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential consumer demand for natural gas services is determined by numerous components including natural gas and competing fuel prices, weather patterns, appliance ownership characteristics, income, and energy conservation measure implementation. This study utilizes household-level data on a set of the determinants of residential natural gas demand, combined with corresponding consumption observations, to analyze the price response over the [open quotes]short-run[close quotes] period, in which primary natural gas-consuming appliances are fixed. Two model specifications are employed in this study to model the natural gas demand function and derive short-run price elasticity estimates. These are the Error Components (EC) and Fixed Effects (FE) models. These specifications result in elastic short-run responses estimates ranging between [minus]2.164 and [minus]7.015. These values contrast with the inelastic short-run estimated responses presented in previous empirical work, and the likelihood of actually observing such large short-run responses is expected to be small. The large estimates developed in the current study are evidently due to the use of household-specific data that incorporates disaggregated factors that influence monthly fluctuations in demand. This level of detail is subsumed within the aggregated data employed in prior studies. The price elasticity estimates developed in this study are directly applicable to short-run fuel demand analyses. The estimates are also applicable to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy conservation programs.

Wilson, P.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

ABWR start-up test analysis using BWR core simulator with three-dimensional direct response matrix method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ABWR start-up test analysis has been done with the BWR core simulator using the three--dimensional direct response matrix (3D-DRM) method. The Monte Carlo code VMONT made the sub-response matrices for the 3D-DRM method. Each boundary surface was subdivided by 4 x 4 for transverse segments, by 4 for angular segments and by 4 for axial zones in a node. For the calculation speedup, the 3D-DRM code used the divided sub-response matrices data set. The code used the MPI and OpenMP for the parallelized method. The median value is set as the average critical eigenvalues. The changes from the maximum value to the minimum value are 0.34 %{Delta}k with the spectral history method and 0.40 %{Delta}k without it, and the respective standard deviations were 0.12 % and 0.14 %. Using the spectral history method decreased the variation by 0.06 %{Delta}k. The root mean square differences of the axial power distribution were about 6 % between the analysis results and the plant data. Using the currents which converged in the previous exposure step reduced the number of iterations when the CR pattern changed only slightly. The averaged calculation time for each exposure step was about 5 hours on 12 PC Linux cluster servers with Core 2 Quad 3 GHz. (authors)

Mitsuyasu, T.; Ishii, K.; Hino, T.; Aoyama, M. [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Research Laboratory, 2-1 Omika-cho 7-chome, Hitachi-shi Ibaraki-ken, 319-1221 (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Multi-boson spectrum of the SU(2)-Higgs model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lattice simulations are used to compute the spectrum of energy levels for all angular momentum and parity quantum numbers in the SU(2)-Higgs model, with parameters chosen to match experimental data from the Higgs-W boson sector of the standard model. Creation operators are constructed for all lattice irreducible representations, and a correlation matrix is formed from which the spectrum is extracted using a variational analysis. Many multi-boson states are observed and careful analysis reveals that all are consistent with weakly-interacting Higgs and W bosons.

Mark Wurtz; Randy Lewis

2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

138

Multi-boson spectrum of the SU(2)-Higgs model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lattice simulations are used to compute the spectrum of energy levels for all angular momentum and parity quantum numbers in the SU(2)-Higgs model, with parameters chosen to match experimental data from the Higgs-W boson sector of the standard model. Creation operators are constructed for all lattice irreducible representations, and a correlation matrix is formed from which the spectrum is extracted using a variational analysis. Many multi-boson states are observed and careful analysis reveals that all are consistent with weakly-interacting Higgs and W bosons.

Wurtz, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Joint spectrum allocation and scheduling for fair spectrum sharing in cognitive radio wireless networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cognitive radio and Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA) enable wireless users to share a wide range of available spectrums. In this paper, we study joint spectrum allocation and scheduling problems in cognitive radio wireless networks with the objectives of ... Keywords: Cognitive radio, Dynamic spectrum access, Fairness, Scheduling, Spectrum allocation

Jian Tang; Satyajayant Misra; Guoliang Xue

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Analysis of the Hydrologic Response Associated with Shutdown and Restart of the 200-ZP-1 Pump-and-Treat System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of programs have been implemented on the Hanford Site that utilize the pumping and treatment of contaminated groundwater as part of their remediation strategy. Often the treated water is reinjected into the aquifer at injection well sites. The implementation of remedial pump and treat systems, however, results in hydraulic pressure responses, both areally and vertically (i.e., with depth) within the pumped aquifer. The area within the aquifer affected by the pump and treat system (i.e., radius of influence) is commonly estimated based on detecting associated water-level responses within surrounding monitor wells. Natural external stresses, such as barometric pressure fluctuations, however, can have a discernible impact on well water-level measurements. These temporal barometric effects may significantly mask water-level responses within more distant wells that are only slightly affected (< 0.10 m) by the test system. External stress effects, therefore, can lead to erroneous indications of the radius of influence of the imposed pump and treat system remediation activities and can greatly diminish the ability to analyze the associated well responses for hydraulic property characterization. When these extraneous influences are significant, adjustments or removal of the barometric effects from the test-response record may be required for quantitative hydrologic assessment. This report examines possible hydrologic effects of pump and treat remediation actions and provides a detailed analysis of water-level measurements for selected 200-ZP-1 pump and treat system monitor wells during the recent Y2K shutdown (December 1999) and restart activity (January 2000). The general findings presented in this report have universal application for unconfined and confined aquifer systems.

Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.

2000-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Empirical Analysis of the Spot Market Implications ofPrice-Responsive Demand  

SciTech Connect

Regardless of the form of restructuring, deregulatedelectricity industries share one common feature: the absence of anysignificant, rapid demand-side response to the wholesale (or, spotmarket) price. For a variety of reasons, most electricity consumers stillpay an average cost based regulated retail tariff held over from the eraof vertical integration, even as the retailers themselves are oftenforced to purchase electricity at volatile wholesale prices set in openmarkets. This results in considerable price risk for retailers, who aresometimes additionally forbidden by regulators from signing hedgingcontracts. More importantly, because end-users do not perceive real-time(or even hourly or daily) fluctuations in the wholesale price ofelectricity, they have no incentive to adjust their consumptionaccordingly. Consequently, demand for electricity is highly inelastic,which together with the non storability of electricity that requiresmarket clearing over very short time steps spawn many other problemsassociated with electricity markets, such as exercise of market power andprice volatility. Indeed, electricity generation resources can bestretched to the point where system adequacy is threatened. Economictheory suggests that even modest price responsiveness can relieve thestress on generation resources and decrease spot prices. To quantify thiseffect, actual generator bid data from the New York control area is usedto construct supply stacks and intersect them with demand curves ofvarious slopes to approximate the effect of different levels of demandresponse. The potential impact of real-time pricing (RTP) on theequilibrium spot price and quantity is then estimated. These resultsindicate the immediate benefits that could be derived from a moreprice-responsive demand providing policymakers with a measure of howprices can be potentially reduced and consumption maintained within thecapability of generation assets.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Bartholomew, Emily S.; Marnay, Chris

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Analysis of the differential response of five annuals to elevated CO sub 2 during growth  

SciTech Connect

In order to investigate the effects, without competition, of CO{sub 2} on germination, growth, physiological response, and reproduction, the authors focussed on co-occurring species that are prominent members of an annual community in Illinois. Five species of old field annual plants - Abutilon theophrasti (C{sub 3}), Amaranthus retroflexus (C{sub 4}), Ambrosia artemisiifolia (C{sub 3}), Chenopodium album (C{sub 3}), and Setaria faberii (C{sub 4}) - were grown for their entire life cycle as individuals at CO{sub 2} concentration of 350 {mu}L/O, 500 {mu}L/L, and 700 {mu}L/L. Emergence time, growth rate, shoot water status, photosynthesis, conductance, flowering time, nitrogen content, and biomass and reproductive biomass were measured. There was no detectable effect of enhanced CO{sub 2} on timing of emergency in any of the species. The three levels of carbon dioxide concentration were shown to produce varying effects on remaining quantities measured in the five different plants. Some of these differences were not statistically significant. The response of most characters had a significant species {times} CO{sub 2} interaction. However, this was not simply caused by the C{sub 3}/C{sub 4} dichotomy. Reproductive biomass (seed, fruits, and flowers) increased with increasing CO{sub 2} in Amaranthus (C{sub 4}) and in Chenopodium and Ambrosia (both C{sub 3}), but there was no change in Setaria (C{sub 4}), and Abutilon (C{sub 3}) showed a peak at 500 {mu}L/L. Species of the same community differed in their response to CO{sub 2}, and these differences may help explain the outcome of competitive interactions among these species above ambient CO{sub 2} levels.

Garbutt, K. (West Virginia Univ., Morgantown (USA)); Williams, W.E. (St. Mary's College of Maryland, St. Mary's City (USA)); Bazzaz, F.A. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Dynamic Response Analysis of Underground Powerhouse Structures Considering Coupling Effects of Hydraulic Impulse and Dynamic Loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When accident takes place in hydropower generator units, they transit from normal working condition to accident working condition. During this period, the generator pier structures bear coupling effect of dynamic load from the units and hydraulic impulse ... Keywords: underground powerhouse structure, unit dynamic load, hydraulic impulse, coupling effect, dynamic analysis

Li Xiaoli; Yuan Chaoqing; Li Ke; Li Yujie

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Real-Time Analysis of Local Wind Patterns for Application to Nuclear-Emergency Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PGandE) has sponsored development of a computer-based system for real-time analysis of local wind measurements in a complex-terrain setting. Mass-consistent modeling of tower- and Doppler-sounder data produces ...

Richard H. Thuillier

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Preliminary Investigation of Methods for Correcting for Variations in Solar Spectrum under Clear Skies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Study of two methods for correcting Isc of PV modules for variations in solar spectrum: empirical relationships based on air mass, and spectral irradiance models and PV module spectral response data.

Marion, B.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

VVER-440 dosimetry and neutron spectrum benchmark  

SciTech Connect

Light Water Reactor (LWR) benchmark experiments performed in the United States under the Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program (SDIP), in general, reported measured reaction rates and not neutron flux spectrum. The VVER-440 benchmark experiments, using a combination of spherical hydrogen-filled proportional counters and a stilbene scintillator detector, were measurements that provided a direct verification of the transport neutron flux spectrum. The original SAILOR cross-section library from ENDF/B-IV were used, except that the iron, hydrogen, and oxygen values from ENDF/B-VI were inserted. A linear-least-squares analysis showed that the average difference between calculations and measurements below 10 MeV was (a) less than 6% at the surveillance position; (b) less than 5% at the pressure vessel (PV) inner surface; (c) less than 6% at 1/3 thickness into the PV (1/3 T); (d) less than 17% at 2/3 thickness into the PV (2/3 T); and (e) less than 24% at the PV outer surface.

Sajot, E. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Nuclear Science Center; Kam, F.B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Recent research results in the analysis of pipeline response to buried explosive detonations  

SciTech Connect

The increasing use of explosives over the past several years for strip mining and urban development calls for some method to predict the effects of blasting within 100 ft of buried natural gas pipelines; previous methods applied only to greater standoff distances or to aboveground pipelines. Consequently, A.G.A.'s Pipeline Research Committee hired Southwest Research Institute to develop an analytical approach, a test program, and several techniques for defining the maximum blasting stresses on a pipeline and predicting the pipe's response under a wide variety of conditions. A review of this research includes a synopsis of the theoretical approach, the experimental methods used, and a basic procedure for handling blasting encroachment, from the initial notification through the post-blast activities.

Means, J.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum author responses to request for additional information.  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) submitted SAND Report SAND2009-5822 to NRC that documented the incorporation of plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. NRC responded with a Request for Additional Information (RAI), identifying information needed in connection with its review of the application. The purpose of this SAND report is to provide the authors responses to each RAI. SAND Report SAND2010-6106 containing the proposed changes to the Addendum is provided separately.

Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

employer. Abstract Empirical Analysis of the Spot Market Implications of Price-Responsive Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof, or The Regents of the University of California. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof, or The Regents of the University of California.

Ernest Orlando Lawrence; Afzal S. Siddiqui; Emily S. Bartholomew; Chris Marnay; Afzal S Siddiqui; Emily S Bartholomew; Chris Marnay

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Monte Carlo Study of the abBA Experiment: Detector Response and Physics Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The abBA collaboration proposes to conduct a comprehensive program of precise measurements of neutron $\\beta$-decay coefficients $a$ (the correlation between the neutrino momentum and the decay electron momentum), $b$ (the electron energy spectral distortion term), $A$ (the correlation between the neutron spin and the decay electron momentum), and $B$ (the correlation between the neutron spin and the decay neutrino momentum) at a cold neutron beam facility. We have used a GEANT4-based code to simulate the propagation of decay electrons and protons in the electromagnetic spectrometer and study the energy and timing response of a pair of Silicon detectors. We used these results to examine systematic effects and find the uncertainties with which the physics parameters $a$, $b$, $A$, and $B$ can be extracted from an over-determined experimental data set.

E. Frlez

2004-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

151

Modeling and Analysis of the Role of Fast-Response Energy Storage in the Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The large short time-scale variability of renewable energy resources presents significant challenges to the reliable operation of power systems. This variability can be mitigated by deploying fast-ramping generators. However, these generators are costly to operate and produce environmentally harmful emissions. Fast-response energy storage devices, such as batteries and flywheels, provide an environmentally friendly alternative, but are expensive and have limited capacity. To study the environmental benefits of storage, we introduce a slotted-time dynamic residual dc power flow model with the prediction error of the difference between the generation (including renewables) and the load as input and the fast-ramping generation and the storage (charging/discharging) operation as the control variables used to ensure that the demand is satisfied (as much as possible) in each time slot. We assume the input prediction error sequence to be i.i.d. zero-mean random variables. The optimal power flow problem is then formu...

Su, Han-I

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Dynamic spectrum access -- concepts and future architectures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New trends and developments in radio technology are enhancing the future capabilities of devices to access electromagnetic spectrum using the full range of dimensions associated with the spectrum. This increased capability, together with current developments ...

M. Nekovee

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Estimates of Large Spectrum Width from Autocovariances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors demonstrate that there are maximum measurable (saturation) spectrum widths for standard autocovariance techniques, the 0,1-lag autocovariance estimator and the 1,2-lag estimator. The maximal mean measurable spectrum widths from the ...

Valery M. Melnikov; Dusan S. Zrni?

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Disruption Analysis and Response Implicattions of Passive Plates for the NSTX Upgrade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NSTX upgrade project requires analysis qualifications of existing vacuum vessel and passive stabilizing plates for increased plasma performance. Vertical stability is critically dependent on the passive conducting structure that surrounds the plasma. In this paper, the passive conducting structure is analyzed for the upgrade condition during plasma disruption to ensure the level of stress in the stabilizing plates and the fastener is within its design limits. The counter-bore of the passive plates for bolting is evaluated in details and counter-bore bushing is redesigned to prevent shear failure during disruptions as a result of high pulling and pushing forces, particularly for support at the corner bolts

Yuhu Zhai, Peter Titus, Art Brooks, and Ron Hatcher

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

155

Advanced Analysis of the Responses of Cotton Genotypes Growing Under Water Stress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ever-growing world population raises the concern and necessity of rational use and distribution of limited water resources. Water deficit is the single most dominant abiotic factor limiting cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) yield in drought-prone Texas croplands. Characterizing plant traits conferring drought tolerance to cotton genotypes and then transferring this information back to breeders and geneticists have the potential of significantly increasing and stabilizing production statewide. Although a plethora of physiological studies have been conducted and have demonstrated that drought tolerance in plants is likely to be conferred by a combination of plant traits rather than a single trait, this knowledge has not translated into improved breeding lines. Experiments were conducted in 2010 and 2011 in the Drought Tolerance Laboratory (Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Corpus Christi, TX) to analyze the responses of cotton genotypes to different levels of water stress. This facility is equipped with computerized systems capable of continuously monitoring whole-plant water use as well as several environmental parameters. Sixteen cotton genotypes were provided by Monsanto Co. and the Texas AgriLife Cotton Improvement Programs at College Station and Lubbock. Seeds were pre-germinated in wet paper towels and then hand planted in large pots previously filled with fritted clay. A total of 3 and 8 (2010 and 2011, respectively) pots containing plants of each genotype were permanently placed on micro-lysimeters for continuous measurement of water use. Water regimes were imposed in 2010 (well-watered and water-stressed), and 2011 (water-stressed) when plants reached the early-flowering stage and were carried until plants reached maturity (100% open bolls). Data collected showed that genotypes have very distinct water use patterns. The water stress treatment imposed on the test plants negatively affected plant growth that was indicated by a lower plant height, total number of leaves, and main-stem nodes of stressed plants when contrasted to their well-watered counterparts. Stomatal density was remarkably different among genotypes and a higher density was found on the abaxial (lower) leaf surface for all genotypes studied. Root dry mass production had different responses depending upon the severity of the water stress. Highest root dry mass was observed when plants were exposed to a mild stress and lowest when a more severe water restriction was imposed.

Maeda, Murilo 1985-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Black Hole Spectrum: Continuous or Discrete?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We formulate a qualitative argument, based on Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, to support the claim that when the effects of matter fields are assumed to overshadow the effects of quantum mechanics of spacetime, the discrete spectrum of black hole radiation, as such as predicted by Bekenstein's proposal for a discrete black hole area spectrum, reduces to Hawking's black-body spectrum.

Jarmo Makela

1996-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

Modeling and Analysis of the Role of Fast-Response Energy Storage in the Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—The large short time-scale variability of renewable energy resources presents significant challenges to the reliable operation of power systems. This variability can be mitigated by deploying fast-ramping generators. However, these generators are costly to operate and produce environmentally harmful emissions. Fast-response energy storage devices, such as batteries and flywheels, provide an environmentally friendly alternative, but are expensive and have limited capacity. To study the environmental benefits of storage, we introduce a slotted-time dynamic residual dc power flow model with the prediction error of the difference between the generation (including renewables) and the load as input and the fast-ramping generation and the storage (charging/discharging) operation as the control variables used to ensure that the demand is satisfied (as much as possible) in each time slot. We assume the input prediction error sequence to be i.i.d. zero-mean random variables. The optimal power flow problem is then formulated as an infinite horizon average-cost dynamic program with the cost function taken as a weighted sum of the average fast-ramping generation and the loss of load probability. We find the optimal policies at the two extremes of the cost function weights and propose a two-threshold policy for the general case. We also obtain refined analytical results under the assumption of Laplace distributed prediction error and corroborate this assumption using simulated wind power generation data from NREL. I.

Han-i Su; Abbas El Gamal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Response Surface Analysis of Elemental Composition and Energy Properties of Corn Stover During Torrefaction  

SciTech Connect

This research studied the effects of torrefaction temperature (250-250 C) and time (30-120 minutes) on elemental composition and energy properties changes in corn stover. Torrefied material was analyzed for moisture content, moisture-free carbon (%), hydrogen (%), nitrogen (%), sulfur (%), and higher heating value (MJ/kg). Results at 350 C and 120 minutes indicated a steep decrease in moisture content to a final value of about 1.48% - a reduction of about 69%. With respect to carbon content, the increase was about 23%, while hydrogen and sulfur content decreased by about 46.82% and 66.6%, respectively. The hydrogen-to-carbon ratio decreased as torrefaction temperature and time increased, with the lowest value of 0.6 observed at 350 C and 120 minutes. Higher heating value measured at 350 C and 60 minutes increased by about 22% and the maximum degree of carbonization observed was about 1.21. Further, the regression models developed for chemical composition in terms of torrefaction temperature and time adequately described the process with coefficient of determination values (R2) in the range of 0.92-0.99 for the elemental composition and energy properties studied. Response surface plots indicated that increasing both torrefaction temperature and time resulted in decreased moisture content, hydrogen content, and the hydrogen to-carbon ratio, and increased carbon content and higher heating value. This effect was more significant at torrefaction temperatures and times >280 C and >30 minutes.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Richard D. Boardman; Christopher T. Wright

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Software Tools for the Analysis of the Photocathode Response of Photomultiplier Vacuum Tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The central institute of electronics (ZEA-2) in the Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ) has developed a system to scan the response of the photocathode of photomultiplier tubes (PMT). The PMT sits tight on a supporting structure, while a blue light emitting diode is moved along its surface by two stepper motors, spanning both the x and y coordinates. All the system is located in a light-tight box made by wood. A graphical software was developed in-situ to perform the scan operations under different configurations (e.g., the step size of the scan and the number of measurements per point). During each point measurement the current output generated in the vacuum photomultiplier is processed in sequence by a pre-amplifier (mainly to convert the current signal into a voltage signal), an amplifier, and by an ADC module (typically a CAEN N957). The information of the measurement is saved in files at the end of the scan. Recently, software based on the CERN ROOT and on the Qt libraries was developed to help the user anal...

Fabbri, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Short-distance contribution to the spectrum of Hawking radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hawking effect can be rederived in terms of two-point functions and in such a way that it makes it possible to estimate, within the conventional semiclassical theory, the contribution of ultrashort distances to the Planckian spectrum. For Schwarzschild black holes of three solar masses the analysis shows that Hawking radiation is very robust up to frequencies of 96 T_H or 270 T_H for bosons and fermions, respectively. For primordial black holes (with masses around 10^{15} g) these frequencies turn out to be of order 52T_H and 142 T_H. Only at these frequencies and above do we find that the contribution of Planck distances is of order of the total spectrum itself. Below this scale, the contribution of ultrashort distances to the spectrum is negligible. This suggests that only above these frequencies could an underlying quantum theory of gravity potentially predict significant deviations from Hawking's semiclassical result.

I. Agullo; J. Navarro-Salas; Gonzalo J. Olmo; Leonard Parker

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Application of Smoothed Estimators in Spectrum Sensing Technique Based on Model Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Application of Smoothed Estimators in Spectrum Sensing Technique Based on Model Selection Bassem--In cognitive radio networks, secondary user (SU) does not have rights to transmit when the primary user (PU technique based on distribution analysis was developed for sensing the spectrum holes in the PU band

Gesbert, David

162

Supplement analysis for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 2: Comment response document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE), prepared a draft Supplement Analysis (SA) for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL-L), in accordance with DOE`s requirements for implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (10 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 1021.314). It considers whether the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (1992 EIS/EIR) should be supplement3ed, whether a new environmental impact statement (EIS) should be prepared, or no further NEPA documentation is required. The SA examines the current project and program plans and proposals for LLNL and SNL-L, operations to identify new or modified projects or operations or new information for the period from 1998 to 2002 that was not considered in the 1992 EIS/EIR. When such changes, modifications, and information are identified, they are examined to determine whether they could be considered substantial or significant in reference to the 1992 proposed action and the 1993 Record of Decision (ROD). DOE released the draft SA to the public to obtain stakeholder comments and to consider those comments in the preparation of the final SA. DOE distributed copies of the draft SA to those who were known to have an interest in LLNL or SNL-L activities in addition to those who requested a copy. In response to comments received, DOE prepared this Comment Response Document.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) : responsibility or Innovation? : an analysis of the feedback between CSR activities and the expectations placed upon corporations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis uses case study and interview data to present a framework for analyzing corporate behavior in order to define corporate social responsibility (CSR). It answers the question: Can corporations tie corporate social ...

Rodriguez, Adrian Xavier

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Gabor Transforms on the Sphere with Applications to CMB Power Spectrum Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Fourier transform of a dataset apodised with a window function is known as the Gabor transform. In this paper we extend the Gabor transform formalism to the sphere with the intention of applying it to CMB data analysis. The Gabor coefficients on the sphere known as the pseudo power spectrum is studied for windows of different size. By assuming that the pseudo power spectrum coefficients are Gaussian distributed, we formulate a likelihood ansatz using these as input parameters to estimate the full sky power spectrum from a patch on the sky. Since this likelihood can be calculated quickly without having to invert huge matrices, this allows for fast power spectrum estimation. By using the pseudo power spectrum from several patches on the sky together, the full sky power spectrum can be estimated from full-sky or nearly full-sky observations.

Frode K. Hansen; Krzysztof M. Gorski; Eric Hivon

2002-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

165

Collaborative spectrum sensing in cognitive radio networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The radio frequency (RF) spectrum is a scarce natural resource, currently regulated by government agencies. With the explosive emergence of wireless applications, the demands for… (more)

Sun, Hongjian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A New Solar Irradiance Reference Spectrum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Solar Irradiance Reference Spectrum Pilewskie, Peter University of Colorado Fontenla, Juan LASP University of Colorado Harder, Jerry LASP University of Colorado Category:...

167

Multicarrier Orthogonal Spread-Spectrum (MOSS) Data ...  

Multicarrier Orthogonal Spread-Spectrum (MOSS) Data Transmission Method Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this ...

168

Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP5) Applications Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP) is widely used throughout North America, Europe, and the Far East to analyze plant responses over a broad spectrum of potential accident conditions. The use of MAAP continues to increase because its representation of integral plant response and short run times make this program ideal for supporting engineering evaluations. With greater use, however, the level of detail to be represented within the reactor core, reactor coolant system (RCS), and containment has...

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

169

Method and apparatus for transport, introduction, atomization and excitation of emission spectrum for quantitative analysis of high temperature gas sample streams containing vapor and particulates without degradation of sample stream temperature  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample transport, sample introduction, and flame excitation system for spectrometric analysis of high temperature gas streams which eliminates degradation of the sample stream by condensation losses.

Eckels, David E. (Ankeny, IA); Hass, William J. (Ames, IA)

1989-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

170

Spatial energy spectrum of primordial magnetic fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here, we analyze the primordial magnetic field transition between a radiative and a matter-dominated universe. The gravitational structure formation affects its evolution and energy spectrum. The structure excitation can trigger magnetic field amplification and the steepening of its energy density spectrum.

Grazyna Siemieniec-Ozieblo

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

171

Towards real-time dynamic spectrum auctions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a low-complexity auction framework to distribute spectrum in real-time among a large number of wireless users with dynamic traffic. Our design consists of a compact and highly expressive bidding format, two pricing models to ... Keywords: Algorithms, Auctions, Spectrum

Sorabh Gandhi; Chiranjeeb Buragohain; Lili Cao; Haitao Zheng; Subhash Suri

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Spectrum Energy Inc SEI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Inc SEI Energy Inc SEI Jump to: navigation, search Name Spectrum Energy Inc (SEI) Place Elk Grove, California Zip 95758 Sector Efficiency, Services, Solar Product US-based solar and energy services company that installs PV systems on a turnkey-basis; also provides evaluations of energy efficiency. References Spectrum Energy Inc (SEI)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Spectrum Energy Inc (SEI) is a company located in Elk Grove, California . References ↑ "Spectrum Energy Inc (SEI)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Spectrum_Energy_Inc_SEI&oldid=351613" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations

173

Transcriptome analysis reveals response regulator SO2426-mediated gene expression in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under chromate challenge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 exhibits diverse metal ion-reducing capabilities and thus is of potential utility as a bioremediation agent. Knowledge of the molecular components and regulatory mechanisms dictating cellular responses to heavy metal stress, however, remains incomplete. In a previous work, the S. oneidensis so2426 gene, annotated as a DNA-binding response regulator, was demonstrated to be specifically responsive at both the transcript and protein levels to acute chromate [Cr(VI)] challenge. To delineate the cellular function of SO2426 and its contribution to metal stress response, we integrated genetic and physiological approaches with a genome-wide screen for target gene candidates comprising the SO2426 regulon.

Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Wei, Wei [ORNL; Wan, Xiu-Feng [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Thompson, Dorothea K. [Purdue University

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Boron abundance and solar neutrino spectrum distortion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presence of neutrinos from Boron decay in the flux observed on Earth is attested by the observation of their energy spectrum. Possible distortions of the spectrum investigated in current detectors are often interpreted in terms of evidence in favour or against various schemes of neutrino oscillations. We stress here that a distortion of the spectrum at high energies could also result from an increase in the ratio of neutrinos originating from ($^3$He+p) and $^8$B reactions. While a $^8$B neutrino depletion would contribute to this effect, an increase in the Hep contribution seems also needed to reproduce the preliminary data.

R. Escribano; J. -M. Frere; A. Gevaert; D. Monderen

1998-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

175

Distillation by repeated measurements: Continuous spectrum case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Repeated measurements on one part of a bipartite system strongly affect the other part that is not measured, the dynamics of which is regulated by an effective contracted evolution operator. When the spectrum of this operator is discrete, the nonmeasured system is driven into a pure state, irrespective of the initial state, provided that the spectrum satisfies certain conditions. We show here that, even in the case of continuous spectrum, an effective distillation can occur under rather general conditions. We confirm it by applying our formalism to a simple model.

