National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for respondent identification site

  1. Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS)...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    binding sites on protein surfaces for functional group classes based on rigorous free energy criteria that include protein flexibility and fragment desolvation. Information...

  2. n 1980, Congress responded to a growing problem of abandoned factories and other polluted sites by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Thermo Niton's helium-purged XRF units can read lighter elements such as sulfur. To better understand how heavy metals captured behind this dam. XRF analysis was used to survey multiple sites and delineate

  3. Modeling correlation in binary count data with application to fragile site identification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hintze, Christopher Jerry

    2006-10-30

    Available fragile site identification software packages (FSM and FSM3) assume that all chromosomal breaks occur independently. However, under a Mendelian model of inheritance, homozygosity at fragile loci implies pairwise correlation between...

  4. Identification and Characterization of a Bacterial Chromosome Partitioning Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Daniel Chi-Hong

    We have identified a DNA site involved in chromosome partitioning in B. subtilis. This site was identified in vivo as the binding site for the chromosome partitioning protein Spo0J, a member of the ParB family of partitioning ...

  5. Biomaterials 23 (2002) 38653870 Identification and validation of a novel cell-recognition site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Zhiping

    2002-01-01

    Biomaterials 23 (2002) 3865­3870 Identification and validation of a novel cell-recognition site in the 10th type III domain, are effective in promoting cell adhesion when immobilized to a biomaterial adhesion by Pierschbacher and Ruoslahti [1] revolutio- nized the area of biomaterials because it was subse

  6. Identification of sublimation-type thermal contraction crack polygons at the proposed NASA Phoenix landing site: Implications for substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    Identification of sublimation-type thermal contraction crack polygons at the proposed NASA Phoenix within the NASA Phoenix landing site Area D characterized by boulder-topped, polygonally-patterned mounds of buried ice. On the basis of morphological similarities, we classify the Phoenix Box 1 polygons

  7. responding to emergencies

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1%2A en Responding to Emergencies http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsemergencyoperationscounterterrorismrespondingtoemergencies

  8. Responder Technology Alert Monthly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PNNL-24014 Responder Technology Alert Monthly (Oct-Nov 2014) January 2015 JF Upton SL Stein #12;#12;PNNL-24014 Responder Technology Alert Monthly (Oct-Nov 2014) JF Upton SL Stein January 2015 Prepared for the Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate under Contract HSHQPM-14-X-00058. Pacific

  9. Site-Specific Chemoenzymatic Labeling of Aerolysin Enables the Identification of New Aerolysin Receptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wuethrich, Irene

    Aerolysin is a secreted bacterial toxin that perforates the plasma membrane of a target cell with lethal consequences. Previously explored native and epitope-tagged forms of the toxin do not allow site-specific modification ...

  10. Identification of Potential Sites for Astronomical Observations in Northern South-America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinzón, G; Hernández, J

    2015-01-01

    In this study we describe an innovative method to determine potential sites for optical and infrared astronomical observations in the Andes region of northern South America. The method computes the Clear sky fraction (CSF) from Geostationary Observational Environmental Satellite (GOES) data for the years 2008-12 through a comparison with temperatures obtained from long-term records of weather stations and atmospheric temperature profiles from radiosonde. Criteria for sky clearance were established for two infrared GOES channels in order to determine potential sites in the Andes region of northern South-America. The method was validated using the reported observed hours at Observatorio Nacional de Llano del Hato in Venezuela. Separate CSF percentages were computed for dry and rainy seasons for both, photometric and spectroscopic night qualities. Twelve sites with five year averages of CSF for spectroscopic nights larger than 30% during the dry seasons were found to be suitable for astronomical observations. Th...

  11. Identification of Substrate Binding Sites in Enzymes by Computational Solvent Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    . Dennis, Biotechnology Research Institute, National Research Council of Canada, Montreal, Canada; L. Brown * 1 Program in Bioinformatics Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA 2 Department of Biomedical with the most favorable binding free energy. The method then finds the con- sensus site that binds the highest

  12. Identification of an octamer-binding site in the human kappa light-chain enhancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelms, K.; Van Ness, B. (Institute of Human Genetics and Dept. of Biochemistry, Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (MN))

    1990-07-01

    Octamer motifs contribute to the function and tissue specificity of immunoglobulin heavy- and light-chain gene promoters and the heavy-chain enhancer. A variant octamer-binding site within a conserved region of the human kappa light-chain gene enhancer which contributes to the function of this enhancer has been identified.

  13. Identification of bacteria synthesizing ribosomal RNA in response to uranium addition during biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2015-09-18

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this research, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 ?M. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 ?M were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two activemore »bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites.« less

  14. Responder Technology Alert (February 2015)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PNNL-24227 Responder Technology Alert (February 2015) April 2015 JF Upton SL Stein #12;#12;PNNL-24227 Responder Technology Alert (February 2015) JF Upton SL Stein April 2015 Prepared for the Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate under Contract HSHQPM-14-X-00058. Pacific

  15. Responder Technology Alert (April 2015)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PNNL-24326 Responder Technology Alert (April 2015) May 2015 JF Upton SL Stein #12;#12;PNNL-24326 Responder Technology Alert (April 2015) JF Upton SL Stein May 2015 Prepared for the Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate under Contract HSHQPM-14-X-00058. Pacific Northwest National

  16. First Responders and Criticality Accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valerie L. Putman; Douglas M. Minnema

    2005-11-01

    Nuclear criticality accident descriptions typically include, but do not focus on, information useful to first responders. We studied these accidents, noting characteristics to help (1) first responders prepare for such an event and (2) emergency drill planners develop appropriate simulations for training. We also provide recommendations to help people prepare for such events in the future.

  17. Pulling History from the Waste Stream: Identification and Collection of Manhattan Project and Cold War Era Artifacts on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marceau, Thomas E.; Watson, Thomas L.

    2013-11-13

    One man's trash is another man's treasure. Not everything called "waste" is meant for the refuse pile. The mission of the Curation Program is at direct odds with the remediation objectives of the Hanford Site. While others are busily tearing down and burying the Site's physical structures and their associated contents, the Curation Program seeks to preserve the tangible elements of the Site's history from these structures for future generations before they flow into the waste stream. Under the provisions of a Programmatic Agreement, Cultural Resources staff initiated a project to identify and collect artifacts and archives that have historic or interpretive value in documenting the role of the Hanford Site throughout the Manhattan Project and Cold War Era. The genesis of Hanford's modern day Curation Program, its evolution over nearly two decades, issues encountered, and lessons learned along the way -- particularly the importance of upper management advocacy, when and how identification efforts should be accomplished, the challenges of working within a radiological setting, and the importance of first hand information -- are presented.

