National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for response radiological transportation

  1. Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident This Transportation Emergency...

  2. TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Training (MERRTT) | Department of Energy Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) Once the jurisdiction has completed an evaluation of their plans and procedures, they will need to address any gaps in training. To assist, TEPP has developed the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) program. MERRTT provides fundamental knowledge

  3. Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) Model Recovery Procedure contains the recommended elements for developing and conducting recovery planning at transportation incident scene...

  4. Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This part should contain a general statement of the intent of this Annex. To provide for the planning, preparedness and coordination of emergency service efforts to respond to a transportation...

  5. Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportati...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents This part should...

  6. Departmental Radiological Emergency Response Assets

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-06-27

    The order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the DOE/NNSA national radiological emergency response assets and capabilities and Nuclear Emergency Support Team assets. Supersedes DOE O 5530.1A, DOE O 5530.2, DOE O 5530.3, DOE O 5530.4, and DOE O 5530.5.

  7. NNSA Provides Tajikistan Specialized Vehicles to Transport Radiological

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Materials | National Nuclear Security Administration Provides Tajikistan Specialized Vehicles to Transport Radiological Materials | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios

  8. Fifth Anniversary of Radiological Alarm Response Training for...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    nuclear or radiological materials. Fifth Anniversary of Radiological Alarm Response Training The three-day course is held at NNSA's Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak...

  9. Emergency Response Planning for Radiological Releases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Lazaro, M.A.; Allison, T.; Kamboj, S.; Chen, S.Y.

    2006-07-01

    The emergency management planning tool RISK-RDD was developed to aid emergency response planners and decision makers at all levels of government to better understand and prepare for potential problems related to a radiological release, especially those in urban areas. Radioactive release scenarios were studied by using the RISK-RDD radiological emergency management program. The scenarios were selected to investigate the key aspects of radiological risk management not always considered in emergency planning as a whole. These aspects include the evaluation of both aerosolized and non-aerosolized components of an atmospheric release, methods of release, acute and chronic human health risks, and the concomitant economic impacts as a function of the risk-based cleanup level. (authors)

  10. Current Trends in Gamma Radiation Detection for Radiological Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of interdisciplinary research and development has taken place–techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation–the so-called second line of defense.

  11. Operational Guidelines/Radiological Emergency Response | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Operational Guidelines/Radiological Emergency Response Operational Guidelines/Radiological Emergency Response This page provides information and resources concerning the development of operational guidelines as part of planning guidance for protection and recovery following Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and/or Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) incidents. Operational Guidelines Technical (OGT) Manual, 2009 RESRAD-RDD Complementing Software to OGT Manual EPA Protective Action

  12. Recent Developments in Field Response for Mitigation of Radiological

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Incidents | Department of Energy Developments in Field Response for Mitigation of Radiological Incidents Recent Developments in Field Response for Mitigation of Radiological Incidents Carlos Corredor*, Department of Energy; Charley Yu, Argonne National Labs Abstract: Since September 11, 2001, there has been a large effort by the government to develop new methods to reduce the consequence of potential radiological incidents. This is evident in the enhancement of technologies and methods to

  13. INL@Work Radiological Search & Response Training

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Turnage, Jennifer

    2013-05-28

    Dealing with radiological hazards is just part of the job for many INL scientists and engineers. Dodging bullets isn't. But some Department of Defense personnel may have to do both. INL employee Jennifer Turnage helps train soldiers in the art of detecting radiological and nuclear material. For more information about INL's research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  14. INL@Work Radiological Search & Response Training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turnage, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Dealing with radiological hazards is just part of the job for many INL scientists and engineers. Dodging bullets isn't. But some Department of Defense personnel may have to do both. INL employee Jennifer Turnage helps train soldiers in the art of detecting radiological and nuclear material. For more information about INL's research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  15. Current Trends in Gamma Ray Detection for Radiological Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

    2011-08-18

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies.

  16. ASPECT Emergency Response Chemical and Radiological Mapping

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LANL

    2009-09-01

    A unique airborne emergency response tool, ASPECT is a Los Alamos/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency project that can put chemical and radiological mapping tools in the air over an accident scene. The name ASPECT is an acronym for Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology. Update, Sept. 19, 2008: Flying over storm-damaged refineries and chemical factories, a twin-engine plane carrying the ASPECT (Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology) system has been on duty throughout the recent hurricanes that have swept the Florida and Gulf Coast areas. ASPECT is a project of the U.S. U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys National Decontamination Team. Los Alamos National Laboratory leads a science and technology program supporting the EPA and the ASPECT aircraft. Casting about with a combination of airborne photography and infrared spectroscopy, the highly instrumented plane provides emergency responders on the ground with a clear concept of where danger lies, and the nature of the sometimes-invisible plumes that could otherwise kill them. ASPECT is the nations only 24/7 emergency response aircraft with chemical plume mapping capability. Bob Kroutil of Bioscience Division is the project leader, and while he said the team has put in long hours, both on the ground and in the air, its a worthwhile effort. The plane flew over 320 targeted sites in four days, he noted. Prior to the deployment to the Gulf Coast, the plane had been monitoring the Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado. Los Alamos National Laboratory Divisions that are supporting ASPECT include, in addition to B-Division, CTN-5: Networking Engineering and IRM-CAS: Communication, Arts, and Services. Leslie Mansell, CTN-5, and Marilyn Pruitt, IRM-CAS, were recognized the the U.S. EPA for their outstanding support to the hurricane response of Gustav in Louisiana and Ike in Texas. The information from the data collected in the most recent event, Hurricane Ike, was sent to the EPA Region 6 Rapid Needs Assessment and the State of Texas Joint Field Office in Austin, Texas. It appears that though there is considerable damage in Galveston and Texas City, there are fewer chemical leaks than during either hurricanes Katrina or Rita. Specific information gathered from the data was reported out to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Headquarters, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Department of Homeland Security, and the State of Texas Emergency Management Agency.

  17. ASPECT Emergency Response Chemical and Radiological Mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LANL

    2008-05-12

    A unique airborne emergency response tool, ASPECT is a Los Alamos/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency project that can put chemical and radiological mapping tools in the air over an accident scene. The name ASPECT is an acronym for Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology. Update, Sept. 19, 2008: Flying over storm-damaged refineries and chemical factories, a twin-engine plane carrying the ASPECT (Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology) system has been on duty throughout the recent hurricanes that have swept the Florida and Gulf Coast areas. ASPECT is a project of the U.S. U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys National Decontamination Team. Los Alamos National Laboratory leads a science and technology program supporting the EPA and the ASPECT aircraft. Casting about with a combination of airborne photography and infrared spectroscopy, the highly instrumented plane provides emergency responders on the ground with a clear concept of where danger lies, and the nature of the sometimes-invisible plumes that could otherwise kill them. ASPECT is the nations only 24/7 emergency response aircraft with chemical plume mapping capability. Bob Kroutil of Bioscience Division is the project leader, and while he said the team has put in long hours, both on the ground and in the air, its a worthwhile effort. The plane flew over 320 targeted sites in four days, he noted. Prior to the deployment to the Gulf Coast, the plane had been monitoring the Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado. Los Alamos National Laboratory Divisions that are supporting ASPECT include, in addition to B-Division, CTN-5: Networking Engineering and IRM-CAS: Communication, Arts, and Services. Leslie Mansell, CTN-5, and Marilyn Pruitt, IRM-CAS, were recognized the the U.S. EPA for their outstanding support to the hurricane response of Gustav in Louisiana and Ike in Texas. The information from the data collected in the most recent event, Hurricane Ike, was sent to the EPA Region 6 Rapid Needs Assessment and the State of Texas Joint Field Office in Austin, Texas. It appears that though there is considerable damage in Galveston and Texas City, there are fewer chemical leaks than during either hurricanes Katrina or Rita. Specific information gathered from the data was reported out to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Headquarters, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Department of Homeland Security, and the State of Texas Emergency Management Agency.

  18. NNSA Nuclear/Radiological Incident Response | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Nuclear/Radiological Incident Response | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs

  19. EM-Led Radiological Incident Response Program Receives Honors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A program led by EM’s Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) that coordinates analytical capabilities throughout DOE for response to potential national radiological incidents recently received recognition for the best-in-track poster at a waste management conference earlier this year.

  20. Radiological Emergency Response Health and Safety Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. R. Bowman

    2001-05-01

    This manual was created to provide health and safety (H&S) guidance for emergency response operations. The manual is organized in sections that define each aspect of H and S Management for emergency responses. The sections are as follows: Responsibilities; Health Physics; Industrial Hygiene; Safety; Environmental Compliance; Medical; and Record Maintenance. Each section gives guidance on the types of training expected for managers and responders, safety processes and procedures to be followed when performing work, and what is expected of managers and participants. Also included are generic forms that will be used to facilitate or document activities during an emergency response. These ensure consistency in creating useful real-time and archival records and help to prevent the loss or omission of information.

  1. radiological response | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    response | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home

  2. Neutron Energy Measurements in Radiological Emergency Response Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Paul Guss, Michael Hornish, Scott Wilde, Tom Stampahar, Michael Reed

    2009-04-30

    We present significant results in recent advances in the determination of neutron energy. Neutron energy measurements are a small but very significant part of radiological emergency response applications. Mission critical information can be obtained by analyzing the neutron energy given off from radioactive materials. In the case of searching for special nuclear materials, neutron energy information from an unknown source can be of paramount importance.

  3. ORISE Resources: Radiological and Nuclear Terrorism: Medical Response to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mass Casualties Training Clinicians for Response to a Radiological or Nuclear Terrorism Attack The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and its Radiation Studies Branch in the National Center for Environmental Health asked the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) to develop a Web-based and CD-ROM training program to prepare clinicians-medical doctors and registered nurses in hospital emergency service settings-on how to locally respond to mass casualties that may

  4. Commercial low-level radioactive waste transportation liability and radiological risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, G.J.; Brown, O.F. II; Garcia, R.S.

    1992-08-01

    This report was prepared for States, compact regions, and other interested parties to address two subjects related to transporting low-level radioactive waste to disposal facilities. One is the potential liabilities associated with low-level radioactive waste transportation from the perspective of States as hosts to low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The other is the radiological risks of low-level radioactive waste transportation for drivers, the public, and disposal facility workers.

  5. DOE/NV/11718-036 UC-700 FEDERAL RADIOLOGICAL RESPONSE IN THE UNITED STATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11718-036 UC-700 FEDERAL RADIOLOGICAL RESPONSE IN THE UNITED STATES by Daryl J. Thomé Bechtel Nevada Remote Sensing Laboratory P.O. Box 98521 Las Vegas, Nevada, USA 89193-8521 Bruce W. Hurley, Ph.D. U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office P.O. Box 98518 Las Vegas, Nevada, USA 89193 ABSTRACT The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) to coordinate all off-site radiological response

  6. NNSA Nuclear/Radiological Incident Response | National Nuclear...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jan 1, 2009 The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has more than 60 years of nuclear weapons experience in responding to nuclear and radiological accidents and...

  7. NNSA Nuclear/Radiological Incident Response | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Dec 1, 2008 The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has over 60 years of nuclear weapons experience in responding to nuclear and radiological accidents and incidents....

  8. Southern state radiological emergency preparedness and response agencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This Report provides information on the state agencies assigned to radioactive materials transportation incidents in 16 Southern States Energy Board member states. For each, the report lists the agencies with primary authority for preparedness and response, their responsibilities and personnel within the agencies who can offer additional information on their radioactive materials transportation programs. The report also lists each state's emergency team members and its laboratory and analytical capabilities. Finally, the governor's designee for receiving advance notification of high-level radioactive materials and spent fuel shipments under 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's regulations is listed for each state. Part 71 requires prenotification for large quantity radioactive waste shipments. Part 73 addresses prenotification for spent nuclear reactor fuel shipments.

  9. Southern state radiological emergency preparedness and response agencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This Report provides information on the state agencies assigned to radioactive materials transportation incidents in 16 Southern States Energy Board member states. For each, the report lists the agencies with primary authority for preparedness and response, their responsibilities and personnel within the agencies who can offer additional information on their radioactive materials transportation programs. The report also lists each state`s emergency team members and its laboratory and analytical capabilities. Finally, the governor`s designee for receiving advance notification of high-level radioactive materials and spent fuel shipments under 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s regulations is listed for each state. Part 71 requires prenotification for large quantity radioactive waste shipments. Part 73 addresses prenotification for spent nuclear reactor fuel shipments.

  10. FEDERAL RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT CENTER ADVANCE PARTY PHASE RESPONSE ACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FEDERAL RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT CENTER ADVANCE PARTY PHASE RESPONSE ACTIONS Bruce Hurley, Ph.D. U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office P.O. Box 98518 Las Vegas, Nevada 89102 (702) 295-1284 Daryl Thome' Bechtel Nevada Remote Sensing Laboratory P.O. Box 98521 Las Vegas, Nevada 89193 (702) 295-8780 SUMMARY Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response actions are carried out in Advance Party and Main Party phases of deployment. Response activities

  11. Radiological Control

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-06-16

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs.

  12. Fifth Anniversary of Radiological Alarm Response Training for Local Law

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Enforcement and First Responders Across the Country | National Nuclear Security Administration Across the Country | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony

  13. Fifth Anniversary of Radiological Alarm Response Training for Local Law

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Enforcement and First Responders across the Country | National Nuclear Security Administration across the Country | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony

  14. Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-08-01

    Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

  15. Establishing remediation levels in response to a radiological dispersal event (or dirty bomb).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Klemic, G. A.; Taboas, A. L.; Environmental Assessment; Environmental Measurements Lab.; DOE-CH

    2004-05-01

    The detonation of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) could produce significant social and economic damage, the extent of which would depend largely on how quickly and effectively cleanup levels were established and on public acceptance of those levels. This paper shows that current radiological cleanup laws and regulations, models for converting dose or risk goals to cleanup concentrations, and existing site-specific criteria were not designed specifically for RDD cleanups but, absent changes, would apply by default. The goals and approaches of these legal and methodological structures often conflict; using them in response to terrorism could undermine public confidence, cause delays, and produce unnecessary costs or unacceptable cleanups. RDD cleanups would involve immediate priorities not envisioned in the existing radiological cleanup framework, such as balancing radiation risks with the health, economic, and other societal impacts associated with access to the infrastructure necessary to sustain society (e.g., hospitals, bridges, utilities). To minimize the achievement of terrorism goals, the elements of an RDD cleanup response -- including updating existing legal/regulatory structures to clarify federal authority, goals, and methods for developing RDD cleanup criteria -- must be in place soon; given the complexity of the issues and the potential societal impact, this effort should be expedited.

  16. Adapting the U.S. Domestic Radiological Emergency Response Process to an Overseas Incident: FRMAC Without the F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenthal, Daniel J.; Bowman, David R.; Remick, Alan

    2012-05-01

    The earthquake and resulting tsunami in Japan led to a radiological release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plan, which in turn resulted in the rapid activation and deployment by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) emergency response teams. These teams and those from other federal agencies are typically coordinated through the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) when responding to radiological incidents in the U.S. FRMAC is the body through which the collection, analysis, and assessment of environmental radiological data are coordinated and products released to decision makers. This article discusses DOE/NNSA’s role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident as it implemented its components of FRMAC in a foreign country, coordinated its assets, integrated with its federal partners, and collaborated with the Government of Japan. The technical details of the various data collections and analyses are covered in other articles of this issue.

  17. Radiological Assessor Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Uranium transported from the lungs is deposited in the bone (22%), kidney (12%), or other tissues (12%), or excreted (54%), according to International Commission on Radiological ...

  18. EMERGENCY RESPONSE TO A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Emer Emer Emer Emer Emergency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a Transportation ransportation ransportation ransportation ransportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the

  19. COMBINED MODELING OF ACCELERATION, TRANSPORT, AND HYDRODYNAMIC RESPONSE IN

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SOLAR FLARES. I. THE NUMERICAL MODEL (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect COMBINED MODELING OF ACCELERATION, TRANSPORT, AND HYDRODYNAMIC RESPONSE IN SOLAR FLARES. I. THE NUMERICAL MODEL Citation Details In-Document Search Title: COMBINED MODELING OF ACCELERATION, TRANSPORT, AND HYDRODYNAMIC RESPONSE IN SOLAR FLARES. I. THE NUMERICAL MODEL Acceleration and transport of high-energy particles and fluid dynamics of atmospheric plasma are interrelated aspects of solar flares, but for convenience

  20. Transportation needs assessment: Emergency response section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-05-01

    The transportation impacts of moving high level nuclear waste (HLNW) to a repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada are of concern to the residents of the State as well as to the residents of other states through which the nuclear wastes might be transported. The projected volume of the waste suggests that shipments will occur on a daily basis for some period of time. This will increase the risk of accidents, including a catastrophic incident. Furthermore, as the likelihood of repository construction and operation and waste shipments increase, so will the attention given by the national media. This document is not to be construed as a willingness to accept the HLNW repository on the part of the State. Rather it is an initial step in ensuring that the safety and well-being of Nevada residents and visitors and the State`s economy will be adequately addressed in federal decision-making pertaining to the transportation of HLNW into and across Nevada for disposal in the proposed repository. The Preferred Transportation System Needs Assessment identifies critical system design elements and technical and social issues that must be considered in conducting a comprehensive transportation impact analysis. Development of the needs assessment and the impact analysis is especially complex because of the absence of information and experience with shipping HLNW and because of the ``low probability, high consequence`` aspect of the transportation risk.

  1. Radioanalytical Data Quality Objectives and Measurement Quality Objectives during a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. C. Nielsen

    2006-01-01

    During the early and intermediate phases of a nuclear or radiological incident, the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) collects environmental samples that are analyzed by organizations with radioanalytical capability. Resources dedicated to quality assurance (QA) activities must be sufficient to assure that appropriate radioanalytical measurement quality objectives (MQOs) and assessment data quality objectives (DQOs) are met. As the emergency stabilizes, QA activities will evolve commensurate with the need to reach appropriate DQOs. The MQOs represent a compromise between precise analytical determinations and the timeliness necessary for emergency response activities. Minimum detectable concentration (MDC), lower limit of detection, and critical level tests can all serve as measurements reflecting the MQOs. The relationship among protective action guides (PAGs), derived response levels (DRLs), and laboratory detection limits is described. The rationale used to determine the appropriate laboratory detection limit is described.

  2. Radiological Assistance Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-04-10

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy, procedures, authorities, and responsibilities for its Radiological Assistance Program. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

  3. Spent Fuel Transportation Cask Response to the Caldecott Tunnel Fire Scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, Harold E.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Cuta, Judith M.

    2007-01-01

    On April 7, 1982, a tank truck and trailer carrying 8,800 gallons of gasoline was involved in an accident in the Caldecott tunnel on State Route 24 near Oakland, California. The tank trailer overturned and subsequently caught fire. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), one of the agencies responsible for ensuring the safe transportation of radioactive materials in the United States, undertook analyses to determine the possible regulatory implications of this particular event for the transportation of spent nuclear fuel by truck. The Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) code developed by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) was used to determine the thermal environment in the Caldecott tunnel during the fire. The FDS results were used to define boundary conditions for a thermal transient model of a truck transport cask containing spent nuclear fuel. The Nuclear Assurance Corporation (NAC) Legal Weight Truck (LWT) transportation cask was selected for this evaluation, as it represents a typical truck (over-the-road) cask, and can be used to transport a wide variety of spent nuclear fuels. Detailed analysis of the cask response to the fire was performed using the ANSYS® computer code to evaluate the thermal performance of the cask design in this fire scenario. This report describes the methods and approach used to assess the thermal response of the selected cask design to the conditions predicted in the Caldecott tunnel fire. The results of the analysis are presented in detail, with an evaluation of the cask response to the fire. The staff concluded that some components of smaller transportation casks resembling the NAC LWT, despite placement within an ISO container, could degrade significantly. Small transportation casks similar to the NAC LWT would probably experience failure of seals in this severe accident scenario. USNRC staff evaluated the radiological consequences of the cask response to the Caldecott tunnel fire. Although some components heated up beyond their service temperatures, the staff determined that there would be no significant release as a result of the fire for the NAC LWT and similar casks.

  4. ORISE Resources: Radiological and Nuclear Terrorism: Medical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to mass casualties that may involve radiological injuries. The interactive, two-hour training, titled Radiological and Nuclear Terrorism: Medical Response to Mass Casualties...

  5. Preliminary report on operational guidelines developed for use in emergency preparedness and response to a radiological dispersal device incident.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, C.; Cheng, J.-J.; Kamboj, S.; Domotor, S.; Wallo, A.; Environmental Science Division; DOE

    2006-12-15

    This report presents preliminary operational guidelines and supporting work products developed through the interagency Operational Guidelines Task Group (OGT). The report consolidates preliminary operational guidelines, all ancillary work products, and a companion software tool that facilitates their implementation into one reference source document. The report is intended for interim use and comment and provides the foundation for fostering future reviews of the operational guidelines and their implementation within emergency preparedness and response initiatives in the event of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) incident. The report principally focuses on the technical derivation and presentation of the operational guidelines. End-user guidance providing more details on how to apply these operational guidelines within planning and response settings is being considered and developed elsewhere. The preliminary operational guidelines are categorized into seven groups on the basis of their intended application within early, intermediate, and long-term recovery phases of emergency response. We anticipate that these operational guidelines will be updated and refined by interested government agencies in response to comments and lessons learned from their review, consideration, and trial application. This review, comment, and trial application process will facilitate the selection of a final set of operational guidelines that may be more or less inclusive of the preliminary operational guidelines presented in this report. These and updated versions of the operational guidelines will be made available through the OGT public Web site (http://ogcms.energy.gov) as they become finalized for public distribution and comment.

  6. Emergency Response Equipment and Related Training: Airborne Radiological Computer System (Model II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David P. Colton

    2007-02-28

    The materials included in the Airborne Radiological Computer System, Model-II (ARCS-II) were assembled with several considerations in mind. First, the system was designed to measure and record the airborne gamma radiation levels and the corresponding latitude and longitude coordinates, and to provide a first overview look of the extent and severity of an accident's impact. Second, the portable system had to be light enough and durable enough that it could be mounted in an aircraft, ground vehicle, or watercraft. Third, the system must control the collection and storage of the data, as well as provide a real-time display of the data collection results to the operator. The notebook computer and color graphics printer components of the system would only be used for analyzing and plotting the data. In essence, the provided equipment is composed of an acquisition system and an analysis system. The data can be transferred from the acquisition system to the analysis system at the end of the data collection or at some other agreeable time.

  7. radiological. survey

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiological Surveys Over San Francisco, Pacifica, Berkeley, And Oakland, CA Areas http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesamsca

  8. Radiological Worker Computer Based Training

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-02-06

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed an interactive computer based training (CBT) version of the standardized DOE Radiological Worker training program. This CD-ROM based program utilizes graphics, animation, photographs, sound and video to train users in ten topical areas: radiological fundamentals, biological effects, dose limits, ALARA, personnel monitoring, controls and postings, emergency response, contamination controls, high radiation areas, and lessons learned.

  9. Radiological worker training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  10. Radiological Control

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE-STD-1098-2008 October 2008 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ii DOE-STD-1098-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://www.standards.doe.gov/ DOE-STD-1098-2008 Radiological Control DOE Policy October 2008 iii Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist

  11. Radiological and Environmental Monitoring at the Clean Slate I and III Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, With Emphasis on the Implications for Off-site Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A; Etyemezian, Vic; McCurdy, Greg; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; Miller, Julianne J

    2014-09-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]) implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in the dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero (GZ). Three tests—Clean Slate I, II, and III—were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat. The fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. The Desert Research Institute (DRI) installed two monitoring stations in 2008, Station 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Center (ROC) and Station 401 at Clean Slate III. Station 402 was installed at Clean Slate I in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The monitoring activity was implemented to determine if radionuclide contamination in the soil at the Clean Slate sites was being transported beyond the contamination area boundaries. Some of the data collected also permits comparison of radiological exposure at the TTR monitoring stations to conditions observed at Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations around the NTTR. Annual average gross alpha values from the TTR monitoring stations are higher than values from the surrounding CEMP stations. Annual average gross beta values from the TTR monitoring stations are generally lower than values observed for the surrounding CEMP stations. This may be due to use of sample filters with larger pore space because when glass-fiber filters began to be used at TTR Station 400, gross beta values increased. Gamma spectroscopy typically identified only naturally occurring radionuclides. The radionuclides cesium-134 and -137 were identified in only two samples at each station collected in the weeks following the destruction of the nuclear power reactor in Fukushima, Japan, on March 11, 2011. Observed gamma energy values never exceeded the local background by more than 4 μR/h. The higher observed gamma values were coincident with wind from any of the cardinal directions, which suggests that there is no significant transport from the Clean Slate contamination areas. Annual average daily gamma values at the TTR stations are higher than at the surrounding CEMP stations, but they are equivalent to or just slightly higher than the background estimates made at locations at equivalent elevations, such as Denver, Colorado. Winds in excess of approximately 15 mph begin to resuspend soil particles and create dust, but dust generation is also affected by soil temperature, relative humidity, and soil water content. Power curves provide good predictive equations for dust concentration as a function of wind speed. However, winds in the highest wind speed category occur infrequently. iii

  12. Radiological Control - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98-2008, Change Notice 1, Radiological Control by Diane Johnson The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities...

  13. The Role of Radiation Transport in the Thermal Response of Semi-Transparent

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Materials to Localized Laser Heating (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Role of Radiation Transport in the Thermal Response of Semi-Transparent Materials to Localized Laser Heating Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Role of Radiation Transport in the Thermal Response of Semi-Transparent Materials to Localized Laser Heating Authors: Colvin, J ; Shestakov, A ; Stolken, J ; Vignes, R Publication Date: 2010-02-02 OSTI Identifier: 1228025 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-423106 DOE

  14. RADIOLOGICAL SURWY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    111 j -,~ ' - et- -*\. _(a v - r\lfs+8 plY 45+ c iill I r\l&; p) :;!I..; .: .. :,, ,m -,< :' - ' ec-. :-*% ". _(.*- ~ . . : : : ' .. : : : .. ..:, . . . :. : : ,, :;I;:~~:; :.:.!,;;y ' 1;: .: 1. .., ; ' . :. : c :...: .;: .: RADIOLOGICAL SURWY - RADIoL~BI~L.::.~~~y:- : ::: 1 ,: . . : : :: :. :..." - OFi~:,~~~~:poRTI~~~ 0J-g ,m_ ,. :. y.;,:. ,.:I; .:. F~~~~~~as~~~ ~~~~~~~:~~~~ :co~~~:~~~~~; ;, .. ; I : : ::.. :.. :. - ,B~~Lo,.~-~~~. ..; .:I ,,,, :--:.;:I:: ;' #I Y' i ' 11".

  15. DOE standard: Radiological control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

  16. Radiological Assistance Program Flight Planning Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-19

    The Radiological Assitance Program (RAP) is the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) first responder to radiological emergencies. RAP's mission is to identify and minimize radiological hazards, as well as provide radiological emergency response and technical advice to decision makers. One tool commonly used is aerial radiation detection equipment. During a response getting this equipment in the right place quickly is critical. The RAP Flight Planning Tool (a ArcGIS 10 Desktop addin) helps minimize this response time and provides specific customizable flight path information to the flight staff including maps, coordinates, and azimuths.

  17. Radiological training for tritium facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  18. Radiological Control

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1098-2008 October 2008 ------------------------------------- Change Notice 1 May 2009 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1098-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://www.standards.doe.gov/ iii DOE-STD-1098-2008 Change Notice 1: DOE-STD-1098-2008,

  19. Radiological Protection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    This document is an extract from ICRP Publication 103 The 2007 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection The full report is available for purchase and may be ordered online at: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/bookdescription.cws_home/713998/description#description A shorter "users edition" is available at a lower cost and may be ordered here at: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/bookdescription.cws_home/714371/description#description Annals of the ICRP

  20. Radiological Assistance Program Flight Planning Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-12-19

    The Radiological Assitance Program (RAP) is the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) first responder to radiological emergencies. RAP's mission is to identify and minimize radiological hazards, as well as provide radiological emergency response and technical advice to decision makers. One tool commonly used is aerial radiation detection equipment. During a response getting this equipment in the right place quickly is critical. The RAP Flight Planning Tool (a ArcGIS 10 Desktop addin) helps minimize this responsemore » time and provides specific customizable flight path information to the flight staff including maps, coordinates, and azimuths.« less

  1. WIPP transportation exercise to test emergency response capablities for Midland-Odessa

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Exercise to Test Emergency Response Capabilities for Midland-Odessa CARLSBAD, N.M., January 10, 2000 - Emergency response agencies from Midland and Odessa, Texas, will take part in a 1 p.m. (CST) training exercise Jan. 12 at the Ector County Coliseum. The graded exercise will help agencies determine whether emergency personnel are prepared to respond to a possible accident involving a shipment of transuranic radioactive waste headed for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste

  2. Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  3. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-12-02

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy, procedures, authorities, and requirements for the establishment of a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), as set forth in the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP). This directive does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

  4. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5 Radiological Considerations for First Aid Instructor's Guide 2.15-1 Course Number: Radiological Control Technicians Module Title: Radiological Considerations for First Aid Module Number: 2.15 Objectives: 2.15.01 List the proper steps for the treatment of minor injuries occurring in various radiological areas. 2.15.02 List the requirements for responding to major injuries or illnesses in radiological areas. 2.15.03 State the RCT's responsibility at the scene of a major injury in a radiological

  5. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radiological Considerations for First Aid Study Guide 2.15-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Considerations for First Aid Module Number: 2.15 Objectives: 2.15.01 List the proper steps for the treatment of minor injuries occurring in various radiological areas. 2.15.02 List the requirements for responding to major injuries or illnesses in radiological areas. 2.15.03 State the RCT's responsibility at the scene of a major injury in a radiological area after

  6. Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Contamination Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... workers attending training programs unsuitable for their needs. Prerequisites A background and foundation of knowledge ... radiological work and informing the worker of the ...