Bellomo, Bruno; Compagno, Giuseppe [CNISM and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo, via Archirafi 36, IT-90123 Palermo (Italy); Nakazato, Hiromichi [Department of Physics, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Yuasa, Kazuya [Waseda Institute for Advanced Study, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

New Model Atmospheres: Testing the Solar Spectrum in the UV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present preliminary results on the calculation of synthetic spectra obtained with the stellar model atmospheres developed by Cardona, Crivellari, and Simonneau. These new models have been used as input within the SYNTHE series of codes developed by Kurucz. As a first step we have tested if SYNTHE is able to handle these models which go down to log tau(Ross)= -13. We have successfully calculated a synthetic solar spectrum in the wavelength region 2000--4500 A at high resolution (R=522,000). Within this initial test we have found that layers at optical depths with log tau(Ross) spectrum computed from a solar model. We anticipate that these new extended models will be a valuable tool for the analysis of UV stellar light arising from the outermost layers of the atmospheres.

Rodríguez-Merino, L H; Bertone, E; Chavez, M; Buzzoni, A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

New Model Atmospheres: Testing the Solar Spectrum in the UV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present preliminary results on the calculation of synthetic spectra obtained with the stellar model atmospheres developed by Cardona, Crivellari, and Simonneau. These new models have been used as input within the SYNTHE series of codes developed by Kurucz. As a first step we have tested if SYNTHE is able to handle these models which go down to log tau(Ross)= -13. We have successfully calculated a synthetic solar spectrum in the wavelength region 2000--4500 A at high resolution (R=522,000). Within this initial test we have found that layers at optical depths with log tau(Ross) spectrum computed from a solar model. We anticipate that these new extended models will be a valuable tool for the analysis of UV stellar light arising from the outermost layers of the atmospheres.

L. H. Rodriguez-Merino; O. Cardona; E. Bertone; M. Chavez; A. Buzzoni

2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

178

Hierarchical Classifier-Regression Ensemble for Multi-phase Non-linear Dynamic System Response Prediction: Application to Climate Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dynamic physical system often undergoes phase transitions in response to fluctuations induced on system parameters. For example, hurricane activity is the climate system's response initiated by a liquid-vapor phase transition associated with non-linearly ... Keywords: Anomaly detection, Rainfall prediction, Tropical cyclone prediction, spatio-temporal data mining, regression, classification

Doel L. Gonzalez, Zhengzhang Chen, Isaac K. Tetteh, Tatdow Pansombut, Fredrick Semazzi, Vipin Kumar, Anatoli Melechko, Nagiza F. Samatova

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

KamLAND and Solar Antineutrino Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the recent KamLAND observations to predict the solar antineutrino spectrum at some confidence limits. We find that a scaling of the antineutrino probability with respect to the magnetic field profile --in the sense that the same probability function can be reproduced by any profile with a suitable peak field value-- can be utilised to obtain a general shape of the solar antineutrino spectrum. This scaling and the upper bound on the solar antineutrino event rate, that can be derived from the data, lead to: 1) an upper bound on the solar antineutrino flux, 2) the prediction of their energy spectrum, as the normalisation of the spectrum can be obtained from the total number of antineutrino events recorded in the experiment. We get $\\phi_{\\bar\

Bhag C. Chauhan; Joao Pulido; E. Torrente-Lujan

2003-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

180

Global whole-cell FTICR mass spectrometric proteomics analysis of the heat shock response in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans  

SciTech Connect

Despite intense interest in the response to radiation in D. radiodurans, little is known about how the organism responds to other stress factors. Our previous studies indicated that D. radiodurans mounts a regulated protective response to heat shock, and that expression of the groESL and dnaKJ operons are induced in response to elevated temperature. In order to gain greater insight into the heat shock response of D. radiodurans on a more global scale, we undertook the study reported here. Using whole-cell semiquantitative mass spectrometric proteomics integrated with global transcriptome microarray analyses, we have determined a core set of highly induced heat shock genes whose expression correlates well at the transcriptional and translational levels. In addition, we observed that the higher the absolute expression of a given gene at physiological conditions, the better the quantitative correlation between RNA and protein expression levels.

Schmid, Amy K.; Lipton, Mary S.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Integrated Analysis of Fuel, Technology and Emission Allowance Markets: Electric Utility Responses to the Clean Air Act Amendments o f 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed analysis of the strategic responses of the electric utility industry to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The study analyzes the competitive interactions between fuel switching, scrubbing, and emission trading options and provides information on future regional coal demands and prices, the adoption of SO2 control technologies, compliance costs, and the character of SO2 emission allowance markets.

1993-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

182

The complex soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a detailed analysis of the complex soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151 measured by the RGS instruments aboard XMM-Newton. The XMM-Newton RGS spectra demonstrate that the soft X-ray emission is extremely rich in X-ray emission lines and radiative recombination continua (RRC), with no clear evidence for any underlying continuum emission. Line emission, and the associated RRC, are clearly detected from hydrogen-like and helium-like ionization states of neon, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon. The measured lines are blueshifted with a velocity of between ?100-1000 km s ?1, with respect to the systemic velocity of NGC 4151, approximately consistent with the outflow velocities of the absorption lines observed in the UV spectrum of NGC 4151 (Kriss et al. 1995), suggestive of an origin for the UV and soft X-ray emission in the same material. Plasma diagnostics from the observed helium-like triplets, imply a range of electron temperatures of ?1-5×10 4 K and electron densities of between 10 8-10 10 cm ?3. The soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151 is extremely similar to that of NGC 1068, both in terms of the atomic species present and in terms of the relative strengths

N. J. Schurch; R. S. Warwick; R. E. Griffiths; S. M. Kahn

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Performance-Based Environmental Restoration Management Assessment (PERMA): Applying Decision Analysis to Implement Achievable Response-Action Completion Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guide is being issued by the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) to clarify the requirements for implementing the Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP) at DLA installations. This Guide reflects DLA’s continuing commitment to demonstrate and achieve protectiveness and to meet necessary, feasible, and reasonable environmental response-action obligations in the most effective and efficient manner possible. This Performance-Based Environmental Restoration Management Assessment (PERMA) Guide is designed to assist DLA environmental project teams to achieve response complete in a reasonable timeframe, while maintaining protectiveness of human health and the environment. DLA issues this Guide also to clarify and stress the importance of remedy planning and optimization activities in establishing, reducing, and validating the annual environmental liability statement. The Guide reviews how to establish realistic and achievable performance objectives by taking advantage of the flexibility inherent in the DERP Guidance and the iterative nature of the cleanup program (i.e., fiveyear review process), as directed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (as amended). Improving scientific and technical knowledge can and should be routinely integrated into the response-action planning and implementation process to ensure that the best responses are used to feasibly and reasonably achieve and efficiently sustain necessary protection.

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

User's guide for revised SPEC-4 neutron spectrum unfolding code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SPEC-4 computer code was developed in the United Kingdom to solve the spectrum unfolding problem for spherical gas-filled proton-recoil neutron spectrometers. This report describes the ORNL version of SPEC-4 which has been applied to the analysis of data from the Tower Shielding Facility. Recent modifications are described which largely pertain to the graphical output routines. In addition, the input requirements are presented in considerable detail including suggestions and recommendations based on actual operating experience. Finally, auxiliary programs are discussed which can aid the SPEC-4 user.

Johnson, J.O.; Ingersoll, D.T.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Background X-ray Spectrum of Radioactive Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) is commonly used with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to analyze the elemental compositions and microstructures of a variety of samples. For example, the microstructures of nuclear fuels are commonly investigated with this technique. However, the radioactivity of some materials introduces additional X-rays that contribute to the EDS background spectrum. These X-rays are generally not accounted for in spectral analysis software, and can cause misleading results. X-rays from internal conversion [1], Bremsstrahlung [2] radiation associated with alpha ionizations and beta particle interactions [3], and gamma rays from radioactive decay can all elevate the background of radioactive materials.

Shannon Yee; Dawn E. Janney

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Interstellar Communication: The Case for Spread Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spread spectrum, widely employed in modern digital wireless terrestrial radio systems, chooses a signal with a noise-like character and much higher bandwidth than necessary. This paper advocates spread spectrum modulation for interstellar communication, motivated by robust immunity to radio-frequency interference (RFI) of technological origin in the vicinity of the receiver while preserving full detection sensitivity in the presence of natural sources of noise. Receiver design for noise immunity alone provides no basis for choosing a signal with any specific character, therefore failing to reduce ambiguity. By adding RFI to noise immunity as a design objective, the conjunction of choice of signal (by the transmitter) together with optimum detection for noise immunity (in the receiver) leads through simple probabilistic argument to the conclusion that the signal should possess the statistical properties of a burst of white noise. Thus spread spectrum also provides an implicit coordination between transmitter a...

Messerschmitt, David G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Turbulent Density Spectrum in Solar Wind Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The density fluctuation spectrum in the solar wind reveals a Kolmogorov-like scaling with a spectral slope of -5/3 in wavenumber space. The energy transfer process in the magnetized solar wind, characterized typically by MHD turbulence, over extended length-scales remains an unresolved paradox of modern turbulence theories, raising the question of how a compressible magnetofluid exhibits a turbulent spectrum that is characteristic of an incompressible hydrodynamic fluid. To address these questions, we have undertaken three-dimensional time dependent numerical simulations of a compressible magnetohydrodynamic fluid describing super-Alfv\\'enic, supersonic and strongly magnetized plasma fluid. It is shown that a Kolmogorov-like density spectrum can develop by plasma motions that are dominated by Alfv\\'enic cascades whereas compressive modes are dissipated.

Shaikh, Dastgeer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Density Spectrum in the Solar Wind Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The density fluctuation spectrum in the solar wind reveals a Kolmogorov-like scaling with a spectral slope of -5/3 in wavenumber space. The energy transfer process in the magnetized solar wind, characterized typically by MHD turbulence, over extended length-scales remains an unresolved paradox of modern turbulence theories, raising the question of how a compressible magnetofluid exhibits a turbulent spectrum that is characteristic of an incompressible hydrodynamic fluid. To address these questions, we have undertaken three-dimensional time dependent numerical simulations of a compressible magnetohydrodynamic fluid describing super-Alfv\\'enic, supersonic and strongly magnetized plasma fluid. It is shown that a Kolmogorov-like density spectrum can develop by plasma motions that are dominated by Alfv\\'enic cascades whereas compressive modes are dissipated.

Shaikh, Dastgeer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

From the Spectrum to Inflation: An Inverse Formula for the General Slow-Roll Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a general inverse formula for extracting inflationary parameters from the observed power spectrum of cosmological perturbations. Under the general slowroll scheme, which helps to probe the properties of inflation in a model independent way, we invert the leading order, single field, power spectrum formula. We also give some physically interesting examples to demonstrate its wide applicability and illuminate its properties.

Minu Joy; Ewan D. Stewart; Jinn-ouk Gong Hyun-chul Lee

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Analysis of the frequency response of a TeO{sub 2} slow shear wave acousto-optic cell exposed to radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation testing of photonic components is not new, however component level testing to date has not completely addressed quantities which are important to system behavior. One characteristic that is of particular importance for optical processing systems is the frequency response. In this report, we present the analysis of data from an experiment designed to provide a preliminary understanding of the effects of radiation on the frequency response of acousto-optic devices. The goal of the analysis is to describe possible physical mechanisms responsible for the radiation effects and to discuss the effects on signal processing functionality. The experiment discussed in this report was designed by Sandia National Laboratories and performed by Sandia and Phillips Laboratory personnel at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR). In the experiment, a TeO{sub 2} slow shear wave acousto-optic cell was exposed to radiation from the WSMR linear accelerator. The TeO{sub 2} cell was placed in an experimental configuration which allowed swept frequency diffracted power measurements to be taken during radiation exposure and recovery. A series of exposures was performed. Each exposure consisted of between 1 to 800, 1{mu}sec radiation pulses (yielding exposures of 2.25 kRad(Si) to 913 kRad(Si)), followed by recovery time. At low total and cumulative doses, the bandshape of the frequency response (i.e. diffracted power vs. frequency) remained almost identical during and after radiation. At the higher exposures, however, the amplitude and width of the frequency response changed as the radiation continued, but returned to the original shape slowly after the radiation stopped and recovery proceeded. It is interesting to note that the location of the Bragg degeneracy does not change significantly with radiation. In this report, we discuss these effects from the perspective of anisotropic Bragg diffraction and momentum mismatch, and we discuss the effect on the signal processing functionality.

Erteza, I.A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Time-course analysis of the Shewanella amazonensis SB2B proteome in response to sodium chloride shock  

SciTech Connect

Organisms in the genus Shewanella have become models for response to environmental stress. One of the most important environmental stresses is change in osmolarity. In this study, we experimentally determine the response mechanisms of Shewanella amazonensis SB2B during osmotic stress. Osmotic stress in SB2B was induced through exposure to NaCl, and the time-course proteomics response was measured using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Protein trends were qualitatively compared to gene expression trends and to phenotypic characterization. Osmotic stress affects motility, and has also been associated with a change in the membrane fatty acid composition (due to induction of branched chain amino acid degradation pathways); however, we show this is not the case for SB2B. Although proteins and genes involved with branched chain amino acid degradation are induced, fatty acid degradation pathways are not induced and no change in the fatty acid profile occurs in SB2B as a result of osmotic shock. The most extensive response of SB2B over the time course of acclimation to high salt involves an orchestrated sequence of events comprising increased expression of signal transduction associated with motility and restricted cell division and DNA replication. After SB2B has switched to increased branched chain amino acid degradation, motility, and cellular replication proteins return to pre-perturbed levels.

Parnell, John J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Rompato, Giovanni; Nicora, Carrie D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Williamson, Ashley; Pfrender, Michael E.

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

192

Federal Spectrum Management at the National Telecommunications and Information Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Slides from National Telecommunications and Information Administration's presentation on Federal spectrum management.

193

Cosmic Ray Spectrum in Supernova Remnant Shocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform kinetic simulations of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) expanding into a uniform interstellar medium (ISM). Bohm-like diffusion assumed, and simple models for Alfvenic drift and dissipation are adopted. Phenomenological models for thermal leakage injection are considered as well. We find that the preshock gas temperature is the primary parameter that governs the cosmic ray (CR) acceleration efficiency and energy spectrum, while the CR injection rate is a secondary parameter. For SNRs in the warm ISM, if the injection fraction is larger than 10^{-4}, the DSA is efficient enough to convert more than 20 % of the SN explosion energy into CRs and the accelerated CR spectrum exhibits a concave curvature flattening to E^{-1.6}. Such a flat source spectrum near the knee energy, however, may not be reconciled with the CR spectrum observed at Earth. On the other hand, SNRs in the hot ISM, with an injection fraction smaller than 10^{-4}, are inefficient accelerators with...

Kang, Hyesung

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP). Appendix F, remediation analysis with Decision Support Tools (DSTs) for wide-area chemical hazards.  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) commissioned an assessment of the Consequence Management (CM) plans in place on military bases for response to a chemical attack. The effectiveness of the CM plans for recovering from chemical incidents was modeled using a multiple Decision Support Tools (DSTs). First, a scenario was developed based on an aerial dispersion of a chemical agent over a wide-area of land. The extent of contamination was modeled with the Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC) tool. Subsequently, the Analyzer for Wide Area Restoration Effectiveness (AWARE) tool was used to estimate the cost and time demands for remediation based on input of contamination maps, sampling and decontamination resources, strategies, rates and costs. The sampling strategies incorporated in the calculation were designed using the Visual Sample Plan (VSP) tool. Based on a gaps assessment and the DST remediation analysis, an Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP) was developed.

Hassig, Nancy L. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Pulsipher, Brent A. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Foltz, Greg W.; Hoette, Trisha Marie

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Seismic responses of unanchored electrode storage fixtures  

SciTech Connect

Two anchored electrode storage fixtures will be installed in the process cell of the Integral Fast Reactor`s Fuel Cycle Facility at ANL-W in Idaho. In addition to the concerns for structural integrity, the potential for uplifting and tipping of the fixtures during the design basis earthquake must also be examined. In the analysis, a response-spectrum method was employed to investigate tipping, while a static approach was used for the structural-integrity evaluations. The results show that the combined stresses from seismic and other loads are within the allowables permitted by the design codes. The overall vertical seismic reaction forces at the leveling pads are compressive, implying that the fixtures will remain in contact with the floor. No uplifting or tipping of the fixture will occur during the design basis earthquake.

Ting-shu Wu; Blomquist, C.A.; Haupt, H.J.; Herceg, J.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Analysis of residential, industrial and commercial sector responses to potential electricity supply constraints in the 1990s  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is considerable debate over the ability of electric generation capacity to meet the growing needs of the US economy in the 1990s. This study provides new perspective on that debate and examines the possibility of power outages resulting from electricity supply constraints. Previous studies have focused on electricity supply growth, demand growth, and on the linkages between electricity and economic growth. This study assumes the occurrence of electricity supply shortfalls in the 1990s and examines the steps that homeowners, businesses, manufacturers, and other electricity users might take in response to electricity outages.

Fisher, Z.J.; Fang, J.M.; Lyke, A.J.; Krudener, J.R.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Solar Energetic Particle Spectrum on 13 December 2006 Determined by IceTop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On 13 December 2006 the IceTop air shower array at the South Pole detected a major solar particle event. By numerically simulating the response of the IceTop tanks, which are thick Cherenkov detectors with multiple thresholds deployed at high altitude with no geomagnetic cut-off, we determined the particle energy spectrum in the energy range 0.6 to 7.6 GeV. This is the first such spectral measurement using a single instrument with a well defined viewing direction. We compare the IceTop spectrum and its time evolution with previously published results and outline plans for improved resolution of future solar particle spectra.

R. Abbasi; for the IceCube Collaboration

2008-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

198

Solar Energetic Particle Spectrum on 13 December 2006 Determined by IceTop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On 13 December 2006 the IceTop air shower array at the South Pole detected a major solar particle event. By numerically simulating the response of the IceTop tanks, which are thick Cherenkov detectors with multiple thresholds deployed at high altitude with no geomagnetic cut-off, we determined the particle energy spectrum in the energy range 0.6 to 7.6 GeV. This is the first such spectral measurement using a single instrument with a well defined viewing direction. We compare the IceTop spectrum and its time evolution with previously published results and outline plans for improved resolution of future solar particle spectra.

Abbasi, R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Enhanced Interpretation of Electromagnetic Signature Analysis for Large Machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project developed and applied frequency domain models to enhance interpretation of electromagnetic signature analysis (EMSA) for large electrical generators. The project's rationale was to provide a prediction of the native frequency response of the winding calculated from machine dimensions and design data so that the positions of the resonances would be known a priore. This procedure allowed augmentation of an EMSA spectrum at the characteristic resonant frequencies of the machine in the interpret...

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

200

Conversion of electron spectrum associated with fission into the antineutrino spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The accuracy of the procedure that converts the experimentally determined electron spectrum associated with fission of the nuclear fuels ^{235}U, ^{239}Pu, ^{241}Pu, and ^{238}U into the $\\bar{\

Petr Vogel

2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Conversion of electron spectrum associated with fission into the antineutrino spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The accuracy of the procedure that converts the experimentally determined electron spectrum associated with fission of the nuclear fuels ^{235}U, ^{239}Pu, ^{241}Pu, and ^{238}U into the $\\bar{\

Vogel, Petr

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

GOTHIC Analysis of Containment Fan Cooler Unit (CFCU) Cooling Water Response Following a LOCA with Loss of Offsite Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a simplified method to predict the thermal hydraulic status of a containment fan cooling system under a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) with loss of off-site power (LOOP). GOTHIC 5.0c, a general purpose thermal hydraulics computer program for analysis of nuclear power plants and confinements buildings, has been used for the calculation, and the results have been compared with those from RETRAN.

1997-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

203

Fast CMB Power Spectrum Estimation of Temperature and Polarisation with Gabor Transforms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extend the analysis of Gabor transforms on a Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature map (Hansen, Gorski and Hivon 2002) to polarisation. We study the temperature and polarisation power spectra on the cut sky, the so-called pseudo power spectra. The transformation kernels relating the full-sky polarisation power spectra and the polarisation pseudo power spectra are found to be similar to the kernel for the temperature power spectrum. This fact is used to construct a fast power spectrum estimation algorithm using the pseudo power spectrum of temperature and polarisation as data vectors in a maximum likelihood approach. Using the pseudo power spectra as input to the likelihood analysis solves the problem of having to invert huge matrices which makes the standard likelihood approach infeasible.

Frode K. Hansen; Krzysztof M. Gorski

2002-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

204

CELL POPULATIONS AND CELL PROLIFERATION IN THE IN VITRO RESPONSE OF NORMAL MOUSE SPLEEN TO HETEROLOGOUS ERYTHROCYTES*,$ ANALYSIS BY "£1i1 ~ HOT PULSE TECHNIQUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been shown in the accompanying paper (1) that spleen cell suspensions from normal mice can be immunized to heterologous erythrocytes in an in vitro system. When sheep erythrocytes are added at the initiation of culture, the number of antibody-forming cells (as determined by the hemolytic plaque assay) rises from an initial value of approximately 1 per 106 to 1,000 per 10 e recovered cells 4 days later in a typical experiment. The kinetics of the response follow an approximately exponential form at least in the later time periods. The assay system measures 19S antibodyforming cells (2) and the response is "primary " in the sense that it follows the first experimental exposure to antigen. Previous in vivo studies have indicated that the increase is largely the result of proliferation of precursor cells and they have further suggested that cell proliferation begins after an 18-24 hr lag period (for a review see reference 3). These studies, however, leave some room for doubt, as will be discussed below, and the problem has been reinvestigated in this in vitro system as part of a more general analysis of the cellular response to antigen. The questions asked here are: (a) at what times during the

W. Dutton, Ph.D.; Robert; I. Mishell

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

The complex soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a detailed analysis of the complex soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151 measured by the RGS instruments aboard XMM-Newton. The XMM-Newton RGS spectra demonstrate that the soft X-ray emission is extremely rich in X-ray emission lines and radiative recombination continua (RRC), with no clear evidence for any underlying continuum emission. Line emission, and the associated RRC, are clearly detected from hydrogen-like and helium-like ionization states of neon, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon. The measured lines are blueshifted with a velocity of between ~100-1000 km/s, with respect to the systemic velocity of NGC 4151, approximately consistent with the outflow velocities of the absorption lines observed in the UV, suggestive of an origin for the UV and soft X-ray emission in the same material. Plasma diagnostics imply a range of electron temperatures of ~1-5x10^4 K and electron densities of between 10^8-10^10 cm^-3. The soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151 is extremely similar to that of NGC 1068, suggesting that the soft X-ray excesses observed in many Seyfert galaxies may be composed of similar emission features. Modelling the RGS spectra in terms of emission from photoionized and photoexcited gas in an ionization cone reproduces all of the hydrogen-like and helium-like emission features observed in the soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151 in detail and confirms the correspondence between the soft X-ray emission in NGC 4151 and NGC 1068.

N. J. Schurch; R. S. Warwick; R. E. Griffiths; S. M. Kahn

2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

206

Initial Stage Affects Survival Even After Complete Pathologic Remission is Achieved in Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer: Analysis of 70 Patients With Pathologic Major Response After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To analyze outcomes and factors predictive for recurrence and survival in patients with operable esophageal carcinoma who achieved pathologic complete response (PCR) or microscopic residual disease (MRD) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Materials and Methods: Outcomes were assessed in 70 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who achieved pathologic major response (53 with PCR and 17 with MRD) after preoperative CRT. Results: At a median follow-up of 38.6 months for surviving patients, 17 of 70 patients (24.3%) experienced disease recurrence and 31 (44.3%) died. Clinical stage (II vs III; p = 0.013) and pathologic response (PCR vs. MRD; p = 0.014) were independent predictors of disease recurrence. Median overall survival (OS) was 99.6 months (95% CI, 44.1-155.1 months) and the 5-year OS rate was 57%. Median recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 71.5 months (95% CI, 39.5-103.6 months) and the 5-year RFS rate was 51.3%. Median OS of patients with Stage II and Stage III disease was 108.8 months and 39.9 months, respectively, and the 5-year OS rates were 68.2% and 27.0%, respectively (p = 0.0003). In a subgroup of patients with PCR, median OS and RFS were also significantly different according to clinical stage. Multivariate analysis showed that clinical stage was an independent predictor of RFS (p = 0.01) and OS (p = 0.008). Conclusions: Even though patients achieved major response after preoperative CRT, pretreatment clinical stage is an important prognostic marker for recurrence and survival. Patients with MRD have an increased recurrence risk but similar survival compared with patients achieved PCR.

Kim, Min Kyoung [Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Internal Medicine, Yeungnam University, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung-Ja [Department of Pathology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seung-Il; Kim, Yong Hee [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ho-Young; Shin, Ji Hoon [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hwoon Yong; Lee, Gin Hyug; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jin-Sook [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Bae [Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: sbkim3@amc.seoul.kr

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Changes in the halo formation rates due to features in the primordial spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Features in the primordial scalar power spectrum provide a possible roadway to describe the outliers at the low multipoles in the WMAP data. Apart from the CMB angular power spectrum, these features can also alter the matter power spectrum and, thereby, the formation of the large scale structure. Carrying out a complete numerical analysis, we investigate the effects of primordial features on the formation rates of the halos. We consider a few different inflationary models that lead to features in the scalar power spectrum and an improved fit to the CMB data, and analyze the corresponding imprints on the formation of halos. Performing a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis with the WMAP seven year data and the SDSS halo power spectrum from LRG DR7 for the models of our interest, we arrive at the parameter space of the models allowed by the data. We illustrate that, inflationary potentials, such as the quadratic potential with sinusoidal modulations and the axion monodromy model, which generate certain repeated, oscillatory features in the inflationary perturbation spectrum, do not induce a substantial difference in the number density of halos at their best fit values, when compared with, say, a nearly scale invariant spectrum as is generated by the standard quadratic potential. However, we find that the number density and the formation rates of halos change by about 13-22% for halo masses ranging over 10^4-10^14 solar mass, for potential parameters that lie within 2-sigma around the best fit values arrived at from the aforesaid joint constraints. We briefly discuss the implications of our results.

Dhiraj Kumar Hazra

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

208

The complex soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a detailed analysis of the complex soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151 measured by the RGS instruments aboard XMM-Newton. The XMM-Newton RGS spectra demonstrate that the soft X-ray emission is extremely rich in X-ray emission lines and radiative recombination continua (RRC), with no clear evidence for any underlying continuum emission. Line emission, and the associated RRC, are clearly detected from hydrogen-like and helium-like ionization states of neon, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon. The measured lines are blueshifted with a velocity of between ~100-1000 km/s, with respect to the systemic velocity of NGC 4151, approximately consistent with the outflow velocities of the absorption lines observed in the UV, suggestive of an origin for the UV and soft X-ray emission in the same material. Plasma diagnostics imply a range of electron temperatures of ~1-5x10^4 K and electron densities of between 10^8-10^10 cm^-3. The soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151 is extremely similar to that of NGC 1068, suggesting that th...

Schurch, N J; Griffiths, R E; Kahn, S M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Statistical issues in radiation dose-response analysis of employees of the nuclear industry in Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poisson regression methods are used to describe dose-response relations for cancer mortality for a subcohort of 28,347 white male radiation workers. Age specific baseline rates are described using both internal and external (US white male) rates. Regression analyses are based on an analytic data structure (ADS) that consists of a table of observed deaths, expected deaths, and person-years at risk for each combination of levels of seven risk factors. The factors are socioeconomic status, length of employment, birth cohort, age at risk, facility, internal exposure, and external exposure. Each observation in the ADS consists of the index value of each of the stratifying factors, the observed deaths, the expected deaths, the person-years, and the ten year lagged average cumulative dose. Regression diagnostics show that a linear exponential relative risk model is not appropriate for these data. Results are presented using a main effects model for factors other than external radiation, and an excess relative risk term for cumulative external radiation dose.

Frome, E.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Watkins, J.P. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States). Center for Epidemiologic Research

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The Energy Spectrum of Fronts: Time Evolution of Shocks in Burgers‚ Equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Andrews and Hoskins used semigeostrophic theory to argue that the energy spectrum of a front should decay like the ?8/3 power of the wavenumber. They note, however, that their inviscid analysis is restricted to the very moment of breaking; that ...

John P. Boyd

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Department of Energy to Host Spectrum Policy Seminar for the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy to Host Spectrum Policy Seminar for the Utility Sector on December 8, 2010 Department of Energy to Host Spectrum Policy Seminar for the Utility Sector on...

212

A platform for dynamic spectrum access network experimentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to describe a novel and sophisticated platform for dynamic spectrum access experimentation. The platform comprises, software, hardware and dedicated spectrum. The platform has been designed with experimentation in mind and ...

L. E. Doyle; K. Nolan; T. K. Forde; P. Argryoudis; P. Sutton; D. Sarath; G. Baldwin; M. Ammann

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Enhancing spectrum utilization through cooperation and cognition in wireless systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have seen a proliferation of wireless technologies and devices in recent years. The resulting explosion of wireless demand has put immense pressure on available spectrum. Improving spectrum utilization is therefore ...