  18. Emergency Responder Radioactive Material Quick Reference Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) Emergency Responder Radioactive Material Quick Reference Sheet

  19. Planning Considerations Coordinate with local law enforcement & first responders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Planning Considerations Coordinate with local law enforcement & first responders to ensure smooth to in this document as "Site Decision Maker(s)") Select Evacuation Teams and Search Teams Develop training plan Determine search procedures Designate control center locations Plan for emergency assistance (police, fire

  20. Biodetection Technologies for First Responders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Seiner, Derrick R.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Colburn, Heather A.; Straub, Tim M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2012-10-24

    In a white powder scenario, there are a large number of field-deployable assays that can be used to determine if the suspicious substance contains biological material and warrants further investigation. This report summarizes commercially available technologies that are considered hand portable and can be used by first responders in the field. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list, nor do the authors endorse any of the technologies described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about available technologies to help end-users make informed decisions about biodetection technology procurement and use.

  1. Responder Technology Alert (February 2015)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLEDSpeeding FINAL ProgressTechnicalPNNL-24227 Responder

  2. LANL responds to radiological incident

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate student Subtask2 J.N.open to badge holdersLANL responds

  3. Utilities respond to nuclear station blackout rule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, A.M.; Beasley, B.; Tenera, L.P

    1990-02-01

    The authors discuss how nuclear plants in the United States have taken actions to respond to the NRC Station Blackout Rule, 10CFR50.63. The rule requires that each light water cooled nuclear power plant licensed to operate must be able to withstand for a specified duration and recover from a station blackout. Station blackout is defined as the complete loss of a-c power to the essential and non-essential switch-gear buses in a nuclear power plant. A station blackout results from the loss of all off-site power as well as the on-site emergency a-c power system. There are two basic approaches to meeting the station blackout rule. One is to cope with a station blackout independent of a-c power. Coping, as it is called, means the ability of a plant to achieve and maintain a safe shutdown condition. The second approach is to provide an alternate a-c power source (AAC).

  4. Preliminary identification of potentially disruptive scenarios at the Greater Confinement Disposal Facility, Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzowski, R.V.; Newman, G.

    1993-12-01

    The Greater Confinement Disposal location is being evaluated to determine whether defense-generated transuranic waste buried at this location complies with the Containment Requirements established by the US Environmental Protection Agency. One step in determining compliance is to identify those combinations of events and processes (scenarios) that define possible future states of the disposal system for which performance assessments must be performed. An established scenario-development procedure was used to identify a comprehensive set of mutually exclusive scenarios. To assure completeness, 761 features, events, processes, and other listings (FEPS) were compiled from 11 references. This number was reduced to 205 primarily through the elimination of duplications. The 205 FEPs were screened based on site-specific, goal-specific, and regulatory criteria. Four events survived screening and were used in preliminary scenario development: (1) exploratory drilling penetrates a GCD borehole, (2) drilling of a withdrawal/injection well penetrates a GCD borehole, (3) subsidence occurs at the RWMS, and (4) irrigation occurs at the RWMS. A logic diagram was used to develop 16 scenarios from the four events. No screening of these scenarios was attempted at this time. Additional screening of the currently retained events and processes will be based on additional data and information from site-characterization activities. When screening of the events and processes is completed, a final set of scenarios will be developed and screened based on consequence and probability of occurrence.

  5. Guide on Preventing and Responding to All Forms of Violence in the Workplace

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-10-21

    To ensure all sites have the tools to implement processes, we have created this guide. Each site is expected to develop its own site specific set of procedures/process to implement DOE Policy 444.1 Preventing and Responding to all forms of violence in the Workplace.

  6. Identification and Characterization of Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site Using Geophysical Logs: Examples from the Underground Test Area Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack, Margaret Townsend

    2009-03-25

    The diverse and complex geology of the Nevada Test Site region makes for a challenging environment for identifying and characterizing hydrogeologic units penetrated by wells drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Underground Test Area (UGTA) Environmental Restoration Sub-Project. Fortunately, UGTA geoscientists have access to large and robust sets of subsurface geologic data, as well as a large historical knowledge base of subsurface geological analyses acquired mainly during the underground nuclear weapons testing program. Of particular importance to the accurate identification and characterization of hydrogeologic units in UGTA boreholes are the data and interpretation principles associated with geophysical well logs. Although most UGTA participants and stakeholders are probably familiar with drill hole data such as drill core and cuttings, they may be less familiar with the use of geophysical logs; this document is meant to serve as a primer on the use of geophysical logs in the UGTA project. Standard geophysical logging tools used in the UGTA project to identify and characterize hydrogeologic units are described, and basic interpretation principles and techniques are explained. Numerous examples of geophysical log data from a variety of hydrogeologic units encountered in UGTA wells are presented to highlight the use and value of geophysical logs in the accurate hydrogeologic characterization of UGTA wells.

  7. Guide on Preventing and Responding to All Forms of Violence in the Workplace

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-04-22

    This guide is a broad overview of the basic tools for development of site specific procedures for responding to workplace violence. Supports implementation of DOE P 444.1. Does not cancel/supersede other directives.

  8. NEW - DOE G 444.1 1, Guide on Preventing and Responding to All Forms of Violence in the Workplace

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    This guide is a broad overview of the basic tools for a site to develop its site specific procedures for responding to workplace violence. Supports implementation of DOE P 444.1.

  9. Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valerie L. Putman

    2012-08-01

    This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency.

    This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel.

    For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know …).

    INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

  10. Responder Technology Alert Monthly (January 2015)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upton, Jaki F.; Stein, Steven L.

    2015-02-01

    As part of technology foraging for the Responder Technology Alliance, established by the Department of Homeland Science and Technologies First Responders Group, this report summarizes technologies that are relevant in the area of “wearables,” with the potential for use by first responders. The content was collected over the previous month(s) and reproduced from a general Internet search using the term wearables. Additional information is available at the websites provided. This report is not meant to be an exhaustive list nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about current developments in the areas wearable technology.

  11. Emergency Responder Radioactive Material Quick Reference Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This job aid is a quick reference to assist emergency responders in identifying preliminary safety precautions that should be taken during the initial response phase after arrival at the scene of...

  12. Respond to the article | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes andRespond toRespond

  13. identification Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schenato, Luca

    Networked Control Systems Clock Sync Channel identification in WSN Distributed control of Smart. Sandro Zampieri #12;Networked Control Systems Clock Sync Channel identification in WSN Distributed Systems Clock Sync Channel identification in WSN Distributed control of Smart Grids Conclusions Issues

  14. Multi-level RF identification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steele, Kerry D.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2004-07-20

    A radio frequency identification system having a radio frequency transceiver for generating a continuous wave RF interrogation signal that impinges upon an RF identification tag. An oscillation circuit in the RF identification tag modulates the interrogation signal with a subcarrier of a predetermined frequency and modulates the frequency-modulated signal back to the transmitting interrogator. The interrogator recovers and analyzes the subcarrier signal and determines its frequency. The interrogator generates an output indicative of the frequency of the subcarrier frequency, thereby identifying the responding RFID tag as one of a "class" of RFID tags configured to respond with a subcarrier signal of a predetermined frequency.

