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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident This Transportation Emergency...

2

TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program » TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) Once the jurisdiction has completed an evaluation of their plans and procedures, they will need to address any gaps in training. To assist, TEPP has developed the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) program. MERRTT provides fundamental knowledge for responding to transportation incidents involving radiological material and builds on training in existing hazardous materials curricula. MERRTT satisfies the training requirements outlined in the Waste Isolation Pilot

3

Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) Model Recovery Procedure contains the recommended elements for developing and conducting recovery planning at transportation incident scene...

4

Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This part should contain a general statement of the intent of this Annex. To provide for the planning, preparedness and coordination of emergency service efforts to respond to a transportation...

5

Radiological Emergency Response Plan (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes a radiological emergency response plan fund, into which any entity operating a nuclear reactor or storing nuclear fuel and radioactive waste in this state (referred to...

6

NNSA Conducts Radiological Response Training in Kazakhstan |...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Radiological Response Training in Kazakhstan | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

7

NNSA Conducts International Radiological Response Training in...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International Radiological Response Training in Vienna | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

8

DOE O 153.1, Departmental Radiological Emergency Response Assets  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the DOE/NNSA national radiological emergency response assets and capabilities and Nuclear Emergency ...

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

9

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMA 358, 05/10 FEMA 358, 05/10 Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q Q Law Enforcement ____________________________________ Fire ___________________________________________ Medical ____________________________________________ State Radiological Assistance ___________________________ Local Government Official ______________________________ Local Emergency Management Agency ___________________ State Emergency Management Agency ___________________ HAZMAT Team ______________________________________ Water Pollution Control ________________________________ CHEMTEL (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-255-3924 _________ CHEMTREC (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-424-9300 _______

10

Current Trends in Gamma Radiation Detection for Radiological Emergency Response  

SciTech Connect

Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of interdisciplinary research and development has taken placetechniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportationthe so-called second line of defense.

Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Health Physics journal features U.S. radiological response to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics journal features U.S. radiological response to Fukushima accident | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

12

Current Trends in Gamma Ray Detection for Radiological Emergency Response  

SciTech Connect

Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies.

Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

13

Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range draft  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range draft environmental assessment available for public review and comment Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range draft environmental assessment available for public review and comment August 4, 2010 Media contact: Brad Bugger, 208-526-0833 The public is invited to read and comment on a draft environmental assessment that the U.S. Department of Energy has published for a proposed radiological response training range at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). At the range, INL experts would train personnel, conduct exercises, and perform technology evaluation and demonstrations in support of national technical nuclear forensic and radiological emergency response programs. �The Radiological Response Training Range will allow emergency responders to prepare for a major radiological incident by training in an environment that safely simulates scenarios they might encounter,� said Vic Pearson, DOE�s document manager for the environmental assessment. �Activities at the range would directly support the nation�s readiness to respond to a radiological incident, but more importantly, would enable responders to develop proficiency in characterizing the scene in support of determining the origins of the incident.�

14

NNSA conducts radiological response training in Kazakhstan |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform...

15

NNSA Conducts International Radiological Response Training in...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our...

16

Radiological Emergency Response Health and Safety Manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual was created to provide health and safety (H&S) guidance for emergency response operations. The manual is organized in sections that define each aspect of H and S Management for emergency responses. The sections are as follows: Responsibilities; Health Physics; Industrial Hygiene; Safety; Environmental Compliance; Medical; and Record Maintenance. Each section gives guidance on the types of training expected for managers and responders, safety processes and procedures to be followed when performing work, and what is expected of managers and participants. Also included are generic forms that will be used to facilitate or document activities during an emergency response. These ensure consistency in creating useful real-time and archival records and help to prevent the loss or omission of information.

D. R. Bowman

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

SU?E?I?89: Real?Time Information and Decision Support for Radiological Emergency Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Emergency response and medical preparedness for radiological incidents is one of the critical cornerstones for Homeland Security

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Neutron Energy Measurements in Radiological Emergency Response Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present significant results in recent advances in the determination of neutron energy. Neutron energy measurements are a small but very significant part of radiological emergency response applications. Mission critical information can be obtained by analyzing the neutron energy given off from radioactive materials. In the case of searching for special nuclear materials, neutron energy information from an unknown source can be of paramount importance.

Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Paul Guss, Michael Hornish, Scott Wilde, Tom Stampahar, Michael Reed

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMA 358, 0510 Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q...

20

Commercial low-level radioactive waste transportation liability and radiological risk  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared for States, compact regions, and other interested parties to address two subjects related to transporting low-level radioactive waste to disposal facilities. One is the potential liabilities associated with low-level radioactive waste transportation from the perspective of States as hosts to low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The other is the radiological risks of low-level radioactive waste transportation for drivers, the public, and disposal facility workers.

Quinn, G.J.; Brown, O.F. II; Garcia, R.S.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NNSA Nuclear/Radiological Incident Response | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

field deployable teams of heath physics professionals equipped to conduct radiological search, monitoring, and assessment activities. Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining...

22

Southern state radiological emergency preparedness and response agencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Report provides information on the state agencies assigned to radioactive materials transportation incidents in 16 Southern States Energy Board member states. For each, the report lists the agencies with primary authority for preparedness and response, their responsibilities and personnel within the agencies who can offer additional information on their radioactive materials transportation programs. The report also lists each state`s emergency team members and its laboratory and analytical capabilities. Finally, the governor`s designee for receiving advance notification of high-level radioactive materials and spent fuel shipments under 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s regulations is listed for each state. Part 71 requires prenotification for large quantity radioactive waste shipments. Part 73 addresses prenotification for spent nuclear reactor fuel shipments.

Not Available

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Optimizing the Transportation System's Response Capabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capabilities 2 Abstract For the purposes of post-disaster response and recovery we view the transportation cooperation among evacuation vehicles. Keywords: Post-disaster response, controlled evacuation, transportation the Transportation System's Response Capabilities 1 Introduction For the purposes of a post-disaster response

Paschalidis, Ioannis "Yannis"

24

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response

25

U.S. Department of Energy Region 6 Radiological Assistance Program response plan. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upon request, the DOE, through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP), makes available and will provide radiological advice, monitoring, and assessment activities during radiological incidents where the release of radioactive materials is suspected or has occurred. Assistance will end when the need for such assistance is over, or if there are other resources available to adequately address the incident. The implementation of the RAP is usually accomplished through the recommendation of the DOE Regional Coordinating Office`s (RCO) on duty Regional Response Coordinator (RRC) with the approval of the Regional Coordinating Office Director (RCOD). The DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is the designated RCO for DOE Region 6 RAP. The purpose of this document is: to describe the mechanism for responding to any organization or private citizen requesting assistance to radiological incidents; to coordinate radiological assistance among participating federal agencies, states, and tribes in DOE Region 6; and to describe the RAP Scaled Response concept of operations.

Jakubowski, F.M.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

US DOE/NNSA and DoD Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident: Radiological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

US DOENNSA and DoD Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident: Radiological Soil Samples BusinessUSA DataTools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov ...

27

Land Transport Emergency Response Technology Report  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories was tasked by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) to provide assistance in developing an emergency response plan for radioactive material transportation activities. Those tasks included compiling radioactive materials (RAM) transportation accident data from the open literature and databases, investigating emergency response plans for radioactive materials transport in the United States, and developing specific recommendations for the JNC' nuclear material transport emergency response plan, based on information gathered during the first two tasks. These recommendations include developing a RAM database, a public transparency Internet website, an emergency response infrastructure designed specifically for transportation needs, and a clear set of directives to provide authority in the case of transportation accidents or incidents involving RAM.

DOTSON, LORI J.; PIERCE, JIM D.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Protracted Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Graves' Ophthalmopathy: A Pilot Study of Clinical and Radiologic Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and radiologic response of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy given low-dose orbital radiotherapy (RT) with a protracted fractionation. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients (36 orbits) received orbital RT with a total dose of 10 Gy, fractionated in 1 Gy once a week over 10 weeks. Of these, 9 patients received steroid therapy as well. Patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically at 6 months after treatment. Clinical response assessment was carried out using three criteria: by physical examination, by a modified clinical activity score, and by a verbal questionnaire considering the 10 most common signs and symptoms of the disease. Radiologic response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Improvement in ocular pain, palpebral edema, visual acuity, and ocular motility was observed in all patients. Significant decrease in symptoms such as tearing (p < 0.001) diplopia (p = 0.008), conjunctival hyperemia (p = 0.002), and ocular grittiness (p = 0.031) also occurred. Magnetic resonance imaging showed decrease in ocular muscle thickness and in the intensity of the T2 sequence signal in the majority of patients. Treatments were well tolerated, and to date no complications from treatment have been observed. There was no statistical difference in clinical and radiologic response between patients receiving RT alone and those receiving RT plus steroid therapy. Conclusion: RT delivered in at a low dose and in a protracted scheme should be considered as a useful therapeutic option for patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy.

Casimiro de Deus Cardoso, Cejana; Giordani, Adelmo Jose [Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Borri Wolosker, Angela Maria [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Souhami, Luis [Department of Radiotherapy, McGill University Heath Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Gois Manso, Paulo [Department of Ophthalmology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Souza Dias, Rodrigo; Comodo Segreto, Helena Regina [Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Araujo Segreto, Roberto, E-mail: segreto.dmed@epm.br [Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Division of Radiotherapy, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Incorporation of HPAC 5.0 Transport Phenomenology to RASCAL's Radiological Releases  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to describe the incorporation of DTRA's HPAC (Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability) code under the NRC's code RASCAL (Radiological Assessment System for Consequence AnaLysis). The current version of RASCAL (version 3.0.5) evaluates releases from: nuclear power plants, spent fuel storage pools and casks, fuel cycle facilities, and radioactive material handling facilities. It appears to be a single piece of software; however, it is a set of inter-linked modules. These elements include: (1) Source term: this module calculates a time-dependent source term, which for nuclear power plants, is composed of about 50 radionuclides including parents and daughters; (2) Meteorological data processor: this module interrupts weather observations and forecasts along with local topography to generate time-dependent wind fields used in the transport of the plume; (3) Atmospheric transport and diffusion: this module uses the wind fields with a two-dimensional Gaussian puff model to transport the plume downwind and to calculate concentrations of each radionuclide as a function of time and location; (4) Dose calculator: this module calculates various types of doses resulting from airborne releases (TEDE, thyroid, acute, etc.) to individuals at each location from three dose pathways--inhalation, cloudshine, and groundshine. It also calculates the longer-term intermediate phase doses from deposited radionuclides. The calculations are completely consistent with the EPA protective action guide manual and the methods adopted by the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC); (5) Display of results: this module allows the user to display a wide variety of calculated results as either a picture of the plume footprint on a map background for each of the result types or as numeric table; and (6) Uranium hexafluoride module: for uranium hexafluoride releases, RASCAL contains a heavy gas model to account for the exothermic reaction with air and gravitational slumping of the plume. In summary, the incorporation of HPAC transport methodology under RASCAL provides for a much more defined prediction of the dispersion of the radiological material as well as the latest dose conversion factors following a postulated accident.

Sanders, Robert Lon [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Adapting the U.S. Domestic Radiological Emergency Response Process to an Overseas Incident: FRMAC Without the F  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The earthquake and resulting tsunami in Japan led to a radiological release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plan, which in turn resulted in the rapid activation and deployment by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) emergency response teams. These teams and those from other federal agencies are typically coordinated through the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) when responding to radiological incidents in the U.S. FRMAC is the body through which the collection, analysis, and assessment of environmental radiological data are coordinated and products released to decision makers. This article discusses DOE/NNSAs role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident as it implemented its components of FRMAC in a foreign country, coordinated its assets, integrated with its federal partners, and collaborated with the Government of Japan. The technical details of the various data collections and analyses are covered in other articles of this issue.

Blumenthal, Daniel J. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Bowman, David R. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Remick, Alan [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Gas transport, sorption, and mechanical response of fractured coal.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fractured coal exhibits strong and dynamic coupling between fluid transport and mechanical response especially when the pore fluid is a sorbing gas. This complex interaction (more)

Wang, Shugang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Considerations for First Aid Radiological Considerations for First Aid Study Guide 2.15-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Considerations for First Aid Module Number: 2.15 Objectives: 2.15.01 List the proper steps for the treatment of minor injuries occurring in various radiological areas. 2.15.02 List the requirements for responding to major injuries or illnesses in radiological areas. 2.15.03 State the RCT's responsibility at the scene of a major injury in a radiological area after medical personnel have arrived at the scene. i 2.15.04 List the requirements for treatment and transport of contaminated injured personnel at your facility. INTRODUCTION "Standard first aid is applied prior to contamination control whenever it is considered to have life-saving value, or is important to the patient for relief of pain or prevention of

34

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Radiological Considerations for First Aid 5 Radiological Considerations for First Aid Instructor's Guide 2.15-1 Course Number: Radiological Control Technicians Module Title: Radiological Considerations for First Aid Module Number: 2.15 Objectives: 2.15.01 List the proper steps for the treatment of minor injuries occurring in various radiological areas. 2.15.02 List the requirements for responding to major injuries or illnesses in radiological areas. 2.15.03 State the RCT's responsibility at the scene of a major injury in a radiological area after medical personnel have arrived at the scene. L 2.15.04 List the requirements for treatment and transport of contaminated injured personnel at your facility. References: 1. Basic Radiation Protection Technology (2nd edition) - Daniel A. Gollnick 2. Operational Health Physics Training - H. J. Moe

35

Packaging and Transportation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Packaging and Transportation Packaging and Transportation Packaging and Transportation Packaging and Transportation Radiological shipments are accomplished safely. Annually, about 400 million hazardous materials shipments occur in the United States by rail, air, sea, and land. Of these shipments, about three million are radiological shipments. Since Fiscal Year (FY) 2004, EM has completed over 150,000 shipments of radioactive material/waste. Please click here to see Office of Packaging and Transportation Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Report. SUPPORTING PROGRAMS SAFE TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOLOGICAL SHIPMENTS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) TEPP provides the tools for planning, training and exercises, and technical assistance to assist State and Tribal authorities in preparing for response

36

Demand responsive public transportation using wireless technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution has been the bane of society for which we still have not got a satisfying solution. The air pollution due to automobiles constitutes around 60--90% of the total air pollution in the urban area. To curtail this, the mass transportation, ... Keywords: Djiktra's algorithm, on-demand public transportation, routing algorithms, wireless client-server backbone

S. Prashanth; Sp Geetha; Ga Shanmugha Sundaram

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

EMERGENCY RESPONSE TO A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emer Emer Emer Emer Emer Emergency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a Transportation ransportation ransportation ransportation ransportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond the scope of this video and requires either additional

38

USD(AT&L) SUBJECT: DoD Response to Nuclear and Radiological Incidents References: See Enclosure 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

establish policy and assign responsibilities for the DoD consequence management response to U.S. nuclear weapon incidents and other nuclear or radiological incidents involving materials in DoD custody in accordance with the guidance in National Security Presidential Directive (NSPD) 28, the National Response Framework, and the National Incident Management System (References (b) through (d)). 2. APPLICABILITY. This Directive applies to: a. OSD, the Military Departments, the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Joint Staff, the Combatant Commands, the Office of the Inspector General of the

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Transportation needs assessment: Emergency response section  

SciTech Connect

The transportation impacts of moving high level nuclear waste (HLNW) to a repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada are of concern to the residents of the State as well as to the residents of other states through which the nuclear wastes might be transported. The projected volume of the waste suggests that shipments will occur on a daily basis for some period of time. This will increase the risk of accidents, including a catastrophic incident. Furthermore, as the likelihood of repository construction and operation and waste shipments increase, so will the attention given by the national media. This document is not to be construed as a willingness to accept the HLNW repository on the part of the State. Rather it is an initial step in ensuring that the safety and well-being of Nevada residents and visitors and the State`s economy will be adequately addressed in federal decision-making pertaining to the transportation of HLNW into and across Nevada for disposal in the proposed repository. The Preferred Transportation System Needs Assessment identifies critical system design elements and technical and social issues that must be considered in conducting a comprehensive transportation impact analysis. Development of the needs assessment and the impact analysis is especially complex because of the absence of information and experience with shipping HLNW and because of the ``low probability, high consequence`` aspect of the transportation risk.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Radiological Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1098-2008 October 2008 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ii DOE-STD-1098-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://www.standards.doe.gov/ DOE-STD-1098-2008 Radiological Control DOE Policy October 2008 iii Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Emergency Response Transport Forecasting Using Historical Wind Field Pattern Matching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical pattern matching, or analog forecasting, is used to generate short-term mesoscale transport forecasts for emergency response at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. A simple historical pattern-matching algorithm ...

Roger G. Carter; Robert E. Keislar

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material The purpose of this User's Guide is to provide instructors with an overview of the key points covered in the video. The Student Handout portion of this Guide is designed to assist the instructor in reviewing those points with students. The Student Handout should be distributed to students after the video is shown and the instructor should use the Guide to facilitate a discussion on each response disciplines' activities or duties at the scene. During this discussion, the instructor can present response scenarios, each of which would have a different discipline arriving first at the accident scene. The purpose of this discussion

43

Radiological Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas On July 13, 2000, the Secretary of Energy imposed an agency-wide suspension on the unrestricted release of scrap metal originating from radiological areas at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for the purpose of recycling. The suspension was imposed in response to concerns from the general public and industry groups about the potential effects of radioactivity in or on material released in accordance with requirements established in DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The suspension was to remain in force until DOE developed and implemented improvements in, and better informed the public about, its release process. In addition, in 2001 the DOE announced its intention to prepare a

44

A demand-responsive decision support system for coal transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a demand-responsive decision support system is proposed by integrating the operations of coal shipment, coal stockpiles and coal railing within a whole system. A generic and flexible scheduling optimisation methodology is developed to ... Keywords: Coal shipment, Coal stockpiles, Coal train scheduling, Decision support system, Mine transportation

Erhan Kozan; Shi Qiang Liu

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this User's Guide is to provide instructors with an overview of the key points covered in the video. The Student Handout portion of this Guide is designed to assist the instructor in reviewing those points with students. The Student Handout should be distributed to students after the video is shown and the instructor should use the Guide to facilitate a discussion on key activities and duties at the scene. PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT More Documents & Publications Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient

46

PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond the scope of this video and requires either additional specific areas of competency or more hours of training

47

Preliminary report on operational guidelines developed for use in emergency preparedness and response to a radiological dispersal device incident.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents preliminary operational guidelines and supporting work products developed through the interagency Operational Guidelines Task Group (OGT). The report consolidates preliminary operational guidelines, all ancillary work products, and a companion software tool that facilitates their implementation into one reference source document. The report is intended for interim use and comment and provides the foundation for fostering future reviews of the operational guidelines and their implementation within emergency preparedness and response initiatives in the event of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) incident. The report principally focuses on the technical derivation and presentation of the operational guidelines. End-user guidance providing more details on how to apply these operational guidelines within planning and response settings is being considered and developed elsewhere. The preliminary operational guidelines are categorized into seven groups on the basis of their intended application within early, intermediate, and long-term recovery phases of emergency response. We anticipate that these operational guidelines will be updated and refined by interested government agencies in response to comments and lessons learned from their review, consideration, and trial application. This review, comment, and trial application process will facilitate the selection of a final set of operational guidelines that may be more or less inclusive of the preliminary operational guidelines presented in this report. These and updated versions of the operational guidelines will be made available through the OGT public Web site (http://ogcms.energy.gov) as they become finalized for public distribution and comment.

Yu, C.; Cheng, J.-J.; Kamboj, S.; Domotor, S.; Wallo, A.; Environmental Science Division; DOE

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Emergency Response Equipment and Related Training: Airborne Radiological Computer System (Model II)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The materials included in the Airborne Radiological Computer System, Model-II (ARCS-II) were assembled with several considerations in mind. First, the system was designed to measure and record the airborne gamma radiation levels and the corresponding latitude and longitude coordinates, and to provide a first overview look of the extent and severity of an accident's impact. Second, the portable system had to be light enough and durable enough that it could be mounted in an aircraft, ground vehicle, or watercraft. Third, the system must control the collection and storage of the data, as well as provide a real-time display of the data collection results to the operator. The notebook computer and color graphics printer components of the system would only be used for analyzing and plotting the data. In essence, the provided equipment is composed of an acquisition system and an analysis system. The data can be transferred from the acquisition system to the analysis system at the end of the data collection or at some other agreeable time.

David P. Colton

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

49

Development of the triage, monitoring and treatment Handbook for Members of the Public Affected by Radiological Terrorism - A European Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

European national emergency response plans have long been focused on accidents at nuclear power plants. Recently, the possible threats by disaffected groups have shifted the focus to being prepared also for malevolent use of radiation that are aimed at creating disruption and panic in the society. The casualties will most likely be members of the public. According to the scenario, the number of affected people can vary from a few to mass casualties. The radiation exposure can range from very low to substantial, possibly combined with conventional injuries. There is a need to develop practicable tools for the adequate response to such acts and more specifically to address European guidelines for triage, monitoring and treatment of exposed people. Although European countries have developed emergency response plans for nuclear accidents they have not all made plans for handling malevolent use of radioactive material. Indeed, there is a need to develop practical guidance on emergency response and medical treatment of the public affected by malevolent acts. Generic guidance on this topic has been published by international organisations. They are, however, not operational documents to be used in emergency situations. The Triage, Monitoring and Treatment (TMT) Handbook aims to strengthen the European ability to efficiently respond to malevolent acts in terms of protecting and treating exposed people. Part of the Handbook is also devoted to public information and communication issues which would contribute to public reassurance in emergency situations. The Handbook will be drafted by European and international experts before it is circulated to all emergency response institutions in Europe that would be a part of the handling of malevolent acts using radioactive material. The institutions would be given a 6 months consultation time with encouragement to test the draft Handbook in national exercises. A workshop will allow feedback from these end users on the content, structure and usefulness of the Handbook before a final version is produced. In order to achieve the project's objectives a consortium has been drawn together including, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland, the UK Health Protection Agency, the Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection of Poland and the World Health Organisation. Enviros Consulting is acting as the technical secretariat for the project. The Handbook will aim to harmonise the approaches to handling malevolent acts across Europe. This harmonisation will have an added value on the public confidence in authorities since differing approaches in neighbouring countries could lead to public confusion and mistrust. (authors)

Kruse, P. [Enviros Consulting Limited, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX (United Kingdom); Rojas-Palma, C. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Radiation Protection Div., Mol (Belgium)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Radiological worker training  

SciTech Connect

This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

/ Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Operations > Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team

52

Radiological Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1098-2008 October 2008 ------------------------------------- Change Notice 1 May 2009 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1098-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://www.standards.doe.gov/ iii DOE-STD-1098-2008 Change Notice 1: DOE-STD-1098-2008, Radiological Control Standard Section/page/paragraph Change Section 211, page 2-3, paragraph 1 Add new paragraph 1: "Approval by the appropriate Secretarial Officer or designee should be required

53

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for developing an emergency response plan, as outlined in OSHA's 29 CFR 1910.120(q), for facility response. This model has been adopted and applied to work for response to transportation accidents involving radioactive material or other hazardous materials incidents Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure.docx More Documents & Publications Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

54

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

55

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Contamination Control...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL WORKER TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C....

56

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Control Training...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION...

57

Guidelines for NIH Rodent Transportation 1. The IC Veterinarian or IC Animal Transportation Coordinator is responsible for the oversight of rodent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Guidelines for NIH Rodent Transportation A. General 1. The IC Veterinarian or IC Animal Transportation Coordinator is responsible for the oversight of rodent transportation within their program and assurance that all transportation is handled in accordance with all applicable laws, policies and guidelines

Bandettini, Peter A.

58

DOE standard: Radiological control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

Not Available

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Radiological training for tritium facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Evaluation of ANSI N42-17A by investigating the effects of temperature and humidity on the response of radiological instruments  

SciTech Connect

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N42.17A-1989 standard`s performance criteria and test methods has been evaluated by investigating the effects of temperature and humidity on the response of 105 portable direct-reading radiological instruments (45 beta-gamma survey meters, 32 neutron rem meters, 1O alpha contamination and 18 tritium-in-air monitors). The US Department of Energy (DOE) mandates the use of ANSI standards for the calibration and performance testing of radiological instruments, and requires that instruments be appropriate for existing environmental conditions. Random tests conducted in an environmental chamber determined the effects of temperatures ranging from {minus}10{degree}C to 50{degree}C and humidity at levels of 40% RH and 95% RH on the response of a cross section of instruments used in routine health physics operations at Los Alamos. The following instruments were tested: Eberline RO-2 and RO-C ionization chambers, Eberline E-530 survey meter with the Model HP-C stainless steel Geiger-Muller (G) wall probe, Eberline PIC-6A and PIC-6B ion chambers, Eberline ESP-1 survey meter with the Model HP-260 pancake G detector, Ludlum 3 survey meter with the Model 44-6 stainless steel G wall probe, Eberline ESP-1, ESP-2 and PAR-4 survey meters with the neutron rem detector, Health Physics Instruments 2080 survey meter with the moderator detector, Ludlum 139 survey meter with the Model 43-32 air-proportional alpha detector, and the Overhoff 394-C, Johnston J-111 and J-110 tritium monitors. Experimental results encompass 1128 temperature tests (1269-hours exposure in the chamber) and 735 humidity tests (1890-hours exposure in the chamber). The study shows the standard`s test requirement for temperature at or near the extreme conditions, and the standard`s test requirement for humidity at 95% RH may be too restrictive for instruments used in the work environment.

Clement, R.S.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

RADIOLOGICAL SURWY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

111 111 j -,~ ' - et- -*\. _(a v - r\lfs+8 plY 45+ c iill I r\l&; p) :;!I..; .: .. :,, ,m -,< :' - ' ec-. :-*% ". _(.*- ~ . . : : : ' .. : : : .. ..:, . . . :. : : ,, :;I;:~~:; :.:.!,;;y ' 1;: .: 1. .., ; ' . :. : c :...: .;: .: RADIOLOGICAL SURWY - RADIoL~BI~L.::.~~~y:- : ::: 1 ,: . . : : :: :. :..." - OFi~:,~~~~:poRTI~~~ 0J-g ,m_ ,. :. y.;,:. ,.:I; .:. F~~~~~~as~~~ ~~~~~~~:~~~~ :co~~~:~~~~~; ;, .. ; I : : ::.. :.. :. - ,B~~Lo,.~-~~~. ..; .:I ,,,, :--:.;:I:: ;' #I Y' i ' 11". .. .. ; :;: ;I, ' . 1::. J;,;. ~;_:y,;:::::; - T.J..:+~uS~~ .' .:' : : . . .. ...: .:.. : OFTHE EXCERIORPORTIONS O F THE FORIMER BLISS ANT3 LAUGHLIN STEEL COMPANY FAC' KJTy - BUFFALO,NEw YORK - T. J.VITKUS I : . . : : ' . .:. : I : : .. :. Prepaied for.:the:' 6ffice.iibfiEnvir~nmenfal Re$o&idn z . . :

62

Radiological Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Radiological Assistance Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > First Responders > Radiological Assistance Program Radiological Assistance Program RAP Logo NNSA's Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is the nation's

63

Radiological Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Radiological Assistance Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > First Responders > Radiological Assistance Program Radiological Assistance Program RAP Logo NNSA's Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is the nation's

64

Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Exercise Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exercise Exercise Program TEPP Exercise Program Tom Clawson TEPP Contractor tom@trgroupinc.com Brief TEPP History Brief TEPP History * In 1988, identified need to address emergency preparedness concerns of DOE emergency preparedness concerns of DOE radiological shipments bl h d * EM established in 1989 - Identified need for responder training along all transportation corridors as key to EM mission - TEPP incorporated into DOE Order 151.1, with responsibility assigned to EM * WIPP adopted the the TEPP training in 2000, and began using MERRTT along their routes in 2000 * Created a single DOE radiological transportation training program * Created a single DOE radiological transportation training program for the Department TEPP Exercise Program TEPP Exercise Program * TEPP's exercise program is just

65

Radiological Control Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation banner Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration T-Shirt Contest Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive...

67

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Print banner Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration T-Shirt Contest Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive...

68

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Transportation and Air Quality Transportation Energy Policy Analysis Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Appliance Energy...

69

Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q Q Law Enforcement ____________________________________ Fire ___________________________________________ Medical ____________________________________________ State Radiological Assistance ___________________________ Local Government Official ______________________________ Local Emergency Management Agency ___________________ State Emergency Management Agency ___________________ HAZMAT Team ______________________________________ Water Pollution Control ________________________________ CHEMTEL (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-255-3924 _________ CHEMTREC (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-424-9300 _______

70

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Transportation of Depleted Uranium Materials in Support of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Program Issues associated with transport of depleted UF6 cylinders and conversion products. Conversion Plan Transportation Requirements The DOE has prepared two Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) for the proposal to build and operate depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6) conversion facilities at its Portsmouth and Paducah gaseous diffusion plant sites, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The proposed action calls for transporting the cylinder at ETTP to Portsmouth for conversion. The transportation of depleted UF6 cylinders and of the depleted uranium conversion products following conversion was addressed in the EISs.