  7. A Local Incident Flux Response Expansion Transport Method for Coupling to the Diffusion Method in Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dingkang Zhang; Farzad Rahnema; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2013-09-01

    A local incident flux response expansion transport method is developed to generate transport solutions for coupling to diffusion theory codes regardless of their solution method (e.g., fine mesh, nodal, response based, finite element, etc.) for reactor core calculations in both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) cylindrical geometries. In this approach, a Monte Carlo method is first used to precompute the local transport solution (i.e., response function library) for each unique transport coarse node, in which diffusion theory is not valid due to strong transport effects. The response function library is then used to iteratively determine the albedo coefficients on the diffusion-transport interfaces, which are then used as the coupling parameters within the diffusion code. This interface coupling technique allows a seamless integration of the transport and diffusion methods. The new method retains the detailed heterogeneity of the transport nodes and naturally constructs any local solution within them by a simple superposition of local responses to all incoming fluxes from the contiguous coarse nodes. A new technique is also developed for coupling to fine-mesh diffusion methods/codes. The local transport method/module is tested in 2-D and 3-D pebble-bed reactor benchmark problems consisting of an inner reflector, an annular fuel region, and a controlled outer reflector. It is found that the results predicted by the transport module agree very well with the reference fluxes calculated directly by MCNP in both benchmark problems.

  8. 2013 Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Presentations |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 3 Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Presentations » 2013 Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Presentations 2013 Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Presentations Below are the presentations presented during the 2013 Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) meetings PDF icon Nov 2013 Derived Intervention and Response Levels for Tritium Oxide at the Savannah River Site; Tim Janik, Savannah River Site

  9. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Instructor's Guide 2.13-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Module Number: 2.13 Objectives: 2.13.01 Describe the general response and responsibilities of an RCT during any incident. L 2.13.02 Identify any emergency equipment and facilities that are available, including the location and contents of emergency equipment kits. L 2.13.03 Describe the RCT response to a Continuous Air Monitor (CAM)

  10. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Study Guide 2.13-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Module Number: 2.13 Objectives: 2.13.01 Describe the general response and responsibilities of an RCT during any incident. i 2.13.02 Identify any emergency equipment and facilities that are available, including the location and contents of emergency equipment kits. i 2.13.03 Describe the RCT response to a Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) alarm.

  11. A CFD-based wind solver for a fast response transport and dispersion model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gowardhan, Akshay A; Brown, Michael J; Pardyjak, Eric R; Senocak, Inanc

    2010-01-01

    In many cities, ambient air quality is deteriorating leading to concerns about the health of city inhabitants. In urban areas with narrow streets surrounded by clusters of tall buildings, called street canyons, air pollution from traffic emissions and other sources is difficult to disperse and may accumulate resulting in high pollutant concentrations. For various situations, including the evacuation of populated areas in the event of an accidental or deliberate release of chemical, biological and radiological agents, it is important that models should be developed that produce urban flow fields quickly. For these reasons it has become important to predict the flow field in urban street canyons. Various computational techniques have been used to calculate these flow fields, but these techniques are often computationally intensive. Most fast response models currently in use are at a disadvantage in these cases as they are unable to correlate highly heterogeneous urban structures with the diagnostic parameterizations on which they are based. In this paper, a fast and reasonably accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique that solves the Navier-Stokes equations for complex urban areas has been developed called QUIC-CFD (Q-CFD). This technique represents an intermediate balance between fast (on the order of minutes for a several block problem) and reasonably accurate solutions. The paper details the solution procedure and validates this model for various simple and complex urban geometries.

  12. transportation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    security missions undertaken by the U.S. government.

    Pantex Plant's Calvin Nelson honored as Analyst of the Year for Transportation Security http:nnsa.energy.gov...

  13. Response of microscale turbulence and transport to the evolution of resistive magnetohydrodynamic magnetic island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jiquan, E-mail: lijq@energy.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Kishimoto, Y. [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Wang, Z. X. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Nonlinear evolution of microscale turbulence interacting with a naturally growing MHD magnetic island is simulated based on a Landau-fluid model. Here, we report on a new short wavelength magnetic-island-induced ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability triggered by a critical threshold of magnetic island width in multiscale turbulence, which is referred to as sw-MITG mode. The sw-MITG mode is characterized by a substantially low stability threshold and a global structure propagating along the ion diamagnetic drift direction. Its generation results from the response of microscale fluctuations to turbulent cross-field heat transport associated with increasing boundary layer width about the island separatrix. An intermittency of heat transport is caused by the sw-MITG mode interacting with dynamical magnetic island and microturbulence.

  14. Apparatus for safeguarding a radiological source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M

    2014-10-07

    A tamper detector is provided for safeguarding a radiological source that is moved into and out of a storage location through an access porthole for storage and use. The radiological source is presumed to have an associated shipping container approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for transporting the radiological source. The tamper detector typically includes a network of sealed tubing that spans at least a portion of the access porthole. There is an opening in the network of sealed tubing that is large enough for passage therethrough of the radiological source and small enough to prevent passage therethrough of the associated shipping cask. Generally a gas source connector is provided for establishing a gas pressure in the network of sealed tubing, and a pressure drop sensor is provided for detecting a drop in the gas pressure below a preset value.

  15. HAZARDS OF THERMAL EXPANSION FOR RADIOLOGICAL CONTAINER ENGULFED IN FIRE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2013-05-01

    Fire accidents pose a serious threat to nuclear facilities. It is imperative that transport casks or shielded containers designed to transport/contain radiological materials have the ability to withstand a hypothetical fire. A numerical simulation was performed for a shielded container constructed of stainless steel and lead engulfed in a hypothetical fire as outlined by 10 CFR §71.73. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the thermal response of the container during and after the fire. The thermal model shows that after 30 minutes of fire, the stainless steel will maintain its integrity and not melt. However, the lead shielding will melt since its temperature exceeds the melting point. Due to the method of construction of the container under consideration, ample void space must be provided to allow for thermal expansion of the lead upon heating and melting, so as to not overstress the weldment.

  16. Office of Radiological Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of physical security of radiological materials;

  17. Provision of mobile and man-portable radiation detection equipment;
  18. Regional cooperation on safeguards...

  19. Radiological Worker Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... workers attending training programs unsuitable for their needs. Prerequisites A background and foundation of knowledge ... radiological work and informing the worker of the ...

  20. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... using these values combined with a knowledge of the drinking water sources and the ... the technician (or line supervisor) informing workers of radiological conditions such as: ...

  21. Radiological Worker Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... be maintained by the organization 17 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ... Radiological Worker Training Program Management References ... facilitysite- specific Skin & other organs 50 NA facility...

  22. WIPP Documents - Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation

  1. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Exercise Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Exercise Program TEPP Exercise Program Tom Clawson TEPP Contractor tom@trgroupinc.com Brief TEPP History Brief TEPP History * In 1988, identified need to address emergency preparedness concerns of DOE emergency preparedness concerns of DOE radiological shipments bl h d * EM established in 1989 - Identified need for responder training along all transportation corridors as key to EM mission - TEPP incorporated into DOE Order 151.1, with responsibility assigned to EM * WIPP adopted the the TEPP

  2. Mass transport parameters of aspen wood chip beds via stimulus-response tracer techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Wunderlich, T.K. Jr. )

    1993-02-05

    A stimulus-response tracer technique has been used to characterize packed beds of untreated, as well as acid prehydrolyzed, and enzymatically hydrolyzed aspen wood chips. Glucose was used as the trace. Bulk liquid phase dispersion, interphase mass transfer, and intraparticle diffusion coefficients were determined for these materials as well as effective porosities and tortuosities. The untreated and prehydrolyzed aspen wood chips were found to have effective void fractions of ca. 0.8, while the enzymatically hydrolyzed wood chips exhibited a void fraction of 0.37. Intraparticle diffusion was approximately twice as rapid in the prehydrolyzed and enzymatically hydrolyzed wood chips as in the untreated wood chips. Also, under the current experimental conditions, intraparticle diffusional transport resistance accounted for roughly half of the total tracer pulse dispersion. It is demonstrated that stimulus-response tracer techniques can be useful and convenient probes for beds of lignocellulosic, or other porous materials, which vary in character with extent of conversion and/or treatment.

  3. FRMAC Interactions During a Radiological or Nuclear Event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, C T

    2011-01-27

    During a radiological or nuclear event of national significance the Federal Radiological Emergency Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) assists federal, state, tribal, and local authorities by providing timely, high-quality predictions, measurements, analyses and assessments to promote efficient and effective emergency response for protection of the public and the environment from the consequences of such an event.

  4. Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our

  5. DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Student's Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Student's Guide Notes Module 4-1 I. Introduction II. Radiological Control Program A. Overall program The Radiological Control Program consists of the commitments, policies, and procedures that are administered by a site or facility to meet the EH Health and Safety Policy. The Radiation Protection Program required by 10 CFR Part 835 is an element of the overall Radiological Control Program. The Radiological Control Program should address the following: * Requirements * Responsibilities *

  6. Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Control Training for Supervisors

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at

  7. Transporting TMI-2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) core debris to INEL: Public safety and public response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitt, R.C.; Reno, H.W.; Young, W.R.; Hamric, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the approach taken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure that public safety is maintained during transport of core debris from the Unit-2 reactor at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID. It provides up-to-date information about public response to the transport action and discusses DOE's position on several institutional issues. The authors advise that planners of future transport operations be prepared for a multitude of comments from all levels of federal, state, and local governments, special interest groups, and private citizens. They also advise planners to keep meticulous records concerning all informational transactions.

  8. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  9. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    7of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Practical Training Phase II Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 ii Table of Contents Page Introduction.............................................................................. ......1 Development of Job Performance Measures (JPMs)............................ .....1 Conduct Job Performance Evaluation...................................................3 Qualification

  10. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Radiological Control Technician Training Facility Practical Training Attachment Phase IV Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 ii This page intentionally left blank DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 iii Table of Contents Page Introduction................................................................................................................................1 Facility Job Performance Measures

  11. Radiological Technician Training

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Part 2 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Technician Qualification Standard Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 iii Table of Contents Page Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Purpose of Qualification Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  12. Radiological assessment. A textbook on environmental dose analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Till, J.E.; Meyer, H.R.

    1983-09-01

    Radiological assessment is the quantitative process of estimating the consequences to humans resulting from the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. It is a multidisciplinary subject requiring the expertise of a number of individuals in order to predict source terms, describe environmental transport, calculate internal and external dose, and extrapolate dose to health effects. Up to this time there has been available no comprehensive book describing, on a uniform and comprehensive level, the techniques and models used in radiological assessment. Radiological Assessment is based on material presented at the 1980 Health Physics Society Summer School held in Seattle, Washington. The material has been expanded and edited to make it comprehensive in scope and useful as a text. Topics covered include (1) source terms for nuclear facilities and Medical and Industrial sites; (2) transport of radionuclides in the atmosphere; (3) transport of radionuclides in surface waters; (4) transport of radionuclides in groundwater; (5) terrestrial and aquatic food chain pathways; (6) reference man; a system for internal dose calculations; (7) internal dosimetry; (8) external dosimetry; (9) models for special-case radionuclides; (10) calculation of health effects in irradiated populations; (11) evaluation of uncertainties in environmental radiological assessment models; (12) regulatory standards for environmental releases of radionuclides; (13) development of computer codes for radiological assessment; and (14) assessment of accidental releases of radionuclides.

  13. Going the Distance? NRC's Response to the National Academy of Science's Transportation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Easton, E.P.; Bajwa, C.S.

    2008-07-01

    In February 2006, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) published the results of a 3 1/2-year study, titled Going the Distance, that examined the safety of transporting spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) in the United States. NAS initiated this study to address what it perceived to be a national need for an independent, objective, and authoritative analysis of SNF and HLW transport in the United States. The study was co-sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the Electric Power Research Institute and the National Cooperative Highway Research Program. This paper addresses some of the recommendations made in the NAS study related to the performance of SNF transportation casks in long duration fires, the use of full-scale package testing, and the need for an independent review of transportation security prior to the commencement of large scale shipping campaigns to an interim storage site or geologic repository. In conclusion: The NRC believes that the current regulations in 10 CFR Part 71 for the design of SNF and HLW transportation packages provide a very high level of protection to the public for very severe accidents and credible threat scenarios. As recommended by the NAS study, additional studies of accidents involving severe fires have been completed. These studies have confirmed that spent fuel casks would be expected to withstand very severe fires without the release of any fission products from the spent fuel. Additionally, changes in rail operating procedures such as the use of dedicated trains and prohibition on the co-location of SNF and flammable liquids in rail tunnels can further reduce the already low probability of severe rail accident fires involving SNF and HLW. (authors)

  14. Emergency response training draws professionals from two states

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Two States CARLSBAD, N.M., January 31, 2000 - Emergency response professionals from Oregon and Texas will be in Carlsbad Feb. 1-2 to learn how to handle potential accidents involving radioactive and hazardous materials. The course, titled "Train-The-Trainer: First Responder Radiological Transportation Emergency Course," is taught by members of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's (WIPP) Emergency Responder Training Team. It provides emergency response professionals with the tools to teach

  15. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 (Revised 2013) Module 2.03 Counting Errors and Statistics Instructor's Material Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Counting Errors and Statistics Module Number: 2.03 Objectives: (This document, Instructor's Material, is referred to as Instructor's Guide in the Program Management Guide) 2.03.01. Identify five general types of errors that can occur when analyzing radioactive samples, and describe the effect of each source of error on sample

  16. Radiological Assessor Training

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1-2008 August 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Assessor Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techs\ Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.1-1B, Radiation Protection

  17. General Employee Radiological Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    _______ Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 Original Change Part 2 page 5 The average annual radiation dose to a

  18. General Employee Radiological Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 December 2007_______ Change Notice 1 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 Original Change Part 2 page 5 The

  19. General Employee Radiological Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 iii Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in chapter 14,

  20. Packaging and Transportation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Packaging and Transportation Packaging and Transportation Packaging and Transportation Radiological shipments are accomplished safely. Annually, about 400 million hazardous materials shipments occur in the United States by rail, air, sea, and land. Of these shipments, about three million are radiological shipments. Since Fiscal Year (FY) 2004, EM has completed over 150,000 shipments of radioactive material/waste. Please click here to see Office of Packaging and Transportation Fiscal Year 2012

  1. Response of a Spent Fuel Transportation Cask to a Tunnel Fire Event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajwa, C. S.

    2003-02-25

    The staff of the Spent Fuel Project Office at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission undertook the investigation and thermal analysis of the Baltimore tunnel fire event. This event occurred in the Howard Street tunnel, in Baltimore, Maryland, on July 18, 2001. The staff was tasked with assessing the consequences of this event on the transportation of spent nuclear fuel. This paper describes the staff's coordination with the following government and laboratory organizations: the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), to determine the details of the train derailment and fire; the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), to quantify the thermal conditions within the tunnel; the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analysis (CNWRA), to validate the NIST evaluations, and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), to assist in the thermal analysis. The results of the staff's review and analysis efforts are also discussed. The staff has concluded that had the spent fuel transportation cask analyzed, a design approved under 10 CFR Part 71, been subjected to the Howard Street tunnel fire, no release of radioactive materials would have resulted from this postulated event, and the health and safety of the public would have been maintained.

  2. Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.2 Users’ Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Bradley J Schrader

    2010-10-01

    The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.2 (RSAC-7) is the newest version of the RSAC legacy code. It calculates the consequences of a release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. A user can generate a fission product inventory from either reactor operating history or a nuclear criticality event. RSAC-7 models the effects of high-efficiency particulate air filters or other cleanup systems and calculates the decay and ingrowth during transport through processes, facilities, and the environment. Doses are calculated for inhalation, air immersion, ground surface, ingestion, and cloud gamma pathways. RSAC-7 can be used as a tool to evaluate accident conditions in emergency response scenarios, radiological sabotage events and to evaluate safety basis accident consequences. This users’ manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for RSAC-7. Instructions, screens, and examples are provided to guide the user through the functions provided by RSAC-7. This program was designed for users who are familiar with radiological dose assessment methods.

  3. I COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    im I COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY I Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prprd* OFF-SITE PROPERTY H' | Prepared for Office of Operational FORMER LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS SITE Safety U.S. Department LEWISTON, NEW YORK I of Energy i J.D. BERGER i Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division I l*~~~~~~ ~~~~DRAFT REPORT January 1983 I I I ------- COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY H' FORMER LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS SITE

  4. ORISE: Radiological program assessment services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiological program assessment services Minimizing the risk of human exposure to hazardous levels of radioactive materials requires designing a comprehensive safety program that...

  5. Overview of Radiological Dose

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Upgrading RESRAD-RDD and Planning for Improvised Nuclear Device Incidents - The RESRAD-RDD&IND Charley Yu 1 , Carlos Corredor 2 , Jing-Jy Cheng 1 , Sunita Kamboj 1 , David LePoire 1 , and Paul Flood 1 1 Argonne National Laboratory, 2 U.S. Department of Energy July 16, 2014 HPS 59 th Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD RESRAD-RDD Background  Computer model that runs on the .NET framework (4.0)  First released in 2004  Calculates operational guidelines for a radiological dispersal device

  6. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    _______ Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHNICIAN TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Original Change Part 3 1.05-1 NCRP Report No. 93

  7. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 (Revised 2013) Module 2.03 Counting Errors and Statistics Student's Material Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Counting Errors and Statistics Module Number: 2.03 Objectives: (This document, Study Material, is referred to as Study Guide in the Program Management Guide) 2.03.01. Identify five general types of errors that can occur when analyzing radioactive samples, and describe the effect of each source of error on sample measurements. 2.03.02. State

  8. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Change Notice No. 1 2009 Change Notice No. 2 2011 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHNICIAN TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Original Change Part 3 1.05-1 NCRP

  9. For S Radiological

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ? . -. .- * -* (\/If.r.-5- .* , d- For S Radiological ' mer Bridgepo pecial Metals Adrian, Survey of the Irt Brass Company Extrusion Plant, Michigan / /f?t' . ( F. F. Haywood H. W. Dickson W. D. Cottrell W. H. Shinpaugh _ : I., _-. .I ( ._ rc/ DOE/EV-0005128 ORNL-57 13 / J. E. Burden 0. R. Stone R. W. Doane W. A. Goldsmith 4 , Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service U.S. Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia

  10. Smart Radiological Dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kosslow, William J.; Bandzuch, Gregory S.

    2004-07-20

    A radiation dosimeter providing an indication of the dose of radiation to which the radiation sensor has been exposed. The dosimeter contains features enabling the monitoring and evaluating of radiological risks so that a user can concentrate on the task at hand. The dosimeter provides an audible alarm indication that a predetermined time period has elapsed, an audible alarm indication reminding the user to check the dosimeter indication periodically, an audible alarm indicating that a predetermined accumulated dose has been prematurely reached, and an audible alarm indication prior or to reaching the 3/4 scale point.

  11. ORNL-5680 Radiological Surveys

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOVEV-0005/l (Supplement) ORNL-5680 Radiological Surveys of Properties in the Middlesex, New Jersey, Area R. W. Leggett D. L. Anderson F. F. Haywood D. J. Christian W. D. Cottrell R. W. Doane D. J. Crawford W. H. Shinpaugh E. B. Wagner T. E. Myrick W. A. Goldsmith Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service U.S. Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161 NTIS price codes-Printed Copy: A07 Microfiche ,401 I I This

  12. Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office, 1955 Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-1170, or emailed to: RRTREA@id.doe.gov. DOE-ID-10-010 Editorial Date August 4...

  13. Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sant'Andrea University Hospital, Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy) "Sacro Cuore" Catholic University, Radiology Department (Italy) Publication Date: 2013-11-06 OSTI Identifier: ...

  14. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is...

  15. Standardized radiological dose evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, V.L.; Stahlnecker, E.

    1996-05-01

    Following the end of the Cold War, the mission of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site changed from production of nuclear weapons to cleanup. Authorization baseis documents for the facilities, primarily the Final Safety Analysis Reports, are being replaced with new ones in which accident scenarios are sorted into coarse bins of consequence and frequency, similar to the approach of DOE-STD-3011-94. Because this binning does not require high precision, a standardized approach for radiological dose evaluations is taken for all the facilities at the site. This is done through a standard calculation ``template`` for use by all safety analysts preparing the new documents. This report describes this template and its use.

  16. CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response): A Generic Transportation Network Model for the Calculation of Evacuation Time Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, M. P.; Urbanik, II, T.; Desrosiers, A. E.

    1982-03-01

    This paper describes the methodology and application of the computer model CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response) which estimates the time required for a specific population density and distribution to evacuate an area using a specific transportation network. The CLEAR model simulates vehicle departure and movement on a transportation network according to the conditions and consequences of traffic flow. These include handling vehicles at intersecting road segments, calculating the velocity of travel on a road segment as a function of its vehicle density, and accounting for the delay of vehicles in traffic queues. The program also models the distribution of times required by individuals to prepare for an evacuation. In order to test its accuracy, the CLEAR model was used to estimate evacuatlon tlmes for the emergency planning zone surrounding the Beaver Valley Nuclear Power Plant. The Beaver Valley site was selected because evacuation time estimates had previously been prepared by the licensee, Duquesne Light, as well as by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency. A lack of documentation prevented a detailed comparison of the estimates based on the CLEAR model and those obtained by Duquesne Light. However, the CLEAR model results compared favorably with the estimates prepared by the other two agencies.

  17. Enewetak radiological support project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friesen, B.

    1982-09-01

    From 1972 through 1980, the Department of Energy acted in an advisory role to the Defense Nuclear Agency during planning for and execution of the cleanup of Enewetak Atoll. The Nevada Operations Office of the Department of Energy was responsible for the radiological characterization of the atoll and for certification of radiological condition of each island upon completion of the project. In-situ measurements of gamma rays emitted by americium-241 were utilized along with wet chemistry separation of plutonium from soil samples to identify and delineate surface areas requiring removal of soil. Military forces removed over 100,000 cubic yards of soil from the surface of five islands and deposited this material in a crater remaining from the nuclear testing period. Subsurface soil was excavated and removed from several locations where measurements indicated the presence of radionuclides above predetermined criteria. The methodologies of data acquisition, analysis and interpretation are described and detailed results are provided in text, figures and microfiche. The final radiological condition of each of 43 islets is reported.

  18. Emergency Response Training Draws Professionals From Seven States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Seven States CARLSBAD, N.M., August 18, 2000 - Emergency response professionals from Arizona, California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, and Texas will be in Carlsbad Aug. 23-25 to learn how to handle potential accidents involving radioactive and hazardous materials. The course, titled "Train-The-Trainer: First Responder Radiological Transportation Emergency Course," is taught by members of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's (WIPP) Emergency Responder Training Team. The

  19. PIA - Radiological Work Permit | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Radiological Work Permit PIA - Radiological Work Permit PIA - Radiological Work Permit PDF icon PIA - Radiological Work Permit More Documents & Publications PIA - Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - HSPD-12 Physical and Logical Access System

  20. Estimate Radiological Dose for Animals

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-12-18

    Estimate Radiological dose for animals in ecological environment using open literature values for parameters such as body weight, plant and soil ingestion rate, rad. halflife, absorbed energy, biological halflife, gamma energy per decay, soil-to-plant transfer factor, ...etc

  1. Radiological cleanup of Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    For 8 years, from 1972 until 1980, the United States planned and carried out the radiological cleanup, rehabilitation, and resettlement of Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands. This documentary records, from the perspective of DOD, the background, decisions, actions, and results of this major national and international effort. The documentary is designed: First, to provide a historical document which records with accuracy this major event in the history of Enewetak Atoll, the Marshall Islands, the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, Micronesia, the Pacific Basin, and the United States. Second, to provide a definitive record of the radiological contamination of the Atoll. Third, to provide a detailed record of the radiological exposure of the cleanup forces themselves. Fourth, to provide a useful guide for subsequent radiological cleanup efforts elsewhere.

  2. Radiological Control Manual. Revision 0, January 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  3. Radiological Protection for DOE Activities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-29

    Establishes radiological protection program requirements that, combined with 10 CFR 835 and its associated implementation guidance, form the basis for a comprehensive program for protection of individuals from the hazards of ionizing radiation in controlled areas. Extended by DOE N 441.3. Cancels DOE 5480.11, DOE 5480.15, DOE N 5400.13, DOE N 5480.11; please note: the DOE radiological control manual (DOE/EH-0256T)

  4. ORISE: Radiological program assessment services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiological program assessment services Minimizing the risk of human exposure to hazardous levels of radioactive materials requires designing a comprehensive safety program that ensures appropriate measures are taken to protect workers and the public. As a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) institute, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) understands the importance of having an effective safety program in place to assure stakeholders and regulators that your radiological

  5. LANL responds to radiological incident

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL responds to radiological incident LANL responds to radiological incident Multiple tests indicate no health risks to public or employees. August 27, 2012 Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center(LANSCE). Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The contamination poses no danger to the public. The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center August 27, 2012-The

  6. Radiological Monitoring Continues at WIPP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiological Monitoring Continues at WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M., February 19, 2014 - Radiological control personnel continue to collect surface and underground monitoring samples at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) after an underground air monitor detected airborne radiation around 11:30 p.m. (MT) on February 14. Recent laboratory analyses by Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center (CEMRC) found some trace amounts of americium and plutonium from a

  7. Financial assistance to states and tribes to support emergency preparedness and response and the safe transportation of hazardous shipments: 1996 Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradbury, J.A.; Leyson, J.; Lester, M.K.

    1996-07-01

    This report revises and updates the 1995 report Financial Assistance to States and Tribes to Support Emergency Preparedness and Response and the Safe Transportation of Hazardous Shipments, PNL-10260 (UC-620). The presentation of data and some of the data reported have been changed; these data supersede those presented in the earlier publication. All data have been updated to fiscal year 1995, with the exception of FEMA data that are updated to fiscal year 1994 only. The report identifies and summarizes existing sources of financial assistance to States and Tribes in preparing and responding to transportation emergencies and ensuring the safe transportation of hazardous shipments through their jurisdictions. It is intended for use as an information resource for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Transportation, Emergency Management, and Analytical Services (EM-76).

  8. Radiological safety training for accelerator facilities: DOE handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    This program management guide describes the proper implementation standard for core training as outline in the DOE Radiological Control (RadCon) Manual. Its purpose is to assist DOE employees and Managing and Operating (M&O) contractors having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RadCon Manual.

  9. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo

  10. GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets

  11. Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets

  12. NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiological Surveys Over San Francisco, Pacifica,

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Berkeley, And Oakland, CA Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration Radiological Surveys Over San Francisco, Pacifica, Berkeley, And Oakland, CA Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our

  13. Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo

  14. NNSA Recovers Radiological Material from Mexico | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Recovers Radiological Material from Mexico | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs

  15. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technical Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    10 Access Control and Work Area Setup Study Guide 2.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Access Control and Work Area Setup Module Number: 2.10 Objectives: i 2.10.01 State the purpose of and information found on a Radiological Work Permit (RWP) including the different classifications at your site. i 2.10.02 State responsibilities in using or initiating a RWP. i 2.10.03 State the document that governs the ALARA program at your site. i 2.10.04 Describe how

  16. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ALARA Instructor's Guide 1.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: ALARA Module Number: 1.10 Objectives: 1.10.01 Describe the assumptions on which the current ALARA philosophy is based. 1.10.02 Identify the ALARA philosophy for collective personnel exposure and individual exposure. 1.10.03 Identify the scope of an effective radiological ALARA program. 1.10.04 Identify the purposes for conducting pre-job and/or post-job ALARA reviews. 1.10.05 Identify RCT responsibilities

  17. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Access Control and Work Area Setup Instructor's Guide 2.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Access Control and Work Area Setup Module Number: 2.10 Objectives: L 2.10.01 State the purpose of and information found on a Radiological Work Permit (RWP) including the different classifications at your site. L 2.10.02 State responsibilities in using or initiating a RWP. L 2.10.03 State the document that governs the ALARA program at your site. L 2.10.04 Describe how

  18. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ALARA Study Guide 1.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: ALARA Module Number: 1.10 Objectives: 1.10.01 Describe the assumptions on which the current ALARA philosophy is based. 1.10.02 Identify the ALARA philosophy for collective personnel exposure and individual exposure. 1.10.03 Identify the scope of an effective radiological ALARA program. 1.10.04 Identify the purposes for conducting pre-job and/or post-job ALARA reviews. 1.10.05 Identify RCT responsibilities for

  19. Radiological control manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kloepping, R.

    1996-05-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP.