Rahul, Hariharan Shankar, 1975-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

DOE/SEA-03; Special Environmental Analysis for the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Actions Taken in Response to the Cerro Grande Fire at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (September 2000)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis for Actions Taken in Response to the Cerro Grande Fire at LANL Analysis for Actions Taken in Response to the Cerro Grande Fire at LANL DOE/LAAO September 2000 S-1 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, is issuing this special environmental analysis (SEA) to document its assessment of impacts associated with emergency activities conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos County, New Mexico, in response to major disaster conditions caused by the recent wildfire known as the Cerro Grande Fire. This wildfire burned about 7,650 1 acres (ac) (3,061 hectares [ha]) within the boundaries of LANL and about an additional 35,500 ac (14,200 ha) in neighboring areas. DOE's emergency response to the threat of this fire began with certain preventative actions undertaken immediately before

215

Large Cohort Dose-Volume Response Analysis of Parotid Gland Function After Radiotherapy: Intensity-Modulated Versus Conventional Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare parotid gland dose-volume response relationships in a large cohort of patients treated with intensity-modulated (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Methods and materials: A total of 221 patients (64 treated with IMRT, 157 with CRT) with various head-and-neck malignancies were prospectively evaluated. The distribution of tumor subsites in both groups was unbalanced. Stimulated parotid flow rates were measured before and 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year after radiotherapy. Parotid gland dose-volume histograms were derived from computed tomography-based treatment planning. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model proposed by Lyman was fit to the data. A complication was defined as stimulated parotid flow ratio gland dose using Poisson regression modeling. Results: One year after radiotherapy, NTCP curves for IMRT and CRT were comparable with a TD{sub 50} (uniform dose leading to a 50% complication probability) of 38 and 40 Gy, respectively. Until 6 months after RT, corrected for mean dose, different complication probabilities existed for IMRT vs. CRT. The relative risk of a complication for IMRT vs. CRT after 6 weeks was 1.42 (95% CI 1.21-1.67), after 6 months 1.41 (95% CI; 1.12-1.77), and at 1 year 1.21 (95% CI 0.87-1.68), after correcting for mean dose. Conclusions: One year after radiotherapy, no difference existed in the mean dose-based NTCP curves for IMRT and CRT. Early after radiotherapy (up to 6 months) mean dose based (Lyman) models failed to fully describe the effects of radiotherapy on the parotid glands.

Dijkema, Tim [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)], E-mail: T.Dijkema@umcutrecht.nl; Terhaard, Chris H.J.; Roesink, Judith M.; Braam, Petra M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gils, Carla H. van [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Moerland, Marinus A.; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLOR ENERGY SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports solar light from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a large core polymer fiber optic. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of solar lighting and electric lighting. A benchmark prototype system has been developed to evaluate the HSL system. Sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. A secondary mirror consisting of eight planar-segmented mirrors directs the visible part of the spectrum to eight fibers (receiver) and subsequently to eight luminaires. This results in about 8,200 lumens incident at each fiber tip. Each fiber can illuminate about 16.7 m{sup 2} (180 ft{sup 2}) of office space. The IR spectrum is directed to a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) array to produce electricity. During this reporting period, the project team made advancements in the design of the second generation (Alpha) system. For the Alpha system, the eight individual 12 mm fibers have been replaced with a centralized bundle of 3 mm fibers. The TRNSYS Full-Spectrum Solar Energy System model has been updated and new components have been added. The TPV array and nonimaging device have been tested and progress has been made in the fiber transmission models. A test plan was developed for both the high-lumen tests and the study to determine the non-energy benefits of daylighting. The photobioreactor team also made major advancements in the testing of model scale and bench top lab-scale systems.

Byard D. Wood

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Burning actinides in very hard spectrum reactors  

SciTech Connect

The major unresolved problem in the nuclear industry is the ultimate disposition of the waste products of light water reactors. The study demonstrates the feasibility of designing a very hard spectrum actinide burner reactor (ABR). A 1100 MW/sub t/ ABR design fueled entirely with actinides reprocessed from light water reactor (LWR) wastes is proposed as both an ultimate disposal mechanism for actinides and a means of concurrently producing usable power. Actinides from discharged ABR fuel are recycled to the ABR while fission products are routed to a permanent repository. As an integral part of a large energy park, each such ABR would dispose of the waste actinides from 2 LWRs.

Robinson, A.H.; Shirley, G.W.; Prichard, A.W.; Trapp, T.J.

1978-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

218

Bilinear control of discrete spectrum Schrödinger operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bilinear control problem of the Schr\\"odinger equation $i\\frac{\\partial}{\\partial t}\\psi(t)$ $=(A+u(t) B)\\psi(t)$, where $u(t)$ is the control function, is investigated through topological irreducibility of the set $\\mathfrak{M}=\\{e^{-it (A+u B)}, u\\in \\mathbb{R}, t>0\\}$ of bounded operators. This allows to prove the approximate controllability of such systems when the uncontrolled Hamiltonian $A$ has a simple discrete spectrum and under an appropriate assumption on $B$.

Kais Ammari; Zied Ammari

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

Spectrum tailoring of the neutron energy spectrum in the context of delayed neutron detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the purpose of measuring plutonium mass in spent fuel, a delayed neutron instrument is of particular interest since, if properly designed, the delayed neutron signal from {sup 235}U is significantly stronger than the signature from {sup 239}Pu or {sup 241}Pu. A key factor in properly designing a delayed neutron instrument is to minimize the fission of {sup 238}U. This minimization is achieved by keeping the interrogating neutron spectrum below {approx} 1 MeV. In the context of spent fuel measurements it is desirable to use a 14 MeV (deuterium and tritium) neutron generator for economic reasons. Spectrum tailoring is the term used to describe the inclusion of material between the 14 MeV neutrons and the interrogated object that lower the neutron energy through nuclear reactions and moderation. This report quantifies the utility of different material combination for spectrum tailoring.

Koehler, William E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Steve J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Nathan P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fensin, Mike L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Information content in the halo-model dark-matter power spectrum II: Multiple cosmological parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the cosmological Fisher information in the non-linear dark-matter power spectrum in the context of the halo model. We find that there is a plateau in information content on translinear scales which is generic to all cosmological parameters we tried. There is a rise in information on smaller scales, but we find that it is quite degenerate among different cosmological parameters (except, perhaps, the tilt). This suggests that it could be difficult to constrain cosmological parameters using the non-linear regime of the dark-matter power spectrum. We suggest ways to get around this problem, such as removing the largest haloes from consideration in survey analysis.

Mark C. Neyrinck; István Szapudi

2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

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221

DOE/SEA-03; Special Environmental Analysis for the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Actions Taken in Response to the Cerro Grande Fire at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (September 2000)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis Analysis Actions taken in Response to the Cerro Grande Fire at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico September 2000 U.S. Department of Energy Los Alamos Area Office Los Alamos, New Mexico for the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration DOE/SEA-03 COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Title: Special Environmental Analysis for the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Actions Taken in Response to the Cerro Grande Fire at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico Contacts: For further information on this Special Environmental Analysis (SEA) or to provide comments contact: Ms. Elizabeth Withers SEA Document Manager Los Alamos Area Office,

222

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF THE ANGULAR POWER SPECTRUM OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPIES IN THE WMAP DATA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies is one of the most important characteristics in cosmology that can shed light on the properties of the universe such as its geometry and total density. Using flat sky approximation and Fourier analysis, we estimate the angular power spectrum from an ensemble of the least foreground-contaminated square patches from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe W and V frequency band map. This method circumvents the issue of foreground cleaning and that of breaking orthogonality in spherical harmonic analysis because we are able to mask out the bright Galactic plane region, thereby rendering a direct measurement of the angular power spectrum. We test and confirm the Gaussian statistical characteristic of the selected patches, from which the first and second acoustic peaks of the power spectrum are reproduced, and the third peak is clearly visible, albeit with some noise residual at the tail.

Chiang, Lung-Yih [Institute of Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, 1, Rooservolt Road, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Fei-Fan, E-mail: lychiang@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

223

Spectrum and Charge Ratio of Vertical Cosmic Ray Muons up to Momenta of 2.5 TeV/c  

SciTech Connect

The ALEPH detector at LEP has been used to measure the momentum spectrum and charge ratio of vertical cosmic ray muons underground. The sea-level cosmic ray muon spectrum for momenta up to 2.5 TeV/c has been obtained by correcting for the overburden of 320 meter water equivalent (mwe). The results are compared with Monte Carlo models for air shower development in the atmosphere. From the analysis of the spectrum the total flux and the spectral index of the cosmic ray primaries is inferred. The charge ratio suggests a dominantly light composition of cosmic ray primaries with energies up to 10{sup 15} eV.

Schmelling, M.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; Hashim, N.O.; /Kenyatta U. Coll.; Grupen, C.; /Siegen U.; Luitz, S.; /SLAC; Maciuc, F.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; Mailov, A.; /Siegen U.; Muller, A.-S.; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.; Sander, H.-G.; /Mainz U., Inst. Phys.; Schmeling, S.; /CERN; Tcaciuc, R.; /Siegen U.; Wachsmuth, H.; /CERN; Zuber, K.; /Dresden, Tech. U.

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

224

Full Spectrum Light Therapy Full spectrum light bulbs are said to not only improve mood, but also  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Full Spectrum Light Therapy Full spectrum light bulbs are said to not only improve mood, but also spectrum light bulbs produce light that is seen by the human eye in a bluish-white tint. Where is full energy, learning ability, and behavior. Light therapy mimics outdoor light and causes a biochemical

Bates, Rebecca A.

225

A Photoionization Model For The Soft X-Ray Spectrum Of NGC 4151  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present analysis of archival data from multiple XMM-Newton observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151. Spectral data from the RGS instruments reveal several strong soft X-ray emission lines, chiefly from hydrogen-like and helium-like oxygen, nitrogen, neon and carbon. Radiative recombination continua (RRC) from oxygen and carbon are also detected. Our analysis suggests that the emission data are consistent with photoionization. Using the CLOUDY photoionization code, we found that, while a two-component, high column density model (10e23 cm-2) with low covering factor proved adequate in reproducing all detected Lyman series lines, it proved insufficient in modeling He-like triplets observed (neon, oxygen, and nitrogen). If resonance line data were ignored, the two-component model was sufficient to match flux from intercombination and forbidden lines. However, with the inclusion of resonance line data, He-like triplets could no longer be modeled with only two components. We found that observed oxygen G and R ratios especially were anomalous in parameter space investigated. We investigated, and were forced to dismiss, the possibility that a third purely collisional component could be responsible for enhanced resonance line contributions. We succeeded in modeling the observed spectrum with the addition of a third, lower column density (10e20.5 cm-2) component with non-zero microturbulence and high covering factor. While sufficient to reproduce observed soft X-ray flux, our model faces certain shortcomings, particularly in a less-than-ideal visual fit to the line profile. Two of the three emission model components bear similarities to components determined by Kraemer et al. (2005) in their study of NGC 4151 absorption spectra.

B. K. Armentrout; S. B. Kraemer; T. J. Turner

2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

226

Area spectrum of the Schwarzschild black hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a Hamiltonian theory of spherically symmetric vacuum Einstein gravity under Kruskal-like boundary conditions in variables associated with the Einstein-Rosen wormhole throat. The configuration variable in the reduced classical theory is the radius of the throat, in a foliation that is frozen at the left hand side infinity but asymptotically Minkowski at the right hand side infinity, and such that the proper time at the throat agrees with the right hand side Minkowski time. The classical Hamiltonian is numerically equal to the Schwarzschild mass. Within a class of Hamiltonian quantizations, we show that the spectrum of the Hamiltonian operator is discrete and bounded below, and can be made positive definite. The large eigenvalues behave asymptotically as~\\sqrt{2k}, where k is an integer. The resulting area spectrum agrees with that proposed by Bekenstein and Mukhanov. Analogous results hold in the presence of a negative cosmological constant and electric charge. The classical input that led to the q...

Louko, J; Louko, Jorma; Makela, Jarmo

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Area spectrum of the Schwarzschild black hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a Hamiltonian theory of spherically symmetric vacuum Einstein gravity under Kruskal-like boundary conditions in variables associated with the Einstein-Rosen wormhole throat. The configuration variable in the reduced classical theory is the radius of the throat, in a foliation that is frozen at the left hand side infinity but asymptotically Minkowski at the right hand side infinity, and such that the proper time at the throat agrees with the right hand side Minkowski time. The classical Hamiltonian is numerically equal to the Schwarzschild mass. Within a class of Hamiltonian quantizations, we show that the spectrum of the Hamiltonian operator is discrete and bounded below, and can be made positive definite. The large eigenvalues behave asymptotically as~$\\sqrt{2k}$, where $k$ is an integer. The resulting area spectrum agrees with that proposed by Bekenstein and others. Analogous results hold in the presence of a negative cosmological constant and electric charge. The classical input that led to the quantum results is discussed.

Jorma Louko; Jarmo Makela

1996-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

228

The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF  

SciTech Connect

The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Spectrum flipping for wavelet packet decomposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, it is shown that the higher compression performance of biorthogonal wavelet filters over orthogonal wavelet filters is the combined effect from (1) the asymmetry of the frequency responses of the biorthogonal wavelet filters and (2) the ... Keywords: compression performance of wavelets, frequency responses of biorthogonal wavelet filters, wavelet packet decomposition

Jianyu Lin

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Engineering responses to pandemics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Focusing on pandemic influenza, this chapter approaches the planning for and response to such a major worldwide health event as a complex engineering systems problem. Action-oriented analysis of pandemics requires a broad inclusion of academic disciplines ...

Richard C. Larson; Karima R. Nigmatulina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Corrections on energy spectrum and scatterings for fast neutron radiography at NECTAR facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron spectrum and scattered neutrons caused distortions are major problems in fast neutron radiography and should be considered for improving the image quality. This paper puts emphasis on the removal of these image distortions and deviations for fast neutron radiography performed at the NECTAR facility of the research reactor FRM-II in Technische Universit\\"at M\\"unchen (TUM), Germany. The NECTAR energy spectrum is analyzed and established to modify the influence caused by neutron spectrum, as well as the Point Scattered Function (PScF) simulated by the Monte-Carlo program MCNPX is used to evaluate scattering effects from the object and improve images qualities. Good analysis results prove the sounded effects of above two corrections.

Shu-Quan, Liu; Hang, Li; Yu-Bin, Zou; Yuan-Rong, Lu; Zhi-Yu, Guo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Lyman Alpha Flux Power Spectrum and Its Covariance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the flux power spectrum and its covariance using simulated Lyman alpha forests. We find that pseudo-hydro techniques are good approximations of hydrodynamical simulations at high redshift. However, the pseudo-hydro techniques fail at low redshift because they are insufficient for characterizing some components of the low-redshift intergalactic medium, notably the warm-hot intergalactic medium. Hence, to use the low-redshift Lyman alpha flux power spectrum to constrain cosmology, one would need realistic hydrodynamical simulations. By comparing one-dimensional mass statistics with flux statistics, we show that the nonlinear transform between density and flux quenches the fluctuations so that the flux power spectrum is much less sensitive to cosmological parameters than the one-dimensional mass power spectrum. The covariance of the flux power spectrum is nearly Gaussian. As such, the uncertainties of the underlying mass power spectrum could still be large, even though the flux power spectrum can be p...

Zhan, H; Eisenstein, D J; Katz, N; Zhan, Hu; Dave, Romeel; Eisenstein, Daniel; Katz, Neal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand Response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

234

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

235

Wind Sea and Swell Separation of 1D Wave Spectrum by a Spectrum Integration Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an earlier paper by Wang and Hwang, a wave steepness method was introduced to separate the wind sea and swell of the 1D wave spectrum without relying on external information, such as the wind speed. Later, the method was found to produce the ...

Paul A. Hwang; Francisco J. Ocampo-Torres; Héctor García-Nava

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Chapter 9: Photovoltaic DevicesChapter 9: Photovoltaic Devices Solar energy spectrumSolar energy spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Photovoltaic devices or solar cells convert thePhotovoltaic devices or solar cells convert the incident solar 4 Solar cell plant #12;Cars powered by photovoltaic devices PHYS 5320 Chapter Nine 5 #12;SolarChapter 9: Photovoltaic DevicesChapter 9: Photovoltaic Devices Solar energy spectrumSolar energy

Wang, Jianfang

237

Is Biochemical Response More Important Than Duration of Neoadjuvant Hormone Therapy Before Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer? An Analysis of the 3- Versus 8-Month Randomized Trial  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To ascertain whether biochemical response to neoadjuvant androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) before radiotherapy (RT), rather than duration, is the critical determinant of benefit in the multimodal treatment of localized prostate cancer, by comparing outcomes of subjects from the Canadian multicenter 3- vs 8-month trial with a pre-RT, post-hormone PSA (PRPH-PSA) <=0.1 ng/ml vs those >0.1 ng/ml. Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2001, 378 men with localized prostate cancer were randomized to 3 or 8 months of neoadjuvant ADT before RT. On univariate analysis, survival indices were compared between those with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml vs >0.1 ng/ml, for all patients and subgroups, including treatment arm, risk group, and gleason Score. Multivariate analysis identified independent predictors of outcome. Results: Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was significantly higher for those with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml compared with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml (55.3% vs 49.4%, p = 0.014). No difference in survival indices was observed between treatment arms. There was no difference in bDFS between patients in the 3- and 8-month arms with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml nor those with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml. bDFS was significantly higher for high-risk patients with PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml compared with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml (57.0% vs 29.4%, p = 0.017). Multivariate analysis identified PRPH-PSA (p = 0.041), Gleason score (p = 0.001), initial PSA (p = 0.025), and T-stage (p = 0.003), not ADT duration, as independent predictors of outcome. Conclusion: Biochemical response to neoadjuvant ADT before RT, not duration, appears to be the critical determinant of benefit in the setting of combined therapy. Individually tailored ADT duration based on PRPH-PSA would maximize therapeutic gain, while minimizing the duration of ADT and its related toxicities.

Alexander, Abraham, E-mail: aalexander3@bccancer.bc.c [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Crook, Juanita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Jones, Stuart [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada); Malone, Shawn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Regional Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Bowen, Julie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northeastern Ontario Regional Cancer Center, Sudbury, ON (Canada); Truong, Pauline; Pai, Howard; Ludgate, Charles [Radiation Therapy Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, BC (Canada)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Analysis of supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle control strategies and dynamic response for Generation IV Reactors.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of specific control strategies and dynamic behavior of the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle has been extended to the two reactor types selected for continued development under the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative; namely, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) and the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). Direct application of the standard S-CO{sub 2} recompression cycle to the VHTR was found to be challenging because of the mismatch in the temperature drop of the He gaseous reactor coolant through the He-to-CO{sub 2} reactor heat exchanger (RHX) versus the temperature rise of the CO{sub 2} through the RHX. The reference VHTR features a large temperature drop of 450 C between the assumed core outlet and inlet temperatures of 850 and 400 C, respectively. This large temperature difference is an essential feature of the VHTR enabling a lower He flow rate reducing the required core velocities and pressure drop. In contrast, the standard recompression S-CO{sub 2} cycle wants to operate with a temperature rise through the RHX of about 150 C reflecting the temperature drop as the CO{sub 2} expands from 20 MPa to 7.4 MPa in the turbine and the fact that the cycle is highly recuperated such that the CO{sub 2} entering the RHX is effectively preheated. Because of this mismatch, direct application of the standard recompression cycle results in a relatively poor cycle efficiency of 44.9%. However, two approaches have been identified by which the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can be successfully adapted to the VHTR and the benefits of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle, especially a significant gain in cycle efficiency, can be realized. The first approach involves the use of three separate cascaded S-CO{sub 2} cycles. Each S-CO{sub 2} cycle is coupled to the VHTR through its own He-to-CO{sub 2} RHX in which the He temperature is reduced by 150 C. The three respective cycles have efficiencies of 54, 50, and 44%, respectively, resulting in a net cycle efficiency of 49.3 %. The other approach involves reducing the minimum cycle pressure significantly below the critical pressure such that the temperature drop in the turbine is increased while the minimum cycle temperature is maintained above the critical temperature to prevent the formation of a liquid phase. The latter approach also involves the addition of a precooler and a third compressor before the main compressor to retain the benefits of compression near the critical point with the main compressor. For a minimum cycle pressure of 1 MPa, a cycle efficiency of 49.5% is achieved. Either approach opens up the door to applying the SCO{sub 2} cycle to the VHTR. In contrast, the SFR system typically has a core outlet-inlet temperature difference of about 150 C such that the standard recompression cycle is ideally suited for direct application to the SFR. The ANL Plant Dynamics Code has been modified for application to the VHTR and SFR when the reactor side dynamic behavior is calculated with another system level computer code such as SAS4A/SYSSYS-1 in the SFR case. The key modification involves modeling heat exchange in the RHX, accepting time dependent tabular input from the reactor code, and generating time dependent tabular input to the reactor code such that both the reactor and S-CO{sub 2} cycle sides can be calculated in a convergent iterative scheme. This approach retains the modeling benefits provided by the detailed reactor system level code and can be applied to any reactor system type incorporating a S-CO{sub 2} cycle. This approach was applied to the particular calculation of a scram scenario for a SFR in which the main and intermediate sodium pumps are not tripped and the generator is not disconnected from the electrical grid in order to enhance heat removal from the reactor system thereby enhancing the cooldown rate of the Na-to-CO{sub 2} RHX. The reactor side is calculated with SAS4A/SASSYS-1 while the S-CO{sub 2} cycle is calculated with the Plant Dynamics Code with a number of iterations over a timescale of 500 seconds. It is found that the RHX u

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

239

Spectrum of gravitational radiation from primordial turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy injection into the early universe can induce turbulent motions of the primordial plasma, which in turn act as a source for gravitational radiation. Earlier work computed the amplitude and characteristic frequency of the relic gravitational wave background, as a function of the total energy injected and the stirring scale of the turbulence. This paper computes the frequency spectrum of relic gravitational radiation from a turbulent source of the stationary Kolmogoroff form which acts for a given duration, making no other approximations. We also show that the limit of long source wavelengths, commonly employed in aeroacoustic problems, is an excellent approximation. The gravitational waves from cosmological turbulence around the electroweak energy scale will be detectable by future space-based laser interferometers for a substantial range of turbulence parameters.

Gogoberidze, Grigol [Centre for Plasma Astrophysics, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); National Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, 2A Kazbegi Ave, GE-0160 Tbilisi (Georgia); Kahniashvili, Tina [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Plaza, New York, New York 10003 (United States); National Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, 2A Kazbegi Ave, GE-0160 Tbilisi (Georgia); Kosowsky, Arthur [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Automated mass spectrum generation for new physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe an extension of the FeynRules package dedicated to the automatic generation of the mass spectrum associated with any Lagrangian-based quantum field theory. After introducing a simplified way to implement particle mixings, we present a new class of FeynRules functions allowing both for the analytical computation of all the model mass matrices and for the generation of a C++ package, dubbed ASperGe. This program can then be further employed for a numerical evaluation of the rotation matrices necessary to diagonalize the field basis. We illustrate these features in the context of the Two-Higgs-Doublet Model, the Minimal Left-Right Symmetric Standard Model and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model.

Adam Alloul; Jorgen D'Hondt; Karen De Causmaecker; Benjamin Fuks; Michel Rausch de Traubenberg

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Uncertainty of the Solar Neutrino Energy Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar neutrino spectrum measured by the Super-Kamiokande shows an excess in high energy bins, which may be explained by vacuum oscillation solution or $hep$ neutrino effect. Here we reconsider an uncertainty of the data caused by the tail of the energy resolution function. Events observed at energy higher than 13.5 MeV are induced by the tail of the resolution. At Super-Kamiokande precision level this uncertainty is no more than few percent within a Gaussian tail. But a power-law decay tail at 3 $\\sigma$ results considerable excesses in these bins, which may be another possible explanation of the anomaly in 708d(825d) data.

Q. Y. Liu

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

242

The Effects of Flux Spectrum Perturbation on Transmutation of Actinides: Optimizing the Production of Transcurium Isotopes  

SciTech Connect

This research presented herein involves the optimization of transcurium production in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Due to the dependence of isotope cross sections on incoming neutron energy, the efficiency with which an isotope is transmuted is highly dependent upon the flux spectrum. There are certain energy bands in which the rate of fission of transcurium production feedstock materials is minimized, relative to the rate of non-fission absorptions. It is proposed that by perturbing the flux spectrum, it is possible to increase the amount of key isotopes, such as 249Bk and 252Cf, that are produced during a transmutation cycle, relative to the consumption of feedstock material. This optimization process is carried out by developing an iterative objective framework involving problem definition, flux spectrum and cross section analysis, simulated transmutation, and analysis of final yields and transmutation parameters. It is shown that it is possible to perturb the local flux spectrum in the transcurium target by perturbing the composition of the target. It is further shown that these perturbations are able to alter the target yields in a non-negligible way. Future work is necessary to develop the optimization framework, and identify the necessary algorithms to update the problem definition based upon progress towards the optimization goals.

Hogle, Susan L [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Alexander, Charles W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Decision-making in autism spectrum conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................................................................. 24 2.2.2 Design......................................................................................................................................... 25 2.2.3 Data analysis... ..................................................................................................... 35 2.5 Discussion ...................................................................................................................... 36 vi Chapter 3: Materials and methods ............................................................... 39 3...

Luke, Lydia R.

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

244

Management Responsibilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Responsibilities Management Responsibilities Depleted UF6 Management Responsibilities DOE has responsibility for safe and efficient management of approximately 700,000 metric tons of depleted UF6. Organizational Responsibilities In the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for managing all the depleted uranium that has been generated by the government and has been declared surplus to national defense needs. In addition, as a result of two memoranda of agreement that have been signed between the DOE and USEC, the DOE has assumed management responsibility for approximately 145,000 metric tons of depleted UF6 that has been or will be generated by USEC. Any additional depleted UF6 that USEC generates will be USEC's responsibility to manage. DOE Management Responsibility

245

Spin--wave spectrum of an amorphous ferromagnet  

SciTech Connect

The spin-wave spectruin of an amorphous Heisenberg ferromagnet is calculated by a diagrammatic expansion making use of a transformation due to Taylor and Wu Phys. Rev., B2: 1752 (1970). The upper limit of the spectrum is found to occur at frequencies below that of the corresponding crystalline system, while the low-frequency part of the spectrum is enhanced. Internal van Hove singularities are absent in the spin-wave spectrum of the amorphous ferromagnet. (auth)

Gubernatis, J.E.; Taylor, P.L.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Meta-analysis for deriving age- and gender-specific dose-response relationships between urinary cadmium concentration and {beta} {sub 2}-microglobulinuria under environmental exposure  

SciTech Connect

A meta-analysis was conducted to derive age- and gender-specific dose-response relationships between urinary cadmium (Cd) concentration and {beta} {sub 2}-microglobulinuria ({beta}2MG-uria) under environmental exposure. {beta}2MG-uria was defined by a cutoff point of 1000 {mu}g {beta} {sub 2}-microglobulin/g creatinine. We proposed a model for describing the relationships among the interindividual variabilities in urinary Cd concentration, the ratio of Cd concentrations in the target organ and in urine, and the threshold Cd concentration in the target organ. The parameters in the model were determined so that good agreement might be achieved between the prevalence rates of {beta}2MG-uria reported in the literature and those estimated by the model. In this analysis, only the data from the literature on populations environmentally exposed to Cd were used. Using the model and estimated parameters, the prevalence rate of {beta}2MG-uria can be estimated for an age- and gender-specific subpopulation for which the distribution of urinary Cd concentrations is known. The maximum permissible level of urinary Cd concentration was defined as the maximum geometric mean of the urinary Cd concentration in an age- and gender-specific subpopulation that would not result in a statistically significant increase in the prevalence rate of {beta}2MG-uria. This was estimated to be approximately 3 {mu}g/g creatinine for a population in a small geographical area and approximately 2 {mu}g/g creatinine for a nationwide population.

Gamo, Masashi [Research Center for Chemical Risk Management, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan)]. E-mail: masashi-gamo@aist.go.jp; Ono, Kyoko [Research Center for Chemical Risk Management, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Nakanishi, Junko [Research Center for Chemical Risk Management, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Solar spectrum...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar spectrum: Uncertainties between current models and implications for atmospheric radiation modeling and remote sensing Trishchenko, Alexander Canada Centre for Remote Sensing...

248

Structural mechanics of fast spectrum nuclear reactor cores  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mechanics of fast spectrum nuclear reactor cores A fast reactor core is composed of a closely packed hexagonal arrangement of fuel, control, blanket , and shielding assemblies....

249

Energy Spectrum of Ultracold Atoms in a Synthetic Magnetic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... turning on a magnetic field makes the electron's energies generate a ... The scientists wittily named the energy spectrum the "Hofstadter moth." In this ...

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

250

A Spectrum Of Potentially Diamondiferous Lamproites And Minettes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jharia Coalfield, Eastern India Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Spectrum Of Potentially Diamondiferous Lamproites And Minettes...