71

Fukushima Radiological Assessment Tool: Benchmarking Radiological Assessment and Dose Models using Fukushima Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is developing the Fukushima Radiological Assessment Tool (FRAT), a comprehensive database and software application for accessing, analyzing, and interpreting data related to radiological releases from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). This report documents the development of the FRAT to support the benchmarking of emergency response and dose modeling codes used by nuclear power plants, using radiological data from the Fukushima ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

General Employee Radiological Training (GERT)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Employee Radiological Training (GERT) Radiological Training for NSLS Access has been replaced with BNL General Employee Radiological Training (GERT). Please read the...

73

A Local Incident Flux Response Expansion Transport Method for Coupling to the Diffusion Method in Cylindrical Geometry  

SciTech Connect

A local incident flux response expansion transport method is developed to generate transport solutions for coupling to diffusion theory codes regardless of their solution method (e.g., fine mesh, nodal, response based, finite element, etc.) for reactor core calculations in both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) cylindrical geometries. In this approach, a Monte Carlo method is first used to precompute the local transport solution (i.e., response function library) for each unique transport coarse node, in which diffusion theory is not valid due to strong transport effects. The response function library is then used to iteratively determine the albedo coefficients on the diffusion-transport interfaces, which are then used as the coupling parameters within the diffusion code. This interface coupling technique allows a seamless integration of the transport and diffusion methods. The new method retains the detailed heterogeneity of the transport nodes and naturally constructs any local solution within them by a simple superposition of local responses to all incoming fluxes from the contiguous coarse nodes. A new technique is also developed for coupling to fine-mesh diffusion methods/codes. The local transport method/module is tested in 2-D and 3-D pebble-bed reactor benchmark problems consisting of an inner reflector, an annular fuel region, and a controlled outer reflector. It is found that the results predicted by the transport module agree very well with the reference fluxes calculated directly by MCNP in both benchmark problems.

Dingkang Zhang; Farzad Rahnema; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Emergency response planning for railroad transportation related spills of oil or other hazardous materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In December 1984 an unintentional release of poison gas from a chemical plant in Bhopal, India killed over 2,500 people. Thousands of others were injured. Although this material was not in transportation at the time, this accident raised public awareness. Americans began to ask, "What if something similar happened here?" Chemicals with hazardous properties have become part of daily life. Industry, government, and the public have become aware of the need to respond to problems involving hazardous materials. Safe transportation of hazardous materials is very important. Union Pacific Railroad transports more hazardous material shipments than any other carrier. Early on they realized the benefits to having a dedicated team of personnel to respond to incidents involving hazardous materials. In order to remain the safest carrier of these commodities, an emergency response plan utilizing in house response personnel was needed. This document describes how that plan was created and includes a copy of the plan for the Union Pacific Railroad's Settegast Yard in Houston, Texas. Other carriers may use this as a template to establish their own in house response teams or emergency response plans.

Reeder, Geoffrey Benton

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Risks » Transportation Health Risks » Transportation DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Transportation A discussion of health risks associated with transport of depleted UF6. Transport Regulations and Requirements In the future, it is likely that depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinders will be transported to a conversion facility. For example, it is currently anticipated that the cylinders at the ETTP Site in Oak Ridge, TN, will be transported to the Portsmouth Site, OH, for conversion. Uranium hexafluoride has been shipped safely in the United States for over 40 years by both truck and rail. Shipments of depleted UF6 would be made in accordance with all applicable transportation regulations. Shipment of depleted UF6 is regulated by the

76

Radiological Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Radiological Triage Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Render Safe > Radiological Triage Radiological Triage Triage Logo NNSA's Triage is a non-deployable, secure, on-line capability

77

WIPP transportation exercise to test emergency response capablities for Midland-Odessa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Exercise to Test Transportation Exercise to Test Emergency Response Capabilities for Midland-Odessa CARLSBAD, N.M., January 10, 2000 - Emergency response agencies from Midland and Odessa, Texas, will take part in a 1 p.m. (CST) training exercise Jan. 12 at the Ector County Coliseum. The graded exercise will help agencies determine whether emergency personnel are prepared to respond to a possible accident involving a shipment of transuranic radioactive waste headed for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). "This is an excellent opportunity for emergency responders to test the skills they've learned," said Dale Childers, assistant chief of the Odessa Fire Department and emergency management coordinator for Ector County. "It will also help us determine what improvements,

78

Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transportation systems are an often overlooked critical infrastructure component. These systems comprise a widely diverse elements whose operation impact all aspects of society today. This chapter introduces the key transportation sectors and illustrates ...

Mark Hartong; Rajn Goel; Duminda Wijesekera

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Radiological Control Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Support personnel, an accredited Personnel Monitoring service, a fully functional Instrumentation & Calibration facility, expertise in Radiological Engineering and the...

80

AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS  

SciTech Connect

Measuring terrestrial gamma radiation from airborne platforms has proved to be a useful method for characterizing radiation levels over large areas. Over 300 aerial radiological surveys have been carried out over the past 25 years including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, commercial nuclear power plants, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program/Uranium Mine Tailing Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP/UMTRAP) sites, nuclear weapons test sites, contaminated industrial areas, and nuclear accident sites. This paper describes the aerial measurement technology currently in use by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) for routine environmental surveys and emergency response activities. Equipment, data-collection and -analysis methods, and examples of survey results are described.

Proctor, A.E.

1997-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A CFD-based wind solver for a fast response transport and dispersion model  

SciTech Connect

In many cities, ambient air quality is deteriorating leading to concerns about the health of city inhabitants. In urban areas with narrow streets surrounded by clusters of tall buildings, called street canyons, air pollution from traffic emissions and other sources is difficult to disperse and may accumulate resulting in high pollutant concentrations. For various situations, including the evacuation of populated areas in the event of an accidental or deliberate release of chemical, biological and radiological agents, it is important that models should be developed that produce urban flow fields quickly. For these reasons it has become important to predict the flow field in urban street canyons. Various computational techniques have been used to calculate these flow fields, but these techniques are often computationally intensive. Most fast response models currently in use are at a disadvantage in these cases as they are unable to correlate highly heterogeneous urban structures with the diagnostic parameterizations on which they are based. In this paper, a fast and reasonably accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique that solves the Navier-Stokes equations for complex urban areas has been developed called QUIC-CFD (Q-CFD). This technique represents an intermediate balance between fast (on the order of minutes for a several block problem) and reasonably accurate solutions. The paper details the solution procedure and validates this model for various simple and complex urban geometries.

Gowardhan, Akshay A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Michael J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pardyjak, Eric R [UNIV OF UTAH; Senocak, Inanc [BOISE STATE UNIV

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meier AKMeier@lbl.gov (510) 486-4740 Links Transportation and Air Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

83

HAZARDS OF THERMAL EXPANSION FOR RADIOLOGICAL CONTAINER ENGULFED IN FIRE  

SciTech Connect

Fire accidents pose a serious threat to nuclear facilities. It is imperative that transport casks or shielded containers designed to transport/contain radiological materials have the ability to withstand a hypothetical fire. A numerical simulation was performed for a shielded container constructed of stainless steel and lead engulfed in a hypothetical fire as outlined by 10 CFR 71.73. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the thermal response of the container during and after the fire. The thermal model shows that after 30 minutes of fire, the stainless steel will maintain its integrity and not melt. However, the lead shielding will melt since its temperature exceeds the melting point. Due to the method of construction of the container under consideration, ample void space must be provided to allow for thermal expansion of the lead upon heating and melting, so as to not overstress the weldment.

Donna Post Guillen

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix C December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008

85

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEASUREMENT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix B December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL WORKER TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ . ii Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Foreword This Handbook describes a recommended implementation process for core training as outlined in

86

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix A Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in

87

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix A Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in

88

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix C December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008

89

EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Nonlinear Radiation Response and Transport Properties in Scintillating Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Figure 1. Time-of-Flight (TOF) versus light Figure 1. Time-of-Flight (TOF) versus light output (L) of CsI:Tl to He + ions. The inset is an example where L=263 is determined for particles with certainty energy (TOF=840). The energy resolution can be determined by ∆L/L = 45/263. The light-energy dependence and energy resolution can be observed as the difference in curvature and dispersive of the data. EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Nonlinear Radiation Response and Transport Properties in Scintillating Materials Project start date: Spring 2007 EMSL Lead Investigator: Yanwen Zhang Deposition and Microfabrication, EMSL, PNNL Co-investigators: Vaithiyalingam Shutthanandan Deposition and Microfabrication, EMSL, PNNL Scintillation response has wide applications in the field of astronomy, medical physics, high-energy

90

General Employee Radiological Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution...

91

Environmental conditions and responses of circus elephants transported by truck and railcar during relatively high and low temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No published research exists regarding the transport of circus elephants despite evidence of stressful conditions in transported livestock. Shipments of elephants with participating circuses and private exhibitors were identified during relatively high and low temperatures to characterize the transport environment and the animals' response to transport. Ten hot and five cold weather trips with seven circuses were surveyed. During each trip, external and internal temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation were continuously measured during both extremes. Concentrations of ammonia and carbon monoxide during transport were also determined. Body temperature from a sample of elephants for each circus or exhibitor was also measured continuously as an indication of the animal's physiological response. Blood samples were taken an hour before, immediately before, immediately after, and an hour after transport to determine plasma cortisol concentrations as an indication of psycho-physiological response. Direct and video observations were made and analyzed for the occurrence of normal and abnormal behaviors. The temperature of the transport vehicle during transport maintained temperatures with a range under 36?C and above 0?C during hot and cool weather surveys, respectively. Concentrations of ammonia or carbon monoxide were not detectable during transport. Body temperature for each elephant was maintained within a 1.5?C range. Increases in body temperature were observed during or after physical activity with a maximum of 37.5?C. Significant differences in cortisol concentrations were found between the first and second (p=0.015) and the first and third (p=0.028) sample times during one trip, though appear minimal and may reflect arousal. No other significant differences were found between sample times. Observations during transport identified that the stereotypic behavior of weaving occurred in some elephants up to 80% of the time in transport time, although animals were observed to eat and drink, among other behaviors associated with a positive environment. Due to the lack of extreme temperatures within the transport vehicle during transport, biologically insignificant fluctuations in cortisol concentrations, stable body temperature, occurrence of natural behaviors, comparatively robust overall health, and the absence of the stressors in transported livestock, transport does not appear to be inherently stressful or compromise the welfare of the surveyed elephants.

Toscano, Michael Jeffrey

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Policy and Procedure Manual Diagnostic Services Department of Radiology Diagnostic Division  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disaster or an ETC alert. DEFINITION: None POLICY: Department of Radiology response to disaster. RESPONSIBILITIES: 1. Refer to hospital Disaster and Emergency Preparedness Manual for more detailed information Disaster Plan Radiology: 10/98, 10/04, 05/06, 01/10 SUBJECT/TITLE: DISASTER PLAN RADIOLOGY PURPOSE

93

Marshall Islands radiological followup  

SciTech Connect

In August, 1968, President Johnson announced that the people of Bikini Atoll would be able to return to their homeland. Thereafter, similar approval was given for the return of the peoples of Enewetak. These two regions, which comprised the Pacific Nuclear Testing Areas from 1946 to 1958, will probably be repopulated by the original inhabitants and their families within the next year. As part of its continuing responsibility to insure the public health and safety in connection with the nuclear programs under its sponsorship, ERDA (formerly AEC) has contracted Brookhaven National Laboratory to establish radiological safety and environmental monitoring programs for the returning Bikini and Enewetak peoples. These programs are described in the following paper. They are designed to define the external radiation environment, assess radiation doses from internal emitters in the human food chain, make long range predictions of total doses and dose commitments to individuals and to each population group, and to suggest actions which will minimize doses via the more significant pathways. (auth)

Greenhouse, N.A.; McCraw, T.F.

1976-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

94

Radiological design guide  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this design guide is to provide radiological safety requirements, standards, and information necessary for designing facilities that will operate without unacceptable risk to personnel, the public, or the environment as required by the US Department of Energy (DOE). This design guide, together with WHC-CM-4-29, Nuclear Criticality Safety, WHC-CM-4-46, Nonreactor Facility Safety Analysis, and WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance, covers the radiation safety design requirements at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This design guide applies to the design of all new facilities. The WHC organization with line responsibility for design shall determine to what extent this design guide shall apply to the modifications to existing facilities. In making this determination, consideration shall include a cost versus benefit study. Specifically, facilities that store, handle, or process radioactive materials will be covered. This design guide replaces WHC-CM-4-9 and is designated a living document. This design guide is intended for design purposes only. Design criteria are different from operational criteria and often more stringent. Criteria that might be acceptable for operations might not be adequate for design.

Evans, R.A.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

95

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Study Guide 2.13-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Module Number: 2.13 Objectives: 2.13.01 Describe the general response and responsibilities of an RCT during any incident. i 2.13.02 Identify any emergency equipment and facilities that are available, including the location and contents of emergency equipment kits. i 2.13.03 Describe the RCT response to a Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) alarm. i 2.13.04 Describe the RCT response to a personnel contamination monitor alarm. i 2.13.05 Describe the RCT response to off scale or lost dosimetry. i 2.13.06 Describe the RCT response to rapidly increasing, unanticipated radiation levels or an area radiation monitor alarm. i 2.13.07

96

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Instructor's Guide 2.13-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Module Number: 2.13 Objectives: 2.13.01 Describe the general response and responsibilities of an RCT during any incident. L 2.13.02 Identify any emergency equipment and facilities that are available, including the location and contents of emergency equipment kits. L 2.13.03 Describe the RCT response to a Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) alarm. L 2.13.04 Describe the RCT response to a personnel contamination monitor alarm. L 2.13.05 Describe the RCT response to off scale or lost dosimetry. L 2.13.06 Describe the RCT response to rapidly increasing, unanticipated radiation levels or an area radiation monitor alarm. L

97

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

98

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

99

NNSA Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency Management  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency Management Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency Management System | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > NNSA Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency ... Press Release NNSA Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency Management

100

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 December 2008 Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

FRMAC Interactions During a Radiological or Nuclear Event  

SciTech Connect

During a radiological or nuclear event of national significance the Federal Radiological Emergency Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) assists federal, state, tribal, and local authorities by providing timely, high-quality predictions, measurements, analyses and assessments to promote efficient and effective emergency response for protection of the public and the environment from the consequences of such an event.

Wong, C T

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

102

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7of 9 7of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Practical Training Phase II Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 ii Table of Contents Page Introduction.............................................................................. ......1 Development of Job Performance Measures (JPMs)............................ .....1 Conduct Job Performance Evaluation...................................................3 Qualification Area: Radiological Instrumentation.......................................5 Task 2-1.................. ..................................................................... 5 Objective.............................................................................. 5

103

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Due to limited parking, all visitors are strongly encouraged to: Due to limited parking, all visitors are strongly encouraged to: 1) car-pool, 2) take the Lab's special conference shuttle service, or 3) take the regular off-site shuttle. If you choose to use the regular off-site shuttle bus, you will need an authorized bus pass, which can be obtained by contacting Eric Essman in advance. Transportation & Visitor Information Location and Directions to the Lab: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is located in Berkeley, on the hillside directly above the campus of University of California at Berkeley. The address is One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720. For comprehensive directions to the lab, please refer to: http://www.lbl.gov/Workplace/Transportation.html Maps and Parking Information: On Thursday and Friday, a limited number (15) of barricaded reserved parking spaces will be available for NON-LBNL Staff SNAP Collaboration Meeting participants in parking lot K1, in front of building 54 (cafeteria). On Saturday, plenty of parking spaces will be available everywhere, as it is a non-work day.

104

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Student's Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Student's Guide Notes Module 4-1 I. Introduction II. Radiological Control Program A. Overall program The Radiological Control Program consists of the commitments, policies, and procedures that are administered by a site or facility to meet the EH Health and Safety Policy. The Radiation Protection Program required by 10 CFR Part 835 is an element of the overall Radiological Control Program. The Radiological Control Program should address the following: * Requirements * Responsibilities * Programs/procedures * Assessments B. Size of the program Radiological Control Programs vary in size. There are several factors that may affect the magnitude of a Radiological Control Program. The specific mission, types and quantities of

105

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Control Training for Supervisors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A A December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 iii Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in

106

Radiological Assessor Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-2008 1-2008 August 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Assessor Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techs\ Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.1-1B, Radiation Protection Programs, March 2007, and as outlined in DOE- STD- 1098-99, CN1, March 2005, DOE Radiological Control (the Radiological Control Standard - RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of

107

Trade, transport, and sinks extend the carbon dioxide responsibility of countries: An editorial essay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globalization and the dynamics of ecosystem sinks need be considered in post-Kyoto climate negotiations as they increasingly affect the carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere. Currently, the allocation of responsibility for greenhouse gas mitigation is based on territorial emissions from fossil-fuel combustion, process emissions and some land-use emissions. However, at least three additional factors can significantly alter a country's impact on climate from carbon dioxide emissions. First, international trade causes a separation of consumption from production, reducing domestic pollution at the expense of foreign producers, or vice versa. Second, international transportation emissions are not allocated to countries for the purpose of mitigation. Third, forest growth absorbs carbon dioxide and can contribute to both carbon sequestration and climate change protection. Here we quantify how these three factors change the carbon dioxide emissions allocated to China, Japan, Russia, USA, and European Union member countries. We show that international trade can change the carbon dioxide currently allocated to countries by up to 60% and that forest expansion can turn some countries into net carbon sinks. These factors are expected to become more dominant as fossil-fuel combustion and process emissions are mitigated and as international trade and forest sinks continue to grow. Emission inventories currently in wide-spread use help to understand the global carbon cycle, but for long-term climate change mitigation a deeper understanding of the interaction between the carbon cycle and society is needed. Restructuring international trade and investment flows to meet environmental objectives, together with the inclusion of forest sinks, are crucial issues that need consideration in the design of future climate policies. And even these additional issues do not capture the full impact of changes in the carbon cycle on the global climate system.

Peters, Glen P [Center for International Climate and Energy Research (CICERO), Oslo, Norway; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Hertwich, Edgar G. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology; Saikku, Laura [University of Helsinki

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

109

Radiological assessment. A textbook on environmental dose analysis  

SciTech Connect

Radiological assessment is the quantitative process of estimating the consequences to humans resulting from the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. It is a multidisciplinary subject requiring the expertise of a number of individuals in order to predict source terms, describe environmental transport, calculate internal and external dose, and extrapolate dose to health effects. Up to this time there has been available no comprehensive book describing, on a uniform and comprehensive level, the techniques and models used in radiological assessment. Radiological Assessment is based on material presented at the 1980 Health Physics Society Summer School held in Seattle, Washington. The material has been expanded and edited to make it comprehensive in scope and useful as a text. Topics covered include (1) source terms for nuclear facilities and Medical and Industrial sites; (2) transport of radionuclides in the atmosphere; (3) transport of radionuclides in surface waters; (4) transport of radionuclides in groundwater; (5) terrestrial and aquatic food chain pathways; (6) reference man; a system for internal dose calculations; (7) internal dosimetry; (8) external dosimetry; (9) models for special-case radionuclides; (10) calculation of health effects in irradiated populations; (11) evaluation of uncertainties in environmental radiological assessment models; (12) regulatory standards for environmental releases of radionuclides; (13) development of computer codes for radiological assessment; and (14) assessment of accidental releases of radionuclides.

Till, J.E.; Meyer, H.R. (eds.)

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Blog > NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia NNSA Blog > NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Blog NNSA today concluded International Radiological Assistance Program Training for Emergency Response (I-RAPTER) in Slovenia. The training, co-sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency, was provided to 36 nuclear/radiological emergency responders, which included 15 participants from Slovenia and 21 students from 20 other countries. The training was conducted with involvement of personnel from Sandia National Laboratories, the Remote Sensing Laboratory and Idaho National Laboratory. To read more about the training see: http://www.nnsa.energy.gov/mediaroom/pressreleases/slovenia Posted on March 22, 2012 at 4:13 pm ET

111

Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established November 03, 2003 Washington, DC Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established

112

TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXASTRANS TEXAS TRANSPORTATION HALL HONOR OF HALL HONOR OF TEXASTRAN HALL HONOR OF TEXASTRAN HALL HONOR OF Inductees #12;2 TEXAS TRANSPORTATION HALL HONOR OF L NOR OF Texas is recognized as having one of the finest multimodal transportation systems in the world. The existence of this system has been key

113

Radiological Assessor Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

141-2001 141-2001 April 2001 Change Notice No. 1 and Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Assessor Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Radiological Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 iii

114

General Employee Radiological Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 iii Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in chapter 14, Radiation Safety Training, of Implementation Guide G44.1B, Radiation Protection Programs Guide, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard [RCS - DOE-STD-1098-99, Ch. 1]. The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals

115

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Control Technician Training Facility Practical Training Attachment Phase IV Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 ii This page intentionally left blank DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 iii Table of Contents Page Introduction................................................................................................................................1 Facility Job Performance Measures ........................................................................................2 Final Verification Signatures ....................................................................................................3 DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 iv

116

Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror  

SciTech Connect

Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

Hart, M

2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

117

Radiological Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Part 2 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Technician Qualification Standard Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 iii Table of Contents Page Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Purpose of Qualification Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Phase I: RCT Academics Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . 1 Phase II: RCT Core Practical (JPMs) Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . 1

118

Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.0 Users Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.0 (RSAC-7) is the newest version of the RSAC legacy code. It calculates the consequences of a release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. A user can generate a fission product inventory from either reactor operating history or a nuclear criticality event. RSAC-7 models the effects of high-efficiency particulate air filters or other cleanup systems and calculates the decay and ingrowth during transport through processes, facilities, and the environment. Doses are calculated for inhalation, air immersion, ground surface, ingestion, and cloud gamma pathways. RSAC-7 can be used as a tool to evaluate accident conditions in emergency response scenarios, radiological sabotage events and to evaluate safety basis accident consequences. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for RSAC-7. Instructions, screens, and examples are provided to guide the user through the functions provided by RSAC-7. This program was designed for users who are familiar with radiological dose assessment methods.

Dr. Bradley J Schrader

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.2 Users Manual  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer (RSAC) Program Version 7.2 (RSAC-7) is the newest version of the RSAC legacy code. It calculates the consequences of a release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. A user can generate a fission product inventory from either reactor operating history or a nuclear criticality event. RSAC-7 models the effects of high-efficiency particulate air filters or other cleanup systems and calculates the decay and ingrowth during transport through processes, facilities, and the environment. Doses are calculated for inhalation, air immersion, ground surface, ingestion, and cloud gamma pathways. RSAC-7 can be used as a tool to evaluate accident conditions in emergency response scenarios, radiological sabotage events and to evaluate safety basis accident consequences. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for RSAC-7. Instructions, screens, and examples are provided to guide the user through the functions provided by RSAC-7. This program was designed for users who are familiar with radiological dose assessment methods.

Dr. Bradley J Schrader

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Going the Distance? NRC's Response to the National Academy of Science's Transportation Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In February 2006, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) published the results of a 3 1/2-year study, titled Going the Distance, that examined the safety of transporting spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) in the United States. NAS initiated this study to address what it perceived to be a national need for an independent, objective, and authoritative analysis of SNF and HLW transport in the United States. The study was co-sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the Electric Power Research Institute and the National Cooperative Highway Research Program. This paper addresses some of the recommendations made in the NAS study related to the performance of SNF transportation casks in long duration fires, the use of full-scale package testing, and the need for an independent review of transportation security prior to the commencement of large scale shipping campaigns to an interim storage site or geologic repository. In conclusion: The NRC believes that the current regulations in 10 CFR Part 71 for the design of SNF and HLW transportation packages provide a very high level of protection to the public for very severe accidents and credible threat scenarios. As recommended by the NAS study, additional studies of accidents involving severe fires have been completed. These studies have confirmed that spent fuel casks would be expected to withstand very severe fires without the release of any fission products from the spent fuel. Additionally, changes in rail operating procedures such as the use of dedicated trains and prohibition on the co-location of SNF and flammable liquids in rail tunnels can further reduce the already low probability of severe rail accident fires involving SNF and HLW. (authors)

Easton, E.P.; Bajwa, C.S. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protection | National Nuclear Protection | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Global Threat Reduction Initiative > GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection

122

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B B December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL WORKER TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ . Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 iii Foreword This Handbook describes a recommended implementation process for core training as outlined in

123

PNNL: Available Technologies: Nuclear & Radiological  

PNNL has more than 40 years of experience in radiological science and radiochemical separations based on its activities at the U.S. Department of ...

124

Low-level radioactive waste transportation safety history  

SciTech Connect

The Radioactive Materials Incident Report (RMIR) database was developed fin 1981 at the Transportation Technology Center of Sandia National Laboratories to support its research and development activities for the US department of Energy (DOE). This database contains information about radioactive material (RAM) transportation incidents that have occurred in the US since 1971. These data were drawn from the US Department of Transportation`s (DOT) Hazardous Materials Incident Report system, from Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) files, and from various agencies including state radiological control offices. Support for the RMIR data base is funded by the US DOE National Transportation Program (NTP). Transportation events in RMIR are classified in one of the following ways: as a transportation accident, as a handling accident, or as a reported incident. This presentation will provide definitions for these classifications and give examples of each. The primary objective of this presentation is to provide information on nuclear materials transportation accident/incident events involving low-level waste (LLW) that have occurred in the US for the period 1971 through 1996. Among the areas to be examined are: transportation accidents by mode, package response during accidents, and an examination of accidents where release of contents has occurred. Where information is available, accident and incident history and package response for LLW packages in transportation accidents will be described.

McClure, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Transportation Systems Analysis Dept.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Radiological Toolbox User's Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A toolbox of radiological data has been assembled to provide users access to the physical, chemical, anatomical, physiological and mathematical data relevant to the radiation protection of workers and member of the public. The software runs on a PC and provides users, through a single graphical interface, quick access to contemporary data and the means to extract these data for further computations and analysis. The numerical data, for the most part, are stored within databases in SI units. However, the user can display and extract values using non-SI units. This is the first release of the toolbox which was developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Eckerman, KF

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Smart Radiological Dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation dosimeter providing an indication of the dose of radiation to which the radiation sensor has been exposed. The dosimeter contains features enabling the monitoring and evaluating of radiological risks so that a user can concentrate on the task at hand. The dosimeter provides an audible alarm indication that a predetermined time period has elapsed, an audible alarm indication reminding the user to check the dosimeter indication periodically, an audible alarm indicating that a predetermined accumulated dose has been prematurely reached, and an audible alarm indication prior or to reaching the 3/4 scale point.

Kosslow, William J.; Bandzuch, Gregory S.

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

127

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change Notice No. 1 2009 Change Notice No. 2 2011 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHNICIAN TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Original Change Part 3 1.05-1 NCRP Report No. 93 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States". NCRP Report No. 160 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population

128

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

98 98 October 1998 Change Notice No. 1 June 2001 Change Notice No. 2 December 2003 Reaffirmation with Errata May 2004 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-98 ii This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration,

129

Responsive polymers for dynamic modulation of bio-macromolecular transport properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Responsive self-assembling polymers are used in wide range of applications in the food, pharmaceutical, agricultural, electronic and environmental industries, as well as in the biomedical field. The proper design of such ...

Deshmukh, Smeet

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The application of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) and Information Technology systems to disaster response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disaster response operations during recent terrorist attacks and natural disasters have been a cause for concern. Lack of planning is one source of difficulties with these operations, but even if a perfect plan is agreed ...

Pinelis, Lev

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources Posted By Office of Public Affairs Container NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) was recently commended

132

ORISE: REAC/TS Radiological Incident Medical Consultation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Incident Medical Consultation Radiological Incident Medical Consultation Radiological Incident Medical Consultation The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with a comprehensive capability to respond effectively to medical emergencies involving radiological or nuclear materials. Through the management of the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), ORISE provides advice and consultation to emergency personnel responsible for the medical management of radiation accidents. REAC/TS strengthens hospital preparedness for radiation emergencies by preparing and educating first responders, medical personnel and occupational health professionals who will provide care to patients with a radiation injury or illness. REAC/TS staff provide medical advice,

133

GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources Posted By Office of Public Affairs Container NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) was recently commended

134

Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: ... Fact Sheet Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet

135

NNSA conducts radiological response training in Kazakhstan |...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home >...

136

NNSA Conducts Radiological Response Training in Kazakhstan |...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

(I-RAPTER) training in Almaty, Kazakhstan. The training, held at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Almaty, included using radiation detection equipment to locate hidden...

137

NNSA conducts radiological response training in Kazakhstan |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Y-12 Earn 11 R&D 100 Awards Jul 2, 2013 US, International Partners Remove Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam, Set Nuclear Security Milestone View All > Timeline Curious about NNSA...

138

NNSA conducts radiological response training in Kazakhstan |...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the United States Senate Committee on Armed Services Sep 17, 2013 NNSA, Republic of Korea Ministry Agree to Minimize Use of HEU in Nuclear Reactors Sep 3, 2013 NNSA Conducts...

139

Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Force Established Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established November 03, 2003 Washington, DC Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established NNSA's Administrator...

140

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Controls - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Radiological Controls - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II February 2006 A section of Appendix...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Concerns Regarding Lead Contamination and Radiological Controls...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Concerns Regarding Lead Contamination and Radiological Controls at the Nevada Test Site, INS-O-06-02 Concerns Regarding Lead Contamination and Radiological Controls at...