  20. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31

    The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

  1. Memorandum, Reporting of Radiological Sealed Sources Transactions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Memorandum, Reporting of Radiological Sealed Sources Transactions Memorandum, Reporting of Radiological Sealed Sources Transactions December 16, 2010 The requirements for reporting transactions involving radiological sealed sources are identified in Department of Energy (DOE) Notice (N) 234.1, Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources. The data reported in accordance with DOE N 234.1 are maintained in the DOE Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) database by the

  2. Nuclear & Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    & Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

  3. International Data on Radiological Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Finck; Margaret Goldberg

    2010-07-01

    ABSTRACT The mission of radiological dispersal device (RDD) nuclear forensics is to identify the provenance of nuclear and radiological materials used in RDDs and to aid law enforcement in tracking nuclear materials and routes. The application of databases to radiological forensics is to match RDD source material to a source model in the database, provide guidance regarding a possible second device, and aid the FBI by providing a short list of manufacturers and distributors, and ultimately to the last legal owner of the source. The Argonne/Idaho National Laboratory RDD attribution database is a powerful technical tool in radiological forensics. The database (1267 unique vendors) includes all sealed sources and a device registered in the U.S., is complemented by data from the IAEA Catalogue, and is supported by rigorous in-lab characterization of selected sealed sources regarding physical form, radiochemical composition, and age-dating profiles. Close working relationships with global partners in the commercial sealed sources industry provide invaluable technical information and expertise in the development of signature profiles. These profiles are critical to the down-selection of potential candidates in either pre- or post- event RDD attribution. The down-selection process includes a match between an interdicted (or detonated) source and a model in the database linked to one or more manufacturers and distributors.

  4. Radiological Control Training for Supervisors

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3-2001 August 2001 Change Notice No 1. with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax

  5. Radioactive Waste Management Complex low-level waste radiological performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheras, S.J.; Rood, A.S.; Magnuson, S.O.; Sussman, M.E.; Bhatt, R.N.

    1994-04-01

    This report documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of radioactive low-level waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This radiological performance assessment was conducted to evaluate compliance with applicable radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals inadvertently intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty and sensitivity analyses were performed. The results of the analyses indicate compliance with established radiological criteria and provide reasonable assurance that public health and safety will be protected.

  6. CASL - Radiation Transport Methods Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Transport Methods Update The Radiation Transport Methods (RTM) focus area is responsible for the development of methods, algorithms, and implementations of radiation...

  7. Understanding Mechanisms of Radiological Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rick Demmer; John Drake; Ryan James, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, the study of radiological contamination and decontamination has expanded significantly. This paper addresses the mechanisms of radiological contamination that have been reported and then discusses which methods have recently been used during performance testing of several different decontamination technologies. About twenty years ago the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL began a search for decontamination processes which could minimize secondary waste. In order to test the effectiveness of these decontamination technologies, a new simulated contamination, termed SIMCON, was developed. SIMCON was designed to replicate the types of contamination found on stainless steel, spent fuel processing equipment. Ten years later, the INL began research into methods for simulating urban contamination resulting from a radiological dispersal device (RDD). This work was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and included the initial development an aqueous application of contaminant to substrate. Since 2007, research sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has advanced that effort and led to the development of a contamination method that simulates particulate fallout from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND). The IND method diverges from previous efforts to create tenacious contamination by simulating a reproducible “loose” contamination. Examining these different types of contamination (and subsequent decontamination processes), which have included several different radionuclides and substrates, sheds light on contamination processes that occur throughout the nuclear industry and in the urban environment.

  8. E. Cardis, International V.K. Ivanov, Medical Radiological Rese

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    25026 E. Cardis, International V.K. Ivanov, Medical Radiological Rese K. Mabuchi, Radia A.E. Okeanov, Belarussian Centre for Medic EDITORLAL NOTE This unedited Background Paper is not to be referenced or quoted. The views expressed remain the responsibility of the named authors. The views are not necessarily those of the governments of the member states of the Sponsoring Organizations. Although great care has been taken to maintain the accuracy of information contained in t h i s Background

  9. Office of Radiological Security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Radiological Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at

  10. Response Response

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Attachment 7 Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Percent of Mentors that are People with Disabilities 9.00% Total number of Mentors (The count used to calculate the Mentor percentages) 252 Demographic Information Percent of Mentors Two or More Races Not reported Percent of White Mentors 63.00% Percent of Female Mentors 39.00% Percent of Male Mentors 61.00% Percent of Veteran Mentors 21.00% Percent of Asian American Mentors

  11. ORISE: Radiological Assessment and Monitoring System (RAMS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiological Assessment and Monitoring System (RAMS) ORISE develops paperless tool to assist with data entry for radiological monitoring During the Empire 09 exercise, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education tested for the first time a paperless system of data management to support the operations of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center. How ORISE is Making a Difference The paperless FRMAC provides tools that enables the FRMAC to collect and process field

  12. Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    researchers. Course Description: This course illustrates and reinforces the skills and knowledge needed to assist personnel with radiological controls for laboratory research...

  13. Operating Experience Level 3: Radiologically Contaminated Respirators...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Experience Level 3 provides information on a safety concern related to radiological contamination of launderedreconditioned respirators and parts that have been certified as...

  14. Progress Continues on Mitigation of Radiological Contamination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 13, 2015 Progress Continues on Mitigation of Radiological Contamination This week, WIPP personnel will complete the installation of the brattice cloth and salt barrier on a...

  15. Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... workers attending training programs unsuitable for their needs. Prerequisites A background and foundation of knowledge ... radiological work and informing the worker of the ...

  16. Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... the skills and knowledge needed to assist ... of tools, equipment, or workers. 2. Not wearing gloves, or ... radiological work and informing the worker of the ...

  17. Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of tools, equipment, or workers. 2. Not wearing gloves, or ... radiological work and informing the worker of the ... special survey techniques or by review of process knowledge. ...

  18. radiological. survey | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    survey NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiological Surveys Over San Francisco, Pacifica, Berkeley, And Oakland, CA Areas A U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security...

  19. Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    practices, emerging trends, compliance issues, etc. in support of radiological ... of Real and Personal Property RESRAD Family of Codes Knowledge Information Management ...

  20. NEVADA TEST SITE RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL MANUAL

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... are based on dose coefficients from International Commission on Radiological Protec- ... dose is: BS Bone surface, ET Extrathoracic, K Kidney, L Liver, and T Thyroid. ...

  1. Response

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Response SEAB Recommendations Related to the Evaluation of New Funding Constructs for Energy R&D in the Department of Energy Introduction Over the past seven years, the Department of Energy (DOE) has introduced several new energy research and development (R&D) management and funding mechanisms, designed to complement each other, with the goal of maximizing the Nation's ability to achieve energy breakthroughs as quickly as possible. * Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) focus on

  2. Radiological Training for Accelerator Facilities

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8-2002 May 2002 Change Notice No 1. with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR ACCELERATOR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to

  3. RADIOLOGICAL DATA FOR ALARA PLANNING PURPOSES Rev. 1 Contact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RADIOLOGICAL DATA FOR ALARA PLANNING PURPOSES Rev. 1 Contact 1 ft 3 ft 10 ft 25 ft 50 ft 125 ft 100 mR/hr line 5 mR/hr line (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (feet) (feet) Outside of Cask (max) *Unshielded Liner (max) Top of *Unshielded Liner after the cask lid is removed *Unshielded Liner Inside of Cask/Lid Outside of Cask Lifting rig or any other support equipment Does the cask have fixed contamination that may "leach out" during transport (Yes/No)? If yes, please list

  4. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Instructor's Guide 2.12-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Shipment/Receipt of Radioactive Material Module Number: 2.12 Objectives: 2.12.01 List the applicable agencies which have regulations that govern the transport of radioactive material. 2.12.02 Define terms used in DOT regulations. 2.12.03 Describe methods that may be used to determine the radionuclide contents of a package. 2.12.04 Describe the necessary radiation and contamination surveys to be performed on

  5. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Study Guide 2.12-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Shipment/Receipt of Radioactive Material Module Number: 2.12 Objectives: 2.12.01 List the applicable agencies which have regulations that govern the transport of radioactive material. 2.12.02 Define terms used in DOT regulations. 2.12.03 Describe methods that may be used to determine the radionuclide contents of a package. 2.12.04 Describe the necessary radiation and contamination surveys to be performed on packages

  6. Accuracy of the electron transport in mcnp5 and its suitability for ionization chamber response simulations: A comparison with the egsnrc and penelope codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koivunoro, Hanna; Siiskonen, Teemu; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Hippelaeinen, Eero; Savolainen, Sauli

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: In this work, accuracy of the mcnp5 code in the electron transport calculations and its suitability for ionization chamber (IC) response simulations in photon beams are studied in comparison to egsnrc and penelope codes. Methods: The electron transport is studied by comparing the depth dose distributions in a water phantom subdivided into thin layers using incident energies (0.05, 0.1, 1, and 10 MeV) for the broad parallel electron beams. The IC response simulations are studied in water phantom in three dosimetric gas materials (air, argon, and methane based tissue equivalent gas) for photon beams ({sup 60}Co source, 6 MV linear medical accelerator, and mono-energetic 2 MeV photon source). Two optional electron transport models of mcnp5 are evaluated: the ITS-based electron energy indexing (mcnp5{sub ITS}) and the new detailed electron energy-loss straggling logic (mcnp5{sub new}). The electron substep length (ESTEP parameter) dependency in mcnp5 is investigated as well. Results: For the electron beam studies, large discrepancies (>3%) are observed between the mcnp5 dose distributions and the reference codes at 1 MeV and lower energies. The discrepancy is especially notable for 0.1 and 0.05 MeV electron beams. The boundary crossing artifacts, which are well known for the mcnp5{sub ITS}, are observed for the mcnp5{sub new} only at 0.1 and 0.05 MeV beam energies. If the excessive boundary crossing is eliminated by using single scoring cells, the mcnp5{sub ITS} provides dose distributions that agree better with the reference codes than mcnp5{sub new}. The mcnp5 dose estimates for the gas cavity agree within 1% with the reference codes, if the mcnp5{sub ITS} is applied or electron substep length is set adequately for the gas in the cavity using the mcnp5{sub new}. The mcnp5{sub new} results are found highly dependent on the chosen electron substep length and might lead up to 15% underestimation of the absorbed dose. Conclusions: Since the mcnp5 electron transport calculations are not accurate at all energies and in every medium by general clinical standards, caution is needed, if mcnp5 is used with the current electron transport models for dosimetric applications.

  7. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council - Nevada Test Site

    2009-10-01

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/11718--079, “NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 5 issued in November 2004. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect the recent changes in compliance requirements with 10 CFR 835, and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

  8. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council Nevada Test Site

    2010-02-09

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, “Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 0 issued in October 2009. Brief Description of Revision: A minor revision to correct oversights made during revision to incorporate the 10 CFR 835 Update; and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

  9. Memorandum, Reporting of Radiological Sealed Sources Transactions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The requirements for reporting transactions involving radiological sealed sources are identified in Department of Energy (DOE) Notice (N) 234.1, Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources. The data reported in accordance with DOE N 234.1 are maintained in the DOE Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) database by the Office of Information Management, within the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security.

  10. Limitations Influencing Interventional Radiology in Canada: Results of a National Survey by the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association (CIRA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Brien, Jeremy; Baerlocher, Mark Otto Asch, Murray R.; Hayeems, Eran; Kachura, John R.; Collingwood, Peter

    2007-09-15

    Purpose. To describe the current state and limitations to interventional radiology (IR) in Canada through a large, national survey of Canadian interventional radiologists. Methods. An anonymous online survey was offered to members of the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association (CIRA). Only staff radiologists were invited to participate. Results. Seventy-five (75) responses were received from a total of 247, giving a response rate of 30%. Respondents were split approximately equally between academic centers (47%) and community practice (53%), and the majority of interventional radiologists worked in hospitals with either 200-500 (49%) or 500-1,000 (39%) beds. Procedures listed by respondents as most commonly performed in their practice included PICC line insertion (83%), angiography and stenting (65%), and percutaneous biopsy (37%). Procedures listed as not currently performed but which interventional radiologists believed would benefit their patient population included radiofrequency ablation (36%), carotid stenting (34%), and aortic stenting (21%); the majority of respondents noted that a lack of support from referring services was the main reason for not performing these procedures (56%). Impediments to increasing scope and volume of practice in Canadian IR were most commonly related to room or equipment shortage (35%), radiologist shortage (33%), and a lack of funding or administrative support (28%). Conclusion. Interventional radiology in Canada is limited by a number of factors including funding, manpower, and referral support. A concerted effort should be undertaken by individual interventional radiologists and IR organizations to increase training capacity, funding, remuneration, and public exposure to IR in order to help advance the subspecialty.

  11. Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch From Open Energy Information Address: 591...

  12. Los Alamos National Security Corrective Action Plan - Radiological...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Los Alamos National Security Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II Los Alamos National Security Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II Los Alamos ...

  13. Radiological Source Term Estimates for the February 14, 2014...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Radiological Source Term Estimates for the February 14, 2014 WIPP Release Event Radiological Source Term Estimates for the February 14, 2014 WIPP Release Event This document was...

  14. Office of Radiological Security | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Radiological ... Office of Radiological Security Read more about Y-12's contributions of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative to secure the world's most vulnerable...

  15. MODARIA: Modelling and Data for Radiological Impact Assessment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    MODARIA: Modelling and Data for Radiological Impact Assessment Context and Overview MODARIA: Modelling and Data for Radiological Impact Assessment Context and Overview Presentation...

  16. Decision Support Tool for the Management of Debris from Radiological Dispersal Devices and Other Incidents of National Significance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemieux, P.; Thorneloe, S.; Hayes, C.; Rodgers, M.; Christman, R.

    2008-07-01

    Unique challenges exist for the handling, transport, and disposal of debris resulting from homeland security incidents, disasters or other national emergencies. Access to guidance to facilitate decision making to ensure the safe and timely disposal of debris is critical to helping restore a community or region and prevent further contamination or spread of disease. For a radiological dispersal device (RDD), proper characterization of the quantity, properties, and level of contamination of debris can have a significant impact on cleanup costs and timelines. A suite of decision support tools (DSTs) is being developed by the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development to assist individuals responsible for making decisions associated with handling, transport, and disposal of such debris. The DSTs are location-specific to help identify specific facilities and contacts for making final disposal decisions. The DSTs provide quick reference to technical information, regulations, and other information to provide decision makers with assistance in guiding disposal decisions that are important for the protection of public health, first responders, and the environment. These tools are being developed in partnership with other U.S. government agencies, EPA program offices, industry, and state and local emergency response programs. (authors)

  17. 2012 Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Presentations |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 2 Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Presentations » 2012 Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Presentations 2012 Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Presentations 2012 Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Presentations PDF icon November 2012; Environmental Measurements in an Emergency: This is not a Drill!; Stephen V. Musolino; Brookhaven National Laboratory PDF icon November 2012; Brookhaven

  18. DOE Issues WIPP Radiological Release Investigation Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today, the Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) released the initial accident investigation report related to the Feb. 14 radiological release at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico.

  19. Radiological safety training for uranium facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    This handbook contains recommended training materials consistent with DOE standardized core radiological training material. These materials consist of a program management guide, instructor`s guide, student guide, and overhead transparencies.

  20. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

    1990-01-01

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  1. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

    1989-01-01

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  2. Radiological Primer Common Understanding of Terms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiological Primer Understanding Radiological Terms Richard Bloom and Dr. Antone Brooks Health Safety Environmental Protection Committee Hanford Advisory Board Tom Rogers and Crystal Mathey Washington State Department of Health Radioactivity vs. Radiation  What is radioactivity?  Property exhibited by certain types of matter of emitting radiation spontaneously.  What is radiation?  Process by which energy is emitted from a source  Forms of ionizing radiation  Gamma (photons)

  3. Flashback: Rapid scanning for radiological threats

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flashback: Rapid scanning for radiological threats Flashback: Rapid scanning for radiological threats The ability to identify distinct material density enables the Multi-Mode Passive Detection System (MMPDS)to quickly detect unshielded to heavily shielded nuclear threats, as well as gamma rays, with near-zero false alarms. November 1, 2015 Decision Science Decision Science Decision Sciences' Multi-Mode Passive Detection System: Rapid scanning forradiological threats Click on headline to go to

  4. Microsoft Word - Berger Radiological Conditions.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Dec. 2, 2009 1 Summary of Information Regarding Radiological Conditions of NFSS Vicinity Properties J. D. Berger, CHP DeNuke Contracting Services, Inc. Oak Ridge, TN The following is a summary of the information obtained from reviews of radiological survey reports, prepared by ORAU in support of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. These reports were obtained for review from the IVEA Program at ORAU/ORISE. A list of the reports, reviewed for this summary, is included at the

  5. Radiological Safety Training for Accelerator Facilities

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1108-2002 May 2002 Reaffirmation with Change Notice 2 July 2013 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY TRAINING FOR ACCELERATOR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change Notice No.2 Radiological Training

  6. RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF BALLOD AND ASSOCIATES PROPERTY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ,..~ ,!-~ <-\ NJ' to RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF BALLOD AND ASSOCIATES PROPERTY (STEPAN CHEMICAL COMPANY) MAYWOOD, NEW JERSEY Leslie W. Cole, Jim Berger, Phyllis Cotton, Robert Gosslee, Jonathan Sowell, Clayton Weaver FINAL REPORT July 30, 1981 Work performed by Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division Oak Ridge Associated Universities Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 Under Interagency Agreement DOE No. 40-770-80 NRC Fin. No. A-9093-0, Between the U.S.

  7. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Health and Safety Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FRMAC Health and Safety Working Group

    2012-03-20

    This manual is a tool to provide information to all responders and emergency planners and is suggested as a starting point for all organizations that provide personnel/assets for radiological emergency response. It defines the safety requirements for the protection of all emergency responders. The intent is to comply with appropriate regulations or provide an equal level of protection when the situation makes it necessary to deviate. In the event a situation arises which is not addressed in the manual, an appropriate management-level expert will define alternate requirements based on the specifics of the emergency situation. This manual is not intended to pertain to the general public.

  8. Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul P. Guss

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec’s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Space and Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

  9. Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Guss, Robert Augdahl, Bill Nickels, Cassandra Zellers

    2008-04-16

    This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec’s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

  10. PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do

  11. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radiological Protection Standards Instructor's Guide 1.09-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Protection Standards Module Number: 1.09 Objectives: 1.09.01 Identify the role of advisory agencies in the development of recommendations for radiological control. 1.09.02 Identify the role of regulatory agencies in the development of standards and regulations for radiological control. 1.09.03 Identify the scope of the 10 CFR Part 835. References: 1. ANL-88-26

  12. Using handheld plastic scintillator detectors to triage individuals exposed to a radiological dispersal device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manger, Ryan P; Hertel, Nolan; Burgett, E.; Ansari, A.

    2011-01-01

    After a radiological dispersal device (RDD) event, people could become internally contaminated by inhaling dispersed radioactive particles. A rapid method to screen individuals who are internally contaminated is desirable. Such initial screening can help in prompt identification of those who are highly contaminated and in prioritizing individuals for further and more definitive evaluation such as laboratory testing. The use of handheld plastic scintillators to rapidly screen those exposed to an RDD with gamma-emitting radionuclides was investigated in this study. The Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code was used to model two commercially available plastic scintillation detectors in conjunction with anthropomorphic phantom models to determine the detector response to inhaled radionuclides. Biokinetic models were used to simulate an inhaled radionuclide and its progression through the anthropomorphic phantoms up to 30 d after intake. The objective of the study was to see if internal contamination levels equivalent to 250 mSv committed effective dose equivalent could be detected using these instruments. Five radionuclides were examined: {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 131}I and {sup 241}Am. The results demonstrate that all of the radionuclides except {sup 241}Am could be detected when placing either one of the two plastic scintillator detector systems on the posterior right torso of the contaminated individuals.

  13. Regional Transportation Simulation Tool for Emergency Planning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rtstep-diag TRACC RESEARCH Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Structural Mechanics Transportation Systems Modeling Regional Transportation Simulation Tool for Emergency Evacuation Planning (Click to play movie) Large-scale evacuations from major cities during no-notice events - such as chemical or radiological attacks, hazardous material spills, or earthquakes - have an obvious impact on large regions rather than on just the directly affected area. The scope of impact includes the

  14. Simulation of transportation of low enriched uranium solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hope, E.P.; Ades, M.J.

    1996-08-01

    A simulation of the transportation by truck of low enriched uranium solutions has been completed for NEPA purposes at the Savannah River Site. The analysis involves three distinct source terms, and establishes the radiological risks of shipment to three possible destinations. Additionally, loading accidents were analyzed to determine the radiological consequences of mishaps during handling and delivery. Source terms were developed from laboratory measurements of chemical samples from low enriched uranium feed materials being stored at SRS facilities, and from manufacturer data on transport containers. The transportation simulations were accomplished over the INTERNET using the DOE TRANSNET system at Sandia National Laboratory. The HIGHWAY 3.3 code was used to analyze routing scenarios, and the RADTRAN 4 code was used to analyze incident free and accident risks of transporting radiological materials. Loading accidents were assessed using the Savannah River Site AXAIR89Q and RELEASE 2 codes.

  15. MELTER: A model of the thermal response of cargos transported in the Safe-Secure Trailer subject to fire environments for risk assessment applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, M.E.

    1994-08-01

    MELTER is an analysis of cargo responses inside a fire-threatened Safe-Secure Trailer (SST) developed for the Defense Program Transportation Risk Assessment (DPTRA). Many simplifying assumptions are required to make the subject problem tractable. MELTER incorporates modeling which balances the competing requirements of execution speed, generality, completeness of essential physics, and robustness. Input parameters affecting the analysis include those defining the fire scenario, those defining the cargo loaded in the SST, and those defining properties of the SST. For a specified fire, SST, and cargo geometry MELTER predicts the critical fire duration that will lead to a failure. The principal features of the analysis include: (a) Geometric considerations to interpret fire-scenario descriptors in terms of a thermal radiation boundary condition, (b) a simple model of the SST`s wall combining the diffusion model for radiation through optically-thick media with an endothermic reaction front to describe the charring of dimensional, rigid foam in the SST wall, (c) a transient radiation enclosure model, (d) a one-dimensional, spherical idealization of the shipped cargos providing modularity so that cargos of interest can be inserted into the model, and (e) associated numerical methods to integrate coupled, differential equations and find roots.

  16. RTSTEP regional transportation simulation tool for emergency planning - final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ley, H.; Sokolov, V.; Hope, M.; Auld, J.; Zhang, K.; Park, Y.; Kang, X.

    2012-01-20

    Large-scale evacuations from major cities during no-notice events - such as chemical or radiological attacks, hazardous material spills, or earthquakes - have an obvious impact on large regions rather than on just the directly affected area. The scope of impact includes the accommodation of emergency evacuation traffic throughout a very large area; the planning of resources to respond appropriately to the needs of the affected population; the placement of medical supplies and decontamination equipment; and the assessment and determination of primary escape routes, as well as routes for incoming emergency responders. Compared to events with advance notice, such as evacuations based on hurricanes approaching an affected area, the response to no-notice events relies exclusively on pre-planning and general regional emergency preparedness. Another unique issue is the lack of a full and immediate understanding of the underlying threats to the population, making it even more essential to gain extensive knowledge of the available resources, the chain of command, and established procedures. Given the size of the area affected, an advanced understanding of the regional transportation systems is essential to help with the planning for such events. The objectives of the work described here (carried out by Argonne National Laboratory) is the development of a multi-modal regional transportation model that allows for the analysis of different evacuation scenarios and emergency response strategies to build a wealth of knowledge that can be used to develop appropriate regional emergency response plans. The focus of this work is on the effects of no-notice evacuations on the regional transportation network, as well as the response of the transportation network to the sudden and unusual demand. The effects are dynamic in nature, with scenarios changing potentially from minute to minute. The response to a radiological or chemical hazard will be based on the time-delayed dispersion of such materials over a large area, with responders trying to mitigate the immediate danger to the population in a variety of ways that may change over time (e.g., in-place evacuation, staged evacuations, and declarations of growing evacuation zones over time). In addition, available resources will be marshaled in unusual ways, such as the repurposing of transit vehicles to support mass evacuations. Thus, any simulation strategy will need to be able to address highly dynamic effects and will need to be able to handle any mode of ground transportation. Depending on the urgency and timeline of the event, emergency responders may also direct evacuees to leave largely on foot, keeping roadways as clear as possible for emergency responders, logistics, mass transport, and law enforcement. This RTSTEP project developed a regional emergency evacuation modeling tool for the Chicago Metropolitan Area that emergency responders can use to pre-plan evacuation strategies and compare different response strategies on the basis of a rather realistic model of the underlying complex transportation system. This approach is a significant improvement over existing response strategies that are largely based on experience gained from small-scale events, anecdotal evidence, and extrapolation to the scale of the assumed emergency. The new tool will thus add to the toolbox available to emergency response planners to help them design appropriate generalized procedures and strategies that lead to an improved outcome when used during an actual event.

  17. Interventional Radiology of Male Varicocele: Current Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iaccarino, Vittorio Venetucci, Pietro

    2012-12-15

    Varicocele is a fairly common condition in male individuals. Although a minor disease, it may cause infertility and testicular pain. Consequently, it has high health and social impact. Here we review the current status of interventional radiology of male varicocele. We describe the radiological anatomy of gonadal veins and the clinical aspects of male varicocele, particularly the physical examination, which includes a new clinical and ultrasound Doppler maneuver. The surgical and radiological treatment options are also described with the focus on retrograde and antegrade sclerotherapy, together with our long experience with these procedures. Last, we compare the outcomes, recurrence and persistence rates, complications, procedure time and cost-effectiveness of each method. It clearly emerges from this analysis that there is a need for randomized multicentre trials designed to compare the various surgical and percutaneous techniques, all of which are aimed at occlusion of the anterior pampiniform plexus.

  18. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1999-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

  19. Future of Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation In the coming decades, transportation in the U.S. is expected to change radically in response to environmental constraints, fluctuating oil availability and economic factors. Future Decision-Makers The transportation systems that emerge in the 21 st century will be defined largely by the choices, skills and imaginations of today's youth. Future Workforce As scientists and engineers, they will develop new vehicle and fuel technologies. As citizens, they will make decisions

  20. OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2 7% d &y / 7 ORNL/TM- 10076 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL ~-T-m -~=- -~ w-~- -"" * ,<.~- ~w&$UREMENTs: TAKEN IN THE NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK, AREA (NF002) J. K. Williams B. A. Berven ~.~~;:;-~~~ ~. -,' - ~~ 7, OPERATED BY MARTIN MARIDTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC, FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY --... ORNL/TM-10076 HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Nuclear and Chemical Waste Programs (Activity No. AH 10 05 00 0; ONLWCOI) RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL

  1. Radiological Safety Analysis Computer Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-08-28

    RSAC-6 is the latest version of the RSAC program. It calculates the consequences of a release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. Using a personal computer, a user can generate a fission product inventory; decay and in-grow the inventory during transport through processes, facilities, and the environment; model the downwind dispersion of the activity; and calculate doses to downwind individuals. Internal dose from the inhalation and ingestion pathways is calculated. External dose from ground surface andmore » plume gamma pathways is calculated. New and exciting updates to the program include the ability to evaluate a release to an enclosed room, resuspension of deposited activity and evaluation of a release up to 1 meter from the release point. Enhanced tools are included for dry deposition, building wake, occupancy factors, respirable fraction, AMAD adjustment, updated and enhanced radionuclide inventory and inclusion of the dose-conversion factors from FOR 11 and 12.« less

  2. Fifth Anniversary of Radiological Alarm Response Training for...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios...

  3. Recent Developments in Field Response for Mitigation of Radiological...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PAGs to quickly determine if protective actions are warranted. I.e can certain roads, bridges or metro systems be used, can the public return to their homes or businesses, can the...

  4. Radiological Scoping Survey of the Scotia Depot, Scotia, NY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, E. N.

    2008-02-25

    The objectives of the radiological scoping survey were to collect adequate field data for use in evaluating the radiological condition of Scotia Depot land areas, warehouses, and support buildings.

  5. Transportation Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transportation-research TRACC RESEARCH Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Structural Mechanics Transportation Systems Modeling Transportation Research Current Research Overview The U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) has established its only high-performance computing and engineering analysis research facility at Argonne National Laboratory to provide applications support in key areas of applied research and development for the USDOT community. The Transportation Research and

  6. Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    NNSA presentation on Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant from May 13, 2011

  7. Los Alamos National Security Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Phase II | Department of Energy Los Alamos National Security Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II Los Alamos National Security Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II Los Alamos National Security Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II PDF icon Los Alamos National Security Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II More Documents & Publications Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Office Corrective Action Plan -

  8. ORISE: Radiological Terrorism Toolkit | How ORISE is Making a Difference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiological Terrorism Toolkit ORISE partners with CDC to develop Radiological Terrorism: A Toolkit for Public Health Officials Radiological Terrorism: A Toolkit for Public Health Officials How ORISE is Making a Difference Working closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) distributed more than 400 radiological terrorism toolkits filled with key resources, such as training guidelines, clinical directives, details

  9. Accident Investigation Report - Radiological Release | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report - Radiological Release On February 14, 2014, an airborne radiological release occurred at the Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Because access to the underground was restricted following the event, the investigation was broken into two phases. The Phase 1 report focused on how the radiological material was released into the atmosphere and Phase 2, performed once limited access to the underground

  10. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radiation Protection Standards Study Guide 1.09-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Protection Standards Module Number: 1.09 Objectives: 1.09.01 Identify the role of advisory agencies in the development of recommendations for radiological control. 1.09.02 Identify the role of regulatory agencies in the development of standards and regulations for radiological control. 1.09.03 Identify the scope of 10 CFR Part 835. References: 1. ANL-88-26 (1988)

  11. DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Overheads

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6.1 DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Overhead 6.1 Radiological Aspects of Uranium Objectives: * Identify the radiological properties of uranium. * Describe the toxicological properties and behavior of uranium. * Identify appropriate instrumentation, measurement techniques, and special radiological survey methods for uranium. OT 6.2 DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Overhead 6.2 Radiological Aspects of Uranium (cont.) Objectives: * Describe personnel protection requirements, external dose control techniques, and internal

  12. Radiological/biological/aerosol removal system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haslam, Jeffery J

    2015-03-17

    An air filter replacement system for existing buildings, vehicles, arenas, and other enclosed airspaces includes a replacement air filter for replacing a standard air filter. The replacement air filter has dimensions and air flow specifications that allow it to replace the standard air filter. The replacement air filter includes a filter material that removes radiological or biological or aerosol particles.