  15. Respond to the article | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes andRespond to theRespond to the

  16. Respond to the article | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes andRespond to theRespond to

  17. Respond to the article | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes andRespond to theRespond

  18. Respond to the article | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes andRespond to theRespond19,4,

  19. Respond to the article | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes andRespond toRespond to the

  20. Respond to the article | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes andRespond toRespond to

  1. Respond to the article | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes andRespond toRespond to1, 2014

  2. Respond to the article | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes andRespond toRespond to1,

  3. Respond to the article | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes andRespond toRespond to1,7,

  4. Respond to the article | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes andRespond toRespond3, 2014 -

  5. Respond to the article | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes andRespond toRespond3, 2014 -4,

  6. Respond to the article | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes andRespond toRespond3, 2014

  7. Respond to the article | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes andRespond toRespond3, 20147,

  8. DRAFT - DOE G 444.1-1, Guide on Preventing and Responding to All Forms of Violence in the Workplace

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    To ensure all sites have the tools to implement processes, we have created this guide. Each site is expected to develop its own site specific set of procedures/process to implement DOE Policy 444.1 Preventing and Responding to all forms of violence in the Workplace.

  9. First Responder Initial Response Procedure | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Procedure First Responder Initial Response Procedure The purpose of this response flow chart is to provide first responders with guidance for response to a transportation...

  10. Homeowners: Respond to Natural Gas Disruptions | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Disruptions Homeowners: Respond to Natural Gas Disruptions Homeowners: Respond to Natural Gas Disruptions Because natural gas is distributed through underground...

  11. Local Leaders: Respond to Fuel Shortages | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Fuel Shortages Ensuring adequate fuel supplies is a key component in responding to energy emergencies. Fuel powers backup generators and allows emergency responders and...

  12. Energy Department Emergency Response Team Ready to Respond to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emergency Response Team Ready to Respond to Hurricane Irene Energy Department Emergency Response Team Ready to Respond to Hurricane Irene August 26, 2011 - 12:15pm Addthis...

  13. Respond to the article | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes andRespond to the article

  14. Respond to the article | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes andRespond to the

  15. Respond to the article | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes andRespond to

  16. Training For Radiation Emergencies, First Responder Operations- Course Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation slides use in the Training For Radiation Emergencies, First Responder Operations refresher training course.

  17. A Simple Evacuation Modeling and Simulation Tool for First Responders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Daniel B [ORNL; Payne, Patricia W [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Although modeling and simulation of mass evacuations during a natural or man-made disaster is an on-going and vigorous area of study, tool adoption by front-line first responders is uneven. Some of the factors that account for this situation include cost and complexity of the software. For several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been actively developing the free Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit (IMPACT) to address these issues. One of the components of IMPACT is a multi-agent simulation module for area-based and path-based evacuations. The user interface is designed so that anyone familiar with typical computer drawing tools can quickly author a geospatially-correct evacuation visualization suitable for table-top exercises. Since IMPACT is designed for use in the field where network communications may not be available, quick on-site evacuation alternatives can be evaluated to keep pace with a fluid threat situation. Realism is enhanced by incorporating collision avoidance into the simulation. Statistics are gathered as the simulation unfolds, including most importantly time-to-evacuate, to help first responders choose the best course of action.

  18. Application of Spatial Data Modeling and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Identification of Potential Siting Options for Various Electrical Generation Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, Gary T; Belles, Randy; Blevins, Brandon R; Hadley, Stanton W; Harrison, Thomas J; Jochem, Warren C; Neish, Bradley S; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Rose, Amy N

    2012-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) initiated an internal National Electric Generation Siting Study, which is an ongoing multiphase study addressing several key questions related to our national electrical energy supply. This effort has led to the development of a tool, OR-SAGE (Oak Ridge Siting Analysis for power Generation Expansion), to support siting evaluations. The objective in developing OR-SAGE was to use industry-accepted approaches and/or develop appropriate criteria for screening sites and employ an array of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data sources at ORNL to identify candidate areas for a power generation technology application. The initial phase of the study examined nuclear power generation. These early nuclear phase results were shared with staff from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), which formed the genesis and support for an expansion of the work to several other power generation forms, including advanced coal with carbon capture and storage (CCS), solar, and compressed air energy storage (CAES). Wind generation was not included in this scope of work for EPRI. The OR-SAGE tool is essentially a dynamic visualization database. The results shown in this report represent a single static set of results using a specific set of input parameters. In this case, the GIS input parameters were optimized to support an economic study conducted by EPRI. A single set of individual results should not be construed as an ultimate energy solution, since US energy policy is very complex. However, the strength of the OR-SAGE tool is that numerous alternative scenarios can be quickly generated to provide additional insight into electrical generation or other GIS-based applications. The screening process divides the contiguous United States into 100 x 100 m (1-hectare) squares (cells), applying successive power generation-appropriate site selection and evaluation criteria (SSEC) to each cell. There are just under 700 million cells representing the contiguous United States. If a cell meets the requirements of each criterion, the cell is deemed a candidate area for siting a specific power generation form relative to a reference plant for that power type. Some SSEC parameters preclude siting a power plant because of an environmental, regulatory, or land-use constraint. Other SSEC assist in identifying less favorable areas, such as proximity to hazardous operations. All of the selected SSEC tend to recommend against sites. The focus of the ORNL electrical generation source siting study is on identifying candidate areas from which potential sites might be selected, stopping short of performing any detailed site evaluations or comparisons. This approach is designed to quickly screen for and characterize candidate areas. Critical assumptions supporting this work include the supply of cooling water to thermoelectric power generation; a methodology to provide an adequate siting footprint for typical power plant applications; a methodology to estimate thermoelectric plant capacity while accounting for available cooling water; and a methodology to account for future ({approx}2035) siting limitations as population increases and demands on freshwater sources change. OR-SAGE algorithms were built to account for these critical assumptions. Stream flow is the primary thermoelectric plant cooling source evaluated in this study. All cooling was assumed to be provided by a closed-cycle cooling (CCC) system requiring makeup water to account for evaporation and blowdown. Limited evaluations of shoreline cooling and the use of municipal processed water (gray) cooling were performed. Using a representative set of SSEC as input to the OR-SAGE tool and employing the accompanying critical assumptions, independent results for the various power generation sources studied were calculated.

  19. Biodetection Technologies for First Responders: 2014 Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozanich, Richard M.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Colburn, Heather A.; Straub, Tim M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2014-03-28

    This report summarizes commercially-available, hand-portable technologies that can be used by first responders in the field. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list, nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, this report is meant to provide useful information about available technologies to help end-users make informed decisions about biodetection technology procurement and use. Information listed in this report is primarily vendor-provided; however, where possible it has been supplemented with additional information obtained from publications, reports, and websites. Manufacturers were given the chance to review summaries of their technologies from August through November 2013 to verify the accuracy of technical specifications, available references, and pricing.

