Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NE market through the Real-Time Price Response and Day-Aheadin the prices they pay and include real-time pricing,on a day-ahead or real-time basis. Prices are higher during

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and...

4

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices...

5

What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K.C. Mares, D. Shroyer. , 2010. Demand Response andOpen Automated Demand Response Opportunities for DataProcessing Industry Demand Response Participation: A Scoping

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012. Addressing Electricity Demand through Demand Response:has been driving up the electricity demand while widespreadexperiences in addressing electricity demand This section is

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Reactor Internals Segmentation Experience Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several U.S. nuclear power plants entered decommissioning in the 1990's. Based on current information, the next group of plants will not begin this process for nearly a decade. This report provides detailed information on projects involving the segmentation of the Reactor Vessel Internal Subassemblies conducted at a number of plants undergoing decommissioning. Utilities have found this task very challenging from both a technological and radiation exposure perspective. This report documents the experience...

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

8

NNSA Conducts International Radiological Response Training in...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International Radiological Response Training in Vienna | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

9

The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive dataset describing tropical cloud systems and their environmental setting and impacts has been collected during the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) and Aerosol and Chemical Transport in Tropical ...

Peter T. May; James H. Mather; Geraint Vaughan; Keith N. Bower; Christian Jakob; Greg M. McFarquhar; Gerald G. Mace

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Gain International Work Experience in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gain International Work Experience in China www.StudyCLI.org "The CLI internship gave me a huge boost both personally and professionally. At 21 years old, I've lived in China and can speak basic city of Guilin, China. CLIinternsengageinadynamicrangeofprojects: Y Establishnewrelationshipswith

Virginia Tech

11

An Interview with LANL's International, Space, and Response (ISR) New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Interview with LANL's International, Space, and Response (ISR) New An Interview with LANL's International, Space, and Response (ISR) New Division Leader Kevin Saeger was appointed Los Alamos National Laboratory International, Space, and Response Division Leader in 2010. Formerly a Decision Applications Division group leader, Saeger has worked at the Laboratory for ten years. Saeger has a bachelor's degree in aerospace engineering, and master's and doctoral degrees in aeronautics and astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. NSS: Your experience has been diverse-aerospace engineering, software design, working at the Pentagon, and leading a LANL risk analysis group to halt terrorism. What attracted you to ISR? ISR is unparalleled in its ability to successfully integrate science, engineering, and technology to deliver custom sensors to the field. ISR has

12

Alternative fuels assessment: The international experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of this analysis, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has conducted a review of the experience with alternative transport fuels outside the US. The purpose of this review is to better understand what kinds of policies and programs other countries have instituted, and what the response by consumers and the private sector has been. While the experience in other countries grows out of their unique resource, economic, and institutional conditions, it is possible to draw lessons that are useful for evaluating options to develop a flexible-fuel transportation system in the US. The programs of other countries also affect US policy and planning related to alternative fuel supplies and vehicle and conversion technology. 4 figs., 7 tabs.

Sathaye, J.; Atkinson, B.; Meyers, S.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Intern experience with Texas Utilities Services, Inc.: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is a review of the author's year of experience as an intern with Texas Utilities Services...The author worked as a Nuclear Fuels Engineer for the duration of the internship period. His primary assignment was the development of a system to facilitate the financial accounting and materials accountability for nuclear fuel. This assignment required the author to coordinate the design process with many people from different disciplines. In addition, the author was responsible for performing financial and economic analyses of the nuclear fuel cycle. This offered him the opportunity to evaluate the economic impact of various engineering and financial decisions upon the nuclear fuel cycle.

Janne, Randall Lee, 1953-

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

EAQUATE: An International Experiment For Hyperspectral Atmospheric Sounding Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The international experiment called the European Aqua Thermodynamic Experiment (EAQUATE) was held in September 2004 in Italy and the United Kingdom to validate Aqua satellite Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiance measurements and derived ...

J. P. Taylor; S. Newman; W. L. Smith; V. Cuomo; F. Romano; G. Pappalardo; G. Pavese; L. Mona; A. Amodeo; A. M. Larar; D. K. Zhou; C. Serio; P. Di Girolamo; F. Esposito; G. Grieco; D. Summa; R. Restieri; G. Masiello; T. Maestri; R. Rizzi; P. Antonelli; S. Mango; G. Pisani

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

The Sulu Sea Internal Soliton Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results of a comprehensive study of large-amplitude internal solitons generated in the Sulu Sea in the Philippines by intense tidal flow over a sharp bathymetric feature. Surface signatures of these waves have been observed in ...

John R. Apel; James R. Holbrook; Antony K. Liu; John J. Tsai

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Recent United States and International Experiences in Reactor Vessel and Internals Segmentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The segmentation of reactor vessels and internals is one of the most challenging tasks in nuclear power plant decommissioning. Many experiences, lessons learned, and best practices have been gained through the execution of the first few reactor vessel and internals segmentation projects. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) previously documented the experiences, lessons learned, best practices, and technologies used in decommissioning reactor vessel and internals segmentation projects in the Unit...

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

17

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience In this study, we examine the arrangements for and experiences of end-use loads providing ancillary services (AS) in five electricity markets: Australia, the United Kingdom (UK), the Nordic market, and the ERCOT and PJM markets in the United States. Our objective in undertaking this review of international experience was to identify specific approaches or market designs that have enabled customer loads to effectively deliver various ancillary services (AS) products. We hope that this report will contribute to the ongoing discussion in the U.S. and elsewhere regarding what institutional and technical developments are needed to ensure that

18

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience In this study, we examine the arrangements for and experiences of end-use loads providing ancillary services (AS) in five electricity markets: Australia, the United Kingdom (UK), the Nordic market, and the ERCOT and PJM markets in the United States. Our objective in undertaking this review of international experience was to identify specific approaches or market designs that have enabled customer loads to effectively deliver various ancillary services (AS) products. We hope that this report will contribute to the ongoing discussion in the U.S. and elsewhere regarding what institutional and technical developments are needed to ensure that

19

Promotion of Wind Energy: Lessons Learned from International Experience and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Promotion of Wind Energy: Lessons Learned from International Experience and Promotion of Wind Energy: Lessons Learned from International Experience and United Nations Development Programme Global Environment Facility (UNDP-GEF) Projects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Promotion of Wind Energy: Lessons Learned from International Experience and United Nations Development Programme Global Environment Facility (UNDP-GEF) Projects Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: www.undp.org/gef/documents/publications/windpower_web.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/promotion-wind-energy-lessons-learned Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property.

20

NNSA Conducts International Radiological Response Training in...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Warm Pool Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment General Description The Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) was a collaborative effort led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Beginning January 21 and ending February 14, 2006, the experiment was conducted in the region near the ARM Climate Research Facility in Darwin, Northern Australia. This permanent facility is fully equipped with sophisticated instruments for measuring cloud and other atmospheric properties to provide a long-term record of continuous observational data. Measurements obtained from the other experiment components (explained below) will complement this dataset to provide a detailed description of the tropical atmosphere.

22

International cooperation experiences: results achieved, lessons learned, and way ahead  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss the experience we had with international cooperation initiatives with respect to three projects, funded by the European Commission within the context of FP6 and FP7. We provide a summary of the main technical achievements which ... Keywords: critical infrastructure protection, global positioning system, open source software, security information and event monitoring, software quality, synchrophasors

Craig Gibson; Matteo Melideo; Luigi Romano; Salvatore D'Antonio

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Secretary of Energy Welcomes International Response to Hurricane Katrina |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary of Energy Welcomes International Response to Hurricane Secretary of Energy Welcomes International Response to Hurricane Katrina Secretary of Energy Welcomes International Response to Hurricane Katrina September 2, 2005 - 9:46am Addthis Washington, D.C. - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman released the following statement regarding today's announcement by the International Energy Agency: "In responding to Hurricane Katrina, today, the International Energy Agency (IEA) recognized the immediate need to supply additional crude oil and gasoline products to the market. Therefore, IEA member countries have agreed to make available 60 million barrels, or, an average of 2 million barrels per day, for 30 days beginning immediately. This will consist of both oil and gasoline, with an emphasis on refined product.

24

Sloshing response of a reactor tank with internals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sloshing response of a large reactor tank with in-tank components is presented. The study indicates that the presence of the internal components can significantly change the dynamic characteristics of the sloshing motion. The sloshing frequency of a tank with internals is considerably higher than that of a tank without internal. The higher sloshing frequency reduces the sloshing wave height on the free-surface but increases the dynamic pressure in the fluid.

Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we examine the arrangements for and experiences of end-use loads providing ancillary services (AS) in five electricity markets: Australia, the United Kingdom (UK), the Nordic market, and the ERCOT and PJM markets in the United States. Our objective in undertaking this review of international experience was to identify specific approaches or market designs that have enabled customer loads to effectively deliver various ancillary services (AS) products. We hope that this report will contribute to the ongoing discussion in the U.S. and elsewhere regarding what institutional and technical developments are needed to ensure that customer loads can meaningfully participate in all wholesale electricity markets.

Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles; Kintner-Meyer, Michael

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Intern experience at Fluor Engineers, Inc.: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report demonstrates how the author's internship with the Houston Division of Fluor Engineers, Inc. fulfilled requirements of the Doctor of Engineering program and met the internship objectives. During the sixteen-month period between May 1980 and August 1981, the intern held the position of Engineer with the Cost and Scheduling Department. This position allowed the author to observe and participate in a wide variety of projects in both technical and supervisory capacities, dealing primarily with scheduling and cost control for construction of large chemical process plants. Substantial experience was also obtained from interface with other departments of the company, including accounting, procurement, process engineering, project engineering, finance, and design engineering. Additionally, the intern's position allowed regular contact with project and corporate management, providing exposure to the company's top decision makers. A brief overview of both cost engineering and scheduling engineering is presented to demonstrate the technical aspect of the internship. Finally, several of the author's positions at Fluor are described in order to detail the intern's experience and show specifically how each objective was achieved.

Dobbs, Stephen Benton, 1956-

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program Title What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2012 Authors Shen, Bo, Chun Chun Ni, Girish Ghatikar, and Lynn K. Price Conference Name ECEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry Date Published 06/2012 Conference Location Arnhem, the Netherlands Keywords china, demand response program, electricity, market sectors Abstract China has achieved remarkable economic growth over the last decade. To fuel the growth, China addeda total of 455 gigawatts of new generation capacity between 2006 and 2011, which is an increase of 76%in five years. Even so, this capacity does not meet the growing demand for electricity, and most ofChina's industrial sector is facing the worst power shortages since 2004. The Chinese government hasbeen managing the capacity shortfall through direct load control programs. While such mandatoryprograms have spared China from electricity outages, it does so at a high cost to the industrial sector.The load control program has significantly affected business operations and economic outputs, whilefailing to trigger greater energy efficiency improvement. Instead, it has led to a proliferation of dieselgenerators used by industrial facilities when electricity is not delivered, increasing diesel use andassociated air pollution.

28

Intern experience at the Texas Transportation Institute: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report discusses the author's engineering experience at the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI), Texas A&M University from March 1974 through July 1977. A report of this experience plus twelve additional hours of academic course work were substituted for an internship according to requirements established by the College of Engineering. Although the author could not retroactively establish objectives of the type associated with a typical internship, the work experience gained could be related to the two general objectives of an intership: 1. To demonstrate an identifiable contribution to the organization in which the intern served, and 2. To enable the intern to become aware of the non-technical aspects of working as an engineer in a non-academic environment. While a member of the Texas Transportation Institute staff, the author worked on a number of projects in the areas of highway traffic engineering research and the preparation of continuing education courses for transportation engineering officials. These assignments were contained within the Urban Transportation Systems Division of TTI. This report delineates the author's contribution to four particular projects and discusses the technical as well as non-technical experience gained from each. Having been exposed to more engineering situations than many of the other Doctor of Engineering students, the author has already formulated some rather specific milestones for the future. The Doctor of Engineering program is discussed in conjunction with its potential for helping the author attain these career goals and objectives. Also, some thoughts are presented regarding the Doctor of Engineering as a viable alternative to the Ph.D. in preparing for a career in engineering higher education.

Andersen, Donald A.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

International Experience with Quantifying the Co-Benefits of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Experience with Quantifying the Co-Benefits of Energy International Experience with Quantifying the Co-Benefits of Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Programs and Policies Title International Experience with Quantifying the Co-Benefits of Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Programs and Policies Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Williams, Christopher J., Ali Hasanbeigi, Lynn K. Price, and Grace Wu Date Published 11/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords co-benefits, energy efficiency, ghg emissions, quantification Abstract Improving the efficiency of energy production and consumption and switching to lower carbon energy sources can significantly decrease carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and reduce climate change impacts. A growing body of research has found that these measures can also directly mitigate many non-climate change related human health hazards and environmental damage. Positive impacts of policies and programs that occur in addition to the intended primary policy goal are called co-benefits. Policy analysis relies on forecasting and comparing the costs of policy and program implementation and the benefits that accrue to society from implementation. GHG reduction and energy efficiency policies and programs face political resistance in part because of the difficulty of quantifying their benefits. On the one hand, climate change mitigation policy benefits are often global, long-term, and subject to large uncertainties, and subsidized energy pricing can reduce the direct monetary benefits of energy efficiency policies to below their cost. On the other hand, the co-benefits that accrue from these efforts' resultant reductions in conventional air pollution (such as improved health, agricultural productivity, reduced damage to infrastructure, and local ecosystem improvements) are generally near term, local, and more certain than climate change mitigation benefits and larger than the monetary value of energy savings. The incorporation of co-benefits into energy efficiency and climate mitigation policy and program analysis therefore might significantly increase the uptake of these policies. Faster policy uptake is especially important in developing countries because ongoing development efforts that do not consider co-benefits may lock in suboptimal technologies and infrastructure and result in high costs in future years.

30

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LBNL -62701 ORNL/TM-2007/060 PNNL-16618 Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience Grayson Heffner 1 , Charles Goldman 1 , Brendan Kirby 2 and Michael Kintner-Meyer 3 1. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2. Oak Ridge National Laboratory 3. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Energy Technologies Division May 2007 The work described in this report was coordinated by the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions and was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Transmission Reliability Program of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 (for LBNL); DE-AC0-500OR22725 (for ORNL); and DE-AC06-76RL01830 (for PNNL).

31

Intern experience with William F. Guyton & Associates: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is a review of the author's experience as an intern with William F. Guyton & Associates. William F. Guyton & Associates is a consulting groundwater hydrology firm with offices in Austin and Houston, Texas. The intern worked at the main office in Austin for the duration of the internship. The author worked on a variety of projects during the internship. These projects encompassed general groundwater studies, computer simulation, technical analyses of aquifer parameters, and inspection of water well construction and testing. General groundwater studies involved the collection of water well construction and chemical analyses data. The author wrote several computer codes to handle basic computations, and the author used several existing finite difference codes to simulate groundwater movement. The technical analyses of pumping test data were analyzed by the author to determine aquifer parameters. The field work involved on-site inspection of water well construction and involved quality control of the pumping test after construction. The author interacted with various agencies of the state and federal government. This interaction was necessary to many of the projects. The collection of water well data and the use of the finite difference codes gave the author the opportunity to obtain knowledge of the daily operations of these agencies.

Stevens, William Scott, 1953-

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Intern experience at International Business Machines Corporation, STD/Austin: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report highlights the author's major activities and accomplishments during his 15 months internship at the International Business Machines (IBM) Corporation in Austin, Texas. The internship objectives were set so as to provide him with an experience commensurate with the requirements of the Doctor of Engineering Program at Texas A&M University. During his internship, the author was involved with a variety of technical and non-technical projects. His assignments included: 1) The design of an automation strategy for one manufacturing center. 2) The overall supervision and coordination of a major automation project. 3) The development of a project scheduling/tracking system. 4) Co-authoring an "Equipment Specifications Guidelines" form. 5) Other assignments as needed. The nature and scope of the above assignments provided the author with a broadly based experience in the Manufacturing Engineering field. Additionally, the leadership role he played in some of the assignments afforded him with first hand exposure to many aspects of management and leadership skills. All in all, the author believes that this internship proved to be an enriching experience and a valuable addition to his overall education.

Tayar, Emile J. (Emile Joseph), 1954-

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elkraft 2005b. Demand Response in Practice, NewsletterPanel. AESP 2006. Demand Response in Ancillary Services, B.and developing Demand response in the Energy Markets”,

Heffner, Grayson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main policy instruments currently used in the EU Member States to achieve the targets set for electricity produced from renewable energy sources are: (1) the quota obligation system; (2) the feed-in tariff system; and (3) the tendering system. The current study aims to review the experience gained with the quota obligation system. The report provides an overview of the regions where obligation systems have been implemented and contains a detailed evaluation of the performance of the obligation systems in the USA, the UK and in Sweden. The obligation systems in these countries have been evaluated based on the following criteria: Effectiveness; Market efficiency; Certainty for the renewable energy industry; Cost effectiveness; Stakeholder support for the obligation system; and Equity. The evaluation of international experiences with the obligation system gives rise to a mixed picture. Although an obligation in theory is effective and cost effective, it seems too early to conclude that the system delivers these promises in practice. On the one hand this is due to the limited period of implementation that makes it hard to distinguish between the direct effect of the system and some teething problems that will be solved in due time. On the other hand, the conclusion can be drawn that the obligation is a complex system, which will only function well if designed carefully. It does seem worthwhile, however, to continue monitoring the experiences with the obligation system abroad, because this will further reveal whether the system is indeed effective and cost effective in practice. In the longer term, e.g. beyond 2010, the introduction of an obligation system in the Netherlands could be considered. Finally, as the design of support schemes is being improved, it appears that the basic concepts of both the obligation system and the feed in system have been refined in such a way that the two systems are gradually converging. An important difference between the two systems however remains, namely that an obligation system relies more on market forces whereas the feed-in system is based on a greater involvement of the government.

Wiser, R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Lessons from International Experience with Electricity Market Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of experience with the electricity industry re-structuringof experience with the electricity industry re-structuringexperience with electricity industry re- structuring over

Wolak, Frank

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Intern experience at MEL, Incorporated, Inc., Baton Rouge, Louisiana: an intern report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a requirement of the Doctor of Engineering program, the author spent a one year internship at MEL, Inc., an engineering consulting firm located in Baton Roughe, Louisiana. During this period, he was responsible for the following assignments: 1. specifying the appropriate computer to implement an existing financial management system, 2. developing a "Project Management Quality Control Manual" which contains guidelines and checklists for the management and administration of a project from conception through completion, 3. designing the mechanical systems on a lift span bridge to be constructed over Bayou Grain Caillou in Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana, 4. serving as project manager on three projects, 5. developing computer programs for billing clients and keeping drafting time records, and 6. particiipating in contract negotiations, fee proposal preparation, and Management Committee meetings. These assignments exposed the author to a broad spectrum of both technical and managerial problems and practices. The internship experience proved to be a valuable part of his overall education.

Morgan, James Oliver, 1939-

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Sending off our Summer Interns with Energy Literacy & Work Experience...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nearly 20 years working in capital markets. She took the entire intern class through a tour of what it means to never take no for an answer and how to gain excellence in our...

38

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 EMCS EPACT ERCOT FCM FERC FRCC demand side managementEnergy Regulatory Commission (FERC). EPAct began the processin wholesale markets, which FERC Order 888 furthered by

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigeration systems Elevators Irrigation pumps Water heating Figure 9: Common Examples of Commercial and Industrial

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

services provided to the energy markets, Order 745 advancesin the wholesale energy market (both day-ahead and real-the capacity market is. The energy market does not feature

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New England 13 and the PJM Interconnection 14 . According toGW. The current size of the PJM system is approximately 165markets, most notably in the PJM Interconnection and ISO-New

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the U.S. national Smart Grid activity coordinated by theor occupant comfort. While smart-grid developments may

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time. 4 Reducing this peak demand through DR programs meansthat a 5% reduction in peak demand would have resulted insame 5% reduction in the peak demand of the US as a whole.

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Building Energy Management Systems (BEMS) to begin pre-a facility using Energy Management Control Systems (EMCS) orAct of 2007 energy management control systems The Energy

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

25 Metering and ControlSmart Meter and Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) andAMP Auto-DR BRA advanced metering infrastructure C&I CAP CEC

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is determined by the market energy price offered by themay be paid the spot market energy price. (e.g. PJM SRM, UKor the wholesale market price for energy. By codifying the

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

The Linear Collider Physics Case: International Response to the Technology Independent Questions Posed by the International Technology Recommendation Panel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The International Technology Recommendation Panel distributed a list of questions to each major laboratory. Question 30, part b and d, were technology independent and related to the physics goals of the Linear Collider. An international panel, with representation from Asia, Europe, and the Americas, was formed by the World Wide Study during LCWS04 to formulate a response. This is given below and constitutes the response of the world-wide Linear Collider community.

Klaus Desch; JoAnne Hewett; Akiya Miyamoto; Yasuhiro Okada; Mark Oreglia; Georg Weiglein; Satoru Yamashita

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

48

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand response in the Energy Markets”, Copenhagen, 27 May.in capacity or energy markets – a steady revenue stream andand a small spot energy market together with other essential

Heffner, Grayson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Secretary of Energy Welcomes International Response to Hurricane...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Energy Agency (IEA) recognized the immediate need to supply additional crude oil and gasoline products to the market. Therefore, IEA member countries have agreed to...

50

Intern experience at Brown & Root, Inc.: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To document that the objectives of the internship were met, the report examines the organizational approach at Brown & Root and then describes seven major job assignments that were completed by the author during the internship. The internship report outlines the process by which Brown & Root carries out the design and construction of offshore oil and gas production facilities ... A supplementary presentation of the author's previous experience at an oil company permits a comparison of the viewpoints of engineering and construction contractors and oil companies.

Kibbee, Stephen Edward, 1951-

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

International Experience in Standards and Labeling Programs for Rice Cookers  

SciTech Connect

China has had an active program on energy efficiency standards for household appliances since the mid-1990s. Rice cooker is among the first to be subject to such mandatory regulation, since it is one of the most prevalent electric appliances in Chinese households. Since first introduced in 1989, the minimum energy efficiency standard for rice cookers has not been revised. Therefore, the potential for energy saving is considerable. Initial analysis from CNIS indicates that potential carbon savings is likely to reach 7.6 million tons of CO2 by the 10th year of the standard implementation. Since September 2007, CNIS has been working with various groups to develop the new standard for rice cookers. With The Energy Foundation's support, LBNL has assisted CNIS in the revision of the minimum energy efficiency standard for rice cookers that is expected to be effective in 2009. Specifically, work has been in the following areas: assistance in developing consumer survey on usage pattern of rice cookers, review of international standards, review of international test procedures, comparison of the international standards and test procedures, and assessment of technical options of reducing energy use. This report particularly summarizes the findings of reviewing international standards and technical options of reducing energy consumption. The report consists of an overview of rice cooker standards and labeling programs and testing procedures in Hong Kong, South Korea, Japan and Thailand, and Japan's case study in developing energy efficiency rice cooker technologies and rice cooker efficiency programs. The results from the analysis can be summarized as the follows: Hong Kong has a Voluntary Energy Efficiency Labeling scheme for electric rice cookers initiated in 2001, with revision implemented in 2007; South Korea has both MEPS and Mandatory Energy Efficiency Label targeting the same category of rice cookers as Hong Kong; Thailand's voluntary endorsement labeling program is similar to Hong Kong in program design but has 5 efficiency grades; Japan's program is distinct in its adoption of the 'Top Runner' approach, in which, the future efficiency standards is set based on the efficiency levels of the most efficient product in the current domestic market. Although the standards are voluntary, penalties can still be evoked if the average efficiency target is not met. Both Hong Kong and South Korea's tests involve pouring water into the inner pot equal to 80% of its rated volume; however, white rice is used as a load for its tests in Hong Kong whereas no rice is used for tests in South Korea. In Japan's case, water level specified by the manufactures is used and milled rice is used as a load only partially in the tests. Moreover, Japan does not conduct heat efficiency test but its energy consumption measurements tests are much more complex, with 4 different tests are conducted to determine the annual average energy consumption. Hong Kong and Thailand both set Minimum Allowable Heat Efficiency for different rated wattages. The energy efficiency requirements are identical except that the minimum heat efficiency in Thailand is 1 percentage point higher for all rated power categories. In South Korea, MEPS and label's energy efficiency grades are determined by the rice cooker's Rated Energy Efficiency for induction, non-induction, pressure, nonpressure rice cookers. Japan's target standard values are set for electromagnetic induction heating products and non-electromagnetic induction heating products by different size of rice cookers. Specific formulas are used by type and size depending on the mass of water evaporation of the rice cookers. Japan has been the leading country in technology development of various types of rice cookers, and developed concrete energy efficiency standards for rice cookers. However, as consumers in Japan emphasize the deliciousness of cooked rice over other factors, many types of models were developed to improve the taste of cooked rice. Nonetheless, the efficie

Zhou, Nan; Zheng, Nina

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Evaluation of Tracers for Use in the International Field Experiment on CO2 Ocean Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracers for Use in the International Field Experiment Tracers for Use in the International Field Experiment on CO 2 Ocean Sequestration E. Eric Adams (eeadams@mit.edu; 617-253-6595) Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139 USA Introduction An international field experiment is scheduled to take place off of the west coast of the big island of Hawaii during the second half of 2001 (Adams, et al., 1999; Herzog, et al., 2000). Scientists representing some dozen institutions in five countries on four continents are expected to participate. The experiment will involve several sub-experiments in which CO 2 will be released at a depth of 800 m as a buoyant liquid at rates of 0.1 to 1.0 kg/s. The releases will each be made for a duration of about one hour using nozzles with differing diameters and numbers of ports.

53

Intern experience at MEL, Inc.: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...The author spent a one-year internship at MEL, Inc., a civil and mechanical engineering consulting firm located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. By special arrangement with the president of the firm, the author was able to participate in roles at various levels within the firm. These activities included engineering design, supervision and management, project cost control, and interface with top level management. During this period, the author has been engaged in the following assignments: 1. Serving as senior project engineer on the Louisiana Training Institution air conditioning and heating project, 2. Serving at the review and advisory level for three projects, 3. Studying and implementing computer aided design and drafting system for MEL, Inc. 4. Developing a projet cost control system that is interactive with the firm's payroll program. 5. Upgrading the firm's computer capacity. 6. Performing special assignments from the President, Executive Vice-President, Manager of Operation and Manager of Business and Fiscal Affairs at MEL, Inc. These activities involved the application of scientific principles to the design, installation, and improvement of integrated systems of people, materials, and equipment to provide the most effective operating and work procedures. As a result of this involvement in a wide range of assignments, the author now has a broadly based experience in a consulting engineering firm as both engineer and manager. The author also found that well-developed, practical courses in communication, business, engineering, law, and management from the Doctor of Engineering program at Texas A&M University contributed greatly to this successful internship with MEL, Incorporated.

Chen, Chu-Chen, 1937-

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Intern experience at the Center for Urban Programs: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report discusses the author's internship at Texas A&M University Center for Urban Programs from May, 1978 through February, 1979. The objectives of the internship were to: 1. Increase the intern's technical competence in problems facing local governments; 2. Improve the administration of the Center for Urban Programs so that the Center can more effectively serve Texas local governments; and 3. Gain insight into the decision making process of local governments by active participation. The intern's responsibilities included work on Center staff-directed research projects, Center-coordinated research projects, and Center administration. The intern's major project responsibilities included directing the Community Energy Conservation project of the Texas Energy Extension Service, developing a street maintenance priority ranking system for the City of Denton, serving as University Coordinator for the Garland Urban Observatory and devising a Budget Forecasting System for the Center. To accomplish the third objective, the author served on the College Station Parks and Recreation Board during the internship. In evaluating the internship, the intern found that it fulfilled all the objectives set forth by the intern, his internship supervisor, and his academic committee chairman. The intern increased his technical competence in solving problems facing local governments. He effectively handled administrative responsibilities at the Center and he participated in the decision making process of a local government. The intern also developed personal contacts with local, state, and federal government officials.

Kerbel, Richard (Richard Ira), 1950-

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

INTEGRAL BENCHMARKS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE INTERNATIONAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECT AND THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY BENCHMARK EVALUATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) continue to expand their efforts and broaden their scope to identify, evaluate, and provide integral benchmark data for method and data validation. Benchmark model specifications provided by these two projects are used heavily by the international reactor physics, nuclear data, and criticality safety communities. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. The status of the IRPhEP and ICSBEP is discussed in this paper, and the future of the two projects is outlined and discussed. Selected benchmarks that have been added to the IRPhEP and ICSBEP handbooks since PHYSOR’06 are highlighted, and the future of the two projects is discussed.

J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Enrico Sartori; Yolanda Rugama

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Depletion Reactivity Benchmark for the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute– (EPRI-) sponsored depletion reactivity benchmarks documented in reports 1022909, Benchmarks for Quantifying Fuel Reactivity Depletion Uncertainty, and 1025203, Utilization of the EPRI Depletion Benchmarks for Burnup Credit Validation, have been translated to an evaluated benchmark for incorporation in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhE), published by the Organisation for Economic ...