  13. Environmental Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance U.S. Department of Energy AREA ENVR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1216-2015 NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-HDBK-1216-2015 iii TABLE OF CONTENTS PARAGRAPH PAGE 1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Objectives

  14. Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling: Challenges of the Fukushima Daiichi Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugiyama, Gayle; Nasstrom, John; Pobanz, Brenda; Foster, Kevin; Simpson, Matthew; Vogt, Phil; Aluzzi, Fernando; Homann, Steve

    2012-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provided a wide range of predictions and analyses as part of the response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This work encompassed: weather forecasts and atmospheric transport predictions, estimates of possible dose in Japan based on hypothetical U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission scenarios of potential radionuclide releases, predictions of possible plume arrival times and dose levels at U.S. locations, and source estimation and plume model refinement. An overview of NARAC response activities is provided, along with a more in-depth discussion of some of NARAC’s preliminary source reconstruction analyses. NARAC optimized the overall agreement of model predictions to dose rate measurements using statistical comparisons of data and model values paired in space and time. Estimated emission rates varied depending on the choice of release assumptions (e.g., time-varying vs. constant release rates), the radionuclide mix, meteorology, and/or the radiological data used in the analysis. Results were found to be consistent with other studies within expected uncertainties, despite the application of different source estimation methodologies and the use of significantly different radiological measurement data. A discussion of some of the operational and scientific challenges encountered during the response, along with recommendations for future work, is provided.

  15. Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urbatsch, Todd James

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Penn Central Transportation Co - PA 06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Central Transportation Co - PA 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Penn Central Transportation Co. (PA.06) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Documents Related to Penn Central Transportation Co.

  17. Paint for detection of radiological or chemical agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Brunk, James L. (Martinez, CA); Day, Sumner Daniel (Danville, CA)

    2010-08-24

    A paint that warns of radiological or chemical substances comprising a paint operatively connected to the surface, an indicator material carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances, and a thermo-activation material carried by the paint. In one embodiment, a method of warning of radiological or chemical substances comprising the steps of painting a surface with an indicator material, and monitoring the surface for indications of the radiological or chemical substances. In another embodiment, a paint is operatively connected to a vehicle and an indicator material is carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances.

  18. Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan- Radiological Release Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose ofthis Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to specify U.S. Departme~t of Energy (DOE) actions for addressing Office of Environmental Management (EM) Headquarters (HQ) issues identified in the Accident Investigation Report for the Phase 2: Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) on February 14, 2014. The report identified 24 Conclusions and 40 Judgments of Need (JONs). Six of the Conclusions and five of the JONs were determined to be associated with EM HQ oversight of the operations. As such, EM HQ has taken the action to develop the CAP for those JONs specific to HQ (i.e., JONs 6,30,31 ,37 and 40). This report documents those corrective actions, along with the responsible office and due dates for completing the actions.

  19. NV/YMP RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL MANUAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE; BECHTEL NEVADA

    2004-11-01

    This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and the Yucca Mountain Office of Repository Development (YMORD). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835), Occupational Radiation Protection. Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Pleasanton, California; and at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, field work by NNSA/NSO at other locations is also covered by this manual.

  20. The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer Program (RSAC-5) user`s manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenzel, D.R.

    1994-02-01

    The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer Program (RSAC-5) calculates the consequences of the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. Using a personal computer, a user can generate a fission product inventory from either reactor operating history or nuclear criticalities. RSAC-5 models the effects of high-efficiency particulate air filters or other cleanup systems and calculates decay and ingrowth during transport through processes, facilities, and the environment. Doses are calculated through the inhalation, immersion, ground surface, and ingestion pathways. RSAC+, a menu-driven companion program to RSAC-5, assists users in creating and running RSAC-5 input files. This user`s manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for RSAC-5 and RSAC+. Instructions, screens, and examples are provided to guide the user through the functions provided by RSAC-5 and RSAC+. These programs are designed for users who are familiar with radiological dose assessment methods.

  1. Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radiological Control Managers’ Council

    2012-03-26

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of low-level radioactive waste and the handling of radioactive sources. Remediation of contaminated land areas may also result in radiological exposures.

  2. Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reaffirmation August 2002 Change Notice 1 December 2004 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy,

  3. Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Change Notice 2 with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800)

  4. Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    145-2008 April 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public

  5. Fixation of Radiological Contamination; International Collaborative Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rick Demmer

    2013-03-01

    A cooperative international project was conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) to integrate a capture coating with a high performance atomizing process. The initial results were promising, and lead to further trials. The somewhat longer testing and optimization process has resulted in a product that could be demonstrated in the field to reduce airborne radiological dust and contamination.

  6. eFRMAC Overview: Data Management and Enabling Technologies for Characterization of a Radiological Release A Case Study: The Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenthal, Daniel J.; Clark, Harvey W.; Essex, James J.; Wagner, Eric C.

    2013-07-01

    The eFRMAC enterprise is a suite of technologies and software developed by the United States Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Emergency Response to coordinate the rapid data collection, management, and analysis required during a radiological emergency. This enables the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center assets to evaluate a radiological or nuclear incident efficiently to facilitate protective actions to protect public health and the environment. This document identifies and describes eFRMAC methods including (1) data acquisition, (2) data management, (3) data analysis, (4) product creation, (5) quality control, and (6) dissemination.

  7. Beam Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam Transport Beam Transport A simplified drawing of the beam transport system from the linac to Target-1 (Lujan Center), Target-2 (Blue Room) and Target-4 is shown below. In usual operation beam is transported from the linac through the pulsed Ring Injection Kicker (RIKI) magnet. When RIKI is switched on, the beam is injected into the storage ring with the time structure shown here. The beam is accumulated in the PSR and then transported to Target-1. beam_transport1 Simplified drawing of the

  8. First Responder Initial Response Procedure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this response flow chart is to provide first responders with guidance for response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material.

  9. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 1, Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31

    The Monitoring division is primarily responsible for the coordination and direction of: Aerial measurements to delineate the footprint of radioactive contaminants that have been released into the environment. Monitoring of radiation levels in the environment; Sampling to determine the extent of contaminant deposition in soil, water, air and on vegetation; Preliminary field analyses to quantify soil concentrations or depositions; and Environmental and personal dosimetry for FRMAC field personnel, during a Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) and Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response. Monitoring and sampling techniques used during CM/FRMAC operations are specifically selected for use during radiological emergencies where large numbers of measurements and samples must be acquired, analyzed, and interpreted in the shortest amount of time possible. In addition, techniques and procedures are flexible so that they can be used during a variety of different scenarios; e.g., accidents involving releases from nuclear reactors, contamination by nuclear waste, nuclear weapon accidents, space vehicle reentries, or contamination from a radiological dispersal device. The Monitoring division also provides technicians to support specific Health and Safety Division activities including: The operation of the Hotline; FRMAC facility surveys; Assistance with Health and Safety at Check Points; and Assistance at population assembly areas which require support from the FRMAC. This volume covers deployment activities, initial FRMAC activities, development and implementation of the monitoring and assessment plan, the briefing of field teams, and the transfer of FRMAC to the EPA.

  10. WIPP Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transuranic Waste Transportation Container Documents Documents related to transuranic waste containers and packages. CBFO Tribal Program Information about WIPP shipments across tribal lands. Transportation Centralized Procurement Program - The Centralized Procurement Program provides a common method to procure standard items used in the packaging and handling of transuranic wasted destined for WIPP. Transuranic Waste Transportation Routes - A map showing transuranic waste generator sites and

  11. MODARIA: Modelling and Data for Radiological Impact Assessment Context and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Overview | Department of Energy MODARIA: Modelling and Data for Radiological Impact Assessment Context and Overview MODARIA: Modelling and Data for Radiological Impact Assessment Context and Overview Presentation from the 2015 Annual Performance and Risk Assessment (P&RA) Community of Practice (CoP) Technical Exchange Meeting held in Richland, Washington on December 15-16, 2015. PDF icon MODARIA: Modelling and Data for Radiological Impact Assessment Context and Overview More Documents

  12. Anniversary of Fire, Radiological Events Marks Major Progress at WIPP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 12, 2016 Anniversary of Fire, Radiological Events Marks Major Progress at WIPP February 2016 marks two years since the underground fire and radiological release events forced the temporary closure of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Since that time much progress has been made in the recovery of the underground including mine stability and habitability, initial panel closure, radiological risk remediation and the addition of

  13. Nuclear and Radiological Field Training Center | Y-12 National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex ... Nuclear and Radiological Field Training Center A site used for nuclear research in Oak Ridge, Tennessee during the Manhattan Project is now the Y-12 National Security Complex's Nuclear and Radiological Field Training Center - the only facility of its kind in the world. The Center provides world-class nuclear and radiological training in a safe, secure, realistic environment using expert instruction and personnel to serve as observers/evaluators for customer training. For military

  14. 2012 Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Presentations |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Presentations 2012 Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Presentations 2012 Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Presentations PDF icon November 2012; Environmental Measurements in an Emergency: This is not a Drill!; Stephen V. Musolino; Brookhaven National Laboratory PDF icon November 2012; Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) D&D Presentation for the DOE ERAD Working

  15. Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) The Environmental Radiological Assistance Directory or ERAD, developed by AU-22, serves as an assistance tool to the DOE complex for protection of the public and environment from radiation. The ERAD is a combination webinar/conference call, designed to provide DOE and its contractors a forum to share information, lessons-learned, best practices, emerging trends, compliance

  16. EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas Summary This Programmatic EA evaluates alternatives for the management of scrap metal originating from DOE radiological control areas, including the proposed action to allow for the recycle of uncontaminated scrap metal that meets the requirements of DOE Order 458.1. (Metals with volumetric radioactive contamination are not included in

  17. Surface Contamination Guidelines/Radiological Clearance of Property |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Surface Contamination Guidelines/Radiological Clearance of Property Surface Contamination Guidelines/Radiological Clearance of Property Authorized limits govern the control and clearance of personal and real property. They are radionuclide concentrations or activity levels approved by DOE to permit the clearance of property from DOE radiological control for either restricted or unrestricted use, consistent with DOE's radiation protection framework and standards for the

  18. Accident Investigations of the February 14, 2014, Radiological Release at

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, NM | Department of Energy Accident Investigations of the February 14, 2014, Radiological Release at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, NM Accident Investigations of the February 14, 2014, Radiological Release at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, NM February 14, 2014 Accident Investigations of the February 14, 2014, Radiological Release at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, NM On February 14, 2014, at approximately 2314

  19. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9 Radiological Control Technician Training Fundamental Academic Training Instructor's Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los

  20. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9 Radiological Control Technician Training Fundamental Academic Training Study Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National

  1. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Site Academic Training Study Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National

  2. Transportation Fuel Supply | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SheetsTransportation Fuel Supply content top Transportation Fuel Supply

  3. DOE Issues WIPP Radiological Release Phase II Investigation Report...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    radiological event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. ... second from left, receives the New Mexico Patriotic Employer Award from the N.M. ...

  4. Nuclear and Radiological Field Training Center | Y-12 National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Nuclear and Radiological Field Training Center A site used for nuclear research in Oak Ridge, Tennessee during the Manhattan Project is now the Y-12 National Security Complex's...

  5. An Assessment Of The External Radiological Impact In Areas Of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Assessment Of The External Radiological Impact In Areas Of Greece With Elevated Natural Radioactivity Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  6. ORISE: Radiological Terrorism Toolkit | How ORISE is Making a...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education (ORISE) distributed more than 400 radiological terrorism toolkits filled with key resources, such as training guidelines, clinical directives, details about radioactive...

  7. Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    radiological release occurred at the Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Because access to the underground was restricted following...

  8. Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage ...

  9. The New Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    None File Format: Microsoft Windows WMV File Size: 19 Kb Video of Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL) Editorial Date December 7, 2011 By Danielle Miller...

  10. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients.

  11. Radiological Dose Calculations for Fusion Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Abbott; Lee C. Cadwallader; David A. Petti

    2003-04-01

    This report summarizes the results and rationale for radiological dose calculations for the maximally exposed individual during fusion accident conditions. Early doses per unit activity (Sieverts per TeraBecquerel) are given for 535 magnetic fusion isotopes of interest for several release scenarios. These data can be used for accident assessment calculations to determine if the accident consequences exceed Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Department of Energy evaluation guides. A generalized yearly dose estimate for routine releases, based on 1 Terabecquerel unit releases per radionuclide, has also been performed using averaged site parameters and assumed populations. These routine release data are useful for assessing designs against US Environmental Protection Agency yearly release limits.

  12. Radiological Control Programs for Special Tritium Compounds

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    84-2004 SEPTEMBER 2004 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 Date June 2006 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL PROGRAMS FOR SPECIAL TRITIUM COMPOUNDS U.S. Department of Energy AREA OCSH Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii Table of Changes Page Change 67 (near bottom) In row 1, column 2 of the table titled "dosimetric properties" 6 mrem was changed to 6 x 10 -2 mrem Available on the Department of Energy

  13. Radiological Control Programs for Special Tritium Compounds

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE.F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: May 11, 2006 REPLY TO EH-52:JRabovsky:3-2 135 ATTN OF: APPROVAL OF CHANGE NOTICE 1 TO DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) SUBJECT. HANDBOOK 1184-2004, RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL PROGRAMS FOR SPECIAL TRITIUM COMPOUNDS TO: Dennis Kubicki, EH-24 Technical Standards Manager This memorandum forwards the subject Change Notice 1 to DOE Handbook, DOE- HDBK- 1184-2004, which has approved for publication and distribution. The change to

  14. Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1145-2013 March 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities U.S. Department of Energy TRNG-0061 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the

  15. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Exercise Overview |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Exercise Overview Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Exercise Overview PDF icon Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Exercise Overview More Documents & Publications Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program - Making A Difference DOE Efforts in Preparing and Improving First Response Capabilities and Performance through Drills and Exercises Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program

  16. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Carol J.

    1998-01-01

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H.sup.- beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H.sup.- beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H.sup.- beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H.sup.- beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H.sup.- beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H.sup.- beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser.

  17. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnstone, C.J.

    1998-06-02

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H{sup {minus}} beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H{sup {minus}} beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H{sup {minus}} beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H{sup {minus}} beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H{sup {minus}} beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H{sup {minus}} beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser. 9 figs.

  18. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Plan, U.S. Department of Energy Region 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsha Keister

    2010-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Region 6 Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Plan (TEPP Plan) operates within the framework of the DOE emergency management system for developing, coordinating, and directing emergency planning, preparedness, and readiness assurance activities for radiological transportation incidents. The DOE Region 6 TEPP Plan is a narrative description of the DOE Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program activities, training and technical assistance provided to states and tribes along DOE's transportation corridors in DOE Region 6.

  19. Nuclear and Radiological Forensics and Attribution Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D K; Niemeyer, S

    2005-11-04

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Nuclear and Radiological Forensics and Attribution Program is to develop the technical capability for the nation to rapidly, accurately, and credibly attribute the origins and pathways of interdicted or collected materials, intact nuclear devices, and radiological dispersal devices. A robust attribution capability contributes to threat assessment, prevention, and deterrence of nuclear terrorism; it also supports the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in its investigative mission to prevent and respond to nuclear terrorism. Development of the capability involves two major elements: (1) the ability to collect evidence and make forensic measurements, and (2) the ability to interpret the forensic data. The Program leverages the existing capability throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory complex in a way that meets the requirements of the FBI and other government users. At the same time the capability is being developed, the Program also conducts investigations for a variety of sponsors using the current capability. The combination of operations and R&D in one program helps to ensure a strong linkage between the needs of the user community and the scientific development.

  20. Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-11-18

    Establishes requirements and responsibilities for management of Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration, materials transportation and packaging and ensures the safe, secure, efficient packaging and transportation of materials, both hazardous and non-hazardous.

  1. Radiological Security Partnership | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiological Security ... Radiological Security Partnership The mp4 video format is not supported by this browser. Download video Captions: On Time: 4:36 min. This voluntary program provides government-funded security enhancements at sites with radioactive materials of concern

  2. Greening Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Goal 2: Greening Transportation LANL supports and encourages employees to reduce their personal greenhouse gas emissions by offering various commuting and work schedule options. Our goal is to reduce emissions related to employee travel and commuting to and from work by 13 percent. Energy Conservation» Efficient Water Use & Management» High Performance Sustainable Buildings» Greening Transportation» Green Purchasing & Green Technology» Pollution Prevention» Science

  3. Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Transportation Energyadmin2015-05-14T22:34:50+00:00 Transportation Energy The national-level objective for the future is to create a carbon-neutral fleet that is powered by low-carbon US sources. Sandia delivers advanced technologies and design tools to the broad transportation sector in the following areas: Predictive Simulation of Engines Fuel sprays and their transition from the liquid to gas phase and computationally tractable models that capture the physics of combustion. Convergence of

  4. Sustainable Transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

  5. Recovery from chemical, biological, and radiological incidents :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franco, David Oliver; Yang, Lynn I.; Hammer, Ann E.

    2012-06-01

    To restore regional lifeline services and economic activity as quickly as possible after a chemical, biological or radiological incident, emergency planners and managers will need to prioritize critical infrastructure across many sectors for restoration. In parallel, state and local governments will need to identify and implement measures to promote reoccupation and economy recovery in the region. This document provides guidance on predisaster planning for two of the National Disaster Recovery Framework Recovery Support Functions: Infrastructure Systems and Economic Recovery. It identifies key considerations for infrastructure restoration, outlines a process for prioritizing critical infrastructure for restoration, and identifies critical considerations for promoting regional economic recovery following a widearea disaster. Its goal is to equip members of the emergency preparedness community to systematically prioritize critical infrastructure for restoration, and to develop effective economic recovery plans in preparation for a widearea CBR disaster.

  6. 2013 Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD) Presentations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    November 2013 Derived Intervention and Response Levels for Tritium Oxide at the Savannah River Site May 2013 THE MARSAME METHODOLOGY Fundamentals, Benefits, and Applications March 2013 Working to Keep our Shipments Safe, Secure and Economical ANL Facility Decommissioning Training Program January 2013 DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program Radiological Reporting Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) & HSS Environmental and Radiation Protection Performance Dashboards November 2012 Environmental Measurements in an Emergency: This is not a Drill! BGRR D&D Presentation for the DOE ERAD Working Group September 2012 Development of Authorized Limits for Portsmouth Oil Inventory Disposition Development of Authorized Limits for Portsmouth Oil Inventory Disposition Development of Authorized Limits for Portsmouth Oil Inventory Disposition Clearance of Real and Personal Property Under DOE Radiation Protection Directive DOE Order 458.1 June 2012 RESRAD Codes for ERAD June 27, 2012 Florida International University (FIU) D&D Knowledge Management Information Tool, June 27, 2012 May 2012 Integrated Cloud Based Environmental Data Management System DOE Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment

  7. Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan- Radiological Release Phase I

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to specify U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) actions for addressing Office of Environmental Management (EM) Headquarters (HQ) issues identified in the Accident Investigation Report for the Phase 1: Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) on February 14, 2014. The report identified 31 Conclusions and 47 Judgments of Need (JON). Twelve of the Conclusions and ten of the JONs were determined to be associated with DOE HQ oversight of the operations. As such, EM HQ has taken the action to develop the CAP for those JONs specific to HQ (i.e., JONs 11, 13, 23, 25, 26, 32, 44-47). This report documents those corrective actions, along with the responsible office and due dates for completing the actions. The overall approval process for the CAPs associated with this event will involve both the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and EM HQ offices. Specifically, CBFO will approve the NWP CAP (with EM HQ concurrence); EM HQ Office of Safety, Security, and Quality Programs (EM-40) will approve the CBFO CAP; and the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM-1) will approve the EM HQ CAP.

  8. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technican Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radiological Work Coverage Study Guide 2.11-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Work Coverage Module Number: 2.11 Objectives: 2.11.01 List four purposes of job coverage. 2.11.02 Explain the differences between continuous and intermittent job coverage. 2.11.03 Given example conditions, identify those that should require job coverage. 2.11.04 Identify items that should be considered in planning job coverage. 2.11.05 Identify examples of information that

  9. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radiological Work Coverage Instructor's Guide 2.11-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Work Coverage Module Number: 2.11 Objectives: 2.11.01 List four purposes of job coverage. 2.11.02 Explain the differences between continuous and intermittent job coverage. 2.11.03 Given example conditions, identify those that should require job coverage. 2.11.04 Identify items that should be considered in planning job coverage. 2.11.05 Identify examples of information

  10. Radiological Risk Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-08-05

    Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document develops plausible and/or likely scenarios, including the identification of likely radioactive materials and quantities of those radioactive materials to be involved. These include 60Co, 90Sr, 137Cs, 192Ir, 226Ra, plutonium, and 241Am. Two broad categories of scenarios are considered. The first category includes events that may be suspected from the outset, such as an explosion of a "dirty bomb" in downtown Seattle. The explosion would most likely be heard, but the type of explosion (e.g., sewer methane gas or RDD) may not be immediately known. Emergency first responders must be able to quickly detect the radioisotopes previously listed, assess the situation, and deploy a response to contain and mitigate (if possible) detrimental effects resulting from the incident. In such scenarios, advance notice of about an hour or two might be available before any contaminated wastewater reaches a treatment plant. The second category includes events that could go initially undetected by emergency personnel. Examples of such a scenario would be the inadvertent or surreptitious introduction of radioactive material into the sewer system. Intact rogue radioactive sources from industrial radiography devices, well-logging apparatus, or moisture density gages may get into wastewater and be carried to a treatment plant. Other scenarios might include a terrorist deliberately putting a dispersible radioactive material into wastewater. Alternatively, a botched terrorism preparation of an RDD may result in radioactive material entering wastewater without anyone's knowledge. Drinking water supplies may also be contaminated, with the result that some or most of the radioactivity ends up in wastewater.

  11. Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Corrective Action Plan- Radiological Release Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On March 22, 2015, the Department of Energy established an Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Office (EM-LA) responsible for management of the environmental restoration and the legacy waste management programs at LANL. The NA-LA continues with the responsibility for the management of LANL's national security mission and the enduring waste management program (newly generated waste). As a result of this delineation in responsibilities, this corrective action plan was prepared collaboratively between NA-LA and EM-LA Field Offices, with joint responsibility for addressing the Judgement of Needs (JONs) identified in the Accident Investigation Board Accident Investigation Report, Phase 2 Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, February 14, 2014, dated April 2015.

  12. Resolving the mystery of transport within internal transport barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staebler, G. M.; Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.; Greenfield, C. M.; Lao, L. L.; Smith, S. P.; Kinsey, J. E.; Grierson, B. A.; Chrystal, C.

    2014-05-15

    The Trapped Gyro-Landau Fluid (TGLF) quasi-linear model [G. M. Staebler, et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 102508 (2005)], which is calibrated to nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations, is now able to predict the electron density, electron and ion temperatures, and ion toroidal rotation simultaneously for internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges. This is a strong validation of gyrokinetic theory of ITBs, requiring multiple instabilities responsible for transport in different channels at different scales. The mystery of transport inside the ITB is that momentum and particle transport is far above the predicted neoclassical levels in apparent contradiction with the expectation from the theory of suppression of turbulence by E×B velocity shear. The success of TGLF in predicting ITB transport is due to the inclusion of ion gyro-radius scale modes that become dominant at high E×B velocity shear and to improvements to TGLF that allow momentum transport from gyrokinetic turbulence to be faithfully modeled.

  13. Adaptively Reevaluated Bayesian Localization (ARBL): A Novel Technique for Radiological Source Localization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Erin A.; Robinson, Sean M.; Anderson, Kevin K.; McCall, Jonathon D.; Prinke, Amanda M.; Webster, Jennifer B.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

    2015-06-01

    Adaptively Reevaluated Bayesian Localization (ARBL): A Novel Technique for Radiological Source Localization

  14. INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION ON RADIOLOGICAL THREAT REDUCTION PROGRAMS IN RUSSIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landers, Christopher C.; Tatyrek, Aaron P.

    2009-10-07

    Since its inception in 2004, the United States Department of Energy’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has provided the Russian Federation with significant financial and technical assistance to secure its highly vulnerable and dangerous radiological material. The three program areas of this assistance are the removal of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG), the physical protection of vulnerable in-use radiological material of concern, and the recovery of disused or abandoned radiological material of concern. Despite the many successes of the GTRI program in Russia, however, there is still a need for increased international cooperation in these efforts. Furthermore, concerns exist over how the Russian government will ensure that the security of its radiological materials provided through GTRI will be sustained. This paper addresses these issues and highlights the successes of GTRI efforts and ongoing activities.

  15. Autonomous mobile robot for radiologic surveys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dudar, Aed M.; Wagner, David G.; Teese, Gregory D.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for conducting radiologic surveys. The apparatus comprises in the main a robot capable of following a preprogrammed path through an area, a radiation monitor adapted to receive input from a radiation detector assembly, ultrasonic transducers for navigation and collision avoidance, and an on-board computer system including an integrator for interfacing the radiation monitor and the robot. Front and rear bumpers are attached to the robot by bumper mounts. The robot may be equipped with memory boards for the collection and storage of radiation survey information. The on-board computer system is connected to a remote host computer via a UHF radio link. The apparatus is powered by a rechargeable 24-volt DC battery, and is stored at a docking station when not in use and/or for recharging. A remote host computer contains a stored database defining paths between points in the area where the robot is to operate, including but not limited to the locations of walls, doors, stationary furniture and equipment, and sonic markers if used. When a program consisting of a series of paths is downloaded to the on-board computer system, the robot conducts a floor survey autonomously at any preselected rate. When the radiation monitor detects contamination, the robot resurveys the area at reduced speed and resumes its preprogrammed path if the contamination is not confirmed. If the contamination is confirmed, the robot stops and sounds an alarm.

  16. Mobile autonomous robotic apparatus for radiologic characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dudar, Aed M. (Dearborn, MI); Ward, Clyde R. (Aiken, SC); Jones, Joel D. (Aiken, SC); Mallet, William R. (Cowichan Bay, CA); Harpring, Larry J. (North Augusta, SC); Collins, Montenius X. (Blackville, SC); Anderson, Erin K. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A mobile robotic system that conducts radiological surveys to map alpha, beta, and gamma radiation on surfaces in relatively level open areas or areas containing obstacles such as stored containers or hallways, equipment, walls and support columns. The invention incorporates improved radiation monitoring methods using multiple scintillation detectors, the use of laser scanners for maneuvering in open areas, ultrasound pulse generators and receptors for collision avoidance in limited space areas or hallways, methods to trigger visible alarms when radiation is detected, and methods to transmit location data for real-time reporting and mapping of radiation locations on computer monitors at a host station. A multitude of high performance scintillation detectors detect radiation while the on-board system controls the direction and speed of the robot due to pre-programmed paths. The operators may revise the preselected movements of the robotic system by ethernet communications to remonitor areas of radiation or to avoid walls, columns, equipment, or containers. The robotic system is capable of floor survey speeds of from 1/2-inch per second up to about 30 inches per second, while the on-board processor collects, stores, and transmits information for real-time mapping of radiation intensity and the locations of the radiation for real-time display on computer monitors at a central command console.

  17. Autonomous mobile robot for radiologic surveys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dudar, A.M.; Wagner, D.G.; Teese, G.D.

    1994-06-28

    An apparatus is described for conducting radiologic surveys. The apparatus comprises in the main a robot capable of following a preprogrammed path through an area, a radiation monitor adapted to receive input from a radiation detector assembly, ultrasonic transducers for navigation and collision avoidance, and an on-board computer system including an integrator for interfacing the radiation monitor and the robot. Front and rear bumpers are attached to the robot by bumper mounts. The robot may be equipped with memory boards for the collection and storage of radiation survey information. The on-board computer system is connected to a remote host computer via a UHF radio link. The apparatus is powered by a rechargeable 24-volt DC battery, and is stored at a docking station when not in use and/or for recharging. A remote host computer contains a stored database defining paths between points in the area where the robot is to operate, including but not limited to the locations of walls, doors, stationary furniture and equipment, and sonic markers if used. When a program consisting of a series of paths is downloaded to the on-board computer system, the robot conducts a floor survey autonomously at any preselected rate. When the radiation monitor detects contamination, the robot resurveys the area at reduced speed and resumes its preprogrammed path if the contamination is not confirmed. If the contamination is confirmed, the robot stops and sounds an alarm. 5 figures.

  18. Mobile autonomous robotic apparatus for radiologic characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dudar, A.M.; Ward, C.R.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.; Harpring, L.J.; Collins, M.X.; Anderson, E.K.

    1999-08-10

    A mobile robotic system is described that conducts radiological surveys to map alpha, beta, and gamma radiation on surfaces in relatively level open areas or areas containing obstacles such as stored containers or hallways, equipment, walls and support columns. The invention incorporates improved radiation monitoring methods using multiple scintillation detectors, the use of laser scanners for maneuvering in open areas, ultrasound pulse generators and receptors for collision avoidance in limited space areas or hallways, methods to trigger visible alarms when radiation is detected, and methods to transmit location data for real-time reporting and mapping of radiation locations on computer monitors at a host station. A multitude of high performance scintillation detectors detect radiation while the on-board system controls the direction and speed of the robot due to pre-programmed paths. The operators may revise the preselected movements of the robotic system by ethernet communications to remonitor areas of radiation or to avoid walls, columns, equipment, or containers. The robotic system is capable of floor survey speeds of from 1/2-inch per second up to about 30 inches per second, while the on-board processor collects, stores, and transmits information for real-time mapping of radiation intensity and the locations of the radiation for real-time display on computer monitors at a central command console. 4 figs.