  20. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain site characterization study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stetzenbach, K.; Farnham, I.

    1996-06-01

    Extensive tracer testing is expected to take place at the C-well complex in the Nevada Test Site as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The C-well complex consists of one pumping well, C3, and two injection wells, C1 and C2 into which tracer will be introduced. The goal of this research was to provide USGS with numerous tracers to completed these tests. Several classes of fluorinated organic acids have been evaluated. These include numerous isomers of fluorinated benzoic acids, cinnamic acids, and salicylic acids. Also several derivatives of 2-hydroxy nicotinic acid (pyridone) have been tested. The stability of these compounds was determined using batch and column tests. Ames testing (mutagenicity/carcinogenicity) was conducted on the fluorinated benzoic acids and a literature review of toxicity of the fluorobenzoates and three perfluoro aliphatic acids was prepared. Solubilities were measured and method development work was performed to optimize the detection of these compounds. A Quality Assurance (QA) Program was developed under existing DOE and USGS guidelines. The program includes QA procedures and technical standard operating procedures. A tracer test, using sodium iodide, was performed at the C-well complex. HRC chemists performed analyses on site, to provide real time data for the USGS hydrologists and in the laboratories at UNLV. Over 2,500 analyses were performed. This report provides the results of the laboratory experiments and literature reviews used to evaluate the potential tracers and reports on the results of the iodide C-well tracer test.

  1. Identification of structures, systems, and components important to safety at the potential repository at Yucca Mountain; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, D.J.; Miller, D.D. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Klamerus, L.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1991-10-01

    This study recommends which structures, systems, and components of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain are important to safety. The assessment was completed in April 1990 and uses the reference repository configuration in the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design Report and follows the methodology required at that time by DOE Procedure AP6.10-Q. Failures of repository items during the preclosure period are evaluated to determine the potential offsite radiation doses and associated probabilities. Items are important to safety if, in the event they fail to perform their intended function, an accident could result which causes a dose commitment greater than 0.5 rem to the whole body or any organ of an individual in an unrestricted area. This study recommends that these repository items include the structures that house spent fuel and high-level waste, the associated filtered ventilation exhaust systems, certain waste- handling equipment, the waste containers, the waste treatment building structure, the underground waste transporters, and other items listed in this report. This work was completed April 1990. 27 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Site Index - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flow Compensation Claim Process Presentations Related Information Vocational Rehabilitation Visitor Control Site Access Beryllium Program Beryllium Program Beryllium...

  3. Responding to Emergencies | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultiday ProductionDesigningResources Thomas Jefferson Site

  4. Webinar: National Hydrogen Safety Training Resource for Emergency Responders

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Text version and video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar titled "National Hydrogen Safety Training Resource for Emergency Responders," originally presented on March 24, 2015.

  5. National Hydrogen Safety Training Resource for Emergency Responders...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "National Hydrogen Safety Training Resource for Emergency Responders" held on March 24, 2015. National Hydrogen Safety...

  6. NNSA hosts Illinois emergency responders during technical exchange...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    responders during an Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Technical Exchange meeting at NNSA's Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) in Las Vegas, Nev. The technical exchange consisted of...

  7. Secretary of Energy's First Biennial Report to Congress Responding...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Secretary of Energy's First Biennial Report to Congress Responding to Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) Findings and Recommendations during Fiscal Year...

  8. FIRE Action Plan to Respond to Next Step Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 FIRE Action Plan to Respond to Next Step Options Program Advisory Committee Report #2 July 3, 2001 The FIRE Action s are listed among the NSO-PAC2 recommendations. 1. Response to NSO PAC-1 Report Representatives of the FIRE project presented an action plan for how to respond to issues that had been raised

  9. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Responding to Electrical Power Outages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Responding to Electrical Power Outages and Floods Bruce The Texas A&M University System Electrical power outages and floods can affect you and your residential power outages and flooding. System Components To properly respond to a disaster, homeowners need to know

  10. Does rationality consist in responding correctly to reasons? John Broome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    Does rationality consist in responding correctly to reasons? John Broome Journal of Moral form. What does it mean to say that rationality consists in responding correctly to reasons? Partly does not call for a response from you. Your punishment is the responsibility of the authorities

  11. EIA responds to Nature article on shale gas projections

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    EIA has responded to a December 4, 2014 Nature article on projections of shale gas production made by EIA and by the Bureau of Economic Geology of the University of Texas at Austin (BEG/UT) with a letter to the editors of Nature. BEG/UT has also responded to the article in their own letter to the editor.

  12. Responder Technology Alert Monthly (Oct-Nov 2014)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upton, Jaki F.; Stein, Steven L.

    2015-01-21

    As part of technology foraging for the Responder Technology Alliance, established by the Department of Homeland Science and Technologies First Responders Group, this report summarizes technologies that are relevant in the area of “wearables,” with the potential for use by first responders. The content was collected over the previous month(s) and reproduced from a general Internet search using the term wearables. Additional information is available at the websites provided. This report is not meant to be an exhaustive list nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about current developments in the areas wearable technology.

  13. Patterns for responding to climate in shared-wall housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Susan Kaufmann

    1982-01-01

    Out of the inescapables of building come inspiration for architectural design. Decisions which respond to climate make their mark in design, just as structural requirements, lighting provisions, and the limitations of a ...

  14. Federal policy towards emergency responder interoperability : a path forward

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weir, Tristan John

    2006-01-01

    Emergency responders have suffered from a lack of cross-agency radio communications for the past three decades. After numerous firefighters died in the terrorist attacks of September 11, partially due to a lack of ...

  15. Webinar: National Hydrogen Safety Training Resource for Emergency Responders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department's Fuel Cell Technologies Office announces the launch of a new, free, online national hydrogen safety training resource for emergency responders. This webinar will provide additional details about the emergency response hydrogen training resource.

  16. Responding to Solicitations Under DOE Work For Others Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes andRespondRESPONDING TO

  17. Methodology for Assessing Radiation Detectors Used by Emergency Responders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piotr Wasiolek; April Simpson

    2008-03-01

    The threat of weapons of mass destruction terrorism resulted in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security deploying large quantities of radiation detectors throughout the emergency responder community. However, emergency responders specific needs were not always met by standard health physics instrumentation used in radiation facilities. Several American National Standards Institute standards were developed and approved to evaluate the technical capabilities of detection equipment. Establishing technical capability is a critical step, but it is equally important to emergency responders that the instruments are easy to operate and can withstand the rugged situations they encounter. The System Assessment and Validation for Emergency Responders (SAVER) Program (managed by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of Grants and Training, Systems Support Division) focuses predominantly on the usability, ergonomics, readability, and other features of the detectors, rather than performance controlled by industry standards and the manufacturers. National Security Technologies, LLC, as a SAVER Technical Agent, conducts equipment evaluations using active emergency responders who are familiar with the detection equipment and knowledgeable of situations encountered in the field, which provides more relevant data to emergency responders.