251

THE ROTATIONAL SPECTRUM OF HCl{sup +}  

SciTech Connect

The rotational spectrum of the radical ion HCl{sup +} has been detected at high resolution in the laboratory, confirming the identification reported in the accompanying Letter by De Luca et al., in diffuse clouds toward W31C and W49N. Three rotational transitions, one in the ground-state {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2} ladder and two in the {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2} ladder (643 cm{sup -1} above ground), were observed in a microwave discharge of He and HCl. Well-resolved chlorine hyperfine structure and {Lambda}-doubling, and the detection of lines of H{sup 37}Cl{sup +} at precisely the expected isotopic shift, provide conclusive evidence for the laboratory identification. Detection of rotational transitions in the {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2} ladder of HCl{sup +} for the first time allows an experimental determination of the individual hyperfine coupling constants of chlorine and yields a precise value of eQq{sub 2}. The spectroscopic constants obtained by fitting a Hamiltonian simultaneously to our data and more than 8000 optical transitions are so precise that they allow us to calculate the frequencies of the {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2} J = 5/2 - 3/2 transition observed in space to within 0.2 km s{sup -1}, and indeed, those of the strongest rotational transitions below 7.5 THz, to better than 1 km s{sup -1}.

Gupta, H.; Drouin, B. J.; Pearson, J. C., E-mail: Harshal.Gupta@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Apparatus for synthesis of a solar spectrum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a xenon arc lamp and a tungsten filament lamp provide light beams that together contain all the wavelengths required to accurately simulate a solar spectrum. Suitable filter apparatus selectively direct visible and ultraviolet light from the xenon arc lamp into two legs of a trifurcated randomized fiber optic cable. Infrared light selectively filtered from the tungsten filament lamp is directed into the third leg of the fiber optic cable. The individual optic fibers from the three legs are brought together in a random fashion into a single output leg. The output beam emanating from the output leg of the trifurcated randomized fiber optic cable is extremely uniform and contains wavelengths from each of the individual filtered light beams. This uniform output beam passes through suitable collimation apparatus before striking the surface of the solar cell being tested. Adjustable aperture apparatus located between the lamps and the input legs of the trifurcated fiber optic cable and can be selectively adjusted to limit the amount of light entering each leg thereby providing a means of ``fine tuning`` or precisely adjusting the spectral content of the output beam. Finally, On adjustable aperture apparatus may also be placed in the output beam to adjust the intensity of the output beam without changing the spectral content and distribution of the output beam.

Sopori, B.L.

1991-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Apparatus for synthesis of a solar spectrum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A xenon arc lamp and a tungsten filament lamp provide light beams that together contain all the wavelengths required to accurately simulate a solar spectrum. Suitable filter apparatus selectively direct visible and ultraviolet light from the xenon arc lamp into two legs of a trifurcated randomized fiber optic cable. Infrared light selectively filtered from the tungsten filament lamp is directed into the third leg of the fiber optic cable. The individual optic fibers from the three legs are brought together in a random fashion into a single output leg. The output beam emanating from the output leg of the trifurcated randomized fiber optic cable is extremely uniform and contains wavelengths from each of the individual filtered light beams. This uniform output beam passes through suitable collimation apparatus before striking the surface of the solar cell being tested. Adjustable aperture apparatus located between the lamps and the input legs of the trifurcated fiber optic cable can be selectively adjusted to limit the amount of light entering each leg, thereby providing a means of "fine tuning" or precisely adjusting the spectral content of the output beam. Finally, an adjustable aperture apparatus may also be placed in the output beam to adjust the intensity of the output beam without changing the spectral content and distribution of the output beam.

Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Apparatus for synthesis of a solar spectrum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a xenon arc lamp and a tungsten filament lamp provide light beams that together contain all the wavelengths required to accurately simulate a solar spectrum. Suitable filter apparatus selectively direct visible and ultraviolet light from the xenon arc lamp into two legs of a trifurcated randomized fiber optic cable. Infrared light selectively filtered from the tungsten filament lamp is directed into the third leg of the fiber optic cable. The individual optic fibers from the three legs are brought together in a random fashion into a single output leg. The output beam emanating from the output leg of the trifurcated randomized fiber optic cable is extremely uniform and contains wavelengths from each of the individual filtered light beams. This uniform output beam passes through suitable collimation apparatus before striking the surface of the solar cell being tested. Adjustable aperture apparatus located between the lamps and the input legs of the trifurcated fiber optic cable and can be selectively adjusted to limit the amount of light entering each leg thereby providing a means of fine tuning'' or precisely adjusting the spectral content of the output beam. Finally, On adjustable aperture apparatus may also be placed in the output beam to adjust the intensity of the output beam without changing the spectral content and distribution of the output beam.

Sopori, B.L.

1991-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Helium spectrum in erupting solar prominences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Even quiescent solar prominences may become active and sometimes erupt. These events are occasionally linked to coronal mass ejections. However we know very little about the plasma properties during the activation and eruption processes. We present new computations of the helium line profiles emitted by an eruptive prominence. The prominence is modelled as a plane-parallel slab standing vertically above the solar surface and moving upward as a solid body. The helium spectrum is computed with a non local thermodynamic equilibrium radiative transfer code. The effect of Doppler dimming / brightening is investigated in the resonance lines of He I and He II formed in the EUV, as well as on the He I 10830 A and 5876 A lines. We focus on the line profile properties and the resulting integrated intensities. It is shown that the helium lines are very sensitive to Doppler dimming effects. We also study the effect of frequency redistribution in the formation mechanisms of the resonance lines and find that it is necessary to use partial redistribution in frequency for the resonance lines.

Nicolas Labrosse; Pierre Gouttebroze; Jean-Claude Vial

2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

256

UTC Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Security Incident response teams, Cyber Security Incident handling ... is the mandatory standards for nuclear power reactor licensees, 10 CFR ...

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

257

Classification of multi class dataset using wavelet power spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data mining techniques are widely used in many fields. One of the applications of data mining in the field of the Bioinformatics is classification of tissue samples. In the present work, a wavelet power spectrum based approach has been presented for ... Keywords: Feature selection, Multi class, RPV, Wavelet power spectrum

S. Prabakaran; Rajendra Sahu; Sekher Verma

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Performance of Primary Users in Spectrum Sharing Cognitive Radio Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the performance of the primary user in a multiuser cognitive radio environment. Using spectrum sharing method, multiple cognitive users compete to share a channel dedicated to the primary user in order to transmit their data to ... Keywords: Bit error rate, Channel capacity, Cognitive communications, Outage probability, Spectrum sharing, User scheduling

Abdallah K. Farraj; Eman M. Hammad

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Is allowing trading enough? Making secondary markets in spectrum work  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The debate on spectrum reforms has mostly focused on the choice between a property rights and a commons regime. This article argues that moving to a property right system requires careful attention to details in order to avoid that ''micro'' rather than ... Keywords: Efficiency, Impediments, Licence variations, Spectrum, Trading

Pietro Crocioni

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Modeling of combustion noise spectrum from turbulent premixed flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of combustion noise spectrum from turbulent premixed flames Y. Liu, A. P. Dowling, T. D, Nantes, France 2321 #12;Turbulent combustion processes generate sound radiation due to temporal changes, this temporal correlation and its role in the modeling of combustion noise spectrum are studied by analyzing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Supporting Dynamic Spectrum Access in Heterogeneous LTE+ Networks  

SciTech Connect

As early as 2014, mobile network operators’ spectral capac- ity is expected to be overwhelmed by the demand brought on by new devices and applications. With Long Term Evo- lution Advanced (LTE+) networks likely as the future one world 4G standard, network operators may need to deploy a Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA) overlay in Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets) to extend coverage, increase spectrum efficiency, and increase the capacity of these networks. In this paper, we propose three new management frameworks for DSA in an LTE+ HetNet: Spectrum Accountability Client, Cell Spectrum Management, and Domain Spectrum Man- agement. For these spectrum management frameworks, we define protocol interfaces and operational signaling scenar- ios to support cooperative sensing, spectrum lease manage- ment, and alarm scenarios for rule adjustment. We also quan- tify, through integer programs, the benefits of using DSA in an LTE+ HetNet, that can opportunistically reuse vacant TV and GSM spectrum. Using integer programs, we consider a topology using Geographic Information System data from the Blacksburg, VA metro area to assess the realistic benefits of DSA in an LTE+ HetNet.

Luiz A. DaSilva; Ryan E. Irwin; Mike Benonis

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

DISTRIBUTED COGNITIVE MAC FOR ENERGY-CONSTRAINED OPPORTUNISTIC SPECTRUM ACCESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISTRIBUTED COGNITIVE MAC FOR ENERGY-CONSTRAINED OPPORTUNISTIC SPECTRUM ACCESS Yunxia Chen, Qing@arl.army.mil ABSTRACT We address the design of distributed cognitive medium ac- cess control (MAC) protocols for opportunistic spectrum access (OSA) under an energy constraint on the secondary users. The objective

Islam, M. Saif

263

Spread spectrum based cooperative communication transceiver on FPGA platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe the implementation of a spread spectrum based cooperative relaying on an FPGA platform. We focus on a network comprising one source, one or more relays, and one destination. Once the source's message is received by the relays, ... Keywords: FPGA, cognitive radio, cooperative communication, rake receiver, spread spectrum

Babak AzimiSadjadi, Satya Prakash Ponnaluri, Ali Namazi, Siddharth Gaddam, Daniel McCarthy, Paul J. Oleski

264

A Similarity Theory of the Tropospheric Turbulence Energy Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-range model is proposed for the energy spectrum of tropospheric turbulence in which the range-I spectrum is governed by the cascade of eddy enstrophy, that of range-II by the cascade of eddy kinetic energy, and that of range-III by ...

F. A. Gifford

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Online Pricing of Secondary Spectrum Access with Unknown Demand Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-of-the-day arrival rate trends. The simulations showed that AMTP closely tracks the time-varying optimal price1 Online Pricing of Secondary Spectrum Access with Unknown Demand Function Huseyin Mutlu, Murat while SUs are admitted and priced according to current availability of excess spectrum. The average rate

Starobinski, David

266

Fast Spectrum Molten Salt Reactor Options  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 2010, fast-spectrum molten-salt reactors (FS-MSRs) were selected as a transformational reactor concept for light-water reactor (LWR)-derived heavy actinide disposition by the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) program and were the subject of a preliminary scoping investigation. Much of the reactor description information presented in this report derives from the preliminary studies performed for the ARC project. This report, however, has a somewhat broader scope-providing a conceptual overview of the characteristics and design options for FS-MSRs. It does not present in-depth evaluation of any FS-MSR particular characteristic, but instead provides an overview of all of the major reactor system technologies and characteristics, including the technology developments since the end of major molten salt reactor (MSR) development efforts in the 1970s. This report first presents a historical overview of the FS-MSR technology and describes the innovative characteristics of an FS-MSR. Next, it provides an overview of possible reactor configurations. The following design features/options and performance considerations are described including: (1) reactor salt options-both chloride and fluoride salts; (2) the impact of changing the carrier salt and actinide concentration on conversion ratio; (3) the conversion ratio; (4) an overview of the fuel salt chemical processing; (5) potential power cycles and hydrogen production options; and (6) overview of the performance characteristics of FS-MSRs, including general comparative metrics with LWRs. The conceptual-level evaluation includes resource sustainability, proliferation resistance, economics, and safety. The report concludes with a description of the work necessary to begin more detailed evaluation of FS-MSRs as a realistic reactor and fuel cycle option.

Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Patton, Bruce W [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

What can be learned from the lensed cosmic microwave background B-mode polarization power spectrum?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of weak gravitational lensing on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies and polarization will provide access to cosmological information that cannot be obtained from the primary anisotropies alone. We compare the information content of the lensed B-mode polarization power spectrum, properly accounting for the non-Gaussian correlations between the power on different scales, with that of the unlensed CMB fields and the lensing potential. The latter represent the products of an (idealised) optimal analysis that exploits the lens-induced non-Gaussianity to reconstruct the fields. Compressing the non-Gaussian lensed CMB into power spectra is wasteful and leaves a tight degeneracy between the equation of state of dark energy and neutrino mass that is much stronger than in the more optimal analysis. Despite this, a power spectrum analysis will be a useful first step in analysing future B-mode polarization data. For this reason, we also consider how to extract accurate parameter constraints from the lensed B-mode power spectrum. We show with simulations that for cosmic-variance-limited measurements of the lensed B-mode power, including the non-Gaussian correlations in existing likelihood approximations gives biased parameter results. We develop a more refined likelihood approximation that performs significantly better. This new approximation should also be of more general interest in the wider context of parameter estimation from Gaussian CMB data.

Sarah Smith; Anthony Challinor; Graca Rocha

2005-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

268

Wireless Field Area Network Spectrum Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities are looking for communications technologies that can provide robust support for integration and management of a broad range of Smart Grid applications, starting with advanced distribution management and automation [ADA], distributed energy resources [DERs], advanced metering [AMI], and demand response [DR]. The number and variety of candidate technologies can seem daunting; this EPRI research highlights some core Smart Grid communications requirements and assesses the degree to which systems ba...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

269

Measurement of Cosmic Ray Spectrum and Anisotropy with the ARGO-YBJ experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The combined measurement of the cosmic ray (CR) energy spectrum and anisotropy in their arrival direction distribution needs the knowledge of the elemental composition of the radiation to discriminate between different origin and propagation models. Important information on the CR mass composition can be obtained studying the EAS muon content through the measurement of the CR rate at different zenith angles. In this paper we report on the observation of the anisotropy of galactic CRs at different angular scales with the ARGO-YBJ experiment. We report also on the study of the primary CR rate for different zenith angles. The light component (p+He) has been selected and its energy spectrum measured in the energy range (5 - 200) TeV for quasi-vertical events. With this analysis for the first time a ground-based measurement of the CR spectrum overlaps data obtained with direct methods for more than one energy decade, thus providing a solid anchorage to the CR spectrum measurements carried out by EAS arrays in the ...

Di Sciascio, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The power spectrum of the atomic dipole moment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper calculates the power spectrum S(omega) of the electric field generated by the atomic dipole moment of a laser-driven two-level system from an open quantum systems perspective. Its shape is similar to the shape of Mollow's resonance fluorescence spectrum but there are some differences. For sufficiently strong laser driving, there are two sidebands but their relative height is reduced. Moreover, the amplitude of this spectrum has a different dependence on the laser Rabi frequency Omega. It does not vanish when Omega tends to zero. The calculation of the spectrum which we present here involves less approximations than the calculation of Mollow's spectrum and constitutes an interesting alternative property.

Adam Stokes; Almut Beige

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Public Perception and the Oil Industry: An Analysis of Oil Employees' and Nigerians' Opinions Regarding Exxon Mobil and Shell Oil's Corporate Social Responsibility Efforts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study looked at oil industry employees and Nigerians perceptions of Exxon Mobil and Shell Oil as socially responsible corporations and the role the two-step… (more)

Narcisse, Liana L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Analysis of Short-Bunch Production with the APS Booster and a Bunch Compressor Michael Borland, AOD/OAG ∗ August 8, 2003 1 Abstract There is significant interest among x-ray scientists in short-pulse x-rays. The x-rays from the APS ring, although very bright, are produced by an electron bunch with an rms length of more than 30 ps. Typically, it is only a linear accelerator that can produce a very short bunch. An idea was brought to my attention by Glenn Decker that might allow us to produce a short bunch using the APS booster. This idea involves extracting the beam from the booster at 3 to 4 GeV, while it is still relatively short, then compressing it with a magnetic bunch compressor. In this note, we present a preliminary analysis of this idea, along with the related idea of using a nonequilibrium beam from the APS photoinjector. 2 Background We will begin with an examination of the ideal result

273

Integrated fluorescence analysis system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated fluorescence analysis system enables a component part of a sample to be virtually sorted within a sample volume after a spectrum of the component part has been identified from a fluorescence spectrum of the entire sample in a flow cytometer. Birefringent optics enables the entire spectrum to be resolved into a set of numbers representing the intensity of spectral components of the spectrum. One or more spectral components are selected to program a scanning laser microscope, preferably a confocal microscope, whereby the spectrum from individual pixels or voxels in the sample can be compared. Individual pixels or voxels containing the selected spectral components are identified and an image may be formed to show the morphology of the sample with respect to only those components having the selected spectral components. There is no need for any physical sorting of the sample components to obtain the morphological information.

Buican, Tudor N. (Los Alamos, NM); Yoshida, Thomas M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Lyman Alpha Flux Power Spectrum and Its Covariance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the flux power spectrum and its covariance using simulated Lyman alpha forests. We find that pseudo-hydro techniques are good approximations of hydrodynamical simulations at high redshift. However, the pseudo-hydro techniques fail at low redshift because they are insufficient for characterizing some components of the low-redshift intergalactic medium, notably the warm-hot intergalactic medium. Hence, to use the low-redshift Lyman alpha flux power spectrum to constrain cosmology, one would need realistic hydrodynamical simulations. By comparing one-dimensional mass statistics with flux statistics, we show that the nonlinear transform between density and flux quenches the fluctuations so that the flux power spectrum is much less sensitive to cosmological parameters than the one-dimensional mass power spectrum. The covariance of the flux power spectrum is nearly Gaussian. As such, the uncertainties of the underlying mass power spectrum could still be large, even though the flux power spectrum can be precisely determined from a small number of lines of sight.

Hu Zhan; Romeel Dave; Daniel Eisenstein; Neal Katz

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

275

Clinical heterogeneity among people with high functioning autism spectrum conditions: evidence favouring a continuous severity gradient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Autism Spec- trum Quotient [14]. The AQ comprises 50 questions, cov- ering 5 domains each of 10 questions assessing areas of relevance for the diagnosis of an autistic spectrum disor- der, these being social skills, attention switching, atten- tion... and they do not derive any financial benefit from its use. Authors' contributions The study was devised by HR and MWS. SW and SBC pre- pared the data for analysis and advised on interpretation of the results. PW carried out the statistical analysis. HR and MWS...

Ring, Howard; Woodbury-Smith, Marc; Watson, Peter; Wheelwright, Sally; Baron-Cohen, Simon

2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

276

On the spectrum of 1D quantum Ising quasicrystal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider one dimensional quantum Ising spin-1/2 chains with two-valued nearest neighbor couplings arranged in a quasi-periodic sequence, with uniform, transverse magnetic field. By employing the Jordan-Wigner transformation of the spin operators to spinless fermions, the energy spectrum can be computed exactly on a finite lattice. By employing the transfer matrix technique and investigating the dynamics of the corresponding trace map, we show that in the thermodynamic limit the energy spectrum is a Cantor set of zero Lebesgue measure. Moreover, we show that local Hausdorff dimension is continuous and nonconstant over the spectrum. This forms a rigorous counterpart of numerous numerical studies.

W. N. Yessen

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

Multi-Higgs Mass Spectrum in Gauge-Higgs Unification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study an SU(2) supersymmetric gauge model in a framework of gauge-Higgs unification. Multi-Higgs spectrum appears in the model at low energy. We develop a useful perturbative approximation scheme for evaluating effective potential to study the multi-Higgs mass spectrum. We find that both tree-massless and massive Higgs scalars obtain mass corrections of similar size from finite parts of the loop effects. The corrections modify multi-Higgs mass spectrum, and hence, the loop effects are significant in view of future verifications of the gauge-Higgs unification scenario in high-energy experiments.

Kojima, Kentaro; Yamashita, Toshifumi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Spectral Subtraction with Variance Reduced Noise Spectrum Estimates Kamil K. Wojcicki, Benjamin J. Shannon and Kuldip K. Paliwal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. IEEE Intern. Conf. on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP'79), Washington, DC, USA, pp. 208 findings which suggest that estimation of the phase spectrum using low dynamic range analysis windows (at 20­40ms window durations) is beneficial for speech enhancement. Using an objective speech quality

279

A Bayesian approach to power-spectrum significance estimation, with application to solar neutrino data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The usual procedure for estimating the significance of a peak in a power spectrum is to calculate the probability of obtaining that value or a larger value by chance, on the assumption that the time series contains only noise (e.g. that the measurements were derived from random samplings of a Gaussian distribution). However, it is known that one should regard this P-Value approach with caution. As an alternative, we here examine a Bayesian approach to estimating the significance of a peak in a power spectrum. This approach requires that we consider explicitly the hypothesis that the time series contains a periodic signal as well as noise. The challenge is to identify a probability distribution function for the power that is appropriate for this hypothesis. We propose what seem to be reasonable conditions to require of this function, and then propose a simple function that meets these requirements. We also propose a consistency condition, and check to see that our function satisfies this condition. We find that the Bayesian significance estimates are considerably more conservative than the conventional estimates. We apply this procedure to three recent analyses of solar neutrino data: (a) bimodality of GALLEX data; (b) power spectrum analysis of Super-Kamiokande data; and (c) the combined analysis of radiochemical neutrino data and irradiance data.

P. A. Sturrock

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Power Spectrum of Primordial Inhomogeneity Determined from the 4-Year COBE DMR Sky Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fourier analysis and power spectrum estimation of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy on an incompletely sampled sky developed by Gorski (1994) has been applied to the high-latitude portion of the 4-year COBE DMR 31.5, 53 and 90 GHz sky maps. Likelihood analysis using newly constructed Galaxy cuts (extended beyond |b| = 20deg to excise the known foreground emission) and simultaneously correcting for the faint high latitude galactic foreground emission is conducted on the DMR sky maps pixelized in both ecliptic and galactic coordinates. The Bayesian power spectrum estimation from the foreground corrected 4-year COBE DMR data renders n ~ 1.2 +/- 0.3, and Q_{rms-PS} ~ 15.3^{+3.7}_{-2.8} microK (projections of the two-parameter likelihood). These results are consistent with the Harrison-Zel'dovich n=1 model of amplitude Q_{rms-PS} ~ 18 microK detected with significance exceeding 14sigma (dQ/Q < 0.07). (A small power spectrum amplitude drop below the published 2-year results is predominantly due to the application of the new, extended Galaxy cuts.)

K. M. Gorski; A. J. Banday; C. L. Bennett; G. Hinshaw; A. Kogut; G. F. Smoot; E. L. Wright

1996-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Crosstalk Compensation for a Rapid, Higher Resolution Impedance Spectrum Measurement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Batteries and other energy storage devices are playing larger roles in various industries (e.g., military, automotive, electric utilities, etc.) as the U.S. seeks to reduce its dependence on foreign energy resources. As such, there exists a significant need for accurate, robust state-of-health assessment techniques. Present techniques tend to focus on simple, passive monitoring of voltage and current at a given ambient temperature. However, this approach has the disadvantage of ignoring key elements of health, that is, changes in resistance growth and power fade. Impedance spectroscopy is considered a useful laboratory tool in gauging changes in the resistance and power performance, but it has not been widely considered as an onboard diagnostic tool due to the length of time required to complete the measurement. Cross-Talk Compensation (CTC) is a novel approach that enables rapid, high resolution impedance spectra measurements using a hardware platform that could be designed as an embedded system. This input signal consists of a sum-of-sines excitation current that has a known frequency spread and a duration of one period of the lowest frequency. The voltage response is then captured at a sufficiently fast sample rate. Previously developed rapid impedance spectrum measurement techniques either required a longer excitation signal or a sum-of-sines signal that was separated by harmonic frequencies to reduce or eliminate, respectively, the cross-talk interference in the calculated results. The distinct advantage of CTC, however, is that non-harmonic frequencies can now be included within the excitation signal while still keeping the signal duration at one period of the lowest frequency. Since the frequency spread of the input signal is known, the crosstalk interference between sinusoidal signals within the sum-of-sines at a given frequency of interest can be pre-determined and assigned to an error matrix. Consequently, the real and imaginary components of the impedance at each frequency of interest can be calculated using simple linear algebra based on the error matrix and measured response from the energy storage device given the excitation signal. Analytical validation of CTC over a frequency range between 2000 and 0.1 Hz (i.e., a ten-second input signal duration) was performed using a standardized battery lumped parameter model. The results indicated that the CTC was able to successfully resolve more than 45 frequencies within a sum-of-sines excitation signal, whereas previous techniques could only resolve up to 15 frequencies. A simplified derivation of the CTC technique and its corresponding analytical validation studies using the lumped-parameter model will be presented.

Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; David M. Rose; William H. Morrison; Chester G. Motloch

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Effects of crystal length on the angular spectrum of spontaneous parametric downconversion photon pairs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theoretical and experimental analysis of the joint effects of the transverse electric field distribution and of the nonlinear crystal characteristics on the properties of photon pairs generated by spontaneous parametric downconversion (SPDC). While it is known that for a sufficiently short crystal the pump electric field distribution fully determines the joint signal-idler properties, for longer crystals the nonlinear crystal properties also play an important role. In this paper we present experimental measurements of the angular spectrum (AS) and of the conditional angular spectrum (CAS) of photon pairs produced by spontaneous parametric downconversion (SPDC), carried out through spatially-resolved photon counting. In our experiment we control whether or not the source operates in the short-crystal regime through the degree of pump focusing, and explicitly show how the AS and CAS measurements differ in these two regimes. Our theory provides an understanding of the boundary between these two regimes and also predicts the corresponding differing behaviors.

Roberto Ramirez-Alarcon; Hector Cruz-Ramirez; Alfred B. U'Ren

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

283

The SNO Solar Neutrino Data, Neutrinoless Double Beta-Decay and Neutrino Mass Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assuming 3 neutrino mixing and massive Majorana neutrinos, we analyze the implications of the results of the solar neutrino experiments, including the latest SNO data, which favor the LMA MSW solution of the solar neutrino problem with \\tan^2 \\theta_sol | in neutrinoless double beta decay. For \\cos (2 \\theta_sol) \\geq 0.26, which follows from the analysis of the new solar neutrino data, we find significant lower limits on || in the cases of quasi-degenerate and inverted hierarchy neutrino mass spectrum, || \\geq 0.035 eV and || \\geq 8.5 10^-3 eV, respectively. If the spectrum is hierarchical the upper limit holds || \\leq 8.2 10^-3 eV. Correspondingly, not only a measured value of || \

S. Pascoli; S. T. Petcov

2002-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

284

On the spectrum of QCD-like theories and the conformal window  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the spectrum of the SU(3) gauge theory with twelve flavours in the fundamental representation of the gauge group. We isolate distinctive features of the hadronic phase - the one proper of QCD at zero temperature - and the so called conformal phase. The latter should emerge at sufficiently large Nf and before the loss of asymptotic freedom. In particular, we analyse available lattice data for the spectrum of Nf=12 and include a comparison with results with Nf=16; the latter theory, predicted by the perturbative beta-function to develop an IRFP and therefore be in the conformal phase, can serve as a paradigm for the study of theories in the conformal window. Our analysis suggests that the theory with twelve flavours is in the conformal window, possibly close to its lower boundary.

Albert Deuzeman; Maria Paola Lombardo; Elisabetta Pallante

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

285

Effects of crystal length on the angular spectrum of spontaneous parametric downconversion photon pairs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theoretical and experimental analysis of the joint effects of the transverse electric field distribution and of the nonlinear crystal characteristics on the properties of photon pairs generated by spontaneous parametric downconversion (SPDC). While it is known that for a sufficiently short crystal the pump electric field distribution fully determines the joint signal-idler properties, for longer crystals the nonlinear crystal properties also play an important role. In this paper we present experimental measurements of the angular spectrum (AS) and of the conditional angular spectrum (CAS) of photon pairs produced by spontaneous parametric downconversion (SPDC), carried out through spatially-resolved photon counting. In our experiment we control whether or not the source operates in the short-crystal regime through the degree of pump focusing, and explicitly show how the AS and CAS measurements differ in these two regimes. Our theory provides an understanding of the boundary between these two regi...

Ramirez-Alarcon, Roberto; U'Ren, Alfred B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Cosmic Microwave Background Spectrum from the Full COBE/FIRAS Data Set  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have refined the analysis of the data from the FIRAS (Far InfraRed Absolute Spectrophotometer) on board the COBE (COsmic Background Explorer). The FIRAS measures the difference between the cosmic microwave background and a precise blackbody spectrum. We find new tighter upper limits on general deviations from a blackbody spectrum. The RMS deviations are less than 50 parts per million of the peak of the CMBR. For the Comptonization and chemical potential we find $|y| < 15\\times10^{-6}$ and $|\\mu| < 9\\times10^{-5}$ (95\\% CL). There are also refinements in the absolute temperature, 2.728 $\\pm$ 0.004 K (95\\% CL), and dipole direction, $(\\ell,b)=(264.14^\\circ\\pm0.30, 48.26^\\circ\\pm0.30)$ (95\\% CL), and amplitude, $3.372 \\pm 0.007$ mK (95\\% CL). All of these results agree with our previous publications.

D. J. Fixsen; E. S. Cheng; J. M. Gales; J. C. Mather; R. A. Shafer; E. L. Wright

1996-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

287

Hurricane Directional Wave Spectrum Spatial Variation at Landfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NASA Scanning Radar Altimeter (SRA) flew aboard one of the NOAA WP-3D hurricane research aircraft to document the sea surface directional wave spectrum in the region between Charleston, South Carolina, and Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, as ...

E. J. Walsh; C. W. Wright; D. Vandemark; W. B. Krabill; A. W. Garcia; S. H. Houston; S. T. Murillo; M. D. Powell; P. G. Black; F. D. Marks Jr.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

A Note on the Ocean Surface Roughness Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a recent study, the dimensionless surface roughness spectrum has been empirically parameterized as a power-law function of the dimensionless wind speed expressed as the ratio of wind friction velocity and phase speed of the surface roughness ...