  19. Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Department of Energy (DOE) Notice N 234.1 Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources has been superseded by DOE Order O 231.1B Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. O 231.1B identifies the requirements for centralized inventory and transaction reporting for radioactive sealed sources. Each DOE site/facility operator that owns, possesses, uses or maintains in custody those accountable radioactive

  20. Portsmouth Training Exercise Helps Radiological Trainees Spot Mistakes

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Safely | Department of Energy Portsmouth Training Exercise Helps Radiological Trainees Spot Mistakes Safely Portsmouth Training Exercise Helps Radiological Trainees Spot Mistakes Safely February 11, 2016 - 12:10pm Addthis Connie Martin performs work inside the Error Lab while trainees observe her actions for mistakes. Connie Martin performs work inside the Error Lab while trainees observe her actions for mistakes. Lorrie Graham (left) talks with trainees in a classroom setting before

  1. Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe Guidelines

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on Endovascular Treatment in Aortoiliac Arterial Disease (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe Guidelines on Endovascular Treatment in Aortoiliac Arterial Disease Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe Guidelines on Endovascular Treatment in Aortoiliac Arterial Disease PurposeThese guidelines are intended for use in assessing the standard for technical success

  2. Hospital Triage in First Hours After Nuclear or Radiological Disaster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hospital Triage in the First 24 Hours after a Nuclear or Radiological Disaster Medical professionals with the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) authored an article that addresses the problems emergency physicians would likely face in the event of a nuclear or radiological catastrophe. The article specifically covers actions that would need to occur so that reasonable decisions are made during the critical

  3. DOE Subpart H Report. Annual NESHAPS Meeting on Radiological Emissions |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Subpart H Report. Annual NESHAPS Meeting on Radiological Emissions DOE Subpart H Report. Annual NESHAPS Meeting on Radiological Emissions Gustavo Vazquez*, DOE; Sandra Snyder, PNNL Abstract: The National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, (NESHAPs - Radioactive Air) meeting provides an opportunity for federal and state regulators, Department of Energy employees and contractors, standards developers, and industry representatives to work together

  4. DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Overheads

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    13.1 Overhead 13.1 DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Radiological Aspects of Accelerators Objectives: * Identify the general characteristics of accelerators. * Identify the types of particles accelerated. * Identify the two basic types of accelerators. * Identify uses for accelerators. * Define prompt radiation. * Identify prompt radiation sources. OT 13.2 Overhead 13.2 DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Radiological Aspects of Accelerators (cont.) Objectives: * Define radioactivation. * Explain how contaminated material

  5. Lessons learned by southern states in transportation of radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report has been prepared under a cooperative agreement with DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and is a summary of the lessons learned by southern states regarding the transportation of radioactive materials including High-Level Radioactive Wastes (HLRW) and Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF). Sources used in this publication include interviews of state radiological health and public safety officials that are members of the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) Advisory Committee on Radioactive Materials Transportation, as well as the Board`s Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transportation Working Group. Other sources include letters written by the above mentioned committees concerning various aspects of DOE shipment campaigns.

  6. Transportation Anslysis Simulation System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-08-23

    TRANSIMS version 3.1 is an integrated set of analytical and simulation models and supporting databases. The system is designed to create a virtual metropolitan region with representation of each of the region’s individuals, their activities and the transportation infrastructure they use. TRANSIMS puts into practice a new, disaggregate approach to travel demand modeling using agent-based micro-simulation technology. TRANSIMS methodology creates a virtual metropolitan region with representation of the transportation infrastructure and the population, at themore » level of households and individual travelers. Trips a planned to satisfy the population’s activity pattems at the individual traveler level. TRANSIMS then simulates the movement of travelers and vehicles across the transportation network using multiple modes, including car, transit, bike and walk, on a second-by-second basis. Metropolitan planners must plan growth of their cities according to the stringent transportation system planning requirements of the Interniodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and other similar laws and regulations. These require each state and its metropotitan regions to work together to develop short and long term transportation improvement plans. The plans must (1) estimate the future transportation needs for travelers and goods movements, (2) evaluate ways to manage and reduce congestion, (3) examine the effectiveness of building new roads and transit systems, and (4) limit the environmental impact of the various strategies. The needed consistent and accurate transportation improvement plans require an analytical capability that properly accounts for travel demand, human behavior, traffic and transit operations, major investments, and environmental effects. Other existing planning tools use aggregated information and representative behavior to predict average response and average use of transportation facilities. They do not account for individual traveler response to the dynamic transportation environment. In contrast, TRANSIMS provides disaggregated information that more explicitly represents the complex nature of humans interacting with the transportation system. It first generates a synthetic population that represents individuals and their households in the metropolitan region in a statistically valid way. The demographic makeup and spatial distribution of this synthetic population is derived from census data so that it matches that of the region’s real population. From survey data, a model is built of household and individual activities that may occur at home, in the workplace, school or shopping centers, for example. Trip plans including departure times, travel modes, and specific routes are created for each individual to get to his or her daily activities. TRANSIMS then simulates the movement of millions of individuals, following their trip plans throughout the transportation network, including their use of vehicles such as cars or buses, on a second-by-second basis. The virtual travel in TRANSIMS mimics the traveling and driving behavior of real people in the metropolitan region. The interactions of individual vehicles produce realistic traffic dynamics from which analysts can judge to performance of the transportation sysime and estimate vehicle emissions. Los Alamos, in cooperation with the Department of Transportation, Federal HIghway Administration and the local Metropolitan Planning Offices, has done TRANSIMS micro-simulations of auto traffic patterns in these two urban areas and completed associated scenario-based studies.« less

  7. Emergency Response Health Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mena, RaJah; Pemberton, Wendy; Beal, William

    2012-05-01

    Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health; however, there are major differences between health physics for research or occupational safety and health physics during a large-scale radiological emergency. The deployment of a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) monitoring and assessment team to Japan in the wake of the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant yielded a wealth of lessons on these difference. Critical teams (CMOC (Consequence Management Outside the Continental U.S.) and CMHT (Consequence Management Home Team) ) worked together to collect, compile, review, and analyze radiological data from Japan to support the response needs of and answer questions from the Government of Japan, the U.S. military in Japan, the U.S. Embassy and U.S. citizens in Japan, and U.S. citizens in America. This paper addresses the unique challenges presented to the health physicist or analyst of radiological data in a large-scale emergency. A key lesson learned was that public perception and the availability of technology with social media requires a diligent effort to keep the public informed of the science behind the decisions in a manner that is meaningful to them.

  8. Legacy Site Decontamination Experience as Applied to the Urban Radiological Dispersal Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, J.L.; MacKinney, J.A.

    2007-07-01

    Pursuant to the National Response Plan, Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex [1], the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is assigned lead agency responsibility for decontamination and clean-up efforts following a domestic terrorist event involving a radiological dispersal device (RDD). An RDD incident in a modern city environment poses many of the same issues and problems traditionally faced at 'legacy' clean up projects being performed across our country. However there are also many aspects associated with an urban RDD clean-up that have never been faced in legacy site remediation. For example, the demolition and destructive technologies widely used in legacy remediation would be unacceptable in the case of historically or architecturally significant properties or those with prohibitively high replacement cost; contaminated properties will likely belong to numerous small private entities whose business interests are at stake; reducing the time required to decontaminate and return a city to normal use cannot be overemphasized due to its tremendous economic and political impact. The mission of the EPA's National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC) includes developing the best technology and tools needed for field personnel to achieve their goals should that event occur. To that end, NHSRC has been exploring how the vast experience within the legacy site remediation community could be tapped to help meet this need, and to identify gaps in decontamination technology. This paper articulates much of what has been learned over the past year as a result of efforts to identify these technology and procedural needs to address the urban RDD. This includes comparing and contrasting remediation techniques and methodologies currently used in nuclear facility and site cleanup with those that would be needed following an urban RDD event. Finally, this presentation includes an appeal to the radiological decontamination community to come forward with ideas and technologies for consideration to help meet this nationally significant need. (authors)

  9. Alarm Response Training | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alarm Response Training Alarm Response Training The mp4 video format is not supported by this browser. Download video Captions: On Time: 4:04 min. View an introduction to our Alarm Response Training, which prepares and trains personnel responding to civilian nuclear and radiological security alarms

  10. Session 70 - Panel: Consequence Management of a Radiological Dispersion Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demmer, Rick; Lenox, Dave; Wilson, Pete; Schumann, Jean; Honerlah, Hans; Chen, S.Y.; Gwiazdowski, Gene

    2006-07-01

    This was an unusual panel session in that the panelists did not give presentations but responded to a tabletop exercise where they postulated decisions necessary after radiological dispersal device detonation event (dirty bomb). Articles in the daily WM'06 newsletter sought to prepare the participants for a simulated exercise involving the sighting of a known terrorist and the theft of radiological materials. During the slide presentation (in the form of a developing television news broadcast) the audience played decision makers and their 'votes' were tallied for multiple choice decisions and questions. After that was completed, the expert panel was asked to give their best responses for those decisions. The audience was allowed to ask questions and to give opinions as the panel responded. During the exercise the session co-chairs alternated announcing the events as they unfolded in the exercise and polled the audience using multiple-choice options for decisions to be made during the event. The answers to those questions were recorded and compared to the panelists' answers. The event chronology and decisions (audience questions) are shown in this report. - An explosion was reported at the Tucson International Airport (9:35 am). 1. Who is in charge? - Witnesses report 10-20 fatalities, 50 injured and massive damage to the airport, no cause determined yet (9:55 am). 2. IC's Next Action Should Be? - KRAD (local television station) Investigative News Reporters interviewed witnesses that observed a 25 foot U-Haul truck pull up onto the departure ramp just moments before the explosion (10:02 am). Terrorism has not been ruled out. 3. When is the incident declared a potential crime scene? - City of Tucson IC has ordered an evacuation of the airport to a holding area at a nearby long term parking area (10:10 am). No information has been given as to why the evacuation took place. The explosion is suspected to contain chemical, biological or radiological agents. County and State emergency operations centers have been activated. 4. Terrorism is suspected; next action is? - KRAD News has just learned that elevated levels of radiation have been detected at the airport and by the University of Arizona remote detectors (10:17 am). A 'dirty bomb' is now suspected. 5. What should the IC do next? - KRAD reporters have learned that dose rates are approximately 7.5 mR/hr gamma radiation in the short-term parking area (10:28 am). Experts attending a conference at the Tucson Convention Center state that these levels are not life threatening, but well above acceptable levels. 6. What does the IC do next? 7. Who is the coordinating agency? - Forensics indicate that the radioactive material used in the explosion at the Tucson Airport is apparently a mixture of high jacked low level waste from a nuclear facility and stolen radiation sources for medical or industrial purposes (11:21 am). The origin of the waste material is from an audience member's plant (assume it is your own material). 8. Who is responsible for surveys and characterization? 9. Who is responsible for the decontamination? 10. Where are the injured and contaminated victims treated? KRAD learned from the University of Arizona that the plume from the 'dirty bomb' elevated radiation levels above approved levels over a 3 square mile area downwind of the Tucson Airport (1:13 pm). People in the affected area are checking in at emergency rooms at the hospital to learn if they're in danger of radiation health affects. Gridlock has set in as panicked people are either leaving the area or headed for emergency rooms. 11. What should be done to help mitigate fears? DHS raises the National Terrorism Alert to Code Red (late afternoon). 12. What should your nuclear facility do next? 13. KRAD reporter contacts you at your nuclear facility and asks, 'Since title to the waste remains with your company, will your company cover the cost of the terrorist event including all decontamination and medical expenses? The results of the question were very interesting and stimulated quite a bit of discussion am

  11. Emergency Response | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Our Mission / Emergency Response Emergency Response NNSA's Office of Emergency Operations is the United States government's primary capability for radiological and nuclear emergency response and for providing security to the nation from the threat of nuclear terrorism. The Office of Emergency Operations maintains a high level of readiness for protecting and serving the U.S. and its allies through the development, implementation and coordination of programs and systems designed to serve as a last

  12. Emergency Response | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    About Us / Our Programs / Emergency Response Emergency Response NNSA's Office of Emergency Operations is the United States government's primary capability for radiological and nuclear emergency response and for providing security to the nation from the threat of nuclear terrorism. The Office of Emergency Operations maintains a high level of readiness for protecting and serving the U.S. and its allies through the development, implementation and coordination of programs and systems designed to

  13. Results of the radiological survey at Two Mile Creek, Tonawanda, New York (TNY002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, M.E.; Rodriguez, R.E.; Uziel, M.S.

    1997-08-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at Two Mile Creek, Tonawanda, New York. The survey was performed in November 1991 and May 1996. The purpose of the survey was to determine if radioactive materials from work performed under government contract at the Linde Air Products Division of Union Carbide Corporation, Tonawanda, New York, had been transported into the creek. The survey included a surface gamma scan in accessible areas near the creek and the collection of soil, sediment, and core samples for radionuclide analyses. Survey results indicate that no significant material originating at the Linde plant is presently in the creek. Three of the 1991 soil sample locations on the creek bank and one near the lake contained slightly elevated concentrations of {sup 238}U with radionuclide distributions similar to that found in materials resulting from former processing activities at the Linde site.

  14. Transportation System Concept of Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Slater-Thompson

    2006-08-16

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, authorized the DOE to develop and manage a Federal system for the disposal of SNF and HLW. OCRWM was created to manage acceptance and disposal of SNF and HLW in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. This responsibility includes managing the transportation of SNF and HLW from origin sites to the Repository for disposal. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is the core high-level OCRWM document written to describe the Transportation System integrated design and present the vision, mission, and goals for Transportation System operations. By defining the functions, processes, and critical interfaces of this system early in the system development phase, programmatic risks are minimized, system costs are contained, and system operations are better managed, safer, and more secure. This document also facilitates discussions and understanding among parties responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Transportation System. Such understanding is important for the timely development of system requirements and identification of system interfaces. Information provided in the Transportation System Concept of Operations includes: the functions and key components of the Transportation System; system component interactions; flows of information within the system; the general operating sequences; and the internal and external factors affecting transportation operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations reflects OCRWM's overall waste management system policies and mission objectives, and as such provides a description of the preferred state of system operation. The description of general Transportation System operating functions in the Transportation System Concept of Operations is the first step in the OCRWM systems engineering process, establishing the starting point for the lower level descriptions. of subsystems and components, and the Transportation System Requirements Document. Other program and system documents, plans, instructions, and detailed designs will be consistent with and informed by the Transportation System Concept of Operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is a living document, enduring throughout the OCRWM systems engineering lifecycle. It will undergo formal approval and controlled revisions as appropriate while the Transportation System matures. Revisions will take into account new policy decisions, new information available through system modeling, engineering investigations, technical analyses and tests, and the introduction of new technologies that can demonstrably improve system performance.

  15. Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1991-11-20

    The Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) is a real-time emergency response modeling capability designed to advise Emergency Managers of the path, timing, and projected impacts from an atmospheric release. TRAC evaluates the effects of both radiological and non-radiological hazardous substances, gases and particulates. Using available surface and upper air meteorological information, TRAC realistically treats complex sources and atmospheric conditions, such as those found in mountainous terrain. TRAC calculates atmospheric concentration, deposition, and dose for more thanmore »25,000 receptor locations within 80 km of the release point. Human-engineered output products support critical decisions on the type, location, and timing of protective actions for workers and the public during an emergency.« less

  16. Results of radiological measurements taken in the Niagara Falls, New York, area (NF002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.K.; Berven, B.A.

    1986-11-01

    The results of a radiological survey of 100 elevated gamma radiation anomalies in the Niagara Falls, New York, area are presented. These radiation anomalies were identified by a mobile gamma scanning survey during the period October 3-16, 1984, and were recommended for an onsite survey to determine if the elevated levels of radiation may be related to the transportation of radioactive waste material to the Lake Ontario Ordnance Works for storage. In this survey, radiological measurements included outdoor gamma exposure rates at 1 m above the surface; outdoor gamma exposure rates at the surface, range of gamma exposure rates during scan; and uranium, radium, and thorium concentrations in biased surface soil samples. The results show 38 anomalies (35 located along Pletcher Road and 3 associated with other unreleated locations) were found to exceed Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) remedial action guidelines and were recommended for formal characterization surveys. (Since the time of this survey, remedial actions have been conducted on the 38 anomalies identified as exceeding FUSRAP guidelines, and the radioactive material above guidelines has been removed.) The remaining 62 anomalies are associated with asphalt driveways and parking lots, which used a phosphate slag material (previously identified as cyclowollastonite, synthetic CaSiO/sub 3/). This rocky-slag waste material was used for bedding under asphalt surfaces and in general gravel applications. Most of the contaminated soil and rock samples collected at the latter anomalies had approximately equal concentrations of /sup 226/Ra and /sup 238/U and, therefore, are not related to materials connected with the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), including material that was transported to the NFSS. 13 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  17. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring. CY2014 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikoloch, George; Shadel, Craig; Chapman, Jenny; Mizell, Steve A.; McCurdy, Greg; Etyemezian, Vicken; Miller, Julianne J.

    2015-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during ongoing monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2014 monitoring are: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2014 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations; (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. Differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely the result of differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  18. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2013 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Etyemezian, Vicken; Miller, Julianne J

    2014-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during on-going monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2013 monitoring include: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2012 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations (this was the latest documented data available at the time of this writing); (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. However, differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely due to differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  19. Implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center(FRMAC) - Emergency Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-04-01

    Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-5 requires all federal departments and agencies to adopt a National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities, as well as in support of those actions taken to assist state and local entities. This system provides a consistent nationwide template to enable federal, state, local, and tribal governments, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together effectively and efficiently to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism. This document identifies the operational concepts of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center's (FRMAC) implementation of the NIMS/ICS response structure under the National Response Plan (NRP). The construct identified here defines the basic response template to be tailored to the incident-specific response requirements. FRMAC's mission to facilitate interagency environmental data management, monitoring, sampling, analysis, and assessment and link this information to the planning and decision staff clearly places the FRMAC in the Planning Section. FRMAC is not a mitigating resource for radiological contamination but is present to conduct radiological impact assessment for public dose avoidance. Field monitoring is a fact-finding mission to support this effort directly. Decisions based on the assessed data will drive public protection and operational requirements. This organizational structure under NIMS is focused by the mission responsibilities and interface requirements following the premise to provide emergency responders with a flexible yet standardized structure for incident response activities. The coordination responsibilities outlined in the NRP are based on the NIMS/ICS construct and Unified Command (UC) for management of a domestic incident. The NRP Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex (NUC) further provides requirements and protocols for coordinating federal government capabilities to respond to nuclear/radiological Incidents of National Significance (INS) and other radiological incidents. When a FRMAC is established, it operates under the parameters of NIMS as defined in the NRP. FRMAC and its operations have been modified to reflect NIMS/ICS concepts and principles and to facilitate working in a Unified Command structure. FRMAC is established at or near the scene of the incident to coordinate radiological monitoring and assessment and is established in coordination with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS); the coordinating agency; other federal agencies; and state, local, and tribal authorities. However, regardless of the coordinating agency designation, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) coordinates radiological monitoring and assessment activities for the initial phases of the offsite federal incident response through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) and FRMAC assets. Monitoring and assessment data are managed by FRMAC in an accountable, secure, and retrievable format. Monitoring data interpretations, including exposure rate contours, dose projections, and any requested radiological assessments are to be provided to the DHS; to the coordinating agency; and to state, local, and tribal government agencies.

  20. radiological consquence management | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration consquence management | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs

  1. Analytical methods for removing radiological constituents prior to organic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakonson, K.; Monagle, M.; Cournoyer, M.

    1997-12-31

    Within the Department of Energy (DOE), there is a need to analyze mixed waste materials (i.e. materials that are contaminated with both radiological and hazardous components). As part of the technical support the Organic Analysis Group provides for programs within Los Alamos National Laboratory, methods are under development for radiologically contaminated oil samples being tested for polychlorinated biphenyls and other semivolatile constituents. Radionuclides are removed from oil samples by filtering the samples through a commercials available solid phase extraction cartridge. An aliquot of the eluent is then analyzed to quantitate the residual radioactivity.

  2. RADIOLOGICAL EFFLUENT AND ONSITE AREA MONITORING REPORT FOR THE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    327-33 a a RADIOLOGICAL EFFLUENT AND ONSITE AREA MONITORING REPORT FOR THE 0 NEVADA TEST SITE (JANUARY 1986 THROUGH DECEMBER 1986) BANEL A. GONZALEZ HEALTH PHY%ICIST SePTEMl3ER 1987 WORK PERFORMED UNDER CONTRACT NO. DE-ACXM-84-84NV10327 REYNOLDS ELECTRICAL & ENGINEERING CO., INC. POST OFFICE BOX 14400 LAS VEGAS, NV 89114 DOE/NV/10327-33 RADIOLOGICAL EFFLUENT AND ONSITE AREA MONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE (JANUARY 1986 THROUGH DECEMBER 1986) Daniel A. Gonzalez Health Physicist

  3. Radiological Worker Training Power Point Slides for App. A

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    30-2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overheads December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 OT 1.1 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.1 Regulatory Documents Objectives: * Identify the hierarchy of regulatory documents. * Define the purposes of 10 CFR Parts 820, 830 and 835. * Define the purpose of the DOE Radiological Control Standard. OT 1.2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.2 Regulatory Documents (cont.) Objectives: * Define the terms "shall" and "should" as used in

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- U S Naval Radiological Defense

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Laboratory - CA 0-06 Naval Radiological Defense Laboratory - CA 0-06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: U. S. NAVAL RADIOLOGICAL DEFENSE LABORATORY (CA.0-06) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to the DoD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: San Francisco , California CA.0-06-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CA.0-06-1 Site Operations: NRC licensed DoD facility which used small quantities of nuclear materials for R&D purposes and decontaminated ships.

  5. RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF DECONTAMINATION DEBRIS LOCATED AT THE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    h ' . * ' 1. MI). q-8 RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF DECONTAMINATION DEBRIS LOCATED AT THE FUTURA CHEMICAL COMPANY FACILITY 9200 LATTY AVENUE HAZELWOOD, MISSOURI L.W. Cole J.D. Berger W.O. Helton B.M. Putnam T.J. Sowell C.F. Weaver R.D. Condra September 9, 1981 Work performed by Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division Oak Ridge Associated Universities Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 Under Interagency Agreement DOE No. 40-770-80 NRC Fin. No. A-9093-0

  6. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Contamination Control Instructor's Guide 2.05-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Contamination Control Module Number: 2.05 Objectives: 2.05.01 Define the terms "removable and fixed surface contamination," state the difference between them and list common methods used to measure each. 2.05.02 State the components of a radiological monitoring program for contamination control and common methods used to accomplish them. 2.05.03 State the basic goal of a

  7. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Contamination Control Study Guide 2.05-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Contamination Control Module Number: 2.05 Objectives: 2.05.01 Define the terms "removable and fixed surface contamination," state the difference between them and list common methods used to measure each. 2.05.02 State the components of a radiological monitoring program for contamination control and common methods used to accomplish them. 2.05.03 State the basic goal of a contamination

  8. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Monitoring Study Guide 2.09-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Environmental Monitoring Module Number: 2.09 Objectives: 2.09.01 State the goals of an environmental monitoring program. 2.09.02 State the exposure limits to the general public as they apply to environmental monitoring. 2.09.03 Define the term "critical nuclide." 2.09.04 Define the term "critical pathway." i 2.09.05 State locations frequently surveyed for radiological

  9. Radiological risk assessment of environmental radon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi

    2013-11-27

    Measurements of radon gas ({sup 222}Rn) in the environmental are important to assess indoor air quality and to study the potential risk to human health. Generally known that exposure to radon is considered the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The environmental radon concentration depends on the {sup 226}Ra concentration, indoor atmosphere, cracking on rocks and building materials. This study was carried out to determine the indoor radon concentration from selected samples of tin tailings (amang) and building materials in an airtight sealed homemade radon chamber. The radiological risk assessment for radon gas was also calculated based on the annual exposure dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk. The continuous radon monitor Sun Nuclear model 1029 was used to measure the radon concentration emanates from selected samples for 96 hours. Five types of tin tailings collected from Kampar, Perak and four samples of building materials commonly used in Malaysia dwellings or building constructions were analysed for radon concentration. The indoor radon concentration determined in ilmenite, monazite, struverite, xenotime and zircon samples varies from 219.6 ± 76.8 Bq m{sup ?3} to 571.1 ± 251.4 Bq m{sup ?3}, 101.0 ± 41.0 Bq m{sup ?3} to 245.3 ± 100.2 Bq m{sup ?3}, 53.1 ± 7.5 Bq m{sup ?3} to 181.8 ± 9.7 Bq m{sup ?3}, 256.1 ± 59.3 Bq m{sup ?3} to 652.2 ± 222.2 Bq m{sup ?3} and 164.5 ± 75.9 Bq m{sup ?3} to 653.3 ± 240.0 Bq m{sup ?3}, respectively. Whereas, in the building materials, the radon concentration from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and cement showed 396.3 ± 194.3 Bq m{sup ?3}, 192.1 ± 75.4 Bq m{sup ?3}, 176.1 ± 85.9 Bq m{sup ?3} and 28.4 ± 5.7 Bq m{sup ?3}, respectively. The radon concentration in tin tailings and building materials were found to be much higher in xenotime and cement brick samples than others. All samples in tin tailings were exceeded the action level for radon gas of 148 Bq m{sup ?3} proposed by EPA except monazite 0.15 kg, struverite 0.15 kg and 0.25 kg. Whereas, all building material samples have exceeded the radon concentration in concrete and building materials of 3 to 7 Bq m{sup ?3} estimated by ICRP. The annual effective dose, effective dose equivalent, and radon exhalation rates in tin tailings were calculated to be in the range of 2.47 to 11.46 mSv, 5.94 to 1090.56 mSv y{sup ?1}, and 0.23 to 1.18 mBq kg{sup ?1} h{sup ?1}. For building materials, the calculated risk assessment of the annual effective dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk were 0.72 to 10.00 mSv, 1.73 to 24.00 mSv y{sup ?1}, 0.010 to 0.06 mBq kg{sup ?1} h{sup ?1} and 40 to 550 chances of persons will suffer the cancer per million (1 × 10{sup 6}), respectively.

  10. Improving Site-Specific Radiological Performance Assessments - 13431

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tauxe, John; Black, Paul; Catlett, Kate; Lee, Robert; Perona, Ralph; Stockton, Tom; Sully, Mike

    2013-07-01

    An improved approach is presented for conducting complete and defensible radiological site-specific performance assessments (PAs) to support radioactive waste disposal decisions. The basic tenets of PA were initiated some thirty years ago, focusing on geologic disposals and evaluating compliance with regulations. Some of these regulations were inherently probabilistic (i.e., addressing uncertainty in a quantitative fashion), such as the containment requirements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) 40 CFR 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, Chap. 191.13 [1]. Methods of analysis were developed to meet those requirements, but at their core early PAs used 'conservative' parameter values and modeling approaches. This limited the utility of such PAs to compliance evaluation, and did little to inform decisions about optimizing disposal, closure and long-term monitoring and maintenance, or, in general, maintaining doses 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA). This basic approach to PA development in the United States was employed essentially unchanged through the end of the 20. century, principally by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Performance assessments developed in support of private radioactive waste disposal operations, regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its agreement states, were typically not as sophisticated. Discussion of new approaches to PA is timely, since at the time of this writing, the DOE is in the midst of revising its Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management [2], and the NRC is revising 10 CFR 61, Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste [3]. Over the previous decade, theoretical developments and improved computational technology have provided the foundation for integrating decision analysis (DA) concepts and objective-focused thinking, plus a Bayesian approach to probabilistic modeling and risk analysis, to guide improvements in PA. This decision-making approach, [4, 5, 6] provides a transparent formal framework for using a value- or objective-focused approach to decision-making. DA, as an analytical means to implement structured decision making, provides a context for both understanding how uncertainty affects decisions and for targeting uncertainty reduction. The proposed DA approach improves defensibility and transparency of decision-making. The DA approach is fully consistent with the need to perform realistic modeling (rather than conservative modeling), including evaluation of site-specific factors. Instead of using generic stylized scenarios for radionuclide fate and transport and for human exposures to radionuclides, site-specific scenarios better represent the advantages and disadvantages of alternative disposal sites or engineered designs, thus clarifying their differences as well as providing a sound basis for evaluation of site performance. The full DA approach to PA is described, from explicitly incorporating societal values through stakeholder involvement to model building. Model building involves scoping by considering features, events, processes, and exposure scenarios (FEPSs), development of a conceptual site model (CSM), translation into numerical models and subsequent computation, and model evaluation. These are implemented in a cycle of uncertainty analysis, sensitivity analysis and value of information analysis so that uncertainty can be reduced until sufficient confidence is gained in the decisions to be made. This includes the traditional focus on hydrogeological processes, but also places emphasis on other FEPSs such as biotically-induced transport and human exposure phenomena. The significance of human exposure scenarios is emphasized by modifying the traditional acronym 'FEPs' to include them, hence 'FEPSs'. The radioactive waste community is also recognizing that disposal sites are to be considered a national (or even global) resource. As such, there is a pressing need to optimize their utility withi

  11. Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This booklet was written to answer questions most frequently asked by fire fighters, law enforcement officers, and emergency medical services personnel. The booklet is not intended as a substitute...