  18. Site Index - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment Top Scientific ImpactTechnologies |Site Index Site Index

  19. Weldon Spring SIte Remedial Action Project Update, Responding to the Community.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , cMarch 20,WJLP-~SinceGeotimes

  20. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulation Test Site Simulation Test Site Sen. Murray Press Conference Sen. Murray Press Conference Sen. Murray Press Conference Sen. Murray Press Conference Sen. Murray Press...

  1. Radiation belt electrons respond to multiple solar wind inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiation belt electrons respond to multiple solar wind inputs E. J. Rigler,1 M. Wiltberger,1 and D is clearly valuable from a practical standpoint, but the latter helps build confidence in any physical on the fractional or percent variance of radiation belt electron flux that can be attributed to each different solar

  2. Table of Contents Preparing for and Responding to Drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3 Table of Contents Preparing for and Responding to Drought WHEN EVERY DROP COuNtsProtecting Public, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency, and American Water Works Association. 2010. When every drop counts P r o f e s s i o n A l s #12;#12;Table of Contents Acknowledgments

  3. GENERAL INFORMATION A0. Respondent Information (Not for Publication)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bou-Zeid, Elie

    to which applications should be sent, please provide: A2. Source of institutional control (check one only categories as of the institution's official fall reporting date or as of October 15, 2007. FULL-TIME PARTGENERAL INFORMATION A0. Respondent Information (Not for Publication) Name Jonathan R. LeBouef Title

  4. Training For Radiation Emergencies, First Responder Operations- Student Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this program is to provide refresher operations training, as well as in-depth training in radiation, to fire fighters who are currently trained to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standard for Professional Competence of Responders to Hazardous Materials (NFPA 472).

  5. Training For Radiation Emergencies, First Responder Operations- Instructors Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this program is to provide refresher operations training, as well as in-depth training in radiation, to fire fighters who are currently trained to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standard for Professional Competence of Responders to Hazardous Materials (NFPA 472).

  6. "Designing equipment and buildings to more quickly respond to occupant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    prediction system Energy Efficient Smart Buildings In the near future, intelligent buildings"Designing equipment and buildings to more quickly respond to occupant behavior." Kamin Whitehouse University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 434.982.2211 Whitehouse Research Group Our group is creating smart

  7. U.S. First Responder Safety Training for Advanced Electric Drive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    First Responder Safety Training for Advanced Electric Drive Vehicle Presentation U.S. First Responder Safety Training for Advanced Electric Drive Vehicle Presentation 2010 DOE...

  8. Peptide identification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  9. Particle identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lippmann, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Particle IDentification (PID) is fundamental to particle physics experiments. This paper reviews PID strategies and methods used by the large LHC experiments, which provide outstanding examples of the state-of-the-art. The first part focuses on the general design of these experiments with respect to PID and the technologies used. Three PID techniques are discussed in more detail: ionization measurements, time-of-flight measurements and Cherenkov imaging. Four examples of the implementation of these techniques at the LHC are given, together with selections of relevant examples from other experiments and short overviews on new developments. Finally, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS 02) experiment is briefly described as an impressive example of a space-based experiment using a number of familiar PID techniques.

  10. Particle identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Lippmann

    2011-06-12

    Particle IDentification (PID) is fundamental to particle physics experiments. This paper reviews PID strategies and methods used by the large LHC experiments, which provide outstanding examples of the state-of-the-art. The first part focuses on the general design of these experiments with respect to PID and the technologies used. Three PID techniques are discussed in more detail: ionization measurements, time-of-flight measurements and Cherenkov imaging. Four examples of the implementation of these techniques at the LHC are given, together with selections of relevant examples from other experiments and short overviews on new developments. Finally, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS 02) experiment is briefly described as an impressive example of a space-based experiment using a number of familiar PID techniques.

  11. Apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; Wilde, Tyson; Barlow, Jonathan S.

    2010-04-13

    A method of responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a bore hole comprises detecting the anomalous change in downhole pressure, sending a signal along the segmented electromagnetic transmission path, receiving the signal, and performing a automated response. The anomalous change in downhole pressure is detected at a first location along a segmented electromagnetic transmission path, and the segmented electromagnetic transmission path is integrated into the tool string. The signal is received by at least one receiver in communication with the segmented electromagnetic transmission path. The automated response is performed along the tool string. Disclosed is an apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a downhole tool string, comprising a segmented electromagnetic transmission path connecting one or more receivers and at least one pressure sensor.

  12. Homeowners: Respond to Power Outages | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill FinancingDepartment ofPower Outages Homeowners: Respond to Power

  13. Challenges for Early Responders to a Nuclear / Radiological Terrorism Incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, M.A. [Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Stearns, L.J. [Shaw Environmental, Inc, Monroeville, PA (United States); Davie, A.D. [Shaw Environmental, Inc, Alpharetta, GA (United States); Day, E. [PELL Resources Company, Manassas, VA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Even in the best of circumstances, most municipalities would face severe challenges in providing effective incident response to a large scale radiation release caused by nuclear terrorism or accident. Compounding obvious complexities, the effectiveness of first and early responders to a radiological emergency may also be hampered by an insufficient distribution of radiation detection and monitoring equipment, local policies concerning triage and field decontamination of critical victims, malfunctioning communications, inadequate inter-agency agility, and the psychological 'fear' impact on early responders. This paper examines several issues impeding the early response to nuclear terrorism incidents with specific consideration given to the on-going and forward-thinking preparedness efforts currently being developed in the Sacramento, California region. Specific recommendations are provided addressing hot zone protocols, radiation detection and monitoring equipment, hasty patient packaging techniques, vertically and horizontally integrated pre-event training, mitigating psychological fear, and protocols for the effective 'hand-off' from first responders to subsequent early response-recovery teams. (authors)

  14. TRACKING SITE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003235MLTPL00 AASG Geothermal Data submissions tracking application and site.  https://github.com/usgin/aasgtrack 

  15. Business Owners: Respond to an Energy Emergency | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment|Marketing, LLCEfficiency | DepartmentEnergy CHINO,UtilityRespond to

  16. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subcontract for characterization work issued Subcontract for characterization work issued Recovery Act Projects Underway Recovery Act Projects Underway Hanford Site New Hires...

  17. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Treatment Record Groundwater Treatment Resin HAMMER Site-Wide Safety Standards Helicopter Removes Truck on ALE Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete HSS Beryllium Out...

  18. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Well Drilling Wells are drilled at the Hanford Site to support detecting and treating contamination in the groundwater. Search Search Search Filter: Well Drilling All Galleries 284...

  19. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stops on her tour was the site's largest groundwater treatment facility. The 200 West Pump and Treat System removes multiple chemical and radiological contaminants from...