Paul A. Hwang

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Spectrum Widths from Echo Power Differences Reveal Meteorological Features  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new Doppler spectrum width estimator using the absolute power differences (APDs) at lag one is presented, and its performance is evaluated using simulated signals as well as those recorded from the National Severe Storms Laboratory's Research ...

Valery M. Melnikov; Richard J. Doviak

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The Mesoscale Kinetic Energy Spectrum of a Baroclinic Life Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric mesoscale kinetic energy spectrum is investigated through numerical simulations of an idealized baroclinic wave life cycle, from linear instability to mature nonlinear evolution and with high horizontal and vertical resolution (?x ...

Michael L. Waite; Chris Snyder

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Evolution and Trend of the Outgoing Longwave Radiation Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variability and change occurring in the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) spectrum are investigated by using simulations performed with a Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory coupled atmosphere–ocean–land general circulation model. First, ...

Yi Huang; V. Ramaswamy

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Normalized Maximum-Likelihood Estimators of the Directional Wave Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new family of data-adaptative directional wave spectrum estimators is proposed. These estimators may be considered as an improvement over the well-known extended maximum-likelihood method (EMLM). The normalization is based on the idea of ...

M. A. Arribas; J. J. Egozcue

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

On the Equilibrium Spectrum of Transient Waves in the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spectrum of transient heat flux in the midlatitude troposphere has a maximum at a synoptic scale. The same is true of the transient energy. The wavenumber of these maxima can be explained by the theory of nonlinear baroclinic adjustment, ...

Wendell T. Welch; Ka-Kit Tung

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The Annual Peak in the SST Anomaly Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The manner in which monthly mean sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs) show enhanced variance at the annual period in the extratropics (an annual peak in the variance spectrum) is illustrated by observations and model simulations. A mechanism,...

Jens Möller; Dietmar Dommenget; Vladimir A. Semenov

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A Modification of the Garrett–Munk Internal Wave Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Garrett–Munk (GM) spectrum continues to be a useful description of the oceanic internal wave field. However, there are several inconsistencies and ambiguities that make it difficult to use in comparing internal wave fields at different ...

Murray D. Levine

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

MEASURING THE JET POWER OF FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO QUASARS  

SciTech Connect

We use frequency-dependent position shifts of flat-spectrum radio cores to estimate the kinetic power of active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets. We find a correlation between the derived jet powers and AGN narrow-line luminosity, consistent with the well-known relation for radio galaxies and steep spectrum quasars. This technique can be applied to intrinsically weak jets even at high redshift.

Shabala, S. S.; Santoso, J. S. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Godfrey, L. E. H. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

297

On the Spectrum of the Resonant Quantum Kicked Rotor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is proven that none of the bands in the quasi-energy spectrum of the Quantum Kicked Rotor is flat at any primitive resonance of any order. Perturbative estimates of bandwidths at small kick strength are established for the case of primitive resonances of prime order. Different bands scale with different powers of the kick strength, due to degeneracies in the spectrum of the free rotor.

Italo Guarneri

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

298

On the Spectrum of the Resonant Quantum Kicked Rotor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is proven that none of the bands in the quasi-energy spectrum of the Quantum Kicked Rotor is flat at any primitive resonance of any order. Perturbative estimates of bandwidths at small kick strength are established for the case of primitive resonances of prime order. Different bands scale with different powers of the kick strength, due to degeneracies in the spectrum of the free rotor.

Guarneri, Italo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The Ocean Response to Low-Frequency Interannual Atmospheric Variability in the Mediterranean Sea. Part I: Sensitivity Experiments and Energy Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study a general circulation model is used in order to investigate the interannual response of the Mediterranean Basin to low-frequency interannual variability in atmospheric forcing for the period 1980–88. The model incorporates a ...

G. Korres; N. Pinardi; A. Lascaratos

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

High Resolution Irradiance Spectrum from 300 to 1000 nm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The FTS scans that made up the Kitt Peak Solar Flux Atlas by Kurucz, Furenlid, Brault, and Testerman (1984) have been re-reduced. An approximate telluric atmospheric model was determined for each FTS scan. Large-scale features produced by O3 and O2 dimer were computed and divided out. The solar continuum level was found by fitting a smooth curve to high points in each scan. The scans were normalized to the fitted continuum to produce a residual flux spectrum for each FTS scan. The telluric line spectrum was computed using HITRAN and other line data for H2O, O2, and CO2. The line parameters were adjusted for an approximate match to the observed spectra. The scans were divided by the computed telluric spectra to produce residual irradiance spectra. Artifacts from wavelength mismatches, deep lines, etc, were removed by hand and replaced by linear interpolation. Overlapping scans were fitted together to make a continuous spectrum from 300 to 1000 nm. All the above steps were iterative. The monochromatic error varies from 0.1 to 1.0 percent. The residual spectrum was calibrated two different ways: First by normalizing it to the continuum of theoretical solar model ASUN (Kurucz 1992), and second, by degrading the spectrum to the resolution of the observed irradiance (Thuillier et al. 2004) to determine a normalization function that was then applied to the high resolution spectrum.

Robert L. Kurucz

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Exelon response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This letter constitutes the response of Exelon Generation Company, LLC and its operating unit, Exelon Nuclear Partners, to the Department of Energy’s request for comments and information (July 27,...

302

Solar Energetic Particle Spectrum on 13 December 2006 Determined by IceTop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most derivations of a solar spectrum (e.g. Bombardieri eta lower limit on the solar proton spectrum. We estimate thatCalifornia. Solar Energetic Particle Spectrum on 13 December

Klein, Spencer; IceCube Collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

Myers, D. R.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Linear Theory Power Spectrum from the Lyman-alpha Forest in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the SDSS Lyman-alpha forest P_F(k,z) measurement to determine the linear theory power spectrum. Our analysis is based on fully hydrodynamic simulations, extended using hydro-PM simulations. We account for the effect of absorbers with damping wings, which leads to an increase in the slope of the linear power spectrum. We break the degeneracy between the mean level of absorption and the linear power spectrum without significant use of external constraints, which is possible because of the high precision of the P_F(k,z) measurements over a wide range of redshift and scale. We infer linear theory power spectrum amplitude Delta^2_L(k_p=0.009s/km,z_p=3.0)=0.452_{-0.057-0.116}^{+0.069+0.141} and slope n_eff(k_p,z_p)=-2.321_{-0.047-0.102}^{+0.055+0.131} (errors are Delta chi^2=1 and 4, with possible systematic errors included through nuisance parameters in the fit; the errors are correlated with r~0.63). The inferred curvature of the linear power spectrum and the evolution of its amplitude and slope with r...

McDonald, P; Cen, R; Weinberg, D H; Burles, S; Schneider, D P; Schlegel, D J; Bahcall, Neta A; Brinkmann, J; Ivezic, Z; Kent, S; Vanden Berk, Daniel E

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Thermostat response and room temperature control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examines the impact to thermal comfort of the operation of the room thermostat. The topics of the article include types of thermostat response, reset response, proportional response, digital systems, system response, verification of building temperatures, thermal comfort analysis, and productivity costs of implementing mandated setpoints.

Int-Hout, D. (Carrier Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO{sub 2} take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry`s response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and oxides of nitrogen (NO[sub x]) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO[sub 2] take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry's response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Lagrangian Frequency Spectrum as a Diagnostic for Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence Dynamics  

SciTech Connect

For the phenomenological description of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence competing models exist, e.g., Boldyrev [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 115002 (2006)] and Gogoberidze [Phys. Plasmas 14, 022304 (2007)], which predict the same Eulerian inertial-range scaling of the turbulent energy spectrum although they employ fundamentally different basic interaction mechanisms. A relation is found that links the Lagrangian frequency spectrum with the autocorrelation time scale of the turbulent fluctuations {tau}{sub ac} and the associated cascade time scale {tau}{sub cas}. Thus, the Lagrangian energy spectrum can serve to identify weak ({tau}{sub ac}<<{tau}{sub cas}) and strong ({tau}{sub ac{approx}{tau}cas}) interaction mechanisms providing insight into the turbulent energy cascade. The new approach is illustrated by results from direct numerical simulations of two- and three-dimensional incompressible MHD turbulence.

Busse, Angela; Mueller, Wolf-Christian; Gogoberidze, Grigol [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Georgian National Astrophysical Observatory, 2a Kazbegi Avenue, 0160 Tbilisi (Georgia) and Centre for Plasma Astrophysics, University of Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

309

Solar EUV Spectrum Calculated for Quiet Sun Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present spectral synthesis calculations of the solar extreme UV (EUV) in spherical symmetry carried out with the 'Solar Modeling in 3D' code. The calculations are based on one-dimensional atmospheric structures that represent a temporal and spatial mean of the chromosphere, transition region, and corona. The synthetic irradiance spectra are compared with the recent calibration spectrum taken with the EUV Variability Experiment during the Whole Heliospheric Interval. The good agreement between the synthetic and observed quiet Sun spectrum shows that the employed atmospheric structures are suitable for irradiance calculations. The validation of the quiet Sun spectrum for the present solar minimum is the first step towards the modeling of the EUV variations.

Haberreiter, Margit

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Spectrum of second-harmonic radiation generated from incoherent light  

SciTech Connect

We report on the development of the theory of second-harmonic generation by an incoherent pump with broad angular and frequency spectra. We show that spatial as well as temporal walk-off effects in a nonlinear crystal result in angular dispersion of the second-harmonic radiation. We demonstrate that the acceptance angle in second-harmonic generation by incoherent light is caused by the width of the pump angular spectrum and the resulting angular dispersion of second-harmonic radiation but does not depend on crystal length. In this case the frequency spectrum of second-harmonic radiation is determined by its angular dispersion and the pump angular spectrum. The theory is supported by an experiment in which a LiIO{sub 3} crystal was pumped by a tungsten halogen lamp.

Stabinis, A.; Pyragaite, V.; Tamosauskas, G.; Piskarskas, A. [Department of Quantum Electronics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Avenue 9, Building 3, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

The Spectrum of the Kazakov Migdal-Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gross has found an exact expression for the density of eigenvalues in the simplest version of the Kazakov-Migdal model of induced QCD. In this paper we compute the spectrum of small fluctuations around Gross's semi-circular solution. By solving Migdal's wave equation we find a string-like spectrum which, in four dimensions, corresponds to the infinite tower of mesons in strong coupling lattice QCD with adjoint matter. In one dimension our formula reproduces correctly the well known spectrum of the hermitean matrix model with a harmonic oscillator potential. We comment on the relevance of our results to the possibility of the model describing extended objects in more than one dimension.

S. Aoki; A. Gocksch

1992-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

312

Towards the Modelling of the Second Solar Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses the modelling issue of the linearly-polarized solar limb spectrum, which is due to scattering processes and it offers a rich diagnostic potential for exploring solar magnetic fields via the Hanle effect. However, this so-called second solar spectrum is full of mysterious spectral features, which cannot be understood with simplified polarization transfer theories, thus suggesting that the underlying scattering physics is more complex than previously thought. In this paper we argue that the physical understanding of the second solar spectrum requires the consideration of scattering processes in multilevel atomic models, taking fully into account the transfer of atomic polarization among all the levels involved. The consideration of lower-level atomic polarization leads to non-linear and non-local coupled sets of equations, even for the two-level model atom case considered in this paper. The unknowns of the problem are the irreducible tensor components of the atomic density matrix whose self...

Bueno, J Trujillo

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

than 30 years, than 30 years, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has advanced the science of renewable energy and energy- efficiency technologies while building the capabilities to guide rapid deployment of commercial applications. Transforming our energy systems to achieve the nation's aggressive economic, environmental, and security goals requires a comprehensive approach. Today, NREL is at the epicenter of this transformation-enabling a future of sustainable energy systems based on clean, cost- effective, and secure resources. The NREL Innovation Spectrum The scope of NREL's capabilities emulates the nature of the innovation process itself. Shepherding new technologies from initial concept to commercial application requires a breadth of expertise across the innovation spectrum,

314

Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the tranducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

Beene, J.R.; Bemis, C.E. Jr.

1984-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

315

Discrete Quantum Spectrum of Observable Correlations from Inflation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The decoherence of quantum fluctuations into classical perturbations during inflation is discussed. A simple quantum mechanical argument, using a spatial particle wavefunction rather than a field description, shows that observable correlations from inflation must have a discrete spectrum, since they originate and freeze into the metric within a compact region. The number of discrete modes is estimated using a holographic bound on the number of degrees of freedom. The discreteness may be detectable in some models; for example, if there is a fundamental universal frequency spectrum, the inflationary gravitational wave background may be resolvable into discrete emission lines.

Craig J. Hogan

2005-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

316

Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the transducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When such a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

Beene, James R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bemis, Jr., Curtis E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Do hep neutrinos affect the solar neutrino energy spectrum?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If the low energy cross section for 3He + p goes to 4He + e + nu_e, the `hep' reaction, is > 20 times larger than the best (but uncertain) theoretical estimates, then this reaction could significantly influence the electron energy spectrum produced by solar neutrino interactions and measured in the SuperKamiokande, SNO, and ICARUS experiments. We compare predicted energy spectra for different assumed hep fluxes and different neutrino oscillation scenarios with the observed SuperKamiokande spectrum. The spectra with enhanced hep contributions provide better fits to the SuperKamiokande data.

John Bahcall; Plamen Krastev

1998-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

318

Flexible spectrum management for mobile broadband services: How does it vary across advanced and emerging markets?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand for wireless data and Internet services are expected to grow exponentially, both in advanced and emerging markets in the near future. While advanced countries have often used centralized planning and coordination methodology to forecast and allocate ... Keywords: Cognitive radios, Economies of scale, Inefficient spectrum allocation, Multi SIMs, Secondary spectrum market, Spectrum sharing, Spectrum trading, System dynamics

Varadharajan Sridhar; Thomas Casey; Heikki HäMmäInen

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

SIC (MUltiple SIgnal Classification) CSP (Cross-power Spectrum Phase)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2ch CSP ( ) 1 MU- SIC (MUltiple SIgnal Classification) CSP (Cross- power Spectrum Phase) [1, 2, 3, 4] [5, 6] [7, 8, 9, 10] [7] CSP CSP [8] [9] CSP [10] Estimation of talker's head orientation based (Kobe univ.) [11] 2ch CSP CSP CSP CSP 2 CSP GCC-PHAT (Generalized Cross- Correlation PHAse Transform

Takiguchi, Tetsuya

320

An optimised gene selection approach using wavelet power spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data mining is a boon to many fields like bioinformatics for processing a vast amount of data. In our previous paper, we proposed a novel feature selection method for microarray data classification using Wavelet Power Spectrum (WPS). In this paper, we ...

Prabakaran Subramani; Rajendra Sahu; Sekhar Verma; S. Prabakaran

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Observations of the Directional Spectrum of Fetch-Limited Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of the wave directional spectrum of fetch-limited sea states are made from measurements made with a heave–pitch–roll buoy at the Maui location off the west coast of New Zealand. The fetch-limited sea states have significant wave heights ...

Kevin C. Ewans

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Multiband Emission from Pulsar Wind Nebulae: A Possible Injection Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recent research shows that particles with a spectrum of a relativistic Maxwellian plus a high-energy tail can be accelerated by relativistic collisionless shocks. We investigate the possibility of the high-energy particles with this new spectrum injected in pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) from the terminate shock based on the study of multiwavelength emission from PWNe.} {The dynamics of a supernova remnant (SNR) and multiband nonthermal emission from the PWN inside the remnant are investigated using a dynamical model with electrons/positrons injected with the new spectrum. In this model, the dynamical and radiative evolution of a pulsar wind nebula in a non-radiative supernova remnant can be self-consistently described.} {This model is applied to the three composite SNRs, G0.9+0.1, MSH 15-52, G338.3-0.0, and the multiband observed emission from the three PWNe can be well reproduced.} {Our studies on the three remnant provide evidence for the new spectrum of the particles, which are accelerated by the terminate ...

Fang, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Equilibrium Wave Spectrum and Sea State Bias in Satellite Altimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a well-developed sea at equilibrium with a constant wind, the energy-containing range of the wavenumber spectrum for wind-generated gravity waves is approximated by a generalized power law ?(U2/g)2?k?4+2?Y(k,?), where Y is the angular spread ...

Roman E. Glazman; Meric A. Srokosz

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Energy-efficient distributed spectrum sensing with convex optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy-efficient distributed spectrum sensing with convex optimization Sina Maleki, Ashish paid to schemes that are energy-efficient. It is known that although distributed detection schemes with the number of cognitive radios. An energy-efficient distributed sensing scheme was pro- posed in [7], based

Leus, Geert

325

The TeV spectrum of H1426+428  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The BL Lac object H1426+428 was recently detected as a high energy gamma-ray source by the VERITAS collaboration (Horan et al. 2002). We have reanalyzed the 2001 portion of the data used in the detection in order to examine the spectrum of H1426+428 above 250 GeV. We find that the time-averaged spectrum agrees with a power law of the shape dF/dE = 10^(-7.31 +- 0.15(stat) +- 0.16(syst)) x E^(-3.50 +- 0.35(stat) +- 0.05(syst)) m^(-2)s^(-1)TeV^(-1) The statistical evidence from our data for emission above 2.5 TeV is 2.6 sigma. With 95% c.l., the integral flux of H1426+428 above 2.5 TeV is larger than 3% of the corresponding flux from the Crab Nebula. The spectrum is consistent with the (non-contemporaneous) measurement by Aharonian et al. (2002) both in shape and in normalization. Below 800 GeV, the data clearly favours a spectrum steeper than that of any other TeV Blazar observed so far indicating a difference in the processes involved either at the source or in the intervening space.

D. Petry; I. H. Bond; S. M. Bradbury; J. H. Buckley; D. A. Carter-Lewis; W. Cui; C. Duke; I. de la Calle Perez; A. Falcone; D. J. Fegan; S. J. Fegan; J. P. Finley; J. A. Gaidos; K. Gibbs; S. Gammell; J. Hall; T. A. Hall; A. M. Hillas; J. Holder; D. Horan; M. Jordan; M. Kertzman; D. Kieda; J. Kildea; J. Knapp; K. Kosack; F. Krennrich; S. LeBohec; P. Moriarty; D. Müller; T. N. Nagai; R. Ong; M. Page; R. Pallassini; B. Power-Mooney; J. Quinn; N. W. Reay; P. T. Reynolds; H. J. Rose; M. Schroedter; G. H. Sembroski; R. Sidwell; N. Stanton; S. P. Swordy; V. V. Vassiliev; S. P. Wakely; G. Walker; T. C. Weekes

2002-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

326

Frequency–Wavenumber Spectrum for GATF, Phase I Rainfields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oceanic rainfall frequency-wavenumber spectrum and its associated space-time correlation have been evaluated from subsets of GATE Phase 1 data. The records, of a duration of 4 days, were sampled at 15 minute intervals in 4 × 4 km grid boxes ...

Shoichiro Nakamoto; Juan B. Valdés; Gerald R. North

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

The power spectrum of the seeing during solar observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of the power spectrum of the atmospheric seeing in the line of sight of the Sun, in the range 0.001-1 Hz, have been performed in Santa Maria degli Angeli Lucernaria Dome, at IRSOL and in Huairou Station. This study is aimed to understand the criticity of the meridian transits method for solar diameter monitoring.

Sigismondi, Costantino; Wang, Xiaofan; De Rosi, Giulia; Bianda, Michele; Ramelli, Renzo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

SAS: Self-Adaptive Spectrum Management for Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, like B-MAC. The use of SAS results in higher packet reception ratio and system throughput, and a lower in the 2.4 GHz ISM band may also be affected by existing electrical appliances. For example, Figure 1 Running Fig. 1. 2.4 GHz Spectrum Usage in a Home Environment address the problem arising from this crowded

Zhou, Gang

329

NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation: Issue 3 (Book)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This quarterly magazine is dedicated to stepping beyond the technical journals to reveal NREL's vital work in a real-world context for our stakeholders. Continuum provides insights into the latest and most impactful clean energy innovations, while spotlighting those talented researchers and unique facilities that make it all happen. This edition focuses on the NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Energy Spectrum of Anyons in a Magnetic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the many-anyon system in external magnetic field, we derive the energy spectrum as an exact solution of the quantum eigenvalue problem with particular topological constraints. Our results agree with the numerical spectra recently obtained for the 3- and the 4-anyon systems.

Fabrizio Illuminati

1992-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

331

Hurricane Directional Wave Spectrum Spatial Variation in the Open Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sea surface directional wave spectrum was measured for the first time in all quadrants of a hurricane's inner core over open water. The NASA airborne scanning radar altimeter (SRA) carried aboard one of the NOAA WP-3D hurricane research ...

C. W. Wright; E. J. Walsh; D. Vandemark; W. B. Krabill; A. W. Garcia; S. H. Houston; M. D. Powell; P. G. Black; F. D. Marks

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Higher Order Contributions to the 21 cm Power Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the contribution of 3rd and 4th order terms to the power spectrum of 21 cm brightness temperature fluctuations during the epoch of reionization, which arise because the 21 cm brightness temperature involves a product of the hydrogenic neutral fraction and the gas density. The 3rd order terms vanish for Gaussian random fields, and have been previously neglected or ignored. We measure these higher order terms from radiative transfer simulations and estimate them using cosmological perturbation theory. In our simulated models, the higher order terms are significant: neglecting them leads to a >~100% error in 21 cm power spectrum predictions on scales of k >~ 1 Mpc^{-1} when the neutral fraction is ~0.5. The higher order terms have a simple physical interpretation. On small scales they are produced by gravitational mode coupling. Small scale structure grows more readily in large-scale overdense regions, but the same regions tend to be ionized and hence do not contribute to the 21 cm signal. This acts to suppress the influence of non-linear density fluctuations and the small-scale amplitude of the 21 cm power spectrum. These results modify earlier intuition that the 21 cm power spectrum simply traces the density power spectrum on scales smaller than that of a typical bubble, and imply that small scale measurements contain more information about the nature of the ionizing sources than previously believed. On large scales, higher order moments are not directly related to gravity. They are non-zero because over-dense regions tend to ionize first and are important in magnitude at late times owing to the large fluctuations in the neutral fraction. (Abridged)

Adam Lidz; Oliver Zahn; Matthew McQuinn; Matias Zaldarriaga; Suvendra Dutta; Lars Hernquist

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

333

Constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity from WMAP7 and luminous red galaxies power spectrum and forecast for future surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We place new constraints on the primordial local non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} using recent cosmic microwave background anisotropy and galaxy clustering data. We model the galaxy power spectrum according to the halo model, accounting for a scale-dependent bias correction proportional to f{sub NL}/k{sup 2}. We first constrain f{sub NL} in a full 13 parameters analysis that includes 5 parameters of the halo model and 7 cosmological parameters. Using the WMAP7 CMB data and the SDSS DR4 galaxy power spectrum, we find f{sub NL}=171{sub -139}{sup +140} at 68% C.L. and -69forecast the constraints on f{sub NL} from future surveys as EUCLID and from CMB missions as Planck showing that their combined analysis could detect f{sub NL{approx}}5.

De Bernardis, Francesco [Physics Department and INFN, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza', Ple Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Rome (Italy); Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Serra, Paolo; Cooray, Asantha [Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Melchiorri, Alessandro [Physics Department and INFN, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza', Ple Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Rome (Italy)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

The Linear Theory Power Spectrum from the Lyman-alpha Forest in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the SDSS Ly-alpha forest P_F(k,z) measurement to determine the linear theory power spectrum. Our analysis is based on fully hydrodynamic simulations, extended using hydro-PM simulations. We account for the effect of absorbers with damping wings, which leads to an increase in the slope of the linear power spectrum. We break the degeneracy between the mean level of absorption and the linear power spectrum without significant use of external constraints. We infer linear theory power spectrum amplitude Delta^2_L(k_p=0.009s/km,z_p=3.0)=0.452_{-0.057-0.116}^{+0.069+0.141} and slope n_eff=-2.321_{-0.047-0.102}^{+0.055+0.131} (possible systematic errors are included through nuisance parameters in the fit - a factor >~5 smaller errors would be obtained on both parameters if we ignored modeling uncertainties). The errors are correlated and not perfectly Gaussian, so we provide a chi^2 table to accurately describe the results. The result corresponds to sigma_8=0.85, n=0.94, for a LCDM model with Omega_m=0.3, Omega_b=0.04, and h=0.7, but is most useful in a combined fit with the CMB. The inferred curvature of the linear power spectrum and the evolution of its amplitude and slope with redshift are consistent with expectations for LCDM models, with the evolution of the slope, in particular, being tightly constrained. We use this information to constrain systematic contamination, e.g., fluctuations in the UV background. This paper should serve as a starting point for more work to refine the analysis, including technical improvements such as increasing the size and number of the hydrodynamic simulations, and improvements in the treatment of the various forms of feedback from galaxies and quasars.

P. McDonald; U. Seljak; R. Cen; D. Shih; D. H. Weinberg; S. Burles; D. P. Schneider; D. J. Schlegel; N. A. Bahcall; J. W. Briggs; J. Brinkmann; M. Fukugita; Z. Ivezic; S. Kent; D. E. Vanden Berk

2004-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

335

The Effects of a Dynamic Spectrum Access Overlay in LTE-Advanced Networks  

SciTech Connect

As early as 2014, wireless network operators spectral capacity will be overwhelmed by a data tsunami brought on by new devices and applications. To augment spectral capacity, operators could deploy a Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA) overlay. In the light of the many planned Long Term Evolution (LTE) network deployments, the affects of a DSA overlay have not been fully considered into the existing LTE standards. Coalescing many different aspects of DSA, this paper develops the Spectrum Accountability (SA) framework. The SA framework defines specific network element functionality, protocol interfaces, and signaling flow diagrams for LTE to support service requests and enforce rights of responsibilities of primary and secondary users, respectively. We also include a network simulation to quantify the benefits of using DSA channels to augment capacity. Based on our simulation we show that, network operators can benefit up to %40 increase in operating capacity when sharing DSA bands to augment spectral capacity. With our framework, this paper could serve as an guide in developing future LTE network standards that include DSA.

Juan D. Deaton; Ryan E. lrwin; Luiz A. DaSilva

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Low-mass fission detector for the fission neutron spectrum measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the fission neutron spectrum measurement, the neutron energy is determined in a time-of-flight experiment by the time difference between the fission event and detection of the neutron. Therefore, the neutron energy resolution is directly determined by the time resolution of both neutron and fission detectors. For the fission detection, the detector needs not only a good timing response but also the tolerance of radiation damage and high {alpha}-decay rate. A parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) has many advantages for the detection of heavy charged particles such as fission fragments. These include fast timing, resistance to radiation damage, and tolerance of high counting rate. A PPAC also can be tuned to be insensitive to particles, which is important for experiments with - emitting actinides. Therefore, a PPAC is an ideal detector for experiments requiring a fast and clean trigger for fission. In the following sections, the description will be given for the design and performance of a new low-mass PPAC for the fission-neutron spectrum measurements at LANL.

Wu, C Y; Henderson, R; Gostic, J; Haight, R C; Lee, H Y

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

337

Analysis of genes regulated by the peroxide response regulator PerR in Borrelia burgdorferi using real-time RT-PCR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, is a spirochetal bacterium that is transmitted to mammals via the bite of an Ixodes tick. The environments that the bacterium is exposed to when it resides in the tick and mammal are quite disparate and include differences in temperature, pH, and oxygen concentration. Although it has been shown that the aforementioned factors alter gene expression, few regulatory proteins have been identified in the B. burgdorferi genome. bb0647 encodes a peroxide response regulator (PerR) which regulates gene expression in response to oxidative stress in other organisms. Several borrelial genes with homology to known oxidative stress genes, and the pathogenesis-associated gene dbpA, contain putative PerR binding domains. To determine if PerR regulates the expression of oxidative stress genes in B. burgdorferi, we inactivated perR from a non-infectious B. burgdorferi strain (designated Lab), creating strain JS167. JS167 is hyper-resistant to reactive oxygen species and has increased superoxide dismutase activity compared to the Lab parental strain. JS167 makes four-fold more DbpA protein than Lab. We analyzed the expression of two oxidative stress genes, napA and sodA, and dbpA using real-time RT-PCR in JS167 and the infectious isolate MSK5 compared to Lab. We found napA and dbpA were induced 1.13-fold and 2.89-fold in JS167 compared to Lab, and sodA was induced 1.78-fold more in Lab than in JS167. The napA and sodA results indicate that the hyper-resistance of JS167 to reactive oxygen species is not due to the up-regulation of these two genes. MSK5 contains all known borrelial plasmids, and we therefore expect that gene expression be more tightly regulated in this strain compared to Lab. dbpA and sodA were expressed 3.48-fold and 1.25-fold more in Lab than in MSK5 and napA was expressed 1.38-fold more in MSK5. The low level of expression of dbpA in MSK5 does not correspond to DbpA protein levels in this isolate. Further studies addressing the effect of different oxygen concentrations and/or the presence of different oxidative stressors are needed to determine how these genes are regulated in response to oxidative stress.