  12. Paint for detection of corrosion and warning of chemical and radiological attack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA)

    2010-08-24

    A system for warning of corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances. The system comprises painting a surface with a paint or coating that includes an indicator material and monitoring the surface for indications of the corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances.

  13. Method for warning of radiological and chemical substances using detection paints on a vehicle surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA)

    2012-03-13

    A system for warning of corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances. The system comprises painting a surface with a paint or coating that includes an indicator material and monitoring the surface for indications of the corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances.

  14. Surface with two paint strips for detection and warning of chemical warfare and radiological agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2013-04-02

    A system for warning of corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances. The system comprises painting a surface with a paint or coating that includes an indicator material and monitoring the surface for indications of the corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances.

  15. Radiological Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA

  16. Radiological Security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home / About

  17. Radiological Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home /

  18. radiological emergency | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    emergency | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog

  19. Radiological Security Partnership | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA

  20. radiological detection | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    detection | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog

  1. radiological survey | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    survey | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home /

  2. Radiological Security Partnership Information | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration Information | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs

  3. Radiological Security Program | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home

  4. radiological protection | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    protection | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog

  5. Order Module--DOE STD-1098-2008, DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy STD-1098-2008, DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL Order Module--DOE STD-1098-2008, DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL "The radiological control program discussed in DOE-STD-1098-2008 goes beyond the scope of, and includes more details than, the documented radiation protection program (RPP) required by 10 CFR 835, -Occupational Radiation Protection.‖ To ensure implementation of a comprehensive and coherent radiological control program that exceeds basic

  6. DOE-HDBK-1143-2001; Radiological Control Training for Supervisors - Course Introduction

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    143-2001 Instructor's Guide DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN Course Material Topic: Administrative Policies and Procedures Objectives: Upon completion of this training, the student will be able to: 1. Identify the radiological controlled areas a person should be allowed to enter after successfully completing General Employee Radiological Training, Radiological Worker I training, and Radiological Worker II training. 2. List five actions used to increase the awareness level of workers relating to

  7. Radiology utilizing a gas multiwire detector with resolution enhancement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw (Grafton, VA); Majewski, Lucasz A. (Grafton, VA)

    1999-09-28

    This invention relates to a process and apparatus for obtaining filmless, radiological, digital images utilizing a gas multiwire detector. Resolution is enhanced through projection geometry. This invention further relates to imaging systems for X-ray examination of patients or objects, and is particularly suited for mammography.

  8. EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Programmatic EA evaluates alternatives for the management of scrap metal originating from DOE radiological control areas, including the proposed action to allow for the recycle of uncontaminated scrap metal that meets the requirements of DOE Order 458.1. (Metals with volumetric radioactive contamination are not included in the scope of this Programmatic EA.)

  9. Radiological Laboratory, Utility, Office Building LEED Strategy & Achievement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seguin, Nicole R.

    2012-07-18

    Missions that the Radiological Laboratory, utility, Office Building (RLUOB) supports are: (1) Nuclear Materials Handling, Processing, and Fabrication; (2) Stockpile Management; (3) Materials and Manufacturing Technologies; (4) Nonproliferation Programs; (5) Waste Management Activities - Environmental Programs; and (6) Materials Disposition. The key capabilities are actinide analytical chemistry and material characterization.

  10. Summary of comments received from workshops on radiological criteria for decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caplin, J.; Page, G.; Smith, D.; Wiblin, C.

    1994-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an enhanced participatory rulemaking to establish radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning of NRC-licensed facilities. Open public meetings were held during 1993 in Chicago, IL, San Francisco, CA, Boston, MA, Dallas, TX, Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, and Washington, DC. Interested parties were invited to provide input on the rulemaking issues before the NRC staff develops a draft proposed rule. This report summarizes 3,635 comments categorized from transcripts of the seven workshops and 1,677 comments from 100 NRC docketed letters from individuals and organizations. No analysis or response to the comments is included. The comments reflect a broad spectrum of viewpoints on the issues related to radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning. The NRC also held public meetings on the scope of the Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) during July 1993. The GEIS meetings were held in Washington, DC., San Francisco, CA, Oklahoma City, OK, and Cleveland, OH. Related comments from these meetings were reviewed and comments which differed substantially from those from the workshops are also summarized in the body of the report. A summary of the comments from the GEIS scoping meetings is included as an Appendix.

  11. Technical Area (TA)-54 Area G Nitrate-Salt Waste Container Response

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Instructions | Department of Energy Technical Area (TA)-54 Area G Nitrate-Salt Waste Container Response Instructions Technical Area (TA)-54 Area G Nitrate-Salt Waste Container Response Instructions This document was used to determine facts and conditions during the Department of Energy Accident Investigation Board's investigation into the radiological release event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Additional documents referenced and listed in the Phase 2 Radiological Release Event at the

  12. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2012 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Miller, Julianne J

    2013-07-01

    In 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the US Department of Energy (DOE), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR)). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero. Three tests, Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat; the fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. DOE is working to clean up and close all four sites. Substantial cleaned up has been accomplished at Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1. Cleanup of Clean Slate 2 and 3 is on the DOE planning horizon for some time in the next several years. The Desert Research Institute installed two monitoring stations, number 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories Range Operations Center and number 401 at Clean Slate 3, in 2008 and a third monitoring station, number 402 at Clean Slate 1, in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The primary objectives of the data collection and analysis effort are to (1) monitor the concentration of radiological parameters in dust particles suspended in air, (2) determine whether winds are re-distributing radionuclides or contaminated soil material, (3) evaluate the controlling meteorological conditions if wind transport is occurring, and (4) measure ancillary radiological, meteorological, and environmental parameters that might provide insight to the above assessments. The following observations are based on data collected during CY2012. The mean annual concentration of gross alpha and gross beta is highest at Station 400 and lowest at Station 401. This difference may be the result of using filter media at Station 400 with a smaller pore size than the media used at the other two stations. Average annual gamma exposure at Station 401 is slightly greater than at Station 400 and 402. Average annual gamma exposure at all three TTR stations are in the upper range to slightly higher than values reported for the CEMP stations surrounding the TTR. At higher wind speeds, the saltation counts are greater at Station 401 than at Station 402 while the suspended particulate concentrations are greater at Station 402 than at Statin 401. Although these observations seem counterintuitive, they are likely the result of differences in the soil material present at the two sites. Station 401 is located on an interfluve elevated above two adjacent drainage channels where the soil surface is likely to be composed of coarser material. Station 402 is located in finer sediments at the playa edge and is also subject to dust from a dirt road only 500 m to the north. During prolonged high wind events, suspended dust concentrations at Station 401 peaked with the initial winds then decreased whereas dust concentrations at Station 402 peaked with each peak in the wind speed. This likely reflects a limited PM10 source that is quickly expended at Station 401 relative to an abundant PM10 source at Station 402. In CY2013, to facilitate comparisons between radiological analyses of collected dust, the filter media at all three stations will be standardized. In addition, a sequence of samples will be collected at Station 400 using both types of filter media to enable development of a mathematical relationship between the results derived from the two filter types. Additionally, having acquired approximately four years of observations at Stations 400 and 401 and a year of observations at Station 402, a period-of-record analysis of the radiological and airborne dust conditions will be undertaken.

  13. Department of Energy Receives Highest Transportation Industry Safety Award

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy Receives Highest Transportation Industry Safety Award Department of Energy Receives Highest Transportation Industry Safety Award May 1, 2007 - 12:45pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today received the Transportation Community Awareness and Emergency Response (TRANSCAER) Chairman's Award, one of industry's highest transportation safety awards, for helping local communities in emergency preparedness and response. TRANSCAER is a voluntary

  14. Method for warning of radiological and chemical agents using detection paints on a vehicle surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Brunk, James L. (Martinez, CA); Day, S. Daniel (Danville, CA)

    2012-03-27

    A paint that warns of radiological or chemical substances comprising a paint operatively connected to the surface, an indicator material carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances, and a thermo-activation material carried by the paint. In one embodiment, a method of warning of radiological or chemical substances comprising the steps of painting a surface with an indicator material, and monitoring the surface for indications of the radiological or chemical substances. In another embodiment, a paint is operatively connected to a vehicle and an indicator material is carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances.

  15. Aerial vehicle with paint for detection of radiological and chemical warfare agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Brunk, James L.; Day, S. Daniel

    2013-04-02

    A paint that warns of radiological or chemical substances comprising a paint operatively connected to the surface, an indicator material carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances, and a thermo-activation material carried by the paint. In one embodiment, a method of warning of radiological or chemical substances comprising the steps of painting a surface with an indicator material, and monitoring the surface for indications of the radiological or chemical substances. In another embodiment, a paint is operatively connected to a vehicle and an indicator material is carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances.

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rulsion Tritium Transport Model

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Rulsion Tritium Transport Model Rulison, Colorado, Site Tritium Transport Model Tritium Transport at the Rulison Site, a Nuclear-Stimulated Low-Permeability Natural Gas Reservoir, September 2007 pdf_icon Tritium Transport Model Comments and Responses Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Gateway Enterprises Addendum: Tritium Transport at the Rulison Site, a Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir, January 2009 pdf_icon

  17. Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-12-22

    The Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for management of Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), materials transportation and packaging to ensure the safe, secure, efficient packaging and transportation of materials, both hazardous and nonhazardous. Cancels DOE O 460.2 and DOE O 460.2 Chg 1

  18. Areas for US-India civilian nuclear cooperation to prevent/mitigate radiological events.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balachandran, Gopalan; Forden, Geoffrey Ethan

    2013-01-01

    Over the decades, India and the United States have had very little formal collaboration on nuclear issues. Partly this was because neither country needed collaboration to make progress in the nuclear field. But it was also due, in part, to the concerns both countries had about the other's intentions. Now that the U.S.-India Deal on nuclear collaboration has been signed and the Hyde Act passed in the United States, it is possible to recognize that both countries can benefit from such nuclear collaboration, especially if it starts with issues important to both countries that do not touch on strategic systems. Fortunately, there are many noncontroversial areas for collaboration. This study, funded by the U.S. State Department, has identified a number of areas in the prevention of and response to radiological incidents where such collaboration could take place.

  19. Transportation Systems Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TRACC RESEARCH Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Structural Mechanics Transportation Systems Modeling TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS MODELING Overview of TSM Transportation systems modeling research at TRACC uses the TRANSIMS (Transportation Analysis SIMulation System) traffic micro simulation code developed by the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT). The TRANSIMS code represents the latest generation of traffic simulation codes developed jointly under multiyear programs by USDOT, the

  20. Base Technology for Radioactive Material Transportation Packaging Systems

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-07-08

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policies and responsibilities for coordinating and planning base technology for radioactive material transportation packaging systems.

  1. Pipeline transportation and underground storage are vital and...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... for Providing Appropriate Access to Geospatial Data in Response to Security Concerns. Source: Energy Information Administration, GasTran Gas Transportation Information ...

  2. Introduction The Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex (RNCTEC) is a multi-use test and evaluation platform that will serve the U.S. homeland security mission. Background The Department of Homeland Security's Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO), with assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration, has established the RNCTEC at the Nevada National Security Site, formerly known as the Nevada Test Site, to support all federal agencies to

  3. Good Practices for Ocupational Radiological Protection in Plutonium Facilities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Not Measurement Sensitive DOE- STD-1128-2013 April 2013 DOE STANDARD GOOD PRACTICES FOR OCCUPATIONAL RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION IN PLUTONIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1128-2013 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii DOE-STD-1128-2013 Foreword This Technical

  4. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9 Radiological Control Technician Training Technician Qualification Standard Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 iii Course Developers Dave Lent Coleman Research Joe DeMers EG&G Mound Applied Technologies (formerly) Andy Hobbs FERMCO Dennis Maloney RUST - GJPO Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Michael

  5. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Sources of Radiation Instructor's Guide 1.05-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Sources of Radiation Module Number: 1.05 Objectives: 1.05.01 Identify the following four sources of natural background radiation including the origin, radionuclides, variables, and contribution to exposure. a. Terrestrial b. Cosmic c. Internal Emitters d. Radon 1.05.02 Identify the following four sources of artificially produced radiation and the magnitude of dose received from each. a.

  6. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radioactivity & Radioactive Decay Instructor's Guide 1.06-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radioactivity & Radioactive Decay Module Number: 1.06 Objectives: 1.06.01 Identify how the neutron to proton ratio is related to nuclear stability. 1.06.02 Identify the definition for the following terms: a. radioactivity b. radioactive decay 1.06.03 Identify the characteristics of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. 1.06.04 Given simple equations identify the following

  7. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    External Exposure Control Instructor's Guide 1.11-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: External Exposure Control Module Number: 1.11 Objectives: 1.11.01 Identify the four basic methods for minimizing personnel external exposure. 1.11.02 Using the Exposure Rate = 6CEN equation, calculate the gamma exposure rate for specific radionuclides. 1.11.03 Identify "source reduction" techniques for minimizing personnel external exposures. 1.11.04 Identify

  8. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 Radiation Detector Theory Instructor's Guide 1.13-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiation Detector Theory Module Number: 1.13 Objectives: 1.13.01 Identify the three fundamental laws associated with electrical charges. 1.13.02 Identify the definition of current, voltage and resistance and their respective units. 1.13.03 Select the function of the detector and readout circuitry components in a radiation measurement system. 1.13.04 Identify the parameters that

  9. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Respiratory Protection Instructor's Guide 2.07-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Respiratory Protection Module Number: 2.07 Objectives: 2.07.01 Explain the purpose of respiratory protection standards and regulations. 2.07.02 Identify the OSHA, ANSI, and DOE respiratory protection program requirements. 2.07.03 Identify the standards which regulate respiratory protection. 2.07.04 Describe the advantages and disadvantages (limitations) of each of the following

  10. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6 Radiation Survey Instrumentation Instructor's Guide 2.16-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiation Survey Instrumentation Module Number: 2.16 Objectives: 2.16.01 List the factors which affect an RCT's selection of a portable radiation survey instrument, and identify appropriate instruments for external radiation surveys. L 2.16.02 Identify the following features and specifications for ion chamber instruments used at your facility: a. Detector type b. Instrument

  11. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Instructor's Guide 2.17-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Contamination Monitoring Instrumentation Module Number: 2.17 Objectives: 2.17.01 List the factors which affects an RCT's selection of a portable contamination monitoring instrument. L 2.17.02 Describe the following features and specifications for commonly used count rate meter probes used at your site for beta/gamma and/or alpha surveys: a. Detector type b. Detector shielding and window c. Types of radiation

  12. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Instructor's Guide 2.19-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Counting Room Equipment Module Number: 2.19 Objectives: L 2.19.01 Describe the following features and specifications for commonly used laboratory counter or scalers: a. Detector type b. Detector shielding c. Detector window d. Types of radiation detected and measured e. Operator-adjustable controls f. Source check g. Procedure for sample counting L 2.19.02 Describe the following features and specifications for

  13. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - Sources of Radiation Study Guide 1.05-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Sources of Radiation Module Number: 1.05 Objectives: 1.05.01 Identify the following four sources of natural background radiation including the origin, radionuclides, variables, and contribution to exposure. a. Terrestrial b. Cosmic c. Internal Emitters d. Radon 1.05.02 Identify the following four sources of artificially produced radiation and the magnitude of dose received from each. a. Nuclear

  14. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - Radioactivity and Radioactive Decay Study Guide 1.06-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radioactivity & Radioactive Decay Module Number: 1.06 Objectives: 1.06.01 Identify how the neutron to proton ratio is related to nuclear stability. 1.06.02 Identify the definition for the following terms: a. radioactivity b. radioactive decay 1.06.03 Identify the characteristics of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. 1.06.04 Given simple equations identify the following

  15. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    External Exposure Control Study Guide 1.11-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: External Exposure Control Module Number: 1.11 Objectives: 1.11.01 Identify the four basic methods for minimizing personnel external exposure. 1.11.02 Using the Exposure Rate = 6CEN equation, calculate the gamma exposure rate for specific radionuclides. 1.11.03 Identify "source reduction" techniques for minimizing personnel external exposures. 1.11.04 Identify

  16. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Respiratory Protection Study Guide 2.07-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Respiratory Protection Module Number: 2.07 Objectives: 2.07.01 Explain the purpose of respiratory protection standards and regulations. 2.07.02 Identify the OSHA, ANSI, and DOE respiratory protection program requirements. 2.07.03 Identify the standards which regulate respiratory protection. 2.07.04 Describe the advantages and disadvantages (limitations) of each of the following respirators: a.

  17. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Instrumentation Study Guide 2.16-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiation Survey Instrumentation Module Number: 2.16 Objectives: 2.16.01 List the factors which affect an RCT's selection of a portable radiation survey instrument, and identify appropriate instruments for external radiation surveys. i 2.16.02 Identify the following features and specifications for ion chamber instruments used at your facility: a. Detector type b. Instrument operating range c. Detector

  18. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Study Guide 2.17-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Contamination Monitoring Instrumentation Module Number: 2.17 Objectives: 2.17.01 List the factors which affects an RCT's selection of a portable contamination monitoring instrument. i 2.17.02 Describe the following features and specifications for commonly used count rate meter probes used at your site for beta/gamma and/or alpha surveys: a. Detector type b. Detector shielding and window c. Types of radiation

  19. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Study Guide 2.19-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Counting Room Equipment Module Number: 2.19 Objectives: 2.19.01 Describe the features and specifications for commonly used laboratory counters or scalers: a. Detector type b. Detector shielding c. Detector window d. Types of radiation detected and measured e. Operator-adjustable controls f. Source check g. Procedure for sample counting 2.19.02 Describe the features and specifications for low-background automatic

  20. DOE-HDBK-1131-98; General Employee Radiological Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE-HDBK-1131-98 December 1998 Change Notice No. 1 November 2003 Reaffirmation with Errata April 2004 DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of

  1. In-Situ Radiological Surveys to Address Nuclear Criticality Safety Requirements During Remediation Activities at the Shallow Land Disposal Area, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania - 12268

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Phillip; Mihalo, Mark; Eberlin, John; Lambert, Mike; Matthews, Brian

    2012-07-01

    Cabrera Services Inc. (CABRERA) is the remedial contractor for the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) Site in Armstrong County Pennsylvania, a United States (US) Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) contract. The remediation is being completed under the USACE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) which was established to identify, investigate, and clean up or control sites previously used by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its predecessor, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED). As part of the management of the FUSRAP, the USACE is overseeing investigation and remediation of radiological contamination at the SLDA Site in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 US Code (USC), Section 9601 et. seq, as amended and, the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP), Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Section 300.430(f) (2). The objective of this project is to clean up radioactive waste at SLDA. The radioactive waste contains special nuclear material (SNM), primarily U-235, in 10 burial trenches, Cabrera duties include processing, packaging and transporting the waste to an offsite disposal facility in accordance with the selected remedial alternative as defined in the Final Record of Decision (USACE, 2007). Of particular importance during the remediation is the need to address nuclear criticality safety (NCS) controls for the safe exhumation and management of waste containing fissile materials. The partnership between Cabrera Services, Inc. and Measutronics Corporation led to the development of a valuable survey tool and operating procedure that are essential components of the SLDA Criticality Safety and Material Control and Accountability programs. Using proven existing technologies in the design and manufacture of the Mobile Survey Cart, the continued deployment of the Cart will allow for an efficient and reliable methodology to allow for the safe exhumation of the Special Nuclear Material in existing SLDA trenches. (authors)

  2. emergency response assets

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4%2A en Radiological Assistance Program http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsemergencyoperationscounterterrorismrespondingtoemergenciesfirstresponders-0

  3. Radiological characterization of a vitrification facility for decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asou, M. [CEA/DEN/VALRHO/UMODD, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Le Goaller, C. [CEA/DEN/VALRHO/DDCO, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Martin, F. [AREVA NC DAP/MOP (France)

    2007-07-01

    Cleanup operations in the Marcoule Vitrification Facility (AVM) will start in 2007. This plant includes 20 highly irradiating storage tanks for high-level liquid waste before vitrification. The objective of the cleanup phase is to significantly decrease the amount of highly radioactive waste resulting from dismantling. A comprehensive radiological survey of the plant was initiated in 2000. Most of the tanks were characterized using advanced technologies: gamma imaging, CdZnTe gamma spectroscopy, dose rate measurements and 3D calculations codes. At the same time, inspections were conducted to develop 3D geometrical models of the tanks. The techniques used and the main results obtained are described as well as lessons learned from these operations. The rinsing program was defined in 2006. Decontamination operations are expected to begin in 2007, and radiological surveys will be followed up to monitor the efficiency of the decontamination process. Specific rinsing of all tanks and equipment will be carried out from 2007 to 2009. Concentrated liquid solutions will be vitrified between 2008 and 2010; the decommissioning of AVM will be delayed until the end of 2010. This strategy aims at producing less than 5% 'B' type (long-lived intermediate-level) waste from the decommissioning operations, as well as reducing the dose rate and risks by simplified remote dismantling. The paper reviews the main options selected for decontamination, as well as the radiological characterization strategy. Some cost-related aspects will also be analyzed. (authors)

  4. Transportation of radionuclides in urban environs: draft environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finley, N.C.; Aldrich, D.C.; Daniel, S.L.; Ericson, D.M.; Henning-Sachs, C.; Kaestner, P.C.; Ortiz, N.R.; Sheldon, D.D.; Taylor, J.M.

    1980-07-01

    This report assesses the environmental consequences of the transportation of radioactive materials in densely populated urban areas, including estimates of the radiological, nonradiological, and social impacts arising from this process. The chapters of the report and the appendices which follow detail the methodology and results for each of four causative event categories: incident free transport, vehicular accidents, human errors or deviations from accepted quality assurance practices, and sabotage or malevolent acts. The numerical results are expressed in terms of the expected radiological and economic impacts from each. Following these discussions, alternatives to the current transport practice are considered. Then, the detailed analysis is extended from a limited area of New York city to other urban areas. The appendices contain the data bases and specific models used to evaluate these impacts, as well as discussions of chemical toxicity and the social impacts of radioactive material transport in urban areas. The latter are evaluated for each causative event category in terms of psychological, sociological, political, legal, and organizational impacts. The report is followed by an extensive bibliography covering the many fields of study which were required in performing the analysis.

  5. Radioactive Material Transportation Requirements for the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, Mark Earl; Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Bolander, Thane Weston

    2000-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) created the National Transportation Program (NTP) whose goal is to ensure the availability of safe, efficient, and timely transportation of DOE materials. The Integration and Planning Group of the NTP, assisted by Global Technologies Incorporated (GTI), was tasked to identify requirements associated with the transport of DOE Environmental Management (EM) radiological waste/material. A systems engineering approach was used to identify source documents, extract requirements, perform a functional analysis, and set up a transportation requirements management database in RDD-100. Functions and requirements for transporting the following DOE radioactive waste/material are contained in the database: high level radioactive waste (HLW), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW), nuclear materials (NM), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and transuranic waste (TRU waste). The requirements will be used in the development of standard transportation protocols for DOE shipping. The protocols will then be combined into a DOE Transportation Program Management Guide, which will be used to standardize DOE transportation processes.

  6. DRAFT - Design of Radiological Survey and Sampling to Support Title Transfer or Lease of Property on the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cusick L.T.

    2002-09-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns, operates, and manages the buildings and land areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. As land and buildings are declared excess or underutilized, it is the intent of DOE to either transfer the title of or lease suitable property to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET) or other entities for public use. It is DOE's responsibility, in coordination with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 4, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), to ensure that the land, facilities, and personal property that are to have the title transferred or are to be leased are suitable for public use. Release of personal property must also meet site requirements and be approved by the DOE contractor responsible for site radiological control. The terms title transfer and lease in this document have unique meanings. Title transfer will result in release of ownership without any restriction or further control by DOE. Under lease conditions, the government retains ownership of the property along with the responsibility to oversee property utilization. This includes involvement in the lessee's health, safety, and radiological control plans and conduct of site inspections. It may also entail lease restrictions, such as limiting access to certain areas or prohibiting digging, drilling, or disturbing material under surface coatings. Survey and sampling requirements are generally more rigorous for title transfer than for lease. Because of the accelerated clean up process, there is an increasing emphasis on title transfers of facilities and land. The purpose of this document is to describe the radiological survey and sampling protocols that are being used for assessing the radiological conditions and characteristics of building and land areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation that contain space potentially available for title transfer or lease. After necessary surveys and sampling and laboratory analyses are completed, the data are analyzed and included in an Environmental Baseline Summary (EBS) report for title transfer or in a Baseline Environmental Analysis Report (BEAR) for lease. The data from the BEAR is then used in a Screening-Level Human Health Risk Assessment (SHHRA) or a risk calculation (RC) to assess the potential risks to future owners/occupants. If title is to be transferred, release criteria in the form of specific activity concentrations called Derived Concentration Guideline Levels (DCGLs) will be developed for the each property. The DCGLs are based on the risk model and are used with the data in the EBS to determine, with statistical confidence, that the release criteria for the property have been met. The goal of the survey and sampling efforts is to (1) document the baseline conditions of the property (real or personal) prior to title transfer or lease, (2) obtain enough information that an evaluation of radiological risks can be made, and (3) collect sufftcient data so that areas that contain minimal residual levels of radioactivity can be identified and, following radiological control procedures, be released from radiological control. (It should be noted that release from radiological control does not necessarily mean free release because DOE may maintain institutional control of the site after it is released from radiological control). To meet the goals of this document, a Data Quality Objective (DQO) process will be used to enhance data collection efficiency and assist with decision-making. The steps of the DQO process involve stating the problem, identifying the decision, identifying inputs to the decision, developing study boundaries, developing the decision rule, and optimizing the design. This document describes the DQOs chosen for surveys and sampling efforts performed for the purposes listed above. The previous version to this document focused on the requirements for radiological survey and sampling protocols that are be used for leasing. Because the primary focus at this time is on title transfer, this revision applies to both situations.

  7. NREL: Transportation Research - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    work on fuel cell electric vehicle technologies. Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter Stay up to date on NREL's RD&D of transportation and hydrogen technologies with this...

  8. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Stakeholders Forum 1 Planning for a Shipment Campaign Identifying Responders Needs National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Tom Clawson US Department of Energy Transportation...

  9. TEPP Training Brochure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) developed the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) to address concerns from States, Tribes, and local...

  10. 508 Compliant Version- TEPP Training Brochure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) developed the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) to address concerns from States, Tribes, and local...

  11. OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES 0" THE SOUTHWESTERN RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    977 7 OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES 0" THE SOUTHWESTERN RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY from January through June 1969 Environmental Surveillance Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY February 1971 This surveillance performed under a Memorandum of Understanding (No. SF 54 373) for the U. S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION -- SWRHL-97r pf' SWRHL-97r OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF THE SOUTHWESTERN RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY from January through June

  12. Radiological Source Term Estimates for the February 14, 2014 WIPP Release

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Event | Department of Energy Radiological Source Term Estimates for the February 14, 2014 WIPP Release Event Radiological Source Term Estimates for the February 14, 2014 WIPP Release Event This document was used to determine facts and conditions during the Department of Energy Accident Investigation Board's investigation into the radiological release event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The Technical Assessment Team (TAT) has undertaken a deliberative investigation process to understand

  13. Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, February 14, 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On February 14, 2014, an airborne radiological release occurred at the Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Because access to the underground was restricted following the event, the investigation was broken into two phases. The Phase 1 report focused on how the radiological material was released into the atmosphere and Phase 2, performed once limited access to the underground was re?established, focused on the source of the released radiological material.

  14. Silver-Mordenite for Radiologic Gas Capture from Complex Streams: Dual

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Catalytic CH3I Decomposition and I Confinement (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Silver-Mordenite for Radiologic Gas Capture from Complex Streams: Dual Catalytic CH3I Decomposition and I Confinement Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Silver-Mordenite for Radiologic Gas Capture from Complex Streams: Dual Catalytic CH3I Decomposition and I Confinement The effective capture and storage of radiological iodine (129I) remains a strong concern for safe nuclear waste

  15. OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF TFE SOUTHWESTERN RADIOLOG1 CAL BEALTH LABORATORY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF TFE SOUTHWESTERN RADIOLOG1 CAL BEALTH LABORATORY from July through December 1969 - by Environmental Surveillance Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory ENVIROhMENTAL PROTECTION AGEXCI' February 1971 This surveillance performed under a Xenorandum of Understanding (No. SF 54 373) for the U. S . ATOMIC %I.;Ei?GY COMXESSION OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF TRE SQUTmJESTERN RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY from July through December 1969 by Environmental Surveillance

  16. Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program | Department of Energy Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls

  17. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training, Part 5 of 9

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Site Academic Training Instructor's Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los

  18. DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Instructor's Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4-1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN Course Material Topic: Elements of a Radiological Control Program Objectives: Upon completion of this lesson, the participant will be able to: 1. Identify factors that influence the scope and magnitude of a Radiological Control Program at any nuclear facility. 2. Identify typical elements of a Radiological Control Program. Training Aids: Overhead Transparencies (OTs): OT 4.1 - OT 4.5 (may be supplemented or substituted with updated or site-specific

  19. DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Instructor's Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8-1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN Course Material Topic: Radiological Aspects of Plutonium Objectives: Upon completion of this lesson, the participant will be able to: 1. Identify the radiological properties of plutonium. 2. Identify the biological effects of plutonium. 3. Identify special controls and considerations required for plutonium operations. 4. Describe appropriate instruments, measurement techniques, and special radiological survey methods for plutonium. 5. Describe personnel

  20. DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Instructor's Guide, Part 2 of 5

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5 Radiological Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Instructor's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy Radiological Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Instructor's Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. Radiological Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Instructor's Guide iii Table of Contents Regulatory Documents * (2) ............................................................................ Module1-1 10 CFR Part 835, Background and Focus (3)

  1. Characterization of a MOSkin detector for in vivo skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safari, M. J.; Wong, J. H. D.; Ng, K. H.; Jong, W. L.; Cutajar, D. L.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The MOSkin is a MOSFET detector designed especially for skin dose measurements. This detector has been characterized for various factors affecting its response for megavoltage photon beams and has been used for patient dose measurements during radiotherapy procedures. However, the characteristics of this detector in kilovoltage photon beams and low dose ranges have not been studied. The purpose of this study was to characterize the MOSkin detector to determine its suitability for in vivo entrance skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures. Methods: The calibration and reproducibility of the MOSkin detector and its dependency on different radiation beam qualities were carried out using RQR standard radiation qualities in free-in-air geometry. Studies of the other characterization parameters, such as the dose linearity and dependency on exposure angle, field size, frame rate, depth-dose, and source-to-surface distance (SSD), were carried out using a solid water phantom under a clinical x-ray unit. Results: The MOSkin detector showed good reproducibility (94%) and dose linearity (99%) for the dose range of 2 to 213 cGy. The sensitivity did not significantly change with the variation of SSD (±1%), field size (±1%), frame rate (±3%), or beam energy (±5%). The detector angular dependence was within ±5% over 360° and the dose recorded by the MOSkin detector in different depths of a solid water phantom was in good agreement with the Markus parallel plate ionization chamber to within ±3%. Conclusions: The MOSkin detector proved to be reliable when exposed to different field sizes, SSDs, depths in solid water, dose rates, frame rates, and radiation incident angles within a clinical x-ray beam. The MOSkin detector with water equivalent depth equal to 0.07 mm is a suitable detector for in vivo skin dosimetry during interventional radiology procedures.