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

57

GROWTH OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY AND REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety (ICNC) 2007, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) have continued to expand their efforts and broaden their scope. Eighteen countries participated on the ICSBEP in 2007. Now, there are 20, with recent contributions from Sweden and Argentina. The IRPhEP has also expanded from eight contributing countries in 2007 to 16 in 2011. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments1' have increased from 442 evaluations (38000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 3955 critical or subcritical configurations to 516 evaluations (nearly 55000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 4405 critical or subcritical configurations in the 2010 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. The contents of the Handbook have also increased from 21 to 24 criticality-alarm-placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and from 20 to 200 configurations categorized as fundamental physics measurements relevant to criticality safety applications. Approximately 25 new evaluations and 150 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments2' have increased from 16 different experimental series that were performed at 12 different reactor facilities to 53 experimental series that were performed at 30 different reactor facilities in the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Considerable effort has also been made to improve the functionality of the searchable database, DICE (Database for the International Criticality Benchmark Evaluation Project) and verify the accuracy of the data contained therein. DICE will be discussed in separate papers at ICNC 2011. The status of the ICSBEP and the IRPhEP will be discussed in the full paper, selected benchmarks that have been added to the ICSBEP Handbook will be highlighted, and a preview of the new benchmarks that will appear in the September 2011 edition of the Handbook will be provided. Accomplishments of the IRPhEP will also be highlighted and the future of both projects will be discussed. REFERENCES (1) International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments, NEA/NSC/DOC(95)03/I-IX, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development-Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA), September 2010 Edition, ISBN 978-92-64-99140-8. (2) International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments, NEA/NSC/DOC(2006)1, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development-Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA), March 2011 Edition, ISBN 978-92-64-99141-5.

J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Internal Energy Dependence of Molecular Condensation Coefficients Determined from Molecular Beam Surface Scattering Experiments  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

An experiment was performed which confirms the existence of an internal mode dependence of molecular sticking probabilities for collisions of molecules with a cold surface. The scattering of a velocity selected effusive beam of CCl{sub 4} from a 90 K CC1{sub 4} ice surface has been studied at five translational velocities and for two different internal temperatures. At a surface temperature of 90 K (approx. 99% sticking probability) a four fold increase in reflected intensity was observed for the internally excited (560 K) CC1{sub 4} relative to the room temperature (298 K) CC1{sub 4} at a translational velocity of 2.5 X 10{sup 4} cm/sec. For a surface temperature of 90 K all angular distributions were found to peak 15{sup 0} superspecularly independent of incident velocity.

Sibener, S. J.; Lee, Y. T.

1978-05-00T23:59:59.000Z

59

International Experiences and Frameworks to Support Country-Driven Low-Emissions Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Experiences and International Experiences and Frameworks to Support Country-Driven Low-Emissions Development Ron Benioff, Jaquelin Cochran, and Sadie Cox National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared by the Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) and presented at the Low-Emissions Development Policy Implementation Forum at the World Bank (Washington DC, July 13, 2011) Conference Paper NREL/CP-6A20-52860 August 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

60

Trojan Nuclear Power Plant Reactor Vessel and Internals Removal: Trojan Nuclear Plant Decommissioning Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One goal of the EPRI Decommissioning Technology Program is to capture the growing utility experience in nuclear plant decommissioning activities for the benefit of other utilities facing similar challenges in the future. This report provides historical information on the background, scope, organization, schedule, cost, contracts, and support activities associated with the Trojan Nuclear Plant Reactor Vessel and Internals Removal (RVAIR) Project. Also discussed are problems, successes, and lessons learned...

2000-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

BWRVIP-118: BWR Vessel and Internals Project: NMCA Experience Report and Applications Guidelines, 2003 Revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The boiling water reactor (BWR) fleet has widely embraced noble metal chemical addition (NMCA) to provide protection against intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). This report, prepared by a Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) focus group, updates a report issued in 2001 that compiled data from plants operating on NMCA. It provides guidance for BWRs planning to implement NMCA, and information about expected plant response to operation with NMCA. It also identifies steps ...

2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

62

Growth and Expansion of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project and the Newly Organized International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since ICNC 2003, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) has continued to expand its efforts and broaden its scope. Criticality-alarm / shielding type benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications are not only included in the scope of the project, but benchmark data are also included in the latest version of the handbook. A considerable number of improvements have been made to the searchable database, DICE and the criticality-alarm / shielding benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements have been included in the database. There were 12 countries participating on the ICSBEP in 2003. That number has increased to 18 with recent contributions of data and/or resources from Brazil, Czech Republic, Poland, India, Canada, and China. South Africa, Germany, Argentina, and Australia have been invited to participate. Since ICNC 2003, the contents of the “International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments” have increased from 350 evaluations (28,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3070 critical or subcritical configurations to 442 evaluations (over 38,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3957 critical or subcritical configurations, 23 criticality-alarm-placement / shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 20 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications in the 2006 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. Approximately 30 new evaluations and 250 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2007 Edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2003, a reactor physics counterpart to the ICSBEP, The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated. Beginning in 1999, the IRPhEP was conducted as a pilot activity by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). The project was endorsed as an official activity of the NSC in June of 2003. The IRPhEP is patterned after its predecessor, the ICSBEP, but focuses on other integral measurements such as buckling, spectral characteristics, reactivity effects, reactivity coefficients, kinetics measurements, reaction-rate and power distributions, nuclide compositions and other miscellaneous types of measurements in addition to the critical configuration. The two projects are closely coordinated to avoid duplication of effort and to leverage limited resources to achieve a common goal. The purpose of the IRPhEP is to provide an extensively peer reviewed set of reactor physics related integral benchmark data that can be used by reactor designers and safety analysts to validate the analytical tools used to design next generation reactors and establish the safety basis for operation of these reactors. While coordination and administration of the IRPhEP takes place at an international level, each participating country is responsible for the administration, technical direction, and priorities of the project within their respective countries. The work of the IRPhEP is documented in an OECD NEA Handbook entitled, “International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.” The first edition of this Handbook, the 2006 Edition spans over 2000 pages and contains data from 16 different experimental series that were

J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Yolanda Rugama; Enrico Satori

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Tax and Fiscal Policies for Promotion of Industrial EnergyEfficiency: A Survey of International Experience  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Foundation's China Sustainable Energy Program (CSEP) has undertaken a major project investigating fiscal and tax policy options for stimulating energy efficiency and renewable energy development in China. This report, which is part of the sectoral sub-project studies on energy efficiency in industry, surveys international experience with tax and fiscal policies directed toward increasing investments in energy efficiency in the industrial sector. The report begins with an overview of tax and fiscal policies, including descriptions and evaluations of programs that use energy or energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) taxes, pollution levies, public benefit charges, grants or subsidies, subsidized audits, loans, tax relief for specific technologies, and tax relief as part of an energy or greenhouse gas (GHG) emission tax or agreement scheme. Following the discussion of these individual policies, the report reviews experience with integrated programs found in two countries as well as with GHG emissions trading programs. The report concludes with a discussion of the best practices related to international experience with tax and fiscal policies to encourage investment in energy efficiency in industry.

Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Sinton, Jonathan; Worrell,Ernst; Graus, Wina

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Benchmark Data Through The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPHEP)  

SciTech Connect

The International Reactor Physics Experiments Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency’s (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) in June of 2002. The IRPhEP focus is on the derivation of internationally peer reviewed benchmark models for several types of integral measurements, in addition to the critical configuration. While the benchmarks produced by the IRPhEP are of primary interest to the Reactor Physics Community, many of the benchmarks can be of significant value to the Criticality Safety and Nuclear Data Communities. Benchmarks that support the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), for example, also support fuel manufacture, handling, transportation, and storage activities and could challenge current analytical methods. The IRPhEP is patterned after the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and is closely coordinated with the ICSBEP. This paper highlights the benchmarks that are currently being prepared by the IRPhEP that are also of interest to the Criticality Safety Community. The different types of measurements and associated benchmarks that can be expected in the first publication and beyond are described. The protocol for inclusion of IRPhEP benchmarks as ICSBEP benchmarks and for inclusion of ICSBEP benchmarks as IRPhEP benchmarks is detailed. The format for IRPhEP benchmark evaluations is described as an extension of the ICSBEP format. Benchmarks produced by the IRPhEP add new dimension to criticality safety benchmarking efforts and expand the collection of available integral benchmarks for nuclear data testing. The first publication of the "International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments" is scheduled for January of 2006.

J. Blair Briggs; Dr. Enrico Sartori

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of InternationalExperience-- Technical Appendix: Market Descriptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we examine the arrangements for andexperiences of end-use loads providing ancillary services (AS) in fiveelectricity markets: Australia, the United Kingdom (UK), the Nordicmarket, and the ERCOT and PJM markets in the United States. Our objectivein undertaking this review of international experience was to identifyspecific approaches or market designs that have enabled customer loads toeffectively deliver various ancillary services (AS) products. We hopethat this report will contribute to the ongoing discussion in the U.S.and elsewhere regarding what institutional and technical developments areneeded to ensure that customer loads can meaningfully participate in allwholesale electricity markets.

Grayson Heffner, Charles Goldman, Kintner-Meyer, M; Kirby, Brendan

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Legal-Military Dilemma in the Response to International Terrorism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, the US appears to have responded inconsistently to similar acts of terrorism in two different ways, using either a law enforcement or military response. These legal and military responses can be either unilateral or multilateral. This study attempts to determine when each type of response is preferred by decisionmakers, both political leaders and their citizens. The hypotheses suggesting that a response is preferred depending upon terrorist attack success, location, and the terrorists' sociocultural similarities are tested in three experiments and examined in a case study. These three variables are believed, as suggested by the Cognitive Calculus concept, to cause an emotional reaction amongst the respondents resulting in them having a higher preference for the military and unilateral options. Whether or not the respondents were experiencing an emotional reaction was studied in each experiment as well as being tested in the third experiment by examining the respondents? selection of options based upon their success rates. The case study examined US government responses to the First World Trade Center bombing, the Bojinka Plot, the Khobar Towers bombing, and the September 11, 2001 attacks. The results of the experiments and case study suggest a calm and deliberative response by the respondents to acts of terrorism, with a greater preference for legal and multilateral responses to terrorism.

Allan, Matthew W.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Anvil Characteristics as Seen by C-POL during the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tropical Pacific Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) took place in Darwin, Australia, in early 2006. C-band radar data were used to characterize tropical anvil (i.e., thick, nonprecipitating cloud associated with deep ...

Kaycee Frederick; Courtney Schumacher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

BWRVIP 159: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, HWC/NMCA Experience Report and NMCA Applications Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All BWRs in the US apply Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC), and the majority implement Noble Metal Chemical Application (NMCA) to provide protection against intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). This report, prepared by a BWRVIP focus group, summarizes BWR plant experience with both HWC and NMCA conditions. It provides guidance for BWRs applying and operating with noble metals, including information about expected plant response. It also addresses reapplication issues and identifies steps that pl...

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

69

Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markers: Best Practices from International Experience, Summary for Policymakers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experience, Experience, Summary for Policymakers Jaquelin Cochran, Lori Bird, Jenny Heeter, and Douglas J. Arent NREL/TP-6A00-53730 April 2012 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation,

70

Intern experience at the Union Carbide Corporation, Texas City plant: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents a survey of the author's internship experience with Union Carbide Corporation's Texas City plant during the period July 1, 1980 through May 15, 1981. The ten and one-half month internship was spent as an engineering intern attached to the Maintenance Department, with access to virtually every staff and line component of the organization. The intent of this report is to demonstrate that this experience fulfills the requirements of the Doctor of Engineering internship. The author's internship activities can be divided into three major categories which correspond to the three principal internship objectives. The first objective required a study of the organization and how the individual parts function together to produce results. This study was conducted by taking part in various diverse orientations and small projects throughout the organization. The second objective called for development of interpersonal and management skills. This was accomplished by participating in all forms of daily business activities, talking with the observing managers, receiving formal management training and taking advantage of every opportunity to practice these important skills. The third objective required an identifiable contribution be made to one or more particular projects. The three principal projects to which the author contributed involved inventory control, industrial hygiene, and maintenance workforce utilization. The result of the internship experience was an appreciation for both the technical and non-technical aspects of operating a large chemical plant. The conclusion of the report is that the objectives were met and the internship requirement for the degree of Doctor of Engineering has been satisfied.

Tippett, Donald Dwight, 1947-

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Atmosphere Response Time Scales Estimated from AOGCM Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global-mean surface air temperature response of the climate system to a specific radiative forcing shows characteristic time scales. Identifying these time scales and their corresponding amplitudes (climate sensitivity) allows one to ...

D. J. L. Olivié; G. P. Peters; D. Saint-Martin

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

CSNI Project for Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (FALSIRE II)  

SciTech Connect

A summary of Phase II of the Project for FALSIRE is presented. FALSIRE was created by the Fracture Assessment Group (FAG) of the OECD/NEA`s Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CNSI) Principal Working Group No. 3. FALSIRE I in 1988 assessed fracture methods through interpretive analyses of 6 large-scale fracture experiments in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under pressurized- thermal-shock (PTS) loading. In FALSIRE II, experiments examined cleavage fracture in RPV steels for a wide range of materials, crack geometries, and constraint and loading conditions. The cracks were relatively shallow, in the transition temperature region. Included were cracks showing either unstable extension or two stages of extensions under transient thermal and mechanical loads. Crack initiation was also investigated in connection with clad surfaces and with biaxial load. Within FALSIRE II, comparative assessments were performed for 7 reference fracture experiments based on 45 analyses received from 22 organizations representing 12 countries. Temperature distributions in thermal shock loaded samples were approximated with high accuracy and small scatter bands. Structural response was predicted reasonably well; discrepancies could usually be traced to the assumed material models and approximated material properties. Almost all participants elected to use the finite element method.

Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.; Keeney, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schulz, H.; Sievers, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Koeln (Gemany)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience-- Technical Appendix: Market Descriptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Denmark. Elkraft 2005a. Demand Response in Practice, Elkraftand Developing Demand Response in the Energy Markets.Demand Management Delivery. Demand Response Workshop. Slide

Grayson Heffner, Charles Goldman, Kintner-Meyer, M; Kirby, Brendan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

First Experiments with the Polarized Internal Gas Target (PIT) at ANKE/COSY  

SciTech Connect

For future few-nucleon interaction studies with polarized beams and targets at COSY-Juelich, a polarized internal storage-cell gas target was implemented at the magnet spectrometer ANKE in summer 2005. First commissioning of the polarized Atomic Beam Source (ABS) at ANKE was carried out and some improvements of the system have been done. Storage-cell tests to determine the COSY beam dimensions have been performed. Electron cooling combined with stacking and stochastic cooling have been studied. Experiments with N{sub 2} gas in the storage cell to simulate the background produced by beam interaction with the aluminum cell walls were performed to investigate the beam heating by the target gas. The analysis of the d-vector p-vector {yields}dp and d-vector p-vector{yields}(dp{sub sp}){pi}{sup 0} reactions showed that events from the extended target can be clearly identified in the ANKE detector system.The polarization of the atomic beam of the ABS, positioned close to the strong dipole magnet D2 of ANKE, was tuned with a Lamb-shift polarimeter (LSP) beneath the target chamber. With use of the known analyzing powers of the quasi-free np{yields}d{pi}{sup 0} reaction, the polarization in the storage cell was measured to be Q{sub y} = 0.79{+-}0.07 in the vertical stray field of the D2 magnet acting as a holding field. The achieved target thickness was 2x10{sup 13} atoms/cm{sup 2} for one hyperfine state populated in the ABS beam only. With a COSY beam intensity of 6x10{sup 9} stored polarized deuterons in the ring, the luminosity for double polarized experiments was 1x10{sup 29} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}.

Engels, R.; Lorentz, B.; Prasuhn, D.; Rathmann, F.; Sarkadi, J.; Schleichert, R.; Seyfarth, H.; Stroeher, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Leo-Brandt-Str. 1, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Chiladze, D. [High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi State University, 380662 Tbilisi (Georgia); Dymov, S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Grigoryev, K.; Mikirtychyants, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Leo-Brandt-Str. 1, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Orlova Rosha 2, 188300 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Kacharava, A. [Physikalisches Institut II, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi State University, 380662 Tbilisi (Georgia); Klehr, F. [Zentralabt. Technologie, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Leo-Brandt-Str. 1, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Mikirtychyants, S.; Vasilyev, A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Orlova Rosha 2, 188300 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Schieck, H. Paetz gen. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Steffens, E. [Physikalisches Institut II, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

75

First Experiments with the Polarized Internal Gas Target (PIT) at ANKE/COSY  

SciTech Connect

For future few-nucleon interaction studies with polarized beams and targets at COSY-Juelich, a polarized internal storage-cell gas target was implemented at the magnet spectrometer ANKE. First commissioning of the polarized Atomic Beam Source (ABS) at ANKE was carried out and some improvements of the system have been done. Storage-cell tests to determine the COSY beam dimensions have been performed. Electron cooling combined with stacking and stochastic cooling have been studied. Experiments with N{sub 2} gas in the storage cell to simulate the background produced by beam interaction with the aluminum cell walls were performed to investigate the beam heating by the target gas. The analysis of the d-vectorp-vector->dp and d-vectorp-vector->(dp{sub sp})pi{sup 0} reactions showed that events from different positions of the extended target can be clearly identified in the ANKE detector system. The polarization of the atomic beam of the ABS, positioned close to the strong dipole magnet D2 of ANKE, was tuned with a Lamb-shift polarimeter (LSP) beneath the target chamber. With use of the known analyzing powers of the quasi-free np->dpi{sup 0} reaction, the polarization in the storage cell was measured to be Q{sub y} = 0.79+-0.07 in the vertical stray field of the D2 magnet acting as a holding field. The target thickness achieved was 2x10{sup 13} atoms/cm{sup 2} for one hyperfine state populated in the ABS beam only. With a COSY beam intensity of 6x10{sup 9} stored polarized deuterons in the ring, the luminosity for double polarized experiments was 1x10{sup 29} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}.

Engels, R.; Lorentz, B.; Prasuhn, D.; Rathmann, F.; Sarkadi, J.; Schleichert, R.; Seyfarth, H.; Stroeher, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Leo-Brandt-Str. 1, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Chiladze, D. [High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi State University, 380662 Tbilisi (Georgia); Dymov, S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Grigoryev, K.; Mikirtychyants, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Leo-Brandt-Str. 1, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Orlova Rosha 2, 188300 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Kacharava, A. [Physikalisches Institut II, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi State University, 0186 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Klehr, F. [Zentralabt. Technologie, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Leo-Brandt-Str. 1, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Mikirtychyants, S.; Vasilyev, A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Orlova Rosha 2, 188300 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Schieck, H. Paetz gen. [Institut fuer Kernphaysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Steffens, E. [Physikalisches Institut II, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

76

Intern experience at Tech Tran Corporation, Naperville, Illinois: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents a survey of the author's internship experience with Tech Tran Corporation during the period September 3, 1981 through April 30, 1982. The eight month internship was spent as an engineering intern with a small consulting firm specializing in high technology state-of-the-art manufacturing technology management and assessment. The intent of this report is to demonstrate that this experience fulfills the requirements of the Doctor of Engineering internship. The primary objective of the internship was to develop technical expertise in the field of industrial automation. Secondary goals were to improve oral and written communication skills and project management techniques. The three projects presented in this report met these objectives and goals. The major project was to develop a state-of-the-art assessment of robotics. This assessment was developed by surveying hundreds of robots users, manufacturers and researchers, and undertaking a comprehensive literature search on U.S. and foreign robots. The information was distilled into a professional managerial level report on robotics. The second project was to develop technical summaries and assessments of completed projects of the Army Missile Command's Manufacturing Technology Program. This was performed by reviewing project reports and interviewing government and contractor engineers throughout the country. The third project was to be an Associate Editor for Manufacturing Technoogy Horizons digest. This is a bi-monthly digest featuring major developments in manufacturing techniques and equipment. Short concise summaries for manufacturing processes were researched and developed through written correspondence and phone interviews. The internship was an opportunity to use my engineering skills to learn about the robotics industry, and improve oral and written communication skills. Thus, objectives for the Doctor of Engineering degree were met and the internship requirement satisfied.

Campbell, John Arthur, 1947-

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

7th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extended abstracts that follow present a summary of the Proceedings of the 7th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at Columbia University’s Kellogg Center in New York City on March 15–17, 2006. These International Workshops on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response have been held regularly since 1993 (1–5). Since the first workshop, there has been a rapid growth (see Fig. 1) in the number of centers developing microbeams for radiobiological research, and worldwide there are currently about 30 microbeams in operation or under development. Single-cell/single-particle microbeam systems can deliver beams of different ionizing radiations with a spatial resolution of a few micrometers down to a few tenths of a micrometer. Microbeams can be used to addressquestions relating to the effects of low doses of radiation (a single radiation track traversing a cell or group of cells), to probe subcellular targets (e.g. nucleus or cytoplasm), and to address questions regarding the propagation of information about DNA damage (for example, the radiation-induced bystander effect). Much of the recent research using microbeams has been to study low-dose effects and ‘‘non-targeted’’ responses such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. This Workshop provided a forum to assess the current state of microbeam technology and current biological applications and to discuss future directions for development, both technological and biological. Over 100 participants reviewed the current state of microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments in the fields of both physics and biology.

Brenner, David J.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

78

HOUSEHOLD RESPONSE TO DYNAMIC PRICING OF ELECTRICITY A SURVEY OF SEVENTEEN PRICING EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(DOE) defines demand response as "changes in electric usage by end-use customers from their normalHOUSEHOLD RESPONSE TO DYNAMIC PRICING OF ELECTRICITY A SURVEY OF SEVENTEEN PRICING EXPERIMENTS response in electricity markets. One of the best ways to let that happen is to let customers see

79

Anvil characteristics as seen by C-POL during the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Tropical Pacific Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) took place in Darwin, Australia in early 2006. C-band radar data from this experiment were used to characterize tropical anvil areal coverage, height, and thickness during the month-long field campaign. The morphology, evolution, and longevity of the anvil were analyzed as well as the relationship of the anvil to the rest of the precipitating system. In addition, idealized in-cloud radiative heating profiles were created based on the anvil observations. The anvil was separated into mixed (i.e., echo base below 6 km) and ice only categories. The experiment areal average coverage for both types of anvil was between 4-5% of the radar grid. Ice anvil thickness averaged 2.8 km and mixed anvil thickness averaged 6.7 km. No consistent diurnal signal was seen in the anvil, implying that the life cycle of the parent convection was of first order importance in determining the anvil height, thickness, and area. Areal peaks show that mixed anvil typically formed out of the stratiform region. Peak production in ice anvil usually followed the mixed anvil peak by 1-3 hr. Anvil typically lasted 4-10 hr after the initial convective rain area peak. The TWP-ICE experienced three distinct regimes: the active monsoon, dry monsoon, and break periods. During the entire experiment (except the active monsoon period) there was a strong negative correlation between ice anvil thickness and ice anvil height, a strong positive correlation between ice anvil area and thickness, and a greater variance in ice anvil bottom than ice anvil top. Anvil produced during the active regime had the most dramatic in-cloud radiative response with a maximum cooling of 0.45�° K day-1 at 12 km, a maximum heating of 3�° K day-1 at 9 km, and a secondary maximum heating of 1.2�° K day-1 at 5 km.

Frederick, Kaycee Loretta

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

International RADAGAST Experiment in Niamey, Niger: Changes and Drivers of Atmospheric Radiation Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sahara desert is notorious as a source of massive dust storms. This dust dramatically influences the Earth-atmosphere energy budget through reflecting and absorbing the incoming sunlight. However, this budget is poorly understood, and in particular, we lack quantitative understanding of how the diurnal and seasonal variation of meteorological variables and aerosol properties influence the propagation of solar irradiance through the desert atmosphere. To improve our understanding of these influences, coincident and collocated observations of fluxes, measured from both space and the surface, are highly desirable. Recently, the unique capabilities of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) Experiment, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF), the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument, and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) were combined effectively as part of a large international project: the Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using AMF, GERB data and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST), which took place in Niamey, Niger, in 2006. The RADAGAST objectives, instrumentation, and scientific background are presented in [1]. Initial results from RADAGAST documented the strong radiative impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the Earth’s radiation budget [2]. A special issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research will include a collection of papers with the more complete results from RADAGAST (e.g., [1,3], and references therein). In particular, a year-long time series from RADAGAST are used to investigate (i) the factors that control the radiative fluxes and the divergence of radiation across the atmosphere [3-5], (ii) seasonal changes in the surface energy balance and associated variations in atmospheric constituents (water vapor, clouds, aerosols) [6], and (iii) sensitivity of microphysical, chemical and optical properties of aerosols to their sources and the atmospheric conditions [7]. Here we show retrievals of the aerosol properties from spectrally resolved solar measurements, the simulated and observed radiative fluxes at the surface, and outline factors that control the magnitude and variability of aerosol and radiative properties [8].

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Slingo, A.; Bharmal, N.; Robinson, G. J.; Turner, David D.; Miller, Mark; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Miller, R.

2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience-- Technical Appendix: Market Descriptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response in the Energy Markets. Copenhagen, 27 May.Demand Response in the Energy Markets Fingrid Oyj 2005a.Response in the Energy Markets: Framework and Infrastructure

Grayson Heffner, Charles Goldman, Kintner-Meyer, M; Kirby, Brendan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Experiences and Challenges with Using Cert Data to Analyze International Cyber Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the increasing interconnection of computer networks and sophistication of cyber attacks, it is important to understand the dynamics of such situations, especially in regards to cyber international relations. The ...

Madnick, Stuart

83

The MoLE project: an international experiment about mobile learning environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aims to present an international project, called the MoLE Project, which provided learning resources and tools for personnel in disaster or emergency situations. Thus, it illustrates the interpenetration of e-Learning and field workers with ... Keywords: education, mobile technologies, system evaluation

Marie-Hélène Ferrer, Jacob Hodges, Nathalie Bonnardel

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

International Experiments to Study Tropical Cyclones in the Western North Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four separate (but coincident in time) field experiments to study tropical cyclones in the western North Pacific area will be carried out during August/September 1990 by the United States, the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the ...

Russell L. Elsberry

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be able to be met). In PJM, the largest regional wholesalewhen called upon to do so. (e.g. PJM ELRP, IMO WA) Ancillarymarket energy price. (e.g. PJM SRM, UK STOR) Source: DOE (

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

new approach to meet its peak demand, this paper highlightsaimed at both reducing the peak demand and improving theshortages during the peak demand season. A Barclays report

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compared with old coal-fired plants, widespread use oftwo large- scale coal-fired power plants a week in recent

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supplies and rising coal prices combined with relativelycontrol of power prices coupled with coal supply shortagesprice of electricity in China is capped by the government. Tight coal

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

may be paid the spot market energy price. (e.g. PJM SRM, UKor the wholesale market price for energy. By codifying the

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Intern experience at Dallas Power and Light Company: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A survey of the author's internship experience with the Dallas Power & Light Company during the period January, 1979 through January, 1980 is presented. During this one year internship, the author worked as an engineer in the Executive Department. The intent of this report is to demonstrate that this experience fulfills the requirements for the Doctor of Engineering internship. The author's activities during this period can be categorized into two major areas. First, technically oriented, in which he developed a model to project future electrical demands based on land usage, and a computer program that implements this model. Secondly, a selection of non-technical business oriented areas were investigated. The tasks in these areas offered him the opportunity to be exposed to the organization and operation of an investor owned public utility company and to gain experience in a non-academic business environment.

Fischer, Roger Lewis, 1945-

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 against a natural circulation experiment in Nuclear Power Plant Borssele. International Agreement Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the ICAP (International Code Assessment and Applications Program) agreement between ECN (Netherlands Energy Research Foundation) and USNRC, ECN has performed a number of assessment calculations for the thermohydraulic system analysis code RELAP5/MOD2/36.05. This document describes the assessment of this computer program versus a natural circulation experiment as conducted at the Borssele Nuclear Power Plant. The results of this comparison show that the code RELAP5/MOD2 predicts well the natural circulation behaviour of Nuclear Power Plant Borssele.

Winters, L. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

International Experience with Key Program Elements of IndustrialEnergy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-SettingPrograms  

SciTech Connect

Target-setting agreements, also known as voluntary ornegotiated agreements, have been used by a number of governments as amechanism for promoting energy efficiency within the industrial sector. Arecent survey of such target-setting agreement programs identified 23energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programsin 18 countries. International best practice related to target-settingagreement programs calls for establishment of a coordinated set ofpolicies that provide strong economic incentives as well as technical andfinancial support to participating industries. The key program elementsof a target-setting program are the target-setting process,identification of energy-saving technologies and measures usingenergy-energy efficiency guidebooks and benchmarking as well as byconducting energy-efficiency audits, development of an energy-savingsaction plan, development and implementation of energy managementprotocols, development of incentives and supporting policies, monitoringprogress toward targets, and program evaluation. This report firstprovides a description of three key target-setting agreement programs andthen describes international experience with the key program elementsthat comprise such programs using information from the three keytarget-setting programs as well as from other international programsrelated to industrial energy efficiency or GHG emissionsreductions.

Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

2008-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

93

Lidar Network Observations of Cirrus Morphological and Scattering Properties during the International Cirrus Experiment 1989: The 18 October 1989 Case Study and Statistical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four lidars located roughly 75 km from each other in the inner German Bight of the North Sea, were used to measure geometrical and optical properties of cirrus clouds during the International Cirrus Experiment 1989 (ICE '89). A complete cirrus ...

Albert Ansmann; Jens Bösenberg; Gérard Brogniez; Salem Elouragini; Pierre H. Flamant; Karlheinz Klapheck; Holger Linn; Louis Menenger; Walfried Michaelis; Maren Riebesell; Christoph Senff; Pierre-Yves Thro; Ulla Wandinger; Claus Weitkamp

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

BWRVIP-176: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, BWR Shutdown Chemistry Experience Report and Application Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All BWRs in the US apply Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC), and the majority implement Noble Metal Chemical Application (NMCA) to provide protection against intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). This report, prepared by an industry focus group, summarizes recent plant experience in shutdown chemistry prior to refueling outages, and provides guidance on good practices and situations to avoid. The goals are to minimize the adverse effects of activity release, mitigate intergranular stress corrosion...

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

95

BWRVIP-225: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, BWR Shutdown and Startup Chemistry Experience and Application Sourcebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All U.S. BWRs apply hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) and the majority of BWRs implement noble metals addition in the form of a noble metal chemical application (NMCA) or an On-Line NobleChemTM (OLNC) to protect against intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). This report, prepared by an industry focus group, summarizes recent plant experience in shutdown and startup chemistry control. The overall goals are to minimize activity transport during shutdown evolutions, avoid increasing outage duration, ...

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

96

Intern experience at Tech Tran Corporation, Naperville, Illinois: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents a survey of the author's internship experience with Tech Tran Corporation during the period September 1, 1981 through May 1, 1982. The eight month internship was spent as an associate engineer and associate editor assigned to the engineering branch. The intent of this report is to demonstrate that this experience fulfills the requirements of the Doctor of Engineering internship. The author's internship activities are presented to document the achievement of three major objectives: orientation to professional engineering consulting; development of management and interpersonal skills; and recognizable contributions to the internship firm. These objectives were attained through trips to various organizations, meetings, and conferences involved in manufacturing technology, assignments as an engineering consultant representing Tech Tran, and work preformed on three major Tech Tran contracts. The result of this internship experience was an appreciation for both the technical and non-technical aspects of operating an engineering consulting firm. The conclusion of the report is that the objectives were realized, and the internship requirements for the degree of Doctor of Engineering were satisfied.

Morgan, Joseph Alan, 1947-

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets: Best Practices from International Experience, Summary for Policymakers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many countries -- reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems -- are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy on the electric grid, including that from wind and solar energy. This document summarizes policy best practices that energy ministers and other stakeholders can pursue to ensure that electricity markets and power systems can effectively coevolve with increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy. There is no one-size-fits-all approach; each country studied has crafted its own combination of policies, market designs, and system operations to achieve the system reliability and flexibility needed to successfully integrate renewables. Notwithstanding this diversity, the approaches taken by the countries studied all coalesce around five strategic areas: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations. This study also emphatically underscores the value of countries sharing their experiences. The more diverse and robust the experience base from which a country can draw, the more likely that it will be able to implement an appropriate, optimized, and system-wide approach.

Cochran, J.; Bird, L.; Heeter, J.; Arent, D. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Electrical generation plant design practice intern experience at Power Systems Engineering, Inc.: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A survey of the author's internship experience with Power Systems Engineering, Inc. during the period September 1980 through August, 1981 is presented. During this onr year internship, the author was assigned to two engineering projects. One involved design of a 480 MW power plant. The other was the design of a 8.2 MW induction generator for cogeneration. The author's activities during this period can be categorized into two major areas. First, technically oriented, he designed protective relaying and SCADA systems for the projects. Secondly, he assisted the Project Manager in project management activities such as project progress and cost control. The intent of this report is to prepare a training manual for PSE young engineers. It covers both technical guidelines for power plant design and nonacademic professional codes. Although this report is primarily written for young engineers, it can also be used as a reference by older and experienced engineers.

Lee, Ting-Zern Joe, 1950-

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Experiments to Address Lower Plenum Response Under Severe Accident Conditions: Volume 1: Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a set of experiments that were performed to address reactor pressure vessel lower plenum response under severe accident conditions. High temperature (2400 degrees K) debris was used to study the response of BWR and PWR lower head instrument tube penetrations of a BWR drain line and of molten debris quenching in a sub-cooled water pool. The importance of water as a heat sink within the instrument tube penetrations and drain line was quantified. Furthermore, the axial penetration of m...

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

South Asia Urban Air Quality Management Briefing Note No. 2 International Experience with CNG Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are much cleaner than vehicles fueled by conventional diesel, especially with respect to the emissions of fine particulate matter which is the pollutant of interest in South Asia. Many cities around the world have mounted NGV programs with varying degree of success. How can NGV programs be made viable and sustainable in the long run? Natural gas (NG) is a clean-burning alternative fuel with a significant potential for reducing harmful emissions, especially those of fine particles, from vehicles. Vehicular particulate emissions in turn are a concern, because they are small (small particles are especially harmful to health) and numerous, and occur near ground level where people live and work. In response, some have argued for mandating NG as an automotive fuel, most notably in Delhi. This note discusses where NG vehicle 1 programs have been successful, where have they failed and why.

unknown authors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Proceedings of the international workshop on spallation materials technology  

SciTech Connect

This document contains papers which were presented at the International Workshop on Spallation Materials Technology. Topics included: overviews and thermal response; operational experience; materials experience; target station and component design; particle transport and damage calculations; neutron sources; and compatibility.

Mansur, L.K.; Ullmaier, H. [comps.] [comps.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets: Best Practices from International Experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many countries -- reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems -- are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy on the electric grid, including that from wind and solar energy. This study documents the diverse approaches to effective integration of variable renewable energy among six countries -- Australia (South Australia), Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Spain, and the United States (Western region-Colorado and Texas)-- and summarizes policy best practices that energy ministers and other stakeholders can pursue to ensure that electricity markets and power systems can effectively coevolve with increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy. Each country has crafted its own combination of policies, market designs, and system operations to achieve the system reliability and flexibility needed to successfully integrate renewables. Notwithstanding this diversity, the approaches taken by the countries studied all coalesce around five strategic areas: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations. The ability to maintain a broad ecosystem perspective, to organize and make available the wealth of experiences, and to ensure a clear path from analysis to enactment should be the primary focus going forward.

Cochran, J.; Bird, L.; Heeter, J.; Arent, D. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Energy supply and environmental issues: The Los Alamos National Laboratory experience in regional and international programs  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory, operated by the University of California, encompasses more than forty-three square miles of mesas and canyons in northern New Mexico. A Department of Energy national laboratory, Los Alamos is one of the largest multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratories in the world. Our mission, to apply science and engineering capabilities to problems of national security, has expanded to include a broad array of programs. We conduct extensive research in energy, nuclear safeguards and security, biomedical science, computational science, environmental protection and cleanup, materials science, and other basic sciences. The Energy Technology Programs Office is responsible for overseeing and developing programs in three strategic areas: energy systems and the environment, transportation and infrastructure, and integrated chemicals and materials processing. Our programs focus on developing reliable, economic and environmentally sound technologies that can help ensure an adequate supply of energy for the nation. To meet these needs, we are involved in programs that range from new and enhanced oil recovery technologies and tapping renewable energy sources, through efforts in industrial processes, electric power systems, clean coal technologies, civilian radioactive waste, high temperature superconductivity, to studying the environmental effects of energy use.

Goff, S.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE): Cloud and Rain Characteristics in the Australian Monsoon  

SciTech Connect

The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the European Commission DG RTD-1.2, and several United States, Australian, Canadian, and European Universities. This experiment will be undertaken over a 4-week period in early 2006. January and February corresponds to the wet phase of the Australia monsoon. This season has been selected because, despite Darwin’s coastal location, the convection that occurs over and near Darwin at this time is largely of maritime origin with a large fetch over water. Based on previous experiments, the convection appears typical of maritime convection with widespread convection that has complex organization, but is not as deep or as intense as continental or coastal convection. Therefore, it is expected that the convection and cloud characteristics will be representative of conditions typical for wide areas of the tropics.

PT May; C Jakob; JH Mather

2004-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

In April, SSPEED hosted nearly 140 attendees at a two-day conference: Gulf Coast Hurricanes, Mitigation & Response. The conference showcased speakers from various universities and international  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Davies provided insight to the restructuring of the British disaster response system, including the development of a common vocabulary to communicate the prediction of and response to disaster events among, Mitigation & Response. The conference showcased speakers from various universities and international

106

Exercises Abroad: How Differing National Experiences are Reflected in Emergency Response Planning and Exercises  

SciTech Connect

Recently a member of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Consequence Management Response Team took part in outreaches and an exercise in different foreign countries. In Brazil and South Korea, the outreaches revolved around a nuclear power plant exercise. In Canada, participation was limited to a table top Consequence Management exercise. This talk will briefly discuss each event and resulting pertinent observations. In each case, it became evident that governments respond to disasters very differently, and that these differences are not only culturally based, but also influenced by each government’s respective experience in dealing with natural disasters.

Craig Marianno

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

A parametric study of double-shell tank response to internal high-frequency pressure loading  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The double-shell waste tank 241SY101 (SY101) is a 3,785,400-liter tank used to store radioactive waste at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The tank waste has formed two layers of sludge in the tank; a convective and a nonconvective layer. Ongoing reactions in the waste cause a buildup of hydrogen molecules that become trapped within the nonconvective layer of the waste. Various means of preventing the buildup of hydrogen molecules in the nonconvective layer have been investigated, including the use of a sonic probe that would transmit high-frequency acoustic pressure waves into the nonconvective layer of the waste. During the operation of the sonic probe, the pressure waves transmitted from the probe induce pressure time history loading on the inside surface of the primary tank. For low-frequency fluid-structure interaction loads, such as those associated with seismic events, the convective and impulsive effects of the waste-filled tank are well documented. However, for high-frequency loading, such as that associated with acoustic pressure waves, interactions between the waste and the primary tank are not understood. The pressure time history is represented by a harmonic function with a frequency range between 30 and 100 Hz. Structural analyses of the double-shell tank have been performed that address the tank`s response to the sonic probe acoustic pressure loads. This paper addresses the variations in the tank response as a function of percent waste mass considered to be effective in the dynamic excitation of the tank. It also compares results predicted by analyses that discretely model the liquid waste and presents recommendations for the simplified effective mass approach. Also considered in the parametric study is the effect of damping on the tank response for the same pressure loading.

Baliga, R.; Choi, K.; Shulman, J.S. [ADVENT Engineering Services, Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States); Strehlow, J.P.; Abatt, G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Enhancing Price Response Programs through Auto-DR: California's 2007 Implementation Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.and Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. May

Wikler, Greg

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

2nd International Joint Topical Meeting on Emergency Preparedness and Response and Robotic and Remote Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is desirable for the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration emergency preparedness and response community to have available every resource to enhance its capabilities for assessing the health effects of environmental agents. Such resources will aid DOE/NNSA in achieving its goal of protecting the health and safety of workers, the public, and environment in event of the release of radiological, chemical, or biological agents into the environment. Studies are reported in this paper where composite data analyses were done for the chemicals included in DOE's Protective Action Criteria (PACs) database. PACs define the concentration of airborne chemicals at which protective actions are required. They are used by DOE/NNSA in developing Emergency Preparedness Procedures and for Operational Emergencies. Data analyses were conducted to discern structure-activity relationship patterns among PAC chemicals by assigned classification schemes based on the 30 accepted categories used by the EPA Gene-Tox Program. PAC chemicals were scored according to their frequency of distribution, severity of toxicity index, and structural classification. These studies yielded results that could be helpful in assessing the toxicity of new chemicals. It is suggested that provisions be made to include chemical structural information in the PAC database.

Lu, Po-Yung [ORNL; Thomas, Richard D. [Intercet, Ltd.; Wassom, John S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Retired)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Quasi-static and dynamic responses of advanced high strength steels: Experiments and modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measured responses of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) and their tailor welded blanks (TWBs), over a wide range of strain-rates (10*4 to 103 s*1) are presented. The steels investigated include transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), dual phase (DP), and drawing quality (DQ) steels. The TWBs include DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds. A tensile split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) was used for the dynamic experiments. AHSS and their TWB's were found to exhibit positive strain-rate sensitivity. The Khan-Huang-Liang (KHL) constitutive model is shown to correlate and predict the observed responses reasonably well. Micro-texture characterization of DQ steels, DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds were performed to investigate the effect of strain-rate on texture evolution of these materials. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique was used to analyze the micro-texture evolution and kernel average misorientation (KAM) map. Measurement of micro-hardness profile across the cross section of tensile samples was conducted to understand the effect of initial microstructure on ductility of laser weld samples.

Khan, Akhtar; Baig, Muneer; Choi, Shi Hoon; Yang, Hoe Seok; Sun, Xin

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Tank waste remediation system retrieval and disposal mission readiness-to-proceed responses to internal independent assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is planning to make critical decisions during fiscal year (FY) 1998 regarding privatization contracts for the treatment of Hanford tank waste. Specifically, DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL), will make decisions related to proceeding with Phase 1 Privatization. In support of these decisions, the management and integration (M+I) contractor must be able to meet the requirements to support the Phase 1 privatization contractors. As part of the assessment of the Tank Waste Retrieval (TWR) Readiness-To-Proceed (RTP), an independent review of their process and products was required by the RL letter of August 8, 1997. The Independent Review Team reviewed the adequacy of the planning that has been done by the M+I contractor to validate that, if the plans are carried out, there is reasonable assurance of success. Overall, the RTP Independent Review Team concluded that, if the planning by the M+I contractor team is carried out with adequate funding, there is reasonable assurance that the M+I contractor will be able to deliver waste to the privatization contractor for the duration of Phase 1. This conclusion was based on addressing the recommendations contained in the Independent Review Team`s Final Report and in the individual Criteria and Review Approach (CRA) forms completed during the assessment. The purpose of this report is to formally document the independent assessment and the RTP team responses to the Independent Review Team recommendations. It also provides closure logics for selected recommendations from a Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) internal assessment of the Technical Basis Review (TBR) packages. This report contains the RTP recommendation closure process (Section 2.0); the closure tables (Section 3.0) which provide traceability between each review team recommendation and its corresponding Project Hanford Management Contract closure logic; and two attachments that formally document the Independent Review Team Final Report and the Internal Assessment Final Report.

Schaus, P.S.

1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

112

Experiences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiences Experiences with 100Gbps Network Applications Mehmet Balman, Eric Pouyoul, Yushu Yao, E. Wes Bethel Burlen Loring, Prabhat, John Shalf, Alex Sim, and Brian L. Tierney Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA {mbalman,epouyoul,yyao,ewbethel,bloring,prabhat,jshalf,asim,btierney}@lbl.gov ABSTRACT 100Gbps networking has finally arrived, and many research and educational institutions have begun to deploy 100Gbps routers and services. ESnet and Internet2 worked together to make 100Gbps networks available to researchers at the Supercomputing 2011 con- ference in Seattle Washington. In this paper, we describe two of the first applications to take advantage of this network. We demon- strate a visualization application that enables remotely located sci- entists to gain insights from large datasets. We also demonstrate climate

113

Nondestructive Evaluation Improvement Focus Group Extent of Condition Actions in Response to North Anna Dissimilar Metal Weld Operating Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Improvement Focus Group (NIFG) was formed to address NDE improvement and extent of condition actions in response to North Anna dissimilar metal weld operating experience. The operating experience occurred early in 2012 and involved the missed detection of significant flaws during ultrasonic examinations performed according to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI, Appendix VIII, Supplement 10. As appropriate, the NIFG products are to be ...

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Experiments to Address Lower Plenum Response Under Severe Accident Conditions: Volume 2: Data Report, Part 1: Tests 1-6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a set of experiments that were performed to address reactor pressure vessel lower plenum response under severe accident conditions. High temperature (2400 degrees K) debris was used to study the response of BWR and PWR lower head instrument tube penetrations of a BWR drain line, and of molten debris quenching in a sub-cooled water pool. The importance of water as a heat sink within the instrument tube penetrations and drain line was quantified. Furthermore, the axial penetration of ...

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

115

Experiments to Address Lower Plenum Response Under Severe Accident Conditions: Volume 2: Data Report, Part 2: Tests 7-10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a set of experiments that were performed to address reactor pressure vessel lower plenum response under severe accident conditions. High temperature (2400 degrees K) debris was used to study the response of BWR and PWR lower head instrument tube penetrations of a BWR drain line, and of molten debris quenching in a sub-cooled water pool. The importance of water as a heat sink within the instrument tube penetrations and drain line was quantified. Furthermore, the axial penetration of ...

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

116

COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTS TO CFD MODELS FOR MIXING USING DUAL OPPOSING JETS IN TANKS WITH AND WITHOUT INTERNAL OBSTRUCTIONS  

SciTech Connect

This paper documents testing methods, statistical data analysis, and a comparison of experimental results to CFD models for blending of fluids, which were blended using a single pump designed with dual opposing nozzles in an eight foot diameter tank. Overall, this research presents new findings in the field of mixing research. Specifically, blending processes were clearly shown to have random, chaotic effects, where possible causal factors such as turbulence, pump fluctuations, and eddies required future evaluation. CFD models were shown to provide reasonable estimates for the average blending times, but large variations -- or scatter -- occurred for blending times during similar tests. Using this experimental blending time data, the chaotic nature of blending was demonstrated and the variability of blending times with respect to average blending times were shown to increase with system complexity. Prior to this research, the variation in blending times caused discrepancies between CFD models and experiments. This research addressed this discrepancy, and determined statistical correction factors that can be applied to CFD models, and thereby quantified techniques to permit the application of CFD models to complex systems, such as blending. These blending time correction factors for CFD models are comparable to safety factors used in structural design, and compensate variability that cannot be theoretically calculated. To determine these correction factors, research was performed to investigate blending, using a pump with dual opposing jets which re-circulate fluids in the tank to promote blending when fluids are added to the tank. In all, eighty-five tests were performed both in a tank without internal obstructions and a tank with vertical obstructions similar to a tube bank in a heat exchanger. These obstructions provided scale models of vertical cooling coils below the liquid surface for a full scale, liquid radioactive waste storage tank. Also, different jet diameters and different horizontal orientations of the jets were investigated with respect to blending. Two types of blending tests were performed. The first set of eighty-one tests blended small quantities of tracer fluids into solution. Data from these tests were statistically evaluated to determine blending times for the addition of tracer solution to tanks, and blending times were successfully compared to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models. The second set of four tests blended bulk quantities of solutions of different density and viscosity. For example, in one test a quarter tank of water was added to a three quarters of a tank of a more viscous salt solution. In this case, the blending process was noted to significantly change due to stratification of fluids, and blending times increased substantially. However, CFD models for stratification and the variability of blending times for different density fluids was not pursued, and further research is recommended in the area of blending bulk quantities of fluids. All in all, testing showed that CFD models can be effectively applied if statistically validated through experimental testing, but in the absence of experimental validation CFD model scan be extremely misleading as a basis for design and operation decisions.

Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Fowley, M.

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

117

Journal of Nuclear Materials, Volumes 367-370, 2007, 1586-1589 Designing Optimised Experiments for the International Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility R. Kemp1 G.A. Cottrell2 and H.K.D.H. Bhadesia1 1 Department EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon., OX14 3DB, UK Abstract The development of fusion power requires a facility for assessing the behaviour of materials subjected to damage

Cambridge, University of

118

CO2-Induced Climate Change in CMIP2 Experiments: Quantification of Agreement and Role of Internal Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CO2-induced changes in surface air temperature, precipitation, and sea level pressure are compared between model experiments participating in the second phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP2). A statistical formalism is ...

Jouni Räisänen

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program. Interim report. Construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors is summarized along with technical descriptions of the plants. Included in the report are the AVR Experimental Pebble Bed Reactor, the Dragon Reactor, AGR Reactors, and the Thorium High Temperature Reactor (THTR). The study demonstrates that the European experience has been favorable and forms a good foundation for the development of Advanced High Temperature Reactors.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Nothing Personal : a Collection of Nonfiction Essays Exposing the Perverted Experiences of Life, Interactions, and Responses.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nothing Personal is a collection of nonfiction essays playfully written in response to subtle misunderstandings. Such misunderstandings, in this creative thesis, are fueled by an… (more)

Taylor, Benjamin P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

International Atomic Energy Agency specialists meeting on experience in ageing, maintenance, and modernization of instrumentation and control systems for improving nuclear power plant availability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the proceedings of the Specialist`s Meeting on Experience in Aging, Maintenance and Modernization of Instrumentation and Control Systems for Improving Nuclear Power Plant Availability that was held at the Ramada Inn in Rockville, Maryland on May 5--7, 1993. The Meeting was presented in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the International Atomic Energy Agency. There were approximately 65 participants from 13 countries at the Meeting. Individual reports have been cataloged separately.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

International Conference on Computer Systems and Technologies -CompSysTech'10 An Experiment with Using Google Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Using Google Tools for Project Supervision at Tertiary Education Jií Srba Abstract: Problem oriented and coordination management tools for the support of group work. An experiment using a combination of Google Groups on, we chose to focus on Google Groups and other related technology. Google Groups is a service from

Srba, Jiri

123

Observations and Simulations of Upper-Ocean Response to Wind Events during the Ocean Storms Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ocean Storms dataset is used to compile observations of the oceanic response to midlatitude storms. Of particular interest are episodic mixed layer temperature cooling events whose characteristics are reviewed. The data include subsurface ...

W. G. Large; G. B. Crawford

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

PINTEX Data: Numeric results from the Polarized Internal Target Experiments (PINTEX) at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The PINTEX group studied proton-proton and proton-deuteron scattering and reactions between 100 and 500 MeV at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF). More than a dozen experiments made use of electron-cooled polarized proton or deuteron beams, orbiting in the 'Indiana Cooler' storage ring, and of a polarized atomic-beam target of hydrogen or deuterium in the path of the stored beam. The collaboration involved researchers from several midwestern universities, as well as a number of European institutions. The PINTEX program ended when the Indiana Cooler was shut down in August 2002. The website contains links to some of the numerical results, descriptions of experiments, and a complete list of publications resulting from PINTEX.

PINTEX Collaboration; Meyer, H.O.

125

BWRVIP-225, Revision 1: BWR Vessel and Internals Project: BWR Shutdown and Startup Chemistry Experience and Application Sourcebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All boiling water reactors (BWRs) in the US apply Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC), and the majority implement noble metals addition in the form of On-line NobleChemTM (OLNC) to protect against intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). This report, prepared by an industry focus group, summarizes recent plant experience in shutdown and startup chemistry control. The overall goals are to minimize activity transport during shutdown evolutions, avoid increasing outage duration, and to ...

2013-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

126

Prior Experience Alters the Behavioral Response of Prey to a Nonnative Predator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2002; A´ lvarez and Nicieza, 2006) despite their energetic or developmental costs (Lawler, 1989; Skelly (spirulina) and 25% Tetramin flakes five times weekly. We began our experiment when all tadpoles reached., AND L. A. HATCHETT. 1994. Predator avoidance costs and habituation to fish chemicals by a stream isopod

Ryan, Michael J.

127

Modeling and simulation of the thermal and psychrometric transient response of all electric ships, internal compartments and cabinets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a general computational model for all electric ships and internal compartments (open and closed domains) that contain heat sources and sinks. A simplified physical model, which combines principles of classical thermodynamics and ... Keywords: relative humidity distribution, temperature distribution, thermal management

J. V. C. Vargas; J. C. Ordonez; R. Hovsapian

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Modeling and Simulation of the Thermal and Psychrometric Transient Response of All-Electric Ships, Internal Compartments and Cabinets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a general computational model for all-electric ships and internal compartments (open and closed domains) that contain heat sources and sinks. A simplified physical model, which combines principles of classical thermodynamics and heat transfer, ... Keywords: Thermal management, relative humidity distribution, temperature distribution

J.C. Ordonez; J.V.C. Vargas; R. Hovsapian

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

THE DIFFUSION OF VOLUNTARY INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT STANDARDS: RESPONSIBLE CARE, ISO 9000 and ISO 14001 IN THE CHEMICAL INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Costa Rican Hotel Industry." Social & Natural Resourcesand Michael Lenox. 2000. "Industry Self-Regulation withoutSanctions: The Chemical Industry's Responsible Care

Delmas, Magali A; Montiel, Ivan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Financial constraints and firms' investment: results of a natural experiment measuring firm response to power interruption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a natural experiment to reveal the e¤ect of ?nancing constraints on ?rms?ability to substitute speci?cally for de?cient public services and more generally to acquired complementary capital. The analysis of the ?rm-level data from Sub-Saharan Africa... shows that, controlling for other factors, ?rms with a better access to credit are also more likely to invest into private substitutes when public services are de?cient. Consistent with the predictions of the theoretical model these ?ndings indicate...

Steinbuks, J

131

Plasma Response to Lithium-Coated Plasma-Facing Components in the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have shown beneficial effects on the performance of divertor plasmas as a result of applying lithium coatings on the graphite and carbonfiber- composite plasma-facing components. These coatings have mostly been applied by a pair of lithium evaporators mounted at the top of the vacuum vessel which inject collimated streams of lithium vapor towards the lower divertor. In NBI-heated, deuterium H-mode plasmas run immediately after the application of lithium, performance modifications included decreases in the plasma density, particularly in the edge, and inductive flux consumption, and increases in the electron and ion temperatures and the energy confinement time. Reductions in the number and amplitude of ELMs were observed, including complete ELM suppression for periods up to 1.2 s, apparently as a result of altering the stability of the edge. However, in the plasmas where ELMs were suppressed, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities, although not of lithium itself which remained at a very low level in the plasma core, lithium also inhibited parasitic losses through the scrape-off layer of ICRF power coupled to the plasma, enabling the waves to heat electrons in the core of H-mode plasmas produced by NBI. Lithium has also been introduced by injecting a stream of chemically stabilized, fine lithium powder directly into the scrape-off layer of NBI-heated plasmas. The lithium was ionized in the SOL and appeared to flow along the magnetic field to the divertor plates. This method of coating produced similar effects to the evaporated lithium but at lower amounts.

M.G. Bell, H.W. Kugel, R. Kaita, L.E. Zakharov, H. Schneider, B.P. LeBlanc, D. Mansfield, R.E. Bell, R. Maingi, S. Ding, S.M. Kaye, S.F. Paul, S.P. Gerhardt, J.M. Canik, J.C. Hosea, G. Taylor and the NSTX Research Team

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

132

Monte Carlo Study of the abBA Experiment: Detector Response and Physics Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The abBA collaboration proposes to conduct a comprehensive program of precise measurements of neutron $\\beta$-decay coefficients $a$ (the correlation between the neutrino momentum and the decay electron momentum), $b$ (the electron energy spectral distortion term), $A$ (the correlation between the neutron spin and the decay electron momentum), and $B$ (the correlation between the neutron spin and the decay neutrino momentum) at a cold neutron beam facility. We have used a GEANT4-based code to simulate the propagation of decay electrons and protons in the electromagnetic spectrometer and study the energy and timing response of a pair of Silicon detectors. We used these results to examine systematic effects and find the uncertainties with which the physics parameters $a$, $b$, $A$, and $B$ can be extracted from an over-determined experimental data set.

E. Frlez

2004-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

133

Identification of Integral Benchmarks for Nuclear Data Testing Using DICE (Database for the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments)  

SciTech Connect

Typical users of the International Criticality Safety Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook have specific criteria to which they desire to find matching experiments. Depending on the application, those criteria may consist of any combination of physical or chemical characteristics and/or various neutronic parameters. The ICSBEP Handbook contains a structured format helping the user narrow the search for experiments of interest. However, with nearly 4300 different experimental configurations and the ever increasing addition of experimental data, the necessity to perform multiple criteria searches have rendered these features insufficient. As a result, a relational database was created with information extracted from the ICSBEP Handbook. A users’ interface was designed by OECD and DOE to allow the interrogation of this database. The database and the corresponding users’ interface are referred to as DICE. DICE currently offers the capability to perform multiple criteria searches that go beyond simple fuel, physical form and spectra and includes expanded general information, fuel form, moderator/coolant, neutron-absorbing material, cladding, reflector, separator, geometry, benchmark results, spectra, and neutron balance parameters. DICE also includes the capability to display graphical representations of neutron spectra, detailed neutron balance, sensitivity coefficients for capture, fission, elastic scattering, inelastic scattering, nu-bar and mu-bar, as well as several other features.