142

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 December 2008 Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Original Change Part 2 Module 2 page 17 Medical radiation sources (total average dose ~ 54 mrem/yr) 1) X rays (total average dose ~ 40mrem/yr) a) X rays are similar to gamma rays; however, they originate outside the nucleus.

143

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TS TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 December 2008 Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Original Change Throughout Program Management Guide Instructor's Guide Student's Guide "Shall" and "Must" statements Program Management Instructor's Material Student's Material Reworded to non-mandatory language unless associated with a requirement document.

144

For S Radiological  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

? . ? . -. .- * -* (\/If.r.-5- .* , d- For S Radiological ' mer Bridgepo pecial Metals Adrian, Survey of the Irt Brass Company Extrusion Plant, Michigan / /f?t' . ( F. F. Haywood H. W. Dickson W. D. Cottrell W. H. Shinpaugh _ : I., _-. .I ( ._ rc/ DOE/EV-0005128 ORNL-57 13 / J. E. Burden 0. R. Stone R. W. Doane W. A. Goldsmith 4 , Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service U.S. Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161 NTIS price codes-Printed Copy: A06 Microfiche A01 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the UnitedStatesGovernment. Neither theUnitedStatesGovernment noranyagency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or

145

Radiological Worker Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TS TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 December 2008 Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Original Change Throughout Program Management Guide Instructor's Guide Student's Guide "Shall" and "Must" statements Program Management Instructor's Material Student's Material Reworded to non-mandatory language unless associated with a requirement document.

146

General Employee Radiological Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Not Measurement Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 December 2007_______ Change Notice 1 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 Original Change Part 2 page 5 The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 360 millirem/year. The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 620 millirem/year. Part 2 page 5 Natural background radiation is by far the

147

General Employee Radiological Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

_______ _______ Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 Original Change Part 2 page 5 The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 360 millirem/year. The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 620 millirem/year. Part 2 page 5 Natural background radiation is by far the

148

Standardized radiological dose evaluations  

SciTech Connect

Following the end of the Cold War, the mission of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site changed from production of nuclear weapons to cleanup. Authorization baseis documents for the facilities, primarily the Final Safety Analysis Reports, are being replaced with new ones in which accident scenarios are sorted into coarse bins of consequence and frequency, similar to the approach of DOE-STD-3011-94. Because this binning does not require high precision, a standardized approach for radiological dose evaluations is taken for all the facilities at the site. This is done through a standard calculation ``template`` for use by all safety analysts preparing the new documents. This report describes this template and its use.

Peterson, V.L.; Stahlnecker, E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

_______ _______ Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHNICIAN TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Original Change Part 3 1.05-1 NCRP Report No. 93 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States". NCRP Report No. 160 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States". Part 3 1.05-9 4) U.S. national average from diagnostic

150

Radiological Threat Reduction: Dealing with Dirty Bombs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonproliferation and National Security Department May 2, 2007 #12;Topics What is a Radiological Dispersal Device

Homes, Christopher C.

151

Homeland Security Chemical/Biological/Radiological/Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Information at NIST. Homeland Security Chemical/Biological/Radiological/ Nuclear/Explosives (CBRNE) Information at NIST. ...

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

152

I COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

im im I COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY I Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prprd* OFF-SITE PROPERTY H' | Prepared for Office of Operational FORMER LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS SITE Safety U.S. Department LEWISTON, NEW YORK I of Energy i J.D. BERGER i Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division I l*~~~~~~ ~~~~DRAFT REPORT January 1983 I I I ------- COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY H' FORMER LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS SITE LEWISTON, NEW YORK Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites -- Remedial Action Program J. D. Berger Project Staff L.W. Cole W.O. Helton R.D. Condra T.J. Sowell P.R. Cotten C.F. Weaver G.R. Foltz T.S. Yoo R.C. Gosslee Prepared by Radiological Site Assessment Program

153

Radiological Source Registry and Tracking  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Home HSS Logo Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Department of Energy (DOE) Notice N 234.1 Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources has been superseded by DOE Order O 231.1B Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. O 231.1B identifies the requirements for centralized inventory and transaction reporting for radioactive sealed sources. Each DOE site/facility operator that owns, possesses, uses or maintains in custody those accountable radioactive sealed sources identified in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulation Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR 835), Appendix E, and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Categories 1 and 2 radioactive sealed sources identified in Attachment 5, Appendix A of O 321.1B, will submit information to the DOE Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) System.

154

FDH radiological design review guidelines  

SciTech Connect

These guidelines discuss in more detail the radiological design review process used by the Project Hanford Management Contractors as described in HNF-PRO-1622, Radiological Design Review Process. They are intended to supplement the procedure by providing background information on the design review process and providing a ready source of information to design reviewers. The guidelines are not intended to contain all the information in the procedure, but at points, in order to maintain continuity, they contain some of the same information.

Millsap, W.J.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

Radiological safety training for accelerator facilities: DOE handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This program management guide describes the proper implementation standard for core training as outline in the DOE Radiological Control (RadCon) Manual. Its purpose is to assist DOE employees and Managing and Operating (M&O) contractors having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RadCon Manual.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Financial assistance to states and tribes to support emergency preparedness and response and the safe transportation of hazardous shipments: 1996 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report revises and updates the 1995 report Financial Assistance to States and Tribes to Support Emergency Preparedness and Response and the Safe Transportation of Hazardous Shipments, PNL-10260 (UC-620). The presentation of data and some of the data reported have been changed; these data supersede those presented in the earlier publication. All data have been updated to fiscal year 1995, with the exception of FEMA data that are updated to fiscal year 1994 only. The report identifies and summarizes existing sources of financial assistance to States and Tribes in preparing and responding to transportation emergencies and ensuring the safe transportation of hazardous shipments through their jurisdictions. It is intended for use as an information resource for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Transportation, Emergency Management, and Analytical Services (EM-76).

Bradbury, J.A.; Leyson, J.; Lester, M.K.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ALARA Instructor's Guide ALARA Instructor's Guide 1.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: ALARA Module Number: 1.10 Objectives: 1.10.01 Describe the assumptions on which the current ALARA philosophy is based. 1.10.02 Identify the ALARA philosophy for collective personnel exposure and individual exposure. 1.10.03 Identify the scope of an effective radiological ALARA program. 1.10.04 Identify the purposes for conducting pre-job and/or post-job ALARA reviews. 1.10.05 Identify RCT responsibilities for ALARA implementation. References: 1. NCRP Report No. 91 (1987) "Recommendations on Limits for Exposure to Ionizing Radiation" 2. U.S. Department of Energy, DOE-STD-1098-99, "Radiological Control Standard" 3. 10 CFR Part 835 (1998), "Occupational Radiation Protection"

158

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Access Control and Work Area Setup Access Control and Work Area Setup Instructor's Guide 2.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Access Control and Work Area Setup Module Number: 2.10 Objectives: L 2.10.01 State the purpose of and information found on a Radiological Work Permit (RWP) including the different classifications at your site. L 2.10.02 State responsibilities in using or initiating a RWP. L 2.10.03 State the document that governs the ALARA program at your site. L 2.10.04 Describe how exposure/performance goals are established at your site. L 2.10.05 State the conditions under which a pre-job ALARA review is required at your site. L 2.10.06 State the conditions under which a post-job ALARA review is required at your site. 2.10.07 State purpose of radiological postings, signs, labels, and barricades; and

159

Radiological Training for Tritium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change Notice No. 2 Change Notice No. 2 May 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR TRITIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice 2. Radiological Safety Training for Tritium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1105-2002 Page/Section Change Part 1, page 14 Change: U.S. Department of Energy, Radiological Control

160

LANL responds to radiological incident  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL responds to radiological incident LANL responds to radiological incident LANL responds to radiological incident Multiple tests indicate no health risks to public or employees. August 27, 2012 Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center(LANSCE). Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The contamination poses no danger to the public. The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center August 27, 2012-The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), a multidisciplinary accelerator facility used for both civilian and national security research. The Laboratory has determined that about a dozen people

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Radiological control manual. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP.

Kloepping, R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

Regulatory Supervision of Radiological Protection in the Russian Federation as Applied to Facility Decommissioning and Site Remediation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Russian Federation is carrying out major work to manage the legacy of exploitation of nuclear power and use of radioactive materials. This paper describes work on-going to provide enhanced regulatory supervision of these activities as regards radiological protection. The scope includes worker and public protection in routine operation; emergency preparedness and response; radioactive waste management, including treatment, interim storage and transport as well as final disposal; and long term site restoration. Examples examined include waste from facilities in NW Russia, including remediation of previous shore technical bases (STBs) for submarines, spent fuel and radioactive waste management from ice-breakers, and decommissioning of Radio-Thermal-Generators (RTGs) used in navigational devices. Consideration is given to the identification of regulatory responsibilities among different regulators; development of necessary regulatory instruments; and development of regulatory procedures for safety case reviews and compliance monitoring and international cooperation between different regulators. (authors)

Sneve, M.K. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Shandala, N.K. [Institute of Biophysics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

165

International Data on Radiological Sources  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT The mission of radiological dispersal device (RDD) nuclear forensics is to identify the provenance of nuclear and radiological materials used in RDDs and to aid law enforcement in tracking nuclear materials and routes. The application of databases to radiological forensics is to match RDD source material to a source model in the database, provide guidance regarding a possible second device, and aid the FBI by providing a short list of manufacturers and distributors, and ultimately to the last legal owner of the source. The Argonne/Idaho National Laboratory RDD attribution database is a powerful technical tool in radiological forensics. The database (1267 unique vendors) includes all sealed sources and a device registered in the U.S., is complemented by data from the IAEA Catalogue, and is supported by rigorous in-lab characterization of selected sealed sources regarding physical form, radiochemical composition, and age-dating profiles. Close working relationships with global partners in the commercial sealed sources industry provide invaluable technical information and expertise in the development of signature profiles. These profiles are critical to the down-selection of potential candidates in either pre- or post- event RDD attribution. The down-selection process includes a match between an interdicted (or detonated) source and a model in the database linked to one or more manufacturers and distributors.

Martha Finck; Margaret Goldberg

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

WIPP radiological assistance team dispatched to Los Alamos as precautionary measure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Assistance Team Dispatched Radiological Assistance Team Dispatched To Los Alamos as Precautionary Measure CARLSBAD, N.M., May 11, 2000 - A team of radiological experts has been dispatched from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in response to a week-long forest fire that is threatening Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), one of the nation's premiere research laboratories. "We are responding completely as a precautionary measure," said Jere Galle, team leader for the WIPP Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) team. "It is our understanding that nuclear materials at LANL are not in harm's way. Our primary concern, however, is always to protect human health and the environment." The RAP team's mission is to provide radiological assistance to federal agencies, state,

167

Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Exercise Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Exercise May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A firefighter trained to respond to radiological events performs a radiological survey of the WIPP shipping package as part of a WIPP transportation exercise in Morgan County, Georgia. A firefighter trained to respond to radiological events performs a radiological survey of the WIPP shipping package as part of a WIPP transportation exercise in Morgan County, Georgia. The on-scene incident commander briefs a responder during an April 17 WIPP transportation exercise in Georgia. The on-scene incident commander briefs a responder during an April 17 WIPP transportation exercise in Georgia.

168

Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Exercise Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Exercise May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A firefighter trained to respond to radiological events performs a radiological survey of the WIPP shipping package as part of a WIPP transportation exercise in Morgan County, Georgia. A firefighter trained to respond to radiological events performs a radiological survey of the WIPP shipping package as part of a WIPP transportation exercise in Morgan County, Georgia. The on-scene incident commander briefs a responder during an April 17 WIPP transportation exercise in Georgia. The on-scene incident commander briefs a responder during an April 17 WIPP transportation exercise in Georgia.

169

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response Guidebook (ERG2000) was developed jointly by the U.S. Department of Transportation, Transport Canada, and the Secretariat of Communications and Transportation of...

170

Radiological Assistance Program (RAP)- Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Major Programs > Radiological Major Programs > Radiological Assistance Program Radiological Assistance Program Overview Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Radiological Assistance Program Bookmark and Share Survey equipment is used to detect and measure radiation Survey equipment is used to detect and measure radiation. Click on image to view larger image. The Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) team at Argonne can provide assistance in the event of a radiological accident or incident. Support ranges from giving technical information or advice over the telephone, to sending highly trained team members and state-of-the-art equipment to the accident site to help identify and minimize any radiological hazards. The

171

Radioactive Waste Management Complex low-level waste radiological performance assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of radioactive low-level waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This radiological performance assessment was conducted to evaluate compliance with applicable radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals inadvertently intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty and sensitivity analyses were performed. The results of the analyses indicate compliance with established radiological criteria and provide reasonable assurance that public health and safety will be protected.

Maheras, S.J.; Rood, A.S.; Magnuson, S.O.; Sussman, M.E.; Bhatt, R.N.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Radiological assessment of the town of Edgemont  

SciTech Connect

Congress, in 1980, gave the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) the responsibility to coordinate and conduct a monitoring, engineering assessment, and remedial cleanup program in Edgemont, South Dakota. The Congressional intent was to locate public properties in Edgemont that had been contaminated by radioactive materials from a local uranium mill, and to clean up those properties. Because the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 gave NRC the authority to monitor for contamination but not to clean up contamination, Congress later assigned the remedial cleanup responsibility to the Department of Energy (DOE). NRC, through Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), conducted a radiological survey of 96% of the properties in Edgemont and vicinity during the time period of September 1980 through April 1984. (Out of 976 total properties, 941 were surveyed.) The strategy of the survey was to screen properties for the possible presence of contamination by using short- and long-term radon progeny measurements, indoor and outdoor gamma exposure rate measurements, and soil radium-226 measurements. Properties that failed the screening surveys were measured more extensively to determine whether the elevated readings were due to residual radioactive materials from the uranium mill. This report contains the historical perspective of the Edgemont survey, explains the development and modifications of survey protocols, examines the problems encountered during the survey, and lists a summary of the results. The report also presents conclusions about the effectiveness of the survey techniques and about the rationale of a comprehensive survey of a whole community. The appendices section of this report contains all the protocols, a list of all the properties showing survey results for each, and reports on special studies conducted during the survey. These special studies contain many valuable insights that may prove beneficial to future radiological assessment surveys.

Jackson, P.O.; Thomas, V.W.; Young, J.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Preliminary assessment of radiological doses in alternative waste management systems without an MRS facility  

SciTech Connect

This report presents generic analyses of radiological dose impacts of nine hypothetical changes in the operation of a waste management system without a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The waste management activities examined in this study include those for handling commercial spent fuel at nuclear power reactors and at the surface facilities of a deep geologic repository, and the transportation of spent fuel by rail and truck between the reactors and the repository. In the reference study system, the radiological doses to the public and to the occupational workers are low, about 170 person-rem/1000 metric ton of uranium (MTU) handled with 70% of the fuel transported by rail and 30% by truck. The radiological doses to the public are almost entirely from transportation, whereas the doses to the occupational workers are highest at the reactors and the repository. Operating alternatives examined included using larger transportation casks, marshaling rail cars into multicar dedicated trains, consolidating spent fuel at the reactors, and wet or dry transfer options of spent fuel from dry storage casks. The largest contribution to radiological doses per unit of spent fuel for both the public and occupational workers would result from use of truck transportation casks, which are smaller than rail casks. Thus, reducing the number of shipments by increasing cask sizes and capacities (which also would reduce the number of casks to be handled at the terminals) would reduce the radiological doses in all cases. Consolidating spent fuel at the reactors would reduce the radiological doses to the public but would increase the doses to the occupational workers at the reactors.

Schneider, K.J.; Pelto, P.J.; Daling, P.M.; Lavender, J.C.; Fecht, B.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Radiological Training for Tritium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HANDBOOK DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR TRITIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice 1. Radiological Safety Training for Tritium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1105-2002 Page/Section Change Cover sheets parts 1, 2, 3, and 4 Change: Office of Environment, Safety & Health

175

Radiological Control Training for Supervisors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-2001 3-2001 August 2001 Change Notice No 1. with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Radiological Control Training for Supervisors

176

Radiological Training for Accelerator Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8-2002 8-2002 May 2002 Change Notice No 1. with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR ACCELERATOR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice 1. Radiological Safety Training for Accelerator Facilities

177

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Programs. "Manual of Protective Action Guides and Protective~s. "Emergency Response Protective Action Guides: Airbornefor Setting Protective Action Guides. January 1975. Oak

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other responsible State agencies. The concept of operationsmay be First, some state agencies have been mandated toThese reviews are very state agencies extensive and contain

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the nuclear power plant, the Marine Corps base, thePower Plant Emergency Response Plan, July 1975. United States Marine

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Nuclear and Radiological Material Security | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

to intensive site security efforts, NNSA is also working to build international standards and criteria for nuclear and radiological security. This includes NNSA's work to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ORISE Resources: Radiological and Nuclear Terrorism: Medical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The program concludes with an opportunity to apply new knowledge and decision-making skills in a series of six simulated patient case studies depicting hypothetical radiological...

182

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

advice for both domestic and international nuclear or radiological incidents. It is led by a Senior Energy Official who runs the NNSA field operation and who coordinates NNSA...

183

RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF BALLOD AND ASSOCIATES PROPERTY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Cotton, Robert Gosslee, Jonathan Sowell, Clayton Weaver FINAL REPORT July 30, 1981 Work performed by Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and...

184

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ALARA ALARA Study Guide 1.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: ALARA Module Number: 1.10 Objectives: 1.10.01 Describe the assumptions on which the current ALARA philosophy is based. 1.10.02 Identify the ALARA philosophy for collective personnel exposure and individual exposure. 1.10.03 Identify the scope of an effective radiological ALARA program. 1.10.04 Identify the purposes for conducting pre-job and/or post-job ALARA reviews. 1.10.05 Identify RCT responsibilities for ALARA implementation. INTRODUCTION All personnel at a facility must be committed to the ALARA philosophy. The RCT can play a major role in establishing and maintaining that commitment by understanding its concepts. This lesson will familiarize the student with the ALARA concepts and the

185

Standard practice for radiologic examination of semiconductors and electronic components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This practice provides the minimum requirements for nondestructive radiologic examination of semiconductor devices, microelectronic devices, electromagnetic devices, electronic and electrical devices, and the materials used for construction of these items. 1.2 This practice covers the radiologic examination of these items to detect possible defective conditions within the sealed case, especially those resulting from sealing the lid to the case, and internal defects such as extraneous material (foreign objects), improper interconnecting wires, voids in the die attach material or in the glass (when sealing glass is used) or physical damage. 1.3 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this practice. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the app...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

US Department of Energy radiological control manual. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This manual establishes practices for the conduct of Department of Energy radiological control activities. The Manual states DOE`s positions and views on the best courses of action currently available in the area of radiological controls. Accordingly, the provisions in the Manual should be viewed by contractors as an acceptable technique, method or solution for fulfilling their duties and responsibilities. This Manual shall be used by DOE in evaluating the performance of its contractors. This Manual is not a substitute for Regulations; it is intended to be consistent with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements and shall be revised whenever necessary to ensure such consistency. Some of the Manual provisions, however, challenge the user to go well beyond minimum requirements. Following the course of action delineated in the Manual will result in achieving and surpassing related statutory or regulatory requirements.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Safety philosophy in the transportation of radioactive material  

SciTech Connect

From Winter meeting of American Society of Mechanical Engineers; Detroit, Michigan, USA (11 Nov 1973). The radiological'' and common cause risks'' involved in transporting radioactive materials are briefly discussed. (TFD)

Langhaar, J.W.

1974-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE STD 1098-2008, Radiological Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STD-1098-2008 STD-1098-2008 DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL DOE-STD-1098-2008 Familiar Level August 2011 1 DOE-STD-1098-2008 RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL FAMILIAR LEVEL OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources listed below, you will be able to answer the following questions: 1. What is the purpose of DOE-STD-1098-2008? 2. To which DOE position is the authority and responsibility to establish a comprehensive and effective radiological control training program assigned? 3. What is the definition of the term -total effective dose?‖ 4. What is the definition of the term -lifetime control level?‖ 5. What are three trigger levels that require a formal radiological review of work activities?

189

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING & RADIOLOG SC BSE Plan Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING & RADIOLOG SC BSE Plan Requirements 1 Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group Career: UENG RQ = Requirement Program: LN = Line Plan: 6000BSE RG 6412 NUCLEAR ENGINEERING no exceptions here) RG 6521 NUCLEAR ENGINEERING AND RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCES RESIDENCY, GPA REQUIREMENTS Effective

Shyy, Wei

190

Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual, Revision 0 issued in October 2009. Brief Description of Revision: A minor revision to correct oversights made during revision to incorporate the 10 CFR 835 Update; and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

Radiological Control Managers' Council Nevada Test Site

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

191

Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual  

SciTech Connect

This document supersedes DOE/NV/11718--079, NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual, Revision 5 issued in November 2004. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect the recent changes in compliance requirements with 10 CFR 835, and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

Radiological Control Managers' Council - Nevada Test Site

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Assessment of Incident-Free Transport for Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel to Yucca Mountain Using RADTRAN 5.5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the incident-free radiological impacts associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel to the proposed Yucca Mountain repository using the RADTRAN 5.5 computer code developed by Sandia National Laboratories.

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

193

Radiological characterization of Yankee Nuclear Power Station  

SciTech Connect

The Yankee nuclear power station located in Rowe, Massachusetts, permanently ceased power operations on February 26, 1992, after 31 yr of operation. Yankee has since initiated decommissioning planning activities. A significant component of these activities is the determination of the extent of radiological contamination of the Yankee site. This paper describes the site radiological characterization program that has been implemented for decommissioning the Yankee plant. Radiological scoping surveys were completed to support submittal of a decommissioning plan to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by October 1, 1993. These surveys were designed to provide sufficient detail to estimate the extent of contamination, volume of radiological waste, activity of radiological waste, and personnel dose estimates for removal activities. Surveys were conducted both inside and on the grounds outside of the Yankee plant buildings. Survey results were combined with analytical evaluations to characterize the Yankee site.

Bellini, F.X.; Cumming, E.R.; Hollenbeck, P. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study Guide Study Guide 2.12-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Shipment/Receipt of Radioactive Material Module Number: 2.12 Objectives: 2.12.01 List the applicable agencies which have regulations that govern the transport of radioactive material. 2.12.02 Define terms used in DOT regulations. 2.12.03 Describe methods that may be used to determine the radionuclide contents of a package. 2.12.04 Describe the necessary radiation and contamination surveys to be performed on packages and state the applicable limits. 2.12.05 Describe the necessary radiation and contamination surveys to be performed on exclusive use vehicles and state the applicable limits. 2.12.06 Identify the proper placement of placards on a transport vehicle. i 2.12.07 Identify inspection criteria that should be checked prior to releasing a

195

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Instructor's Guide Instructor's Guide 2.12-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Shipment/Receipt of Radioactive Material Module Number: 2.12 Objectives: 2.12.01 List the applicable agencies which have regulations that govern the transport of radioactive material. 2.12.02 Define terms used in DOT regulations. 2.12.03 Describe methods that may be used to determine the radionuclide contents of a package. 2.12.04 Describe the necessary radiation and contamination surveys to be performed on packages and state the applicable limits. 2.12.05 Describe the necessary radiation and contamination surveys to be performed on exclusive use vehicles and state the applicable limits. 2.12.06 Identify the proper placement of placards on a transport vehicle. L 2.12.07 Identify inspection criteria that should be checked prior to releasing a

196

Radiological survey results at 4400 Piehl Road, Ottawa Lake, Michigan  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at 4400 Piehl Road in Ottawa Lake, Michigan. The survey was performed in September, 1992. The purpose of the survey was to determine if materials containing uranium from work performed under government contract at the former Baker Brothers facility in Toledo, Ohio had been transported off-site to this neighboring area. The radiological survey included surface gamma scans indoors and outdoors, alpha and beta scans inside the house and attached garage, beta-gamma scans of the hard surfaces outside, and the collection of soil, water, and dust samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated that the majority of the measurements on the property were within DOE guidelines. However, the presence of isolated spots of uranium contamination were found in two areas where materials were allegedly transported to the property from the former Baker Brothers site. Uranium uptake by persons on the property by ingestion is fairly unlikely, but inhalation is a possibility. Based on these findings, it is recommended that the residential property at 4400 Piehl Road in Ottawa Lake, Michigan be considered for inclusion under FUSRAP.

Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blog > NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Blog NNSA today concluded...

198

NRC ISSUES REPORT FOR COMMENT ON SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL TRANSPORTATION CASK RESPONSE TO CALDECOTT TUNNEL FIRE SCENARIO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is seeking public comment on a study of how a truck cask for transporting spent nuclear fuel might perform in a severe tunnel fire. The report models the performance of the NAC International Model LWT (NAC) spent fuel cask under the conditions of the April 1982 fire in the Caldecott highway tunnel near Oakland, Calif., when a gasoline tanker carrying 8,800 gallons of gasoline overturned and caught fire. Severe, intense fires such as the Caldecott fire are extremely rare. However, they provide an opportunity to study how transportation packages might perform under very severe accident conditions. The results of this study strongly indicate that any radioactive release from the NAC model or a similar spent fuel shipping cask involved in a severe tunnel fire such as that of the Caldecott highway tunnel accident would be within regulatory limits. The peak internal temperatures predicted for the NAC cask in the analysis of the Caldecott fire scenario were not high enough to result in rupture of the fuel cladding (protective metal tubing around the fuel). Therefore, it would not be expected that any radioactive material (including spent nuclear fuel particles or fission products) would be released from the fuel rods. The maximum cask temperatures experienced around the lid, vent and drain ports exceeded the

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technical Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 Access Control and Work Area Setup 10 Access Control and Work Area Setup Study Guide 2.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Access Control and Work Area Setup Module Number: 2.10 Objectives: i 2.10.01 State the purpose of and information found on a Radiological Work Permit (RWP) including the different classifications at your site. i 2.10.02 State responsibilities in using or initiating a RWP. i 2.10.03 State the document that governs the ALARA program at your site. i 2.10.04 Describe how exposure/performance goals are established at your site. i 2.10.05 State the conditions under which a pre-job ALARA review is required at your site. i 2.10.06 State the conditions under which a post-job ALARA review is required at your site. 2.10.07 State purpose of radiological postings, signs, labels, and barricades; and the

200

Radiological decontamination, survey, and statistical release method for vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Earth-moving vehicles (e.g., dump trucks, belly dumps) commonly haul radiologically contaminated materials from a site being remediated to a disposal site. Traditionally, each vehicle must be surveyed before being released. The logistical difficulties of implementing the traditional approach on a large scale demand that an alternative be devised. A statistical method for assessing product quality from a continuous process was adapted to the vehicle decontamination process. This method produced a sampling scheme that automatically compensates and accommodates fluctuating batch sizes and changing conditions without the need to modify or rectify the sampling scheme in the field. Vehicles are randomly selected (sampled) upon completion of the decontamination process to be surveyed for residual radioactive surface contamination. The frequency of sampling is based on the expected number of vehicles passing through the decontamination process in a given period and the confidence level desired. This process has been successfully used for 1 year at the former uranium millsite in Monticello, Utah (a cleanup site regulated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act). The method forces improvement in the quality of the decontamination process and results in a lower likelihood that vehicles exceeding the surface contamination standards are offered for survey. Implementation of this statistical sampling method on Monticello projects has resulted in more efficient processing of vehicles through decontamination and radiological release, saved hundreds of hours of processing time, provided a high level of confidence that release limits are met, and improved the radiological cleanliness of vehicles leaving the controlled site.

Goodwill, M.E.; Lively, J.W.; Morris, R.L.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C C December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management

202

Radiological safety training for uranium facilities  

SciTech Connect

This handbook contains recommended training materials consistent with DOE standardized core radiological training material. These materials consist of a program management guide, instructor`s guide, student guide, and overhead transparencies.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change Notice No. 1. and Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585...

204

Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1145-2013 March 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities U.S. Department of Energy TRNG-0061 Washington, D.C. 20585...

205

A radiological evaluation of phosphogypsum  

SciTech Connect

Phosphogypsum is the by-product resulting from phosphoric acid or phosphate fertilizer production. The phosphate used in these chemical processes contains the naturally occurring radioactive material U and all its subsequent decay products. During processing, the U generally remains in the phosphoric acid product, while the daughter, {sup 226}Ra, tends to be concentrated in the phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum has physical properties that make it useful as a sub-base for roadways, parking lots, and similar construction. A radiological evaluation, to determine exposures to workers mixing this material with a stabilizing agent (portland cement), was performed at a South Louisiana phosphoric acid chemical plant. Measurements of the {sup 226}Ra content of the phosphogypsum showed an average of 1.1 +/- 0.3 Bq g-1 (0.7-1.7 Bq g-1). The average measured gross gamma exposure rate on the phosphogypsum pile corresponded to a dose equivalent rate of 0.368 +/- 0.006 mu Sv h-1 (0.32-0.42 mu Sv h-1). Radon daughter concentrations measured on top of the phosphogypsum pile ranged from 0.0006 to 0.001 working levels. An analysis of the airborne {sup 226}Ra concentrations showed only background levels.