  2. Alarm Response Training Academy celebrates an anniversary | Y-12 National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Complex Alarm Response Training ... Alarm Response Training Academy celebrates an anniversary Posted: November 12, 2015 - 3:08pm Top-notch classroom training and live scenarios drive ART's success. A little more than a year ago, the Alarm Response Training program moved into the newly remodeled Building 9109. There, Y-12 experts conduct courses to train law enforcement, radiation safety officers, security personnel, FBI and others to protect nuclear and radiological materials of

  3. Transportation Organization and Functions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Office of Packaging and Transportation list of organizations and functions, with a list of acronyms.

  4. Extension of DOE N 441.1, Radiological Protection for DOE Activities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-11-20

    This Notice extends DOE N 441.1, Radiological Protection for DOE Activities, dated 9-30-95 until 6-30-00.

  5. Radiological Conditions at the Semipalatinsk Test Site, Kazakhstan: Preliminary Assessment and Recommendations for Further Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, Bruce A. )

    1999-01-01

    This is a review of the book ''Radiological Conditions at the Semipalatinsk Test Site, Kazakhstan: Preliminary Assessment and Recommendations for Further Study.''

  6. The Role of the Consequence Management Home Team in the Fukushima Daiichi Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pemberton, Wendy; Mena, RaJah; Beal, William

    2012-05-01

    The Consequence Management Home Team (CMHT) is a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration asset and played an important role in the U.S. response effort to the Fukushima Daiichi accident, ranging from the early days of the response to a continued involvement in supporting late phase efforts. Each stage of their work had distinct characteristics in terms of management of incoming data streams and creation of products. The CMHT assisted a variety of response organizations with modeling; radiological operations planning; field monitoring techniques; and the analysis, interpretation, and distribution of radiological data. In the Fukushima Daiichi response, the CMHT grew to include a broader range of support than was historically planned. Through their work, the social and economic impacts of a nuclear or radiological incident were minimized. The CMHT was an integral component of the response in Japan and acted as the central point from which all of the data and products flowed.

  7. Monitoring activities review of the Radiological Environmental Surveillance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritter, P.D.

    1992-03-01

    The 1992 Monitoring Activities Review (MAR) is directed at the Radiological Environment Surveillance Program (RESP) activities at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of Idaho Engineering Laboratory (INEL). MAR panelists studied RESP documents and discussed their concerns with Environmental Monitoring Unit (EMU) staff and other panel members. These concerns were subsequently consolidated into a collection of recommendations with supporting discussions. Recommendations focus on specific monitoring activities, as well as the overall program. The MAR report also contains pertinent comments that should not require further action.

  8. Compact cyclone filter train for radiological and hazardous environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bench, T.R.

    1998-04-28

    A compact cyclone filter train is disclosed for the removal of hazardous and radiological particles from a gaseous fluid medium. This filter train permits a small cyclone separator to be used in a very small space envelope due to the arrangement of the filter housing adjacent to the separator with the cyclone separator and the filters mounted on a plate. The entire unit will have a hoist connection at the center of gravity so that the entire unit including the separator, the filters, and the base can be lifted and repositioned as desired. 3 figs.

  9. Compact cyclone filter train for radiological and hazardous environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bench, Thomas R.

    1998-01-01

    A compact cyclone filter train for the removal of hazardous and radiologi particles from a gaseous fluid medium which permits a small cyclone separator to be used in a very small space envelope due to the arrangement of the filter housing adjacent to the separator with the cyclone separator and the filters mounted on a plate. The entire unit will have a hoist connection at the center of gravity so that the entire unit including the separator, the filters, and the base can be lifted and repositioned as desired.

  10. Radiological Worker Training Power Point Slides for App. A

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1.1 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.1 Regulatory Documents Objectives: * Identify the hierarchy of regulatory documents. * Define the purposes of 10 CFR Parts 820, 830 and 835. * Define the purpose of the DOE Radiological Control Standard. OT 1.2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.2 Regulatory Documents (cont.) Objectives: * Define the terms "shall" and "should" as used in the above documents. * Describe the role of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) at DOE sites

  11. Understanding Contamination; Twenty Years of Simulating Radiological Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emily Snyder; John Drake; Ryan James

    2012-02-01

    A wide variety of simulated contamination methods have been developed by researchers to reproducibly test radiological decontamination methods. Some twenty years ago a method of non-radioactive contamination simulation was proposed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that mimicked the character of radioactive cesium and zirconium contamination on stainless steel. It involved baking the contamination into the surface of the stainless steel in order to 'fix' it into a tenacious, tightly bound oxide layer. This type of contamination was particularly applicable to nuclear processing facilities (and nuclear reactors) where oxide growth and exchange of radioactive materials within the oxide layer became the predominant model for material/contaminant interaction. Additional simulation methods and their empirically derived basis (from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility) are discussed. In the last ten years the INL, working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC), has continued to develop contamination simulation methodologies. The most notable of these newer methodologies was developed to compare the efficacy of different decontamination technologies against radiological dispersal device (RDD, 'dirty bomb') type of contamination. There are many different scenarios for how RDD contamination may be spread, but the most commonly used one at the INL involves the dispersal of an aqueous solution containing radioactive Cs-137. This method was chosen during the DARPA projects and has continued through the NHSRC series of decontamination trials and also gives a tenacious 'fixed' contamination. Much has been learned about the interaction of cesium contamination with building materials, particularly concrete, throughout these tests. The effects of porosity, cation-exchange capacity of the material and the amount of dirt and debris on the surface are very important factors. The interaction of the contaminant/substrate with the particular decontamination technology is also very important. Results of decontamination testing from hundreds of contaminated coupons have lead to certain conclusions about the contamination and the type of decontamination methods being deployed. A recent addition to the DARPA initiated methodology simulates the deposition of nuclear fallout. This contamination differs from previous tests in that it has been developed and validated purely to simulate a 'loose' type of contamination. This may represent the first time that a radiologically contaminated 'fallout' stimulant has been developed to reproducibly test decontamination methods. While no contaminant/methodology may serve as a complete example of all aspects that could be seen in the field, the study of this family of simulation methods provides insight into the nature of radiological contamination.

  12. Health and Safety Research Division RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    b+^"4-- F Health and Safety Research Division RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT 464 DAVISON AVENUE, I4AYWOOD, NEW JERSEY September 1981 Work performed as part of the REMEDIAL ACTION SURVEY AND CERTI FICATION ACTIVITIES OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY f:. J . , LIST OF FIGURES LIST OF TAELES CONTENTS Page i v INTRODUCTION. 1 SURVEY I.IETHODS. 2 SURVEY RESULTS" 2 0utdoor Survey Results 2

  13. Health and Safety Research Divlsion RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    u+'.nop-s' ]._"' Contpact No. tl-7405-eng-25 Health and Safety Research Divlsion RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT 467 LATHAI,I STREET, MAYWOOD, NEW JERSEY September 1981 Work perfonned as part of the REMEDIAL ACTION SURVEY AND CERTIFICATION ACTIVITIES OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTI'IENT OF ENERGY CONTENTS Page i v LIST OF FIGURES LIST OF TABLES INTRODUCTION SURVEY METHODS v 1 2 2 2 3 4 5 SURVEY RESUL

  14. OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY LABORATORY RESULTS OF THE INDEPENDENT RADIOLOGICAL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    L15 ) pouiuh, _Ols~~~t~~ ^ORNL/RASA-86/70 (LN006V) OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY LABORATORY RESULTS OF THE INDEPENDENT RADIOLOGICAL 'i * rf-if nVERIFICATION SURVEY AT 121 AVENUE F, LODI, NEW JERSEY (LN006V) M. G. Yalcintas C. A. Johnson Access to the information in this report is limited to those indicated on the distribution list and to Department of Energy OPfRATED BY and Department of Energy Contractors MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY This

  15. OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY LABORATORY RESULTS OF THE INDEPENDENT RADIOLOGICAL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4q /L~ÂŁe _ *^^.^^^Al~ fl1b /ORNL/RASA-86/69 (LN005V) OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY LABORATORY RESULTS OF THE INDEPENDENT RADIOLOGICAL L'ririir g ~VERIFICATION SURVEY AT 3 HANCOCK STREET, LODI, NEW JERSEY (LN005V) M. G. Yalcintas C. A. Johnson Access to the information in this report is limited to those indicated on the distribution list and to Department of Energy OPERATED BY and Department of Energy Contractors MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

  16. OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF THE INDEPENDENT RADIOLOGICAL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ornl<^~~ ~~ORNL/RASA-86/64 (MJ18V) orni OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF THE INDEPENDENT RADIOLOGICAL EZ-BBBB - *VERIFICATION SURVEY AT THE BALLOD ASSOCIATES PROPERTY, ROCHELLE PARK, NEW JERSEY (MJ18V) M. G. Yalcintas C. A. Johnson Access to the information in this report is limited to those indicated on the distribution list and to Department of Energy and Department of Energy Contractors OPERATED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

  17. I RADIOLOGICAL SCOPING SURVEY OF FO,RMER MONSANTO' FACILITIES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -I a.d *4dk *-f--l- --- I. ,e-- - .- --_ -- -. ;,. -* " . I . RADIOLOGICAL SCOPING SURVEY OF FO,RMER MONSANTO' FACILITIES (Unit XII and W a rehouse) DAYTON, OHIO Report Date: 4 September 1997 Survey Dak 27 Aitgust 1991 Prepared by: Mark L. Mays, Chief Radiation Safety Branch Sponsored by: M iamisburg Environmental Matigement Reject Office Ohio FTekl Ofice U.S.. Department of Energy Conducted by: %diation Safety Branch Of&e of Environmental Management ggtb Air Base W ing U.S. Departmtnt

  18. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE-HDBK-1122-99 July 1999 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHNICIAN TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce,

  19. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Unit Analysis & Conversion Instructor's Guide 1.02-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Unit Analysis & Conversion Module Number: 1.02 Objectives: 1.02.01 Identify the commonly used unit systems of measurement and the base units for mass, length, and time in each system. 1.02.02 Identify the values and abbreviations for SI prefixes. 1.02.03 Given a measurement and the appropriate conversion factor(s) or conversion factor table, convert the measurement to the

  20. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Physical Sciences Instructor's Guide 1.03-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Physical Sciences Module Number: 1.03 Objectives: 1.03.01 Define the following terms as they relate to physics: a. Work b. Force c. Energy 1.03.02 Identify and describe four forms of energy. 1.03.03 State the Law of Conservation of Energy. 1.03.04 Distinguish between a solid, a liquid, and a gas in terms of shape and volume. 1.03.05 Identify the basic structure of the atom, including the

  1. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Physics Instructor's Guide 1.04-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Nuclear Physics Module Number: 1.04 Objectives: 1.04.01 Identify the definitions of the following terms: a. Nucleon b. Nuclide c. Isotope 1.04.02 Identify the basic principles of the mass-energy equivalence concept. 1.04.03 Identify the definitions of the following terms: a. Mass defect b. Binding energy c. Binding energy per nucleon 1.04.04 Identify the definitions of the following terms: a.

  2. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7 Interaction of Radiation with Matter Instructor's Guide 1.07-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Interaction of Radiation with Matter Module Number: 1.07 Objectives: 1.07.01 Identify the definitions of the following terms: a. ionization b. excitation c. bremsstrahlung 1.07.02 Identify the definitions of the following terms: a. specific ionization b. linear energy transfer (LET) c. stopping power d. range e. W-value 1.07.03 Identify the two major mechanisms of energy

  3. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Biological Effects of Radiation Instructor's Guide 1.08-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Biological Effects of Radiation Module Number: 1.08 Objectives: 1.08.01 Identify the function of the following cell structures: a. Cell membrane b. Cytoplasm c. Mitochondria d. Lysosome e. Nucleus f. DNA g. Chromosomes 1.08.02 Identify effects of radiation on cell structures. 1.08.03 Define the law of Bergonie and Tribondeau. 1.08.04 Identify factors which affect the

  4. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Internal Exposure Control Instructor's Guide 1.12-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Internal Exposure Control Module Number: 1.12 Objectives: 1.12.01 Identify four ways in which radioactive materials can enter the body. 1.12.02 Given a pathway for radioactive materials into the body, identify one method to prevent or minimize entry by that pathway. 1.12.03 Identify the definition and distinguish between the terms "Annual Limit on Intake" (ALI) and

  5. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Communication Systems Instructor's Guide 2.02-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Communication Systems Module Number: 2.02 Objectives: 2.02.01 Explain the importance of good communication. 2.02.02 Identify two methods of communication and be able to determine different types of each. 2.02.03 Describe different types of communication systems. 2.02.04 Describe the FCC and DOE guidelines regarding proper use of communication systems. 2.02.05 Describe general attributes of

  6. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Counting Errors and Statistics Instructor's Guide 2.03-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Counting Errors and Statistics Module Number: 2.03 Objectives: 2.03.01. Identify five general types of errors that can occur when analyzing radioactive samples, and describe the effect of each source of error on sample measurements. 2.03.02. State two applications of counting statistics in sample analysis. 2.03.03. Define the following terms: a. mode b. median c. mean 2.03.04.

  7. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Dosimetry Instructor's Guide 2.04-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Dosimetry Module Number: 2.04 Objectives: 2.04.01 Identify the DOE external exposure limits for general employees. 2.04.02 Identify the DOE limits established for the embryo/fetus of a declared pregnant female general employee. L 2.04.03 Identify the administrative exposure control guidelines at your site, including those for the: a. General Employee b. Member of the Public/Minor c. Incidents and

  8. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Air Sampling Program/Methods Instructor's Guide 2.06-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Air Sampling Program/Methods Module Number: 2.06 Objectives: 2.06.01 State the primary objectives of an air monitoring program. 2.06.02 Describe the three physical states of airborne radioactive contaminants. 2.06.03 List and describe the primary considerations to ensure a representative air sample is obtained. 2.06.04 Define the term "isokinetic sampling" as associated

  9. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8 Radioactive Source Control Instructor's Guide 2.08-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radioactive Source Control Module Number: 2.08 Objectives: 2.08.01 Describe the requirements for radioactive sources per 10 CFR 835. L 2.08.02 Identify the characteristics of radioactive sources that must be controlled at your site. L 2.08.03 Identify the packaging, marking, and labeling requirements for radioactive sources. L 2.08.04 Describe the approval and posting requirements

  10. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Monitoring Instructor's Guide 2.09-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Environmental Monitoring Module Number: 2.09 Objectives: 2.09.01 State the goals of an environmental monitoring program. 2.09.02 State the exposure limits to the general public as they apply to environmental monitoring. 2.09.03 Define the term "critical nuclide." 2.09.04 Define the term "critical pathway." L 2.09.05 State locations frequently surveyed for

  11. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Instructor's Guide 2.14-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Personnel Decontamination Module Number: 2.14 Objectives: 2.14.01 List the three factors which determine the actions taken in decontamination of personnel. L 2.14.02 List the preliminary actions and notifications required by the RCT for an individual suspected to be contaminated. L 2.14.03 List the actions to be taken by the RCT when contamination of clothing is confirmed. L 2.14.04 List the actions to be taken

  12. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Instructor's Guide 2.18-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Air Sampling Equipment Module Number: 2.18 Objectives: 2.18.01 Identify the factors that affect the operator's selection of a portable air sampler. L 2.18.02 Identify the physical and operating characteristics and the limitation(s) of the Staplex and Radeco portable air samplers. L 2.18.03 Identify the physical and operating characteristics and the limitation(s) of Motor air pumps. L 2.18.04 List the steps for

  13. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Unit Analysis & Conversion Study Guide 1.02-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Unit Analysis & Conversion Module Number: 1.02 Objectives: 1.02.01 Identify the commonly used unit systems of measurement and the base units for mass, length, and time in each system. 1.02.02 Identify the values and abbreviations for SI prefixes. 1.02.03 Given a measurement and the appropriate conversion factor(s) or conversion factor table, convert the measurement to the specified

  14. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Physical Sciences Study Guide 1.03-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Physical Sciences Module Number: 1.03 Objectives: 1.03.01 Define the following terms as they relate to physics: a. Work b. Force c. Energy 1.03.02 Identify and describe four forms of energy. 1.03.03 State the Law of Conservation of Energy. 1.03.04 Distinguish between a solid, a liquid, and a gas in terms of shape and volume. 1.03.05 Identify the basic structure of the atom, including the

  15. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4 - Nuclear Physics Study Guide 1.04-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Nuclear Physics Module Number: 1.04 Objectives: 1.04.01 Identify the definitions of the following terms: a. Nucleon b. Nuclide c. Isotope 1.04.02 Identify the basic principles of the mass-energy equivalence concept. 1.04.03 Identify the definitions of the following terms: a. Mass defect b. Binding energy c. Binding energy per nucleon 1.04.04 Identify the definitions of the following terms: a.

  16. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8 Biological Effects of Radiation Study Guide 1.08-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Biological Effects of Radiation Module Number: 1.08 Objectives: 1.08.01 Identify the function of the following cell structures: a. Cell membrane b. Cytoplasm c. Mitochondria d. Lysosome e. Nucleus f. DNA g. Chromosomes 1.08.02 Identify effects of radiation on cell structures. 1.08.03 Define the law of Bergonie and Tribondeau. 1.08.04 Identify factors which affect the radiosensitivity

  17. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Internal Exposure Control Study Guide 1.12-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Internal Exposure Control Module Number: 1.12 Objectives: 1.12.01 Identify four ways in which radioactive materials can enter the body. 1.12.02 Given a pathway for radioactive materials into the body, identify one method to prevent or minimize entry by that pathway. 1.12.03 Identify the definition and distinguish between the terms "Annual Limit on Intake" (ALI) and "Derived

  18. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Number TRNG-0003 Module 1.13 Radiation Detector Theory Study Guide 1.13-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiation Detector Theory Module Number: 1.13 Objectives: 1.13.01 Identify the three fundamental laws associated with electrical charges. 1.13.02 Identify the definition of current, voltage and resistance and their respective units. 1.13.03 Select the function of the detector and readout circuitry components in a radiation measurement system. 1.13.04 Identify the

  19. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Communication Systems Study Guide 2.02-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Communication Systems Module Number: 2.02 Objectives: 2.02.01 Explain the importance of good communication. 2.02.02 Identify two methods of communication and be able to determine different types of each. 2.02.03 Describe different types of communication systems. 2.02.04 Describe the FCC and DOE guidelines regarding proper use of communication systems. 2.02.05 Describe general attributes of good

  20. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Counting Errors and Statistics Study Guide 2.03-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Counting Errors and Statistics Module Number: 2.03 Objectives: 2.03.01. Identify five general types of errors that can occur when analyzing radioactive samples, and describe the effect of each source of error on sample measurements. 2.03.02. State two applications of counting statistics in sample analysis. 2.03.03. Define the following terms: a. mode b. median c. mean 2.03.04. Given a

  1. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Dosimetry Study Guide 2.04-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Dosimetry Module Number: 2.04 Objectives: 2.04.01 Identify the DOE external exposure limits for general employees. 2.04.02 Identify the DOE limits established for the embryo/fetus of a declared pregnant female general employee. i 2.04.03 Identify the administrative exposure control guidelines at your site, including those for the: a. General employee b. Member of the public/minor c. Incidents and

  2. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Air Sampling Program/Methods Study Guide 2.06-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Air Sampling Program/Methods Module Number: 2.06 Objectives: 2.06.01 State the primary objectives of an air monitoring program. 2.06.02 Describe the three physical states of airborne radioactive contaminants. 2.06.03 List and describe the primary considerations to ensure a representative air sample is obtained. 2.06.04 Define the term "isokinetic sampling" as associated with

  3. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radioactive Source Control Study Guide 2.08-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radioactive Source Control Module Number: 2.08 Objectives: 2.08.01 Describe the requirements for radioactive sources per 10 CFR 835. i 2.08.02 Identify the characteristics of radioactive sources that must be controlled at your site. i 2.08.03 Identify the packaging, marking, and labeling requirements for radioactive sources. i 2.08.04 Describe the approval and posting requirements for

  4. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Study Guide 2.14-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Personnel Decontamination Module Number: 2.14 Objectives: 2.14.01 List the three factors which determine the actions taken in decontamination of personnel. i 2.14.02 List the preliminary actions and notifications required by the RCT for an individual suspected to be contaminated. i 2.14.03 List the actions to be taken by the RCT when contamination of clothing is confirmed. i 2.14.04 List the actions to be taken by the

  5. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Study Guide 2.18-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Air Sampling Equipment Module Number: 2.18 Objectives: 2.18.01 Identify the factors that affect the operator's selection of a portable air sampler. i 2.18.02 Identify the physical and operating characteristics and the limitation(s) of the Staplex and Radeco portable air samplers. i 2.18.03 Identify the physical and operating characteristics and the limitation(s) of Motor air pumps. i 2.18.04 List the steps for a

  6. DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    41-2001 April 2001 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Assessor Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of

  7. DOE-STD-1098-99; Radiological Control

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1098-99 July 1999 Reaffirmation December 2004 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ii This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public

  8. DOE-STD-1098-99; Radiological Control

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1098-99 July 1999 Reaffirmation December 2004 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ii This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public

  9. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter The Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter is a monthly electronic newsletter that provides information on NREL's research, development, and deployment of transportation and hydrogen technologies. Photo of a stack of newspapers January 2016 Issue Sustainable Mobility Read the latest issue of the newsletter. Subscribe: To receive new issues by email, subscribe to the newsletter. Archives: For past issues, read the newsletter archives. Printable Version

  10. NREL: Transportation Research - Sustainable Transportation Basics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an introduction to sustainable transportation. NREL research supports development of electric, hybrid, hydrogen fuel cell, biofuel, natural gas, and propane vehicle technologies. ...

  11. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- FRMAC Response Phases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phases NNSA/NFO Language Options U.S. DOE/NNSA - Nevada Field Office Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Response Phases Consequence Management Home Team (CMHT) PDF icon CMHT Brochure (pdf, 2 MB) The Consequence Management Home Team (CMHT) functions as a virtual extension of the FRMAC when a full FRMAC has not yet been, or will not be, deployed. The same products and assistance are available in CMHT as with a full FRMAC with the exception of field monitoring capabilities.

  12. NV/YMP radiological control manual, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gile, A.L.

    1996-11-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the adjacent Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) are located in Nye County, Nevada. The NTS has been the primary location for testing nuclear explosives in the continental US since 1951. Current activities include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for US defense-generated waste, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, and non-nuclear test operations such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the hazardous Materials (HAZMAT) Spill Center (HSC). Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of low-level nuclear waste and the handling of radioactive sources. Planned future remediation of contaminated land areas may also result in radiological exposures. The NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual, Revision 2, represents DOE-accepted guidelines and best practices for implementing Nevada Test Site and Yucca Mountain Project Radiation Protection Programs in accordance with the requirements of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. These programs provide protection for approximately 3,000 employees and visitors annually and include coverage for the on-site activities for both personnel and the environment. The personnel protection effort includes a DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program accredited dosimetry and personnel bioassay programs including in-vivo counting, routine workplace air sampling, personnel monitoring, and programmatic and job-specific As Low as Reasonably Achievable considerations.

  13. Radiological approaches in the evaluation of joint disease in children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poznanski, A.K.; Conway, J.J.; Shkolnik, A.; Pachman, L.M.

    1987-04-01

    In summary, the newer technologies in radiology have allowed us to visualize more clearly the manifestation of joint disease in children. The presence of small erosions and cartilage damage can be seen much better with magnetic resonance imaging than with any other modality short of arthrography, a much more invasive examination. Joint effusion, although sometimes visualized with conventional radiography, is probably best recognized with ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging, although it can be detected with computed tomography as well. For the evaluation of avascular necrosis that can be associated with steroid use in joint disease, bone scintigraphy is a simple, sensitive method. Magnetic resonance may be as or more sensitive and gives additional information as well. In the detection of change with time, conventional radiography probably will remain the standard as it is still the simplest, least expensive examination; however, it has many limitations in specific cases. Bone scintigraphy may be of value in selected cases. Although we have still not had enough experience with magnetic resonance imaging to use it as a way of evaluating progress of joint disease, it promises to be the most sensitive radiologic measure of evaluating progress as small anatomical changes can be detected within the cartilage, which cannot be done easily with other means. 27 references.

  14. Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: sampling and analysis summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Eagle, R.J.; Stuart, M.L.

    1981-07-23

    A radiological survey was conducted in the Northern Marshall Islands to document reamining external gamma exposures from nuclear tests conducted at Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. An additional program was later included to obtain terrestrial and marine samples for radiological dose assessment for current or potential atoll inhabitants. This report is the first of a series summarizing the results from the terrestrial and marine surveys. The sample collection and processing procedures and the general survey methodology are discussed; a summary of the collected samples and radionuclide analyses is presented. Over 5400 samples were collected from the 12 atolls and 2 islands and prepared for analysis including 3093 soil, 961 vegetation, 153 animal, 965 fish composite samples (average of 30 fish per sample), 101 clam, 50 lagoon water, 15 cistern water, 17 groundwater, and 85 lagoon sediment samples. A complete breakdown by sample type, atoll, and island is given here. The total number of analyses by radionuclide are 8840 for /sup 241/Am, 6569 for /sup 137/Cs, 4535 for /sup 239 +240/Pu, 4431 for /sup 90/Sr, 1146 for /sup 238/Pu, 269 for /sup 241/Pu, and 114 each for /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu. A complete breakdown by sample category, atoll or island, and radionuclide is also included.

  15. Radiological Instrumentation Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strom, Daniel J.; McConn, Ronald J.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.

    2005-05-19

    The King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into its combined sanitary and storm sewer system. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material. Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. Volume 2 of PNNL-15163 assesses the radiological instrumentation needs for detection of radiological or nuclear terrorism, in support of decisions to treat contaminated wastewater or to bypass the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP), and in support of radiation protection of the workforce, the public, and the infrastructure of the WPTP. Fixed radiation detection instrumentation should be deployed in a defense-in-depth system that provides 1) early warning of significant radioactive material on the way to the WPTP, including identification of the radionuclide(s) and estimates of the soluble concentrations, with a floating detector located in the wet well at the Interbay Pump Station and telemetered via the internet to all authorized locations; 2) monitoring at strategic locations within the plant, including 2a) the pipe beyond the hydraulic ram in the bar screen room; 2b) above the collection funnels in the fine grit facility; 2c) in the sampling tank in the raw sewage pump room; and 2d) downstream of the concentration facilities that produce 6% blended and concentrated biosolids. Engineering challenges exist for these applications. It is necessary to deploy both ultra-sensitive detectors to provide early warning and identification and detectors capable of functioning in high-dose rate environments that are likely under some scenarios, capable of functioning from 10 microrems per hour (background) up to 1000 rems per hour. Software supporting fixed spectroscopic detectors is needed to provide prompt, reliable, and simple interpretations of spectroscopic outputs that are of use to operators and decision-makers. Software to provide scientists and homeland security personnel with sufficient technical detail for identification, quantification, waste management decisions, and for the inevitable forensic and attribution needs must be developed. Computational modeling using MCNP software has demonstrated that useful detection capabilities can be deployed. In particular, any of the isotopes examined can be detected at levels between 0.01 and 0.1 ?Ci per gallon. General purpose instruments that can be used to determine the nature and extent of radioactive contamination and measure radiation levels for purposes of protecting personnel and members of the public should be available. One or more portable radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) should be available to WTD personnel. Small, portable battery-powered personal radiation monitors should be widely available WTD personnel. The personal monitors can be used for personal and group radiation protection decisions, and to alert management to the need to get expert backup. All considerations of radiological instrumentation require considerations of training and periodic retraining of personnel, as well as periodic calibration and maintenance of instruments. Routine “innocent” alarms will occur due to medical radionuclides that are legally discharged into sanitary sewers on a daily basis.