J. Blair Briggs; A. Nichole Ellis; Yolanda Rugama; Nicolas Soppera; Manuel Bossant

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Surface Meteorology and Air-Sea Fluxes in the Western Equatorial Pacific Warm Pool during the TOGA Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major goal of the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) was to achieve significantly more accurate and complete descriptions of the surface meteorology and air-sea fluxes in the western equatorial warm pool region. Time series of ...

R. A. Weller; S. P. Anderson

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The Interface or Air–Sea Flux Component of the TOGA Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment and Its Impact on Subsequent Air–Sea Interaction Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interface or air–sea flux component of the Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) of the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) research program and its subsequent impact on studies of air–sea interaction are described. The ...

Robert A. Weller; Frank Bradley; Roger Lukas

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Diborane Electrode Response in 3D Silicon Sensors for the CMS and ATLAS Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Unusually high leakage currents have been measured in test wafers produced by the manufacturer SINTEF containing 3D pixel silicon sensor chips designed for the ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) and CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiments. Previous data has shown the CMS chips as having a lower leakage current after processing than ATLAS chips. Some theories behind the cause of the leakage currents include the dicing process and the usage of copper in bump bonding, and with differences in packaging and handling between the ATLAS and CMS chips causing the disparity between the two. Data taken at SLAC from a SINTEF wafer with electrodes doped with diborane and filled with polysilicon, before dicing, and with indium bumps added contradicts this past data, as ATLAS chips showed a lower leakage current than CMS chips. It also argues against copper in bump bonding and the dicing process as main causes of leakage current as neither were involved on this wafer. However, they still display an extremely high leakage current, with the source mostly unknown. The SINTEF wafer shows completely different behavior than the others, as the FEI3s actually performed better than the CMS chips. Therefore this data argues against the differences in packaging and handling or the intrinsic geometry of the two as a cause in the disparity between the leakage currents of the chips. Even though the leakage current in the FEI3s overall is lower, the current is still significant enough to cause problems. As this wafer was not diced, nor had it any copper added for bump bonding, this data argues against the dicing and bump bonding as causes for leakage current. To compliment this information, more data will be taken on the efficiency of the individual electrodes of the ATLAS and CMS chips on this wafer. The electrodes will be shot perpendicularly with a laser to test the efficiency across the width of the electrode. A mask with pinholes has been made to focus the laser to a beam smaller than the width of an electrode in order to properly scan it. This will provide more information on whether something in the electrodes, such as the polysilicon filling, is contributing to the leakage current or if there is another cause to be found. It will also reveal whether the diborane doping method and the new polysilicon filling has increased the electrode efficiency as expected. Thus, the cause of these leakage currents on the wafers from SINTEF has yet to be definitively found.

Brown, Emily R.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

137

Measurement of the Low Energy Nuclear Response in NaI(Tl) Crystals for Use in Dark Matter Direct Detection Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The response of low energy nuclear recoil in NaI(Tl) is investigated in the following experiment. Such detectors have been used recently to search for evidence of dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). NaI(Tl) crystal response to nuclear recoil energy deposition is a key element in these searches. I discuss the cosmological and experimental motivations for these experiments, followed by an overview of the physics of direct detection and current relevant WIMP search experiments. With the experiment motivations covered, the details of NaI(Tl) detectors are reviewed. The specifics of our experiment are laid out including the neutron production, neutron beam calibration, shielding optimization, experimental design and setup. Then the crystal response calibration studies and Geant4 simulations are discussed followed by the final quenching factor values and uncertainties. This experiment measured quenching factors for sodium recoils in the energy range of (9 keV-40 keV) of 19%-27% QF. These results are similar to current published measurements. Interesting features of the QF measurements include an increase at low energies and a dip in the values at 30 keV, the iodine K-shell absorption edge. The goal of this experiment was to add valuable measurements of nuclear recoils at low energies that are relevant to low-mass WIMP experiments. Future plans will improve and expand on these measurements in order to better understand the response of NaI(Tl) at low energies.

Stiegler, Tyana Michele

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Dynamical response of the "GGG" rotor to test the Equivalence Principle: theory, simulation and experiment. Part I: the normal modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent theoretical work suggests that violation of the Equivalence Principle might be revealed in a measurement of the fractional differential acceleration $\\eta$ between two test bodies -of different composition, falling in the gravitational field of a source mass- if the measurement is made to the level of $\\eta\\simeq 10^{-13}$ or better. This being within the reach of ground based experiments, gives them a new impetus. However, while slowly rotating torsion balances in ground laboratories are close to reaching this level, only an experiment performed in low orbit around the Earth is likely to provide a much better accuracy. We report on the progress made with the "Galileo Galilei on the Ground" (GGG) experiment, which aims to compete with torsion balances using an instrument design also capable of being converted into a much higher sensitivity space test. In the present and following paper (Part I and Part II), we demonstrate that the dynamical response of the GGG differential accelerometer set into supercritical rotation -in particular its normal modes (Part I) and rejection of common mode effects (Part II)- can be predicted by means of a simple but effective model that embodies all the relevant physics. Analytical solutions are obtained under special limits, which provide the theoretical understanding. A simulation environment is set up, obtaining quantitative agreement with the available experimental data on the frequencies of the normal modes, and on the whirling behavior. This is a needed and reliable tool for controlling and separating perturbative effects from the expected signal, as well as for planning the optimization of the apparatus.

G. L. Comandi; M. L. Chiofalo; R. Toncelli; D. Bramanti; E. Polacco; A. M. Nobili

2006-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

139

Determination of Effective Emittance and a Radiatively Equivalent Microphysical Model of Cirrus from Ground-Based and Satellite Observations during the International Cirrus Experiment: The 18 October 1989 Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground-based observations and satellite data have been compared for the 18 October 1989 case study of the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE) field campaign. They correspond to thin cirrus clouds with infrared emittances in the range 0–0.3. ...

G. Brogniez; J. C. Buriez; V. Giraud; F. Parol; C. Vanbauce

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Temporal Response of Theoretical Transport Models to Modulated Heat Sources and Cold Edge Pulses in Transient Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of The Inter. Sherwood Fusion Theory Conf., Atlanta, 1998, To Be PublishedInternational Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference(1998) Atlanta Georgia, US, 1998950114614

Kinsey, J.E.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Testing ice microphysics parameterizations in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 using Tropical Warm Pool–International Cloud Experiment data  

SciTech Connect

Cloud properties have been simulated with a new double-moment microphysics scheme under the framework of the single column version of NCAR CAM3. For comparisons, the same simulation was made with the standard single-moment microphysics scheme of CAM3. Results from both simulations were compared favorably with observations during the Tropical Warm Pool- International Cloud Experiment by US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Program in terms of the temporal variation and vertical distribution of cloud fraction and cloud condensate. Major differences between the two simulations are in the magnitude and distribution of ice water content within the mixed-phase cloud during the monsoon period, though the total frozen water (snow plus ice) content is similar. The ice mass content in the mixed-phase cloud from the new scheme is larger than that from the standard scheme, and extends 2 km further downward, which are closer to observations. The dependence of the frozen water mass fraction in total condensate on temperature from the new scheme is also closer to available observations. Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) from the simulation with the new scheme is in general larger than that with the standard scheme, while the surface downward longwave radiation is similar. Sensitivity tests suggest that different treatments of the ice effective radius contribute significantly to the difference in the TOA OLR in addition to cloud water path. The deep convection process affects both TOA OLR and surface downward longwave radiation. The over-frequently-triggered deep convention process in the model is not the only mechanism for the excess middle and high level clouds. Further evaluation especially for ice cloud properties based on in-situ data is needed.

Wang, Weiguo; Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; McFarlane, Sally A.

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

142

Variable-response model of electricity demand by time of day: Results of a Wisconsin pricing experiment: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observationally alike households may differ in demand parameters and thus in economic quantities that are functions of those parameters. We have proposed a methodology for dealing with this variation. Estimation of both translog and CES versions of the model with data from the Wisconsin Electricity Pricing Experiment revealed considerable variation among households in time-of-day electricity consumption demand parameters for both summer and winter seasons and for several different definitions of the peak period. Observed household characteristics explained only a small share of total household differences, but permanent household differences dominated month-to-month variation in either expenditure shares or log consumption ratios in most cases. Permanent differences among households are important relative to total variation, including transitory month-to-month variation. We calculated various economic variables from the demand parameters, including the partial elasticity of substitution, compensated and uncompensated elasticities, and a measure of electricity expenditure under peak load pricing required to maintain the utility level under flat rate pricing relative to the flat rate expenditure. Because these are nonlinear functions of the household demand parameters, the mean parameter value over households with different demand parameters may be substantially different from the value of the function at mean values, under the representative household paradigm. For time-of-day electricity demand, variation among households is significant but small relative to mean parameter values. Therefore, controlling for the effect of household variation makes little difference in these mean calculations, but it does imply substantial variation among households in the welfare implications (and elasticities of response) of the introduction of time-of-day pricing. 25 refs., 12 tabs.

Lillard, L.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Status and Effectiveness of DOE Efforts to Learn from Internal and External Operating Experience in Accordance with Commitment #20 of the DOE Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004-1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety and Security Safety and Security Report to the Secretary on the Status and Effectiveness of DOE Efforts to Learn from Internal and External Operating Experience in Accordance with Commitment #20 of the DOE Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004-1 February 2011 Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Department-wide Action Plan for the Columbia Accident and Davis-Besse Event ........... 3 3.0 Comprehensive Operating Experience Program ................................................................. 5

144

Status and Effectiveness of DOE Efforts to Learn from Internal and External Operating Experience in Accordance with Commitment #20 of the DOE Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004-1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety and Security Safety and Security Report to the Secretary on the Status and Effectiveness of DOE Efforts to Learn from Internal and External Operating Experience in Accordance with Commitment #20 of the DOE Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004-1 February 2011 Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Department-wide Action Plan for the Columbia Accident and Davis-Besse Event ........... 3 3.0 Comprehensive Operating Experience Program ................................................................. 5

145

Degradation of Steam Generator Internals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 1999 ... Regulatory Perspective on Industry's Response to Generic Letter 97-06, " Degradation of Steam Generator Internals" by S. Coffin, M. Subudhi, ...

146

Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) Water Cherenkov Detector Schedule and Cost Books LBNE Far Site Internal Review(December 6-9,2011)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Schedule and Cost Books developed for the Water Cherenkov Detector (WCD) option for the far detector of the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)

Stewart J.; Diwan, M.; Dolph, J.; Novakova, P.; Sharma, R.; Stewart, J.; Viren, B.; Russo, T.; Kaducak, M.; Mantsch, P.; Paulos, B.; Feyzi, F.; Sullivan, G.; Bionta, R.; Fowler, J.; Warner, D.; Bahowick, S.; Van Berg, R.; Kearns, E.; Hazen, E.; Sinnis, G.; Sanchez, M.

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

147

Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)Water Cherenkov Detector Basis of Estimate Forms and Backup Documentation LBNE Far Site Internal Review (December 6-9, 2011)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Basis of Estimate (BOE) forms and backup documentation developed for the Water Cherenkov Detector (WCD) option for the far detector of the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)

Stewart J.; Diwan, M.; Dolph, J.; Novakova, P.; Sharma, R.; Stewart, J.; Viren, B.; Russo, T.; Kaducak, M.; Mantsch, P.; Paulos, B.; Feyzi, F.; Sullivan, G.; Bionta, R.; Fowler, J.; Warner, D.; Bahowick, S.; Van Berg, R.; Kearns, E.; Hazen, E.; Sinnis, G.; Sanchez, M.

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

148

A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight detector response in current mode to inertial confinement fusion experiments (invited)  

SciTech Connect

A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight (nTOF) detector response in current mode for inertial confinement fusion experiments has been applied to the on-axis nTOF detectors located in the basement of the Z-Facility. It will be shown that this method can identify sources of neutron scattering, and is useful for predicting detector responses in future experimental configurations, and for identifying potential sources of neutron scattering when experimental set-ups change. This method can also provide insight on how much broadening neutron scattering contributes to the primary signals, which is then subtracted from them. Detector time responses are deconvolved from the signals, allowing a transformation from dN/dt to dN/dE, extracting neutron spectra at each detector location; these spectra are proportional to the absolute yield.

Nelson, A. J.; Cooper, G. W. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Ruiz, C. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Fehl, D. L.; Hahn, K. D.; Leeper, R. J.; Smelser, R.; Torres, J. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Customer response to day-ahead wholesale market electricity prices: Case study of RTP program experience in New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is growing interest in policies, programs and tariffs that encourage customer loads to provide demand response (DR) to help discipline wholesale electricity markets. Proposals at the retail level range from eliminating fixed rate tariffs as the default service for some or all customer groups to reinstituting utility-sponsored load management programs with market-based inducements to curtail. Alternative rate designs include time-of-use (TOU), day-ahead real-time pricing (RTP), critical peak pricing, and even pricing usage at real-time market balancing prices. Some Independent System Operators (ISOs) have implemented their own DR programs whereby load curtailment capabilities are treated as a system resource and are paid an equivalent value. The resulting load reductions from these tariffs and programs provide a variety of benefits, including limiting the ability of suppliers to increase spot and long-term market-clearing prices above competitive levels (Neenan et al., 2002; Boren stein, 2002; Ruff, 2002). Unfortunately, there is little information in the public domain to characterize and quantify how customers actually respond to these alternative dynamic pricing schemes. A few empirical studies of large customer RTP response have shown modest results for most customers, with a few very price-responsive customers providing most of the aggregate response (Herriges et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 2002). However, these studies examined response to voluntary, two-part RTP programs implemented by utilities in states without retail competition.1 Furthermore, the researchers had limited information on customer characteristics so they were unable to identify the drivers to price response. In the absence of a compelling characterization of why customers join RTP programs and how they respond to prices, many initiatives to modernize retail electricity rates seem to be stymied.

Goldman, C.; Hopper, N.; Sezgen, O.; Moezzi, M.; Bharvirkar, R.; Neenan, B.; Boisvert, R.; Cappers, P.; Pratt, D.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

he International Energy Module determines changes in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude he International Energy Module determines changes in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude oils and petroleum products for import to the United States in response to changes in U.S. import requirements. A market clearing method is used to determine the price at which worldwide demand for oil is equal to the worldwide supply. The module determines new values for oil production and demand for regions outside the United States, along with a new world oil price that balances supply and demand in the international oil market. A detailed description of the International Energy Module is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M071(06), (Washington, DC, February 2006).

151

International | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International | National Nuclear Security Administration International | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog International Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nuclear Security > Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System > International International U.S. Department of Energy / U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

152

Office of International Health Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Health Studies International Health Studies Home Mission and Functions Japan Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) Studies Marshall Islands Program Russian Health Studies Program Russian Radiobiology Human Tissue Repository Spain (Palomares) Program Health and Safety HSS Logo Office of International Health Studies Reports to the Office of Health and Safety Mission and Functions Mission The Office of International Health Studies engages in the conduct of international scientific studies that may provide new knowledge and information about the human response to ionizing radiation in the workplace or people exposed in communities as a result of nuclear accidents. The mission includes providing health and environmental monitoring services to populations specified by law.

153

Internal Communication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Internal Communication Process 11_0303 Page 1 of 6 9 Internal Communication Process 11_0303 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Internal Communication Process Document Number: P-009 Rev 11_0303 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001 Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A P-009 Internal Communication Process 11_0303 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 09_0902 Modified process to better fit current practice. 10_0831 Added verbiage to clarify process. Added initiation phrase to process steps. 11_0303 Added QAM to the last step and made minor editorial updates. P-009 Internal Communication Process 11_0303 Page 3 of 6 I. Purpose

154

Author manuscript, published in "9th International Conference on the Design of Cooperative Systems (COOP'2010) (2010)" Design of a Collaborative Disaster Response Process Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract We describe in this article a framework for disaster response process management. This framework can be used to develop information systems supporting those processes. It is grounded in several research approaches: literature research, case studies, end user interviews and workshops. We compare disaster response process management with business process management and argue why it is substantial different to it. Another main result of this comparison is that business process management technology, such as flexible workflow systems, are not suitable for disaster response processes. We propose an information system supporting disaster response processes based on our developed framework. Finally we present validation of the information system design and give outlook on our future research.

Jörn Franke; François Charoy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Greenpeace International  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report 2 nd edition 2011 japan energy scenario“will we look into the eyes of our children and confess that we had the opportunity, but lacked the courage? that we had the technology, but lacked the vision?” Greenpeace International,

Energy Council; Erec Arthouros Zervos; Sven Teske; Junichi Sato; Hisayo Takada; Image Rice Fields In Kamikatsu; Wolfram Krewitt Dr. Thomas; Sydney Jay Rutovitz; Nicky Ison; Iida Hironao Matsubara

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

International Philosophical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to reproduce all the experiments that lead to our current understanding of atomic physics. Such an undertaking

Sloman, Aaron

157

"Renewable Energy Transition and International Climate Cooperation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Renewable Energy Transition and International Climate Cooperation: The German Experience" Jürgen at Urbana-Champaign. His research and teaching interests include: energy security, climate change

Sheridan, Jennifer

158

Internal Dosimetry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEASUREMENT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1121-2008 Change Notice No.1 October 2013 DOE STANDARD INTERNAL DOSIMETRY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://energy.gov/hss/information-center/department-energy- technical-standards-program ii Change Notice 1. Internal Dosimetry DOE-STD-1121-2008 Page/Section Change Throughout Change: airborne contamination To: airborne radioactivity Section 1.5, p. 4 Change: HPS N 13.1-1999 To: HPS N 13.1-2011 Section 1.5, p. 4 Change: HPS N 13.6-1999 To: HPS N 13,.6-2010 Section 1.5, p. 4 Delete: HPS N 13.14-1994, Internal Dosimetry Programs for

159

Storm Transfer and Response Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An air-sea interaction research program (STREX) has been carried out in the Gulf of Alaska to investigate characteristics of the boundary layers of the atmosphere and ocean in middle-latitude storms. Observations were made by ships, aircraft, ...

R. G. Fleagle; M. Miyake; J. F. Garrett; G. A. McBean

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

International Photovoltaic Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The International Photovoltaics Program Plan is in direct response to the Solar Photovoltaic Energy Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (PL 95-590). As stated in the Act, the primary objective of the plan is to accelerate the widespread use of photovoltaic systems in international markets. Benefits which could result from increased international sales by US companies include: stabilization and expansion of the US photovoltaic industry, preparing the industry for supplying future domestic needs; contribution to the economic and social advancement of developing countries; reduced world demand for oil; and improvements in the US balance of trade. The plan outlines programs for photovoltaic demonstrations, systems developments, supplier assistance, information dissemination/purchaser assistance, and an informaion clearinghouse. Each program element includes tactical objectives and summaries of approaches. A program management office will be established to coordinate and manage the program plan. Although the US Department of Energy (DOE) had the lead responsibility for preparing and implementing the plan, numerous federal organizations and agencies (US Departments of Commerce, Justice, State, Treasury; Agency for International Development; ACTION; Export/Import Bank; Federal Trade Commission; Small Business Administration) were involved in the plan's preparation and implementation.

Costello, D.; Koontz, R.; Posner, D.; Heiferling, P.; Carpenter, P.; Forman, S.; Perelman, L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

International Photovoltaic Program Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The International Photovoltaics Program Plan is in direct response to the Solar Photovoltaic Energy Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (PL 95-590). As stated in the Act, the primary objective of the plan is to accelerate the widespread use of photovoltaic systems in international markets. Benefits which could result from increased international sales by US companies include: stabilization and expansion of the US photovoltaic industry, preparing the industry for supplying future domestic needs; contribution to the economic and social advancement of developing countries; reduced world demand for oil; and improvements in the US balance of trade. The plan outlines programs for photovoltaic demonstrations, systems developments, supplier assistance, information dissemination/purchaser assistance, and an informaion clearinghouse. Each program element includes tactical objectives and summaries of approaches. A program management office will be established to coordinate and manage the program plan. Although the US Department of Energy (DOE) had the lead responsibility for preparing and implementing the plan, numerous federal organizations and agencies (US Departments of Commerce, Justice, State, Treasury; Agency for International Development; ACTION; Export/Import Bank; Federal Trade Commission; Small Business Administration) were involved in the plan's preparation and implementation.

Costello, D.; Koontz, R.; Posner, D.; Heiferling, P.; Carpenter, P.; Forman, S.; Perelman, L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

International Experience in Transportation Analysis and Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management Service for the Defense Logistics Agency in Okinawa, Japan Development of a distribution and disposal system for hazardous materials between different US military bases on Okinawa, Japan. Radioactive

163

REVIEW OF INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH RENEWABLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) more than tripled, from 16,491 MW to over 53,000 MW. Wind and solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity% and solar PV grew nearly 52% from the previous year (U.S. DOE 2010). The sale of RECs produces revenue ................. 11 Figure 5. Solar REC prices, November 2008 to March 2011

164

international scholar program provides professional experience and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Of?ce of Nuclear. Regulatory ... commercial nuclear reactor plants. ... a Ph.D. in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics.

165

INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTERNATIONAL INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS Signed by Secretary Spencer Abraham January 2001-December 2004 TABLE OF CONTENTS Joint Statement of ntent between the Department of Energy of the United States ofAmerica and The Ministry of Energy and Mines of the Republic ofPeru on Cooperation in the Field of Energy -Tab 1 Fifth Hemispheric Energy Ministers Meeting Mexico City, Mexico - March 9, 2001. Mexico Declaration - Energy: A Crucial Factor for Integration and Sustainable Development in the Hemisphere - Tab 2 Extension of the Agreement for Energy Cooperation between the Department of Energy of the United States ofAmerica and the Secretariat ofEnergy of the United Mexican States, and its Four Annexes - Tab3 Implementing Agreement between the Department ofEnergy of the United States ofAmerica and the

166

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly

167

Search for new physics in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment and the response of the CMS calorimeters to particles and jets  

SciTech Connect

A Monte Carlo study of a generic search for new resonances beyond the Standard Model (SM) in the CMS experiment is presented. The resonances are axigluon, coloron, E{sub 6} diquark, excited quark, W{prime}, Z{prime}, and the Randall-Sundrum graviton which decay to dijets. The dijet resonance cross section that the CMS can expect to discover at a 5{sigma} significance or to exclude at 95% confidence level for integrated luminosities of 100 pb{sup -1}, 1 fb{sup -1}, and 10 fb{sup -1} is evaluated. It is shown that a 5{sigma} discovery of a multi-TeV dijet resonance is possible for an axigluon, excited quark, and E{sub 6} diquark. However, a 5{sigma} discovery can not be projected with confidence for a W{prime}, Z{prime} and the Randall-Sundrum graviton. On the other hand, 95% CL exclusion mass regions can be measured for all resonances at high luminosities. In the second part of this dissertation, the analyses of the 2006 test beam data from the combined electromagnetic and hadronic barrel calorimeters are presented. The CMS barrel calorimeters response to a variety of beam particles in a wide momenta range (1 to 350 GeV/c) is measured. Furthermore, using these beam data, the expected performance of the barrel calorimeters to jets is predicted.

Gumus, Kazim Ziya; /Texas Tech.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Internal Controls Guidance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Internal Controls Guidance Internal Controls Guidance Internal Controls Guidance Guidance required to be implemented by Departmental elements to meet the requirements of the Federal Managers' Financial Integrity Act (FMFIA), as described in Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-123, Management's Responsibility for Internal Control. This guidance provides instructions for conducting internal controls evaluations and help ensure the Secretary's annual Statement of Assurance is accurate and adequately supported. Internal Control Evaluations Guidance More Documents & Publications Re: DOE Request for Information - Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities To Inform Federal Smart Grid Policy Request for Information - Operations and Maintenance (O & M) Support

169

International Cooperation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Cooperation International Cooperation International Cooperation Members at a meeting of the international Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF). The Office of Fossil Energy is the Secretariat for the CSLF. Members at a meeting of the international Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF). The Office of Fossil Energy is the Secretariat for the CSLF. Key Bilateral Activities US-India Energy Dialogue: Coal Working Group The Office of Fossil Energy and India's Ministry of Coal jointly chair the Coal Working Group initiative to exchange information on policies, programs and technologies to promote the efficient and environmentally responsible production and use of coal. US-China Collaboration in Fossil Energy R&D The Office of Fossil Energy and China's Ministry of Science and Technology

170

International energy-investment dilemma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The idea of a unified international energy market is dispelled, and the problems that exist in finding stable investors for the uncertain projects are approached. It is shown how the current contracting techniques are inappropriate for the emerging large-scale energy projects, and suggestions are made for new approaches that emphasize clauses for reviews, penalties, supply terms, inflation and oil price escalations, and currency; financing arrangements; government and international agency guarantees; and jurisdiction of national regulatory bodies. The efficiency of the world's human resources will be responsible for establishing investor confidence which will enable major financers to become involved in international energy megaprojects.

Tempest, P.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

International Nuclear Security  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses: (1) Definitions of international nuclear security; (2) What degree of security do we have now; (3) Limitations of a nuclear security strategy focused on national lock-downs of fissile materials and weapons; (4) What do current trends say about the future; and (5) How can nuclear security be strengthened? Nuclear security can be strengthened by: (1) More accurate baseline inventories; (2) Better physical protection, control and accounting; (3) Effective personnel reliability programs; (4) Minimize weapons-usable materials and consolidate to fewer locations; (5) Consider local threat environment when siting facilities; (6) Implement pledges made in the NSS process; and (7) More robust interdiction, emergency response and special operations capabilities. International cooperation is desirable, but not always possible.

Doyle, James E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

172

Internal Resources Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Budget Budget Proposals Human Resources Administration Internal Resources Administration--Includes an Administrative Services Directory and an A-Z index. Budget - Contacts Employee Talent Profile System--A system, launched by Jay Keasling in late 2012, populated with profiles of both scientists and non-scientists, meant to be a resource for the creation of teams across the Biosciences Area and the persue of collective funding opportunities both internal and external to the Laboratory. Complete your profile and look for more system enhancements in the coming year. Equipment List (viewable by Berkeley Lab staff only) -- A list of equipment used in the Life Sciences Division. Several equipment needs training prior to use, therefore, please always contact the person responsible if interested in using the equipment. If listed as a contact on

173

Internal Dosimetry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21-2008 21-2008 October 2008 DOE STANDARD INTERNAL DOSIMETRY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1121-2008 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) standard is approved for use by all DOE Components and their contractors. 2. Constructive comments (recommendations, additions, deletions) and any pertinent data that may improve this document should be sent to Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy (HS-11) U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585

174

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... Jordan 91.087 90.500 85 76.075 ...

175

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... 2013 Africa 117.064 119.114 123.609 ...

176

IWA (International Workshop Agreement)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IWA content IWA (International Workshop Agreement) iso1rss IWA (International Workshop Agreement) Past Meeting Presentations 2nd Internati

177

NCSL International Technical Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NCSL International Technical Exchange. Purpose: The NCSL International ... Charleston, SC 29418. Technical Contact: Val Miller (301) 975-3602.

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

178

Nuclear physics with internal targets in electron storage rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two key experiments in nuclear physics will be discussed in order to illustrate the advantages of the internal target method and demonstrate the power of polarization techniques in electron scattering studies. The progress of internal target experiments will be discussed and the technology of internal polarized target development will be reviewed.

Roy J. Holt

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

International Exercises | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Exercises | National Nuclear Security Administration Exercises | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog International Exercises Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > International Programs > International Exercises International Exercises First responders test plans and procedures during a radiation exercise in Murman

180

Information Technology Intern: Description and Responsibilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, communication room, VOIP communication and all computer software and hardware troubleshooting, installation

Haviland, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Washington Group International -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Group International - Group International - EA-2003-07 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Washington Group International - EA-2003-07 October 23, 2003 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Washington Group International related to Falsification of Records and Procurement Deficiencies at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory This letter refers to the investigation conducted by the Department of Energy (DOE) into allegations that RTS Wright Industries, LLC, (RTS), a supplier for which Washington Group International (WGI) had direct contractual responsibility, had falsified quality control inspection records. These records pertained to the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) Supercompactor Glovebox Suite at the Idaho

182

Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nonproliferation & International Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nonproliferation & International Security Nonproliferation & International Security

183

Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security Nonproliferation & International Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nonproliferation & International Security Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Nonproliferation & International Security Nonproliferation & International Security

184

Internal Communication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Periodic Report Process 11_0708 Page 1 of 5 1 Periodic Report Process 11_0708 Page 1 of 5 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Periodic Report Process Document Number: QAMP-001 Rev. 11_0708 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001 Quality Manual Notify of Changes: QAM, MGT Referenced Document(s): REG-003, Records Register QAMP-001 Periodic Report Process 11_0708 Page 2 of 5 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_0411 Added Online Learning Support Specialist to "Responsibility" and step 1.0 of process (provides a portion of data for Monthly Reports). Changed Backup Document Owner. Changed "shared drive" references to "per REG-003, Records Register". Combined Steps 4.0 and 5.0

185

Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 Internation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response of PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. to Answer of International Transmission Company Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission...