  20. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tour the Hanford Site to learn about cleanup technologies that could be used at Fukushima. Search Search Search Filter: TEPCO Visit All Galleries 284 East Explosive...

  1. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HAMMER Site-Wide Safety Standards Helicopter Removes Truck on ALE Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete HSS Beryllium Out Brief Improving Access to Tank C-107 K Basins...

  2. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Secretary Ernest Moniz Visits Hanford United States Department of Energy Secretary Dr. Ernest Moniz visited the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state on June 19, 2013....

  3. Chapter 3: Building Siting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    : Building Siting Site Issues at LANL Site Inventory and Analysis Site Design Transportation and Parking LANL | Chapter 3 Site Issues at LANL Definitions and related documents...

  4. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Media Visit to Hazardous Burial Ground Members of the media out at one of the most hazardous burial grounds on site to take a look at work funded by Recovery Act funds. Search...

  5. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    McCluskey Room progress Hanford workers continue progress toward demolition of the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Crews worked to remove the face of the glove box that was the site of...

  6. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    waste site, BC, BC Control Area Area: BC Control Area Description: After removing contaminated soils, the 140-acre area was revegetated with seed and about 280,000 pounds of mulch...

  7. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is one of nine former plutonium production reactors along the Columbia River at the Hanford Site. The work is part of the ongoing effort to decommission and prepare the K East...

  8. Triangle Alternative Transportation Fuels First Responder Training Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fueling sites. Vehicles deployed include compressed natural gas (CNG), propane (LPG), hybrid electric includes biodiesel, E85, CNG, LPG, and electric charging. As part of this project, the North Carolina Solar) Vehicle Technology Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicle Technology Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Vehicle

  9. Savannah River Site environmental report for 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A.

    1995-12-31

    The 1990s have brought dramatic change to the Savannah River Site (SRS) in its role as a key part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) weapons complex. Shrinking federal budgets, sharp workforce reductions, the end of the Cold War, and a major shift in mission objectives have combined to severely test the mettle of SRS-South Carolina`s largest employer. But the sprawling 310-square-mile site`s employees have responded to the test in admirable fashion, effectively shifting their emphasis from weapons production to environmental restoration. This report describes the environmental report for the SRS for 1995.

  10. National Hydrogen Safety Training Resource for Emergency Responders Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the BillDepartmentSites KDFNational Fuel Cell and Hydrogen3Slides | Department

  11. Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment Top Scientific ImpactTechnologies |Site Index Site

  12. Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment Top Scientific ImpactTechnologies |Site IndexSite Map

  13. Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Siting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Siting and Review Process Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Washington Energy...

  14. In a mining accident, first responders are working against

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THE SITE-218 58ImprovingIna mining accident, first

  15. Site Recommendation Subsurface Layout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.L. Linden

    2000-06-28

    The purpose of this analysis is to develop a Subsurface Facility layout that is capable of accommodating the statutory capacity of 70,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU), as well as an option to expand the inventory capacity, if authorized, to 97,000 MTU. The layout configuration also requires a degree of flexibility to accommodate potential changes in site conditions or program requirements. The objective of this analysis is to provide a conceptual design of the Subsurface Facility sufficient to support the development of the Subsurface Facility System Description Document (CRWMS M&O 2000e) and the ''Emplacement Drift System Description Document'' (CRWMS M&O 2000i). As well, this analysis provides input to the Site Recommendation Consideration Report. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Evaluation of the existing facilities and their integration into the Subsurface Facility design. (2) Identification and incorporation of factors influencing Subsurface Facility design, such as geological constraints, thermal loading, constructibility, subsurface ventilation, drainage control, radiological considerations, and the Test and Evaluation Facilities. (3) Development of a layout showing an available area in the primary area sufficient to support both the waste inventories and individual layouts showing the emplacement area required for 70,000 MTU and, if authorized, 97,000 MTU.

  16. A System for the Rapid Identification of Toxic Chemicals in HazMat Response Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhavnani, Suresh K.

    Medicine & Biology, Medical School, 2 Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research, 3 Elect. Eng Response Team, Ann Arbor, MI; 5 Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. Introduction The rapid identification of toxic, we collaborated with an experienced first responder from a local county HazMat response team

  17. Preventing and Responding to All Forms of Violence in the Workplace...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P 444.1, Preventing and Responding to All Forms of Violence in the Workplace (Informational Purposes Only) by Beau Newman Functional areas: Workplace Violence, Employee Safety This...

  18. Sacandaga Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700 GJO-2003-411-TACe: SUBJIHX: ?%wSacandaga Site

  19. Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment Top Scientific ImpactTechnologies |Site Index

  20. ARM - Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery Act Recovery Act Logo SubscribegovSite Index Expand

  1. Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species3 Outlook forSimulationsSite Map TUNL pdf's |

  2. Part I Student Identification Pleaseprintortype

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gough, Christopher M.

    Part I Student Identification Pleaseprintortype Name of student Taxpayer identification number Address (number, street, and apt. or suite no.) City, state, and ZIP code Part II Taxpayer Identification Number Certification I certify that the number shown on this form is my correct taxpayer identification

  3. Red Algae Respond to Waves: Morphological and Mechanical Variation in Mastocarpus papillatus Along

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denny, Mark

    Red Algae Respond to Waves: Morphological and Mechanical Variation in Mastocarpus papillatus Along Grove, California, 93950 Abstract. Intertidal algae are exposed to the potentially severe drag forces generated by crashing waves, and several species of brown algae respond, in part, by varying the strength

  4. Colorado State Forest Service SB09-020 --Responsibility for Responding to Wildland Fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado State Forest Service SB09-020 -- Responsibility for Responding to Wildland Fires Summary, and the Colorado State Forest Service in responding to wildland fires. This legislation organizes the roles Forest Service may assist the sheriff in controlling or extinguishing such fires, and may assume command

  5. Webinar March 24: National Hydrogen Safety Training Resource for Emergency Responders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a live webinar titled "National Hydrogen Safety Training Resource for Emergency Responders" on Tuesday, March 24, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time. This webinar will describe a new, free, online national hydrogen safety training resource for emergency responders.

  6. Large Scale Test of Sensor Fingerprint Camera Identification Miroslav Goljan, Jessica Fridrich, and Toms Filler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridrich, Jessica

    Large Scale Test of Sensor Fingerprint Camera Identification Miroslav Goljan, Jessica Fridrich This paper presents a large scale test of camera identification from sensor fingerprints. To overcome-line image sharing site. In our experiment, we tested over one million images spanning 6896 individual

  7. Rapid automatic NCS identification using heavy-atom substructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2002-12-01

    A rapid algorithm for identifying NCS in heavy-atom sites is described. An important component of a fully automated system for structure solution and phase improvement through density modification is a capability for identification of non-crystallographic symmetry as early in the process as possible. Algorithms exist for finding NCS in heavy-atom sites, but currently require of the order of N{sup 5} comparisons to be made, where N is the number of sites to be examined, including crystallographically related locations. A method described here based on considering only sets of sites that have common interatomic distances reduces the computational time by several orders of magnitude. Additionally, searches for proper symmetry allow the identification of NCS in cases where only one heavy atom is present per NCS copy.