Swingle, Kristen Lynn

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Demand Response for Ancillary Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Neutron contribution to CaF2:Mn thermoluminescent dosimeter response in mixed (n/y) field environments.  

SciTech Connect

Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), particularly CaF{sub 2}:Mn, are often used as photon dosimeters in mixed (n/{gamma}) field environments. In these mixed field environments, it is desirable to separate the photon response of a dosimeter from the neutron response. For passive dosimeters that measure an integral response, such as TLDs, the separation of the two components must be performed by postexperiment analysis because the TLD reading system cannot distinguish between photon- and neutron-produced response. Using a model of an aluminum-equilibrated TLD-400 (CaF{sub 2}:Mn) chip, a systematic effort has been made to analytically determine the various components that contribute to the neutron response of a TLD reading. The calculations were performed for five measured reactor neutron spectra and one theoretical thermal neutron spectrum. The five measured reactor spectra all have experimental values for aluminum-equilibrated TLD-400 chips. Calculations were used to determine the percentage of the total TLD response produced by neutron interactions in the TLD and aluminum equilibrator. These calculations will aid the Sandia National Laboratories-Radiation Metrology Laboratory (SNL-RML) in the interpretation of the uncertainty for TLD dosimetry measurements in the mixed field environments produced by SNL reactor facilities.

DePriest, Kendall Russell; Griffin, Patrick Joseph

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Neutron Contribution to CaF2:Mn Thermoluminescent Dosimeter Response in Mixed (n/y) Field Environments  

SciTech Connect

Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), particularly CaF{sub 2}:Mn, are often used as photon dosimeters in mixed (n/{gamma}) field environments. In these mixed field environments, it is desirable to separate the photon response of a dosimeter from the neutron response. For passive dosimeters that measure an integral response, such as TLDs, the separation of the two components must be performed by post-experiment analysis because the TLD reading system cannot distinguish between photon and neutron produced response. Using a model of an aluminum-equilibrated TLD-400 chip, a systematic effort has been made to analytically determine the various components that contribute to the neutron response of a TLD reading. The calculations were performed for five measured reactor neutron spectra and one theoretical thermal neutron spectrum. The five measured reactor spectra all have dosimetry quality experimental values for aluminum-equilibrated TLD-400 chips. Calculations were used to determined the percentage of the total TLD response produced by neutron interactions in the TLD and aluminum equilibrator. These calculations will aid the Sandia National Laboratories-Radiation Metrology Laboratory (SNL-RML) in the interpretation of the uncertainty for TLD dosimetry measurements in the mixed field environments produced by SNL reactor facilities.

DEPRIEST, KENDALL R.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Systematic Analysis of Sequences and Expression Patterns of Drought-Responsive Members of the HD-Zip Gene Family in Maize  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Members of the homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) gene family encode transcription factors that are unique to plants and have diverse functions in plant growth and development such as various stress responses, organ formation and vascular development. Although systematic characterization of this family has been carried out in Arabidopsis and rice, little is known about HD-Zip genes in maize (Zea mays L.). Methods and Findings: In this study, we described the identification and structural characterization of HD-Zip genes in the maize genome. A complete set of 55 HD-Zip genes (Zmhdz1-55) were identified in the maize genome using Blast search tools and categorized into four classes (HD-Zip I-IV) based on phylogeny. Chromosomal location of these genes revealed that they are distributed unevenly across all 10 chromosomes. Segmental duplication contributed largely to the expansion of the maize HD-ZIP gene family, while tandem duplication was only responsible for the amplification of the HD-Zip II genes. Furthermore, most of the maize HD-Zip I genes were found to contain an overabundance of stress-related ciselements in their promoter sequences. The expression levels of the 17 HD-Zip I genes under drought stress were also investigated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). All of the 17 maize HD-ZIP I genes were found to be regulated by drought stress, and the duplicated genes within a sister pair exhibited the similar expression patterns, suggesting their conserved functions during the process of evolution.

Yang Zhao; Yuqiong Zhou; Haiyang Jiang; Xiaoyu Li; Defang Gan; Xiaojian Peng; Suwen Zhu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Social Welfare Implications of Demand Response Programs in Competitive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

343

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

344

Customer Response to Day-ahead Wholesale Market Electricity Prices...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

345

Power-Spectrum Analyses of Super-Kamiokande Solar Neutrino Data: Variability and its Implications for Solar Physics and Neutrino Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There have been conflicting claims as to whether or not power-spectrum analysis of the Super-Kamiokande solar neutrino data yields evidence of variability. Comparison of these claims is complicated by the fact that the relevant articles may use different datasets, different methods of analysis, and different procedures for significance estimation. The purpose of this article is to clarify the role of power spectrum analysis. To this end, we analyze only the Super-Kamiokande 5-day dataset, and we use a standard procedure for significance estimation proposed by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration. We then analyze this dataset, with this method of significance estimation, using six methods of power spectrum analysis. We find that the significance of the principal peak in the power spectrum (that at 9.43 yr-1with a depth of modulation of 7%) shows a clear correlation with the amount and relevance of the information being processed, as would be expected if there were a real signal in the data. The significance level reaches 99.3% for one method of analysis. We discuss, in terms of sub-dominant processes, possible neutrino-physics interpretations of the apparent variability of the Super-Kamiokande measurements, and we suggest steps that could be taken to resolve the question of variability of the solar neutrino flux.

P. A. Sturrock; D. O. Caldwell; J. D. Scargle; M. S. Wheatland

2005-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

346

Discreteness of spectrum and positivity criteria for Schrödinger operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a class of necessary and sufficient conditions for the discreteness of spectrum of Schr\\"odinger operators with scalar potentials which are semibounded below. The classical discreteness of spectrum criterion by A.M.Molchanov (1953) uses a notion of negligible set in a cube as a set whose Wiener's capacity is less than a small constant times the capacity of the cube. We prove that this constant can be taken arbitrarily between 0 and 1. This solves a problem formulated by I.M.Gelfand in 1953. Moreover, we extend the notion of negligibility by allowing the constant to depend on the size of the cube. We give a complete description of all negligibility conditions of this kind. The a priori equivalence of our conditions involving different negligibility classes is a non-trivial property of the capacity. We also establish similar strict positivity criteria for the Schr\\"odinger operators with non-negative potentials.

Vladimir Maz'ya; Mikhail Shubin

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

347

The Turbulence Power Spectrum in Optically Thick Interstellar Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Fourier power spectrum is one of the most widely used statistical tools to analyze the nature of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the interstellar medium. Lazarian & Pogosyan (2004) predicted that the spectral slope should saturate to -3 for an optically thick medium and many observations exist in support of their prediction. However, there have not been any numerical studies to-date testing these results. We analyze the spatial power spectrum of MHD simulations with a wide range of sonic and Alfv\\'enic Mach numbers, which include radiative transfer effects of the $^{13}$CO transition. We confirm numerically the predictions of Lazarian & Pogosyan (2004) that the spectral slope of line intensity maps of an optically thick medium saturates to -3. Furthermore, for very optically thin supersonic CO gas, where the density or CO abundance values are too low to excite emission in all but the densest shock compressed gas, we find that the spectral slope is shallower than expected from the column density....

Burkhart, Blakesley; Ossenkopf, V; Stutzki, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

The Magnetic Sensitivity of the Second Solar Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews some of the developments that over the last 10 years have allowed us to go from deciphering the physical origin of several of the enigmatic features of the second solar spectrum to discovering unknown aspects of the Sun's hidden magnetism via sophisticated radiative transfer modeling. The second solar spectrum is the observational signature of radiatively induced quantum coherences in the atoms and molecules of the solar atmosphere. Magnetic fields produce partial decoherence via the Hanle effect, giving rise to fascinating observable effects in the emergent spectral line polarization. Interestingly, these effects allow us to "see" magnetic fields to which the Zeeman effect is blind within the limitations of the available instrumentation. In the coming years, the physical interpretation of observations of the spectral line polarization resulting from the joint action of the Hanle and Zeeman effects might lead to a new revolution in our empirical understanding of solar magnetic fields.

Bueno, J Trujillo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The Magnetic Sensitivity of the Second Solar Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews some of the developments that over the last 10 years have allowed us to go from deciphering the physical origin of several of the enigmatic features of the second solar spectrum to discovering unknown aspects of the Sun's hidden magnetism via sophisticated radiative transfer modeling. The second solar spectrum is the observational signature of radiatively induced quantum coherences in the atoms and molecules of the solar atmosphere. Magnetic fields produce partial decoherence via the Hanle effect, giving rise to fascinating observable effects in the emergent spectral line polarization. Interestingly, these effects allow us to "see" magnetic fields to which the Zeeman effect is blind within the limitations of the available instrumentation. In the coming years, the physical interpretation of observations of the spectral line polarization resulting from the joint action of the Hanle and Zeeman effects might lead to a new revolution in our empirical understanding of solar magnetic fields.

J. Trujillo Bueno

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

350

Derivation of the Blackbody Radiation Spectrum from a Natural Maximum-Entropy Principle Involving Casimir Energies and Zero-Point Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By numerical calculation, the Planck spectrum with zero-point radiation is shown to satisfy a natural maximum-entropy principle whereas alternative choices of spectra do not. Specifically, if we consider a set of conducting-walled boxes, each with a partition placed at a different location in the box, so that across the collection of boxes the partitions are uniformly spaced across the volume, then the Planck spectrum correspond to that spectrum of random radiation (having constant energy kT per normal mode at low frequencies and zero-point energy (1/2)hw per normal mode at high frequencies) which gives maximum uniformity across the collection of boxes for the radiation energy per box. The analysis involves Casimir energies and zero-point radiation which do not usually appear in thermodynamic analyses. For simplicity, the analysis is presented for waves in one space dimension.

Timothy H. Boyer

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hydrogen-atom spectrum under a minimal-length hypothesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy spectrum of the Coulomb potential with minimal length commutation relations $[X_i, P_j] = i\\hbar\\{\\delta_{ij}(1+\\beta P^2) + \\beta'P_iP_j\\}$ is determined both numerically and perturbatively for arbitrary values of $\\beta'/\\beta$ and angular momenta $\\ell$. The constraint on the minimal length scale from precision hydrogen spectroscopy data is of order of a few GeV$\

Sandor Benczik; Lay Nam Chang; Djordje Minic; Tatsu Takeuchi

2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

352

Second Season QUIET Observations: Measurements of the CMB Polarization Power Spectrum at 95 GHz  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) has observed the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 43 and 95GHz. The 43-GHz results have been published in QUIET Collaboration et al. (2011), and here we report the measurement of CMB polarization power spectra using the 95-GHz data. This data set comprises 5337 hours of observations recorded by an array of 84 polarized coherent receivers with a total array sensitivity of 87 {mu}K{radical}s. Four low-foreground fields were observed, covering a total of {approx} 1000 square degrees with an effective angular resolution of 12'.8, allowing for constraints on primordial gravitational waves and high-signal-to-noise measurements of the E-modes across three acoustic peaks. The data reduction was performed using two independent analysis pipelines, one based on a pseudo-C{ell} (PCL) cross-correlation approach, and the other on a maximum-likelihood (ML) approach. All data selection criteria and filters were modified until a predefined set of null tests had been satisfied before inspecting any non-null power spectrum. The results derived by the two pipelines are in good agreement. We characterize the EE, EB and BB power spectra between {ell} = 25 and 975 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with {Lambda}CDM, while the BB power spectrum is consistent with zero. Based on these measurements, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r = 1.1{sup +0.9}{sub -0.8} (r pipeline, and r = {sup +0.9}{sub -0.8} (r pipeline. In one of the fields, we find a correlation with the dust component of the Planck Sky Model, though the corresponding excess power is small compared to statistical errors. Finally, we derive limits on all known systematic errors, and demonstrate that these correspond to a tensor-to-scalar ratio smaller than r = 0.01, the lowest level yet reported in the literature.

Araujo, D.; /Columbia U., CBA; Bischoff, C.; /Chicago U., EFI /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Brizius, A.; /Chicago U., EFI /Bonn, Max Planck Inst., Radioastron.; Buder, I.; /Chicago U., EFI /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Chinone, Y.; /KEK, Tsukuba /Tohoku U.; Cleary, K.; /Caltech; Dumoulin, R.N.; /Columbia U., CBA; Kusaka, A.; /Chicago U., EFI /Princeton U.; Monsalve, R.; /Miami U.; ss, S.K.N\\ae; /Oslo U.; Newburgh, L.B.; /Columbia U., CBA /Princeton U. /Caltech

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Information content of the non-linear matter power spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use an ensemble of N-body simulations of the currently favoured (concordance) cosmological model to measure the amount of information contained in the non-linear matter power spectrum about the amplitude of the initial power spectrum. Two surprising results emerge from this study: (i) that there is very little independent information in the power spectrum in the translinear regime (k ~ 0.2-0.8 Mpc/h at the present day) over and above the information at linear scales and (ii) that the cumulative information begins to rise sharply again with increasing wavenumber in the non-linear regime. In the fully non-linear regime, the simulations are consistent with no loss of information during translinear and non-linear evolution. If this is indeed the case then the results suggest a picture in which translinear collapse is very rapid, and is followed by a bounce prior to virialization, impelling a wholesale revision of the HKLM-PD formalism.

C. D. Rimes; A. J. S. Hamilton

2005-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

354

High Resolution Irradiance Spectrum from 300 to 1000 nm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The FTS scans that made up the Kitt Peak Solar Flux Atlas by Kurucz, Furenlid, Brault, and Testerman (1984) have been re-reduced. An approximate telluric atmospheric model was determined for each FTS scan. Large-scale features produced by O3 and O2 dimer were computed and divided out. The solar continuum level was found by fitting a smooth curve to high points in each scan. The scans were normalized to the fitted continuum to produce a residual flux spectrum for each FTS scan. The telluric line spectrum was computed using HITRAN and other line data for H2O, O2, and CO2. The line parameters were adjusted for an approximate match to the observed spectra. The scans were divided by the computed telluric spectra to produce residual irradiance spectra. Artifacts from wavelength mismatches, deep lines, etc, were removed by hand and replaced by linear interpolation. Overlapping scans were fitted together to make a continuous spectrum from 300 to 1000 nm. All the above steps were iterative. The monochromatic error var...

Kurucz, R L

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Search for Spatial Variability in the Solar Acoustic Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the various examples of spatial variability in the power of the acoustic spectrum, we attempted to look for spatial variability in the peak frequency of the spectrum. However, the determination of this peak frequency on a spatial scale of a single pixel (8 arc seconds for the GONG data) is limited by the stochastic variations in the power spectrum presumably caused by the stochastic nature of the excitation process. Averaging over a large number of spectra (100 spectra from a 10 $\\times$ 10 pixels area) produced stabler spectra. The peak frequencies of 130 such locations were found to be distributed with a FWHM of about 130 $\\mu$Hz. A map of the spatial variation of this peak frequency did not show any strong feature with statistically significant deviation from the mean of the distribution. Likewise, the scatter in the peak frequencies masked the detection of magnetic field induced changes in the peak frequency. On a much larger scale, the N latitudes showed a slightly lower value of the peak frequency as compared to the S latitudes, although the difference (25 $\\mu$Hz) is barely larger than the {\\it rms} spread (20 $\\mu$Hz).

P. Venkatakrishnan; Brajesh Kumar; S. C. Tripathy

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

356

SEARCH FOR SPATIAL VARIABILITY IN THE SOLAR ACOUSTIC SPECTRUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Motivated by the various examples of spatial variability in the power of the acoustic spectrum, we attempted to look for spatial variability in the peak frequency of the spectrum. However, the determination of this peak frequency on a spatial scale of a single pixel (8 arc seconds for the GONG data) is limited by the stochastic variations in the power spectrum presumably caused by the stochastic nature of the excitation process. Averaging over a large number of spectra (100 spectra from a 10 × 10 pixels area) produced stabler spectra. The peak frequencies of 130 such locations were found to be distributed with a FWHM of about 130 µHz. A map of the spatial variation of this peak frequency did not show any strong feature with statistically significant deviation from the mean of the distribution. Likewise, the scatter in the peak frequencies masked the detection of magnetic field induced changes in the peak frequency. On a much larger scale, the N latitudes showed a slightly lower value of the peak frequency as compared to the S latitudes, although the difference (25 µHz) is barely larger than the rms spread (20 µHz). 1.

P. Venkatakrishnan; Brajesh Kumar; S. C. Tripathy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Towards the Modelling of the Second Solar Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses the modelling issue of the linearly-polarized solar limb spectrum, which is due to scattering processes and it offers a rich diagnostic potential for exploring solar magnetic fields via the Hanle effect. However, this so-called second solar spectrum is full of mysterious spectral features, which cannot be understood with simplified polarization transfer theories, thus suggesting that the underlying scattering physics is more complex than previously thought. In this paper we argue that the physical understanding of the second solar spectrum requires the consideration of scattering processes in multilevel atomic models, taking fully into account the transfer of atomic polarization among all the levels involved. The consideration of lower-level atomic polarization leads to non-linear and non-local coupled sets of equations, even for the two-level model atom case considered in this paper. The unknowns of the problem are the irreducible tensor components of the atomic density matrix whose self-consistent values have first to be obtained to be able to calculate the emergent Stokes profiles. To solve numerically this non-LTE problem of the second kind we present some iterative methods that are very suitable for developing a general multilevel scattering polarization code. We demonstrate that there exists metastable-level atomic polarization in the solar chromosphere, which suggests that the solution to some recently-formulated "paradoxes" is to be found by carefully revising our current ideas about the chromospheric magnetic field.

J. Trujillo Bueno

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

358

An optical spectrum analyzer with quantum limited noise floor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interactions between atoms and lasers provide the potential for unprecedented control of quantum states. Fulfilling this potential requires detailed knowledge of frequency noise in optical oscillators with state-of-the-art stability. We demonstrate a technique that precisely measures the noise spectrum of an ultra-stable laser using optical lattice-trapped $^{87}$Sr atoms as a quantum projection noise-limited reference. We determine the laser noise spectrum from near DC to 100 Hz via the measured fluctuations in atomic excitation, guided by a simple and robust theory model. The noise spectrum yields a 26(4) mHz linewidth at a central frequency of 429 THz, corresponding to an optical Q of $1.6\\times10^{16}$. This approach improves upon optical heterodyne beats between two similar laser systems by providing information unique to a single laser, and complements the traditionally used Allan deviation which evaluates laser performance at relatively long time scales. We use this technique to verify the reduction of...

Bishof, Michael; Martin, Michael J; Ye, Jun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

The Quiescent X-Ray Spectrum of the Neutron Star in Cen X-4 Observed with Chandra/ACIS-S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on spectral and intensity variability analysis from a Chandra/ACIS-S observation of the transient, type-I X-ray bursting low-mass X-ray binary Cen X-4. The quiescent X-ray spectrum during this observation is statistically identical to one observed previously with Beppo/SAX, and close, but not identical, to one observed previously with ASCA. The X-ray spectrum is best described as a pure Hydrogen atmosphere thermal spectrum plus a power-law component that dominates the spectrum above 2 keV. The best-fit radius of the neutron star is r=12.9+/-2.6 (d/1.2 kpc) km if the interstellar absorption is fixed at the value implied by the optical reddening. Allowing the interstellar absorption to be a free parameter yields r=19+45-10 (d/1.2 kpc) km (90% confidence). The thermal spectrum from the neutron star surface is inconsistent with a solar metallicity. We find a 3sigma upper-limit of root-mean-square variability <18% (0.2-2.0 keV; 0.0001-1 Hz) during the observation. On the other hand, the 0.5-10.0 keV luminosity decreased by 40+/-8% in the 4.9 years between the Asca and Chandra observations. This variability can be attributed to the power-law component. Moreover, we limit the variation in thermal temperature to <10% over these 4.9 years. The stability of the thermal temperature and emission area radius supports the interpretation that the quiescent thermal emission is due to the hot neutron star core.

Robert E. Rutledge; Lars Bildsten; Edward F. Brown; George G. Pavlov; Vyacheslav E. Zavlin

2000-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

360

PROBING THE INFLATON: SMALL-SCALE POWER SPECTRUM CONSTRAINTS FROM MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ENERGY SPECTRUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the early universe, energy stored in small-scale density perturbations is quickly dissipated by Silk damping, a process that inevitably generates {mu}- and y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These spectral distortions depend on the shape and amplitude of the primordial power spectrum at wavenumbers k {approx}window functions that account for the effects of thermalization and dissipation physics. We show that COBE/FIRAS places a robust upper limit on the amplitude of the small-scale power spectrum. This limit is about three orders of magnitude stronger than the one derived from primordial black holes in the same scale range. Furthermore, this limit could be improved by another three orders of magnitude with PIXIE, potentially opening up a new window to early universe physics. To illustrate the power of these constraints, we consider several generic models for the small-scale power spectrum predicted by different inflation scenarios, including running-mass inflation models and inflation scenarios with episodes of particle production. PIXIE could place very tight constraints on these scenarios, potentially even ruling out running-mass inflation models if no distortion is detected. We also show that inflation models with sub-Planckian field excursion that generate detectable tensor perturbations should simultaneously produce a large CMB spectral distortion, a link that could potentially be established with PIXIE.

Chluba, Jens; Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Ben-Dayan, Ido, E-mail: jchluba@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H8 (Canada)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

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361

THE COSMIC-RAY ENERGY SPECTRUM OBSERVED WITH THE SURFACE DETECTOR OF THE TELESCOPE ARRAY EXPERIMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Telescope Array (TA) collaboration has measured the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with primary energies above 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} eV. This measurement is based upon four years of observation by the surface detector component of TA. The spectrum shows a dip at an energy of 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} eV and a steepening at 5.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV which is consistent with the expectation from the GZK cutoff. We present the results of a technique, new to the analysis of UHECR surface detector data, that involves generating a complete simulation of UHECRs striking the TA surface detector. The procedure starts with shower simulations using the CORSIKA Monte Carlo program where we have solved the problems caused by use of the ''thinning'' approximation. This simulation method allows us to make an accurate calculation of the acceptance of the detector for the energies concerned.

Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Hanlon, W. [High Energy Astrophysics Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Aida, R. [University of Yamanashi, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, Kofu, Yamanashi (Japan); Azuma, R.; Fukuda, T. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Cheon, B. G.; Cho, E. J. [Department of Physics and Research Institute of Natural Science, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chiba, J. [Department of Physics, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba (Japan); Chikawa, M. [Department of Physics, Kinki University, Higashi Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Cho, W. R. [Department of Physics, Yonsei University, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Fujii, H. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Fujii, T. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Fukushima, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); and others

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Continuum Power Spectrum Components in X-Ray Sources: Detailed Modelling and Search for Coherent Periodicities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper summarises two recently developed techniques in power spectral analysis and their application to a sample of X-ray light curves of accreting collapsed objects in active galactic nuclei and X-ray binaries. The first technique is designed to carry out detailed model fitting of continuum power spectrum components arising from noise variability by using maximum likelihood methods. The technique is applied to the light curves of a number of highly variable AGNs observed with EXOSAT. Substantially steeper logarithmic power spectrum slopes are obtained than previously estimated with standard methods. The second technique was devised in order to reveal coherent periodicities in the presence of ``coloured" (i.e. non--white) noise variability components from the source. To this aim the power spectra are searched for significant narrow peaks superposed on the ``coloured" continuum components. We present the results of a search for an orbital modulation in the light curves of a sample of 25 low mass X--ray binaries (LMXRBs), for which the orbital period is either unknown or detected only at optical wavelengths. This led to the discovery of a significant X--ray orbital modulation at the few percent level in the burster MXB1636-539.

L. Stella; E. Arlandi; G. Tagliaferri; G. L. Israel

1994-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

363

Laser Scintillation Measurements of the Temperature Spectrum in the Atmospheric Surface Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The locally stationary temperature spectrum in the atmospheric surface layer is estimated using laser scintillation. The fluctuations of the parameters of the turbulence spectrum (the structure constant CT2 and inner scale l0) have a lognormal ...

Rod Frehlich

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

The Continuous Spectrum in Baroclinic Models with Uniform Potential Vorticity Gradient and Ekman Damping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytic solutions of the continuous spectrum are obtained for quasigeostrophic models in which the basic-state meridional potential vorticity (PV) gradient is uniform but nonzero. The modes that form the continuous spectrum—continuum modes—are ...

Hylke de Vries

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The Blackbody Radiation Spectrum Follows from Zero-Point Radiation and the Structure of Relativistic Spacetime in Classical Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of this article is entirely within classical physics. Any attempt to describe nature within classical physics requires the presence of Lorentz-invariant classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation so as to account for the Casimir forces between parallel conducting plates at low temperatures. Furthermore, conformal symmetry carries solutions of Maxwell's equations into solutions. In an inertial frame, conformal symmetry leaves zero-point radiation invariant and does not connect it to non-zero-temperature; time-dilating conformal transformations carry the Lorentz-invariant zero-point radiation spectrum into zero-point radiation and carry the thermal radiation spectrum at non-zero temperature into thermal radiation at a different non-zero-temperature. However, in a non-inertial frame, a time-dilating conformal transformation carries classical zero-point radiation into thermal radiation at a finite non-zero-temperature. By taking the no-acceleration limit, one can obtain the Planck radiation spect...

Boyer, Timothy H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Evaluation of the opportunity cost of the spectrum: Application to the digital dividend  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transition to digital television transmission (DTT) creates an opportunity for revising the current allocation and use of the spectrum, and for enhancing its efficiency. The fairly large amount of spectrum that will be freed up in the analog TV switch-off ... Keywords: Administered Incentive Pricing, Digital dividend, Investment, Opportunity cost, Spectrum management

Carlo Cambini; Nicola Garelli

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Distributed cooperative spectrum sensing in cognitive radio for ad hoc networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cognitive radio refers to an intelligent radio with the capability of sensing the radio environment and dynamically reconfiguring the operating parameters. Recent research has focused on using cognitive radios in ad hoc environments. Spectrum sensing ... Keywords: Ad hoc networks, Cognitive radio, Spectrum sensing, TV spectrum

Waleed Ejaz, Najam Ul Hasan, Hyung Seok Kim

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

In-band spectrum sensing in cognitive radio networks: energy detection or feature detection?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a cognitive radio network (CRN), in-band spectrum sensing is essential for the protection of legacy spectrum users, with which the presence of primary users (PUs) can be detected promptly, allowing secondary users (SUs) to vacate the channels immediately. ... Keywords: energy and feature detection, sensing scheduling, sensor clustering, spectrum sensing and opportunity

Hyoil Kim; Kang G. Shin

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

An experimental setup for performance evaluation of spectrum sensing via energy detector: indoor environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectrum sensing is an essential task for cognitive radios (CRs) and next generation wireless networks (NGWNs). In this study, an experimental setup which can emulate a spectrum sensing scheme through the use of energy detector is proposed. Both line--of--sight ... Keywords: energy detector, experimental setup, fading, indoor environment, spectrum sensing, wireless propagation

Serhan Yarkan; Wael Halbawi; Khalid A. Qaraqe

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Potentials and limits of secondary spectrum usage by CDMA base stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the progress of transmission technology and fast growing demand for ubiquitous high speed wireless services, it is clear that the pressure towards more flexibility in usage of limited spectrum will increase. With concept of spectrum sharing, in ... Keywords: primary exclusive region (PER), secondary spectrum usage, secondary usage allowable region (SAR), secondary usage prohibitive region (SPR)

Eun-Hee Shin; Dongwoo Kim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Small-Scale Power Spectrum of Cold Dark Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the best motivated hypotheses in cosmology states that most of the matter in the universe is in the form of weakly-interacting massive particles that decoupled early in the history of the universe and cooled adiabatically to an extremely low temperature. Nevertheless, the finite temperature and horizon scales at which these particles decoupled imprint generic signatures on their small scales density fluctuations. We show that the previously recognized cut-off in the fluctuation power-spectrum due to free-streaming of particles at the thermal speed of decoupling, is supplemented by acoustic oscillations owing to the initial coupling between the cold dark matter (CDM) and the radiation field. The power-spectrum oscillations appear on the scale of the horizon at thermal decoupling which corresponds to a mass scale of \\~10^{-4}*(T_d/10MeV)^{-3} solar masses for a CDM decoupling temperature T_d. The suppression of the power-spectrum on smaller scales by the acoustic oscillations is physically independent from the free-streaming effect, although the two cut-off scales are coincidentally comparable for T_d~10MeV and a particle mass of M~100GeV. The initial conditions for recent numerical simulations of the earliest and smallest objects to have formed in the universe, need to be modified accordingly. The smallest dark matter clumps may be detectable through gamma-ray production from particle annihilation, through fluctuations in the event rate of direct detection experiments, or through their tidal gravitational effect on wide orbits of objects near the outer edge of the solar system.