Laiche, T.P.; Scott, L.M. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Contained radiological analytical chemistry module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Contained radiological analytical chemistry module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Health and Safety Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual is a tool to provide information to all responders and emergency planners and is suggested as a starting point for all organizations that provide personnel/assets for radiological emergency response. It defines the safety requirements for the protection of all emergency responders. The intent is to comply with appropriate regulations or provide an equal level of protection when the situation makes it necessary to deviate. In the event a situation arises which is not addressed in the manual, an appropriate management-level expert will define alternate requirements based on the specifics of the emergency situation. This manual is not intended to pertain to the general public.

FRMAC Health and Safety Working Group

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

209

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 of 3) 3 of 3) RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH Student's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy February 1997 DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Table of Contents Page TERMINAL OBJECTIVE............................................................................1 ENABLING OBJECTIVES...........................................................................1 I. RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION................................................. 2 A. Comparison of Radiation and Radioactive Contamination ..................... 2 B. Types of Contamination.............................................................. 2

210

Glove Perforations During Interventional Radiological Procedures  

SciTech Connect

Intact surgical gloves are essential to avoid contact with blood and other body fluids. The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of glove perforations during interventional radiological procedures. In this study, a total of 758 gloves used in 94 interventional radiological procedures were examined for perforations. Eleven perforations were encountered, only one of which was of occult type. No significant difference in the frequency of glove perforation was found between the categories with varying time duration.

Leena, R. V., E-mail: leenarv_76@yahoo.co.uk; Shyamkumar, N. K. [Christian Medial College, Department of Radiodiagnosis (India)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTecs Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

Paul Guss, Robert Augdahl, Bill Nickels, Cassandra Zellers

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

212

Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTecs Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Space and Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

Paul P. Guss

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Sustainable Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THOUGHT PIECE Sustainable Transport by Melvin M. Webberwant to sustain any mode of transport only if we judge it todraconian in rejecting transport modes that have failed in

Webber, Melvin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

RTSTEP regional transportation simulation tool for emergency planning - final report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale evacuations from major cities during no-notice events - such as chemical or radiological attacks, hazardous material spills, or earthquakes - have an obvious impact on large regions rather than on just the directly affected area. The scope of impact includes the accommodation of emergency evacuation traffic throughout a very large area; the planning of resources to respond appropriately to the needs of the affected population; the placement of medical supplies and decontamination equipment; and the assessment and determination of primary escape routes, as well as routes for incoming emergency responders. Compared to events with advance notice, such as evacuations based on hurricanes approaching an affected area, the response to no-notice events relies exclusively on pre-planning and general regional emergency preparedness. Another unique issue is the lack of a full and immediate understanding of the underlying threats to the population, making it even more essential to gain extensive knowledge of the available resources, the chain of command, and established procedures. Given the size of the area affected, an advanced understanding of the regional transportation systems is essential to help with the planning for such events. The objectives of the work described here (carried out by Argonne National Laboratory) is the development of a multi-modal regional transportation model that allows for the analysis of different evacuation scenarios and emergency response strategies to build a wealth of knowledge that can be used to develop appropriate regional emergency response plans. The focus of this work is on the effects of no-notice evacuations on the regional transportation network, as well as the response of the transportation network to the sudden and unusual demand. The effects are dynamic in nature, with scenarios changing potentially from minute to minute. The response to a radiological or chemical hazard will be based on the time-delayed dispersion of such materials over a large area, with responders trying to mitigate the immediate danger to the population in a variety of ways that may change over time (e.g., in-place evacuation, staged evacuations, and declarations of growing evacuation zones over time). In addition, available resources will be marshaled in unusual ways, such as the repurposing of transit vehicles to support mass evacuations. Thus, any simulation strategy will need to be able to address highly dynamic effects and will need to be able to handle any mode of ground transportation. Depending on the urgency and timeline of the event, emergency responders may also direct evacuees to leave largely on foot, keeping roadways as clear as possible for emergency responders, logistics, mass transport, and law enforcement. This RTSTEP project developed a regional emergency evacuation modeling tool for the Chicago Metropolitan Area that emergency responders can use to pre-plan evacuation strategies and compare different response strategies on the basis of a rather realistic model of the underlying complex transportation system. This approach is a significant improvement over existing response strategies that are largely based on experience gained from small-scale events, anecdotal evidence, and extrapolation to the scale of the assumed emergency. The new tool will thus add to the toolbox available to emergency response planners to help them design appropriate generalized procedures and strategies that lead to an improved outcome when used during an actual event.

Ley, H.; Sokolov, V.; Hope, M.; Auld, J.; Zhang, K.; Park, Y.; Kang, X. (Energy Systems)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

215

Simulation of transportation of low enriched uranium solutions  

SciTech Connect

A simulation of the transportation by truck of low enriched uranium solutions has been completed for NEPA purposes at the Savannah River Site. The analysis involves three distinct source terms, and establishes the radiological risks of shipment to three possible destinations. Additionally, loading accidents were analyzed to determine the radiological consequences of mishaps during handling and delivery. Source terms were developed from laboratory measurements of chemical samples from low enriched uranium feed materials being stored at SRS facilities, and from manufacturer data on transport containers. The transportation simulations were accomplished over the INTERNET using the DOE TRANSNET system at Sandia National Laboratory. The HIGHWAY 3.3 code was used to analyze routing scenarios, and the RADTRAN 4 code was used to analyze incident free and accident risks of transporting radiological materials. Loading accidents were assessed using the Savannah River Site AXAIR89Q and RELEASE 2 codes.

Hope, E.P.; Ades, M.J.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Finding of No Significant Impact Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex, Nevada Test Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIOLOGICAL/NUCLEAR COUNTERMEASURES TEST AND EVALUATION COMPLEX, NEVADA TEST SITE The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is the Federal organization charged with defending the borders of the United States under the authority the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107-296). The DHS requested the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to develop at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) a complex for testing and evaluating countermeasures for interdicting potential terrorist attacks using radiological and/or nuclear weapons of mass destruction. In response to that request, NNSA proposes to construct, operate, and maintain the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex (Rad/NucCTEC). NNSA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1499) (EA) which analyzes the potential

217

Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

Bechtel Nevada

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTIVE APPAREL PROGRAM AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

A program is described for providing adequate radiological protective clothing for all employees. The program consolidates all protective clothing requirements and the development and evaluation of clothing to be utilized, and establishes sound criteria for future procurement of accepted clothing. A council composed of representatives from all interested groups provides an effective means of consultation for the development, evaluation, and establishment of acceptable radiological apparel. Specifications and standards were established for use in the procurement of radiological protective apparel. Items of a non-launderable nature are warehoused and dispersed as requested. Routine reuse items which are laundry-maintained are dispersed through a central laundry facility. A chart illustrates the organization of the program. (C.H.)

Mehas, T.C.

1961-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

ENERGY EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN COMMISSIONREPORT October 2006 CEC-600 Deputy Director FUELS AND TRANSPORTATION DIVISION #12;The Energy Emergency Response Plan is prepared, safety, and welfare. #12;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Energy Emergency Response Plan was prepared from

220

Health Physics journal features U.S. radiological response to...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

version Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr NNSA Blog October 2013 (1) September 2013 (18) August 2013 (17) July 2013 (20) June 2013 (19) May 2013 (25) April 2013 (17) March 2013...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling: Challenges of the Fukushima Daiichi Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provided a wide range of predictions and analyses as part of the response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This work encompassed: weather forecasts and atmospheric transport predictions, estimates of possible dose in Japan based on hypothetical U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission scenarios of potential radionuclide releases, predictions of possible plume arrival times and dose levels at U.S. locations, and source estimation and plume model refinement. An overview of NARAC response activities is provided, along with a more in-depth discussion of some of NARACs preliminary source reconstruction analyses. NARAC optimized the overall agreement of model predictions to dose rate measurements using statistical comparisons of data and model values paired in space and time. Estimated emission rates varied depending on the choice of release assumptions (e.g., time-varying vs. constant release rates), the radionuclide mix, meteorology, and/or the radiological data used in the analysis. Results were found to be consistent with other studies within expected uncertainties, despite the application of different source estimation methodologies and the use of significantly different radiological measurement data. A discussion of some of the operational and scientific challenges encountered during the response, along with recommendations for future work, is provided.

Sugiyama, Gayle [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Nasstrom, John [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Pobanz, Brenda [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Foster, Kevin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Simpson, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Vogt, Phil [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Aluzzi, Fernando [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Homann, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Health and Safety Research Division RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Contaninated material was discovered in the area during an EG&G aerial radiological survey,l and confirmed by a ground-level radiological survey by the Nuclear Regulatory...

223

Health and Safety Research Divlsion RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Contaminated material was discovered in the area during an. EG&G aerial radiological survey,l and confirmed by a ground-level radiological survey by the Nuclear Regulatory...

224

Site-specific waste management instruction - radiological screening facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Site-Specific Waste Management Instruction provides guidance for managing waste generated from radiological sample screening operations conducted to support the Environmental Restoration Contractor`s activities. This document applies only to waste generated within the radiological screening facilities.

G. G. Hopkins

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs The George W. Woodruff School #12 Year Enrollment - Fall Semester Undergraduate Graduate #12; Nuclear Power Industry Radiological Engineering Industry Graduate School DOE National Labs Nuclear Navy #12; 104 Operating Nuclear Power plants

Weber, Rodney

226

U.S.-CHINA RADIOLOGICAL SOURCE SECURITY PROJECT: CONTINUING AND EXPANDING BILATERAL COOPERATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The successful radiological security cooperation between the U.S. and China to secure at-risk sites near venues of the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics has led to an expanded bilateral nonproliferation cooperation scope. The U.S. Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration, the Chinese Atomic Energy Authority and the China Ministry of Environmental Protection are continuing joint efforts to secure radiological sources throughout China under the U.S.-China Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Technology (PUNT) Agreement. Joint cooperation activities include physical security upgrades of sites with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Category 1 radiological sources, packaging, recovery, and storage of high activity transuranic and beta gamma sources, and secure transportation practices for the movement of recovered sources. Expansion of cooperation into numerous provinces within China includes the use of integrated training workshops that will demonstrate methodologies and best practices between U.S. and Chinese radiological source security and recovery experts. The fiscal year 2009 expanded scope of cooperation will be conducted similar to the 2008 Olympic cooperation with the Global Threat Reduction Initiative taking the lead for the U.S., PUNT being the umbrella agreement, and Los Alamos, Sandia, and Oak Ridge National Laboratories operating as technical working groups. This paper outlines the accomplishments of the joint implementation and training efforts to date and discusses the possible impact on future U.S./China cooperation.

Zhu, Zhixuan; Zhou, Qifu; Yang, Yaoyun; Huang, Chaoyun; Lloyd, James; Williams, Adam; Feldman, Alexander; Streeper, Charles; Pope, Noah G.; Hawk, Mark; Rawl, Rick; Howell, Randy A.; Kennedy, Catherine

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

227

Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

NNSA presentation on Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant from May 13, 2011

228

NNSA, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute to Prevent Radiological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Philippine Nuclear Research Institute to Prevent Radiological Terrorism | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

229

US, Netherlands Expand Partnership to Secure Radiological Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expand Partnership to Secure Radiological Materials Worldwide | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

230

ORISE: DeepwaterHorizon and Nuclear & Radiological Incidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wi l l i a m H a l e y Wi l l i a m H a l e y B r a d P o t t e r C o mm o n C h a l l e n g e s a n d S o l u t i o n s J u n e 2 0 1 1 D e e p w a t e r H o r i z o n a n dN u c l e a r & R a d i o l o g i c a l I n c i d e n t s The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill shares many of the same challenges associated with a radiological incident like the one considered in the Empire 09 1 exercise or even a much larger nuclear incident. By analyzing experiences during Deepwater Horizon, these challenges can be identified by the interagency in advance of a radiological or nuclear emergency and solutions made available. Establishing and staffing a UnifiEd Command strUCtUrE The demands of Deepwater Horizon challenged the traditional response construct envisioned by national planning systems.

231

Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides technical support to the requesting federal agency such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Defense, the National Space and Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), or a state agency to address the radiological consequences of an event. These activities include measures to alleviate damage, loss, hardship, or suffering caused by the incident; protect public health and safety; restore essential government services; and provide emergency assistance to those affected. Scheduled to launch in the fall of 2009, Mars Science Laboratory is part of NASA's Mars Exploration Program, a long-term effort of robotic exploration of the red planet. Mars Science Laboratory is a rover that will assess whether Mars ever was, or is still today, an environment able to support microbial life. In other words, its mission is to determine the planet's "habitability." The Mars Science Laboratory rover will carry a radioisotope power system that generates electricity from the heat of plutonium's radioactive decay. This power source gives the mission an operating lifespan on Mars' surface of a full Martian year (687 Earth days) or more, while also providing significantly greater mobility and operational flexibility, enhanced science payload capability, and exploration of a much larger range of latitudes and altitudes than was possible on previous missions to Mars. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the DOE in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. NSTec is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools NSTec has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform NSTec will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, NASA, state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

Paul Guss

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

ORISE: REAC/TS a Key Part of IAEA's Response Assistance Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is to strengthen the IAEA's ability to provide assistance and advice, as well as promote emergency preparedness and response capabilities for radiological incidents among IAEA...

233

First Responder Initial Response Procedure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this response flow chart is to provide first responders with guidance for response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material.

234

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Instructor's Guide Instructor's Guide 2.17-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Contamination Monitoring Instrumentation Module Number: 2.17 Objectives: 2.17.01 List the factors which affects an RCT's selection of a portable contamination monitoring instrument. L 2.17.02 Describe the following features and specifications for commonly used count rate meter probes used at your site for beta/gamma and/or alpha surveys: a. Detector type b. Detector shielding and window c. Types of radiation detected/measured d. Energy response for measured radiation e. Specific limitations/characteristics L 2.17.03 Describe the following features and specifications for commonly used count rate instruments used at your site: a. Types of detectors available for use b. Operator-adjustable controls

235

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Protection Standards Radiological Protection Standards Instructor's Guide 1.09-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Protection Standards Module Number: 1.09 Objectives: 1.09.01 Identify the role of advisory agencies in the development of recommendations for radiological control. 1.09.02 Identify the role of regulatory agencies in the development of standards and regulations for radiological control. 1.09.03 Identify the scope of the 10 CFR Part 835. References: 1. ANL-88-26 (1988) "Operational Health Physics Training"; Moe, Harold; Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago 2. U.S. Department of Energy, DOE-STD-1098-99, "Radiological Control Standard" 3. 10 CFR Part 835 (1998) "Occupational Radiation Protection" Instructional Aids:

236

Simulation-based computation of dose to humans in radiological environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Radiological Environment Modeling System (REMS) quantifies dose to humans working in radiological environments using the IGRIP (Interactive Graphical Robot Instruction Program) and Deneb/ERGO simulation software. These commercially available products are augmented with custom C code to provide radiation exposure information to, and collect radiation dose information from, workcell simulations. Through the use of any radiation transport code or measured data, a radiation exposure input database may be formulated. User-specified IGRIP simulations utilize these databases to compute and accumulate dose to programmable human models operating around radiation sources. Timing, distances, shielding, and human activity may be modeled accurately in the simulations. The accumulated dose is recorded in output files, and the user is able to process and view this output. The entire REMS capability can be operated from a single graphical user interface.

Breazeal, N.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Davis, K.R.; Watson, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vickers, D.S. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Ford, M.S. [Battelle Pantex, Amarillo, TX (United States). Dept. of Radiation Safety

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

An external dose reconstruction involving a radiological dispersal device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent events have underscored the need for the United States government to provide streamlined emergency response procedures and subsequent dose estimations for personnel responding to incidents involving radioactive material. Indeed, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 138 (NCRP 2001) indicates that exposures received by first responders will be important for a number of reasons, including planning for the appropriate use of key personnel in an extended emergency situation. In response, the Department of Homeland Security has published Protective Action Guides (DHS 2006) to help minimize these exposures and associated risks. This research attempts to provide some additional radiological exposure knowledge so that an Incident Commander, with limited or no information, can make more informed decisions about evacuation, sheltering-in-place, relocation of the public, turn-back levels, defining radiation hazard boundaries, and in-field radiological dose assessments of the radiation workers, responders, and members of the public. A method to provide such insight begins with providing a model that describes the physics of radiation interactions, radiation source and geometry, collection of field measurements, and interpretation of the collected data. A Monte Carlo simulation of the model is performed so that calculated results can be compared to measured values. The results of this investigation indicate that measured organ absorbed doses inside a tissue equivalent phantom compared favorably to the derived organ absorbed doses measured by the Panasonic thermoluminescence dosimeters and with Monte Carlo â??Nâ?? Particle modeled results. Additionally, a Victoreen 450P pressurized ion chamber measured the integrated dose and these results compared well with the Panasonic right lateral TLD. This comparison indicates that the Victoreen 450P ionization chamber could potentially serve as an estimator of real-time effective dose and organ absorbed dose, if energy and angular dependence corrections could be taken into account. Finally, the data obtained in this investigation indicate that the MCNP model provided a reasonable method to determine organ absorbed dose and effective dose of a simulated Radiological Dispersal Device in an Inferior-Superior geometry with Na99mTcO4 as the source of radioactive material.

Hearnsberger, David Wayne

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Radiological Safety Training for Uranium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HDBK-1113-2008 DOE HDBK-1113-2008 April 2008 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY TRAINING FOR URANIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1113-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1113-2008 iii Foreword This Handbook describes a recommended implementation process for additional training as outlined in DOE-STD-1098-99, Radiological Control (RCS). Its purpose is to assist those individuals, Department of Energy (DOE) employees, Managing and Operating (M&O) contractors, and Managing and Integrating

239

NV/YMP RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL MANUAL  

SciTech Connect

This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and the Yucca Mountain Office of Repository Development (YMORD). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835), Occupational Radiation Protection. Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Pleasanton, California; and at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, field work by NNSA/NSO at other locations is also covered by this manual.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE; BECHTEL NEVADA

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Microsoft Word - Berger Radiological Conditions.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Dec. Dec. 2, 2009 1 Summary of Information Regarding Radiological Conditions of NFSS Vicinity Properties J. D. Berger, CHP DeNuke Contracting Services, Inc. Oak Ridge, TN The following is a summary of the information obtained from reviews of radiological survey reports, prepared by ORAU in support of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. These reports were obtained for review from the IVEA Program at ORAU/ORISE. A list of the reports, reviewed for this summary, is included at the end of this report. Hard copies of reports for ORAU survey activities of NFSS and NFSS Vicinity Properties are available at the South Campus Site of ORAU (these reports are not available in electronic form). In addition, there are 12 - 14 boxes of hard-copy supporting data and information, pertinent to the surveys. I inspected the contents of Box 54. That box contained records for NFSS Vicinity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

06-97 06-97 February 1997 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 March 2002 Reaffirmation with Errata August 2002 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Reaffirmation with Errata DOE-HDBK-1106-97 Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research

242

Radiological Safety Training for Accelerator Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TS TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1108-2002 May 2002 Reaffirmation with Change Notice 2 July 2013 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY TRAINING FOR ACCELERATOR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change Notice No.2 Radiological Training for Accelerator Facilities Page/Section Change Throughout the document: Program Management Guide Instructor's Guide Student's Guide "Shall" and "Must" statements Revised to: Program Management Instructor's Material Student's Material Reworded to non-mandatory language unless associated with a requirement

243

OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2 7% 2 7% d &y / 7 ORNL/TM- 10076 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL ~-T-m -~=- -~ w-~- -"" * ,<.~- ~w&$UREMENTs: TAKEN IN THE NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK, AREA (NF002) J. K. Williams B. A. Berven ~.~~;:;-~~~ ~. -,' - ~~ 7, OPERATED BY MARTIN MARIDTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC, FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY --... ORNL/TM-10076 HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Nuclear and Chemical Waste Programs (Activity No. AH 10 05 00 0; ONLWCOI) RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS TAKEN IN THE NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK, AREA (NFOO2) J. K. Williams* and B. A. Berven *Biology Division Date Published November 1986 Investigation Team B. A. Berven - RASA Program Manager W. D. Cottrell - FUSRAP Project Director W. H. Shinpaugh - Field Survey Supervisor

244

Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

145-2008 145-2008 April 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1145-2008 Program Management Guide

245

Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1145-2013 March 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities U.S. Department of Energy TRNG-0061 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. ii Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1145-2013 Program Management Foreword

246

A radiological and chemical investigation of the 7500 Area Contamination Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radiological and chemical investigation of the 7500 Area Contamination Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted intermittently from February 1992 through May 1992. The investigation was performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health and Safety Research Division of ORNL at the request of the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Operations Office and the ORNL Environmental Restoration Program. Results of this investigation indicate that the source of radioactive contamination at the point of the contamination incident is from one of the underground abandoned lines. The contamination in soil is likely the result of residual contamination from years of waste transport and maintenance operations (e.g., replacement of degraded joints, upgrading or replacement of entire pipelines, and associated landscaping activities). However, because (1) there is currently an active LLW line positioned in the same subsurface trench with the abandoned lines and (2) the physical condition of the abandoned lines may be brittle, this inquiry could not determine which abandoned line was responsible for the subsurface contamination. Soil sampling at the location of the contamination incident and along the pipeline route was performed in a manner so as not to damage the active LLW line and abandoned lines. Recommendations for corrective actions are included.

Williams, J.K.; Foley, R.D.; Tiner, P.F.; Hatmaker, T.L.; Uziel, M.S.; Swaja, R.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The U. S. Department of Energy's Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) planning process  

SciTech Connect

On September 2, 1987, the U.S. Department of Energy's Nevada operations office (DOE/NV) was tasked by the under secretary to develop a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) capability for response to major radiological emergencies. Prior to this time, each DOE region responded to a major radiological accident in their region. The DOE/NV's basic role is to coordinate the use of DOE's assets countrywide and provide the management nucleus of a FRMAC. Six working groups plus a management panel were established to assist in the implementation of the FRMAC response capability, and an interim FRMAC operation plant was published 9 months later. The paper discusses working groups, galileo planning, exercises, FRMAC planning products and future FRMAC activities.

Brown, H.U.; Boardman, C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 of 3) 2 of 3) Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research Instructor's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy February 1997 DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Table of Contents Page DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - Course/Lesson Plan.............................. 1 Standardized Core Course Materials................................................... 1 Course Goal.........................................................................1 Target Audience.................................................................. 1 Course Description............................................................... 1 Prerequisites...................................................................... 1

249

Fixation of Radiological Contamination; International Collaborative Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cooperative international project was conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the United Kingdoms National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) to integrate a capture coating with a high performance atomizing process. The initial results were promising, and lead to further trials. The somewhat longer testing and optimization process has resulted in a product that could be demonstrated in the field to reduce airborne radiological dust and contamination.

Rick Demmer

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual  

SciTech Connect

This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of low-level radioactive waste and the handling of radioactive sources. Remediation of contaminated land areas may also result in radiological exposures.

Radiological Control Managers Council

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

251

Documents: Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Transportation PDF Icon Transportation Impact Assessment for Shipment of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) Cylinders...

252

Challenges for Early Responders to a Nuclear / Radiological Terrorism Incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Even in the best of circumstances, most municipalities would face severe challenges in providing effective incident response to a large scale radiation release caused by nuclear terrorism or accident. Compounding obvious complexities, the effectiveness of first and early responders to a radiological emergency may also be hampered by an insufficient distribution of radiation detection and monitoring equipment, local policies concerning triage and field decontamination of critical victims, malfunctioning communications, inadequate inter-agency agility, and the psychological 'fear' impact on early responders. This paper examines several issues impeding the early response to nuclear terrorism incidents with specific consideration given to the on-going and forward-thinking preparedness efforts currently being developed in the Sacramento, California region. Specific recommendations are provided addressing hot zone protocols, radiation detection and monitoring equipment, hasty patient packaging techniques, vertically and horizontally integrated pre-event training, mitigating psychological fear, and protocols for the effective 'hand-off' from first responders to subsequent early response-recovery teams. (authors)

Wells, M.A. [Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Stearns, L.J. [Shaw Environmental, Inc, Monroeville, PA (United States); Davie, A.D. [Shaw Environmental, Inc, Alpharetta, GA (United States); Day, E. [PELL Resources Company, Manassas, VA (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 1, Operations  

SciTech Connect

The Monitoring division is primarily responsible for the coordination and direction of: Aerial measurements to delineate the footprint of radioactive contaminants that have been released into the environment. Monitoring of radiation levels in the environment; Sampling to determine the extent of contaminant deposition in soil, water, air and on vegetation; Preliminary field analyses to quantify soil concentrations or depositions; and Environmental and personal dosimetry for FRMAC field personnel, during a Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) and Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response. Monitoring and sampling techniques used during CM/FRMAC operations are specifically selected for use during radiological emergencies where large numbers of measurements and samples must be acquired, analyzed, and interpreted in the shortest amount of time possible. In addition, techniques and procedures are flexible so that they can be used during a variety of different scenarios; e.g., accidents involving releases from nuclear reactors, contamination by nuclear waste, nuclear weapon accidents, space vehicle reentries, or contamination from a radiological dispersal device. The Monitoring division also provides technicians to support specific Health and Safety Division activities including: The operation of the Hotline; FRMAC facility surveys; Assistance with Health and Safety at Check Points; and Assistance at population assembly areas which require support from the FRMAC. This volume covers deployment activities, initial FRMAC activities, development and implementation of the monitoring and assessment plan, the briefing of field teams, and the transfer of FRMAC to the EPA.

NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Real Time Quantitative Radiological Monitoring Equipment for Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed a suite of systems that rapidly scan, analyze, and characterize radiological contamination in soil. These systems have been successfully deployed at several Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories and Cold War Legacy closure sites. Traditionally, these systems have been used during the characterization and remediation of radiologically contaminated soils and surfaces; however, subsequent to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the applications of these systems have expanded to include homeland security operations for first response, continuing assessment and verification of cleanup activities in the event of the detonation of a radiological dispersal device. The core system components are a detector, a spectral analyzer, and a global positioning system (GPS). The system is computer controlled by menu-driven, user-friendly custom software designed for a technician-level operator. A wide variety of detectors have been used including several configurations of sodium iodide (NaI) and high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, and a large area proportional counter designed for the detection of x-rays from actinides such as Am-241 and Pu-238. Systems have been deployed from several platforms including a small all-terrain vehicle (ATV), hand-pushed carts, a backpack mounted unit, and an excavator mounted unit used where personnel safety considerations are paramount. The INL has advanced this concept, and expanded the system functionality to create an integrated, field-deployed analytical system through the use of tailored analysis and operations software. Customized, site specific software is assembled from a supporting toolbox of algorithms that streamline the data acquisition, analysis and reporting process. These algorithms include region specific spectral stripping, automated energy calibration, background subtraction, activity calculations based on measured detector efficiencies, and on-line data quality checks and measures. These analyses are combined to provide real-time areal activity and coverage maps that are displayed to the operator as the survey progresses. The flexible functionality of the INL systems are well suited to multiple roles supporting homeland security needs.

John R. Giles; Lyle G. Roybal; Michael V. Carpenter

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technican Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Work Coverage Radiological Work Coverage Study Guide 2.11-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Work Coverage Module Number: 2.11 Objectives: 2.11.01 List four purposes of job coverage. 2.11.02 Explain the differences between continuous and intermittent job coverage. 2.11.03 Given example conditions, identify those that should require job coverage. 2.11.04 Identify items that should be considered in planning job coverage. 2.11.05 Identify examples of information that should be discussed with workers during pre-job briefings. 2.11.06 Describe exposure control techniques that can be used to control worker and technician radiation exposures. i 2.11.07 Describe the in-progress radiological surveys that should be performed, at your site, under various radiological conditions.

256

Surveillance Guides - RPS 11.2 Radiological Work Practices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIOLOGICAL WORK PRACTICES RADIOLOGICAL WORK PRACTICES 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the practices of workers performing tasks in radiological controlled areas to ensure that these practices protect the safety and health of the workers and comply with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 10 CFR 835, Occupational Radiation Protection 2.2 DOE/EH-0256T, rev. 1, Radiological Control Manual 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirement RP-0024 from the RL S/RID. This requirement comes from the Radiological Control Manual. 4.0 Surveillance Activities The Facility Representative performs the following activities to evaluate the effectiveness of work practices by contractor personnel in minimizing exposure to radiological hazards.

257

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Work Coverage Radiological Work Coverage Instructor's Guide 2.11-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Work Coverage Module Number: 2.11 Objectives: 2.11.01 List four purposes of job coverage. 2.11.02 Explain the differences between continuous and intermittent job coverage. 2.11.03 Given example conditions, identify those that should require job coverage. 2.11.04 Identify items that should be considered in planning job coverage. 2.11.05 Identify examples of information that should be discussed with workers during pre-job briefings. 2.11.06 Describe exposure control techniques that can be used to control worker and technician radiation exposures. L 2.11.07 Describe the in-progress radiological surveys that should be performed, at your site, under various radiological conditions.

258

Radiological and Nuclear Security in A Global Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper considers the state of nuclear and radiological security in the UK and abroad and reports on the methods that could be employed by terrorists with radiological or nuclear material to cause destruction. It is shown that despite current safeguards that problems arise due to materials that are unaccounted for and poor implementation of detection regimes in some geographical regions. The prospect of a future terrorist event that involves nuclear or radiological materials seems likely despite best efforts of prevention.