186

HEPEX: The Hydrological Ensemble Prediction Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hydrological Ensemble Prediction Experiment (HEPEX) is an international project to advance technologies for hydrological forecasting. Its goal is “to bring the international hydrological and meteorological communities together to demonstrate ...

John C. Schaake; Thomas M. Hamill; Roberto Buizza; Martyn Clark

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

The Ocean Response to Low-Frequency Interannual Atmospheric Variability in the Mediterranean Sea. Part I: Sensitivity Experiments and Energy Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study a general circulation model is used in order to investigate the interannual response of the Mediterranean Basin to low-frequency interannual variability in atmospheric forcing for the period 1980–88. The model incorporates a ...

G. Korres; N. Pinardi; A. Lascaratos

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources, October 29,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources, FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources, October 29, 2010 FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources, October 29, 2010 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) presentation on demand response as power system resources before the Electicity Advisory Committee, October 29, 2010 Demand Response as Power System Resources More Documents & Publications A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Cost-Effectiveness Working Group Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006)

189

International Undergraduate Guide 2014/2015 entry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, cosmopolitan and cultured city, which offers a unique living and learning experience. One of the most vibrant satisfaction ratings for safety and security in the International Student Barometer survey. This cosmopolitan

Edinburgh, University of

190

Audit of Department of Energy International Charter Flights, IG-0397 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Department of Energy International Charter Flights, of Department of Energy International Charter Flights, IG-0397 Audit of Department of Energy International Charter Flights, IG-0397 In our November 1994 report entitled, "Audit of Department of Energy International Charter Flights," we reported that the Department had not established a systematic and costeffective process to acquire international air services. We suggested that the Department establish written policy and procedures for acquiring international air service including clarification of the responsibilities for all interested parties. We stated that the written policy and procedures should clarify the responsibilities of the Office of Human Resources and Administration, Headquarters Procurement, and Office of Aviation Policy. In addition,

191

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... Jordan 112.4 107.7 103.5 96.5 ...

192

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... Jordan 1.907 1.909 2.101 2.197 ...

193

Internal Audit Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Internal Audit Process 110304 Page 1 of 7 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Internal Audit Process Document Number: P-007 Rev. 110304 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa...

194

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... Germany 135.7 139.1 124.7 153.7 ...

195

Intern Programs | PARTI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics of Accelerators and Related Technology for International Students (PARTI) About Apply Visa Info For Current Interns Program Description Fermilab's PARTI program offers...

196

Promotion of Wind Energy: Lessons Learned from International...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from International Experience and United Nations Development Programme Global Environment Facility (UNDP-GEF) Projects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL...

197

A space-based end-to-end prototype geographic information network for lunar and planetary exploration and emergency response (2002 and 2003 field experiments)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Communications and imaging experiments conducted in the Arizona desert during July of 2002 with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) helped to identify a fundamental suite of scientific ... Keywords: Geographic information network, Internet, Remote sensing, Satellite imaging

Richard A. Beck; Robert K. Vincent; Doyle W. Watts; Marc A. Seibert; David P. Pleva; Michael A. Cauley; Calvin T. Ramos; Theresa M. Scott; Dean W. Harter; Mary Vickerman; David Irmies; Al Tucholski; Brian Frantz; Glenn Lindamood; Isaac Lopez; Greg Follen; Thaddeus Kollar; Jay Horowitz; Robert Griffin; Raymond Gilstrap; Marjory Johnson; Kenneth Freeman; Celeste Banaag; Joseph Kosmo; Amy Ross; Kevin Groneman; Jeffrey Graham; Kim Shillcutt; Robert Hirsh; Nathan Howard; Dean B. Eppler

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The Potential Use of Summer Rainfall Enhancement in Illinois. Part I: A Field Experiment to Define Responses of Crop Yields to Increased Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An assessment was made of factors affecting the use of cloud seeding to increase summer (June-August) rainfall for improved corn and soybean yields in Illinois. Crop yields from a five-year agricultural field experiment involving nine levels of ...

Stanley A. Changnon; Steven E. Hollinger

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Understanding Lustre Internals  

SciTech Connect

Lustre was initiated and funded, almost a decade ago, by the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) Office of Science and National Nuclear Security Administration laboratories to address the need for an open source, highly-scalable, high-performance parallel filesystem on by then present and future supercomputing platforms. Throughout the last decade, it was deployed over numerous medium-to-large-scale supercomputing platforms and clusters, and it performed and met the expectations of the Lustre user community. As it stands at the time of writing this document, according to the Top500 list, 15 of the top 30 supercomputers in the world use Lustre filesystem. This report aims to present a streamlined overview on how Lustre works internally at reasonable details including relevant data structures, APIs, protocols and algorithms involved for Lustre version 1.6 source code base. More importantly, it tries to explain how various components interconnect with each other and function as a system. Portions of this report are based on discussions with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Lustre Center of Excellence team members and portions of it are based on our own understanding of how the code works. We, as the authors team bare all responsibilities for all errors and omissions in this document. We can only hope it helps current and future Lustre users and Lustre code developers as much as it helped us understanding the Lustre source code and its internal workings.

Wang, Feiyi [ORNL; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Drokin, Oleg [ORNL; Wang, Di [ORNL; Huang, He [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

NNSA summer interns tour Sandia | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

summer interns tour Sandia | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

International Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration International Programs Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > International Programs International Programs NNSA prepares for nuclear and radiological emergencies across the globe.

202

EM International Program Action Table  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM INTERNATIONAL COOPERATIVE PROGRAM] October, 2012 EM INTERNATIONAL COOPERATIVE PROGRAM] October, 2012 E M I n t e r n a t i o n a l P r o g r a m s Page 1 ACTION TABLE Subject Lead Office Engaging Country Meeting Location Purpose Status Date of Event 3 rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design and Operations N. Buschman, EM-22 Germany Albuquerque & Carlsbad, NM Continue collaboration with Germans on salt repository research, design and operations. Draft agenda prepared. October 8-12, 2012 International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation (IFNEC) Ministerial R. Elmetti, EM- 2.1 Multilateral Marrakech, Morocco To support the development of nuclear energy infrastructure globally through workforce training, information sharing, and approaches related to the safe, secure and responsible use of

203

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Jordan 10 10 11 11 11 10 ...

204

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan (s) (s) (s) (s ...

205

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. ... Total Renewable Electricity Net Generation ... Bosnia and Herzegovina 0.039 ...

206

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. ... Total Renewable Electricity Installed Capacity ... Bosnia and Herzegovina 2.411 ...

207

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Electricity Prices ; Petroleum Prices ; Natural Gas Prices ; ...

208

Internal Audit Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internal Audit Services Internal Audit Services Berkeley Lab Internal Audit Services Internal Audit Services Berkeley Lab Contacts Organizational Chart IAS Search Staff Only Lab Search Phone Book A-Z Index Privacy and Security Notice "Internal Auditing is an independent, objective assurance and consulting activity designed to add value and improve an organization's operations. It helps an organization accomplish its objectives by bringing a systematic, disciplined approach to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of risk management, control and governance processes." The Institute of Internal Auditors Standards for the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing About IAS | Audit Committee | Audit Planning | Ethics & Investigations | External Audit Coordination Advisory Services | Other Relevant Audit Links | Contacts | Organizational

209

Internal Audit Preparation Worksheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Internal Audit Preparation Job Aid 11_0304 Page 1 of 5 2 Internal Audit Preparation Job Aid 11_0304 Page 1 of 5 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Internal Audit Preparation Job Aid Document Number: F-012 Rev. 11_0304 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-007, Internal Audit Process Notify of Changes: Internal Auditors Referenced Document(s): F-011 Internal Audit Report F-012 Internal Audit Preparation Job Aid 11_0304 Page 2 of 5 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 11_0304 Change title from Worksheet to Job Aid and changed revision from alpha to numeric for consistency. F-012 Internal Audit Preparation Job Aid 11_0304 Page 3 of 5 Internal Audit Preparation Worksheet F-012 Internal Audit Preparation Job Aid 11_0304 Page 4 of 5

210

Russian Grouting Experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final report on Russian Grouting experience provided an opportunity for international cooperation and access to Russian grouting/waste form experience. the data on radiolytic gas generation from grout mixtures was already used in evaluation of the source of hydrogen and methane generation detected in the sampling ports around the SRS high-level waste tanks in 2002. The concept of venting the radiolytic gases from a waste form by adding porous aggregate is being considered for future cement-based TRU waste forms at SRS. The objectives of this work were to document the Russian experience on grouting for waste forms and tank closures or other decommissioning applications.

Langton, C.A.

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

International Collaboration on Offshore Wind Energy Under IEA Annex XXIII  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper defines the purpose of IEA Annex XXIII, the International Collaboration on Offshore Wind Energy. This international collaboration through the International Energy Agency (IEA) is an efficient forum from which to advance the technical and environmental experiences collected from existing offshore wind energy projects, as well as the research necessary to advance future technology for deep-water wind energy technology.

Musial, W.; Butterfield, S.; Lemming, J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Breaking Barriers, Building Partnerships ADAPT Summer Intern Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program will provide summer work experience to students and adults with disabilities. This program working with an untapped workforce. ADAPT Summer Intern Program's strategic goals are to: · Expose people The ADAPT Summer Intern Program provides summer work experience to students and adults with disabilities

Peterson, Blake R.

213

Essays in international trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is a collection of essays on the effect of trade costs on international trade. Chapter 1 derives and empirically examines how factor proportions determine the structure of commodity trade when international ...

Romalis, John

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

International aeronautical user charges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction: 1.1 BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION Very few issues relating to the international air transportation industry are today as divisive as those pertaining to user charges imposed at international airports and enroute ...

Odoni, Amedeo R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

AOCS: supporting international standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trade standards improve efficiency of production and ease international commerce. They can also affect profitability. AOCS: supporting international standards inform Magazine algae algal AOCS biomass business chemistry cottonseed date detergents f

216

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...

217

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Capacity | Bunker Fuels | ...

218

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ...

219

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Jordan 0.213 Kuwait 63.500 Lebanon 0 Oman ...

220

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Capacity | Bunker Fuels | Stocks |

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

RFI Comments - ASIS International  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Sincerely, /s/ Jack Lichtenstein Vice President, Government Affairs & Public Policy ASIS International 1625 Prince Street Alexandria, VA 22314

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

222

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... 2013 JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN ...

223

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... 2013 Middle East 802.157 Bahrain 0.125 ...

224

A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight (nTOF) detector response in current mode to inertial confinement fusion experiments.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are several machines in this country that produce short bursts of neutrons for various applications. A few examples are the Zmachine, operated by Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM; the OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester in Rochester, NY; and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) operated by the Department of Energy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California. They all incorporate neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors which measure neutron yield, and the shapes of the waveforms from these detectors contain germane information about the plasma conditions that produce the neutrons. However, the signals can also be %E2%80%9Cclouded%E2%80%9D by a certain fraction of neutrons that scatter off structural components and also arrive at the detectors, thereby making analysis of the plasma conditions more difficult. These detectors operate in current mode - i.e., they have no discrimination, and all the photomultiplier anode charges are integrated rather than counted individually as they are in single event counting. Up to now, there has not been a method for modeling an nTOF detector operating in current mode. MCNPPoliMiwas developed in 2002 to simulate neutron and gammaray detection in a plastic scintillator, which produces a collision data output table about each neutron and photon interaction occurring within the scintillator; however, the postprocessing code which accompanies MCNPPoliMi assumes a detector operating in singleevent counting mode and not current mode. Therefore, the idea for this work had been born: could a new postprocessing code be written to simulate an nTOF detector operating in current mode? And if so, could this process be used to address such issues as the impact of neutron scattering on the primary signal? Also, could it possibly even identify sources of scattering (i.e., structural materials) that could be removed or modified to produce %E2%80%9Ccleaner%E2%80%9D neutron signals? This process was first developed and then applied to the axial neutron time of flight detectors at the ZFacility mentioned above. First, MCNPPoliMi was used to model relevant portions of the facility between the source and the detector locations. To obtain useful statistics, variance reduction was utilized. Then, the resulting collision output table produced by MCNPPoliMi was further analyzed by a MATLAB postprocessing code. This converted the energy deposited by neutron and photon interactions in the plastic scintillator (i.e., nTOF detector) into light output, in units of MeVee%D1%84 (electron equivalent) vs time. The time response of the detector was then folded into the signal via another MATLAB code. The simulated response was then compared with experimental data and shown to be in good agreement. To address the issue of neutron scattering, an %E2%80%9CIdeal Case,%E2%80%9D (i.e., a plastic scintillator was placed at the same distance from the source for each detector location) with no structural components in the problem. This was done to produce as %E2%80%9Cpure%E2%80%9D a neutron signal as possible. The simulated waveform from this %E2%80%9CIdeal Case%E2%80%9D was then compared with the simulated data from the %E2%80%9CFull Scale%E2%80%9D geometry (i.e., the detector at the same location, but with all the structural materials now included). The %E2%80%9CIdeal Case%E2%80%9D was subtracted from the %E2%80%9CFull Scale%E2%80%9D geometry case, and this was determined to be the contribution due to scattering. The time response was deconvolved out of the empirical data, and the contribution due to scattering was then subtracted out of it. A transformation was then made from dN/dt to dN/dE to obtain neutron spectra at two different detector locations.

Nelson, Alan J. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Cooper, Gary Wayne [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Fehl, David Lee; Hahn, Kelly Denise; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Smelser, Ruth Marie; Torres, Jose A.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight (nTOF) detector response in current mode to inertial confinement fusion experiments.  

SciTech Connect

There are several machines in this country that produce short bursts of neutrons for various applications. A few examples are the Zmachine, operated by Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM; the OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester in Rochester, NY; and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) operated by the Department of Energy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California. They all incorporate neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors which measure neutron yield, and the shapes of the waveforms from these detectors contain germane information about the plasma conditions that produce the neutrons. However, the signals can also be %E2%80%9Cclouded%E2%80%9D by a certain fraction of neutrons that scatter off structural components and also arrive at the detectors, thereby making analysis of the plasma conditions more difficult. These detectors operate in current mode - i.e., they have no discrimination, and all the photomultiplier anode charges are integrated rather than counted individually as they are in single event counting. Up to now, there has not been a method for modeling an nTOF detector operating in current mode. MCNPPoliMiwas developed in 2002 to simulate neutron and gammaray detection in a plastic scintillator, which produces a collision data output table about each neutron and photon interaction occurring within the scintillator; however, the postprocessing code which accompanies MCNPPoliMi assumes a detector operating in singleevent counting mode and not current mode. Therefore, the idea for this work had been born: could a new postprocessing code be written to simulate an nTOF detector operating in current mode? And if so, could this process be used to address such issues as the impact of neutron scattering on the primary signal? Also, could it possibly even identify sources of scattering (i.e., structural materials) that could be removed or modified to produce %E2%80%9Ccleaner%E2%80%9D neutron signals? This process was first developed and then applied to the axial neutron time of flight detectors at the ZFacility mentioned above. First, MCNPPoliMi was used to model relevant portions of the facility between the source and the detector locations. To obtain useful statistics, variance reduction was utilized. Then, the resulting collision output table produced by MCNPPoliMi was further analyzed by a MATLAB postprocessing code. This converted the energy deposited by neutron and photon interactions in the plastic scintillator (i.e., nTOF detector) into light output, in units of MeVee%D1%84 (electron equivalent) vs time. The time response of the detector was then folded into the signal via another MATLAB code. The simulated response was then compared with experimental data and shown to be in good agreement. To address the issue of neutron scattering, an %E2%80%9CIdeal Case,%E2%80%9D (i.e., a plastic scintillator was placed at the same distance from the source for each detector location) with no structural components in the problem. This was done to produce as %E2%80%9Cpure%E2%80%9D a neutron signal as possible. The simulated waveform from this %E2%80%9CIdeal Case%E2%80%9D was then compared with the simulated data from the %E2%80%9CFull Scale%E2%80%9D geometry (i.e., the detector at the same location, but with all the structural materials now included). The %E2%80%9CIdeal Case%E2%80%9D was subtracted from the %E2%80%9CFull Scale%E2%80%9D geometry case, and this was determined to be the contribution due to scattering. The time response was deconvolved out of the empirical data, and the contribution due to scattering was then subtracted out of it. A transformation was then made from dN/dt to dN/dE to obtain neutron spectra at two different detector locations.

Nelson, Alan J. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Cooper, Gary Wayne [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Fehl, David Lee; Hahn, Kelly Denise; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Smelser, Ruth Marie; Torres, Jose A.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Design and Analysis of Numerical Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculations with numerical models are often referred to as numerical experiments, by analogy to classical laboratory experiments. Usually, many numerical experiments are carried out to determine the response of a numerical model to variations of ...

Kenneth P. Bowman; Jerome Sacks; Yue-Fang Chang

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response of PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. Response of PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. to Answer of International Transmission Company Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company: Response of PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. to Answer of International Transmission Company Response of PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. to Answer of International Transmission Company on the application from International Transmission Company to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Canada border. Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company: Response of PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. to Answer of International Transmission Company PP-230-4 Response of PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. to Answer of International

228

International Materials Protection and Cooperation | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Materials Protection and Cooperation | National Nuclear Materials Protection and Cooperation | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog International Materials Protection and Cooperation Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > International Materials Protection and Cooperation International Materials Protection and Cooperation

229

Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Nancy Jackson Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories

230

Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Nancy Jackson Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories

231

Response Robot Evaluation Exercise Disaster City, TX DAY 1 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Response Robot Evaluation Exercise Disaster City, TX and Meeting of the ASTM International Committee on Homeland ...

2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

232

Office of EERE: International Team  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Office of EERE: International Team on AddThis.com... Policy & Analysis Technology-to-Market International International Partnerships & Projects Stakeholder Engagement...

233

My Experience in the Energy Area: An Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

My Experience in the Energy Area: An Overview My Experience in the Energy Area: An Overview Speaker(s): Debyani Ghosh Date: November 18, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Girish Ghatikar In this seminar, Dr. Ghosh will present her experience working on diverse projects in the energy field, over the course of her career. Dr. Ghosh will describe her role in leading and managing a number of Demand Response studies for prominent national and international clients, including regulatory agencies, utilities, system operators, government departments, and energy agencies. These cover market assessment and benchmarking analysis, estimating savings potential from DR programs, outlining DR program designs, assessing cost-effectiveness of DR options, conducting levelized cost analysis, and providing policy recommendations. In addition,

234

Honeywell International ESCO Qualification Sheet  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Honeywell International ESCO Qualification Sheet DOE Super ESPC Introduction to Honeywell Honeywell has a 110-year history delivering technologically advanced energy solutions to the Energy, Aerospace, Transportation, Chemical and Automation industries. Honeywell is shaping the entire energy spectrum, from cost-saving room thermostats to biofuels. Overall, nearly 50 percent of Honeywell's product portfolio is linked to energy efficiency. We estimate the global economy could operate on 10 to 25 percent less energy by using our existing technologies. Honeywell is a pioneer in performance contracting with more than 25 years of experience delivering performance-based energy solutions. At Honeywell we are building a world that's safer and more secure. More comfortable

235

Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: International  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WMD Counterterrorism & Response WMD Counterterrorism & Response Airworthiness Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) Counterterrorism & Response provides operational planning assistance and training to counter domestic and international nuclear and radiological terrorism, including: Specialized training for nuclear and explosive threats for warfighters and law enforcement Technologies for evaluating airframe integrity and other critical structural integrity Our partners include National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Department of Defense (DoD), and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Program Areas include: Airworthiness and Infrastructure Assurance Nuclear Incident Response Nuclear Counterterrorism Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives Technology Development

236

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A4. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in market exchange rates, Reference case, 2009-2040...

237

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Jordan -0.3 -0.1 0.1 0.7 0.6 0.2 ...

238

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Jordan -0.3 -0.1 0.1 0.7 0.6 Kuwait ...

239

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan 0.225 0.220 0.231 0.251 ...

240

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan 0.214 0.225 0.220 0.231 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Jordan 17.1 6.5 3.2 37.8 26.0 10.0 ...

242

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan 0.220 0.213 0.213 0.213 ...

243

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... Jordan 20.058 19.861 19.295 19.625 ...

244

International Workshop on Metrology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCOPE PROGRAM WORKSHOP FEES LODGING ABSTRACTS DEADLINES BANQUET SPONSORS DIRECTIONSVISITING ARGONNE POSTER SESSION HOME International Workshop on Metrology for X-ray and Neutron...

245

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. ... Germany 41.1 35.6 30.8 28.1 30.8 31 ...

246

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly. Consumption | ... 2013 1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q 1Q 2Q ...

247

Internal Curing Bibliography Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... de la Varga, I., Castro, J., Bentz, DP, and Weiss, WJ, Application of Internal Curing for Mixtures Containing High Volumes of Fly Ash, Cement and ...

2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

248

International Energy Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Summarizes the overall structure of the International Energy Model and its interface with other NEMS modules, mathematical specifications of behavioral relationships, and data sources and estimation methods.

Adrian Geagla

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

249

International Energy Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. ... United States 100.150 ... 180.028 Virgin Islands, U.S. 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...

250

Internal Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix F Internal Dose Estimates from NTS Fallout F-1 #12;Radiation Dose to the Population...........................................................................................40 Comparison to dose estimates from global fallout

251

International Energy Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Summarizes the overall structure of the International Energy Model and its interface with other NEMS modules, mathematical specifications of behavioral relationships, and data sources and estimation methods.

Adrian Geagla

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

252

International Energy Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phadke AAPhadke@lbl.gov (510) 486-6855 Links International Energy Studies Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Appliance Energy...

253

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F17. Delivered energy...

254

International Natural Gas Workshop  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Natural Gas Workshop U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Room 2E-069 Washington, DC 20585 and a member of ...

255

Biofuels International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels International Jump to: navigation, search Name Biofuels International Place Indiana Sector Biofuels Product Pittsburgh based biofuels project developer presently...

256

US EPR Tests Performed to confirm the Mechanical and Hydraulic Design of the Vessel Internals  

SciTech Connect

The EPR is an Evolutionary high-Power Reactor which is based on the best French and German experience of the past twenty years in plant design construction and operation. In the present detailed engineering phase of the plant under construction in Finland (Okiluoto 3) or scheduled in France (Flamanville 3), a few actions are still ongoing mainly to complement equipment validation files. Design and validation of the main EPR components were performed within Framatome ANP's engineering teams and its two Technical Centers located in France and Germany, which develop state of the art methods in the field of thermo hydraulic testing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel internals are mainly derived from components already implemented on presently operating plants, but they differ in some features from the design used in French N4 or German Konvoi. The aim of this paper is to present the tests performed to confirm the hydraulic and mechanical design of the EPR vessel internals. - Four different mock-ups are presented to illustrate these tests: - JULIETTE for the reactor pressure vessel lower internals; - ROMEO for the reactor pressure vessel upper internals; - MAGALY for the design of the skeleton-type control rod guide assembly; - HYDRAVIB for the vibratory response of the reactor pressure vessel lowers internals. (authors)

Dolleans, Philippe; Chambrin, Jean-Luc; Muller, Thierry [FRAMATOME ANP, Tour AREVA 1 place de la Coupole, 92084 PARIS La D ense (France)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Second EPRI International Decommissioning Workshop at Bristol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the proceedings of an international EPRI workshop on decommissioning and radioactive waste management. The workshop focused on a wide range of decommissioning topics, including general approaches, technical developments, and project experiences. The information presented will assist individual utilities in their decommissioning projects, and has the potential to reduce decommissioning costs.

2004-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

258

INTERNATIONAL GRADUATE graduate.carleton.ca  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

real practical experience. And our PREP Services package contains many initiatives that will help ease's greatest assets is its location in Ottawa, the nation's capital. A cosmopolitan city of close to a million. The city has an international airport and is well serviced by inter-city buses and trains. #12;ShApE yOUR f

Carleton University

259

Proceedings of the 6th International COnference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is our great pleasure to welcome you to ACM CoNEXT 2010, the 6th International COnference on emerging Networking EXperiments and Technologies. The conference is hosted by Drexel University and is held in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia. We ...

Jaudelice de Oliveira; Maximilian Ott; Tim Griffin; Muriel Medard

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

This Year's MEISPP Interns | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

This Year's MEISPP Interns This Year's MEISPP Interns This Year's MEISPP Interns August 12, 2010 - 5:56pm Addthis Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director One of the key programs of the Department of Energy's Office of Economic Impact and Diversity is our Minority Educational Institution Student Partnership Program (MEISPP). The MEISPP has become a major recruitment program for DOE managers who are committed to building the highest quality workforce at the Department. Students have unique experiences during their 10 weeks at DOE and perform substantive professional and technical work that furthers the Department's missions in energy, environment, national security and scientific discovery. Beyond having the opportunity to add to the mission of DOE, MEISPP interns receive a stipend along with paid

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

International Energy Forum Ministerial | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Energy Forum Ministerial International Energy Forum Ministerial International Energy Forum Ministerial April 24, 2006 - 10:27am Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Bodman Thank you. And let me take this opportunity to thank our hosts for their hospitality, as well as their efforts in arranging this meeting of the International Energy Forum. Let me also thank my fellow panelists and the panel Chair Minister Naimi, who I look forward to seeing again in Washington next week. These are challenging times in the energy world--demand and supply are roughly in balance, spare capacity is very slim, and continued strong economic growth around the world is fueling increasing demand. I believe that we can meet the challenge if both consumers and producers act responsibly; if we all implement policies that encourage stability,

262

PRODUCT SURVEY April 2008 GIM International  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRODUCT SURVEY April 2008 GIM International [i] Insert here the spectral bands which can Aerial Cameras The first digital aerial cameras were presented to the photogrammetric community the two companies responsible for this innovation. Nine companies now manufacture digital aerial cameras

Giger, Christine

263

REVIEW----DOE RESPONSE.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

) ) International Transmission Company ) Docket No. PP-230-4 d/b/a ITCTransmission ) RESPONSE OF PJM INTERCONNECTION, L.L.C. TO ANSWER OF INTERNATIONAL TRANSMISSION COMPANY d/b/a ITCTransmission AND SUPPLEMENTAL COMMENTS ON BEHALF OF THE MIDWEST INDEPENDENT TRANSMISSION SYSTEM OPERATOR, INC. On April 14, 2011, International Transmission Company, d/b/a ITCTransmission ("ITC" or "Applicant") filed an answer

264

International energy annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar, and wind electric power, biofuels energy for the US, and biofuels electric power for Brazil. New in the 1996 edition are estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from the consumption of petroleum and coal, and the consumption and flaring of natural gas. 72 tabs.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

International Energy Statistics  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics > Countries > International Energy Statistics International Energy Statistics Petroleum Production| Annual Monthly/Quarterly Consumption | Annual Monthly/Quarterly Capacity | Bunker Fuels | Stocks | Annual Monthly/Quarterly Reserves | Imports | Annual Monthly/Quarterly Exports | CO2 Emissions | Heat Content Natural Gas All Flows | Production | Consumption | Reserves | Imports | Exports | Carbon Dioxide Emissions | Heat Content Coal All Flows | Production | Consumption | Reserves | Imports | Exports | Carbon Dioxide Emissions | Heat Content Electricity Generation | Consumption | Capacity | Imports | Net Imports | Exports | Distribution Losses | Heat Content Renewables Electricity Generation| Electricity Consumption | Biofuels Production | Biofuels Consumption | Heat Content Total Energy

266

Letter from Commonwealth of Virginia to ENSR International Detailing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Virginia to ENSR International of Virginia to ENSR International Detailing Responses to Comments made Concerning the Modified Protocol for Downwash Modeling-Mirant Potomac River, LLC Letter from Commonwealth of Virginia to ENSR International Detailing Responses to Comments made Concerning the Modified Protocol for Downwash Modeling-Mirant Potomac River, LLC Docket No. EO-05-01: Letter from Commonwealth of Virginia to ENSR International Detailing Responses to Comments made Concerning the Modified Protocol for Downwash Modeling-Mirant Potomac River, LLC. The comments are addressed for the most part in this letter. As to the electronic media containing the modeling files, an additional copy will be necessary for the public comment process. Letter from Commonwealth of Virginia to ENSR International Detailing

267

TRIO experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The TRIO experiment is a test of in-situ tritium recovery and heat transfer performance of a miniaturized solid breeder blanket assembly. The assembly (capsule) was monitored for temperature and neutron flux profiles during irradiation and a sweep gas flowed through the capsule to an anaytical train wherein the amounts of tritium in its various chemical forms were determined. The capsule was designed to operate at different temperatures and sweep gas conditions. At the end of the experiment the amount of tritium retained in the solid was at a concentration of less than 0.1 wppM. More than 99.9% of tritium generated during the experiment was successfully recovered. The results of the experiment showed that the tritium inventories at the beginning and at the end of the experiment follow a relationship which appears to be characteristic of intragranular diffusion.

Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Misra, B.; Billone, M.C.; Bowers, D.L.; Fischer, A.K.; Greenwood, L.R.; Mattas, R.F.; Tam, S.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Observations of the Internal Tide in Monterey Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from two shipboard experiments in 1994, designed to observe the semidiurnal internal tide in Monterey Canyon, reveal semidiurnal currents of about 20 cm s?1, which is an order of magnitude larger than the estimated barotropic tidal currents. ...

Emil T. Petruncio; Leslie K. Rosenfeld; Jeffrey D. Paduan

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Former SLAC Intern is...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Former SLAC Intern is Youngest to Lead LCLS Experiment By Glenn Roberts Jr. April 4, 2013 Stephanie Mack, 20, read and reread the email in disbelief. After spending time during the...

270

The Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX) is a coordinated international project, composed of an observational field campaign and a research program, focused on the investigation of atmospheric rotors and closely related phenomena in complex ...

Vanda Grubiši?; James D. Doyle; Joachim Kuettner; Richard Dirks; Stephen A. Cohn; Laura L. Pan; Stephen Mobbs; Ronald B. Smith; C. David Whiteman; Stanley Czyzyk; Simon Vosper; Martin Weissmann; Samuel Haimov; Stephan F. J. De Wekker; Fotini Katopodes Chow

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

The Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment—ASTEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atlantic Stratocumulus Experiment (ASTEX) was conducted over the northeast Atlantic Ocean during June 1992 with substantial international collaboration. The main goal of ASTEX was to study the climatologically important transition between ...

Bruce A. Albrecht; Christopher S. Bretherton; Doug Johnson; Wayne H. Scubert; A. Shelby Frisch

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Renewable Energy Resources Inc formerly Internal Hydro International Inc |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Internal Hydro International Inc Internal Hydro International Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Energy Resources Inc (formerly Internal Hydro International Inc) Place Tampa, Florida Zip 33603 Sector Hydro Product Internal Hydro's technology takes waste, pumped pressures of fluids, gases or the constantly available natural flows of water and extracts power from them via a turbine. References Renewable Energy Resources Inc (formerly Internal Hydro International Inc)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Renewable Energy Resources Inc (formerly Internal Hydro International Inc) is a company located in Tampa, Florida . References ↑ "Renewable Energy Resources Inc (formerly Internal Hydro

273

NUCLEAR ISLANDS International Leasing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ISLANDS ISLANDS International Leasing of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Sites to Provide Enduring Assurance of Peaceful Use Christopher E. Paine and Thomas B. Cochran Current International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards do not provide adequate protection against the diversion to military use of materials or technology from certain types of sensitive nuclear fuel cycle facilities. In view of highly enriched uranium's relatively greater ease of use as a nuclear explosive material than plutonium and the significant diseconomies of commercial spent fuel reprocessing, this article focuses on the need for improved international controls over uranium enrichment facilities as the proximate justification for creation of an International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Association (INFCA). In principle, the proposal is equally applicable to alleviating the proliferation concerns provoked by nuclear fuel

274

Essays in international finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is a collection of three essays on exchange rate policies and international capital flows in emerging markets. The first chapter examines the theoretical foundations of the "fear of floating" that has been ...

Jones, Geraint Paul

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; stocks from 1973 through 1995, and trade from 1985 through 1995.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Office of Intergrated and International Energy Analysis Last modified by: Wells, Peggy Created Date: 4/3/2010 1:03:38 PM Manager: Linda E. Doman 202-586-1041

277

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Office of Intergrated and International Energy Analysis Last modified by: PE7 Created Date: 4/3/2010 1:03:38 PM Manager: Linda E. Doman 202-586-1041 Company:

278

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Office of Intergrated and International Energy Analysis Last modified by: AM4 Created Date: 4/3/2010 1:03:38 PM Manager: Linda E. Doman 202-586-1041 Company:

279

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outlook 2013 DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Brazil July 24, ... Germany Non-OECD OECD 108.00 86.00 69.00 44.00 35.00

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

MotorMaster+ International  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Motors with MotorMaster+ International * Are your plant motor systems running at optimal energy efficiency? * Do you know how to cost-effectively determine whether to repair or...

282

INTERNAL FRICTION TO BERYLLIUM  

SciTech Connect

The internal friction in Be wire specimens was measured using a simple, inverted, torsional-pendulum system. Temperatures at liquid nitrogen to 735 deg C at a frequency of about 1 cps were used. (R.E.U.)

Ang, C.; Kamber, K.T.

1963-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Solar Power International  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Solar Power International (SPI) will be held October 21-24 at McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois. The event attracts more than 15,000 professionals in solar energy and related fields and offers...

284

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F11. Delivered energy consumption in Russia by end-use sector and fuel,...

285

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F7. Delivered energy consumption in Japan by end-use sector and fuel,...

286

Mentors - Intern's First Week  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with orientation, safety training, meetings with the program administrator, a lecture, tour and settling into the workplace. By the end of the week, you should be sure your intern...

287

International Coal Market Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As this report is being finalized in November 2007, international steam coal freight-on-board (FOB) prices are at levels not seen since 1980-1982, shipping rates are at unprecedented high levels, and currency fluctuations are altering the degree to which major individual countries are impacted. This report systematically examines the history of the international coal trade, the major exporting and importing countries, and the drivers behind how trade functions. In addition, the report examines in depth t...

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

288

(International meetings on ecology)  

SciTech Connect

the travelers attended the Fifth International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL) in Yokohama, Japan, and two presented invited papers and chaired symposia. One traveler also attended the OJI International Seminar in Gifu, Japan and the Fukuoka Symposium on Theoretical Ecology in Fukuoka, Japan and presented invited papers. At these scientific gatherings, a large number of symposia and specific presentations were relevant to current research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), especially in the areas of landscape dynamics, plant physiology, and aquatic ecosystems.

DeAngelis, D.L.; Garten, C.T. Jr.; Turner, M.G.

1990-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

289

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This monthly publication provides current international oil data. The Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

University of California Santa Cruz Internal Audit & Advisory Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk Issues 19% Facilities, Construction & Maintenance 9% Financial Management 17% Human. Investigations 23 V. External Audit Coordination 24 VI. Management Corrective Actions 25 VII. Local Program community in the discharge of its oversight, management, and operating responsibilities. Internal audit

California at Santa Cruz, University of

291

Upstream Internal Hydraulic Jumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In stratified tidal flow over a sill, the character of the upstream response is determined by a Froude number Fs based on the stratification near the surface. This is distinguished from the Froude number governing the response in the neighborhood ...

Patrick F. Cummins; Laurence Armi; Svein Vagle

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Approved Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cycle 31OCT97 Exp Spokesperson Experiment Title Days 666 Clark Magnetic Rotation in 104Sn 5 667 Janssens Unsafe COULEX of the 240Pu Nucleus 3 670 Smith Exotic Structures in very...

293

Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project manual. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project, as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy and its Hanford contractors. Project services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessment of potential intakes and internal dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. Specific chapters deal with the following subjects: practices of the project, including interpretation of applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for assessment, documentation, and reporting of doses; assessment of internal dose, including summary explanations of when and how assessments are performed; recording and reporting practices for internal dose; selection of workers for bioassay monitoring and establishment of type and frequency of bioassay measurements; capability and scheduling of bioassay monitoring services; recommended dosimetry response to potential internal exposure incidents; quality control and quality assurance provisions of the program.

Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.; MacLellan, J.A.; Long, M.P.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Internal Dose Assessment (IDA) Spreadsheet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Internal Dose Assessment (IDA) Spreadsheet is to calculate internal occupational dose following the methodology described in the EPRI Alpha Monitoring Guidelines.

2007-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

295

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effectiveness: defined as cost per kWh RES-E Stakeholdermeasure is defined as the costs per kWh of RES-E, including

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Service and Balancing Energy Service (ERCOT 2006b). Loadsof a commercial energy services industry, especially loadparticipation in both energy and ancillary services markets.

Heffner, Grayson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that biomass CHP in district heating produced 2.98 TWh and200-300 GWh 24 , district heating CHP 2-3 TWh and industriallarge hydro, 30-40 TWh in district heating CHP, and 5 TWh in

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anaerobic digestion of mixed waste is eligible, but only theafter 1 April 2002. • Mixed waste is only eligible usingwaste which is purely biomass is also eligible, but when co-fired needs to be mixed

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

how to treat out-of-state renewable energy sources. AllowingPetersik, T. (2004): State Renewable Energy Requirements andmeanwhile, the state’s renewable energy fund has opted to

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AESP Brown Bag Seminar, April 18. FERC 2002a. StandardizedService and Wholesale Electric Market Design, FERC WorkingPaper FERC, March. FERC 2005. Principles for Efficient and

Heffner, Grayson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Lessons from International Experience with Electricity Market Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the US wholesale marketmonitoring process at FERC. 2. Why Electricity Markets Arewas the unwillingness of FERC and the California Public

Wolak, Frank

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Smart Metering and Electricity Demand: Technology, Economics and International Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for overall levels of advanced metering in both the electricity and gas sectors (FERC, 2006). Comparing countries and regions is a difficult task, however, because there is no single definition of what it means for a meter or a metering system...

Brophy Haney, A; Jamasb, Tooraj; Pollitt, Michael G.

303

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production increases in small-scale hydro power is 200-300estimated at 1 TWh in small-scale hydro, 2-3 TWh in large

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

feed-in tariff policy is not generally viewed as politically viable in the US,the US does not imply lack of support for a feed-in tariff

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Lessons from International Experience with Electricity Market Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Restructured Electricity Markets: An Internationalon the Office of Gas and Electricity Markets (Ofgem) Licensethe California Electricity Crisis,” The Electricity Journal,

Wolak, Frank

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Geothermal FIT Design: International Experience and U.S. Considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developing power plants is a risky endeavor, whether conventional or renewable generation. Feed-in tariff (FIT) policies can be designed to address some of these risks, and their design can be tailored to geothermal electric plant development. Geothermal projects face risks similar to other generation project development, including finding buyers for power, ensuring adequate transmission capacity, competing to supply electricity and/or renewable energy certificates (RECs), securing reliable revenue streams, navigating the legal issues related to project development, and reacting to changes in existing regulations or incentives. Although FITs have not been created specifically for geothermal in the United States to date, a variety of FIT design options could reduce geothermal power plant development risks and are explored. This analysis focuses on the design of FIT incentive policies for geothermal electric projects and how FITs can be used to reduce risks (excluding drilling unproductive exploratory wells).

Rickerson, W.; Gifford, J.; Grace, R.; Cory, K.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time, tracking expected renewable energy cost reductions. Inthrough rates Renewable energy fund Costs recovered throughfor the renewable energy industry Cost effectiveness

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Intern experience at Brown & Root, Incorporated: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This internship report describes the major activities and accomplishments during the author's one-year intership at Brown & Root in Houston, Texas. The report discusses his engineering assignments, and the necessary functions of a project engineer. The author's assignments covered essentially the technical nature and procedures of his work in several areas of fixed offshore platform design. The author presents and discusses the managerial functions of a project engineer whom he observed working in an offshore engineering company. At the end of this report, the author's accomplishments are summarized, and recommendations concerning the internship are presented.

Roengnarong Ratanaprichavej, 1949-

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and China, to name a few countries. These procedures, which stimulate strong competition between renewable

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from upgraded existing hydro power plants, can be eligibleincreases in small-scale hydro power is 200-300 GWh, larges largest utility and hydro power producer) estimates that

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LaaR Load Acting as a Resource (Texas) LMP Locational Marginal Price MCPE Market Clearing Price of Energy (Texas) NCAS Network Control Ancillary Services (Australia) NGC National...

312

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recycle payment and the electricity price, with both partiesIn November 2004, electricity prices were in the region of £included in the electricity price, which is what suppliers

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renewable energy technologies, the feed-in tariff is usuallyrenewable energy targets; 2) the feed-in tariff system; andtariff Costs recovered through rates Renewable energy fund

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gasification and anaerobic digestion of mixed waste isgasification and anaerobic digestion). • Energy crops,

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surcharge on retail electricity rates, totaling over $300impact on retail electricity rates. The result has been thatlower VAT rates for renewable electricity, and exemption of

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

ITER:The Future International Burning Plasma Experiment Present Status  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the time of procurement. #12;ITER27/4/01 Design - In-vessel Remote Handling (1) Systems near the plasma will become radioactive and will require remote maintenance, with special remote handling equipment. In27/4/01 Design - In-vessel Remote Handling (2) Comprehensive R&D has successfully demonstrated

317

International Experience in Standards and Labeling Programs for Rice Cookers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity Saving mode warm mode mode mode achivement consumption (Yen/Year)electricity ode Saving mode warmmode mode m achivement consumption (Yen/Year)electricity consumption of an IH type rice cooker is 110.9 kWh /year,

Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energikällor‘ [‘Trade with electricity certificates - a newtrade ; trade of TRECs or renewable electricity betweento small electricity consumers 26 . Trade in certificates is

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

International Experience in Standards and Labeling Programs for Rice Cookers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cookers 13 3.2 Energy Saving of Electric13 3.2.1 Energy Saving in Warm13 3.2.2 Energy Saving in Standby

Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operations, Brendan Kirby, ORNL/TM-2006-512, July. PJM 2005.Whitepaper on PJM Forward Energy Reserve: A Centralized CallManager, Retail Markets, PJM Interconnection LLC, January

Heffner, Grayson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems within renewable energy technology‘] paperEU policy-making on renewable energy promotion . Energy forof Origin as a tool for renewable energy policy formulation;

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Students Travel to SRNL for Unique Intern Experience  

The unit is designed to identify the strength and location of radiation-emitting sources, as well as distinguish between different types of ...

323

International Experience in Standards and Labeling Programs for Rice Cookers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13 3.2.2 Energy Saving in Standbyrice warming, timer, and standby modes are conducted. ForFor both the timer and standby mode testing, energy consump-

Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

2006 Young Leader International Scholar Experience By: W. Jud ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 18, 2006 ... lab visits and arranging hosts in various cities. ... times when traveling between cities. ... $25 payable to City of Atlanta can perhaps go on our.

325

CSEM WP 134 Lessons from International Experience with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the electricity supply industry that make a prospective market monitoring process essential to a well for an efficient wholesale market. These features of the electricity supply industry also make antitrust features of the electricity supply industry that make a prospective market monitoring process essential

California at Berkeley. University of

326

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity production from renewable energy (approx. 15-25electricity production from renewable energy sources andthe production of electricity from renewable energy sources

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the exemption of the electricity intensive industry from thestage addressed peat, electricity intensive industry and theECN-C--05-025 Electricity intensive industry. Companies in

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can produce considerable real-time price volatility; Marketreceive a real-time Locational Marginal Price (LMP) greatermarkets in real-time and set the balancing price. These same

Heffner, Grayson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

real-time energy balancing market calculates clearing pricescurtailed energy priced at the sport market price, which canMarginal Price Market Clearing Price of Energy (Texas)

Heffner, Grayson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a premium on the electricity bill is paid voluntarily bysurcharge on the electricity bill. The electricity suppliera separate item on the electricity bill. In either case, the

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass and hydro producers do not consider fluctuations in TREC pricesbiomass and small scale hydropower has doubled, and together with generally high electricity pricesbiomass and hydro power producers show that they do not see uncertainties connected with price

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydropower, waste and co-firing of biomass 11 . England &except micro hydro and co-firing station) are eligible’. Inprevious period. These co-firing rules come from the recent

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sikt? [‘How apt is the renewable electricity certificatesupply of electricity from renewable energy sources in theenergiteknik‘ [‘The renewable electricity certificate system

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constraints in a hydro-dominated energy-only market create aservice markets. Energy-limited (e.g. some hydro resources)

Heffner, Grayson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Window Functions for CMB Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the applicability and derivation of window functions for cosmic microwave background experiments on large and intermediate angular scales. These window functions describe the response of the experiment to power in a particular mode of the fluctuation spectrum. We give general formulae, illustrated with specific examples, for the most common observing strategies.

Martin White; Mark Srednicki

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

International Energy Outlook - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2004 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and issues related to electricity and the environment. The International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2025. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2004 are consistent with those published in EIAÂ’s Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2004 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO2004 projections are based on U.S. and foreign government laws in effect on October 1, 2003.

337

ORISE: Graduate Student Research Experiences - Benjamin Martin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiences program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is trying to improve emergency response by developing computer codes to fuse together two different kinds of satellite...

338

international | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

international international Dataset Summary Description These estimates are derived from the best available solar resource datasets available to NREL by country. These vary in spatial resolution from 1 km to 1 degree (approximately 100 km) depending on the data source. High spatial resolution datasets (1 km to 40 km cells) were modeled to support country or regional projects. Where high resolution datasets were not available, data from NASA's Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) version 6 database were used. The data represents total potential solar energy per year as a function of land area per solar class (KWh/m²/day). Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords capacity clean energy energy international

339

International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 International Energy Module The NEMS International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of future U.S. and world crude-like liquids production and consumption to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. liquid fuels markets on the international petroleum market. For each year of the forecast, the NEMS IEM computes oil prices, provides a supply curve of world crude-like liquids, generates a worldwide oil supply- demand balance with regional detail, and computes quantities of crude oil and light and heavy petroleum products imported into the United States by export region. Changes in the oil price (WTI), which is defined as the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil delivered to Cushing, Oklahoma in

340

International Energy Outlook 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: Today, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) releases its mid-term projections of international energy use and carbon emissions, published in the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000). The IEO2000 report provides an assessment of world energy markets with projections of regional energy consumption, energy consumption by primary fuel, electricity consumption, carbon emissions, nuclear generating capacity, international coal trade flows, and energy use in the transportation sector. World oil production projections are also included in the report. The report is an extension of EIA's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), and the U.S. projections that appear in the IEO are consistent with those published in the AEO. World energy consumption in this year's IEO2000 is projected to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

International Energy Outlook 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ieo99cvr.gif (8385 bytes) ieo99cvr.gif (8385 bytes) Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. The report is an extension of EIAÂ’s Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). U.S. projections appearing in IEO99 are consistent with those published in AEO99. IEO99 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private

342

International Energy Outlook 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2000 2000 with projections to 2020 March 16, 2000 Jay E. Hakes Energy Information Administration Next slide Back to first slide View graphic version Notes: Today, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) releases its mid-term projections of international energy use and carbon emissions, published in the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000). The IEO2000 report provides an assessment of world energy markets with projections of regional energy consumption, energy consumption by primary fuel, electricity consumption, carbon emissions, nuclear generating capacity, international coal trade flows, and energy use in the transportation sector. World oil production projections are also included in the report. The report is an extension of EIA's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO),

343

International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 23 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 International Energy Module The NEMS International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of future U.S. and world crude-like liquids production and consumption to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. liquid fuels markets on the international petroleum market. For each year of the forecast, the NEMS IEM computes world oil prices, provides a supply curve of world crude-like liquids, generates a worldwide oil supply- demand balance with regional detail, and computes quantities of crude oil and light and heavy petroleum products imported into

344

International energy annual 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power and geothermal, solar, and wind electric power. Also included are biomass electric power for Brazil and the US, and biomass, geothermal, and solar energy produced in the US and not used for electricity generation. This report is published to keep the public and other interested parties fully informed of primary energy supplies on a global basis. The data presented have been largely derived from published sources. The data have been converted to units of measurement and thermal values (Appendices E and F) familiar to the American public. 93 tabs.

NONE

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

International energy outlook 1994  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Outlook 1994 (IEO94) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets between 1990 and 2010. The report is provided as a statistical service to assist energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. These forecasts are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Depart. of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO94 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1993-which means that provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan unveiled by the Administration in mid-October are not reflected by the US projections.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 Internation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

from PJM Interconnection LLC Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company: Response to Late Motion to Intervene from PJM...

347

North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade North America: Regulation of International Electricity...

349

INTERNAL CUTTING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for removing material from the interior of a hollow workpiece so as to form a true spherical internal surface in a workpiece, or to cut radial slots of an adjustable constant depth in an already established spherical internal surface. This is accomplished by a spring loaded cutting tool adapted to move axially wherein the entire force urging the tool against the workpiece is derived from the spring. Further features of importance involve the provision of a seal between the workpiece and the cutting device and a suction device for carrying away particles of removed material.

Russell, W.H. Jr.

1959-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This document is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. The Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand and trade in OECD countries.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Second United Nations International Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Confidential until official release during Conference Confidential until official release during Conference A/CONF 15/P/729 Abstract (USA) 7 March 1958 ORIGINAL: ENGLISH HIGH-ENERGY PHYSICS WITH HYDROGEN BUBBLE CHAMBERS~ Prepared by Abstract , _ - - ' ~ u i s W. Akvarez . I e - 4 - - a c bubble chambers in high-energy physics experiments. This paper @.scusses recent experience with liquid hydrogen # - . . . 1 sify of California, Berkeley, California / This document is DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

352

MACS as a tool for international inspections  

SciTech Connect

The MACS/ACRS (Managed Access by Controlled Sensing/Access by Controlled Remote Sensing) system is a collection of communication devices, video capability, and distance-measuring equipment which can effectively substitute for the physical presence of a challenge inspector within a facility. The MACS design allows growth of the prototype, developed in response to the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), into a versatile device for inspection of sensitive nuclear facilities under other international arrangements, for example the proposed Fissile Material Cutoff Convention. A MACS/ACRS-type system in a standard, international-recognized configuration could resolve sensitive information and safety concerns through providing a means of achieving the goals of an inspection while excluding the inspector. We believe the technology used to develop MACS for the Defense Nuclear Agency, followed by ACRS for the Department of Energy, is universally adaptable for minimally-intrusive managed-access international inspections of sensitive sites.

Curtiss, J.A.; Indusi, J.P.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

International Smelting Technology Symposium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vacuum Distillation Refining of Crude Tin - Thermodynamics Analysis and Experiments on the Removal of Arsenic from the Crude Tin · Validating Temperature ...

354

Darrell Kicker International Exchange Coordinator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International University Doshisha University Hakuoh University Hiroshima University Hiroshima City University

355

International Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Activities International Activities International Activities International Activities The International Program assists the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) in identifying technologies and strategies for waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, spent nuclear fuel and surplus nuclear material disposition, and facility deactivation and decommissioning. The International Program seeks to transform advances in science and engineering into practical solutions for environmental remediation. Collaboration with governmental, academic, and industrial organizations in other countries expands the technical depth of the EM program. Working with the international community offers the opportunity to develop consensus on approaches to science, technology and policy for environmental

356

International energy outlook 1996  

SciTech Connect

This International Energy Outlook presents historical data from 1970 to 1993 and EIA`s projections of energy consumption and carbon emissions through 2015 for 6 country groups. Prospects for individual fuels are discussed. Summary tables of the IEO96 world energy consumption, oil production, and carbon emissions projections are provided in Appendix A. The reference case projections of total foreign energy consumption and of natural gas, coal, and renewable energy were prepared using EIA`s World Energy Projection System (WEPS) model. Reference case projections of foreign oil production and consumption were prepared using the International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Nuclear consumption projections were derived from the International Nuclear Model, PC Version (PC-INM). Alternatively, nuclear capacity projections were developed using two methods: the lower reference case projections were based on analysts` knowledge of the nuclear programs in different countries; the upper reference case was generated by the World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES)--a demand-driven model. In addition, the NEMS Coal Export Submodule (CES) was used to derive flows in international coal trade. As noted above, foreign projections of electricity demand are now projected as part of the WEPS. 64 figs., 62 tabs.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

ENGINEERING InternatIonal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and multilateral, for example, the asian development Bank, International atomic energy agency (united nations and the Sydney cBd, our city campus is easily accessible by bus and train. close to cosmopolitan inner-city suburbs such as glebe, Surry Hills and darling Harbour, the city campus is surrounded by places to shop

University of Technology, Sydney

358

INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL FOR SCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International CLIVAR Project Office, CLIVAR Publication Series No. 98. (not peer reviewed) #12;3 CONTENTS Part 1, are they predictable and how will they be affected by climate change? The goals of the workshop were to review, and its role in recent southern hemisphere climate change was reviewed. Measures of the SAM were also

Quartly, Graham

359

Requirements for Xenon International  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

360

International Children's Book Day  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Children's Book Day April 2nd 2013 Folktales Storytelling & wORKSHOP By Barry Stewart, Lobby 2pm ­ 3 pm: UF Smathers Library, Room 1A Books with WingsBy Peter Sís 7pm ­ 9pm: PK Yonge Performing Arts Center 1080 SW 11th Street, Gainesville Peter Sís Award Winning Children's Book Author

Watson, Craig A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Internal split field generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

Thundat; ,Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

362

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outlook 2013 DOE/EIA-0484(2013) ... 930.90 540.30 1982.00 2836.01 1193.30 1092.45 550.26 1983.00 3033.53

363

International Analysis and Planning.pub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experience in Transportation Experience in Transportation Analysis and Planning Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies Research Brief Project Description Country or Region Vehicle emissions planning for the US Agency for International Development in India. ORNL staff helped USAID, the government of India, and the Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers establish emission standards for two wheel motorcycles. Transportation Infrastructure Investment Strategies for Rail, Highway, and Waterway Systems for the World Bank in Bangladesh.

364

Applying augmented reality to consumer garment try-on experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experience in this paper refers to the sentimental episode of consumers through service. Through experience or service, consumers can reach their internal sentiment. In terms of the general garment try-on, if consumers cannot experience the practical ... Keywords: augmented reality, consumer, experience, graphical user interface, human-machine interactive system, usability engineering methods

Alfred Chen; Chen-Yuan Kao; Ying-Hsiu Chen; Wen-Cheng Wang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Upstream Internal Jumps in Stratified Sill Flow: Observations of Formation, Evolution, and Release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-dependent response of upstream undular bores and internal hydraulic jumps from initial formation to eventual release is documented. Two events, characterized by qualitatively different responses, are discussed. In the first case, an ...

Patrick F. Cummins; Laurence Armi

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

SANE experiment  

SciTech Connect

The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) is a measurement of parallel and near-perpendicular double spin asymmetries in an inclusive electron scattering. The main goal of the experiment was to measure A{sub {parallel}} and A{sub 80} and extract the spin asymmetries of the proton A{sub 1}{sup p}, A{sub 2}{sup p} and spin structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup p}. Using the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's polarized electron beam and the University of Virginia's polarized frozen ammonia ({sup 14}NH{sub 3}) target in Hall C, the experiment ran in 2009, collecting data in a Q{sup 2} region from 2.5 to 6.5 GeV{sup 2} and between Bjorken x of 0.3 to 0.8. Particle detection was accomplished using the Big Electron Telescope Array (BETA), a novel non-magnetic detector. This talk will address the progress of the analysis designed to extract the proton spin asymmetries and structure functions. Preliminary results will be presented.

H. Baghdasaryan, SANE Collaboration

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting (OIAF). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John Conti, Director, International, Economic and Greenhouse Gases Division (202/586-4430). Specific questions about the report should be referred to Linda E. Doman (202/586-1041 or linda.doman@eia.doe.gov) or the following analysts: Macroeconomic Assumptions Nasir Khilji (nasir.khilji@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1294) World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler (george.butler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9503) Natural Gas Phyllis Martin (phyllis.martin@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9592) Justine Bardin (justine.baren@eia.doe.gov 202/586-3508) Coal Michael Mellish (michael.mellish@eia.doe.gov,

368

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, or Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division. Specific questions about the report should be referred toLinda E. Doman (202/586-1041) or the following analysts: World Energy Consumption Arthur Andersen (art.andersen@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1441) Linda E. Doman (linda.doman@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1041) World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler (george.butler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9503) Perry Lindstrom (perry.lindstrom@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-0934) Reformulated Gasoline

369

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 (IEO2007) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Admin- istration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2007 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), which was pre- pared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2007 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associa- tions, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Orga- nization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). Projections in IEO2007 are divided according to Organi- zation for Economic Cooperation and Development members (OECD) and non-members (non-OECD). There are

370

International Energy Outlook 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 International Energy Outlook 1997 April 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, Energy Demand and Integration Division;

371

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 (IEO2006) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administra- tion (EIA) of the outlook for international energy mar- kets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2006 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), which was pre- pared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2006 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associa- tions, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Orga- nization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). IEO2006 focuses exclusively on marketed energy. Non- marketed energy sources, which continue to play an important role in some developing countries, are not included

372

International Energy Outlook 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5) 5) Distribution Category UC-950 International Energy Outlook 1995 May 1995 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, Energy Demand and Integration Division;

373

International Energy Outlook - Electicity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2004 Electricity Electricity consumption nearly doubles in the IEO2004 projections. Developing nations in Asia are expected to lead the increase in world electricity use. Figure 60. World Net Electricity Consumptin, 2001-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 61. World Net Electricity Consumptin by Region, 2001-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World net electricity consumption is expected nearly double to over the next two decades, according to the International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) reference case forecast. Total demand for electricity is projected to increase on average by 2.3 percent per year, from 13,290

374

International Energy Outlook 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

contacts.gif (2957 bytes) contacts.gif (2957 bytes) The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, or Arthur T. Andersen, Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division. Specific questions about the report should be referred to Linda E. Doman (202/586-1041) or the following analysts: Report Contact World Energy Consumption Linda E. Doman - 202/586-1041 linda.doman@eia.doe.gov World Oil Markets G. Daniel Butler - 202/586-9503 gbutler@eia.doe.gov Stacy MacIntyre - 202/586-9795- (Consumption) stacy.macintyre@eia.doe.gov Natural Gas Linda E. Doman - 202/586-1041

375

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This monthly publication provides current data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world, presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production, oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

International Politics of Bhutan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to ratify the Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Comprehensive Test Ban treaties, Bhutan has also not ratified them. Bhutan supported India’s nuclear test in 1998. Journal of Bhutan Studies 106 Conclusions In conclusion we could say that no single... characterized by its close and intimate relationship with India. It agreed to be advised by India in international affairs. A treaty to this effect was signed in 1949 (Rose 1977, 77), before the country abandoned its isolation, but took on importance only...