  8. Sites of Sociality: Performances of Dyke Identifications Through Social Networking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malone, Sheila Anne

    2015-01-01

    affa.hells-angels.com/hamc- history/. “History of the Web. ”World Wide Web Foundation. Accessed March 4, 2015.about/vision/history-of-the-web/. Hutchinson, Lee. “Modems,

  9. New geothermal site identification and qualification. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-04-01

    This study identifies remaining undeveloped geothermal resources in California and western Nevada, and it estimates the development costs of each. It has relied on public-domain information and such additional data as geothermal developers have chosen to make available. Reserve estimation has been performed by volumetric analysis with a probabilistic approach to uncertain input parameters. Incremental geothermal reserves in the California/Nevada study area have a minimum value of 2,800 grosss MW and a most-likely value of 4,300 gross MW. For the state of California alone, these values are 2,000 and 3,000 gross MW, respectively. These estimates may be conservative to the extent that they do not take into account resources about which little or no public-domain information is available. The average capital cost of incremental generation capacity is estimated to average $3,100/kW for the California/Nevada study area, and $2,950/kW for the state of California alone. These cost estimates include exploration, confirmation drilling, development drilling, plant construction, and transmission-line costs. For the purposes of this study, a capital cost of $2,400/kW is considered competitive with other renewable resources. The amount of incremental geothermal capacity available at or below $2,400/kW is about 1,700 gross MW for the California/Nevada study area, and the same amount (within 50-MW rounding) for the state of California alone. The capital cost estimates are only approximate, because each developer would bring its own experience, bias, and opportunities to the development process. Nonetheless, the overall costs per project estimated in this study are believed to be reasonable.

  10. New Geothermal Site Identification and Qualification | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures LtdNeville, Ohio: Energy ResourcesCorporation

  11. Identification of chemical hazards for security risk analysis activities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaeger, Calvin Dell

    2005-01-01

    The presentation outline of this paper is: (1) How identification of chemical hazards fits into a security risk analysis approach; (2) Techniques for target identification; and (3) Identification of chemical hazards by different organizations. The summary is: (1) There are a number of different methodologies used within the chemical industry which identify chemical hazards: (a) Some develop a manual listing of potential targets based on published lists of hazardous chemicals or chemicals of concern, 'expert opinion' or known hazards. (b) Others develop a prioritized list based on chemicals found at a facility and consequence analysis (offsite release affecting population, theft of material, product tampering). (2) Identification of chemical hazards should include not only intrinsic properties of the chemicals but also potential reactive chemical hazards and potential use for activities off-site.

  12. Survey respondents were asked what information on the CDM website they--as CDM students --found most relevant. Out of 257 respondents, the top four response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Craig

    CDM Survey Results Survey respondents were asked what information on the CDM website they-- as CDM Information, Degree Information, Faculty Information and Schedule. The category Course Information was mentioned 122 times. The category Course Information also included responses that mentioned the words "class

  13. Washington and Lee University Guidelines for Responding to Information Security Breaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, David

    Washington and Lee University Guidelines for Responding to Information Security Breaches Notifications 1. As further detailed in the university's Guidelines for Reporting Information Security Breaches regarding an actual or suspected data breach should contact: i. the university's Information Security

  14. More money, more science? : how the malaria research community responds to funding opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krestin, Ruth Viviane

    2010-01-01

    Agencies that fund research shape both the rate and direction of scientific progress through the resource allocation choices they make. However, our understanding of the degree to which scientists respond to shifts in that ...

  15. Look at this: the neural correlates of initiating and responding to bids for joint attention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redcay, Elizabeth

    When engaging in joint attention, one person directs another person's attention to an object (Initiating Joint Attention, IJA), and the second person's attention follows (Responding to Joint Attention, RJA). As such, joint ...

  16. The relationship of social desirability responding and the Big Five: an investigation using confirmatory factor analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlisle, Todd Dana

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between social desirability responding (SDR) and the Big Five factors of personality was both summarized with a review of past and current studies and directly investigated using a series of confirmatory ...

  17. Tanks focus area site needs assessment FY 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Tanks Focus Area`s (TFA`s) mission is to manage an integrated technology development program that results in the application of technology to safely and efficiently accomplish tank waste remediation across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The TFA uses a systematic process for developing its annual program that draws from the tanks technology development needs expressed by four DOE tank waste sites - Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The process is iterative and involves six steps: (1) Site needs identification and documentation, (2) Site communication of priority needs, (3) Technical response development, (4) Review technical responses, (5) Develop program planning documents, and (6) Review planning documents. This document describes the outcomes of the first two steps: site needs identification and documentation, and site communication of priority needs. It also describes the initial phases of the third and fourth steps: technical response development and review technical responses. Each site`s Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG) was responsible for developing and delivering priority tank waste needs. This was accomplished using a standardized needs template developed by the National STCG. The standard template helped improve the needs submission process this year. The TFA received the site needs during December 1996 and January 1997.

  18. Pipeline MT Instructions Identification Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Don

    Pipeline MT Instructions Identification Number For identification purposes, you will be assigned a special identification number. M# You can activate your MT email, login to PipelineMT to register for classes or pay tuition and fees. Activating the MTSU Email and PipelineMT accounts: Visit the website

  19. first responders

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en46Afed feed families |fff |fire

  20. RESPONDENT INFORMATION

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNaturalOctober 2015 Alcohol. TheData - U.S.fuel oil

  1. RESPONDENT INFORMATION

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNaturalOctober 2015 Alcohol. TheData - U.S.fuel

  2. Use of uranium decay series for dating an archaeological smelting site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Violetta (Violetta R.)

    2008-01-01

    Through the identification of phases and their isotopic composition and variability, an assessment of the applicability of uranium decay series dating to El Manchon slags was made. El Manchon is the only Mesoamerican site ...

  3. Overview of Hazard Assessment and Emergency Planning Software of Use to RN First Responders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waller, E; Millage, K; Blakely, W F; Ross, J A; Mercier, J R; Sandgren, D J; Levine, I H; Dickerson, W E; Nemhauser, J B; Nasstrom, J S; Sugiyama, G; Homann, S; Buddemeier, B R; Curling, C A; Disraelly, D S

    2008-08-26

    There are numerous software tools available for field deployment, reach-back, training and planning use in the event of a radiological or nuclear (RN) terrorist event. Specialized software tools used by CBRNe responders can increase information available and the speed and accuracy of the response, thereby ensuring that radiation doses to responders, receivers, and the general public are kept as low as reasonably achievable. Software designed to provide health care providers with assistance in selecting appropriate countermeasures or therapeutic interventions in a timely fashion can improve the potential for positive patient outcome. This paper reviews various software applications of relevance to radiological and nuclear (RN) events that are currently in use by first responders, emergency planners, medical receivers, and criminal investigators.