Jones, Nick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H{sup {minus}} beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H{sup {minus}} beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H{sup {minus}} beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H{sup {minus}} beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H{sup {minus}} beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H{sup {minus}} beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser. 9 figs.

Johnstone, C.J.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

260

Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H.sup.- beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H.sup.- beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H.sup.- beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H.sup.- beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H.sup.- beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H.sup.- beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser.

Johnstone, Carol J. (Warrenville, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Radiological Controls - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of...

262

Hospital Triage in First Hours After Nuclear or Radiological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hospital Triage in the First 24 Hours after a Nuclear or Radiological Disaster Medical professionals with the Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) at the...

263

DOE, Westinghouse to Partner with NMJC To Train Radiological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Partner with NMJC To Train Radiological and Waste Handling Technicians Hobbs, NM, December 5, 2001 -- Representatives of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) yesterday...

264

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Overheads  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Radiological Properties of Plutonium * 15 isotopes, all radioactive * Pu-238 (heat source) * Pu-239 (reactor fuel, weapons) * Pu-240 (reactor fuel, weapons) *...

265

Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

266

OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF THE INDEPENDENT RADIOLOGICAL  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

W. D. Cottrell - FUSRAP Project Director M. G. Yalcintas - Field Survey Supervisor Work performed as part of the RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY ACTIVITIES PROGRAM Prepared by the OAK...

267

Don Haward joins WIPP as manager of radiological control and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Don Harward Joins WIPP as Manager of Radiological Control and Emergency Preparedness CARLSBAD, N.M., May 12, 2000 - The Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division (WID) has named Don...

268

Nuclear and Radiological Field Training Center | Y-12 National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Training Center A site used for nuclear research in Oak Ridge, Tennessee during the Manhattan Project is now the Y-12 National Security Complex's Nuclear and Radiological...

269

Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Plan, U.S. Department of Energy Region 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Region 6 Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Plan (TEPP Plan) operates within the framework of the DOE emergency management system for developing, coordinating, and directing emergency planning, preparedness, and readiness assurance activities for radiological transportation incidents. The DOE Region 6 TEPP Plan is a narrative description of the DOE Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program activities, training and technical assistance provided to states and tribes along DOE's transportation corridors in DOE Region 6.

Marsha Keister

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Recycle of radiologically contaminated austenitic stainless steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy owns large quantities of radiologically contaminated austenitic stainless steel which could by recycled for reuse if appropriate release standards were in place. Unfortunately, current policy places the formulation of a release standard for USA industry years, if not decades, away. The Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and various university and industrial partners are participating in initiative to recycle previously contaminated austenitic stainless steels into containers for the storage and disposal of radioactive wastes. This paper describes laboratory scale experiments which demonstrated the decontamination and remelt of stainless steel which had been contaminated with radionuclides.

Imrich, K.J.; Leader, D.R.; Iyer, N.C.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Radiological Dose Calculations for Fusion Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results and rationale for radiological dose calculations for the maximally exposed individual during fusion accident conditions. Early doses per unit activity (Sieverts per TeraBecquerel) are given for 535 magnetic fusion isotopes of interest for several release scenarios. These data can be used for accident assessment calculations to determine if the accident consequences exceed Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Department of Energy evaluation guides. A generalized yearly dose estimate for routine releases, based on 1 Terabecquerel unit releases per radionuclide, has also been performed using averaged site parameters and assumed populations. These routine release data are useful for assessing designs against US Environmental Protection Agency yearly release limits.

Michael L. Abbott; Lee C. Cadwallader; David A. Petti

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Radiological Control Technician: Standardized technician Qualification Standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Qualification Standard states and defines the knowledge and skill requirements necessary for successful completion of the Radiological Control Technician Training Program. The standard is divided into three phases: Phase I concerns RCT Academic training. There are 13 lessons associated with the core academics program and 19 lessons associated with the site academics program. The staff member should sign the appropriate blocks upon successful completion of the examination for that lesson or group of lessons. In addition, facility specific lesson plans may be added to meet the knowledge requirements in the Job Performance Measures (JPM) of the practical program. Phase II concerns RCT core/site practical (JPMs) training. There are thirteen generic tasks associated with the core practical program. Both the trainer/evaluator and student should sign the appropriate block upon successful completion of the JPM. In addition, facility specific tasks may be added or generic tasks deleted based on the results of the facility job evaluation. Phase III concerns the oral examination board successful completion of the oral examination board is documented by the signature of the chairperson of the board. Upon completion of all of the standardized technician qualification requirements, final qualification is verified by the student and the manager of the Radiological Control Department and acknowledged by signatures on the qualification standard. The completed Qualification Standard shall be maintained as an official training record.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

www.mnltap.umn.edu The trusted resource for Minnesota's local transportation agencies Fall 2008 Vol. 16, No. 4 EMERGENCY RESPONSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 16, No. 4 EMERGENCY RESPONSE LTAP role in response ..........................2 LRRB UPDATE OPERA.E. Minneapolis, MN 55455-0375 NONPROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID MPLS. MN PERMIT NO. 155 When a natural disaster way to handle an unthink- able event is preparedness. The disaster preparedness plan in Hugo

Minnesota, University of

274

Radiological survey support activities for the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the Engineering Support Division of the US Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office and in accordance with the programmatic overview/certification responsibilities of the Department of Energy Environmental and Safety Engineering Division, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group conducted a series of radiological measurements and tests at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor located in Ames, Iowa. These measurements and tests were conducted during 1980 and 1981 while the reactor building was being decontaminated and decommissioned for the purpose of returning the building to general use. The results of these evaluations are included in this report. Although the surface contamination within the reactor building could presumably be reduced to negligible levels, the potential for airborne contamination from tritiated water vapor remains. This vapor emmanates from contamination within the concrete of the building and should be monitored until such time as it is reduced to background levels. 2 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Luminescence analysis for radiological and nuclear forensic application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper briefly discusses recombination luminescence and its use in forensic radiation dosimetry. Recombination luminescence techniques offer a new capability for radiological forensic analysis of sites and vehicles previously cleared of isotopic ... Keywords: OSL, TL, environmental dosimetry, forensic, optically stimulated luminescence, radiological, retrospective population dosimetry, thermoluminescence

Nigel A. Spooner; Barnaby W. Smith

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Adapting collaborative radiological practice to low-resource environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe how current radiological best practices are predicated on a sophisticated technological ecosystem usually comprised of multiple large-scale displays, and integrated record keeping and communication systems driven by high-speed networks. At ... Keywords: cscw, ictd, medicine, pacs, professional practice, radiology information systems, teleradiology

Beth E. Kolko; Alexis Hope; Waylon Brunette; Karen Saville; Wayne Gerard; Michael Kawooya; Robert Nathan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Operation Castle. Radiological Safety. Volume 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is designed to cover the overall Operation Castle radiological safety matters from the viewpoint of those issues of direct concern to Headquarters, Joint Task Force Seven. It was written for the express purpose of assisting in the development of future radiological safety plans by presenting detailed discussion of the problems and solutions arising during Operation Castle.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Protection Standards Radiation Protection Standards Study Guide 1.09-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Protection Standards Module Number: 1.09 Objectives: 1.09.01 Identify the role of advisory agencies in the development of recommendations for radiological control. 1.09.02 Identify the role of regulatory agencies in the development of standards and regulations for radiological control. 1.09.03 Identify the scope of 10 CFR Part 835. References: 1. ANL-88-26 (1988) "Operational Health Physics Training"; Moe, Harold; Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago 2. U.S. Department of Energy, DOE-STD-1098-99, "Radiological Control Standard" 3. 10 CFR Part 835 (1998) "Occupational Radiation Protection" DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Module 1.09 Radiation Protection Standards

279

How ORISE is Making a Difference: Radiological Assessment and Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Develops Paperless Tool to Assist with Data Input Into Radiological Develops Paperless Tool to Assist with Data Input Into Radiological Assessment and Monitoring System During the Empire 09 exercise, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) tested (for the first time) a paperless system of data management to support the operations of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). The paperless FRMAC (pFRMAC) provides tools that enables the FRMAC to collect and process field measurements and samples following a radiological or nuclear event. The process allows field data to be entered into specialized electronic tablets that are then sent to the Radiological Assessment and Monitoring System (RAMS). RAMS is the hub of pFRMAC that provides data analysis to the consequence management home team and

280

EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas Summary This Programmatic EA evaluates alternatives for the management of scrap metal originating from DOE radiological control areas, including the proposed action to allow for the recycle of uncontaminated scrap metal that meets the requirements of DOE Order 458.1. (Metals with volumetric radioactive contamination are not included in the scope of this Programmatic EA.) PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 28, 2012 EA-1919: Notice of Public Comment Period Extension Recycling of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas December 12, 2012 EA-1919: Notice of Availability of a Draft Programmatic Environmental

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Emergency Response | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response Emergency Response NNSA's Office of Emergency Operations is the United States government's primary capability for radiological and nuclear emergency response and for providing security to the nation from the threat of nuclear terrorism. The Office of Emergency Operations maintains a high level of readiness for protecting and serving the U.S. and its allies through the development, implementation and coordination of programs and systems designed to serve as a last line of defense in the event of a nuclear terrorist incident or other types of radiological accident. This readiness level provides the U.S. government with quickly deployable, dedicated resources capable of responding rapidly and comprehensively to nuclear or radiological incidents

282

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change Notice 2 Change Notice 2 with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Page/Section Change

283

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reaffirmation Reaffirmation August 2002 Change Notice 1 December 2004 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Page/Section Change

284

Radiological Control Programs for Special Tritium Compounds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

84-2004 84-2004 SEPTEMBER 2004 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 Date June 2006 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL PROGRAMS FOR SPECIAL TRITIUM COMPOUNDS U.S. Department of Energy AREA OCSH Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii Table of Changes Page Change 67 (near bottom) In row 1, column 2 of the table titled "dosimetric properties" 6 mrem was changed to 6 x 10 -2 mrem Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1184-2004 iii Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies have undertaken a wide variety

285

Radiological Control Programs for Special Tritium Compounds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

F 1325.8 F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: May 11, 2006 REPLY TO EH-52:JRabovsky:3-2 135 ATTN OF: APPROVAL OF CHANGE NOTICE 1 TO DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) SUBJECT. HANDBOOK 1184-2004, RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL PROGRAMS FOR SPECIAL TRITIUM COMPOUNDS TO: Dennis Kubicki, EH-24 Technical Standards Manager This memorandum forwards the subject Change Notice 1 to DOE Handbook, DOE- HDBK- 1184-2004, which has approved for publication and distribution. The change to this handbook consists of a correction to the rule of thumb, listed in Appendix A, for converting the uptake of tritium oxide into radiation dose. A factor of 1/100 was inadvertently omitted from this rule of thumb when this DOE Handbook was originally published. This change does not affect the references, is not of a technical nature, and

286

Radiological Control Change Notice 1 Memorandum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DATE: May DATE: May 20, 2004 REPLY TO EH-52:Judith D. Foulke:301 :903-5865 ATTN OF: CHANGE NOTICE TO DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) HANDBOOK, DOE-STD- SUBJECT. 1098-99, RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TO: George Detsis, EH-3 1 This memorandum forwards Change Notice Number 1 to subject DOE Technical Standard, DOE-STD-1098-99. The changes are being made as part of the 5-year review of the standard. The table inserted into the document details the changes. After the changes are made, a notice of intent to reaffirm memorandum will be issued. A compact disk (CD) of the revised document in MS Word and in PDF format is attached. If there are any questions, please contact Dr. Judith Foulke of my staff on 3-5865 or electronic mail (Judy.Foulke@eh.doe.gov). ill R. McArthur, PhD, C1}T Office Director Office of Worker Protection Policy

287

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and 25 years of transportation experience and documented accident data by demonstrating RAM information, regulations, requirements, safety issues, emergency response, regulatory...

288

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effects of Radiation History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms Majority from NRC Contacts Comments & Questions Emergency Planning, Preparedness, and Response DOE Transportation...

289

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

290

Radiological Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

291

Radiological Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

292

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

293

Radiological Security | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

294

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering...

295

21.01.05.M3 Transportation Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21.01.05.M3 Transportation Services Page 1 of 4 UNIVERSITY RULE 21.01.05.M3 Transportation Services Transportation Services is responsible for managing all parking, traffic and transportation-related activities on campus. Transportation Services is guided by state and federal statutes and regulations. Official Rule 1

296

Road Transportation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The recession of the early 1990s marked the starting point for a transformation of the Swedish transportation industry. Cost oriented production techniques by the (more)

Gudmundsson, Erik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Transportation Revolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To transform the vehicle sector, the U.S. auto manufacturing industry is actively developing new technologies and products. This transportation revolution will also affect...

298

Transportation Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

For Review Only 1 Transportation Security Draft Annotated Bibliography Review July 2007 Preliminary Draft - For Review Only 2 Work Plan Task * TEC STG Work Plan, dated 8206,...

299

WIPP Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transuranic Waste Transportation Container Documents Documents related to transuranic waste containers and packages. CBFO Tribal Program Information about WIPP shipments across...

300

Radiological Risk Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document develops plausible and/or likely scenarios, including the identification of likely radioactive materials and quantities of those radioactive materials to be involved. These include 60Co, 90Sr, 137Cs, 192Ir, 226Ra, plutonium, and 241Am. Two broad categories of scenarios are considered. The first category includes events that may be suspected from the outset, such as an explosion of a "dirty bomb" in downtown Seattle. The explosion would most likely be heard, but the type of explosion (e.g., sewer methane gas or RDD) may not be immediately known. Emergency first responders must be able to quickly detect the radioisotopes previously listed, assess the situation, and deploy a response to contain and mitigate (if possible) detrimental effects resulting from the incident. In such scenarios, advance notice of about an hour or two might be available before any contaminated wastewater reaches a treatment plant. The second category includes events that could go initially undetected by emergency personnel. Examples of such a scenario would be the inadvertent or surreptitious introduction of radioactive material into the sewer system. Intact rogue radioactive sources from industrial radiography devices, well-logging apparatus, or moisture density gages may get into wastewater and be carried to a treatment plant. Other scenarios might include a terrorist deliberately putting a dispersible radioactive material into wastewater. Alternatively, a botched terrorism preparation of an RDD may result in radioactive material entering wastewater without anyone's knowledge. Drinking water supplies may also be contaminated, with the result that some or most of the radioactivity ends up in wastewater.

Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Fundamental Academic Training Instructor's Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers

302

GIS Symbology for FRMAC/CMHT Radiological/Nuclear Products  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended to codify, to the extent currently possible, the representation of map products produced for and by the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) and the Consequence Management Home Team (CHMT), particularly those that include model products from the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (NARAC). This is to facilitate consistency between GIS products produced by different members of these teams, which should ease the task of interpreting these products by both team members and those outside the team who may need to use these products during a response. The aspects of symbology being considered are primarily isopleths levels (breakpoints) and colors used to plot NARAC modeled dose or deposition fields on mpas, although some comments will be made about the handling of legend and supporting textual information. Other aspects of symbolizing such products (e.g., transparency) are being left to the individual team members to allow them to adapt to particular organizational needs or requirements that develop during a particular a response or exercise. This document has been written in coordination with the creation of training material in Baskett, et al., 2008. It is not intended as an aid to NARAC product interpretation but to facilitate the work of GIS specialists who deal with these products in map design and in the development of supporting scripts and software that partially or completely automate the integration of NARAC model products with other GIS data. This work was completed as part of the NA-42 Technical Integration Project on GIS Automated Data Processing and Map Production in FY 2008. Other efforts that are part of this work include (a) updating the NARAC shapefile product representation to facilitate the automation work proceed at RSL as part of the same TI effort and (b) to ensure that the NARAC shapefile construct includes all of the necessary legend and other textual data to interpret dispersion and deposition patterns and related products correctly. This document is focusing on the products produced by the GIS Division of the Remove Sensing Laboratory (RSL) and by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC), both separately and in combination. The expectation is that standard products produced by either group independently or in combination should use the same key attributes in displaying the same kinds of data so that products of a given type generally look similar in key aspects of the presentation, thereby minimizing any confusion of users when a variety of products from these groups may be needed. This document is dealing with the set of common standard products used in responding to radiological/nuclear releases. There are a number of less standard products that are used occasionally or in certain specific situations that are not addressed here. This includes special products that are occasionally produced by both NARAC and RSL in responses and major exercises to meet immediate and unanticipated requirements. At some future time, it may be appropriate to review the handling of such special products by both organizations to determine if there are any areas that would benefit from being integrated with the conventions described here. A particular area that should be addressed in the near-term is that of Derived Response Levels (DRLs) calculated by the Consequence Management Home Team (CMHT) or FRMAC Assessment Scientists. A new calculation is done for every event assigning contour levels, or break-points, based upon field measurements. These contour levels can be applied to deposition or dose rate NARAC calculations. Because these calculations are different every time, they can not be stored in a database.

Walker, H; Aluzzi, F; Foster, K; Pobanz, B; Sher, B

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

303

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Controls - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Radiological Controls - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility CRAD, Radiological Controls - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Radiation Protection Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Radiological Controls - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste

304

THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY RARAF -Table of Contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of alpha particle radiation in depleted uranium- induced cellular effects 0.2 114 M. Suzuki (H. Zhou) NIRP;CENTER FOR RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT 2008 121 Exposure to depleted uranium (DU) during

305

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Overheads  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13.1 13.1 Overhead 13.1 DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Radiological Aspects of Accelerators Objectives: * Identify the general characteristics of accelerators. * Identify the types of particles accelerated. * Identify the two basic types of accelerators. * Identify uses for accelerators. * Define prompt radiation. * Identify prompt radiation sources. OT 13.2 Overhead 13.2 DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Radiological Aspects of Accelerators (cont.) Objectives: * Define radioactivation. * Explain how contaminated material differs from activated material with regard to radiological concerns. * Identify activation sources. OT 13.3 Overhead 13.3 DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Radiological Aspects of Accelerators (cont.) Objectives: * Identify engineered and administrative controls at accelerator facilities. * Identify the special

306

Radiological Worker Training Power Point Slides for App. A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30-2008 30-2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overheads December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 OT 1.1 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.1 Regulatory Documents Objectives: * Identify the hierarchy of regulatory documents. * Define the purposes of 10 CFR Parts 820, 830 and 835. * Define the purpose of the DOE Radiological Control Standard. OT 1.2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.2 Regulatory Documents (cont.) Objectives: * Define the terms "shall" and "should" as used in the above documents. * Describe the role of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) at DOE sites and facilities. OT 1.3 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.3 DOE Radiological Health and Safety Policy * Conduct oversight to ensure compliance and that appropriate radiological work

307

Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2009 Site environmental report8-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the Lab- oratory are composed of calcium fluoride and lithium fluoride crystals. Accuracy is verified Biota, provides the guidelines for screening methods to estimate radiological doses to aquatic animals

Homes, Christopher C.

308

Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2008 Site environmental report8-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of calcium fluoride and lithium fluo- ride crystals. Accuracy is verified by exposing the TLD to a known the guidelines for screening methods to estimate radiological doses to aquatic animals, terrestrial plants

Homes, Christopher C.

309

Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2005 Site environmental report8-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are composed of calcium fluoride and lithium fluo- ride crystals. The TLDs' accuracy is verified by comparing Biota, provides the guidelines for screening methods to estimate radiological doses to aquatic animals

Homes, Christopher C.

310

Radiological Source Terms for Tank Farms Safety Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides Unit Liter Dose factors, atmospheric dispersion coefficients, breathing rates and instructions for using and customizing these factors for use in calculating radiological doses for accident analyses in the Hanford Tank Farms.

COWLEY, W.L.

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

311

Radiological Worker Training Power Point Slides for App. A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30-2008 30-2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overheads December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 OT 1.1 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.1 Regulatory Documents Objectives: * Identify the hierarchy of regulatory documents. * Define the purposes of 10 CFR Parts 820, 830 and 835. * Define the purpose of the DOE Radiological Control Standard. OT 1.2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.2 Regulatory Documents (cont.) Objectives: * Define the terms "shall" and "should" as used in the above documents. * Describe the role of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) at DOE sites and facilities. OT 1.3 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.3 DOE Radiological Health and Safety Policy * Conduct oversight to ensure compliance and that appropriate radiological work

312

Autonomous mobile robot for radiologic surveys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for conducting radiologic surveys. The apparatus comprises in the main a robot capable of following a preprogrammed path through an area, a radiation monitor adapted to receive input from a radiation detector assembly, ultrasonic transducers for navigation and collision avoidance, and an on-board computer system including an integrator for interfacing the radiation monitor and the robot. Front and rear bumpers are attached to the robot by bumper mounts. The robot may be equipped with memory boards for the collection and storage of radiation survey information. The on-board computer system is connected to a remote host computer via a UHF radio link. The apparatus is powered by a rechargeable 24-volt DC battery, and is stored at a docking station when not in use and/or for recharging. A remote host computer contains a stored database defining paths between points in the area where the robot is to operate, including but not limited to the locations of walls, doors, stationary furniture and equipment, and sonic markers if used. When a program consisting of a series of paths is downloaded to the on-board computer system, the robot conducts a floor survey autonomously at any preselected rate. When the radiation monitor detects contamination, the robot resurveys the area at reduced speed and resumes its preprogrammed path if the contamination is not confirmed. If the contamination is confirmed, the robot stops and sounds an alarm. 5 figures.

Dudar, A.M.; Wagner, D.G.; Teese, G.D.

1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

313

Autonomous mobile robot for radiologic surveys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for conducting radiologic surveys. The apparatus comprises in the main a robot capable of following a preprogrammed path through an area, a radiation monitor adapted to receive input from a radiation detector assembly, ultrasonic transducers for navigation and collision avoidance, and an on-board computer system including an integrator for interfacing the radiation monitor and the robot. Front and rear bumpers are attached to the robot by bumper mounts. The robot may be equipped with memory boards for the collection and storage of radiation survey information. The on-board computer system is connected to a remote host computer via a UHF radio link. The apparatus is powered by a rechargeable 24-volt DC battery, and is stored at a docking station when not in use and/or for recharging. A remote host computer contains a stored database defining paths between points in the area where the robot is to operate, including but not limited to the locations of walls, doors, stationary furniture and equipment, and sonic markers if used. When a program consisting of a series of paths is downloaded to the on-board computer system, the robot conducts a floor survey autonomously at any preselected rate. When the radiation monitor detects contamination, the robot resurveys the area at reduced speed and resumes its preprogrammed path if the contamination is not confirmed. If the contamination is confirmed, the robot stops and sounds an alarm.

Dudar, Aed M. (Augusta, GA); Wagner, David G. (Augusta, GA); Teese, Gregory D. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Mobile autonomous robotic apparatus for radiologic characterization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mobile robotic system is described that conducts radiological surveys to map alpha, beta, and gamma radiation on surfaces in relatively level open areas or areas containing obstacles such as stored containers or hallways, equipment, walls and support columns. The invention incorporates improved radiation monitoring methods using multiple scintillation detectors, the use of laser scanners for maneuvering in open areas, ultrasound pulse generators and receptors for collision avoidance in limited space areas or hallways, methods to trigger visible alarms when radiation is detected, and methods to transmit location data for real-time reporting and mapping of radiation locations on computer monitors at a host station. A multitude of high performance scintillation detectors detect radiation while the on-board system controls the direction and speed of the robot due to pre-programmed paths. The operators may revise the preselected movements of the robotic system by ethernet communications to remonitor areas of radiation or to avoid walls, columns, equipment, or containers. The robotic system is capable of floor survey speeds of from 1/2-inch per second up to about 30 inches per second, while the on-board processor collects, stores, and transmits information for real-time mapping of radiation intensity and the locations of the radiation for real-time display on computer monitors at a central command console. 4 figs.

Dudar, A.M.; Ward, C.R.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.; Harpring, L.J.; Collins, M.X.; Anderson, E.K.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

315

DOE-HDBK-1143-2001; Radiological Control Training for Supervisors - Course Introduction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

143-2001 143-2001 Instructor's Guide DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN Course Material Topic: Administrative Policies and Procedures Objectives: Upon completion of this training, the student will be able to: 1. Identify the radiological controlled areas a person should be allowed to enter after successfully completing General Employee Radiological Training, Radiological Worker I training, and Radiological Worker II training. 2. List five actions used to increase the awareness level of workers relating to proper radiological work practices. 3. Identify three conditions when a "Stop Radiological Work" should be initiated. 4. Identify the actions that should be performed, prior to recommencement of work, after a "Stop Radiological Work" order has been initiated.

316

Operation Castle. Radiological Safety. Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is designed to cover the overall Operation Castle radiological safety matters from the viewpoint of those issues of direct concern to Headquarters, Joint Task Force Seven. It was written for the express purpose of assisting in the development of future radiological safety plans by presenting detailed discussion of the problems and solutions arising during Operation Castle. Included is a discussion of fallout forecasting techniques.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

A Checklist to Improve Patient Safety in Interventional Radiology  

SciTech Connect

To develop a specific RADiological Patient Safety System (RADPASS) checklist for interventional radiology and to assess the effect of this checklist on health care processes of radiological interventions. On the basis of available literature and expert opinion, a prototype checklist was developed. The checklist was adapted on the basis of observation of daily practice in a tertiary referral centre and evaluation by users. To assess the effect of RADPASS, in a series of radiological interventions, all deviations from optimal care were registered before and after implementation of the checklist. In addition, the checklist and its use were evaluated by interviewing all users. The RADPASS checklist has two parts: A (Planning and Preparation) and B (Procedure). The latter part comprises checks just before starting a procedure (B1) and checks concerning the postprocedural care immediately after completion of the procedure (B2). Two cohorts of, respectively, 94 and 101 radiological interventions were observed; the mean percentage of deviations of the optimal process per intervention decreased from 24 % before implementation to 5 % after implementation (p < 0.001). Postponements and cancellations of interventions decreased from 10 % before implementation to 0 % after implementation. Most users agreed that the checklist was user-friendly and increased patient safety awareness and efficiency. The first validated patient safety checklist for interventional radiology was developed. The use of the RADPASS checklist reduced deviations from the optimal process by three quarters and was associated with less procedure postponements.

Koetser, Inge C. J. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands); Vries, Eefje N. de [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands); Delden, Otto M. van [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands); Smorenburg, Susanne M. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands); Boermeester, Marja A. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Surgery (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Lienden, Krijn P. van, E-mail: k.p.vanlienden@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Transportation Market Distortions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Highways, Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Evaluating Criticism of Transportation Costing, VictoriaFrom Here: Evaluating Transportation Diversity, Victoria

Litman, Todd

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Finding and evaluating potential radiological problems in the vicinity of uranium milling sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tailings at inactive milling sites usually have a low frequency of human occupancy but continuously generate /sup 222/Rn into the atmosphere. Measurements of airborne /sup 222/Rn and /sup 222/Rn flux are made on the sites to define the tailings source term. Concurrently with these measurements, an ambient /sup 222/Rn monitoring network is established off-site and a meteolrololgical station is established at or near the mill site. Radioactivity can migrate to areas outside of site boundaries by wind and water erosion, groundwater transport, spillage of incoming purposes. In order to identify and assess off-site radioactivity on properties in the vicinity of milling sites, a combination of aerial and ground-level radiological monitoring techniques are used. The ground mobile gamma-ray scan is conducted using a vehicle equipped with sensitive gamma-ray detectors. The detectors are shielded so that gamma radiation input is viewed through only one side of the vehicle. This system is capable of precisely locating properties which have anomalously high gamma radiation levels caused by the presence of tailings. Subsequently, these properties are identified as candidate vicinity properties and are scheduled for radiological surveys subject to the property owner's consent. The comprehensive radiological surveys conducted at these vicinity properties determine the amount, type, and location of tailings materials. Structures on a vicinity property are carefully surveyed to determine the presence or absence of construction-related uses of tailings. If structural uses of tailings are found, air samples are analyzed for /sup 222/Rn progeny, short-term continuous /sup 222/Rn monitoring is instituted, and /sup 222/Rn flux rate from tailings are estimated. If warranted, long-term /sup 222/Rn and progeny measurements are made.

Goldsmith, W.A.; Yates, W.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Defense Transportation - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Defense Transportation The Center for Transportation Analysis provides analytical, planning, and operational support to defense transportation related projects. This includes the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Emergency Response Health Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health; however, there are major differences between health physics for research or occupational safety and health physics during a large-scale radiological emergency. The deployment of a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) monitoring and assessment team to Japan in the wake of the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant yielded a wealth of lessons on these difference. Critical teams (CMOC (Consequence Management Outside the Continental U.S.) and CMHT (Consequence Management Home Team) ) worked together to collect, compile, review, and analyze radiological data from Japan to support the response needs of and answer questions from the Government of Japan, the U.S. military in Japan, the U.S. Embassy and U.S. citizens in Japan, and U.S. citizens in America. This paper addresses the unique challenges presented to the health physicist or analyst of radiological data in a large-scale emergency. A key lesson learned was that public perception and the availability of technology with social media requires a diligent effort to keep the public informed of the science behind the decisions in a manner that is meaningful to them.