Galay, Karma

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

International petroleum statistics report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a monthly publication which provides current data on international oil production,demand,imports and stocks. This report has four sections which contain time series data on world oil production and oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Also included is oil supply/demand balance information for the world, and data on oil imports and trade by OECD countries.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

International energy outlook 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and economic outlook, followed by energy consumption by end-use sector. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas, world coal market and electricity consumption and supply are then discussed. The final chapter covers energy-related carbon dioxide emissions.

NONE

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

International Energy Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. ... Total Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Loading ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international data. The report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent 12 months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1996; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1996; and OECD trade from 1986 through 1996.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand Response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

383

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

384

International Potato Center POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Potato Center POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Ref.: 10-35/PDG/IRS/HQ Post ­Doctoral Appointment, Peru. The Center: CIP is a not-for-profit international agricultural research organization

Wang, Z. Jane

385

Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; David W. Nigg

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; David W. Nigg

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Hanford internal dosimetry program manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs.

Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Aldridge, T.L.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

NREL: International Activities Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protection Agency, Millennium Challenge Corporation, Overseas Private Development Investment Corporation, as well as numerous international sponsors and partners, including the...

389

Young Leader International Scholar Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS ESSENTIALS. MEMBERS ... The chosen International Scholars also spend a few days visiting select industrial facilities, research labs, or universities.

390

Internal absorber solar collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thin solar collecting panels are described made from arrays of small rod collectors consisting of a refracting dielectric rod lens with an absorber imbedded within it and a reflecting mirror coated on the back side of the dielectric rod. Non-tracking collector panels on vertical walls or roof tops receive approximately 90% of solar radiation within an acceptance zone 60.degree. in elevation angle by 120.degree. or more in the azimuth sectors with a collector concentration ratio of approximately 3.0. Miniaturized construction of the circular dielectric rods with internal absorbers reduces the weight per area of glass, plastic and metal used in the collector panels. No external parts or insulation are needed as heat losses are low due to partial vacuum or low conductivity gas surrounding heated portions of the collector. The miniature internal absorbers are generally made of solid copper with black selective surface and the collected solar heat is extracted at the collector ends by thermal conductivity along the absorber rods. Heat is removed from end fittings by use of liquid circulants. Several alternate constructions are provided for simplifying collector panel fabrication and for preventing the thermal expansion and contraction of the heated absorber or circulant tubes from damaging vacuum seals. In a modified version of the internal absorber collector, oil with temperature dependent viscosity is pumped through a segmented absorber which is now composed of closely spaced insulated metal tubes. In this way the circulant is automatically diverted through heated portions of the absorber giving higher collector concentration ratios than theoretically possible for an unsegmented absorber.

Sletten, Carlyle J. (106 Nagog Hill Rd., Acton, MA 01720); Herskovitz, Sheldon B. (88 Hammond St., Acton, MA 01720); Holt, F. S. (46 Emerson Rd., Winchester, MA 01890); Sletten, E. J. (Chestnut Hill Rd. R.F.D. Rte. #4, Amherst, NH 03031)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

International energy annual, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This document presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 200 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy includes hydroelectric, geothermal, solar and wind electric power and alcohol for fuel. The data were largely derived from published sources and reports from US Embassy personnel in foreign posts. EIA also used data from reputable secondary sources, industry reports, etc.

NONE

1995-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

392

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

B B World Energy Projection System The projections of world energy consumption published annually by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the International Energy Outlook (IEO) are derived from the World Energy Projection System (WEPS). WEPS is an integrated set of personal-computer-based spreadsheets containing data compilations, assumption specifications, descriptive analysis procedures, and projection models. The WEPS accounting framework incorporates projections from independently documented models and assumptions about the future energy intensity of economic activity (ratios of total energy consumption divided by gross domestic product [GDP]) and about the rate of incremental energy requirements met by natural gas, coal, and renewable energy sources (hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, wind, biomass, and

393

International energy annual 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Energy Annual presents information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu). Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Data are provided on crude oil refining capacity and electricity installed capacity by type. Prices are included for selected crude oils and for refined petroleum products in selected countries. Population and Gross Domestic Product data are also provided.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Internal combustion engine  

SciTech Connect

An improvement to an internal combustion engine is disclosed that has a fuel system for feeding a fuel-air mixture to the combustion chambers and an electrical generation system, such as an alternator. An electrolytic cell is attached adjacent to the engine to generate hydrogen and oxygen upon the application of a voltage between the cathode and anode of the electrolytic cell. The gas feed connects the electrolytic cell to the engine fuel system for feeding the hydrogen and oxygen to the engine combustion chambers. Improvements include placing the electrolytic cell under a predetermined pressure to prevent the electrolyte from boiling off, a cooling system for the electrolytic cell and safety features.

Valdespino, J.M.

1981-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

395

International Space Station Again  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the fifth time in 2 1/2 years, the International Space Station (ISS) had to execute a collision avoidance maneuver in early April to ensure a safe miss distance for a piece of orbital debris. As solar activity increases during the next few years, the frequency of ISS collision avoidance might increase as many hundreds of resident space objects drift down through the ISS orbital regime. The subject of concern in late March 2011 was a fragment from Cosmos 2251, the Russian communications satellite which had accidentally collided with the U.S. Iridium 33 communications satellite in February 2009, producing more than

Iss Airlock Shields; A Note On Active; A Publication Of

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

International petroleum statistics report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This monthly publication provides international oil data for January 1998. The report presents data on oil production, demand, imports, and stocks in four sections. Section 1 containes time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 containes annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

International energy outlook 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and an economic outlook. The IEO2005 projections cover a 24 year period. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas and coal reserves and resources, consumption and trade discussed. The chapter on electricity deals with primary fuel use for electricity generation, and regional developments. The final section is entitled 'Energy-related greenhouse gas emissions'.

NONE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to Late Motion to Intervene Response to Late Motion to Intervene from FirstEnergy Service Corporation Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company: Response to Late Motion to Intervene from FirstEnergy Service Corporation Response from International Transmission Company to late motion to intervene from FirstEnergy Service Corporation in the matter of the application for a presidential permit authorizing International Transmission Company to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company More Documents & Publications Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company: Response to Late Motion to Intervene of New York

399

Automated Demand Response Today  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) has progressed over recent years beyond manual and semi-automated DR to include growing implementation and experience with fully automated demand response (AutoDR). AutoDR has been shown to be of great value over manual and semi-automated DR because it reduces the need for human interactions and decisions, and it increases the speed and reliability of the response. AutoDR, in turn, has evolved into the specification known as OpenADR v1.0 (California Energy Commission, PIER Program, C...

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

400

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H13. World net liquids-fired electricity generation by region and country, 2010-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 93 74 68 66 64 62 60 -1.5 United States a 37 20 17 18 18 18 18 -2.3 Canada 7 7 6 6 6 5 5 -1.0 Mexico/Chile 49 47 45 42 40 38 36 -1.0 OECD Europe 77 73 70 66 63 60 57 -1.0 OECD Asia 112 157 102 97 92 87 83 -1.0 Japan 92 137 83 79 75 71 68 -1.0 South Korea 18 17 16 15 15 14 13 -1.0 Australia/New Zealand 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 -1.0 Total OECD 282 303 239 229 219 209 200 -1.1 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A8. World nuclear energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 894 899 932 978 1,032 1,054 1,030 1,066 0.6 United States a 799 807 820 885 912 908 875 903 0.4 Canada 86 86 99 81 99 117 118 118 1.0 Mexico/Chile 10 6 12 12 21 29 37 46 7.3 OECD Europe 840 867 892 929 1,045 1,065 1,077 1,073 0.7 OECD Asia 406 415 301 447 490 551 557 576 1.1 Japan 266 274 103 192 200 206 209 209 -0.9 South Korea 140 141 198 255 291 346 348 367 3.2 Australia/NewZealand 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- Total OECD 2,140 2,181 2,124 2,354 2,567 2,670 2,664 2,715 0.7 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 272 274 344 414 475 533 592 630 2.8 Russia

402

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A12. World carbon dioxide emissions from natural gas use by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,511 1,563 1,686 1,793 1,888 1,987 2,114 2,233 1.2 United States a 1,222 1,266 1,357 1,404 1,431 1,468 1,528 1,570 0.7 Canada 170 162 171 199 223 240 255 271 1.7 Mexico/Chile 119 135 158 190 234 279 331 392 3.6 OECD Europe 1,024 1,082 1,086 1,123 1,144 1,215 1,277 1,348 0.7 OECD Asia 347 377 408 438 478 505 539 561 1.3 Japan 205 215 242 257 276 288 293 293 1.0 South Korea 72 90 91 98 110 117 136 148 1.7 Australia/NewZealand 70 71 75 83 91 101 110 119 1.7 Total OECD 2,882 3,022 3,180 3,353 3,510

403

International energy outlook 1998  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Outlook 1998 (IEO98) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. Projections in IEO98 are displaced according to six basic country groupings. The industrialized region includes projections for four individual countries -- the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Japan -- along with the subgroups Western Europe and Australasia (defined as Australia, New Zealand, and the US Territories). The developing countries are represented by four separate regional subgroups: developing Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Central and South America. China and India are represented in developing Asia. New to this year`s report, country-level projections are provided for Brazil -- which is represented in Central and South America. Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (EE/FSU) are considered as a separate country grouping. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in five fuel chapters, with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. Summary tables of the IEO98 projections for world energy consumption, carbon emissions, oil production, and nuclear power generating capacity are provided in Appendix A. 88 figs., 77 tabs.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

International Clean Energy Coalition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2003, the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and National Energy Technology Laboratories (NETL) collaboratively established the International Clean Energy Coalition (ICEC). The coalition consisting of energy policy-makers, technologists, and financial institutions was designed to assist developing countries in forming and supporting local approaches to greenhouse gas mitigation within the energy sector. ICEC's work focused on capacity building and clean energy deployment in countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation. Under ICEC, the coalition formed a steering committee consisting of NARUC members and held a series of meetings to develop and manage the workplan and define successful outcomes for the projects. ICEC identified India as a target country for their work and completed a country assessment that helped ICEC build a framework for discussion with Indian energy decisionmakers including two follow-on in-country workshops. As of the conclusion of the project in 2010, ICEC had also conducted outreach activities conducted during United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Ninth Conference of Parties (COP 9) and COP 10. The broad goal of this project was to develop a coalition of decision-makers, technologists, and financial institutions to assist developing countries in implementing affordable, effective and resource appropriate technology and policy strategies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Project goals were met through international forums, a country assessment, and in-country workshops. This project focused on countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation.

Erin Skootsky; Matt Gardner; Bevan Flansburgh

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

405

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1084 through 1994.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Utility Communication Architecture (UCA) International Testing and Quality Assurance Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document covers the status and background of the Testing Quality Assurance Program (QAP) for the Utility Communication Architecture International Users Group (UCAIug) and the related support for testing of International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61850 conformant devices. Through a project sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), American Electric Power, and other founding utilities, the UCAIug has been given the responsibility for promoting the Utility Communication Archite...

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

407

Proceedings: Fourth International Conference on Managing Hazardous Air Pollutants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 have focused attention on hazardous air pollutants emissions, including those associated with fossil fuel power plants. In response to these national initiatives, as well as to international, regional, and state initiatives, attendees at the Fourth International Conference on Managing Hazardous Air Pollutants exchanged ideas on the scientific basis for concerns about and solutions to air toxics management needs.

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

408

INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. In lieu of a field installation on an abandoned pipeline, a preliminary nondestructive testing protocol is being developed to determine the success or failure of the fiber-reinforced liner pipeline repairs. Optimization and validation activities for carbon-fiber repair methods are ongoing.

Bill Bruce; Nancy Porter; George Ritter; Matt Boring; Mark Lozev; Ian Harris; Bill Mohr; Dennis Harwig; Robin Gordon; Chris Neary; Mike Sullivan

2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

409

INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. Development of a comprehensive test plan for this process is recommended for use in the field trial portion of this program.

Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

410

INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. The first round of optimization and validation activities for carbon-fiber repairs are complete. Development of a comprehensive test plan for this process is recommended for use in the field trial portion of this program.

Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

International Truck | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truck Truck Jump to: navigation, search Name International Truck Place Atlanta, GA Website http://www.internationaltruck. References International Truck[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Other Relationship Partnering Center within NREL Transportation Technologies and Systems Partnership Year 2007 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! International Truck is a company located in Atlanta, GA. References ↑ "International Truck" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=International_Truck&oldid=381698" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

412

Sandia Weapon Intern Program visits KCP | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Weapon Intern Program visits KCP | National Nuclear Security Weapon Intern Program visits KCP | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Sandia Weapon Intern Program visits KCP Sandia Weapon Intern Program visits KCP Posted By Office of Public Affairs Participants in Sandia's Weapon Intern Program recently visited and

413

International Working Group Meeting Focuses on Nuclear Power Infrastructure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Working Group Meeting Focuses on Nuclear Power International Working Group Meeting Focuses on Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development and Financing of New Nuclear Projects International Working Group Meeting Focuses on Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development and Financing of New Nuclear Projects December 15, 2009 - 1:09pm Addthis VIENNA, AUSTRIA - The multi-nation Infrastructure Development Working Group (IDWG) held its fifth meeting and also a workshop on the financing of international nuclear power projects in Vienna, Austria, on December 9-10, 2009. An official from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) led the working group meeting. "As a key component of the international Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program, the Infrastructure Development Working Group supports the safe, secure and responsible use of nuclear energy," said

414

Management Responsibilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Responsibilities Management Responsibilities Depleted UF6 Management Responsibilities DOE has responsibility for safe and efficient management of approximately 700,000 metric tons of depleted UF6. Organizational Responsibilities In the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for managing all the depleted uranium that has been generated by the government and has been declared surplus to national defense needs. In addition, as a result of two memoranda of agreement that have been signed between the DOE and USEC, the DOE has assumed management responsibility for approximately 145,000 metric tons of depleted UF6 that has been or will be generated by USEC. Any additional depleted UF6 that USEC generates will be USEC's responsibility to manage. DOE Management Responsibility

415

Blocking response surface designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design of experiments involving more than one blocking factor and quantitative explanatory variables is discussed, the focus being on two key aspects of blocked response surface designs: optimality and orthogonality. First, conditions for orthogonally ... Keywords: D-optimality, Exchange algorithm, Fixed blocks, Orthogonality, Random blocks

P. Goos; A. N. Donev

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

International Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Programs International Programs International Programs The Office of Environmental Management (EM) International Program seeks out international technical experts to support EM's mission of accelerated risk reduction and cleanup of the environmental legacy of the nation's nuclear weapons program and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. To achieve this, EM pursues collaborations with foreign government organizations, educational institutions, and private industry to identify technologies that can address the site cleanup needs of the U.S. Department of Energy. The EM International Program currently works with the Russian Federation and Ukraine through cooperative bilateral arrangements to support EM's accelerated cleanup and closure mission. The EM International Program is also currently evaluating the potential benefits

417

International Team | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Team International Team International Team The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE's) International Team advances the progress of EERE's domestic programs and accelerates global deployment of U.S. clean energy products and services through international collaboration. To realize the benefits of international collaboration, we coordinate with other offices in the U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. government agencies to identify, negotiate and actively manage targeted partnerships and projects that help advance our strategic goals. The collaborative research we support is either in the "pre-competitive" space or includes intellectual property issues that have been agreed upon in advance. All funds support U.S.-based project performers or international organizations

418

Governance of the International Linear Collider Project  

SciTech Connect

Governance models for the International Linear Collider Project are examined in the light of experience from similar international projects around the world. Recommendations for one path which could be followed to realize the ILC successfully are outlined. The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a unique endeavour in particle physics; fully international from the outset, it has no 'host laboratory' to provide infrastructure and support. The realization of this project therefore presents unique challenges, in scientific, technical and political arenas. This document outlines the main questions that need to be answered if the ILC is to become a reality. It describes the methodology used to harness the wisdom displayed and lessons learned from current and previous large international projects. From this basis, it suggests both general principles and outlines a specific model to realize the ILC. It recognizes that there is no unique model for such a laboratory and that there are often several solutions to a particular problem. Nevertheless it proposes concrete solutions that the authors believe are currently the best choices in order to stimulate discussion and catalyze proposals as to how to bring the ILC project to fruition. The ILC Laboratory would be set up by international treaty and be governed by a strong Council to whom a Director General and an associated Directorate would report. Council would empower the Director General to give strong management to the project. It would take its decisions in a timely manner, giving appropriate weight to the financial contributions of the member states. The ILC Laboratory would be set up for a fixed term, capable of extension by agreement of all the partners. The construction of the machine would be based on a Work Breakdown Structure and value engineering and would have a common cash fund sufficiently large to allow the management flexibility to optimize the project's construction. Appropriate contingency, clearly apportioned at both a national and global level, is essential if the project is to be realised. Finally, models for running costs and decommissioning at the conclusion of the ILC project are proposed. This document represents an interim report of the bodies and individuals studying these questions inside the structure set up and supervised by the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA). It represents a request for comment to the international community in all relevant disciplines, scientific, technical and most importantly, political. Many areas require further study and some, in particular the site selection process, have not yet progressed sufficiently to be addressed in detail in this document. Discussion raised by this document will be vital in framing the final proposals due to be published in 2012 in the Technical Design Report being prepared by the Global Design Effort of the ILC.

Foster, B.; /Oxford U.; Barish, B.; /Caltech; Delahaye, J.P.; /CERN; Dosselli, U.; /INFN, Padua; Elsen, E.; /DESY; Harrison, M.; /Brookhaven; Mnich, J.; /DESY; Paterson, J.M.; /SLAC; Richard, F.; /Orsay, LAL; Stapnes, S.; /CERN; Suzuki, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Wormser, G.; /Orsay, LAL; Yamada, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - International collaborations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

international-collaborations PPPL international-collaborations PPPL collaborates in fusion experiments conducted by research institutions around the world. Such collaborations include supplying diagnostic equipment to ITER, a joint venture of the European Union, the United States and five other countries that is under construction in the south of France to demonstrate the feasibility of fusion power. en Multinational achievement: PPPL collaborates on record fusion plasma in tokamak in China http://www.pppl.gov/news/2013/11/multinational-achievement-pppl-collaborates-record-fusion-plasma-tokamak-china

A multinational team led by Chinese researchers in

420

International Builders' Show | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Builders' Show Builders' Show International Builders' Show February 14, 2008 - 11:29am Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you, Andy, and thank you all for being here. The world has reached an energy crossroads. Rising global energy demand and the need for more environmentally-responsible energy production and consumption have presented us with a number of global challenges that require global solutions. Every American has a role to play in meeting these challenges. And that's why I am very pleased to be here at the International Builders' Show, to tour the floor and to see the technologies that are penetrating the marketplace - many of which originated in DOE's network of world-class national laboratories. I also pleased to be here with the National Association of Home Builders

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

International Electricity Trade - Open Access | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Electricity Trade - Open Access International Electricity Trade - Open Access DOE has consistently expressed its policy that international electricity trade should be...

422

Florida International University | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Spotlight Archive Spotlight Archive Contact Florida International University Professors and Faculty of Interest Prof. Osama Mohammed receives IEEE Energy Conversion Award Prof. Osama Mohammed receives IEEE Energy Conversion Award Prof. Madhavan Nair's groundbreading research may lead to new hope in the battle Prof. Madhavan Nair's groundbreading research may lead to new hope in the battle against Neuro-AIDS Asst. Prof. Vagelis Hristidis awarded Google Research Award Asst. Prof. Vagelis Hristidis awarded Google Research Award Exceptional Students and Alumnus DOE Fellow Duriem Calderin on his way to DOE's Hanford Site DOE Fellow Duriem Calderin on his way to DOE's Hanford Site DOE Fellow, Rosa Ramirez hired by DOE's Environmental Management Professional De DOE Fellow, Rosa Ramirez hired by DOE's Environmental Management Professional Development Corps

423

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights Growth in energy use is projected worldwide through 2020. The demand for electricity in homes, business, and industry is growing in all regions, as is the demand for petroleum-powered personal transportation. The International Energy Outlook 1998 (IEO98) reference case forecast indicates that by 2020, the world will consume three times the energy it consumed 28 years ago in 1970 (Figure 2). Much of the projected growth in energy consumption is attributed to expectations of rapid increases in energy use in the developing world—especially in Asia. Although the economic downturn in Asia that began in mid-1997 and continues into 1998 has lowered expectations for near-term growth in the region, the forecast still suggests that almost half the world’s projected increase in energy

424

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Appendix C Appendix C A Status Report on Developing Transportation for Caspian Basin Oil and Gas Production Prior to the breakup of the Soviet Union, the petroleum transportation networks in Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, and Turkmenistan were designed to provide petroleum to the internal Soviet economy and, in particular, to meet the Soviet militaryÂ’s need for petroleum [1]. Investment in the Caspian Basin petroleum transportation system was, however, severely deficient. In order for the producers in the Caspian Sea area to become major petroleum exporters, existing petroleum transport lines, which generally head northward into Russia, will need upgrading. More importantly, new lines will need to be built to transport Caspian Sea oil to export markets, in some combination of westward to the Mediterranean,

425

International Energy Outlook 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3) 3) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 3 May 2003 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director,

426

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2004 Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 54 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2004 reference case forecast. Figure 2. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having Problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 3. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 4. Comparison of 2003 and 2004 World Oil Price Projections, 1970-2025 (2002 Dollars per Barrel). Figure Data Figure 5. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Energy Source, 1970-2025 (Quadrilliion Btu). Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-596-8600.

427

International Energy Outlook 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 8 September 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Ener- gy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John J. Conti, Director, Office

428

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Graphic Data Graphic Data International Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 Figure 1 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 2. World Delivered Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2003-2030 Figure 2 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 3. World Marketed Energy Use by Energy Type, 1980-2030 Figure 3 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 4. Fuel Shares of World Marketed Energy Use, 2003, 2015, and 2030 Figure 4 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 5. World Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, 2003, 2015, and 2030 Figure 5 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

429

International Energy Outlook - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2004 Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate fuel markets in developing Asia. Figure 52. World Coal Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 53. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2001 and 2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 54. Coal Share of Regional Energy Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since

430

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent from 2004 to 2030, international coal trade increases by 44 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coal's share of world energy consumption increases from 26 percent in 2004 to 28 percent in 2030. In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent over the projection period, from 114.4 quadrillion Btu in 2004 to 199.0 quadrillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 54). Coal consumption increases by 2.6 per- cent per year on average from 2004 to 2015, then slows to an average increase of 1.8 percent annually from 2015 to 2030. World GDP and primary energy consumption also grow more rapidly in the first half than in the second half of the projections, reflecting a gradual slowdown of economic growth in non-OECD Asia. Regionally, increased use of coal in non-OECD

431

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia. World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since the late 1980s, a trend that is projected to continue. Although total world consumption of coal in 2001, at 5.26 billion short tons,12 was more than 27 percent higher than the total in 1980, it was 1 percent below the 1989 peak of 5.31 billion short tons (Figure 56). The International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case projects some growth in coal use between 2001 and 2025, at an average annual rate of 1.5 percent (on a tonnage basis), but with considerable variation among regions.

432

International Energy Outlook 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 4 April 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222),

433

International Agreements Comments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ITRATIOAL ITRATIOAL AGREE MENT~S/ MITMES SEREARY SAME W. BDAN JANUARY 205-EEME 2008o Page 1 of 1 Matthews, Carol From: Morman, Laurie Sent: Monday, November 24, 2008 2:52 PM To: Nicoll, Eric; Matthews, Carol Subject: RE: MOU's and Agreements Attachments: Agreements - 1979 to Present.pdf Here's on electronic version of what PI provided............. From: Nicoll, Eric Sent: Monday, November 24, 2008 11:40 AM To: Morman, Laurie; Kolb, Ingrid; Matthews, Carol Subject: RE: MOU's and Agreements OK then we will not include the ones which have come up here. Thanks. Did they organize it by year? From: Morman, Laurie Sent: Monday, November 24, 2008 11:38 AM To: Nicoll, Eric; Kolb, Ingrid; Matthews, Carol Subject: RE: MOU's and Agreements PI has already provided the International agreements.

434

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 7 May 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Ener- gy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John J. Conti, Director, Office of

435

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2030. The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) projects strong growth for worldwide energy demand over the 27-year projection period from 2003 to 2030. Despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook, world economic growth continues to increase at an average annual rate of 3.8 percent over the projection period, driving the robust increase in world energy use. Total world consumption of marketed energy expands from 421 quadrillion Brit- ish thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 722 quadrillion Btu in

436

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comparisons With Other Forecasts, and Performance of Past IEO Forecasts for 1990, 1995, and 2000 Forecast Comparisons Energy Consumption by Region Three organizations provide forecasts comparable with the projections in IEO2006, which extend to 2030 for the first time. The International Energy Agency (IEA) pro- vides "business as usual" projections to 2030 in its World Energy Outlook 2004; Petroleum Economics, Ltd. (PEL) publishes world energy projections to 2025; and Petro- leum Industry Research Associates (PIRA) provides projections to 2020. For comparison, 2002 is used as the base year for all the projections. Comparisons between IEO2006 and IEO2005 extend only to 2025, the last year of the IEO2005 projections. Regional breakouts vary among the different projec- tions, complicating the comparisons. For example, IEO2006, PIRA, and IEA

437

Internal Program Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Synchrophasor Initiative (NASPI) and Synchrophasor Initiative (NASPI) and Advanced Applications Research & Development (AARD) Internal Program Review 27-28 June 2013 Washington, DC Joe Eto Lawrence Berkeley National Lab DOE/OE Transmission Reliability Program 2 Management Review Topics  Project objective  Major technical accomplishments that will be completed this year  Deliverables and schedule for activities to be completed under FY13 funding  Risk factors affecting timely completion of planned activities as well as movement through RD&D cycle  Early thoughts on follow-on work that should be considered for funding in FY14 3 Management Review Issues  RD&D stage of the project: - Theoretical study-proof of concept - Modeling/simulation-using real data?

438

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) System for the Analysis of Global Energy Markets (SAGE) The projections of world energy consumption appearing in IEO2006 are based on EIA's international energy modeling tool, SAGE. SAGE is an integrated set of regional models that provide a technology-rich basis for estimating regional energy consumption. For each region, reference case estimates of 42 end-use energy service demands (e.g., car, commercial truck, and heavy truck road travel; residential lighting; steam heat requirements in the paper industry) are developed on the basis of economic and demographic projections. Pro- jections of energy consumption to meet the energy demands are estimated on the basis of each region's existing energy use patterns, the existing stock of energy-using equipment, and the characteristics of available new technologies, as well as new sources of primary energy supply.

439

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) I n t e r n a t i o n a l E n e r g y O u t l o o k 2 0 0 6 June 2006 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. This publication is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/index.html. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Ener- gy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.doe.gov,

440

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2003 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected to nearly double between 2001 and 2025, with the most robust growth in demand expected among the developing nations. Natural gas is expected to be the fastest growing component of world primary energy consumption in the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case. Consumption of natural gas worldwide is projected to increase by an average of 2.8 percent annually from 2001 to 2025, compared with projected annual growth rates of 1.8 percent for oil consumption and 1.5 percent for coal. Natural gas consumption in 2025, at 176 trillion cubic feet, is projected to be nearly double the 2001 total of 90 trillion cubic feet (Figure 40). The natural gas share of total energy consumption is projected to increase from 23 percent in 2001 to 28 percent in 2025.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. Fossil fuels continue to supply much of the energy used worldwide, and oil remains the dominant energy source. In the International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) ref- erence case, world marketed energy consumption increases on average by 2.0 percent per year from 2003 to 2030. Although world oil prices in the reference case, which remain between $47 and $59 per barrel (in real 2004 dollars), dampen the growth in demand for oil, total world energy use continues to increase as a result of robust economic growth. Worldwide, total energy use grows from 421 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and 722 quadrillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 1). The most rapid growth in energy demand from 2003 to 2030 is projected for nations outside the Organization

442

BWRVIP-44-A: BWR Vessel and Internals Project: Underwater Weld Repair of Nickel Alloy Reactor Vessel Internals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP), formed in June 1994, is an association of utilities focused exclusively on BWR vessel and internals issues. This report describes work performed to qualify a flux-core welding process for use in repairing reactor internals at a water depth of up to 50 feet. A previous version of this report was published as BWRVIP-44 (EPRI report TR-108708). The current report, BWRVIP-44-A, incorporates changes proposed by the BWRVIP in response to U.S. Nuc...