Abraham Loeb; Matias Zaldarriaga

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

372

Spectrum Fatigue Lifetime and Residual Strength for Fiberglass Laminates  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the effects of spectrum loading on lifetime and residual strength of a typical fiberglass laminate configuration used in wind turbine blade construction. Over 1100 tests have been run on laboratory specimens under a variety of load sequences. Repeated block loading at two or more load levels, either tensile-tensile, compressive-compressive, or reversing, as well as more random standard spectra have been studied. Data have been obtained for residual strength at various stages of the lifetime. Several lifetime prediction theories have been applied to the results. The repeated block loading data show lifetimes that are usually shorter than predicted by the most widely used linear damage accumulation theory, Miner's sum. Actual lifetimes are in the range of 10 to 20 percent of predicted lifetime in many cases. Linear and nonlinear residual strength models tend to fit the data better than Miner's sum, with the nonlinear providing a better fit of the two. Direct tests of residual strength at various fractions of the lifetime are consistent with the residual strength models. Load sequencing effects are found to be insignificant. The more a spectrum deviates from constant amplitude, the more sensitive predictions are to the damage law used. The nonlinear model provided improved correlation with test data for a modified standard wind turbine spectrum. When a single, relatively high load cycle was removed, all models provided similar, though somewhat non-conservative correlation with the experimental results. Predictions for the full spectrum, including tensile and compressive loads were slightly non-conservative relative to the experimental data, and accurately captured the trend with varying maximum load. The nonlinear residual strength based prediction with a power law S-N curve extrapolation provided the best fit to the data in most cases. The selection of the constant amplitude fatigue regression model becomes important at the lower stress, higher cycle loading cases. The residual strength models may provide a more accurate estimate of blade lifetime than Miner's rule for some loads spectra. They have the added advantage of providing an estimate of current blade strength throughout the service life.

WAHL, NEIL K.; MANDELL, JOHN F.; SAMBORSKY, DANIEL D.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Higgs and W boson spectrum from lattice simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spectrum of energy levels is computed for all available angular momentum and parity quantum numbers in the SU(2)-Higgs model, with parameters chosen to match experimental data from the Higgs-W boson sector of the standard model. Several multi-boson states are observed, with and without linear momentum, and all are consistent with weakly-interacting Higgs and W bosons. The creation operators used in this study are gauge-invariant so, for example, the Higgs operator is quadratic rather than linear in the Lagrangian's scalar field.

Mark Wurtz; Randy Lewis

2013-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

374

Energy spectrum of ultra high energy cosmic rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The construction of the southern site of the Pierre Auger Observatory is almost completed. Three independent measurements of the flux of the cosmic rays with energies larger than 1 EeV have been performed during the construction phase. The surface detector data collected until August 2007 have been used to establish a flux suppression at the highest energies with a 6 sigma significance. The observations of cosmic rays by the fluorescence detector allowed the extension of the energy spectrum to lower energies, where the efficiency of the surface detector is less than 100% and a change in the spectral index is expected.

Ioana C. Maris; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

375

Raman Spectrum of Supercritical C18O2 and Re-Evaluation of the Fermi Resonance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of its importance to so many processes, CO{sub 2} is one of the most studied molecules in science. However, we report here the discovery of a new phenomenon in the vibrational modes of supercritical CO{sub 2} upon isotopic labeling of both of its oxygens. The Raman spectrum of scC{sup 18}O{sub 2} shows a transposition of the components of the Fermi dyad from their normal positions. Analysis from ab initio molecular dynamics studies shows a previously unknown quantum mechanical influence of the {sup 18}O on the extent of mixing of the two vibrational modes that give rise to the Fermi dyad. This discovery confirms the assignments of the modes comprising the Fermi dyad of scCO{sub 2} and provides the groundwork for further advances in vibrational spectroscopic studies on this important molecule.

Windisch, Charles F.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

376

Properties of the integrated spectrum of serendipitous 2XMM catalogue sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our analysis is aimed at characterizing the properties of the integrated spectrum of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) such as the ubiquity of the Fe K{\\alpha} emission in AGNs and the dependence of the spectral parameters on the X-ray luminosity and redshift. We selected 2646 point sources from the 2XMM catalogue at high galactic latitude (|BII| > 25 degrees) and with the sum of EPIC-PN and EPIC-MOS 0.2-12 keV counts greater than 1000. Redshifts were obtained for 916 sources from the NED. The final sample consists of 507 AGN. Individual source spectra have been summed in the observed frame to compute the integrated spectra in different redshift and luminosity bins over the range 0EWFe) = (1.66 +/...

Chaudhary, P; Hasinger, G; Merloni, A; Comastri, A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Measurement of beam energy spectrum and impurity content in high-power neutral beam injectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy spectrum and impurity content of a high-power neutral beam are measured by implanting the beam into high-purity silicon crystals. The depth distribution of the beam particles is then measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS); the penetration depth is a function of the incident particle energy. This is one of the few measurement techniques that can determine neutral beam energy components directly. From the results, percentages of atomic and molecular ions in the source plasma can be inferred. Use of deuterium as the source gas provides insight into the role of residual hydrogen in the ion source and accelerating grids and in the SIMS analysis. The principal impurities are carbon and oxygen. Preliminary data indicate that carbon can originate from both methane and carbon monoxide, while oxygen can come from molecular oxygen, carbon monoxide, and water. Results are given and future plans are discussed.

Langley, R.A.; Ryan, P.M.; Tsai, C.C.; Menon, M.M.; Botnick, E.M.; Magee, C.W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Theories of convection and the spectrum of turbulence in the solar photosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Classical theories of turbulence do not describe accurately inertial range scaling laws in turbulent convection and notably fail to model the shape of the turbulent spectrum of solar photospheric convection. To understand these discrepancies, a detailed study of scale-by-scale budgets in turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection is presented, with particular emphasis placed on anisotropy and inhomogeneity. A generalized Kolmogorov equation applying to convection is derived and its various terms are computed using numerical simulations of turbulent Boussinesq convection. The analysis of the isotropic part of the equation shows that the third-order velocity structure function is significantly affected by buoyancy forcing and large-scale inhomogeneities. Anisotropic contributions to this equation are also shown to be comparable to their isotropic counterpart at moderate to large scales. Implications of these results for convection in the solar photosphere, mesogranulation and supergranulation are discussed.

F. Rincon

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

379

Spectral analysis of microarray gene expression time series data of Plasmodium falciparum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a new strategy to analyse the periodicity of gene expression profiles using Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) and Autoregressive (AR) model based spectral estimation. By combining the advantages of SSA and AR modelling, more ... Keywords: SSA, autoregressive spectral estimation model, bioinformatics, drug discovery, gene expression profiles, gene target, microarray time series analysis, plasmodium falciparum, singular spectrum analysis

Liping Du; Shuanhu Wu; Alan Wee-Chung Liew; David K. Smith; Hong Yan

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Magnetic filamentary structures in the $?^{2}$ dynamo spectrum in plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinney et al [PPL \\textbf{1},(1994)] have investigated plasma filamentary structure dynamics. More recently, Wilkin et al [Phys Rev Lett \\textbf{99}:134501,(2007)] have shown that kinetic energy spectrum of magnetic structures in small-scale dynamos, are predominantly filamentary. Kirilov et al [PRE (2009)] have shown that use of the boundary values of the mean-field isotropic helical turbulent ${\\alpha}^{2}$-dynamo, could determine the morphology of dynamo instability. In this paper, filamentary Frenet frame in diffusive media, displays the existence of kinematic chaotic dynamo in 3D Euclidean space ${\\textbf{E}^{3}}$. In 2D, either no dynamo action spectrum is found, in agreement with Cowling anti-dynamo theorem, or slow dynamos [PPL \\textbf{15},(2008)]. Curvature and diffusion effects are encodded in the matrix representation of ${\\alpha}^{2}$-dynamo operator. Instead of principal scalar curvatures ${\\kappa}_{1}$ and ${\\kappa}_{2}$ of the surface of structures, only one scalar curvature ${\\kappa}$ is needed to determine dynamos spectra. Filament thickness, increases with scalar curvature, as happens in solar physics.

Garcia de Andrade

2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Counting muons to probe the neutrino mass spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The experimental evidence that \\theta_{13} is large opens new opportunities to identify the neutrino mass spectrum. We outline a possibility to investigate this issue by means of conventional technology. The ideal setup turns out to be long baseline experiment: the muon neutrino beam, with 10^{20} protons on target, has an average energy of 6 (8) GeV; the neutrinos, after propagating 6000 (8000) km, are observed by a muon detector of 1 Mton and with a muon energy threshold of 2 GeV. The expected number of muon events is about 1000, and the difference between the two neutrino spectra is sizeable, about 30%. This allows the identification of the mass spectrum just counting muon tracks. The signal events are well characterized experimentally by their time and direction of arrival, and 2/3 of them are in a region with little atmospheric neutrino background, namely, between 4 GeV and 10 GeV. The distances from CERN to Baikal Lake and from Fermilab to KM3NET, or ANTARES, fit in the ideal range.

Carolina Lujan-Peschard; Giulia Pagliaroli; Francesco Vissani

2013-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

382

Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Interaction of Symptoms and Executive Skills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) are one form of neurodevelopmental disruption that negatively impacts the integration of perceptual, affective and neuroregulatory mechanisms of typical development. Individuals with ASDs categorically demonstrate difficulties with organizing their thoughts/emotions/actions and applying them in a goal directed manner. The neurobiological deficits underlying cognitive and behavioral disorganization are termed executive functioning (EF) skills deficits. This study sought to clarify the association between the defining characteristics of ASDs and their expression in general behavior and EF skills, using parent and teacher ratings. Results of this study indicated that the association between the Behavior Assessment System for Children, Second Edition (BASC-2) and the symptoms of ASDs as measured by the Autism Spectrum Rating Scale (ASRS) varied by rater, with few clinical scales explaining significant variance in the ASRS outcomes. Additionally, the strongest relationship between the BASC-2 Developmental Social Disorders content scale (DSDCS) and the ASRS Scales was in behavior regulation rather than the social domain. Using the ASRS Scales as predictors of executive skills issues was generally stronger for teachers than parents. Only difficulties on the Self-Regulation Scale were consistently predictive of difficulties with Metacognition Index (MI) across parent and teacher ratings. The results give direction with regard to identifying behavioral and ecologically relevant cognitive skills and their relationship characteristics of ASDs.

Matthews, Robb Nelson

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Computation of the spectrum of spatial Lyapunov exponents for the spatially extended beam-plasma systems and electron-wave devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spectrum of Lyapunov exponents is powerful tool for the analysis of the complex system dynamics. In the general framework of nonlinear dynamical systems a number of the numerical technics have been developed to obtain the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents for the complex temporal behavior of the systems with a few degree of freedom. Unfortunately, these methods can not apply directly to analysis of complex spatio-temporal dynamics in plasma devices which are characterized by the infinite phase space, since they are the spatially extended active media. In the present paper we propose the method for the calculation of the spectrum of the spatial Lyapunov exponents (SLEs) for the spatially extended beam-plasma systems. The calculation technique is applied to the analysis of chaotic spatio-temporal oscillations in three different beam-plasma model: (1) simple plasma Pierce diode, (2) coupled Pierce diodes, and (3) electron-wave system with backward electromagnetic wave. We find an excellent agreement between the system dynamics and the behavior of the spectrum of the spatial Lyapunov exponents. Along with the proposed method, the possible problems of SLEs calculation are also discussed. It is shown that for the wide class of the spatially extended systems the set of quantities included in the system state for SLEs calculation can be reduced using the appropriate feature of the plasma systems.

Alexander E. Hramov; Alexey A. Koronovskii; Vladimir A. Maximenko; Olga I. Moskalenko

2013-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

384

Interdependency modeling and emergency response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In large-scale disaster events, infrastructure owners are faced with many challenges in deciding the allocation ofresources for preparation and response actions. This decision process involves building situation awareness, evaluating course of action, ... Keywords: critical infrastructure, discrete event simulation, infrastructure interdependency analysis

Donald D. Dudenhoeffer; May R. Permann; Steven Woolsey; Robert Timpany; Chuck Miller; Anthony McDermott; Milos Manic

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Department of Energy Hosts Seminar on Spectrum Policy Seminar for Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Hosts Seminar on Spectrum Policy Seminar for Department of Energy Hosts Seminar on Spectrum Policy Seminar for Utility Sector Department of Energy Hosts Seminar on Spectrum Policy Seminar for Utility Sector December 10, 2010 - 3:42pm Addthis On December 8, 2010, the Department of Energy General Counsel's office hosted a seminar on the topic of spectrum policy, attended by approximately fifty representatives of the utility industry. At this spectrum policy seminar, senior officials from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the Commerce Department's National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) provided information on spectrum policy issues in light of the role wireless communications will play in the deployment of Smart Grid technologies. They reviewed the current spectrum management

386

Department of Energy Hosts Seminar on Spectrum Policy Seminar for Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hosts Seminar on Spectrum Policy Seminar for Hosts Seminar on Spectrum Policy Seminar for Utility Sector Department of Energy Hosts Seminar on Spectrum Policy Seminar for Utility Sector December 10, 2010 - 3:42pm Addthis On December 8, 2010, the Department of Energy General Counsel's office hosted a seminar on the topic of spectrum policy, attended by approximately fifty representatives of the utility industry. At this spectrum policy seminar, senior officials from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the Commerce Department's National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) provided information on spectrum policy issues in light of the role wireless communications will play in the deployment of Smart Grid technologies. They reviewed the current spectrum management process and discussed some of the federal programs currently available to

387

On the Spectrum Handoff for Cognitive Radio Ad Hoc Networks without Common Control Channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cognitive radio (CR) technology is a promising solution to enhance the spectrum utilization by enabling unlicensed users to exploit the spectrum in an opportunistic manner. Since unlicensed users are temporary visitors to the licensed spectrum, they are required to vacate the spectrum when a licensed user reclaims it. Due to the randomness of the appearance of licensed users, disruptions to both licensed and unlicensed communications are often difficult to prevent. In this chapter, a proactive spectrum handoff framework for CR ad hoc networks is proposed to address these concerns. In the proposed framework, channel switching policies and a proactive spectrum handoff protocol are proposed to let unlicensed users vacate a channel before a licensed user utilizes it to avoid unwanted interference. Network coordination schemes for unlicensed users are also incorporated into the spectrum handoff protocol design to realize channel rendezvous. Moreover, a distributed channel selection scheme to eliminate collisions a...

Song, Yi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Tailoring the Neutron Spectrum from a 14-MeV Neutron Generator to Approximate a Spontaneous-Fission Spectrum  

SciTech Connect

Many applications of neutrons for non-invasive measurements began with isotopic sources such as AmBe or Cf-252. Political factors have rendered AmBe undesirable in the United States and other countries, and the supply of Cf-252 is limited and significantly increasing in price every few years. Compact and low-power deuterium-tritium (DT) electronic neutron generators can often provide sufficient flux, but the 14-MeV neutron spectrum is much more energetic (harder) than an isotopic neutron source. A series of MCNP simulations were run to examine the extent to which the 14-MeV DT neutron spectrum could be softened through the use of high-Z and low-Z materials. Some potential concepts of operation require a portable neutron generator system, so the additional weight of extra materials is also a trade-off parameter. Using a reference distance of 30 cm from the source, the average neutron energy can be lowered to be less than that of either AmBe or Cf-252, while obtaining an increase in flux at the reference distance compared to a bare neutron generator. This paper discusses the types and amounts of materials used, the resulting neutron spectra, neutron flux levels, and associated photon production.

James Simpson; David Chichester

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Model refinement using transient response  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method is presented for estimating uncertain or unknown parameters in a mathematical model using measurements of transient response. The method is based on a least squares formulation in which the differences between the model and test-based responses are minimized. An application of the method is presented for a nonlinear structural dynamic system. The method is also applied to a model of the Department of Energy armored tractor trailer. For the subject problem, the transient response was generated by driving the vehicle over a bump of prescribed shape and size. Results from the analysis and inspection of the test data revealed that a linear model of the vehicle`s suspension is not adequate to accurately predict the response caused by the bump.

Dohrmann, C.R.; Carne, T.G.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Method of detecting system function by measuring frequency response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods of rapidly measuring an impedance spectrum of an energy storage device in-situ over a limited number of logarithmically distributed frequencies are described. An energy storage device is excited with a known input signal, and a response is measured to ascertain the impedance spectrum. An excitation signal is a limited time duration sum-of-sines consisting of a select number of frequencies. In one embodiment, magnitude and phase of each frequency of interest within the sum-of-sines is identified when the selected frequencies and sample rate are logarithmic integer steps greater than two. This technique requires a measurement with a duration of one period of the lowest frequency. In another embodiment, where selected frequencies are distributed in octave steps, the impedance spectrum can be determined using a captured time record that is reduced to a half-period of the lowest frequency.

Morrison, John L.; Morrison, William H.; Christophersen, Jon P.; Motloch, Chester G.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

391

Smooth Renyi Entropies and the Quantum Information Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many of the traditional results in information theory, such as the channel coding theorem or the source coding theorem, are restricted to scenarios where the underlying resources are independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) over a large number of uses. To overcome this limitation, two different techniques, the information spectrum method and the smooth entropy framework, have been developed independently. They are based on new entropy measures, called spectral entropy rates and smooth entropies, respectively, that generalize Shannon entropy (in the classical case) and von Neumann entropy (in the more general quantum case). Here, we show that the two techniques are closely related. More precisely, the spectral entropy rate can be seen as the asymptotic limit of the smooth entropy. Our results apply to the quantum setting and thus include the classical setting as a special case.

Nilanjana Datta; Renato Renner

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Tailoring Relaxation Time Spectrum in Soft Glassy Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physical properties of out of equilibrium soft materials depend on time as well as deformation history. In this work we propose to transform this major shortcoming into gain by applying controlled deformation field to tailor the rheological properties. We take advantage of the fact that deformation field of a certain magnitude can prevent particles in an aging soft glassy material from occupying energy wells up to a certain depth, thereby populating only the deeper wells. We employ two soft glassy materials with dissimilar microstructures and demonstrate that increase in strength of deformation field while aging leads to narrowing of spectrum of relaxation times. We believe that, in principle, this philosophy can be universally applied to different kinds of glassy materials by changing nature and strength of impetus.

Manish Kaushal; Yogesh M. Joshi

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

393

DIFFERENTIAL SPECTRUM OF NEUTRONS AT CHACALTAYA-BOLIVIA  

SciTech Connect

We describe the Neutron Spectrometer Experiment installed at Chacaltaya Cosmic Rays Observatory (68 deg. O, 16.2 deg. S), located in Bolivia, at 5230 m.a.s.l. This experimental system is constituted by passive detectors which register the flux of neutrons, in an energy range of 10 KeV-20 MeV. Using the unfolding code BUNTO a peak around 1 MeV of the characteristic spectrum of neutrons was obtained. Experimental values, observed during April of 2008, are compared with similar ones carried out in 1997 at the same place, in order to look for eventual changes due to local atmosphere. A similar experiment was also carried up at the Laboratory of Testa Grigia-Italy (45.56 deg. N, 7.42 deg. E,. 3480 m.a.l.s). Data of both stations allow us to compare the spectra in order to explain the difference of neutron flux of these two stations.

Mayta, R. [Carrera de Fisica, Universidad Mayor de San Andres, La Paz-Bolivia (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Zanini, A. [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sez. Torino Via P. Giuria n. 10125, Torino (Italy); Ticona, R.; Velarde, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas, UMSA, La Paz-Bolivia (Bolivia, Plurinational State of)

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

394

Parallel Electric Field Spectrum of Solar Wind Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By searching through more than 10 satellite-years of THEMIS and Cluster data, three reliable examples of parallel electric field turbulence in the undisturbed solar wind have been found. The perpendicular and parallel electric field spectra in these examples have similar shapes and amplitudes, even at large scales (frequencies below the ion gyroscale) where Alfvenic turbulence with no parallel electric field component is thought to dominate. The spectra of the parallel electric field fluctuations are power laws with exponents near -5/3 below the ion scales (~ 0.1 Hz), and with a flattening of the spectrum in the vicinity of this frequency. At small scales (above a few Hz), the spectra are steeper than -5/3 with values in the range of -2.1 to -2.8. These steeper slopes are consistent with expectations for kinetic Alfven turbulence, although their amplitude relative to the perpendicular fluctuations is larger than expected.

Mozer, F S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

A Spectrum Of Potentially Diamondiferous Lamproites And Minettes From The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Potentially Diamondiferous Lamproites And Minettes From The Of Potentially Diamondiferous Lamproites And Minettes From The Jharia Coalfield, Eastern India Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Spectrum Of Potentially Diamondiferous Lamproites And Minettes From The Jharia Coalfield, Eastern India Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Abundant Cretaceous (approximately 110 Ma) lamprophyric sills in the Gondwana coalfields show a comagmatic continuum from olivine-lamproites to lamproites and minettes. Four sills in the Jharia coalfield have exotic mineralogy, dominated by olivine (Fo85-92) and phlogopite (5-10% TiO2, 5-13% Al2O3), with subordinate potassium (titanian) richterite and/or arfvedsonite, and spectacularly zoned Sr-rich apatite (up to 20% SrO). Accessory to minor phases include clinopyroxene (titanian diopside to

396

Quantum Hamiltonians with Quasi-Ballistic Dynamics and Point Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consider the family of Schr\\"odinger operators (and also its Dirac version) on $\\ell^2(\\mathbb{Z})$ or $\\ell^2(\\mathbb{N})$ \\[ H^W_{\\omega,S}=\\Delta + \\lambda F(S^n\\omega) + W, \\quad \\omega\\in\\Omega, \\] where $S$ is a transformation on (compact metric) $\\Omega$, $F$ a real Lipschitz function and $W$ a (sufficiently fast) power-decaying perturbation. Under certain conditions it is shown that $H^W_{\\omega,S}$ presents quasi-ballistic dynamics for $\\omega$ in a dense $G_{\\delta}$ set. Applications include potentials generated by rotations of the torus with analytic condition on $F$, doubling map, Axiom A dynamical systems and the Anderson model. If $W$ is a rank one perturbation, examples of $H^W_{\\omega,S}$ with quasi-ballistic dynamics and point spectrum are also presented.

Cesar R. de Oliveira; Roberto A. Prado

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

397

Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics Stability Spectrum with a Resistive Wall  

SciTech Connect

We show that the eigenvalue equations describing a cylindrical ideal magnetophydrodynamicsw (MHD) plasma interacting with a thin resistive wall can be put into the standard mathematical form: ??? = ??? ?. This is accomplished by using a finite element basis for the plasma, and by adding an extra degree of freedom corresponding to the electrical current in the thin wall. The standard form allows the use of linear eigenvalue solvers, without additional interations, to compute the complete spectrum of plasma modes in the presence of a surrounding restrictive wall at arbitrary separation. We show that our method recovers standard results in the limits of (1) an infinitely resistive wall (no wall), and (2) a zero resistance wall (ideal wall).

S.P. Smith and S.C. Jardin

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

398

On the Wave Spectrum Generated by Tropical Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Convective heating profiles are computed from one month of rainfall rate and cloud-top height measurements using global Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission and infrared cloud-top products. Estimates of the tropical wave response to this heating ...

David A. Ortland; M. Joan Alexander; Alison W. Grimsdell

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Initial Analysis of Cybersecurity Framework RFI Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of replacing billions of dollars in aging infrastructure, not to ... that have expertise in utility networks. ... have experience in the utilities sector.” • “…ensure ...

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

400

Comparison of HEU and LEU Fuel Neutron Spectrum for ATR Fuel Element and ATR Flux-Trap Positions  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power and high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the high total core power and high neutron flux, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. An optimized low-enriched uranium (LEU) (U-10Mo) core conversion case, which can meet the project requirements, has been selected. However, LEU contains a significant quantity of high density U-238 (80.3 wt.%), which will harden the neutron spectrum in the core region. Based on the reference ATR HEU and the optimized LEU full core plate-by-plate (PBP) models, the present work investigates and compares the neutron spectra differences in the fuel element (FE), Northeast flux trap (NEFT), Southeast flux trap (SEFT), and East flux trap (EFT) positions. A detailed PBP MCNP ATR core model was developed and validated for fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. The current ATR core with HEU U 235 enrichment of 93.0wt.% was used as the reference model. Each HEU fuel element contains 19 fuel plates with a fuel meat thickness of 0.508 mm (20 mil). In this work, an optimized LEU (U-10Mo) core conversion case with a nominal fuel meat thickness of 0.330 mm (13 mil) and the U-235 enrichment of 19.7 wt.% was used to calculate the impact of the neutron spectrum in FE and FT positions. MCNP-calculated results show that the neutron spectrum in the LEU FE is slightly harder than in the HEU FE, as expected. However, when neutrons transport through water coolant and beryllium (Be), the neutrons are thermalized to an equilibrium neutron spectrum as a function of water volume fraction in the investigated FT positions. As a result, the neutron spectrum differences of the HEU and LEU in the NEFT, SEFT, and EFT are negligible. To demonstrate that the LEU core fuel cycle performance can meet the Updated Final Safety Analysis Report (UFSAR) safety requirements, additional studies will be necessary to evaluate and compare safety parameters such as void reactivity and Doppler coefficients, control components worth (outer shim control cylinders, safety rods and regulating rod), and shutdown margins between the HEU and LEU cores.

G. S. Chang

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

SECOND SEASON QUIET OBSERVATIONS: MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION POWER SPECTRUM AT 95 GHz  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) has observed the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 43 and 95 GHz. The 43 GHz results have been published in a previous paper, and here we report the measurement of CMB polarization power spectra using the 95 GHz data. This data set comprises 5337 hr of observations recorded by an array of 84 polarized coherent receivers with a total array sensitivity of 87 {mu}K{radical}s. Four low-foreground fields were observed, covering a total of {approx}1000 deg{sup 2} with an effective angular resolution of 12.'8, allowing for constraints on primordial gravitational waves and high signal-to-noise measurements of the E-modes across three acoustic peaks. The data reduction was performed using two independent analysis pipelines, one based on a pseudo-C {sub l} (PCL) cross-correlation approach, and the other on a maximum-likelihood (ML) approach. All data selection criteria and filters were modified until a predefined set of null tests had been satisfied before inspecting any non-null power spectrum. The results derived by the two pipelines are in good agreement. We characterize the EE, EB, and BB power spectra between l = 25 and 975 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with {Lambda}CDM, while the BB power spectrum is consistent with zero. Based on these measurements, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r = 1.1{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} (r pipeline, and r = 1.2{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} (r pipeline. In one of the fields, we find a correlation with the dust component of the Planck Sky Model, though the corresponding excess power is small compared to statistical errors. Finally, we derive limits on all known systematic errors, and demonstrate that these correspond to a tensor-to-scalar ratio smaller than r = 0.01, the lowest level yet reported in the literature.

Araujo, D.; Dumoulin, R. N.; Newburgh, L. B.; Zwart, J. T. L. [Department of Physics and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Department of Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chinone, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Cleary, K.; Reeves, R. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd M/C 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Monsalve, R.; Bustos, R. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Naess, S. K.; Eriksen, H. K. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Wehus, I. K. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Bronfman, L. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Church, S. E. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology and Department of Physics, Stanford University, Varian Physics Building, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Dickinson, C. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gaier, T., E-mail: ibuder@uchicago.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Collaboration: QUIET Collaboration; and others

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

THE HARD X-RAY SPECTRUM OF NGC 1365: SCATTERED LIGHT, NOT BLACK HOLE SPIN  

SciTech Connect

Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) show excess X-ray emission above 10 keV compared with extrapolation of spectra from lower energies. Risaliti et al. have recently attempted to model the hard X-ray excess in the type 1.8 AGN NGC 1365, concluding that the hard excess most likely arises from Compton-scattered reflection of X-rays from an inner accretion disk close to the black hole. Their analysis disfavored a model in which the hard excess arises from a high column density of circumnuclear gas partially covering a primary X-ray source, despite such components being required in the NGC 1365 data below 10 keV. Using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer approach, we demonstrate that this conclusion is invalidated by (1) use of slab absorption models, which have unrealistic transmission spectra for partial covering gas, (2) neglect of the effect of Compton scattering on transmitted spectra, and (3) inadequate modeling of the spectrum of scattered X-rays. The scattered spectrum is geometry-dependent and, for high global covering factors, may dominate above 10 keV. We further show that, in models of circumnuclear gas, the suppression of the observed hard X-ray flux by reprocessing may be no larger than required by the ''light bending'' model invoked for inner disk reflection, and the expected emission line strengths lie within the observed range. We conclude that the time-invariant ''red wing'' in AGN X-ray spectra is probably caused by continuum transmitted through and scattered from circumnuclear gas, not by highly redshifted line emission, and that measurement of black hole spin is not possible.

Miller, L. [Department of Physics, Oxford University, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Turner, T. J. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

403

ENERGY EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN COMMISSIONREPORT October 2006 CEC-600 Deputy Director FUELS AND TRANSPORTATION DIVISION #12;The Energy Emergency Response Plan is prepared, safety, and welfare. #12;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Energy Emergency Response Plan was prepared from

404

Demand Response Spinning Reserve  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Title Demand Response Spinning Reserve Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2007 Authors Eto, Joseph H., Janine Nelson-Hoffman, Carlos...

405

DOE Functions and Responsibilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety and Security is responsible for developing and maintaining the Department's Directives that address safety management functions, responsibilities and authorities (FRA)....