Mena, RaJah [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing LaboratoryNellis; Pemberton, Wendy [National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing LaboratoryNellis; Beal, William [Remote Sensing Laboratory at Andrews

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Radiological considerations of phosphogypsum utilization in agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiological concerns associated with phosphogypsum utilization in agriculture have been placed in perspective by considering the consequences of a hypothetical case involving heavy long term applications of phosphogypsum. In California, such a schedule might consist of an initial gypsum application of 10 tons/acre followed by alternate year applications of 5 tons/acre. If the radium content of the gypsum were 15 pCi/g and the till depth 6 inches, this schedule could be maintained for more than 100 years before the radium buildup in the soil would reach a proposed federal concentration limit of 5 pCi/g. An agricultural worker spending 40 h a week in a field containing 5 pCi/g of radium would be exposed to terrestrial radiation of about 7 ..mu..R/h above background. This exposure would result in an annual radiation dose of about 15 mrem, which is 3% of the recommended limit for an individual working in an uncontrolled area. Five pCi/g of radium in the soil could generate airborne radon daughter concentrations exceeding the concentration limit proposed for residential exposure. However, as residential exposure limits are predicated on 75% of continuous occupancy, these limits should not be applied to agricultural workers because of the seasonal nature of their work. Radium uptake by food crops grown in the hypothetical soil would result in a 50 year integrated dose to the bone surface of 1.4 rem. This dose is conservatively based on the assumption that an adult's total vegetable diet comes from this source and that consumption was continuous during the 50 year period.

Lindeken, C.L.

1980-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Sustainable Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) leads U.S. researchers and other partners in making transportation cleaner and more efficient through solutions that put electric drive...

324

electrifyingthefuture transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

programme of electrification and the potential introduction of diesel hybrids. The Department for Transport vehicles Wind turbine systems Industrial equipment The lab has full ethernet capability which will enable

Birmingham, University of

325

Audit Report - Office of Secure Transportation Capabilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Secure Transportation Office of Secure Transportation Capabilities OAS-M-12-05 June 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 June 29, 2012 UN MEMORANDUM FOR THE ASSISTANT DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR, OFFICE OF SECURE TRANSPORTATION FROM: George W. Collard Assistant Inspector General for Audits Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Office of Secure Transportation Capabilities" BACKGROUND The National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Secure Transportation (OST) is responsible for safely and securely transporting nuclear weapons, weapon components and special nuclear material for customers such as the Department of Energy, Department of Defense and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Specifically, OST shipments support the nuclear

326

Workshop on Radiological Surveys in Support of the Edgemont Clean-up Action Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, has given Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) the responsibility for the development of procedures for the identification of offsite structures and properties in the vicinity of Edgemont, South Dakota, that require remedial action because of elevated radiation levels caused by residual radioactivity as defined in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. In order to acquaint interested investigators with the procedures PNL has developed and the measurements that have been performed at Edgemont using these procedures, and also to obtain suggestions for the improvement of these procedures, PNL organized a "Workshop on Radiological Surveys in Support of the Edgemont Clean-up Action Program" on behalf of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This workshop was held in Denver on January 21 and 22, 1981. On the first day of the workshop an in-depth discussion of the procedures employed in the entire radiological survey program at Edgemont was held. It included a description of the equipment, techniques and procedures employed in radon daughter measurements within structures, indoor and outdoor gamma radiation surveys, and 226Ra measurements in surface and sub-surface soil samples. On the second day, the results of the measurements that have been conducted at Edgemont were presented. During the afternoon an open discussion of the radiological survey procedures used at Edgemont was held for the purpose of obtaining suggestions for the possible improvement of these procedures. Many useful suggestions were made and a few modifications in the survey procedures at Edgemont have been made in response to these suggestions.

Perkins, R. W.; Young, J. A.; Jackson, P. O.; Thomas, V. W.; Schwendiman, L. C.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Transportation Network Modeling in Passenger Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Summary & Future work 2 #12;NETPLAN Energy and Transportation Integration model A modeling frameworkTransportation Network Modeling in NETPLAN Passenger Transportation Venkat Krishnan Eirini;Outline 1. Introduction to NETPLAN 2. Transportation modeling- A review Freight Passenger 3. Developed

Daniels, Thomas E.

328

Nuclear and Radiological Material Security | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

17, 2013 NNSA, Republic of Korea Ministry Agree to Minimize Use of HEU in Nuclear Reactors Sep 3, 2013 NNSA Conducts Two Emergency Response Training Courses in Armenia Aug 29, 2013...

329

Nuclear & Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

17, 2013 NNSA, Republic of Korea Ministry Agree to Minimize Use of HEU in Nuclear Reactors Sep 3, 2013 NNSA Conducts Two Emergency Response Training Courses in Armenia Aug 29, 2013...

330

Implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center(FRMAC) - Emergency Phase  

SciTech Connect

Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-5 requires all federal departments and agencies to adopt a National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities, as well as in support of those actions taken to assist state and local entities. This system provides a consistent nationwide template to enable federal, state, local, and tribal governments, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together effectively and efficiently to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism. This document identifies the operational concepts of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center's (FRMAC) implementation of the NIMS/ICS response structure under the National Response Plan (NRP). The construct identified here defines the basic response template to be tailored to the incident-specific response requirements. FRMAC's mission to facilitate interagency environmental data management, monitoring, sampling, analysis, and assessment and link this information to the planning and decision staff clearly places the FRMAC in the Planning Section. FRMAC is not a mitigating resource for radiological contamination but is present to conduct radiological impact assessment for public dose avoidance. Field monitoring is a fact-finding mission to support this effort directly. Decisions based on the assessed data will drive public protection and operational requirements. This organizational structure under NIMS is focused by the mission responsibilities and interface requirements following the premise to provide emergency responders with a flexible yet standardized structure for incident response activities. The coordination responsibilities outlined in the NRP are based on the NIMS/ICS construct and Unified Command (UC) for management of a domestic incident. The NRP Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex (NUC) further provides requirements and protocols for coordinating federal government capabilities to respond to nuclear/radiological Incidents of National Significance (INS) and other radiological incidents. When a FRMAC is established, it operates under the parameters of NIMS as defined in the NRP. FRMAC and its operations have been modified to reflect NIMS/ICS concepts and principles and to facilitate working in a Unified Command structure. FRMAC is established at or near the scene of the incident to coordinate radiological monitoring and assessment and is established in coordination with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS); the coordinating agency; other federal agencies; and state, local, and tribal authorities. However, regardless of the coordinating agency designation, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) coordinates radiological monitoring and assessment activities for the initial phases of the offsite federal incident response through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) and FRMAC assets. Monitoring and assessment data are managed by FRMAC in an accountable, secure, and retrievable format. Monitoring data interpretations, including exposure rate contours, dose projections, and any requested radiological assessments are to be provided to the DHS; to the coordinating agency; and to state, local, and tribal government agencies.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Monitoring Environmental Monitoring Study Guide 2.09-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Environmental Monitoring Module Number: 2.09 Objectives: 2.09.01 State the goals of an environmental monitoring program. 2.09.02 State the exposure limits to the general public as they apply to environmental monitoring. 2.09.03 Define the term "critical nuclide." 2.09.04 Define the term "critical pathway." i 2.09.05 State locations frequently surveyed for radiological contamination at outdoor waste sites associated with your site and the reasons for each. 2.09.06 Define the term "suspect waste site," and how they can be identified. i 2.09.07 Describe the methods used for environmental monitoring at your site. INTRODUCTION Environmental monitoring plays a large role in the field of radiological control.

332

Assessment of SRS radiological liquid and airborne contaminants and pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles and documents the radiological critical-contaminant/critical-pathway analysis performed for SRS. The analysis covers radiological releases to the atmosphere and to surface water, which are the principal media that carry contaminants off site. During routine operations at SRS, limited amounts of radionuclides are released to the environment through atmospheric and/or liquid pathways. These releases potentially result in exposure to offsite people. Though the groundwater beneath an estimated 5 to 10 percent of SRS has been contaminated by radionuclides, there is no evidence that groundwater contaminated with these constituents has migrated offsite (Arnett, 1996). Therefore, with the notable exception of radiological source terms originating from shallow surface water migration into site streams, onsite groundwater was not considered as a potential exposure pathway to offsite people.

Jannik, G.T.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Radiological Worker Training Power Point Slides for App. A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1.1 1.1 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.1 Regulatory Documents Objectives: * Identify the hierarchy of regulatory documents. * Define the purposes of 10 CFR Parts 820, 830 and 835. * Define the purpose of the DOE Radiological Control Standard. OT 1.2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.2 Regulatory Documents (cont.) Objectives: * Define the terms "shall" and "should" as used in the above documents. * Describe the role of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) at DOE sites and facilities. OT 1.3 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.3 DOE Radiological Health and Safety Policy * Conduct oversight to ensure compliance and that appropriate radiological work practices are implemented. * Ensure accurate and appropriately made measurements. * Incorporate measures to minimize

334

Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch From Open Energy Information Address 591 Ala Moana Blvd. Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96813 Website http://hawaii.gov/health/envir Coordinates 21.300314°, -157.864542° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.300314,"lon":-157.864542,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

335

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Fundamental Academic Training Study Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers U.S. Department of Energy

336

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 of 9 6 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Site Academic Training Study Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers U.S. Department of Energy

337

Nanotechnology and its Relationship to Interventional Radiology. Part I: Imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanotechnology refers to the design, creation, and manipulation of structures on the nanometer scale. Interventional radiology stands to benefit greatly from advances in nanotechnology because much of the ongoing research is focused toward novel methods of imaging and delivery of therapy through minimally invasive means. Through the development of new techniques and therapies, nanotechnology has the potential to broaden the horizon of interventional radiology and ensure its continued success. This two-part review is intended to acquaint the interventionalist with the field of nanotechnology, and provide an overview of potential applications, while highlighting advances relevant to interventional radiology. Part I of the article deals with an introduction to some of the basic concepts of nanotechnology and outlines some of the potential imaging applications, concentrating mainly on advances in oncological and vascular imaging.

Power, Sarah; Slattery, Michael M.; Lee, Michael J., E-mail: mlee@rcsi.ie [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Radiology (Ireland)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Transportation System Concept of Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, authorized the DOE to develop and manage a Federal system for the disposal of SNF and HLW. OCRWM was created to manage acceptance and disposal of SNF and HLW in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. This responsibility includes managing the transportation of SNF and HLW from origin sites to the Repository for disposal. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is the core high-level OCRWM document written to describe the Transportation System integrated design and present the vision, mission, and goals for Transportation System operations. By defining the functions, processes, and critical interfaces of this system early in the system development phase, programmatic risks are minimized, system costs are contained, and system operations are better managed, safer, and more secure. This document also facilitates discussions and understanding among parties responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Transportation System. Such understanding is important for the timely development of system requirements and identification of system interfaces. Information provided in the Transportation System Concept of Operations includes: the functions and key components of the Transportation System; system component interactions; flows of information within the system; the general operating sequences; and the internal and external factors affecting transportation operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations reflects OCRWM's overall waste management system policies and mission objectives, and as such provides a description of the preferred state of system operation. The description of general Transportation System operating functions in the Transportation System Concept of Operations is the first step in the OCRWM systems engineering process, establishing the starting point for the lower level descriptions. of subsystems and components, and the Transportation System Requirements Document. Other program and system documents, plans, instructions, and detailed designs will be consistent with and informed by the Transportation System Concept of Operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is a living document, enduring throughout the OCRWM systems engineering lifecycle. It will undergo formal approval and controlled revisions as appropriate while the Transportation System matures. Revisions will take into account new policy decisions, new information available through system modeling, engineering investigations, technical analyses and tests, and the introduction of new technologies that can demonstrably improve system performance.

N. Slater-Thompson

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

339

Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services Annual Report for 1998  

SciTech Connect

During calendar year (CY) 1998, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed its customary radiological protection support services in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations OffIce (RL) and the Hanford contractors. These services included: 1) external dosimetry, 2) internal dosimetry, 3) in vivo measurements, 4) radiological records, 5) instrument calibra- tion and evaluation, and 6) calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (MST). The services were provided under a number of projects as summarized here.

DE Bihl; JA MacLellan; ML Johnson; RK Piper; TP Lynch

1999-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

340

Radiological design criteria for fusion power test facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quest for fusion power and understanding of plasma physics has resulted in planning, design, and construction of several major fusion power test facilities, based largely on magnetic and inertial confinement concepts. We have considered radiological design aspects of the Joint European Torus (JET), Livermore Mirror and Inertial Fusion projects, and Princeton Tokamak. Our analyses on radiological design criteria cover acceptable exposure levels at the site boundary, man-rem doses for plant personnel and population at large, based upon experience gained for the fission reactors, and on considerations of cost-benefit analyses.

Singh, M.S.; Campbell, G.W.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Radiological consequence analysis with HEU and LEU fuels  

SciTech Connect

A model for estimating the radiological consequences from a hypothetical accident in HEU and LEU fueled research and test reactors is presented. Simple hand calculations based on fission product yield table inventories and non-site specific dispersion data may be adequate in many cases. However, more detailed inventories and site specific data on meteorological conditions and release rates and heights can result in substantial reductions in the dose estimates. LEU fuel gives essentially the same doses as HEU fuel. The plutonium buildup in the LEU fuel does not significantly increase the radiological consequences. The dose to the thyroid is the limiting dose. 10 references, 3 figures, 7 tables.

Woodruff, W.L.; Warinner, D.K.; Matos, J.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Site-specific analysis of radiological and physical parameters for cobbly soils at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The remedial action at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site is being performed under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. Under UMTRCA, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged with the responsibility of developing appropriate and applicable standards for the cleanup of radiologically contaminated land and buildings at 24 designated sites, including the Gunnison, Colorado, inactive processing site. Section 108 of Public Law 95-604 states that the US Department of Energy (DOE) shall ``select and perform remedial actions at the designated processing sites and disposal sites in accordance with the general standards`` prescribed by the EPA. Regulations governing the required remedial action at inactive uranium processing sites were promulgated by the EPA in 1983 and are contained in 40 CFR Part 192 (1993), Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings. This document describes the radiological and physical parameters for the remedial action of the soil.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Site-specific analysis of radiological and physical parameters for cobbly soils at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The remedial action at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site is being performed under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 [Public Law (PL) 95-6041]. Under UMTRCA, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged with the responsibility of developing appropriate and applicable standards for the cleanup of radiologically contaminated land and buildings at 24 designated sites, including the Gunnison, Colorado, inactive processing site. The remedial action at the processing site will be conducted to remove the tailings and contaminated materials to meet the EPA bulk soil cleanup standards for surface and subsurface soils. The site areas disturbed by remedial action excavation will be either contoured or backfilled with radiologically uncontaminated soil and contoured to restore the site. The final contours will produce a final surface grade that will create positive drainage from the site.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Radiological monitoring plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant: Surface Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Y-12 Plant conducts a surface water monitoring program in response to DOE Orders and state of Tennessee requirements under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). The anticipated codification of DOE Order 5400.5 for radiation protection of the public and the environment (10 CFR Part 834) will require an environmental radiation protection plan (ERPP). The NPDES permit issued by the state of Tennessee requires a radiological monitoring plan (RMP) for Y-12 Plant surface waters. In a May 4, 1995 memo, the state of Tennessee, Division of Water Pollution Control, stated their desired needs and goals regarding the content of RMPs, associated documentation, and data resulting from the RMPs required under the NPDES permitting system (L. Bunting, General Discussion, Radiological Monitoring Plans, Tennessee Division of Water Pollution Control, May 4,1995). Appendix A provides an overview of how the Y-12 Plant will begin to address these needs and goals. It provides a more complete, documented basis for the current Y-12 Plant surface water monitoring program and is intended to supplement documentation provided in the Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs), NPDES reports, Groundwater Quality Assessment Reports, and studies conducted under the Y-12 Plant Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. The purpose of this update to the Y-12 Plant RMP is to satisfy the requirements of the current NPDES permit, DOE Order 5400.5, and 10 CFR Part 834, as current proposed, by defining the radiological monitoring plan for surface water for the Y-12 Plant. This plan includes initial storm water monitoring and data analysis. Related activities such as sanitary sewer and sediment monitoring are also summarized. The plan discusses monitoring goals necessary to determine background concentrations of radionuclides, to quantify releases, determine trends, satisfy regulatory requirements, support consequence assessments, and meet requirements that releases be ``as low as reasonably achievable`` (ALARA).

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Method for warning of radiological and chemical substances using detection paints on a vehicle surface  

SciTech Connect

A system for warning of corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances. The system comprises painting a surface with a paint or coating that includes an indicator material and monitoring the surface for indications of the corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances.

Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

346

Independent Oversight Evaluation, Office of Secure Transportation -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluation, Office of Secure Transportation - Evaluation, Office of Secure Transportation - February 2004 Independent Oversight Evaluation, Office of Secure Transportation - February 2004 February 2004 Evaluation of the Office of Secure Transportation Emergency Management Program The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of emergency management programs at the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Secure Transportation (OST) in October 2003. Inspection activities included the observation of the OST annual emergency exercise and reviews of selected emergency management program elements. The exercise demonstrated that the OST emergency response organization could effectively provide for prompt event categorization, DOE and NNSA

347

FAQS Qualification Card - Transportation and Traffic Management |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation and Traffic Management Transportation and Traffic Management FAQS Qualification Card - Transportation and Traffic Management A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-TransportationAndTrafficManagement.docx Description Transportation and Traffic Management Qualification Card

348

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport and its infrastructure Coordinating Lead Authors:5 Transport and its infrastructure Chandler, K. , E. Eberts,5 Transport and its infrastructure Sausen, R. , I. Isaksen,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Intelligent Transport Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Sustainable Urban Transport: City Interview Synthesis (of Leeds, Institute for Transport Studies, forthcoming.I NTELLIGENT TRANSPORT SYSTEMS LINKING TECHNOLOGY AND

Deakin, Elizabeth; Frick, Karen Trapenberg; Skabardonis, Alexander

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Preface: Nonclassical Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

models of solute transport in highly heterogeneous geologicSemenov. 2008b. Nonclassical transport processes in geologicand L. Matveev. 2008. Transport regimes and concentration

Bolshov, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Sustainability and Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gilbert is a Toronto-based transport and energy consultantof the forthcoming book Transport Revolutions: Making theand substantial transition to transport systems based on

Gilbert, Richard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Transportation Energy Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Comparative Analysis of Future Transportation Fuels. ucB-prominentlyin our transportation future, powering electricTransportation Energy Futures Daniel Sperling Mark A.

DeLuchi, Mark A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Achieving Sustainable Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a serious concern for future transportation planning, but itplanning for the future. Transportation should be at the topsustainable transportation look like? Again, the future will

Mason, Jonathan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

512-S Facility, Actinide Removal Process Radiological Design Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains top-level requirements for the various areas of radiological protection for workers. Detailed quotations of the requirements for applicable regulatory documents can be found in the Radiological Design Summary Report Implementation Guide. For the purposes of demonstrating compliance with these requirements, per Engineering Standard 01064, ''shall consider / shall evaluate'' indicates that the designer must examine the requirement for the design and either incorporate or provide a technical justification as to why the requirement is not incorporated. This report describes how the Building 512-S, Actinide Removal Process meets the required radiological design criteria and requirements based on 10CFR835, DOE Order 420.1A, WSRC Manual 5Q and various other DOE guides and handbooks. The analyses supporting this Radiological Design Summary Report initially used a source term of 10.6 Ci/gallon of Cs-137 as the basis for bulk shielding calculations. As the project evolved, the source term was reduced to 1.1 Ci/gallon of Cs-137. This latter source term forms the basis for later dose rate evaluations.

Nathan, S.J.

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

355

EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Programmatic EA evaluates alternatives for the management of scrap metal originating from DOE radiological control areas, including the proposed action to allow for the recycle of uncontaminated scrap metal that meets the requirements of DOE Order 458.1. (Metals with volumetric radioactive contamination are not included in the scope of this Programmatic EA.)

356

Radiological Laboratory, Utility, Office Building LEED Strategy & Achievement  

SciTech Connect

Missions that the Radiological Laboratory, utility, Office Building (RLUOB) supports are: (1) Nuclear Materials Handling, Processing, and Fabrication; (2) Stockpile Management; (3) Materials and Manufacturing Technologies; (4) Nonproliferation Programs; (5) Waste Management Activities - Environmental Programs; and (6) Materials Disposition. The key capabilities are actinide analytical chemistry and material characterization.

Seguin, Nicole R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

357

Radiology utilizing a gas multiwire detector with resolution enhancement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process and apparatus for obtaining filmless, radiological, digital images utilizing a gas multiwire detector. Resolution is enhanced through projection geometry. This invention further relates to imaging systems for X-ray examination of patients or objects, and is particularly suited for mammography.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Grafton, VA); Majewski, Lucasz A. (Grafton, VA)

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

358

Radiological aspects of the SSRL 3 GeV injector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the shielding of the injector, results of radiation measurements, the personnel protection system, the beam containment system, the area monitoring, administrative controls and procedures, operator training and personnel dosimetry. In addition, other radiological aspects of the injector such as muons, air activation, toxic gases, induced activity and skyshine are discussed. 79 refs., 18 figs., 13 tabs.

Ipe, N.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Biological Treatment of Petroleum in Radiologically Contaminated Soil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This chapter describes ex situ bioremediation of the petroleum portion of radiologically co-contaminated soils using microorganisms isolated from a waste site and innovative bioreactor technology. Microorganisms first isolated and screened in the laboratory for bioremediation of petroleum were eventually used to treat soils in a bioreactor. The bioreactor treated soils contaminated with over 20,000 mg/kg total petroleum hydrocarbon and reduced the levels to less than 100 mg/kg in 22 months. After treatment, the soils were permanently disposed as low-level radiological waste. The petroleum and radiologically contaminated soil (PRCS) bioreactor operated using bioventing to control the supply of oxygen (air) to the soil being treated. The system treated 3.67 tons of PCRS amended with weathered compost, ammonium nitrate, fertilizer, and water. In addition, a consortium of microbes (patent pending) isolated at the Savannah River National Laboratory from a petroleum-contaminated site was added to the PRCS system. During operation, degradation of petroleum waste was accounted for through monitoring of carbon dioxide levels in the system effluent. The project demonstrated that co-contaminated soils could be successfully treated through bioventing and bioaugmentation to remove petroleum contamination to levels below 100 mg/kg while protecting workers and the environment from radiological contamination.

BERRY, CHRISTOPHER

2005-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

360

Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 19 at the Grand Junction Office Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 19 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 11 at the Grand Junction Office Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 11 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 29 at the Grand Junction Office Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailing during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 29 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Summary of comments received from workshops on radiological criteria for decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an enhanced participatory rulemaking to establish radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning of NRC-licensed facilities. Open public meetings were held during 1993 in Chicago, IL, San Francisco, CA, Boston, MA, Dallas, TX, Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, and Washington, DC. Interested parties were invited to provide input on the rulemaking issues before the NRC staff develops a draft proposed rule. This report summarizes 3,635 comments categorized from transcripts of the seven workshops and 1,677 comments from 100 NRC docketed letters from individuals and organizations. No analysis or response to the comments is included. The comments reflect a broad spectrum of viewpoints on the issues related to radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning. The NRC also held public meetings on the scope of the Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) during July 1993. The GEIS meetings were held in Washington, DC., San Francisco, CA, Oklahoma City, OK, and Cleveland, OH. Related comments from these meetings were reviewed and comments which differed substantially from those from the workshops are also summarized in the body of the report. A summary of the comments from the GEIS scoping meetings is included as an Appendix.

Caplin, J.; Page, G.; Smith, D.; Wiblin, C. [Advanced Systems Technology, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Summary of comments received on staff draft proposed rule on radiological criteria for decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an enhanced participatory rulemaking to establish radiological criteria for the decommissioning of NRC licensed facilities. The NRC obtained comments on the scope, issues, and approaches through a series of workshops (57 FR 58727), Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) scoping meetings (58 FR 33570), a dedicated electronic bulletin board system (58 FR 37760), and written submissions. A summary of workshop and scope-meeting comments was published as NUREG/CR-6156. On February 2, 1994, the Commission published in the Federal Register (59 FR 4868) a notice that the NRC staff had prepared a ``staff draft`` proposed rule on radiological criteria for decommissioning. Copies of the staff draft were distributed to the Agreement States, participants in the earlier meetings, and other interested parties for comment. This report summarizes the comments identified from the 96 docketed letters received on the staff draft. No analysis or response is included in this report. The comments reflect a broad spectrum of viewpoints. Two subjects on which the commenters were in general agreement were (1) that the enhanced participatory rulemaking should proceed, and (2) that the forthcoming GEIS and guidance documents are needed for better understanding of the draft rule.

Caplin, J.; Page, G.; Smith, D.; Wiblin, C. [Advanced Systems Technology, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Transportation Issues  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Issues and Resolutions - Compilation of Laboratory Transportation Work Package Reports Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Compiled by Paul McConnell Sandia National Laboratories September 30, 2012 FCRD-UFD-2012-000342 Transportation Issues and Resolutions ii September 2012 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any

366

Transportation Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

For Review Only 1 Transportation Security Draft Annotated Bibliography Review July 2007 Preliminary Draft - For Review Only 2 Work Plan Task * TEC STG Work Plan, dated 8/2/06, Product #16, stated: "Develop an annotated bibliography of publicly-available documents related to security of radioactive material transportation." * Earlier this year, a preliminary draft annotated bibliography on this topic was developed by T-REX , UNM, to initially address this STG Work Plan Task. Preliminary Draft - For Review Only 3 Considerations in Determining Release of Information * Some "Publicly-available" documents could potentially contain inappropriate information according to standards set by DOE information security policy and DOE Guides. - Such documents would not be freely

367

LNG transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the beginning of 1965, the participants to the starting up of first French LNG transportation system between ARZEW and LE HAVRE were indeed pioneers when they started the cool-down of the three tanks of LE HAVRE, with a LNG freight delivered by old liberty-ship ''BEAUVAIS''. Could they forecast the development of LNG industry in FRANCE and in the world and imagine that modest 'JULES VERNE' and his two english brothers would have, 25 years later, 80 successors - more than five times as big, for the main part of them, that 12 liquefaction plants would be running in the world, supplying about twenty LNG terminals. For the first time, a country - FRANCE - can draw the lessons from the exploitation of the 3 LNG transportation systems during a long period. That is the subject of the present paper.

Picard, J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Alternative Fuel Transportation Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

federal federal register Monday May 17, 1999 Part II Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 10 CFR Part 490 Alternative Fuel Transportation Program; P-series Fuels; Final Rule 26822 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 94 / Monday, May 17, 1999 / Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 10 CFR Part 490 [Docket No. EE-RM-98-PURE] RIN 1904-AA99 Alternative Fuel Transportation Program; P-Series Fuels AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of final rulemaking. SUMMARY: In response to a petition filed by Pure Energy Corporation, DOE is amending the rules for the statutory program that requires certain alternative fuel providers and State government

369

CHAPTER 9: RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT 1998 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT9-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHAPTER 9: RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT 1998 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT9-1 9C H A P T E R Radiological Dose Assessment This chapter discusses the potential radio- logical doses to offsite individuals: RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT 9.1 EXTERNAL PENETRATING RADIATION MEASUREMENTS The Brookhaven National Laboratory

Homes, Christopher C.

370

8-1 1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 8: RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8-1 1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 8: RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT During 1999, potential (0.4 mSv) per year. Radiological Dose Assessment 8CHAPTER1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT B R O O K H: RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT 8.1 AMBIENT RADIATION MEASUREMENTS BNL measures environmental background radiation

Homes, Christopher C.

371

Interim Report on Cumulative Risk Assessment for Radiological and Chemical Constituents of Concern at Decommissioning Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning nuclear facilities focus extensive efforts on site characterization to demonstrate regulatory compliance in the termination of site licenses. Many decommissioning sites, while recognizing radiological characterization and assessment needs, lacked experience in chemical risk assessment. This report documents plant approaches for performing cumulative risk assessments of both radiological and non-radiological constituents of concern.

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

372

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This booklet was written to answer questions most frequently asked by fire fighters, law enforcement officers, and emergency medical services personnel. The booklet is not intended as a substitute...

373

RADIOLOGICAL CRITERIA FOR LICENSE TERMINATION OF URANIUM RECOVERY FACILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiological criteria for building surfaces and radionuclides other than radium in soil, for termination of uranium recovery licenses. SUMMARY: In a Staff Requirements Memorandum (SRM) on SECY-98-084, dated August 11, 1998 (Attachment 1), the Commission indicated that it did not object to the staff's recommendation to use the radium benchmark dose in developing a final rule applicable to uranium recovery licensees. The final rule addresses radiological criteria for decommissioning land and buildings required for license termination for uranium recovery facilities, e.g., uranium mills and in situ leach facilities (ISLs). The final rule will provide a clear and consistent regulatory basis for determining the extent to which lands and structures can be considered to be decommissioned. BACKGROUND: On August 22, 1994 (59 FR 43200), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published a proposed rule for comment in the Federal Register, to amend 10 CFR Part 20, "Standards for Protection Against Radiation, " to include radiological criteria for decommissioning as subpart E. The proposed rule applied to uranium mill facilities and other NRC licensees, but did not apply to mill tailings disposal or to soil radium cleanup at mills because the radiological criteria for these activities are regulated under 10 CFR Part 40, Appendix A. Some commenters recommended that the rule exempt conventional thorium and uranium mill facilities and ISLs. In SECY-97-046A, dated March 28, 1997, entitled "Final Rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination, " the staff recommended that the final rule indicate that for uranium and thorium mill facilities the cleanup of radionuclides other than radium from soil and buildings must result in a dose no greater than the dose resulting from the cleanup of radium-contaminated soil (benchmark

William D. Travers /s

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Transportation Planning & Decision Science Group Transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poster Presentations: Stacy Davis - "Transportation Data Programs: Transportation Energy Data Book, Vehicle Technologies Market Report, and the Vehicle Technologies Fact of...