  16. Secure Transportation Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, P. W.

    2014-10-15

    Secure Transport Management Course (STMC) course provides managers with information related to procedures and equipment used to successfully transport special nuclear material. This workshop outlines these procedures and reinforces the information presented with the aid of numerous practical examples. The course focuses on understanding the regulatory framework for secure transportation of special nuclear materials, identifying the insider and outsider threat(s) to secure transportation, organization of a secure transportation unit, management and supervision of secure transportation units, equipment and facilities required, training and qualification needed.

  17. 2014 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Mike

    2015-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  18. 2013 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  19. 2011 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2012-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  20. 2010 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advance Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    mike lewis

    2011-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  1. 2012 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  2. Guam Transportation Petroleum-Use Reduction Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.

    2013-04-01

    The island of Guam has set a goal to reduce petroleum use 20% by 2020. Because transportation is responsible for one-third of on-island petroleum use, the Guam Energy Task Force (GETF), a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy and numerous Guam-based agencies and organizations, devised a specific plan by which to meet the 20% goal within the transportation sector. This report lays out GETF's plan.

  3. The Role of the Consequence Management Home Team in the Fukushima Daiichi Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pemberton, W., Mena, R., Beal, W.

    2012-05-01

    The Consequence Management Home Team is a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration asset. It assists a variety of response organizations with modeling; radiological operations planning; field monitoring techniques; and the analysis, interpretation, and distribution of radiological data. These reach-back capabilities are activated quickly to support public safety and minimize the social and economic impact of a nuclear or radiological incident. In the Fukushima Daiichi response, the Consequence Management Home Team grew to include a more broad range of support than was historically planned. From the early days of the response to the continuing involvement in supporting late phase efforts, each stage of the Consequence Management Home Team support had distinct characteristics in terms of management of incoming data streams as well as creation of products. Regardless of stage, the Consequence Management Home Team played a critical role in the Fukushima Daiichi response effort.

  4. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

  5. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials andor modal transport. Cancels DOE 1540.2 and DOE 5480.3

  6. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Canceled by DOE 460.1A

  7. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-10-02

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1.

  8. Transportation Energy Futures Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transportation accounts for 71% of total U.S. petroleum consumption and 33% of total greenhouse gas emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) study examines underexplored oil-savings and...

  9. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-05-14

    The order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE, including NNSA, offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials and for modal transportation. Supersedes DOE O 460.1B.

  10. TRANSPORT LOCOMOTIVE AND WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER ITS STANDARDS IDENTIFICATION STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.D. Draper

    2005-03-31

    To date, the project has established important to safety (ITS) performance requirements for structures, systems and components (SSCs) based on identification and categorization of event sequences that may result in a radiological release. These performance requirements are defined within the ''Nuclear Safety Design Basis for License Application'' (NSDB) (BSC 2005). Further, SSCs credited with performing safe functions are classified as ITS. In turn, performance confirmation for these SSCs is sought through the use of consensus code and standards. The purpose of this study is to identify applicable codes and standards for the waste package (WP) transporter and transport locomotive ITS SSCs. Further, this study will form the basis for selection and the extent of applicability of each code and standard. This study is based on the design development completed for License Application only. Accordingly, identification of ITS SSCs beyond those defined within the NSDB are based on designs that may be subject to further development during detail design. Furthermore, several design alternatives may still be under consideration to satisfy certain safety functions, and that final selection will not be determined until further design development has occurred. Therefore, for completeness, throughout this study alternative designs currently under consideration will be discussed. Further, the results of this study will be subject to evaluation as part of a follow-on gap analysis study. Based on the results of this study the gap analysis will evaluate each code and standard to ensure each ITS performance requirement is fully satisfied. When a performance requirement is not fully satisfied a ''gap'' is highlighted. Thereafter, the study will identify supplemental requirements to augment the code or standard to meet performance requirements. Further, the gap analysis will identify non-standard areas of the design that will be subject to a Development Plan. Non-standard components and non-standard design configurations are defined as areas of the design that do not follow standard industry practices or codes and standards. Whereby, performance confirmation can not be readily sought through use of consensus standards.

  11. Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE ...

  12. Transportation Storage Interface

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Future Extended Storage and Transportation Transportation-Storage Interface James Rubenstone Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 2012 ♦ Knoxville, Tennessee Overview * Changing policy environment * Regulatory framework-current and future * Extended storage and transportation-technical information needs * Next Steps 2 Current Policy Environment * U.S. national policy for disposition of spent

  13. Status of ion sources at National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitagawa, A.; Fujita, T.; Goto, A.; Hattori, T.; Hamano, T.; Hojo, S.; Honma, T.; Imaseki, H.; Katagiri, K.; Muramatsu, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Sekiguchi, M.; Suda, M.; Sugiura, A.; Suya, N.

    2012-02-15

    The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) maintains various ion accelerators in order to study the effects of radiation of the human body and medical uses of radiation. Two electrostatic tandem accelerators and three cyclotrons delivered by commercial companies have offered various life science tools; these include proton-induced x-ray emission analysis (PIXE), micro beam irradiation, neutron exposure, and radioisotope tracers and probes. A duoplasmatron, a multicusp ion source, a penning ion source (PIG), and an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) are in operation for these purposes. The Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is an accelerator complex for heavy-ion radiotherapy, fully developed by NIRS. HIMAC is utilized not only for daily treatment with the carbon beam but also for fundamental experiments. Several ECRISs and a PIG at HIMAC satisfy various research and clinical requirements.

  14. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation Deployment Support

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Deployment Support Photo of a car parked in front of a monument. A plug-in electric vehicle charges near the Thomas Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C. Photo from...

  15. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage This is the November 2015 issue of the Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter. November 6, 2015 Photo of a light blue car with a pump nozzle in front of a fuel ...

  16. Emergency Response Training Exercises at JLab March 3 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emergency Response Training Exercises at JLab on Thursday, March 3 Several emergency response organizations will be at Jefferson Lab on Thursday, March 3, to conduct a training session that will include hands-on exercises involving radioactive materials. In an effort to keep the JLab community informed and to prevent unnecessary alarm, an overview of the event follows. Nearly 50 individuals from the Newport News Fire Department, the Va. Dept. of Emergency Management, the Bureau of Radiological

  17. Transportation of Hazardous Evidentiary Material.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborn, Douglas.

    2005-06-01

    This document describes the specimen and transportation containers currently available for use with hazardous and infectious materials. A detailed comparison of advantages, disadvantages, and costs of the different technologies is included. Short- and long-term recommendations are also provided.3 DraftDraftDraftExecutive SummaryThe Federal Bureau of Investigation's Hazardous Materials Response Unit currently has hazardous material transport containers for shipping 1-quart paint cans and small amounts of contaminated forensic evidence, but the containers may not be able to maintain their integrity under accident conditions or for some types of hazardous materials. This report provides guidance and recommendations on the availability of packages for the safe and secure transport of evidence consisting of or contaminated with hazardous chemicals or infectious materials. Only non-bulk containers were considered because these are appropriate for transport on small aircraft. This report will addresses packaging and transportation concerns for Hazardous Classes 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 materials. If the evidence is known or suspected of belonging to one of these Hazardous Classes, it must be packaged in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR Part 173. The anthrax scare of several years ago, and less well publicized incidents involving unknown and uncharacterized substances, has required that suspicious substances be sent to appropriate analytical laboratories for analysis and characterization. Transportation of potentially hazardous or infectious material to an appropriate analytical laboratory requires transport containers that maintain both the biological and chemical integrity of the substance in question. As a rule, only relatively small quantities will be available for analysis. Appropriate transportation packaging is needed that will maintain the integrity of the substance, will not allow biological alteration, will not react chemically with the substance being shipped, and will otherwise maintain it as nearly as possible in its original condition.The recommendations provided are short-term solutions to the problems of shipping evidence, and have considered only currently commercially available containers. These containers may not be appropriate for all cases. Design, testing, and certification of new transportation containers would be necessary to provide a container appropriate for all cases.Table 1 provides a summary of the recommendations for each class of hazardous material.Table 1: Summary of RecommendationsContainerCost1-quart paint can with ArmlockTM seal ringLabelMaster(r)%242.90 eachHazard Class 3, 4, 5, 8, or 9 Small ContainersTC Hazardous Material Transport ContainerCurrently in Use4 DraftDraftDraftTable 1: Summary of Recommendations (continued)ContainerCost55-gallon open or closed-head steel drumsAll-Pak, Inc.%2458.28 - %2473.62 eachHazard Class 3, 4, 5, 8, or 9 Large Containers95-gallon poly overpack LabelMaster(r)%24194.50 each1-liter glass container with plastic coatingLabelMaster(r)%243.35 - %243.70 eachHazard Class 6 Division 6.1 Poisonous by Inhalation (PIH) Small ContainersTC Hazardous Material Transport ContainerCurrently in Use20 to 55-gallon PIH overpacksLabelMaster(r)%24142.50 - %24170.50 eachHazard Class 6 Division 6.1 Poisonous by Inhalation (PIH) Large Containers65 to 95-gallon poly overpacksLabelMaster(r)%24163.30 - %24194.50 each1-liter transparent containerCurrently in UseHazard Class 6 Division 6.2 Infectious Material Small ContainersInfectious Substance ShipperSource Packaging of NE, Inc.%24336.00 eachNone Commercially AvailableN/AHazard Class 6 Division 6.2 Infectious Material Large ContainersNone Commercially Available N/A5

  18. Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced ...

  19. Final Radiological Assessment of External Exposure for CLEAR-Line Americium Recovery Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Adam C.; Belooussova, Olga N.; Hetrick, Lucas Duane

    2014-11-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is currently planning to implement an americium recovery program. The americium, ordinarily isotopically pure 241Am, would be extracted from existing Pu materials, converted to an oxide and shipped to support fabrication of americium oxide-beryllium neutron sources. These operations would occur in the currently proposed Chloride Extraction and Actinide Recovery (CLEAR) line of glove boxes. This glove box line would be collocated with the currently-operational Experimental Chloride Extraction Line (EXCEL). The focus of this document is to provide an in-depth assessment of the currently planned radiation protection measures and to determine whether or not further design work is required to satisfy design-goal and ALARA requirements. Further, this document presents a history of americium recovery operations in the Department of Energy and high-level descriptions of the CLEAR line operations to provide a basis of comparison. Under the working assumptions adopted by this study, it was found that the evaluated design appears to mitigate doses to a level that satisfies the ALARA-in-design requirements of 10 CFR 835 as implemented by the Los Alamos National Laboratory procedure P121. The analyses indicate that extremity doses would also meet design requirements. Dose-rate calculations were performed using the radiation transport code MCNP5 and doses were estimated using a time-motion study developed in consort with the subject matter expert. A copy of this report and all supporting documentation are located on the Radiological Engineering server at Y:\\Rad Engineering\\2013 PROJECTS\\TA-55 Clear Line.

  20. integrated-transportation-models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Training Archive Integrated Transportation Models Workshop at ITM 2012 April 29, 2012 Hyatt Regency Tampa Hosted by: The Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center at Argonne National Laboratory This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. The aim of the workshop was to provide an opportunity for researchers and practitioners to discuss recent research results that can support a wider application of integrated transportation models,

  1. Intelligent Transportation Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intelligent Transportation Systems This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - TRACC Director Background The development and deployment of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) in the United States is an effort of national importance. Through the use of advanced computing, control, and communication technologies, ITS promises to greatly improve the efficiency and safety of the existing surface transportation system and reduce the

  2. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    N ti l T t ti National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Chicago, IL, May 26, 2010 Ahmad Al-Daouk Date and page number - 1 Director, National Security Department National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center - Albuquerque, NM National Transportation Stakeholders Forum OSRP * NNSA Contractors transporting in commerce, are required law to comply with applicable regulations required law to comply with applicable regulations (e.g. federal, local, tribal) * Great majority of NNSA shipments

  3. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-09-23

    Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

  4. Sustainable Transportation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

  5. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  6. Transportation Energy Futures Snapshot

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This snapshot is a summary of the EERE reports that provide a detailed analysis of opportunities and challenges along the path to a more sustainable transportation energy future.

  7. Transportation Energy Futures Snapshot

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    modes, manage the demand for transportation, and shift the fuel mix to more sustainable sources necessary to reach these significant outcomes. Coordinating a...

  8. Natural Gas Transportation Resiliency

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Transportation Resiliency Anders Johnson Director Pipeline System Design April 29, 2014 Confidential and Illustrative for discussion purposes only. The views expressed in this...

  9. NREL: Transportation Research - Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capabilities A Vision for Sustainable Transportation Line graph illustrating three pathways (biofuel, hydrogen, and electric vehicle) to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas ...

  10. WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.C. Weddle; R. Novotny; J. Cron

    1998-09-23

    The purpose of this Design Analysis is to develop preliminary design of the waste package transporter used for waste package (WP) transport and related functions in the subsurface repository. This analysis refines the conceptual design that was started in Phase I of the Viability Assessment. This analysis supports the development of a reliable emplacement concept and a retrieval concept for license application design. The scope of this analysis includes the following activities: (1) Assess features of the transporter design and evaluate alternative design solutions for mechanical components. (2) Develop mechanical equipment details for the transporter. (3) Prepare a preliminary structural evaluation for the transporter. (4) Identify and recommend the equipment design for waste package transport and related functions. (5) Investigate transport equipment interface tolerances. This analysis supports the development of the waste package transporter for the transport, emplacement, and retrieval of packaged radioactive waste forms in the subsurface repository. Once the waste containers are closed and accepted, the packaged radioactive waste forms are termed waste packages (WP). This terminology was finalized as this analysis neared completion; therefore, the term disposal container is used in several references (i.e., the System Description Document (SDD)) (Ref. 5.6). In this analysis and the applicable reference documents, the term ''disposal container'' is synonymous with ''waste package''.

  11. Radiological survey report for the Weldon Spring Raffinate Pits site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-08-01

    The Weldon Spring Site (WSS) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facility comprising the Raffinate Pits facility, the Quarry, and potentially contaminated vicinity properties. Radiological characterization of the WSS will be conducted in three phases: the Raffinate Pits facility, Quarry, and the vicinity properties. Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) and its radiological support subcontractor, Eberline Instrument Corporation (EIC), conducted a radiological characterization survey of the Raffinate Pits during 1982 and 1983 in support of on-site construction work and a technical evaluation of site geology. The survey consisted of direct beta-gamma surface readings, near-surface gamma readings, exposure level measurements, and gamma-logs of boreholes. Soil samples were also collected from the surface, shallow boreholes, and trenches on the site. This report describes the radiological characterization of the Raffinate Pits facility, the procedures used to conduct the survey, the survey results, and their significance. 5 references, 9 figures, 8 tables.

  12. RPS 11.2 Radiological Work Practices 3/9/95

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the practices of workers performing tasks in radiological controlled areas to ensure that these practices protect the safety and health of the...

  13. Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) following a postulated accident in PHWRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soni, N.; Kansal, M.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.

    2012-07-01

    Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) following postulated accident i.e Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) with failed Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), performed as part of the reactor safety analysis of a typical 700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor(PHWR). The rationale behind the assessment is that the public needs to be protected in the event that the postulated accident results in radionuclide release outside containment. Radionuclides deliver dose to the human body through various pathways namely, plume submersion, exposure due to ground deposition, inhalation and ingestion. The total exposure dose measured in terms of total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) is the sum of doses to a hypothetical adult human at exclusion zone boundary by all the exposure pathways. The analysis provides the important inputs to decide upon the type of emergency counter measures to be adopted during the postulated accident. The importance of the various pathways in terms of contribution to the total effective dose equivalent(TEDE) is also assessed with respect to time of exposure. Inhalation and plume gamma dose are the major contributors towards TEDE during initial period of accident whereas ingestion and ground shine dose start dominating in TEDE in the extended period of exposure. Moreover, TEDE is initially dominated by I-131, Kr-88, Te-132, I-133 and Sr-89, whereas, as time progresses, Xe-133,I-131 and Te-132 become the main contributors. (authors)

  14. A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This resource handbook was compiled for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Transportation Risk Assessment Working Group. This document includes the first of a planned series of discussion papers on topical aspects of transportation risk problems. These discussion papers are intended to provide practical advice to program managers and technical personnel responsible for preparing NEPA documents and other transportation risk assessments.

  15. A Resource Handbook on DOE Transportation Risk Assessment (DOE, 2002)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This resource handbook was compiled for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Transportation Risk Assessment Working Group. This document includes the first of a planned series of discussion papers on topical aspects of transportation risk problems. These discussion papers are intended to provide practical advice to program managers and technical personnel responsible for preparing NEPA documents and other transportation risk assessments.

  16. Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare Public Health Service . Environmental Health Service May 1970 OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF THE SOUTHWESTERN RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY from July through December 1967 This surveillance performed under a Memorandum of Understanding (No. SF 54 373) for the U. S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION TABLEOFCONTENTS ABSTRACT TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES I. INTRODUCTION II. OPERATIONAL

  17. RESRAD Family of Codes - A Suite of Tools for Environmental Radiological Dose Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    RESRAD Family of Codes - A Suite of Tools for Environmental Radiological Dose Assessment Charley Yu, PhD, CHP RESRAD Program Manager Environmental Science Division Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL Presented at Environmental Radiological Assistance Directory Web Conference June 27, 2012 Presentation Outline  RESRAD Family of Codes Overview  Brief Overview of the RESRAD Methodology  RESRAD-BUILD Overview  RESRAD-OFFSITE Overview  RESRAD-BIOTA Overview  Summary 2 RESRAD

  18. SWKHL-&Slr OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF THE SOUTHWESTERN RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SWKHL-&Slr OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF THE SOUTHWESTERN RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY from January through June 1968 bY Environmental Surveillance Western Environmental Research Laboratory ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY . Published January 1972 This surveillance performed under a Memorandum of Understanding (No. SF 54 373) for the U. S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION SWRKL-81r OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF THE SOUTHWESTERN RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY from January through June

  19. SWRHL-108r OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF THE SOUTHWESTERN RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gyg?- SWRHL-108r OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF THE SOUTHWESTERN RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY from January through June 1970 Environmental Surveillance Western Environmental Research Laboratory ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Published August 1972 This surveillance performed under a Memorandum of Understanding (No. SF 54 373) for the U.S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION -- SWRH?-108r OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF THE SOUTHWESTERN RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY from January through June

  20. SWRHL-47r OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF THE SOUTHWESTERN RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    47r OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF THE SOUTHWESTERN RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH LABORATORY from January through June 1967 bY Environmental Surveillance Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare' Public Health Service Environmental Health Service March 1970 This surveillance performed under a Memorandum of Understanding (No. SF 54 373) for the U. S. MOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION SWRHL-47r OFF -SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF THE SOU IHWESTERN

  1. Hospital Triage in the First 24 Hours after a Nuclear or Radiological Disaster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hospital Triage in the First 24 Hours after a Nuclear or Radiological Disaster Berger, ME; Leonard, RB; Ricks, RC; Wiley, AL; Lowry, PC; Flynn, DF Abstract: This article addresses the problems emergency physicians would face in the event of a nuclear or radiological catastrophe. It presents information about what needs to be done so that useful information will be gathered and reasonable decisions made in the all important triage period. A brief introductory explanation of radiation injury is

  2. Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program | Department of Energy Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Paper presented at the Waste Management 2012 Conference. February 26 through

  3. Don Haward joins WIPP as manager of radiological control and emergency preparedness

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Don Harward Joins WIPP as Manager of Radiological Control and Emergency Preparedness CARLSBAD, N.M., May 12, 2000 - The Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division (WID) has named Don Harward as manager of Radiological Control and Emergency Preparedness at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Westinghouse is the management and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy's Carlsbad Area Office at WIPP. "Don comes to the division with many years of experience in radiation safety and

  4. Unified Resolve 2014: A Proof of Concept for Radiological Support to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Incident Commanders | Department of Energy Unified Resolve 2014: A Proof of Concept for Radiological Support to Incident Commanders Unified Resolve 2014: A Proof of Concept for Radiological Support to Incident Commanders Daniel Blumenthal*, U.S. Department of Energy ; John Crapo, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education; Gerard Vavrina, U.S. Department of Energy; Katharine McLellan McLellan, U.S. Department of Energy; Michael J. Gresalfi, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Abstract: In

  5. Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    36-2009 July 2009 DOE STANDARD GUIDE OF GOOD PRACTICES FOR OCCUPATIONAL RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION IN URANIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1136-2009 Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities i This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at

  6. Health and Safety Research Division RESULTS FROM A RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY ON YARDEORO AVENUE,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Health and Safety Research Division RESULTS FROM A RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY ON YARDEORO AVENUE, ALBANY, AND CENTRAL AVENUE,, COLONIE, NEW YORK PROPERTIES AL013 - AL028 July 1984 Work performed as part of the RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY ACTIVITIES PROGRAM OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 operated by MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under Contract No. DE-AC05840R21400 _- _^." .-. ..-.- _---.--_ -... .- Fk. 3 ,=. Y)*cx gs 1 XEC @ d +I? ,%r $ g

  7. PRELIMINqRY RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY REPORT OF THE FORMER STATEN ISLAND WAREHOUSE SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    pJ y, 22/4 PRELIMINqRY RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY REPORT OF THE FORMER STATEN ISLAND WAREHOUSE SITE (ARCHER-DANIELS MIOLANO COMPANY) AT PORT RICHMOND, NEW YORK ./ Work performed by the Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 . . ' October 1980 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Former1 y Uti 1 i ted Sites-- Remedial Action Program PRELIMINARY RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY REPORT OF

  8. DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Student's Guide, Part 4 of 5

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Student's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy Radiological Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Student's Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. Radiological Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Student's Guide iii Table of Contents Regulatory Documents..................................................................................... Module1-1 10 CFR Part 835, Background and

  9. DOE-HDBK-1143-2001; Radiological Control Training for Supervisors - Student's Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    43-2001 Student's Guide Notes I. Introduction II. Problem analysis Supervisors of radiological workers are often faced with critical decisions. Providing a model for strategic decision making will ensure that these critical decisions are made in an efficient, rational manner. Module 6-1 Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1143-2001 Student's Guide Notes A. Stating the mission In making decisions, the organization's mission and resultant goals should always be considered.

  10. Transport Version 3

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-05-16

    The Transport version 3 (T3) system uses the Network News Transfer Protocol (NNTP) to move data from sources to a Data Reporisoty (DR). Interested recipients subscribe to newsgroups to retrieve data. Data in transport is protected by AES-256 and RSA cryptographic services provided by the external OpenSSL cryptographic libraries.

  11. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-04

    To establish safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1A. Canceled by DOE O 460.1C.

  12. Fact #636: August 16, 2010 Transportation Energy Use by Mode | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 6: August 16, 2010 Transportation Energy Use by Mode Fact #636: August 16, 2010 Transportation Energy Use by Mode Highway vehicles were responsible for 80.7% of all transportation energy use in 2008. Light vehicles make up the majority of highway fuel use. Transportation Energy Use by Mode, 2008 Bar graph showing the transportation energy use by mode (buses, rail, pipeline, water, air, medium/heavy trucks, and light vehicles) for 2008. For more detailed information, see supporting

  13. Utilization of Local Law Enforcement Aerial Resources in Consequence Management (CM) Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasiolek, Piotr T.; Malchow, Russell L.

    2013-03-12

    During the past decade the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was instrumental in enhancing the nation’s ability to detect and prevent a radiological or nuclear attack in the highest risk cities. Under the DHS Securing the Cities initiative, nearly 13,000 personnel in the New York City region have been trained in preventive radiological and nuclear detection operations, and nearly 8,500 pieces of radiological detection equipment have been funded. As part of the preventive radiological/nuclear detection (PRND) mission, several cities have received funding to purchase commercial aerial radiation detection systems. In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Aerial Measuring System (AMS) program started providing Mobile Aerial Radiological Surveillance (MARS) training to such assets, resulting in over 150 HAZMAT teams’ officers and pilots from 10 law enforcement organizations and fire departments being trained in the aerial radiation detection. From the beginning, the MARS training course covered both the PRND and consequence management (CM) missions. Even if the law enforcement main focus is PRND, their aerial assets can be utilized in the collection of initial radiation data for post-event radiological CM response. Based on over 50 years of AMS operational experience and information collected during MARS training, this presentation will focus on the concepts of CM response using aerial assets as well as utilizing law enforcement/fire department aerial assets in CM. Also discussed will be the need for establishing closer relationships between local jurisdictions’ aerial radiation detection capabilities and state and local radiation control program directors, radiological health department managers, etc. During radiological events these individuals may become primary experts/advisers to Incident Commanders for radiological emergency response, especially in the early stages of a response. The knowledge of the existence, specific capabilities, and use of local aerial radiation detection systems would be critical in planning the response, even before federal assets arrive on the scene. The relationship between local and federal aerial assets and the potential role for the further use of the MARS training and expanded AMS Reachback capabilities in facilitating such interactions will be discussed.

  14. Micro transport machine and methods for using same

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stalford, Harold

    2015-10-13

    A micro transport machine may include a substrate and a movable device comprising a drive component responsive to a wireless power source. The movable device is operable to move between a plurality of disparate areas on the substrate.

  15. Status Update on the NCRP Scientific Committee SC 5-1 Report: Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Incidents - 13450

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S.Y.

    2013-07-01

    In August 2008, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued its final Protective Action Guide (PAG) for radiological dispersal device (RDD) and improvised nuclear device (IND) incidents. This document specifies protective actions for public health during the early and intermediate phases and cleanup guidance for the late phase of RDD or IND incidents, and it discusses approaches to implementing the necessary actions. However, while the PAG provides specific guidance for the early and intermediate phases, it prescribes no equivalent guidance for the late-phase cleanup actions. Instead, the PAG offers a general description of a complex process using a site-specific optimization approach. This approach does not predetermine cleanup levels but approaches the problem from the factors that would bear on the final agreed-on cleanup levels. Based on this approach, the decision-making process involves multifaceted considerations including public health, the environment, and the economy, as well as socio-political factors. In an effort to fully define the process and approach to be used in optimizing late-phase recovery and site restoration following an RDD or IND incident, DHS has tasked the NCRP with preparing a comprehensive report addressing all aspects of the optimization process. Preparation of the NCRP report is a three-year (2010-2013) project assigned to a scientific committee, the Scientific Committee (SC) 5-1; the report was initially titled, Approach to Optimizing Decision Making for Late- Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Terrorism Incidents. Members of SC 5-1 represent a broad range of expertise, including homeland security, health physics, risk and decision analysis, economics, environmental remediation and radioactive waste management, and communication. In the wake of the Fukushima nuclear accident of 2011, and guided by a recent process led by the White House through a Principal Level Exercise (PLE), the optimization approach has since been expanded to include off-site contamination from major nuclear power plant accidents as well as other nuclear or radiological incidents. The expanded application under the current guidance has thus led to a broadened scope of the report, which is reflected in its new title, Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Incidents. The NCRP report, which is due for publication in 2013, will substantiate the current DHS guidance by clarifying and elaborating on the processes required for the development and implementation of procedures for optimizing decision making for late-phase recovery, enabling the establishment of cleanup goals on a site-specific basis. The report will contain a series of topics addressing important issues related to the long-term recovery from nuclear or radiological incidents. Special topics relevant to supporting the optimization of the decision-making process will include cost-benefit analysis, radioactive waste management, risk communication, stakeholder interaction, risk assessment, and decontamination approaches and techniques. The committee also evaluated past nuclear and radiological incidents for their relevance to the report, including the emerging issues associated with the Fukushima nuclear accident. Thus, due to the commonality of the late-phase issues (such as the potential widespread contamination following an event), the majority of the information pertaining to the response in the late-phase decision-making period, including site-specific optimization framework and approach, could be used or adapted for use in case of similar situations that are not due to terrorism, such as those that would be caused by major nuclear facility accidents or radiological incidents. To ensure that the report and the NCRP recommendations are current and relevant to the effective implementation of federal guidance, SC 5-1 has actively coordinated with the agencies of interest and other relevant stakeholders throughout the duration of the project. The resulting report will be an important resource to guide those involved in late-phase recovery efforts following a nuclear or radiological incident. (authors)

  16. Unified Resolve 2014: A Proof of Concept for Radiological Support...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in order to effectively manage response operations. Unlike the spectrum of natural disasters which occur with some frequency, and which our nation's first responder community...

  17. ORISE: DeepwaterHorizon and Nuclear & Radiological Incidents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    System's Incident Command System was utilized during the response, there were immense command and coordination challenges for the unified management team never before...

  18. ORISE: REAC/TS Radiological Incident Medical Consultation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORISE provides advice and consultation to emergency personnel responsible for the medical management of radiation accidents. REACTS strengthens hospital preparedness for radiation...

  19. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology This is the May 2015 issue of the Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter. May 28, 2015 Photo of a car refueling at a hydrogen dispensing station. DOE's H2FIRST project focuses on accelerating the acceptance of hydrogen infrastructure. Photo by John De La Rosa, NREL 33660 New H2FIRST Reports Detail Hydrogen Station Designs, Contaminant Detection Two new reports have been published by NREL and Sandia National Laboratories

  20. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sustainable Mobility Sustainable Mobility This is the January 2016 issue of the Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter. January 26, 2016 Photo of a red electric vehicle in front of ESIF A recent mobility workshop showcased an array of plug-in electric, hybrid electric, and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. Image by Ellen Jaskol/NREL 35097 Summit Explores the Future of Dynamic Mobility Systems NREL brought together local and national thought leaders to discuss the convergence of connectivity,