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

443

UTC Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Security Incident response teams, Cyber Security Incident handling ... is the mandatory standards for nuclear power reactor licensees, 10 CFR ...

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

444

Response Operations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response Operations Response Operations Response Operations Overview The federal government primarily plays a coordinating and support role during disaster response. DOE's role is to facilitate recovery from disruptions to the energy supply. OE's capabilities and resources include personnel with emergency response and energy systems operations experience, leading-edge analytical modeling and visualization capabilities, coordination and contacts with private industry, state governments, and U.S. government agencies, and facilitation of special policy waivers or legal authorities by the Secretary of Energy. Response and Restoration State and Local Energy Assurance Planning National Response Framework ESF-12 This National Response Framework (NRF) is a guide to how the Nation conducts all-hazards response. Emergency Support Function #12 - Energy

445

DC Cancellation As a Method of Generating a t^2 Response and of Solving the Radial Nonobservability Problem in a Concentric Free-Falling Two-Sphere Equivalence-Principle Experiment in a Drag-Free Satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper solves two major problems which have blocked a free-fall Equivalence-Principle (EP) in a satellite for 25 years: a semimajor-axis error between the two proof masses cannot be distinguished from an EP violation and the response to an EP violation only grows as t not t^2. Using the cancellation method described in this paper, the nonobservability problem can be suppressed and a t^2 response can be generated which lasts between 10^4 and 10^6 seconds depending on the cancellation accuracy. t^2 response times between 10^5 and 10^6 seconds are equivalent to a very tall (0.1 to 10 AU) drop tower with a constant gravitational field of 3/7 ge.

Benjamin Lange

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

446

International Energy Statistics - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. ... Jordan ...

447

International Oil and Gas Board International Oil and Gas Board...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Board International Oil and Gas Board Address Place Zip Website Abu Dhabi Supreme Petroleum Council Abu Dhabi Supreme Petroleum Council Abu Dhabi http www abudhabi ae...

448

Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

from PJM Interconnection LLC from PJM Interconnection LLC Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company: Response to Late Motion to Intervene from PJM Interconnection LLC Response from International Transmission Company to late motion to intervene from PJM Interconnection in the matter of the application for a presidential permit authorizing International Transmission Company to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. PP 230-4 International Transmission Company More Documents & Publications Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company: Response to Late Motion to Intervene from FirstEnergy Service Corporation Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International

449

Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0-4 0-4 International Transmission Company: Response to Late Motion to Intervene and Comments Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company: Response to Late Motion to Intervene and Comments Answer of International Transmission Company to late motions to intervene and comments of Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, American Electric Power, and Pepco Holdings, Inc. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company More Documents & Publications Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company: Out of Time Petition to Intervene and Comments of Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company: Response to American Municipal Power, Inc. and Old

450

Magnetically Responsive Photonic Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peng, Y. Li, Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 2007,Y. D. Yin, Angewandte Chemie-International Edition, 2008,Ge, Y. Yin, Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 2011,

Hu, Yongxing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Objectives and strategies of the International Photovoltaic Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Solar Photovoltaic Energy Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD and D) Act of 1978 calls for the Secretary of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a plan to demonstrate photovoltaic systems in other nations and to facilitate the widespread use of these systems. The objective of the International Photovoltaic Program Plan, the strategies that will be used in the plan, and the approach that is being taken to prepare the plan are described. Background on photovoltaic technology and markets and the DOE domestic photovoltaic effort is also provided. The International Photovoltaic Program Plan will complement the DOE domestic activities to stimulate international markets. A number of national and international benefits could result if the objective of accelerating the widespread use of photovoltaic systems in international markets is realized. A primary benefit is that foreign markets may help stabilize the US photovoltaic industry and foster its expansion. Other benefits include contributions to the advancement of developing countries, reductions in world oil imports, and improvements in the US balance of trade. Strategies to be addressed in the plan are photovoltaic system demonstrations, systems development, information gathering and dissemination, financial incentives, and administrative actions. A critical aspect of the plan will be the coordination of selected programs and the monitoring and assessment of the plan's results. Analyses of international markets, international financial institutions, foreign competition, international marketing experiences of other US industries, and system development needs have been initiated to support the plan.

Costello, D.; Posner, D.; Koontz, R.; Heiferling, P.; Carpenter, P.; Perelman, L.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 3.0 Previous Experience with Demand Responsive Lighting11 4.3. Prevalence of Lighting13 4.4. Impact of Title 24 on Lighting

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Metered Mail Form International Mail Only  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metered Mail Form International Mail Only Charge to Department USPS First Class Mail International International Metered Mail Form and must be kept separate from all other domestic mail. · International mail

Palmeri, Thomas

454

Application for Presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 Presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company: Response of New York Transmission Owners to ITC Application for Presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company: Response of New York Transmission Owners to ITC Response of New York Transmission Owners to answer of ITC in regard to the application for a Presidential Peermit authorizing International Transmission Company to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company More Documents & Publications Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company: Response to Late Motion to Intervene of New York Transmission Owners

455

Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Late Motion to Intervene of Late Motion to Intervene of New York Transmission Owners Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company: Response to Late Motion to Intervene of New York Transmission Owners Application from International Transmission Company to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. Response to Late Motion to Intervene of New York Transmission Owners PP-230-4 International Transmission Company More Documents & Publications Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company: Response to Late Motion to Intervene from FirstEnergy Service Corporation Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company: Response to Late Motion to Intervene from PJM

456

International Nonproliferation Export Control Program (INECP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nonproliferation and Nonproliferation and National Security Program > TNPS > Strategic Trade Control > International Programs > INECP Nonproliferation & National Security (NPNS) Overview Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Strategic Trade Control Review of export license applications Multilateral Export Control Arrangements Interdiction Engagement & Training INECP INSEP GIPP Safeguards Concepts and Approaches Human Capital Development Additional Protocol Technical Assistance National Security Systems & Assessments National Security Information Systems Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) Radiation Detection & Response (RDR) Contact NPNS Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr

457

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F13. Delivered energy consumption in China by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.9 -1.0 Natural gas 0.9 1.6 2.5 3.5 4.7 5.9 7.1 7.2 Coal 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.9 -0.2 Electricity 1.8 2.7 3.8 5.0 6.3 7.8 9.2 5.7 Total 6.9 8.3 10.3 12.5 15.0 17.7 20.0 3.6 Commercial Liquids 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.8 -0.8 Natural gas 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.9 1.2 1.5 1.8 7.1 Coal 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.1 Electricity 0.7 1.0 1.4 1.9 2.6 3.5 4.4 6.5 Total 2.5 2.8 3.5 4.3 5.3 6.4 7.6 3.8 Industrial Liquids 8.4 10.2 11.4 12.2 12.7 13.0 13.0 1.5 Natural gas 1.8 2.5 3.2 3.8 4.2 4.5

458

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 121.3 126.1 129.7 132.9 137.2 143.6 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.3 100.5 101.8 102.3 103.9 107.2 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.2 14.8 15.6 16.5 17.3 18.2 1.0 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.9 10.9 12.3 14.1 16.0 18.2 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 82.1 85.5 88.6 90.9 92.8 94.6 0.5 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 40.6 43.0 44.3 45.4 46.1 46.4 0.5 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.7 22.5 23.0 23.0 22.9 22.2 0.0 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.8 13.0 13.8 14.7 15.3 15.9 1.3 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 7.0 7.4 7.5 7.7 8.0 8.2 0.7 Total OECD 234.7 242.3 244.1 254.6 262.7

459

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F1. Total world delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 9.5 9.5 9.1 8.9 8.7 8.5 8.3 -0.4 Natural gas 19.9 20.8 22.6 24.8 27.1 29.0 30.8 1.5 Coal 4.6 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.4 4.4 4.3 -0.3 Electricity 17.6 20.1 23.1 26.4 30.0 33.9 38.0 2.6 Total 52.0 55.1 59.8 65.0 70.8 76.3 81.8 1.5 Commercial Liquids 4.5 4.2 4.2 4.2 4.1 4.0 3.9 -0.4 Natural gas 8.4 8.8 9.4 10.2 11.1 11.8 12.4 1.3 Coal 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 0.5 Electricity 14.8 16.5 18.6 21.3 24.3 27.5 31.1 2.5 Total 28.9 30.8 33.6 37.1 40.9 44.8 49.0 1.8 Industrial Liquids 57.2 61.6 66.4 70.1 74.2 78.2 82.1 1.2 Natural gas 45.5 48.8 54.3 59.0 63.4

460

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F9. Delivered energy consumption in Australia/New Zealand by end-use sector and fuel, 2008-2035 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 1.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 1.0 Total 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 1.1 Commercial Liquids 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 1.6 Total 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 1.2 Industrial Liquids 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.4 Natural gas 0.8 0.8 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.4 Coal 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 -0.1 Electricity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D4. World liquids consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 23.1 23.5 23.4 23.5 23.2 22.9 22.9 23.5 0.0 United States a 18.6 18.9 18.7 18.8 18.4 17.7 17.4 17.5 -0.3 Canada 2.2 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.2 2.4 0.2 Mexico/Chile 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.5 2.7 3.0 3.3 3.6 1.4 OECD Europe 15.0 14.8 13.2 13.1 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 -0.3 OECD Asia 7.7 7.7 8.0 7.7 7.6 7.6 7.6 7.4 -0.1 Japan 4.4 4.4 4.5 4.2 4.0 3.9 3.8 3.6 -0.7 South Korea 2.2 2.3 2.3 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.6 0.5 Australia/NewZealand 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 0.3 Total OECD 45.8 46.0 44.6 44.3 43.8 43.6 43.8 44.3 -0.1 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia

462

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F3. Delivered energy consumption in the United States by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.9 -1.0 Natural gas 4.9 4.8 4.6 4.5 4.5 4.3 4.2 -0.5 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -1.6 Electricity 4.9 4.7 4.8 5.1 5.4 5.7 6.0 0.7 Total 11.4 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.2 11.4 11.6 0.1 Commercial Liquids 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 -0.3 Natural gas 3.2 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 0.5 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -0.7 Electricity 4.5 4.5 4.7 5.0 5.2 5.5 5.7 0.8 Total 8.6 8.8 8.9 9.2 9.5 9.9 10.2 0.6 Industrial Liquids 8.4 8.2 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.6 8.7 0.1 Natural gas 8.0 8.7 9.6 9.8 9.9 10.1 10.4 0.9 Coal 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6

463

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F5. Delivered energy consumption in Mexico and Chile by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.1 Natural gas 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 3.4 Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -0.2 Electricity 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 4.0 Total 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 1.0 1.1 1.2 2.4 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.3 Natural gas 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Electricity 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 5.5 Total 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 4.0 Industrial Liquids 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.6 Natural gas 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.2 2.6 3.0 2.5 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 3.1 Electricity

464

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A6. World natural gas consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (trillion cubic feet) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 28.2 29.2 31.3 33.4 35.1 37.0 39.4 41.6 1.2 United States a 22.9 23.8 25.3 26.3 26.9 27.6 28.7 29.5 0.7 Canada 3.1 2.9 3.1 3.6 4.0 4.3 4.6 4.9 1.7 Mexico/Chile 2.2 2.5 2.9 3.5 4.3 5.1 6.1 7.2 3.6 OECD Europe 18.8 19.8 19.7 20.4 20.8 22.1 23.2 24.5 0.7 OECD Asia 6.1 6.7 7.2 7.8 8.5 9.0 9.5 9.9 1.3 Japan 3.7 3.8 4.3 4.6 4.9 5.1 5.2 5.2 1.0 South Korea 1.2 1.5 1.5 1.7 1.9 2.0 2.3 2.5 1.7 Australia/NewZealand 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.8 2.0 2.2 1.7 Total OECD 53.2 55.6 58.2 61.5 64.4 68.0 72.1 76.0 1.0 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 19.8 21.8

465

Operations Management International, Inc. Profile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The remainder are industrial and international customers. ... The company's policy is to hire workers formerly ... but it quickly becomes an inclusive affair. ...

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

466

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2008 are consistent with those...

467

Kousa International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Los Angeles, California Zip 90010 Sector Wind energy Product Los Angeles-based wind tower manufacturer. References Kousa International1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

468

International Quality Assurance Standards (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tests to make quantitative predictions about photovoltaic (PV) modules are needed. This presentation proposes the creation of international quality assurance standards for PV modules.

Kurtz, S.; Hacke, P.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kempe, M.; Yamamichi, M.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Geopolitics, History, and International Relations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Redundancy Problem: Why More Nuclear Security Forces MayProduce Less Nuclear Security", Risk Analysis 24(4): 935–and international security, eco- nomic development, nuclear

Robinson, William I.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Carbon International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Place London, United Kingdom Zip NW1 8LH Sector Carbon Product London-based energy and communications agency specialising in low carbon energy and climate change....

471

International Natural Gas Workshop Presnetations  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Session 2: European Natural Gas Outlook: ... Impact of U.S. LNG on International Gas Prices Philip Q Hanser, The Brattle Group PDF: Speaker Biographies: PDF:

472

BBI International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name BBI International Place Salida, Colorado Zip 81201 Sector Biofuels Product Information service provider for the Biofuels industry. Is developing 2...

473

Prescience International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Zip 94102 Product String representation "San Francisco b ... ging companies." is too long. References Prescience International1 LinkedIn Connections...

474

International Energy Outlook - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2004 Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2004 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected...

475

NREL: International Activities - Multilateral Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

21st Century Power Partnership, the Clean Energy Solutions Center, and the International Smart Grid Action Network. Clean Energy Solutions Center NREL operates the Clean Energy...

476

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

sitesallmodulescontribredisredis.autoload.inc). You are here Home International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report 2005 International Nuclear Energy...

477

International Energy Statistics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

> Countries > International Energy Statistics: International Energy Statistics; Petroleum. Production| ... Total Non-Hydro Renewable Electricity Net Generation ...

478

International Fuel Services and Commercial Engagement | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Fuel Services and Commercial Engagement Nuclear Reactor Technologies Fuel Cycle Technologies International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation Bilateral...

479

International Comparison of Product Certification and Verification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Comparison of Product Certification and Verification Methods for Appliances Title International Comparison of Product Certification and Verification Methods for...

480

Radiation Response of Nano-scale Gold Foams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our recent experiments and computer simulations focus on the radiation and mechanical response of nanoporous gold (NPG). Radiation tolerance was ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "response international experiences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H3. World installed natural-gas-fired generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 402 435 461 505 568 631 697 1.9 United States a 350 379 390 420 472 519 566 1.6 Canada 20 19 26 28 29 32 35 1.9 Mexico/Chile 31 36 45 56 68 80 95 3.8 OECD Europe 217 219 213 204 218 234 252 0.5 OECD Asia 128 134 140 144 148 157 163 0.8 Japan 83 90 96 97 100 101 101 0.7 South Korea 27 26 26 28 29 35 38 1.1 Australia/New Zealand 18 18 18 19 20 22 23 1.0 Total OECD 746 787 814

482

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Kaya Identity factor projections Table J3. World gross domestic product (GDP) per capita by region expressed in purchasing power parity, Reference case, 2009-2040 (2005 dollars per person) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 32,959 33,559 36,264 39,848 43,145 46,824 51,175 56,306 1.7 United States a 41,478 42,130 45,224 49,521 53,259 57,343 62,044 67,452 1.6 Canada 34,582 35,285 37,485 40,040 41,910 43,909 46,715 50,028 1.2 Mexico/Chile 12,215 12,750 14,862 16,996 19,460 22,324 25,830 30,192 2.9 OECD Europe 25,770 26,269 27,363 29,924 32,694 35,369 38,368 41,753 1.6 OECD Asia 28,623 29,875 32,912 36,117 39,347 42,264 45,505 48,961 1.7 Japan 29,469 30,827 33,255

483

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A14. World population by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (millions) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 470 475 499 523 547 569 591 612 0.8 United States a 308 310 325 340 356 372 388 404 0.9 Canada 34 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 1.0 Mexico/Chile 129 131 138 144 150 155 159 162 0.7 OECD Europe 553 556 570 580 588 594 598 601 0.3 OECD Asia 202 203 204 205 204 203 201 199 -0.1 Japan 128 128 127 125 122 119 117 114 -0.4 South Korea 48 48 49 50 50 50 50 49 0.1 Australia/NewZealand 26 27 28 30 32 33 34 35 0.9 Total OECD 1,226 1,234 1,273 1,307 1,339 1,366 1,390 1,411 0.4 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 338 338 342 342 342 340 337 334 0.0 Russia 141 140 142 141 139 136 134 131 -0.2 Other 197

484

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H5. World installed nuclear generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 115 119 123 130 133 130 135 0.5 United States a 101 104 111 114 114 109 113 0.4 Canada 13 13 11 13 16 16 16 0.7 Mexico/Chile 1 2 2 3 4 5 6 5.1 OECD Europe 132 124 128 142 143 143 142 0.3 OECD Asia 67 45 65 71 79 80 82 0.7 Japan 49 20 34 35 36 37 37 -0.9 South Korea 18 25 32 36 43 43 45 3.2 Australia/New Zealand 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- Total OECD 314 288 316 343 355 352 359 0.5 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 42 49 58 65 73 80 85 2.4 Russia 24 28 35 40 45 50 55 2.8 Other 17 20 23 25 27 29 29 1.8 Non-OECD Asia 21

485

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H21. World net solar electricity generation by region and country, 2010-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 4 33 38 42 48 63 101 11.1 United States a 4 32 37 40 46 62 99 11.2 Canada 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 -- Mexico/Chile 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 -- OECD Europe 23 78 85 89 94 98 102 5.1 OECD Asia 5 12 22 33 39 50 50 8.1 Japan 4 7 14 23 29 39 39 8.1 South Korea 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3.6 Australia/New Zealand 0 4 6 8 8 9 9 -- Total OECD 32 123 145 165 181 211 253 7.1 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 -- Russia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- Other 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 -- Non-OECD Asia 1 31 76 94 107 120 129 17.2 China 1 26 67 79 90 100 105 17.0 India 0 3 7 13 14 17

486

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H11. World installed other renewable generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 38 40 41 42 43 45 47 0.7 United States a 35 38 39 39 40 41 43 0.7 Canada 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0.6 Mexico/Chile 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1.3 OECD Europe 73 75 76 77 78 79 80 0.3 OECD Asia 33 36 36 36 36 36 37 0.3 Japan 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 0.1 South Korea 4 6 6 6 6 6 6 1.2 Australia/New Zealand 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 1.4 Total OECD 144 151 153 155 158 160 163 0.4 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 0.2 Russia 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0.3 Other 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 0.2 Non-OECD Asia 26 36 45 54 63 69 73 3.4 China 20 27 36 45 53 59 61 3.9 India 3 4 4 4

487

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2003 reference case forecast. In the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case, world energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent over a 24-year forecast horizon, from 2001 to 2025. Worldwide, total energy use is projected to grow from 404 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2001 to 640 quadrillion Btu in 2025 (Figure 2). As in past editions of this report, the IEO2003 reference case outlook continues to show robust growth in energy consumption among the developing nations of the world (Figure 3). The strongest growth is projected for developing Asia, where demand for energy is expected to more than double over the forecast period. An average annual growth rate of 3 percent is projected for energy use in developing Asia, accounting for nearly 40 percent of the total projected increment in world energy consumption and 69 percent of the increment for the developing world alone.

488

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H7. World installed hydroelectric generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 170 177 181 190 201 214 228 1.0 United States a 78 78 79 79 79 80 81 0.1 Canada 75 78 80 85 93 101 109 1.3 Mexico/Chile 17 20 22 25 29 33 38 2.8 OECD Europe 151 155 169 176 183 189 195 0.9 OECD Asia 37 39 40 40 40 40 41 0.3 Japan 22 24 24 24 24 25 25 0.3 South Korea 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0.3 Australia/New Zealand 13 13 13 13 14 14 14 0.3 Total OECD 358 371 389 405 424 443 464 0.9 Non-OECD Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 87 91 99 103 110 118 125 1.2 Russia 47 49 54 58 62 66 69 1.3 Other 41 42 45 45 48 52 56 1.1 Non-OECD Asia

489

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference case projections for Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel This page inTenTionally lefT blank 259 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H1. World total installed generating capacity by region and country, 2010-2040 (gigawatts) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,248 1,316 1,324 1,379 1,456 1,546 1,669 1.0 United States a 1,033 1,080 1,068 1,098 1,147 1,206 1,293 0.8 Canada 137 144 152 163 174 185 198 1.2 Mexico/Chile 78 93 104 118 135 155 177 2.8 OECD Europe 946 1,028 1,096 1,133 1,159 1,185 1,211 0.8 OECD Asia 441 444 473 489 501 516 524 0.6 Japan 287 275 293 300 304 309 306 0.2 South Korea 85 93 100 107 114

490

International energy outlook 1999  

SciTech Connect

This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. The historical time frame begins with data from 1970 and extends to 1996, providing readers with a 26-year historical view of energy demand. The IEO99 projections covers a 24-year period. The next part of the report is organized by energy source. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in the five fuel chapters, along with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. The third part of the report looks at energy consumption in the end-use sectors, beginning with a chapter on energy use for electricity generation. New to this year`s outlook are chapters on energy use in the transportation sector and on environmental issues related to energy consumption. 104 figs., 87 tabs.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

International Perspectives Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNCTAD serves as the focal point within the United Nations Secretariat for all matters related to foreign direct investment and transnational corporations. In the past, the Programme on Transnational Corporations was carried out by the United Nations Centre on Transnational Corporations (1975-1992) and the Transnational Corporations and Management Division of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Development (1992-1993). In 1993, the Programme was transferred to the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development. UNCTAD seeks to further the understanding of the nature of transnational corporations and their contribution to development and to create an enabling environment for international investment and enterprise development. UNCTAD's work is carried out through intergovernmental deliberations, technical assistance activities, seminars, workshops and conferences. The term "country " as used in this study also refers, as appropriate, to territories or areas; the designations employed and the presentation of the material do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the

United Nations

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

EM International, July 1994, Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking out and leveraging foreign technology, data, and resources in keeping with EM`s mandate to protect public health and the environment through the safe and cost-effective remediation of the Department`s nuclear weapons sites. EM works closely with foreign governments, industry, and universities to obtain innovative environmental technologies, scientific and engineering expertise, and operations experience that will support EM`s objectives. Where appropriate, these international resources are used to manage the more urgent risks at our sites, secure a safe workplace, help build consensus on critical issues, and strengthen our technology development program. Through international agreements EM engages in cooperative exchange of information, technology, and individuals. Currently, we are managing agreements with a dozen countries in Europe, Latin America, and Asia. These agreements focus on environmental restoration, waste management, transportation of radioactive wastes, and decontamination and decommissioning. This publication contains the following articles: in situ remediation integrated program; in-situ characterization and inspection of tanks; multimedia environmental pollutant assessment system (MEPAS); LLNL wet oxidation -- AEA technology. Besides these articles, this publication covers: EU activities with Russia; technology transfer activities; and international organization activities.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

A Sea-Land Transition Observed during the COAST Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sea wind situation was analyzed during the COAST (Cooperative Operations with Acoustic Sounding Techniques) experiment. The thermal internal boundary layer (TIBL) which develops inland from the coast was investigated by an instrumented aircraft ...

Pierre Durand; Aime Druilhet; Serge Briere

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

GAPEX: A Ground-Based Atmospheric Profiling Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the week 29 October–4 November 1988, a Ground-based Atmospheric Profiling Experiment (GAPEX) was conducted at Denver Stapleton International Airport. The objective of GAPEX was to acquire and analyze atomspheric-temperature and moisture-...

W. L. Smith; H. E. Rvercomb; H. B. Howell; H. M. Woolf; R. O. Knuteson; R. G. Decker; M. J. Lynch; E. R. Westwater; R. G. Strauch; K. P. Moran; B. Stankov; M. J. Falls; J. Jordan; M. Jacobsen; W. F. Dabberdt; R. McBeth; G. Albright; C. Paneitz; G. Wright; P. T. May; M. T. Decker

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Low Oil Price case projections Table E1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 122.3 128.2 132.1 135.5 140.0 146.7 0.7 United States a 94.9 97.9 97.9 101.6 102.9 103.6 105.3 108.8 0.4 Canada 13.7 13.5 14.4 15.2 16.2 17.1 17.8 18.6 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 10.0 11.4 12.9 14.8 16.8 19.3 2.7 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 83.1 88.0 91.8 94.7 97.4 100.0 0.6 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 41.1 44.7 46.6 47.9 49.0 49.7 0.8 Japan 21.0 22.1 22.0 23.6 24.3 24.4 24.4 23.9 0.3 South Korea 10.1 10.8 12.1 13.6 14.7 15.7 16.5 17.4 1.6 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 7.0 7.5 7.6 7.9 8.1 8.4 0.8 Total OECD 234.7 242.3

496

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Projections of liquid fuels and other petroleum production in five cases Table G5. World petroleum production by region and country, High Oil Price case, 2010-2040 (million barrels per day) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2011 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 34.8 35.0 33.9 34.2 36.5 39.3 42.8 45.3 0.9 Middle East 23.8 25.3 23.0 23.6 25.4 27.9 30.8 33.0 1.1 North Africa 3.8 2.4 3.3 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.6 3.7 -0.1 West Africa 4.4 4.3 4.7 4.7 5.0 5.1 5.3 5.3 0.6 South America 2.9 3.0 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.3 0.4 Non-OPEC 50.1 50.0 54.1 55.9 56.8 59.5 62.2 65.7 0.9 OECD 20.4 20.3 23.1 23.6 23.4 23.4 24.2 25.2 0.7 OECD Americas 15.2

497

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F F Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping This page inTenTionally lefT blank 225 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F1. Total world delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 9.5 9.5 9.1 8.9 8.7 8.5 8.3 -0.4 Natural gas 19.9 20.8 22.6 24.8 27.1 29.0 30.8 1.5 Coal 4.6 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.4 4.4 4.3 -0.3 Electricity 17.6 20.1 23.1 26.4 30.0 33.9 38.0 2.6 Total 52.0 55.1 59.8 65.0 70.8 76.3 81.8 1.5 Commercial Liquids 4.5 4.2 4.2 4.2 4.1 4.0 3.9 -0.4 Natural gas 8.4 8.8 9.4 10.2 11.1 11.8 12.4 1.3 Coal 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 0.5 Electricity 14.8

498

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A10. World carbon dioxide emissions by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 6,448 6,657 6,480 6,627 6,762 6,880 7,070 7,283 0.3 United States a 5,418 5,608 5,381 5,454 5,501 5,523 5,607 5,691 0.0 Canada 548 546 551 574 593 609 628 654 0.6 Mexico/Chile 482 503 548 599 668 748 835 937 2.1 OECD Europe 4,147 4,223 4,054 4,097 4,097 4,151 4,202 4,257 0.0 OECD Asia 2,085 2,200 2,287 2,296 2,329 2,341 2,365 2,358 0.2 Japan 1,105 1,176 1,243 1,220 1,223 1,215 1,194 1,150 -0.1 South Korea 531 581 600 627 653 666 703 730 0.8 Australia/NewZealand 449 443 444 449 452 460 468 478 0.3 Total OECD 12,680

499

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference case projections Reference case projections for natural gas production This page inTenTionally lefT blank 283 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections for natural gas production Table I1. World total natural gas production by region, Reference case, 2010-2040 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 28.4 30.4 33.5 36.1 38.2 41.1 44.4 1.5 United States a 21.2 23.9 26.5 28.4 29.7 31.3 33.1 1.5 Canada 5.4 5.0 5.4 5.9 6.4 7.0 7.6 1.1 Mexico 1.8 1.5 1.6 1.6 2.1 2.8 3.5 2.3 Chile 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 2.7 OECD Europe 10.4 9.0 8.1 8.0 8.6 9.2 9.9 -0.2 North Europe 10.1 8.4 7.4 7.3 7.9 8.5 9.1 -0.3 South Europe 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 1.7 Southwest Europe 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -- Turkey/Israel

500

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.5 124.2 128.2 131.8 136.7 144.7 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 96.0 99.4 100.9 101.4 103.0 107.3 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 13.9 14.3 15.3 16.4 17.6 19.0 1.1 Mexico/Chile 8.4 8.8 9.6 10.5 12.0 14.0 16.1 18.5 2.5 OECD Europe 80.0 82.5 80.5 83.3 86.3 88.6 90.5 92.3 0.4 OECD Asia 37.7 39.6 39.3 41.1 42.4 43.5 44.3 44.5 0.4 Japan 21.0 22.1 21.0 21.6 21.9 22.0 21.8 21.0 -0.2 South Korea 10.1 10.8 11.5 12.5 13.3 14.2 14.9 15.7 1.3 Australia/NewZealand 6.7 6.7 6.8 7.0 7.2 7.3 7.5 7.8 0.5 Total OECD 234.7 242.3