375

The radiological impact of the 2000 Hanford Fire (24-Command Fire)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The range fire at the Hanford facility in late June 2000 coupled with the fire at Los Alamos during the same year have raised a number of questions about the potential migration and/or transport of radioactive materials off U.S. nuclear sites into more populated areas. This paper examines the radiological impact of the 24-Command Fire, which occurred on the Hanford Site in late June 2000. Several different approaches are compared against each other to determine the validity of the results. The approaches include physical calculations from collected data as well as estimates from current transport and diffusion software. The analysis begins with the estimation of release. There are sufficient data on the concentrations of radionuclides in the most contaminated areas of the Hanford Site, but very little on the land in between. Once soil concentrations were determined, resuspension factors were applied to estimate releases of material from these areas. A Hanford-specific diffusion and dispersion program, a dose assessment program, and a calculation by hand were used to determine the estimated transport of material to areas populated by the general public. These results are compared against each other as well as the air monitoring results obtained and reported by the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington State Department of Health. Air concentrations from all three methods were used to calculate the associated doses and risks to individuals in these areas. From the analyses, the radiological impact of the fire was determined to be minimal. The ensuing wind events, resuspending particulate matter from the contaminated areas burned during the fire, resulted in a committed effective dose of approximately 10 []Sv (0.01 mrem) from the inhalation of contaminated air. This dose is insignificant when compared to the 360 mrem per year average dose of a member of the general public from indoor and outdoor sources of background radiation. The ingestion pathway was analyzed but found to contribute less than 2 Bq yr? for the most important foodstuffs: vegetables and fruits.

Henderson, Ashley David

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2012 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations  

SciTech Connect

In 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the US Department of Energy (DOE), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR)). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero. Three tests, Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat; the fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. DOE is working to clean up and close all four sites. Substantial cleaned up has been accomplished at Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1. Cleanup of Clean Slate 2 and 3 is on the DOE planning horizon for some time in the next several years. The Desert Research Institute installed two monitoring stations, number 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories Range Operations Center and number 401 at Clean Slate 3, in 2008 and a third monitoring station, number 402 at Clean Slate 1, in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The primary objectives of the data collection and analysis effort are to (1) monitor the concentration of radiological parameters in dust particles suspended in air, (2) determine whether winds are re-distributing radionuclides or contaminated soil material, (3) evaluate the controlling meteorological conditions if wind transport is occurring, and (4) measure ancillary radiological, meteorological, and environmental parameters that might provide insight to the above assessments. The following observations are based on data collected during CY2012. The mean annual concentration of gross alpha and gross beta is highest at Station 400 and lowest at Station 401. This difference may be the result of using filter media at Station 400 with a smaller pore size than the media used at the other two stations. Average annual gamma exposure at Station 401 is slightly greater than at Station 400 and 402. Average annual gamma exposure at all three TTR stations are in the upper range to slightly higher than values reported for the CEMP stations surrounding the TTR. At higher wind speeds, the saltation counts are greater at Station 401 than at Station 402 while the suspended particulate concentrations are greater at Station 402 than at Statin 401. Although these observations seem counterintuitive, they are likely the result of differences in the soil material present at the two sites. Station 401 is located on an interfluve elevated above two adjacent drainage channels where the soil surface is likely to be composed of coarser material. Station 402 is located in finer sediments at the playa edge and is also subject to dust from a dirt road only 500 m to the north. During prolonged high wind events, suspended dust concentrations at Station 401 peaked with the initial winds then decreased whereas dust concentrations at Station 402 peaked with each peak in the wind speed. This likely reflects a limited PM10 source that is quickly expended at Station 401 relative to an abundant PM10 source at Station 402. In CY2013, to facilitate comparisons between radiological analyses of collected dust, the filter media at all three stations will be standardized. In addition, a sequence of samples will be collected at Station 400 using both types of filter media to enable development of a mathematical relationship between the results derived from the two filter types. Additionally, having acquired approximately four years of observations at Stations 400 and 401 and a year of observations at Station 402, a period-of-record analysis of the radiological and airborne dust conditions will be undertaken.

Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Miller, Julianne J

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Transportation Research Internship Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Research Internship Program Civil & Coastal Engineering Overview The Transportation Research Internship Program (TRIP) is conducted by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) and the Center is to provide undergraduates an exciting opportunity to learn about transportation engineering

Slatton, Clint

378

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Instructor's Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-1 4-1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN Course Material Topic: Elements of a Radiological Control Program Objectives: Upon completion of this lesson, the participant will be able to: 1. Identify factors that influence the scope and magnitude of a Radiological Control Program at any nuclear facility. 2. Identify typical elements of a Radiological Control Program. Training Aids: Overhead Transparencies (OTs): OT 4.1 - OT 4.5 (may be supplemented or substituted with updated or site-specific information) Handouts - "List of Radiological Control Program Elements" "Elements of a Radiological Control Program" Equipment Needs: Overhead projector Screen Flip chart Markers Masking tape Student Materials: Student's Guide

379

Clean Slate transportation and human health risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

Public concern regarding activities involving radioactive material generally focuses on the human health risk associated with exposure to ionizing radiation. This report describes the results of a risk analysis conducted to evaluate risk for excavation, handling, and transport of soil contaminated with transuranics at the Clean Slate sites. Transportation risks were estimated for public transport routes from the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to the Envirocore disposal facility or to the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for both radiological risk and risk due to traffic accidents. Human health risks were evaluated for occupational and radiation-related health effects to workers. This report was generated to respond to this public concern, to provide an evaluation of the risk, and to assess feasibility of transport of the contaminated soil for disposal.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Potential Radiological Doses Associated with the Disposal of Petroleum Industry Norm Via Landspreading  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eng-38-5 Eng-38-5 (DE98000550) POTENTIAL RADIOLOGICAL DOSES ASSOCIATED WITH THE DISPOSAL OF PETROLEUM INDUSTRY NORM VIA LANDSPREADING Final Report, September 1998 By Karen P. Smith Deborah L. Blunt John J. Arnish December 1998 Performed Under Argonne National Laboratory Contract No. W-31-109-Eng-38 Argonne National Laboratory Environmental Assessment Division Lakewood, Colorado National Petroleum Technology Office U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Tulsa, Oklahoma DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

ORNL/TM-11118 RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT METPATH INCORPORATED,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

TM-11118 TM-11118 RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT METPATH INCORPORATED, 1 MALCOLM AVENUE, TETERBORO, NEW JERSEY (TJOO3) FL D. Foley L. M. Floyd, Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Serwce U.S. Department of Commerce I 5265 Port Royal Road. Springfield, Virginia 22161 NTIS price codes-Printed Copy:A03 Microfiche A01 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an 8ge"cy of the UnitedSlaterGovernmenl.NeithertheUnitedStatesGovernmen~no,anyagency thereof. nor any 01 their employees. makes any warranty. express 0, implied. 0, assumes any legal liabhty or responsibility lo, the accuracy. completeness. 0, UJB~U~WSJ of any information. apparatus. product. or process disClosed. or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein

382

Radiologic characterization of the Mexican Hat, Utah, uranium mill tailings remedial action site: Addendum D1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This radiologic characterization of the inactive uranium millsite at Mexican Hat, Utah, was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Grand Junctions Project Office in response to and in accord with a Statement of Work prepared by the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technical Assistance Contractor, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. The objective of this project was to determine the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination that exceeds the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards at the Mexican Hat site. The data presented in this report are required for characterization of the areas adjacent to the Mexican Hat tailings piles and for the subsequent design of cleanup activities. Some on- pile sampling was required to determine the depth of the 15-pCi/g Ra- 226 interface in an area where wind and water erosion has taken place.

Ludlam, J.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Areas for US-India civilian nuclear cooperation to prevent/mitigate radiological events.  

SciTech Connect

Over the decades, India and the United States have had very little formal collaboration on nuclear issues. Partly this was because neither country needed collaboration to make progress in the nuclear field. But it was also due, in part, to the concerns both countries had about the other's intentions. Now that the U.S.-India Deal on nuclear collaboration has been signed and the Hyde Act passed in the United States, it is possible to recognize that both countries can benefit from such nuclear collaboration, especially if it starts with issues important to both countries that do not touch on strategic systems. Fortunately, there are many noncontroversial areas for collaboration. This study, funded by the U.S. State Department, has identified a number of areas in the prevention of and response to radiological incidents where such collaboration could take place.

Balachandran, Gopalan; Forden, Geoffrey Ethan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Automatic Estimation of the Radiological Inventory for the Dismantling of Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The estimation of the radiological inventory of Nuclear Facilities to be dismantled is a process that included information related with the physical inventory of all the plant and radiological survey. Estimation of the radiological inventory for all the components and civil structure of the plant could be obtained with mathematical models with statistical approach. A computer application has been developed in order to obtain the radiological inventory in an automatic way. Results: A computer application that is able to estimate the radiological inventory from the radiological measurements or the characterization program has been developed. In this computer applications has been included the statistical functions needed for the estimation of the central tendency and variability, e.g. mean, median, variance, confidence intervals, variance coefficients, etc. This computer application is a necessary tool in order to be able to estimate the radiological inventory of a nuclear facility and it is a powerful tool for decision taken in future sampling surveys.

Garcia-Bermejo, R.; Felipe, A.; Gutierrez, S.; Salas, E. [Iberdrola Ingenieria y Construccion (Spain); Martin, N. [ENRESA (Spain)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response in National Exercise Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response in National Exercise October 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Hnin Khaing of WIPP Laboratories checks a radiological sample, similar to what would be analyzed in an event like the one simulated in the exercise to test national readiness to respond to a large radiological event. Hnin Khaing of WIPP Laboratories checks a radiological sample, similar to what would be analyzed in an event like the one simulated in the exercise to test national readiness to respond to a large radiological event. CARLSBAD, N.M. - For the first time, a program led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) that coordinates analytical capabilities throughout DOE

386

Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response in National Exercise Program Led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office Joins Emergency Response in National Exercise October 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Hnin Khaing of WIPP Laboratories checks a radiological sample, similar to what would be analyzed in an event like the one simulated in the exercise to test national readiness to respond to a large radiological event. Hnin Khaing of WIPP Laboratories checks a radiological sample, similar to what would be analyzed in an event like the one simulated in the exercise to test national readiness to respond to a large radiological event. CARLSBAD, N.M. - For the first time, a program led by EM's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) that coordinates analytical capabilities throughout DOE

387

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS Transportation systems are the building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS Transportation systems are the building blocks of modern society. Efficient mobility improves the quality of life. However, transportation systems by their very nature also affect quality. The transportation systems graduate pro- gram provides in-depth knowledge on the design

Wang, Yuhang

388

Intelligent Transportation Systems - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intelligent Transportation Systems Intelligent Transportation Systems The Center for Transportation Analysis does specialty research and development in intelligent transportation systems. Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) are part of the national strategy for improving the operational safety, efficiency, and security of our nation's highways. Since the early 1990s, ITS has been the umbrella under which significant efforts have been conducted in research, development, testing, deployment and integration of advanced technologies to improve the measures of effectiveness of our national highway network. These measures include level of congestion, the number of accidents and fatalities, delay, throughput, access to transportation, and fuel efficiency. A transportation future that includes ITS will involve a significant improvement in these

389

South Carolina Radioactive Waste Transportation and Disposal Act (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Health and Environmental Control is responsible for regulating the transportation of radioactive waste, with some exceptions, into or within the state for storage, disposal, or...

390

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rulsion Tritium Transport...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

September 2007 pdficon Tritium Transport Model Comments and Responses Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment...

391

Surety applications in transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infrastructure surety can make a valuable contribution to the transportation engineering industry. The lessons learned at Sandia National Laboratories in developing surety principles and technologies for the nuclear weapons complex and the nuclear power industry hold direct applications to the safety, security, and reliability of the critical infrastructure. This presentation introduces the concepts of infrastructure surety, including identification of the normal, abnormal, and malevolent threats to the transportation infrastructure. National problems are identified and examples of failures and successes in response to environmental loads and other structural and systemic vulnerabilities are presented. The infrastructure surety principles developed at Sandia National Laboratories are described. Currently available technologies including (a) three-dimensional computer-assisted drawing packages interactively combined with virtual reality systems, (b) the complex calculational and computational modeling and code-coupling capabilities associated with the new generation of supercomputers, and (c) risk-management methodologies with application to solving the national problems associated with threats to the critical transportation infrastructure are discussed.

Matalucci, R.V.; Miyoshi, D.S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

393

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study Guide Study Guide 2.14-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Personnel Decontamination Module Number: 2.14 Objectives: 2.14.01 List the three factors which determine the actions taken in decontamination of personnel. i 2.14.02 List the preliminary actions and notifications required by the RCT for an individual suspected to be contaminated. i 2.14.03 List the actions to be taken by the RCT when contamination of clothing is confirmed. i 2.14.04 List the actions to be taken by the RCT when skin contamination is confirmed. i 2.14.05 List the steps for using decontamination reagents to decontaminate personnel. INTRODUCTION In our work environment, one of the major concerns of radiological control is the prevention of personnel contamination. When personnel contamination has been

394

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unit Analysis & Conversion Unit Analysis & Conversion Study Guide 1.02-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Unit Analysis & Conversion Module Number: 1.02 Objectives: 1.02.01 Identify the commonly used unit systems of measurement and the base units for mass, length, and time in each system. 1.02.02 Identify the values and abbreviations for SI prefixes. 1.02.03 Given a measurement and the appropriate conversion factor(s) or conversion factor table, convert the measurement to the specified units. 1.02.04 Using the formula provided, convert a given temperature measurement to specified units. INTRODUCTION A working knowledge of the unit analysis and conversion process is necessary for the Radiological Control Technician. It is useful for air and water sample activity

395

RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF DECONTAMINATION DEBRIS LOCATED AT THE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

h h ' . * ' 1. MI). q-8 RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF DECONTAMINATION DEBRIS LOCATED AT THE FUTURA CHEMICAL COMPANY FACILITY 9200 LATTY AVENUE HAZELWOOD, MISSOURI L.W. Cole J.D. Berger W.O. Helton B.M. Putnam T.J. Sowell C.F. Weaver R.D. Condra September 9, 1981 Work performed by Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division Oak Ridge Associated Universities Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 Under Interagency Agreement DOE No. 40-770-80 NRC Fin. No. A-9093-0 Between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy I_--___- ". TABLE OF CONTENTS Page List of Figures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii List of Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.

396

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Monitoring Environmental Monitoring Instructor's Guide 2.09-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Environmental Monitoring Module Number: 2.09 Objectives: 2.09.01 State the goals of an environmental monitoring program. 2.09.02 State the exposure limits to the general public as they apply to environmental monitoring. 2.09.03 Define the term "critical nuclide." 2.09.04 Define the term "critical pathway." L 2.09.05 State locations frequently surveyed for radiological contamination at outdoor waste sites associated with your site and the reasons for each. 2.09.06 Define the term "suspect waste site," and how they can be identified. L 2.09.07 Describe the methods used for environmental monitoring at your site. References: 1. Gollnick, Daniel, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 2nd Edition, Pacific

397

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contamination Control Contamination Control Instructor's Guide 2.05-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Contamination Control Module Number: 2.05 Objectives: 2.05.01 Define the terms "removable and fixed surface contamination," state the difference between them and list common methods used to measure each. 2.05.02 State the components of a radiological monitoring program for contamination control and common methods used to accomplish them. 2.05.03 State the basic goal of a contamination control program and list actions that contribute to its success. 2.05.04 State the basic principles of contamination control and list examples of implementation methods. 2.05.05 List and describe the possible engineering control methods used for contamination control. 2.05.06

398

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRU TRU ALPHA LLWT Project CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project November 2003 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a November 2003 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project More Documents & Publications CRAD, Quality Assurance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT

399

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41-2001 41-2001 April 2001 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Assessor Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Radiological Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 iii Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in

400

I RADIOLOGICAL SCOPING SURVEY OF FO,RMER MONSANTO' FACILITIES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-I a.d *4dk *-f--l- -I a.d *4dk *-f--l- --- I. ,e-- - .- --_ -- -. ;,. -* " . I . RADIOLOGICAL SCOPING SURVEY OF FO,RMER MONSANTO' FACILITIES (Unit XII and W a rehouse) DAYTON, OHIO Report Date: 4 September 1997 Survey Dak 27 Aitgust 1991 Prepared by: Mark L. Mays, Chief Radiation Safety Branch Sponsored by: M iamisburg Environmental Matigement Reject Office Ohio FTekl Ofice U.S.. Department of Energy Conducted by: %diation Safety Branch Of&e of Environmental Management ggtb Air Base W ing U.S. Departmtnt of the Air Force In Cooperation W ith: Southwest District Office Ohio Environmental Protection Agency - O h io Cnvironmwhl Protection Agenty Bureau of Radiological Health Ohio Department of Health. I Lb ^U .L*-u i-.-r- --- , .., II ,.--(_ ~_ -_- --- -_ _.. ;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unit Analysis & Conversion Unit Analysis & Conversion Instructor's Guide 1.02-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Unit Analysis & Conversion Module Number: 1.02 Objectives: 1.02.01 Identify the commonly used unit systems of measurement and the base units for mass, length, and time in each system. 1.02.02 Identify the values and abbreviations for SI prefixes. 1.02.03 Given a measurement and the appropriate conversion factor(s) or conversion factor table, convert the measurement to the specified units. 1.02.04 Using the formula provided, convert a given temperature measurement to specified units. References: 1. "Health Physics and Radiological Health Handbook"; Scinta, Inc; 1989. 2. DOE-HDBK-1010-92 (June 1992) "Classical Physics" DOE Fundamental Handbook; US

402

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contamination Control Contamination Control Study Guide 2.05-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Contamination Control Module Number: 2.05 Objectives: 2.05.01 Define the terms "removable and fixed surface contamination," state the difference between them and list common methods used to measure each. 2.05.02 State the components of a radiological monitoring program for contamination control and common methods used to accomplish them. 2.05.03 State the basic goal of a contamination control program and list actions that contribute to its success. 2.05.04 State the basic principles of contamination control and list examples of implementation methods. 2.05.05 List and describe the possible engineering control methods used for contamination control. 2.05.06

403

Release criteria and pathway analysis for radiological remediation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site-specific activity concentrations were derived for soils contaminated with mixed fission products (MFP), or uranium-processing residues, using the Department of Energy (DOE) pathway analysis computer code RESRAD at four different sites. The concentrations and other radiological parameters, such as limits on background-subtracted gamma exposure rate were used as the basis to arrive at release criteria for two of the sites. Valid statistical parameters, calculated for the distribution of radiological data obtained from site surveys, were then compared with the criteria to determine releasability or need for further decontamination. For the other two sites, RESRAD has been used as a preremediation planning tool to derive residual material guidelines for uranium. 11 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Subbaraman, G.; Tuttle, R.J.; Oliver, B.M. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.); Devgun, J.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

An aerial radiological survey of Naturita, Colorado and surrounding area  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey of four areas in the vicinity of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Naturita, Colorado was conducted in September 1981. The average background radiation exposure rate (normalized to 3 feet above the ground) was about 10 to 16 microroentgens per hour ({mu}R/h). Uranium ore or tailings were detected at Naturita, Nucla, East Vancorum, and the general region downriver and downwind from the former mill tailings site.

Jaffe, R.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

DRAFT - Design of Radiological Survey and Sampling to Support Title Transfer or Lease of Property on the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns, operates, and manages the buildings and land areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. As land and buildings are declared excess or underutilized, it is the intent of DOE to either transfer the title of or lease suitable property to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET) or other entities for public use. It is DOE's responsibility, in coordination with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 4, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), to ensure that the land, facilities, and personal property that are to have the title transferred or are to be leased are suitable for public use. Release of personal property must also meet site requirements and be approved by the DOE contractor responsible for site radiological control. The terms title transfer and lease in this document have unique meanings. Title transfer will result in release of ownership without any restriction or further control by DOE. Under lease conditions, the government retains ownership of the property along with the responsibility to oversee property utilization. This includes involvement in the lessee's health, safety, and radiological control plans and conduct of site inspections. It may also entail lease restrictions, such as limiting access to certain areas or prohibiting digging, drilling, or disturbing material under surface coatings. Survey and sampling requirements are generally more rigorous for title transfer than for lease. Because of the accelerated clean up process, there is an increasing emphasis on title transfers of facilities and land. The purpose of this document is to describe the radiological survey and sampling protocols that are being used for assessing the radiological conditions and characteristics of building and land areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation that contain space potentially available for title transfer or lease. After necessary surveys and sampling and laboratory analyses are completed, the data are analyzed and included in an Environmental Baseline Summary (EBS) report for title transfer or in a Baseline Environmental Analysis Report (BEAR) for lease. The data from the BEAR is then used in a Screening-Level Human Health Risk Assessment (SHHRA) or a risk calculation (RC) to assess the potential risks to future owners/occupants. If title is to be transferred, release criteria in the form of specific activity concentrations called Derived Concentration Guideline Levels (DCGLs) will be developed for the each property. The DCGLs are based on the risk model and are used with the data in the EBS to determine, with statistical confidence, that the release criteria for the property have been met. The goal of the survey and sampling efforts is to (1) document the baseline conditions of the property (real or personal) prior to title transfer or lease, (2) obtain enough information that an evaluation of radiological risks can be made, and (3) collect sufftcient data so that areas that contain minimal residual levels of radioactivity can be identified and, following radiological control procedures, be released from radiological control. (It should be noted that release from radiological control does not necessarily mean free release because DOE may maintain institutional control of the site after it is released from radiological control). To meet the goals of this document, a Data Quality Objective (DQO) process will be used to enhance data collection efficiency and assist with decision-making. The steps of the DQO process involve stating the problem, identifying the decision, identifying inputs to the decision, developing study boundaries, developing the decision rule, and optimizing the design. This document describes the DQOs chosen for surveys and sampling efforts performed for the purposes listed above. The previous version to this document focused on the requirements for radiological survey and sampling protocols that are be used for leasing. Because the primary focus at this time is on title transfer, th

Cusick L.T.

2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

406

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Response Effects of Radiation History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Agencies U. S. Department of Transportation (DOT), U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Postal Services (USPS) U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Conference of State Legislatures - Environment, Energy and Transportation Program, Hazardous and Radioactive Materials International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulations Code of Federal Regulations: Title 10 - Energy Code of Federal Regulations: Title 10, PART 71 - Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material Code of Federal Regulations: Title 49 - Transportation Code of Federal Regulations: Title 49, PART 173 - Shippers - General

407

Radioactive Material Transportation Requirements for the Department of Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) created the National Transportation Program (NTP) whose goal is to ensure the availability of safe, efficient, and timely transportation of DOE materials. The Integration and Planning Group of the NTP, assisted by Global Technologies Incorporated (GTI), was tasked to identify requirements associated with the transport of DOE Environmental Management (EM) radiological waste/material. A systems engineering approach was used to identify source documents, extract requirements, perform a functional analysis, and set up a transportation requirements management database in RDD-100. Functions and requirements for transporting the following DOE radioactive waste/material are contained in the database: high level radioactive waste (HLW), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW), nuclear materials (NM), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and transuranic waste (TRU waste). The requirements will be used in the development of standard transportation protocols for DOE shipping. The protocols will then be combined into a DOE Transportation Program Management Guide, which will be used to standardize DOE transportation processes.

John, Mark Earl; Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Bolander, Thane Weston

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Transportation of radionuclides in urban environs: draft environmental assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the environmental consequences of the transportation of radioactive materials in densely populated urban areas, including estimates of the radiological, nonradiological, and social impacts arising from this process. The chapters of the report and the appendices which follow detail the methodology and results for each of four causative event categories: incident free transport, vehicular accidents, human errors or deviations from accepted quality assurance practices, and sabotage or malevolent acts. The numerical results are expressed in terms of the expected radiological and economic impacts from each. Following these discussions, alternatives to the current transport practice are considered. Then, the detailed analysis is extended from a limited area of New York city to other urban areas. The appendices contain the data bases and specific models used to evaluate these impacts, as well as discussions of chemical toxicity and the social impacts of radioactive material transport in urban areas. The latter are evaluated for each causative event category in terms of psychological, sociological, political, legal, and organizational impacts. The report is followed by an extensive bibliography covering the many fields of study which were required in performing the analysis.

Finley, N.C.; Aldrich, D.C.; Daniel, S.L.; Ericson, D.M.; Henning-Sachs, C.; Kaestner, P.C.; Ortiz, N.R.; Sheldon, D.D.; Taylor, J.M.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Parking and Transportation Service 1117 E. 6th  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parking and Transportation Service 1117 E. 6th Street Tucson, Arizona 85721 BICYCLE (AND NON-MOTORIZED TRANSPORTATION) Parking & Traffic Regulations 2011-2012 It is the responsibility of all individuals walking. For additional information, please call: Administration 621-3550 Alternative Transportation 626-RIDE Customer

Utzinger, Urs

410

Transportation Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to systematically identify and examine possible near and long-term ecological and environmental effects from the production of hydrogen from various energy sources based on the DOE hydrogen production strategy and the use of that hydrogen in transportation applications. This project uses state-of-the-art numerical modeling tools of the environment and energy system emissions in combination with relevant new and prior measurements and other analyses to assess the understanding of the potential ecological and environmental impacts from hydrogen market penetration. H2 technology options and market penetration scenarios will be evaluated using energy-technology-economics models as well as atmospheric trace gas projections based on the IPCC SRES scenarios including the decline in halocarbons due to the Montreal Protocol. Specifically we investigate the impact of hydrogen releases on the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, the long-term stability of the ozone layer due to changes in hydrogen emissions, the impact of hydrogen emissions and resulting concentrations on climate, the impact on microbial ecosystems involved in hydrogen uptake, and criteria pollutants emitted from distributed and centralized hydrogen production pathways and their impacts on human health, air quality, ecosystems, and structures under different penetration scenarios

Wuebbles, D.J.; Dubey, M.K., Edmonds, J.; Layzell, D.; Olsen, S.; Rahn, T.; Rocket, A.; Wang, D.; Jia, W.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Activated transport in AMTEC electrodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transport of alkali metal atoms through porous cathodes of alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter (AMTEC) cells is responsible for significant, reducible losses in the electrical performance of these cells. Experimental evidence for activated transport of metal atoms at grain surfaces and boundaries within some AMTEC electrodes has been derived from temperature dependent studies as well as from analysis of the detailed frequency dependence of ac impedance results for other electrodes, including thin, mature molybdenum electrodes which exhibit transport dominated by free molecular flow of sodium gas at low frequencies or dc conditions. Activated surface transport will almost always exist in parallel with free molecular flow transport, and the process of alkali atom adsorption/desorption from the electrode surface will invariably be part of the transport process, and possibly a dominant part in some cases. Little can be learned about the detailed mass transport process from the ac impedance or current voltage curves of an electrode at one set of operating parameters, because the transport process includes a number of important physical parameters that are not all uniquely determined by one experiment. The temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient of the alkali metal through the electrode in several cases provides an activation energy and pre-exponential, but at least two activated processes may be operative, and the activation parameters should be expected to depend on the alkali metal activity gradient that the electrode experiences. In the case of Pt/W/Mn electrodes operated for 2500 hours, limiting currents varied with electrode thickness, and the activation parameters could be assigned primarily to the surface/grain boundary diffusion process. 17 refs.

Williams, R.M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M.A.; Underwood, M.L.; O`Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Activated transport in AMTEC electrodes  

SciTech Connect

Transport of alkali metal atoms through porous cathodes of alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter (AMTEC) cells is responsible for significant, reducible losses in the electrical performance of these cells. Experimental evidence for activated transport of metal atoms at grain surfaces and boundaries within some AMTEC electrodes has been derived from temperature dependent studies as well as from analysis of the detailed frequency dependence of ac impedance results for other electrodes, including thin, mature molybdenum electrodes which exhibit transport dominated by free molecular flow of sodium gas at low frequencies or dc conditions. Activated surface transport will almost always exist in parallel with free molecular flow transport, and the process of alkali atom adsorption/desorption from the electrode surface will invariably be part of the transport process, and possibly a dominant part in some cases. Little can be learned about the detailed mass transport process from the ac impedance or current voltage curves of an electrode at one set of operating parameters, because the transport process includes a number of important physical parameters that are not all uniquely determined by one experiment. The temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient of the alkali metal through the electrode in several cases provides an activation energy and pre-exponential, but at least two activated processes may be operative, and the activation parameters should be expected to depend on the alkali metal activity gradient that the electrode experiences. In the case of Pt/W/Mn electrodes operated for 2500 hours, limiting currents varied with electrode thickness, and the activation parameters could be assigned primarily to the surface/grain boundary diffusion process. 17 refs.