406

Atmospheric Response to the Gulf Stream: Seasonal Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric response to the Gulf Stream front in sea surface temperature is investigated using high-resolution data from satellite observations and operational analysis and forecast. Two types of atmospheric response are observed with ...

Shoshiro Minobe; Masato Miyashita; Akira Kuwano-Yoshida; Hiroki Tokinaga; Shang-Ping Xie

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Calculation of the Solar UV/EUV Spectrum in Spherical Symmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present work in progress concerning spectral synthesis calculations of the solar UV/EUV in spherical symmetry carried out with the Solar Radiation Physical Modeling (SRPM) project. We compare the synthetic irradiance spectrum for the quiet Sun with the recent solar minimum spectrum taken with the EVE rocket instrument. The good agreement of the synthetic spectrum with the observation shows that the employed atmosphere structures are suitable for irradiance calculations.

Haberreiter, Margit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Diagnostics of the fine spectrum of a quantum well in laser heterostructures using ultrasonic deformation  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a new acoustoelectronic effect in laser nanoheterostructures, which is caused by hole energy modulation and intermixing of hole wave functions in the quantum well of a laser structure in response to ultrasonic deformation. Experimental data are presented which indicate that the laser output intensity and polarisation direction vary periodically, with the acoustic wave period. Theoretical analysis of experimental data is used to assess parameters of the quantum well and the strain distribution in the heterostructure. (semiconductor lasers. physics and technology)

Kulakova, L A; Averkiev, Nikita S; Darinskii, A N; Yakhkind, E Z

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

The Spectrum of High-Frequency Internal Waves in the Atmospheric Waveguide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical structure and power spectrum of the field of internal waves generated in the atmospheric waveguide by random vertical displacements were considered in this paper.

I. P. Chunchuzov

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Contribution from cosmological scalar perturbations to the angular velocity spectrum of extragalactic sources  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of the influence of adiabatic scalar perturbations on the angular velocity spectrum of extragalactic sources is considered. The multipole expansion coefficients of the angular velocity field in terms of vector spherical harmonics are calculated. We show that there is no contribution from adiabatic perturbations to the angular spectrum for a spatially flat Universe at the dusty stage, while there is a contribution only to the electric multiple coefficients at the stage of {Lambda}-term domination. The cases of long-wavelength and short-wavelength perturbations are considered separately. The relationship between the multipole angular velocity spectrum and the primordial scalar perturbation spectrum is discussed.

Marakulin, A. O., E-mail: marakulin@physics.msu.ru; Sazhina, O. S.; Sazhin, M. V. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Using Dogs in a Home-Based Intervention with Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humans and dogs have lived among each other in mutually beneficial relationships for thousands of years. In recent years, this human-animal bond has emerged as a catalyst for animal-assisted activities and therapies that may benefit those with disabilities, including children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). ASD are characterized by qualitative impairments in social interaction and communication and restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests, and activities. The nonverbal and nonjudgmental nature of dogs may be non-threatening and easier for children with ASD to decode, which may decrease anxiety and facilitate social bonding. Further, with their roles as social lubricants/transitional objects and natural foci of interest, dogs may facilitate social interaction between children with ASD and other people. Using a single case, multiple baseline design across participants, this study investigated whether multiple semi-structured interactions with dogs would increase social and communicative behaviors and decrease restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior in children. Although only two had statistically significant results, all three participants showed responses to intervention in the hypothesized directions. This study supports the position that children with ASD may benefit from participating in animal-assisted activities with dogs.

Alison, Courtney E.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

PHY and MAC Layer Design of Hybrid Spread Spectrum Based Smart Meter Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The smart grid is a combined process of revitalizing the traditional power grid applications and introducing new applications to improve the efficiency of power generation, transmission and distribution. This can be achieved by leveraging advanced communication and networking technologies. Therefore the selection of the appropriate communication technology for different smart grid applications has been debated a lot in the recent past. After comparing different possible technologies, a recent research study has arrived at a conclusion that the 3G cellular technology is the right choice for distribution side smart grid applications like smart metering, advanced distribution automation and demand response management system. In this paper, we argue that the current 3G/4G cellular technologies are not an appropriate choice for smart grid distribution applications and propose a Hybrid Spread Spectrum (HSS) based Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) as one of the alternatives to 3G/4G technologies. We present a preliminary PHY and MAC layer design of a HSS based AMI network and evaluate their performance using matlab and NS2 simulations. Also, we propose a time hierarchical scheme that can significantly reduce the volume of random access traffic generated during blackouts and the delay in power outage reporting.

Kuruganti, Phani Teja [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Analysis of Transmitted Optical Spectrum Enabling Accelerated Testing of CPV Designs: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reliability of CPV systems' materials is not well known; methods for accelerated UV testing have not been developed. UV and IR spectra transmitted through representative optical systems are evaluated.

Miller, D. C.; Kempe, M. D.; Kennedy, C. E.; Kurtz, S. R.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Testing and Analysis of Low Cost Composite Materials Under Spectrum Loading and High Cycle Fatigue Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

papers cited are available through the Sandia National Laboratories website: www.sandia.gov/Renewable_Energy/wind_energy-year experimental study of low- cost composite materials for wind turbine blades. Wind turbines are subjected to 109 in and potential interactions between failure modes. Wind turbine design codes typically assume a Miner's rule

415

Theoretical CI study of the vertical electronic spectrum of ethane  

SciTech Connect

Ab initio multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction (MRD-CI) calculations are reported for the ground and 32 excited electronic states of ethane, as well as its two lowest ionic states, {sup 2}E{sub g} and {sup 2}A{sub 1g}. The transition energy results indicate that the 3a{sub 1g} molecular orbital is 0.3--0.6 eV more stable than the 1e{sub g} LUMO for the ethane D{sub 3d} equilibrium conformation. The strongest transition is computed to occur for the 3a{sub 1g} {yields} 3p{sigma} {sup 1}A{sub 2u}--{sup 1}A{sub 1g} excitation at 9.933 eV, with an optical f value of 0.1152. The n = 4 Rydberg transitions are also calculated and are found to occur with roughly 40% of their n = 3 counterparts. The observed broadness of the ethane UV spectrum is believed to be caused primarily by the high density of Rydberg upper states, as well as significant relaxation effects which occur upon excitation from the ethane electronic ground state.

Chantranupong, L.; Hirsch, G.; Buenker, R.J. [Wuppertal Univ. (Germany). Theoretische Chemie; Dillon, M.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Physics Div.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Periodic orbit spectrum in terms of Ruelle--Pollicott resonances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully chaotic Hamiltonian systems possess an infinite number of classical solutions which are periodic, e.g. a trajectory ``p'' returns to its initial conditions after some fixed time tau_p. Our aim is to investigate the spectrum tau_1, tau_2, ... of periods of the periodic orbits. An explicit formula for the density rho(tau) = sum_p delta (tau - tau_p) is derived in terms of the eigenvalues of the classical evolution operator. The density is naturally decomposed into a smooth part plus an interferent sum over oscillatory terms. The frequencies of the oscillatory terms are given by the imaginary part of the complex eigenvalues (Ruelle--Pollicott resonances). For large periods, corrections to the well--known exponential growth of the smooth part of the density are obtained. An alternative formula for rho(tau) in terms of the zeros and poles of the Ruelle zeta function is also discussed. The results are illustrated with the geodesic motion in billiards of constant negative curvature. Connections with the statistical properties of the corresponding quantum eigenvalues, random matrix theory and discrete maps are also considered. In particular, a random matrix conjecture is proposed for the eigenvalues of the classical evolution operator of chaotic billiards.

P. Leboeuf

2004-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

417

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Publication Type...

418

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers...

419

Energy Efficiency/Demand Response/Smart Grid/Distribution ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov Energy Efficiency/Demand Response/Smart Grid/Distribution ...

420

Mechanisms Underlying Cellular Responses to Low Dose/Low LET...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

expression, chromosomal and apoptotic analysis suggest a model for strain specific radiation response; normal DNA damage recognition and repair leading to cell death and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Chemical Spill Response Procedure Initial Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Spill Response Procedure Initial Response 1. Advise lab occupants of the spill such as quantity spilled and chemical name. Risk Assessment 3. Conduct an initial risk assessment to determine if to the chemical spill. This link can be found at the bottom of the Campus Security homepage, http

422

Spatial multi-taper spectrum estimation for nuclear reactor modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-taper univariate and cross-spectral analysis is used to investigate the structure of spatial variation in the temperatures measured across the surface of a nuclear reactor. The construction of the spatial tapers over the approximate circular reactor ...

C. J. Scarrott; G. Tunnicliffe Wilson

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

The Tropical Convective Spectrum. Part I: Archetypal Vertical Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A taxonomy of tropical convective and stratiform vertical structures is constructed through cluster analysis of 3 yr of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) “warm-season” (surface temperature greater than 10°C) precipitation radar (PR) ...

Dennis J. Boccippio; Walter A. Petersen; Daniel J. Cecil

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

a perry descent conjugate gradient method with restricted spectrum ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thus, the global convergence is proven by the spectral analysis for non- ...... formed on PC, Intel(R) Core(TM) 2 Duo, E4600 2.40GHz 2.39GHz, RAM. 2.00 GB

425

Loads Analysis of Several Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Concepts  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a comprehensive dynamic-response analysis of six offshore floating wind turbine concepts.

Robertson, A. N.; Jonkman, J. M.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Search for the Neutrino Magnetic Moment in the Non-Equilibrium Reactor Antineutrino Energy Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the time evolution of the typical nuclear reactor antineutrino energy spectrum during reactor ON period and the decay of the residual antineutrino spectrum after reactor is stopped. We find that relevant variations of the soft recoil electron spectra produced via weak and magnetic ${\\widetilde {\

V. I. Kopeikin; L. A. Mikaelyan; V. V. Sinev

1999-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

427

A Cell Based Dynamic Spectrum Management Scheme with Interference Mitigation for Cognitive Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future wireless systems are expected to be characterized by the coexistence of different radio access technologies (RATs) resulting in complex heterogeneous wireless environments. In parallel with this, the tremendous demand for spectrum has ... Keywords: Bargaining patience, Cognitive networks, Dynamic spectrum management, Game theory, Inter-system interference, Profit

Vanbien Le; Zhiyong Feng; Didier Bourse; Ping Zhang

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The Wind-Induced Wave Growth Rate and the Spectrum of the Gravity-Capillary Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A form of the spectrum of gravity-capillary waves is suggested, based on a balance of the wind input, the spectral flux divergence, the viscous dissipation, and the modulation from the wave-drift interaction. The spectrum in the alongwind ...

Yuguang Liu; Xiao-Hai Yan

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Channel Selection in Multi-channel Opportunistic Spectrum Access Networks with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Channel Selection in Multi-channel Opportunistic Spectrum Access Networks with Perfect Sensing Xin and utilized by primary users (PU). In dynamic spectrum access networks, the protection of PU's is vital, since no PU would accommo- date SU access to its own detriment. Therefore the objective of the problem we

Liu, Xin

430

Energy-Efficient Spectrum Sharing in Relay-Assisted Cognitive Radio Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy-Efficient Spectrum Sharing in Relay-Assisted Cognitive Radio Systems (Invited Paper) Mariem of a relevant spectrum game. Two energy-efficient sources communicating with their respective destination energy-efficient sources. Keywords: resource allocation, cognitive radio, cooperative transmission, Nash

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

431

A low-power digital matched filter for spread-spectrum systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Digital Matched Filter (DMF) is an essential device for Direct-Sequence Spread-Spectrum (DS-SS) communication systems. Reducing the power consumption of a DMF is especially critical for battery-powered terminals. The reception registers and the correlation-calculating ... Keywords: CDMA, VLSI, low power, matched filter, spread-spectrum

Shoji Goto; Takashi Yamada; Norihisa Takayama; Yoshifumi Matsushita; Yasoo Harada; Hiroto Yasuura

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

The black-hole area spectrum in the tunneling formalism with GUP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The black hole area spectrum has been studied in the framework of tunneling mechanism, where a Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP) has been considered. The results implies in a non evenly spaced spectrum for the black hole area which becomes increasingly spaced as the black hole evaporates.

Silva, C A S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

The black-hole area spectrum in the tunneling formalism with GUP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The black hole area spectrum has been studied in the framework of tunneling mechanism, where a Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP) has been considered. The results implies in a non evenly spaced spectrum for the black hole area which becomes increasingly spaced as the black hole evaporates.

C. A. S. Silva; R. R. Landim

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

434

Marginal Hilbert Spectrum Based on EMD Reconstruction and its Application in Fault Diagnosis of Cooling Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HHT (Hilbert-Huang Transform) is one kind of adaptive signal processing method and it is suitable for processing nonlinear and non-stationary signal. Amplitude-frequency characteristics of signal are accurately demonstrated through marginal Hilbert spectrum ... Keywords: Vibration signal, marginal Hilbert spectrum, Reconstruction filter, Fault diagnosis, Cooling tower

He Dhengyun, Yi Ding

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Terrace-like structure in the above-threshold ionization spectrum of an atom in an IR+XUV two-color laser field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the frequency-domain theory, we investigate the above-threshold ionization (ATI) process of an atom in a two-color laser field with infrared (IR) and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) frequencies, where the photon energy of the XUV laser is close to or larger than the atomic ionization threshold. By using the channel analysis, we find that the two laser fields play different roles in an ionization process, where the XUV laser determines the ionization probability by the photon number that the atom absorbs from it, while the IR laser accelerates the ionized electron and hence widens the electron kinetic energy spectrum. As a result, the ATI spectrum presents a terrace-like structure. By using the saddle-point approximation, we obtain a classical formula which can predict the cutoff of each plateau in the terrace-like ATI spectrum. Furthermore, we find that the difference of the heights between two neighboring plateaus in the terrace-like structure of the ATI spectrum increases as the frequency of the XUV lase...

Zhang, Kui; Fu, Panming; Yan, Zong-Chao; Wang, Bingbing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Mass spectrum and thermodynamics of quasiconformal gauge theories from gauge/gravity duality  

SciTech Connect

We use gauge/gravity duality to study simultaneously the mass spectrum and the thermodynamics of a generic quasiconformal gauge theory, specified by its beta function. The beta function of a quasiconformal theory almost vanishes, and the coupling is almost constant between two widely separated energy scales. Depending on whether the gravity dual has a black hole or not, the mass spectrum is either a spectrum of quasinormal oscillations or a normal T=0 mass spectrum. The mass spectrum is quantitatively correlated with the thermal properties of the system. As the theory approaches conformality, the masses have to vanish. We show that in this limit, the masses calculated via gauge/gravity duality satisfy expected scaling properties.

Alanen, J.; Kajantie, K. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Alho, T.; Tuominen, K. [Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

NREL: Energy Analysis - Electric Infrastructure Systems Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Analysis NREL's energy analysis supports distribution and interconnection R&D, which is responsible for distributed resources' system integration. Industrial...

438

ON THE ORIGIN OF THE 1/f SPECTRUM IN THE SOLAR WIND MAGNETIC FIELD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a mechanism for the formation of the low-frequency 1/f magnetic spectrum based on numerical solutions of a shell-reduced MHD model of the turbulent dynamics inside the sub-Alfvenic solar wind. We assign reasonably realistic profiles to the wind speed and the density along the radial direction, and a radial magnetic field. Alfven waves of short periodicity (600 s) are injected at the base of the chromosphere, penetrate into the corona, and are partially reflected, thus triggering a turbulent cascade. The cascade is strong for the reflected wave while it is weak for the outward propagating waves. Reflection at the transition region recycles the strong turbulent spectrum into the outward weak spectrum, which is advected beyond the Alfvenic critical point without substantial evolution. There, the magnetic field has a perpendicular power-law spectrum with slope close to the Kolmogorov -5/3. The parallel spectrum is inherited from the frequency spectrum of large (perpendicular) eddies. The shape is a double power law with slopes of {approx_equal} - 1 and -2 at low and high frequencies, respectively, with the position of the break depending on the injected spectrum. We suggest that the double power-law spectrum measured by Helios at 0.3 AU, where the average magnetic field is not aligned with the radial (contrary to our assumptions), results from the combination of such different spectral slopes. At low frequency the parallel spectrum dominates with its characteristic 1/f shape, while at higher frequencies its steep spectral slope (-2) is masked by the more energetic perpendicular spectrum (slope -5/3).

Verdini, Andrea [Solar-Terrestrial Center of Excellence-SIDC, Royal Observatory of Belgium, Bruxelles (Belgium); Grappin, Roland [LUTH, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Universite Paris-Diderot, 92190 Meudon (France); Pinto, Rui [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/Irfu, and Universite Paris-Diderot CNRS/INSU, Gis-sur-Yvette (France); Velli, Marco, E-mail: verdini@oma.be, E-mail: Roland.Grappin@obspm.fr, E-mail: rui.pinto@cea.fr, E-mail: mvelli@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

439

The noise power spectrum in CT with direct fan beam reconstruction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The noise power spectrum (NPS) is a useful metric for understanding the noise content in images. To examine some unique properties of the NPS of fan beam CT, the authors derived an analytical expression for the NPS of fan beam CT and validated it with computer simulations. The nonstationary noise behavior of fan beam CT was examined by analyzing local regions and the entire field-of-view (FOV). This was performed for cases with uniform as well as nonuniform noise across the detector cells and across views. The simulated NPS from the entire FOV and local regions showed good agreement with the analytically derived NPS. The analysis shows that whereas the NPS of a large FOV in parallel beam CT (using a ramp filter) is proportional to frequency, the NPS with direct fan beam FBP reconstruction shows a high frequency roll off. Even in small regions, the fan beam NPS can show a sharp transition (discontinuity) at high frequencies. These effects are due to the variable magnification and therefore are more pronounced as the fan angle increases. For cases with nonuniform noise, the NPS can show the directional dependence and additional effects.

Baek, Jongduk; Pelc, Norbert J. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response spectrum analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Conventional Benchmarks as a Sample of the Performance Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most benchmarks are smaller than actual application programs. One reason is to improve benchmark universality by demanding resources every computer is likely to have. However, users dynamically increase the size of application programs to match the power ... Keywords: HINT, benchmarks, hierarchical memory, performance analysis

John L. Gustafson; Rajat Todi

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

OVERVIEW ON BNL ASSESSMENT OF SEISMIC ANALYSIS METHODS FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED NPP STRUCTURES.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under the sponsorship of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), to determine the applicability of established soil-structure interaction analysis methods and computer programs to deeply embedded and/or buried (DEB) nuclear power plant (NPP) structures. This paper provides an overview of the BNL study including a description and discussions of analyses performed to assess relative performance of various SSI analysis methods typically applied to NPP structures, as well as the importance of interface modeling for DEB structures. There are four main elements contained in the BNL study: (1) Review and evaluation of existing seismic design practice, (2) Assessment of simplified vs. detailed methods for SSI in-structure response spectrum analysis of DEB structures, (3) Assessment of methods for computing seismic induced earth pressures on DEB structures, and (4) Development of the criteria for benchmark problems which could be used for validating computer programs for computing seismic responses of DEB NPP structures. The BNL study concluded that the equivalent linear SSI methods, including both simplified and detailed approaches, can be extended to DEB structures and produce acceptable SSI response calculations, provided that the SSI response induced by the ground motion is very much within the linear regime or the non-linear effect is not anticipated to control the SSI response parameters. The BNL study also revealed that the response calculation is sensitive to the modeling assumptions made for the soil/structure interface and application of a particular material model for the soil.

XU,J.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C.; GRAVES, H.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: A MEASUREMENT OF THE PRIMORDIAL POWER SPECTRUM  

SciTech Connect

We present constraints on the primordial power spectrum of adiabatic fluctuations using data from the 2008 Southern Survey of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) in combination with measurements from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and a prior on the Hubble constant. The angular resolution of ACT provides sensitivity to scales beyond l = 1000 for resolution of multiple peaks in the primordial temperature power spectrum, which enables us to probe the primordial power spectrum of adiabatic scalar perturbations with wavenumbers up to k {approx_equal} 0.2 Mpc{sup -1}. We find no evidence for deviation from power-law fluctuations over two decades in scale. Matter fluctuations inferred from the primordial temperature power spectrum evolve over cosmic time and can be used to predict the matter power spectrum at late times; we illustrate the overlap of the matter power inferred from cosmic microwave background measurements (which probe the power spectrum in the linear regime) with existing probes of galaxy clustering, cluster abundances, and weak-lensing constraints on the primordial power. This highlights the range of scales probed by current measurements of the matter power spectrum.

Hlozek, Renee; Dunkley, Joanna; Addison, Graeme [Department of Astrophysics, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Appel, John William; Das, Sudeep; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hajian, Amir; Hincks, Adam D. [Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bond, J. Richard [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Carvalho, C. Sofia [IPFN, IST, Av. RoviscoPais, 1049-001Lisboa, Portugal and RCAAM, Academy of Athens, Soranou Efessiou 4, 11-527 Athens (Greece); Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeff [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Duenner, Rolando; Gallardo, Patricio [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Hilton, Matt [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Hughes, John P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Irwin, Kent D. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, 325 Broadway Mailcode 817.03, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); and others

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

444

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

445

Detection of periodic signatures in the solar power spectrum. On the track of l=1 gravity modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present work we show robust indications of the existence of g modes in the Sun using 10 years of GOLF data. The present analysis is based on the exploitation of the collective properties of the predicted low-frequency (25 to 140 microHz) g modes: their asymptotic nature, which implies a quasi equidistant separation of their periods for a given angular degree (l). The Power Spectrum (PS) of the Power Spectrum Density (PSD), reveals a significant structure indicating the presence of features (peaks) in the PSD with near equidistant periods corresponding to l=1 modes in the range n=-4 to n=-26. The study of its statistical significance of this feature was fully undertaken and complemented with Monte Carlo simulations. This structure has a confidence level better than 99.86% not to be due to pure noise. Furthermore, a detailed study of this structure suggests that the gravity modes have a much more complex structure than the one initially expected (line-widths, magnetic splittings...). Compared to the latest solar models, the obtained results tend to favor a solar core rotating significantly faster than the rest of the radiative zone. In the framework of the Phoebus group, we have also applied the same methodology to other helioseismology instruments on board SoHO and ground based networks.

R. A. Garcia; S. Turck-Chieze; S. J. Jimenez-Reyes; J. Ballot; P. L. Palle; A. Eff-Darwich; S. Mathur; J. Provost

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

446

The energy spectrum of gravitational waves in a loop quantum cosmological model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the consequences of loop quantum cosmology (inverse-volume corrections) in the spectrum of the gravitational waves using the method of the Bogoliubov coefficients. These corrections are taken into account at the background level of the theory as well as at the first order in the perturbations theory framework. We show that these corrections lead to an intense graviton production during the loop super-inflationary phase prior to the standard slow-roll era, which leave their imprints through new features on the energy spectrum of the gravitational waves as would be measured today, including a new maximum on the low frequency end of the spectrum.

Joao Morais; Mariam Bouhmadi-Lopez; Alfredo B. Henriques

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

447

Full Spectrum Diffused and Beamed Solar Energy Application Using Optical Fibre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing solar energy application systems use small fraction of full spectrum of solar energy. So attempts are made to show how full spectrum solar energy can be used for diffused and beamed form of incident solar energy. Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) principle with optical fibre in diffused sun light and dielectric mirror separation technique with optical fibre in beamed form are discussed. Comparison of both the cases are done. Keywords: full spectrum, solar photonics, diffused solar energy, beamed solar energy, LSC, dielectric mirror, optical fibre, Photo-Voltaic

Dutta Majumdar, M R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Effect of resonance broadening on the evolution of the edge of a turbulent spectrum  

SciTech Connect

The extent to which nonlinear wave-particle resonance broadening results in a narrowing of an incident lower-hybrid wave spectrum is investigated. This narrowing is of concern because it could make control of lower-hybrid heating difficult. We numerically show, however, that relatively uniform spatial power deposition occurs if resonance broadening effects are treated consistently on both the wave spectrum and the particle distribution. A more naive approach, including only the effects on the evolution of the wave spectrum, would incorrectly predict an unfavorable power deposition profile.

Kritz, A.H.; Fisch, N.J.; Karney, C.F.F.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Project CARDS technical information record: parametric and sensitivity analysis and determination of response spectra for horizontal, vertical and rotational motion of a radioactive material shipping package relative to the motion of its support (railcar). Part 2. Continuation of CARDS-TIR-80-3 (Preliminary)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generation of the response spectra was coupled to a parametric and sensitivity analysis. Support accelerations and tiedown forces are presented as functions of time. The parametric analysis found that the horizontal acceleration of the support and the MAR (max absolute relative) horizontal acceleration are relatively insensitive, while the corresponding vertical accelerations are highly sensitive to changes in 4 of the 13 parameters, and the corresponding rotational accelerations are highly sensitive to changes in 8 of the 13 parameters. The tiedown forces are moderately sensitive to changes in 3 of the parameters. (DLC)

Fields, S.R.

1980-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

450

Characterization of coupled body response in random sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The frequent use of two or more closely positioned vessels during offshore operations makes the study of multi-body hydrodynamics an important topic, especially for the design of deepwater offshore systems. This research investigation studies the response behavior of a coupled mini-TLP / barge system in both head and beam sea conditions. The design sea conditions were selected to represent the combined wind, wave and current conditions for a target location off the coast of West Africa. Both the mini-TLP and the barge were designed to have independent mooring systems. Coupling between the two vessels is introduced through a connection consisting of two breast lines and a fender system. This connection is designed to restrain the horizontal movements of the two vessels while keeping a constant distance between them and avoiding collisions. The main focus of this study is to analyze the experimental data obtained during the model testing, especially the motions of the two bodies and the values related to the fender system, in order to characterize the behavior of the uncoupled and coupled system configurations. A statistical approach is used for the data analysis and interpretation. Statistical parameters are used to provide an overall characterization of system behavior, and Gaussian and Weibull distribution functions are utilized to detect the importance of non-linearity in the data with particular attention to extreme values. Correlations between the two vessels in time domain and frequency domain are investigated. In addition, auto and cross spectrum analyses of the data are used to contrast the motion behavior of the uncoupled and coupled configurations. It is shown that the connection system reduces the horizontal vessel motions; however the forces exerted on the fender system show significant variation depending on sea heading conditions.

Xie, Chen

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Enhanced photocurrent gain and spectrum range based on the composite consisting of SnO{sub 2} nanowires and CdSe quantum dots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High sensitivity with additional spectral response based on the composite consisting of SnO{sub 2} nanowires (NWs) and CdSe quantum dots (QDs) has been demonstrated. The underlying mechanism is attributed to the spatial separation of photogenerated electrons and holes due to the charge transfer arising from type II band alignment between CdSe QD and SnO{sub 2} NW. This work shows that by selective decoration of suitable QDs, the photocurrent gain of NWs not only can be greatly enhanced, but also can be extended to a wider range photoresponse spectrum. Our result, therefore, provides a very useful guideline to create high efficiency photodetectors.

Lu, M. L.; Lin, C. H.; Chen, Y. F. [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

452

Joint Responses to Audit Response Requests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

documenting the NRC Staff s conclusions regarding a pre-application audit of Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and Duke Energy Carolinas (Duke) combined license (COL) application preparation activities, conducted from July 30- August 3, 2007. Because TVA's Bellefonte COL application and Duke's Lee Nuclear COL application were prepared in close coordination through NuStart and the AP 1000 Design Centered Work Group (DCWG), and because these two COL applications were prepared by the same contractor, the audits were performed essentially simultaneously. The referenced audit report requested that the audit response requests (ARRs) be addressed prior to or as part of the respective COL application submittals. Responses to the ARRs are enclosed. The ARRs in the audit report did not directly impact the content of the COL applications, and the timing of the issuance of the audit report did not facilitate a response prior to the filing of the applications.

Juan Peralta Chief; Tennessee Valley

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Measurement of the Cosmic Ray e+ plus e- Spectrum from 20 GeV to 1 TeV with the Fermi Large Area Telescope  

SciTech Connect

Designed as a high-sensitivity gamma-ray observatory, the Fermi Large Area Telescope is also an electron detector with a large acceptance exceeding 2 m{sup 2}sr at 300 GeV. Building on the gamma-ray analysis, we have developed an efficient electron detection strategy which provides sufficient background rejection for measurement of the steeply-falling electron spectrum up to 1 TeV. Our high precision data show that the electron spectrum falls with energy as E{sup -3.0} and does not exhibit prominent spectral features. Interpretations in terms of a conventional diffusive model as well as a potential local extra component are briefly discussed.

Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Battelino, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Blandford, R.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bogaert, G.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /ASDC, Frascati /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Pisa /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; /more authors..

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

454

Department of Energy to Host Spectrum Policy Seminar for the Utility Sector  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Host Spectrum Policy Seminar for the to Host Spectrum Policy Seminar for the Utility Sector on December 8, 2010 Department of Energy to Host Spectrum Policy Seminar for the Utility Sector on December 8, 2010 November 17, 2010 - 7:09pm Addthis On October 5, 2010, after an extensive public notice and comment process, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a report entitled,