Williams, R.M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M.A.; Underwood, M.L.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Transportation Security | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Security SHARE Global Threat Reduction Initiative Transportation Security Cooperation Secure Transport Operations (STOP) Box Security of radioactive material while...

414

Order Module--DOE STD-1098-2008, DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STD-1098-2008, DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL STD-1098-2008, DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL Order Module--DOE STD-1098-2008, DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL "The radiological control program discussed in DOE-STD-1098-2008 goes beyond the scope of, and includes more details than, the documented radiation protection program (RPP) required by 10 CFR 835, -Occupational Radiation Protection.‖ To ensure implementation of a comprehensive and coherent radiological control program that exceeds basic requirements and provides a substantial safety margin, DOE encourages its contractors to implement the provisions of DOE-STD-1098- 2008 to the extent appropriate to facility hazards and operations, consistent with DOE's integrated safety management program. Should any conflicts arise between the site-specific radiological control manual and the documented RPP, the

415

Erosion and Optimal Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

383 pp. EROSION AND OPTIMAL TRANSPORT [23] I. Ekeland and T.and D. Simons, Sediment transport capacity of overland ?ow,measure spaces via optimal transport, Ann. of Math. (2),

Birnir, Bjorn; Rowlett, Julie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The Role of the Consequence Management Home Team in the Fukushima Daiichi Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Consequence Management Home Team (CMHT) is a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration asset and played an important role in the U.S. response effort to the Fukushima Daiichi accident, ranging from the early days of the response to a continued involvement in supporting late phase efforts. Each stage of their work had distinct characteristics in terms of management of incoming data streams and creation of products. The CMHT assisted a variety of response organizations with modeling; radiological operations planning; field monitoring techniques; and the analysis, interpretation, and distribution of radiological data. In the Fukushima Daiichi response, the CMHT grew to include a broader range of support than was historically planned. Through their work, the social and economic impacts of a nuclear or radiological incident were minimized. The CMHT was an integral component of the response in Japan and acted as the central point from which all of the data and products flowed.

Pemberton, Wendy [Remote Sensing Laboratory at Nellis; Mena, RaJah [Remote Sensing Laboratory at Nellis; Beal, William [Remote Sensing Laboratory at Andrews

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Transportation Market Distortions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport Prices and Markets, Victoria Transport PolicySurvey: Survey Suggests Market-Based Vision of Smart Growth,G. 1996. Roads in a Market Economy, Avebury (Aldershot).

Litman, Todd

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Sustainability and Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005. Integrating Sustainability into the Trans- portationTHOUGHT PIECE Sustainability and Transport by Richardof the concept of sustainability to transport planning. In

Gilbert, Richard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Transportation Demand This  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates...

420

Transportation / Field Trips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In the event that a child misses the transportation, parents may choose the ... their child's class on an outing and possibly transport themselves or their ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

PBA Transportation Websites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Useful Websites for Transportation from PBA From: Patterson, Philip (DOE HQ) Subject: Useful Websites for Transportation from PBA Here are some websites you might want to check...

422

Radiological impact of phosphogypsum applied to soils under bahiagrass pasture  

SciTech Connect

Phosphogypsum (PG), a by-product in the manufacture of phosphoric acid, is primarily gypsum. The USEPA regulates the removal of PG from stacks because it contains {sup 226}Ra. Measures to quantify the transfer of radioactivity in PG to the agricultural environment are needed. The objective of the study was to collect data needed for assessment of the radiological impacts of PG applied to two Florida soils. Field experiments using 0,10, and 20 mg PG ha{sup {minus}1} were conducted for 2 yr at the University of Florida RCREC, Ona, FL. PG-attributable levels of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb, and {sup 210}Po were observed in the top 5-cm layer of the soils. Surface {sup 222}Rn flux increased by 0.067 to 0.078 mBq m{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} per Mg PG ha{sup {minus}1}. Radionuclide concentrations in regrowth forages increased at one site where the first post-treatment rainfall did not occur until 20 d after PG application. In mature forages, radionuclide levels generally increased with PG in both soils. No effects on radionuclide levels in subsurface water down to 90 cm and only slight effects on gamma radiation and on airborne {sup 222}Rn measured 1 m from the ground were noted. The linear regression slope for a radiological parameter normalized with respect to the pertinent radionuclide applied per m{sup 2} per Mg PG ha{sup {minus}1} is proposed as the transfer factor (TF) of that radionuclide in PG to the agricultural medium in terms of that parameter. The TF permits the calculation of the potential effect on certain radiological parameters of PGs containing different radionuclide concentrations from the one used in this study.

Alcordo, I.S.; Rechcigl, J.E.; Roessler, C.E.; Littell, R.C.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Idaho's Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory , OAS-L-12-02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho's Radiological and Idaho's Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory OAS-L-12-02 February 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 February 21, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE FROM: Daniel M. Weeber, Director Eastern Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Idaho's Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy owns and operates the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL) through the Idaho Operations Office (Idaho). RESL is a reference measurements laboratory specializing in analytical chemistry, radiation measurements and calibrations, and quality assurance. RESL had been located at the Idaho National Laboratory

424

Radiological Conditions at the Semipalatinsk Test Site, Kazakhstan: Preliminary Assessment and Recommendations for Further Study  

SciTech Connect

This is a review of the book ''Radiological Conditions at the Semipalatinsk Test Site, Kazakhstan: Preliminary Assessment and Recommendations for Further Study.''

Napier, Bruce A. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

DOE-HDBK-1113-98; Radiological Safety Training for Uranium Facilities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACILITIES" Dennis Kubicki, Technical Standards Manager, EH-24 SUBJECT. HANDBOOK, DOE-HDBK-1113-98, "RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY TRAINING FOR TO: In February 2005, a notice of intent...

426

DOE-STD-1098-99; Radiological Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1098-99 July 1999 Reaffirmation December 2004 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ii This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National

427

Understanding Contamination; Twenty Years of Simulating Radiological Contamination  

SciTech Connect

A wide variety of simulated contamination methods have been developed by researchers to reproducibly test radiological decontamination methods. Some twenty years ago a method of non-radioactive contamination simulation was proposed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that mimicked the character of radioactive cesium and zirconium contamination on stainless steel. It involved baking the contamination into the surface of the stainless steel in order to 'fix' it into a tenacious, tightly bound oxide layer. This type of contamination was particularly applicable to nuclear processing facilities (and nuclear reactors) where oxide growth and exchange of radioactive materials within the oxide layer became the predominant model for material/contaminant interaction. Additional simulation methods and their empirically derived basis (from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility) are discussed. In the last ten years the INL, working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC), has continued to develop contamination simulation methodologies. The most notable of these newer methodologies was developed to compare the efficacy of different decontamination technologies against radiological dispersal device (RDD, 'dirty bomb') type of contamination. There are many different scenarios for how RDD contamination may be spread, but the most commonly used one at the INL involves the dispersal of an aqueous solution containing radioactive Cs-137. This method was chosen during the DARPA projects and has continued through the NHSRC series of decontamination trials and also gives a tenacious 'fixed' contamination. Much has been learned about the interaction of cesium contamination with building materials, particularly concrete, throughout these tests. The effects of porosity, cation-exchange capacity of the material and the amount of dirt and debris on the surface are very important factors. The interaction of the contaminant/substrate with the particular decontamination technology is also very important. Results of decontamination testing from hundreds of contaminated coupons have lead to certain conclusions about the contamination and the type of decontamination methods being deployed. A recent addition to the DARPA initiated methodology simulates the deposition of nuclear fallout. This contamination differs from previous tests in that it has been developed and validated purely to simulate a 'loose' type of contamination. This may represent the first time that a radiologically contaminated 'fallout' stimulant has been developed to reproducibly test decontamination methods. While no contaminant/methodology may serve as a complete example of all aspects that could be seen in the field, the study of this family of simulation methods provides insight into the nature of radiological contamination.

Emily Snyder; John Drake; Ryan James

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1990  

SciTech Connect

Various Hanford site-wide radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report for calendar year 1990. These activities include internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, instrument calibration and evaluation, radiation source calibration, and radiological records keeping. For each of these activities, the routine program, program changes and enhancements, associated tasks, investigations and studies, and related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are discussed as applicable. 22 refs., 10 figs., 19 tabs.

Lyon, M; Bihl, D E; Fix, J J; Piper, R K; Freolich, T J; Leonowich, J A; Lynch, T P

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Compact cyclone filter train for radiological and hazardous environments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact cyclone filter train for the removal of hazardous and radiologi particles from a gaseous fluid medium which permits a small cyclone separator to be used in a very small space envelope due to the arrangement of the filter housing adjacent to the separator with the cyclone separator and the filters mounted on a plate. The entire unit will have a hoist connection at the center of gravity so that the entire unit including the separator, the filters, and the base can be lifted and repositioned as desired.

Bench, Thomas R. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Compact cyclone filter train for radiological and hazardous environments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact cyclone filter train is disclosed for the removal of hazardous and radiological particles from a gaseous fluid medium. This filter train permits a small cyclone separator to be used in a very small space envelope due to the arrangement of the filter housing adjacent to the separator with the cyclone separator and the filters mounted on a plate. The entire unit will have a hoist connection at the center of gravity so that the entire unit including the separator, the filters, and the base can be lifted and repositioned as desired. 3 figs.

Bench, T.R.

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

431

Hanford radiological protection support services. Annual report for 1995  

SciTech Connect

Various Hanford Site radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report for calendar year 1995. These activities include external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, radiological record keeping, radiation source calibration, and instrument calibration and evaluation. For each of these activities, the routine program and any program changes or enhancements are described, as well as associated tasks, investigations, and studies. Program-related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are also described.

Lyon, M.; Bihl, D.E.; Carbaugh, E.H. [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services annual report for 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various Hanford Site radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report for calendar year 1993. These activities include internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, instrument calibration and evaluation, radiation source calibration, and radiological record keeping. For each of these activities, the routine program and any program changes or enhancements are described, as well as associated tasks, investigations, and studies. Program-related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are also described.

Lyon, M.; Bihl, D.E.; Fix, J.J.; Froelich, T.J.; Piper, R.K.; Olsen, P.C.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services annual report for 1992  

SciTech Connect

Various Hanford Site radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Richland Field Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report of calendar year 1992. These activities include internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, instrument calibration and evaluation, radiation source calibration, and radiological record keeping. For each of these activities, the routine program and any program changes or enhancements are described, as well as associated tasks, investigations, and studies. Program-related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are also described.

Lyon, M; Bihl, D E; Fix, J J; Piper, R K; Froelich, T J; Lynch, T P

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various Hanford Site radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report for calendar year 1996. These activities include external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, radiological exposure record keeping, radiation source calibration, and instrument calibration and evaluation. For each of these activities, the routine program and any program changes or enhancements are described, as well as associated tasks, investigations, and studies. Program-related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are also described.

Lyon, M.; Bihl, D.E.; Fix, J.J.; Froelich, T.J.; Piper, R.K.; Schulze, S.A.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Compact cyclone filter train for radiological and hazardous environments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact cyclone filter train is described for the removal of hazardous and radiological particles from a gaseous fluid medium which permits a small cyclone separator to be used in a very small space envelope due to the arrangement of the filter housing adjacent to the separator with the cyclone separators and the filters mounted on a plate. The entire unit will have a hoist connection at the center of gravity so that the entire unit including the separator, the filters, and the base can be lifted and repositioned as desired.

Bench, T.R.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Analysis of containment performance and radiological consequences under severe accident conditions for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A severe accident study was conducted to evaluate conservatively scoped source terms and radiological consequences to support the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Conceptual Safety Analysis Report (CSAR). Three different types of severe accident scenarios were postulated with a view of evaluating conservatively scoped source terms. The first scenario evaluates maximum possible steaming loads and associated radionuclide transport, whereas the next scenario is geared towards evaluating conservative containment loads from releases of radionuclide vapors and aerosols with associated generation of combustible gases. The third scenario follows the prescriptions given by the 10 CFR 100 guidelines. It was included in the CSAR for demonstrating site-suitability characteristics of the ANS. Various containment configurations are considered for the study of thermal-hydraulic and radiological behaviors of the ANS containment. Severe accident mitigative design features such as the use of rupture disks were accounted for. This report describes the postulated severe accident scenarios, methodology for analysis, modeling assumptions, modeling of several severe accident phenomena, and evaluation of the resulting source term and radiological consequences.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Validating plastic scintillation detectors for photon dosimetry in the radiologic energy range  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Photon dosimetry in the kilovolt (kV) energy range represents a major challenge for diagnostic and interventional radiology and superficial therapy. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially good candidates for this task. This study proposes a simple way to obtain accurate correction factors to compensate for the response of PSDs to photon energies between 80 and 150 kVp. The performance of PSDs is also investigated to determine their potential usefulness in the diagnostic energy range. Methods: A 1-mm-diameter, 10-mm-long PSD was irradiated by a Therapax SXT 150 unit using five different beam qualities made of tube potentials ranging from 80 to 150 kVp and filtration thickness ranging from 0.8 to 0.2 mmAl + 1.0 mmCu. The light emitted by the detector was collected using an 8-m-long optical fiber and a polychromatic photodiode, which converted the scintillation photons to an electrical current. The PSD response was compared with the reference free air dose rate measured with a calibrated Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber. PSD measurements were corrected using spectra-weighted corrections, accounting for mass energy-absorption coefficient differences between the sensitive volumes of the ionization chamber and the PSD, as suggested by large cavity theory (LCT). Beam spectra were obtained from x-ray simulation software and validated experimentally using a CdTe spectrometer. Correction factors were also obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Percent depth dose (PDD) measurements were compensated for beam hardening using the LCT correction method. These PDD measurements were compared with uncorrected PSD data, PDD measurements obtained using Gafchromic films, Monte Carlo simulations, and previous data. Results: For each beam quality used, the authors observed an increase of the energy response with effective energy when no correction was applied to the PSD response. Using the LCT correction, the PSD response was almost energy independent, with a residual 2.1% coefficient of variation (COV) over the 80-150-kVp energy range. Monte Carlo corrections reduced the COV to 1.4% over this energy range. All PDD measurements were in good agreement with one another except for the uncorrected PSD data, in which an over-response was observed with depth (13% at 10 cm with a 100 kVp beam), showing that beam hardening had a non-negligible effect on the PSD response. A correction based on LCT compensated very well for this effect, reducing the over-response to 3%.Conclusion: In the diagnostic energy range, PSDs show high-energy dependence, which can be corrected using spectra-weighted mass energy-absorption coefficients, showing no considerable sign of quenching between these energies. Correction factors obtained by Monte Carlo simulations confirm that the approximations made by LCT corrections are valid. Thus, PSDs could be useful for real-time dosimetry in radiology applications.

Lessard, Francois; Archambault, Louis; Plamondon, Mathieu [Departement de physique, de genie physique et d' optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4, Canada and Departement de radio-oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d' optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de physique, de genie physique et d' optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4, Canada and Departement de radio-oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); and others

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Transportation Security Review Program and Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Technology Applications for Hazardous Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI formed a Transportation Security Implementation Working Group in response to regulatory requirements to review Carrier Transportation Security Plans, and to address rapidly changing or new transportation security rules. This group, working in collaboration with the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Transportation Task Force, develops and implements transportation security programs with broad application across the industry, such as a Transportation Security Review program for carriers. This report docu...

2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

439

NV/YMP radiological control manual, Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the adjacent Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) are located in Nye County, Nevada. The NTS has been the primary location for testing nuclear explosives in the continental US since 1951. Current activities include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for US defense-generated waste, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, and non-nuclear test operations such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the hazardous Materials (HAZMAT) Spill Center (HSC). Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of low-level nuclear waste and the handling of radioactive sources. Planned future remediation of contaminated land areas may also result in radiological exposures. The NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual, Revision 2, represents DOE-accepted guidelines and best practices for implementing Nevada Test Site and Yucca Mountain Project Radiation Protection Programs in accordance with the requirements of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. These programs provide protection for approximately 3,000 employees and visitors annually and include coverage for the on-site activities for both personnel and the environment. The personnel protection effort includes a DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program accredited dosimetry and personnel bioassay programs including in-vivo counting, routine workplace air sampling, personnel monitoring, and programmatic and job-specific As Low as Reasonably Achievable considerations.

Gile, A.L. [comp.] [comp.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

THE RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT AND RECOVERY OF CONTAMINATED AREAS  

SciTech Connect

The Civil Effects Test Operation Exercise CEX-57.1 following Operation Plumbbob was carried out to obtain information on decontamination procedures that could be used as radiological countermeasures. The test was conducted on D + 1 and D + 2 days after shot Coulomb C. Data were obtained on reclamation of land areas by scraping with a motorgrader, on fire-hosing and scrubbing a concrete- slab roof, and on fire-hosing a composition roof. In addition, some shielding data were obtained for a small building with 6-in.-thick concrete walls and roof. The conceptual nature of a radiological defense system and the role of decontamination or reclamation in such a system are discussed. Most of the report deals with methods for reducing the observed data to interpretive form because the data were taken within a large contaminated area. The decontamination effectiveness in terms of the fraction of contamination remaining was computed. It is concluded that low levels of contamination at the Nevada Test Site could be utilized to advantage to obtain data on gamma -radiation properties, such as the effects of materials and source geometries on the attenuation of fission-product gamma rays. However, higher levels of fall-out in terms of the fall-out particle mass, are required to obtain useful information and training on decontamination techniques; therefore the use of low levels of contamination to conduct studies in this area is not recommended. (auth)

Miller, C.F.

1958-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response radiological transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Graduate Certificate in Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graduate Certificate in Transportation Nohad A. Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning of Engineering and Computer Science integrated transportation systems. The Graduate Certificate in Transportation their capabilities. Students in the program can choose among a wide range of relevant courses in transportation

Bertini, Robert L.

442

TRANSPORTATION Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and educate the future transportation workforce. An example of what we can accomplish is shown2003 CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION STUDIES Annual Report #12;Center for Transportation Studies University of Minnesota 200 Transportation and Safety Building 511 Washington Avenue S.E. Minneapolis, MN

Minnesota, University of

443

Transportation Organization and Functions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Office of Packaging and Transportation list of organizations and functions, with a list of acronyms.

444

Radiological Instrumentation Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect

The King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into its combined sanitary and storm sewer system. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material. Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. Volume 2 of PNNL-15163 assesses the radiological instrumentation needs for detection of radiological or nuclear terrorism, in support of decisions to treat contaminated wastewater or to bypass the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP), and in support of radiation protection of the workforce, the public, and the infrastructure of the WPTP. Fixed radiation detection instrumentation should be deployed in a defense-in-depth system that provides 1) early warning of significant radioactive material on the way to the WPTP, including identification of the radionuclide(s) and estimates of the soluble concentrations, with a floating detector located in the wet well at the Interbay Pump Station and telemetered via the internet to all authorized locations; 2) monitoring at strategic locations within the plant, including 2a) the pipe beyond the hydraulic ram in the bar screen room; 2b) above the collection funnels in the fine grit facility; 2c) in the sampling tank in the raw sewage pump room; and 2d) downstream of the concentration facilities that produce 6% blended and concentrated biosolids. Engineering challenges exist for these applications. It is necessary to deploy both ultra-sensitive detectors to provide early warning and identification and detectors capable of functioning in high-dose rate environments that are likely under some scenarios, capable of functioning from 10 microrems per hour (background) up to 1000 rems per hour. Software supporting fixed spectroscopic detectors is needed to provide prompt, reliable, and simple interpretations of spectroscopic outputs that are of use to operators and decision-makers. Software to provide scientists and homeland security personnel with sufficient technical detail for identification, quantification, waste management decisions, and for the inevitable forensic and attribution needs must be developed. Computational modeling using MCNP software has demonstrated that useful detection capabilities can be deployed. In particular, any of the isotopes examined can be detected at levels between 0.01 and 0.1 ?Ci per gallon. General purpose instruments that can be used to determine the nature and extent of radioactive contamination and measure radiation levels for purposes of protecting personnel and members of the public should be available. One or more portable radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) should be available to WTD personnel. Small, portable battery-powered personal radiation monitors should be widely available WTD personnel. The personal monitors can be used for personal and group radiation protection decisions, and to alert management to the need to get expert backup. All considerations of radiological instrumentation require considerations of training and periodic retraining of personnel, as well as periodic calibration and maintenance of instruments. Routine innocent alarms will occur due to medical radionuclides that are legally discharged into sanitary sewers on a daily basis.

Strom, Daniel J.; McConn, Ronald J.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.

2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

445

ASSET RECOVERY OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS BENEFICIAL REUSE OF RADIOLOGICALLY ENCUMBERED LEAD STOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underutilized and surplus lead stocks and leaded components are a common legacy environmental problem across much of the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. While seeking to dispose of these items through its Environmental Management Program, DOE operational programs continue to pursue contemporary mission requirements such as managing and/or storing radioactive isotopes that require lead materials for shielding. This paradox was identified in late 1999 when DOE's policies for managing scrap metal were assessed. In January 2000, the Secretary of Energy directed the National Center of Excellence for Materials Recycle (NMR) to develop and implement a comprehensive lead reuse program for all of DOE. Fluor Hanford, contractor for DOE Richland Operations, subsequently contacted NMR to pilot lead reclamation and reuse at the Hanford Site. This relationship resulted in the development of a beneficial reuse pathway for lead reclaimed from spent fuel transport railcars being stored at Hanford. The 1.3 million pounds of lead in the railcars is considered radiologically encumbered due to its prior use. Further, the material was considered a mixed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) low-level radioactive waste that would require expensive storage or macro encapsulation to meet land disposal restrictions prior to burial. Working closely with Flour Hanford and the Office of Air, Water, and Radiation (EH-412), NMR developed a directed reuse pathway for this and other radiologically encumbered lead. When derived supplemental release limits were used, the lead recovered from these railcars became eligible for reuse in shielding products to support DOE and commercial nuclear industry operations. Using this disposition pathway has saved Hanford one third of the cost of disposing of the lead and the cost of acquiring additional lead for nuclear shielding applications. Furthermore, the environmental costs associated with mining and producing new lead for shielding products a nd stewardship of the waste was eliminated. Methods and processes developed in cooperation with Fluor Hanford are applicable to, and have been successfully applied to, lead stocks at DOE sites such as Savannah River, Mound, Los Alamos, and Idaho.

Lloyd, E.R.; Meehan, R.W.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

446

Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operat

447

The Role of the Consequence Management Home Team in the Fukushima Daiichi Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Consequence Management Home Team is a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration asset. It assists a variety of response organizations with modeling; radiological operations planning; field monitoring techniques; and the analysis, interpretation, and distribution of radiological data. These reach-back capabilities are activated quickly to support public safety and minimize the social and economic impact of a nuclear or radiological incident. In the Fukushima Daiichi response, the Consequence Management Home Team grew to include a more broad range of support than was historically planned. From the early days of the response to the continuing involvement in supporting late phase efforts, each stage of the Consequence Management Home Team support had distinct characteristics in terms of management of incoming data streams as well as creation of products. Regardless of stage, the Consequence Management Home Team played a critical role in the Fukushima Daiichi response effort.

Pemberton, W., Mena, R., Beal, W.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Slide Rule for Rapid Response Estimation of Radiological Dose from Criticality Accidents  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a functional slide rule that provides a readily usable ?in-hand? method for estimating nuclear criticality accident information from sliding graphs, thereby permitting (1) the rapid estimation of pertinent criticality accident information without laborious or sophisticated calculations in a nuclear criticality emergency situation, (2) the appraisal of potential fission yields and external personnel radiation exposures for facility safety analyses, and (3) a technical basis for emergency preparedness and training programs at nonreactor nuclear facilities. The slide rule permits the estimation of neutron and gamma dose rates and integrated doses based upon estimated fission yields, distance from the fission source, and time-after criticality accidents for five different critical systems. Another sliding graph permits the estimation of critical solution fission yields based upon fissile material concentration, critical vessel geometry, and solution addition rate. Another graph provides neutron and gamma dose-reduction factors for water, steel, and concrete shields.

Broadhead, B.L.; Childs, R.L.; Hopper, C.M.; Parks, C.V.

1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

449

2012 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Student's Guide, Part 4 of 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessor Training Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Student's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy Radiological Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Student's Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. Radiological Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Student's Guide iii Table of Contents Regulatory Documents.....................................................................................

451

2011 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike Lewis

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

2010 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advance Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

mike lewis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

8-1 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 2000 CHAPTER 8: RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT8-1 DRAFT Brookhaven National, and any immersion dose. The dose assessment has routinely shown that the total effective dose equivalent-site locations are with the #12;2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 8-2 CHAPTER 8: RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT DRAFT

Homes, Christopher C.

454

8-1 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 8: RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8-1 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 8: RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT During 2001: RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT 011-400 013-400 017-400 030-400 037-400 038-450 049-400 054-400 066-400073-400 074- tional to the absorbed dose of radiation. The environmental TLDs at BNL are composed of calcium fluoride

Homes, Christopher C.

455

A Mobile High Resolution Gamma Ray Spectrometry System for Radiological Surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surveying nuclear power plant sites for radioactive contamination is an expensive part of the overall decommissioning process. This report details a mobile radiological survey system designed to produce a rapid and cost effective radiological characterization of outdoor land areas. The system combines high resolution gamma ray spectrometry with modern automated surveying techniques to precisely locate areas of contamination.

1998-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

456

Transportation Planning & Decision Science Group Transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award on January 16, 2013, during the Chairman's Luncheon at the 92nd Annual Transportation Research Board (TRB) Meeting in Washington, DC. Dr. Greene was honored for his...

457

Department of Energy Receives Highest Transportation Industry Safety Award  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Receives Highest Transportation Industry Receives Highest Transportation Industry Safety Award Department of Energy Receives Highest Transportation Industry Safety Award May 1, 2007 - 12:45pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today received the Transportation Community Awareness and Emergency Response (TRANSCAER) Chairman's Award, one of industry's highest transportation safety awards, for helping local communities in emergency preparedness and response. TRANSCAER is a voluntary national organization that assists communities in emergency preparedness and response. "I'm very proud that The Department of Energy has raised the bar for community-based transportation emergency preparedness," Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman said. "Safety is our number one priority, and we will

458

Guam Transportation Petroleum-Use Reduction Plan  

SciTech Connect

The island of Guam has set a goal to reduce petroleum use 20% by 2020. Because transportation is responsible for one-third of on-island petroleum use, the Guam Energy Task Force (GETF), a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy and numerous Guam-based agencies and organizations, devised a specific plan by which to meet the 20% goal within the transportation sector. This report lays out GETF's plan.

Johnson, C.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Guam Transportation Petroleum-Use Reduction Plan  

SciTech Connect

The island of Guam has set a goal to reduce petroleum use 20% by 2020. Because transportation is responsible for one-third of on-island petroleum use, the Guam Energy Task Force (GETF), a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy and numerous Guam-based agencies and organizations, devised a specific plan by which to meet the 20% goal within the transportation sector. This report lays out GETF's plan.

Johnson, C.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Building 773-A, Lab F003 Glovebox Project Radiological Design Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

Engineering Standards present the radiological design criteria and requirements, which must be satisfied for all SRS facility designs. The radiological design criteria and requirements specified in the standard are based on the Code of Federal Regulations, DOE Orders, Site manuals, other applicable standards, and various DOE guides and handbooks. This report contains top-level requirements for the various areas of radiological protection for workers. For the purposes of demonstrating compliance with these requirements, the designer must examine the requirement for the design and either incorporate or provide a technical justification as to why the requirement is not incorporated. This document reports a radiological design review for the STREAK lab glovebox upgrades of inlet ventilation, additional mechanical and electrical services, new glovebox instrumentation and alarms. This report demonstrates that the gloveboxes meet the radiological design requirements of Engineering Standards.

Gaul, W.C.

2003-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

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Alternative Transportation ExpoAlternative Transportation ExpoAlternative Transportation Expo SPONSORED BY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternative Transportation ExpoAlternative Transportation ExpoAlternative Transportation Expo providers,Exhibits and vehicles from auto manufacturers, energy providers, entrepreneurs, transportation providers, and an art contest.entrepreneurs, transportation providers, and an art contest

de Lijser, Peter

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Department of Energy Announces Selection of Transportation Contractors at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

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Department of Energy Announces Selection of Transportation Department of Energy Announces Selection of Transportation Contractors at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad, N.M., August 21, 2000 -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of Tri-State Motor Transit Co. (TSMT) and CAST Transportation, Inc. (CAST) to transport radioactive transuranic waste from DOE generator sites throughout the United States to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM. Following a request for proposals issued on January 14, 2000, DOE determined that TSMT and CAST submitted the most advantageous offer to the government to transport transuranic waste to WIPP. TSMT, based in Joplin, MO, is a nationwide carrier with experience hauling hazardous and radiological shipments for DOE. CAST, based in Henderson, CO, is the current carrier

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Transportation: Environment, energy and the economy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the US, the transportation sector consumes over one quarter of the enti