  4. Hanford Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. ); Yancey, E.F. )

    1990-01-01

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

  5. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and roads The spatial location and boundaries for each Site shown on the Site Monitoring Area maps originate from activities conducted under the Compliance Order on Consent with...

  6. PINS Spectrum Identification Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.J. Caffrey

    2012-03-01

    The Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy—PINS, for short—system identifies the chemicals inside munitions and containers without opening them, a decided safety advantage if the fill chemical is a hazardous substance like a chemical warfare agent or an explosive. The PINS Spectrum Identification Guide is intended as a reference for technical professionals responsible for the interpretation of PINS gamma-ray spectra. The guide is divided into two parts. The three chapters that constitute Part I cover the science and technology of PINS. Neutron activation analysis is the focus of Chapter 1. Chapter 2 explores PINS hardware, software, and related operational issues. Gamma-ray spectral analysis basics are introduced in Chapter 3. The six chapters of Part II cover the identification of PINS spectra in detail. Like the PINS decision tree logic, these chapters are organized by chemical element: phosphorus-based chemicals, chlorine-based chemicals, etc. These descriptions of hazardous, toxic, and/or explosive chemicals conclude with a chapter on the identification of the inert chemicals, e.g. sand, used to fill practice munitions.

  7. 2015-01 "Identification and Preparation of Interim Disposition Site(s) to

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s iof1 of 8 2 of 8of EnergyEnable LANL

  8. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  9. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, first quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During first quarter 1989 (January--March), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the first quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from first quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  10. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Fourth quarter, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  11. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  12. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1989 (July--September), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the third quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from third quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  13. RESPONDING TO ALLEGATIONS OF SCIENTIFIC MISCONDUCT FOR US PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE GRANT APPLICANTS AND RECIPIENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    RESPONDING TO ALLEGATIONS OF SCIENTIFIC MISCONDUCT FOR US PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE GRANT APPLICANTS University is committed to excellence in scholarly activities and as such is committed to assuring that the highest standards of scholarly integrity are to be understood and practised. Scholarly activity varies

  14. or executed, and not to others, while the remainder responded to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behrmann, Marlene

    characteristics in anterior intraparietal area PF/IPL. One of the studies [2] reported that a small number,3] reproduced the original finding in area F5, while the third [4] reported neurons with the same functional that a small number of mirror neurons in areas F5 and IPL responded selectively to a particular movement goal

  15. HumanWildlife Conflicts 2(2):194199, Fall 2008 How people should respond when

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by a black bear, mountain lion, or wolf, most respondents said to fight back. Opinion was divided over, carnivores, grizzly bear, human­wildlife conflicts, mountain lion, predator attacks, wolf Attacks by large). Black bears (Ursus americana), grizzly bears (Ursus arctos), mountain lions (Puma concolor), and gray

  16. "Our flexible and diverse program options respond to individual student needs." carleton.ca/socanth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    "Our flexible and diverse program options respond to individual student needs." carleton and social conditions in diverse contexts throughout the world. We offer three program options: coursework work with their area of research interest, while gaining real- world experience. #12;This document

  17. Common Data Set 2011-2012 A0 Respondent Information (Not for Publication)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the publishers further refine CDS items. http://admissions.msu.edu/apply/asp Source of institutional control of undergraduate students for each of the following categories as of the institution's official fall reporting dateCommon Data Set 2011-2012 A0 Respondent Information (Not for Publication) A0 Name: Kyle Sweitzer A0

  18. Situational Judgment Test Responding: Best and Worst or Rate Each Response 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, Jennifer

    2010-01-16

    because this type of SJT has a high cognitive load and thus acts like a knowledge test. It was also hypothesized that the SJT on which respondents rated the effectiveness of each option on a Likert scale would be related to personality because it taps...

  19. Responding to symptoms suggestive of lung cancer: a qualitative interview study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birt, Linda; Hall, Nicky; Emery, Jon; Banks, Jon; Mills, Katie; Johnson, Margaret; Hamilton, Willie; Walter, Fiona M.

    2014-12-11

    illness experiences. Help-seeking was triggered when: symptoms failed to respond as expected; there was an increased awareness of symptoms of lung cancer; the public nature of a cough meant others were able to endorse help-seeking. Almost half visited...

  20. Sector Course Name Duration 2014-2015 HST Total Marine Basic Oil Spill Response (Responder) 5 days $ 1,435.00 -$ 1,435.00$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oyet, Alwell

    Sector Course Name Duration 2014-2015 HST Total Marine Basic Oil Spill Response (Responder) 5 days Aid Emergency Medical Responder Bridging 4 days $ 775.00 100.

  1. Final Land Configuration for the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stegen, R. L.; Kapinos, J. M.; Wehner, J. P.; Snyder, B.; Davis, R. W.

    2006-07-01

    Closure of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) has been completed. The future land use of the site is designated as a National Wildlife Refuge. A joint effort between Kaiser-Hill, Department of Energy, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Environmental Protection Agency, State of Colorado, and other stakeholders was initiated to provide direction for developing the final land configuration. Through early identification of issues and developing mutually agreeable solutions, the final land configuration of the site was successfully completed. (authors)

  2. Completed Sites Listing

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Brunswick Site, NJ 1997 60. Ventron, MA 1997 61. Bellfield, ND 1997 67. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, NJ Site Name 62. Bowman, ND 63. Maybell, CO 64. Naturita, CO List of...

  3. nevada national security site

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en Nevada National Security Site operator recognized for green fleet http:www.nnsa.energy.govblognevada-national-security-site-operator-recognized-green-fleet

    The...

  4. site_transition.cdr

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    OF This fact sheet explains the process for transferring a site to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion...

  5. Common Data Set 2012-2013 A0 Respondent Information (Not for Publication)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    ://www.smcvt.edu/Admissions/Apply.aspx Source of institutional control (Check only one): CDS-A Page 1 #12;Common Data Set 2012-2013 A5 Degrees for each of the following categories as of the institution's official fall reporting date or as of OctoberCommon Data Set 2012-2013 A0 Respondent Information (Not for Publication) A0 Name: John Kulhowvick

  6. Responding to complexity in socio-economic systems: How to build a smart and resilient society?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helbing, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The world is changing at an ever-increasing pace. And it has changed in a much more fundamental way than one would think, primarily because it has become more connected and interdependent than in our entire history. Every new product, every new invention can be combined with those that existed before, thereby creating an explosion of complexity: structural complexity, dynamic complexity, functional complexity, and algorithmic complexity. How to respond to this challenge? And what are the costs?

  7. Distinguishing Between Site Waste, Natural, and Other Sources of Contamination at Uranium and Thorium Contaminated Sites - 12274

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hays, David C. [United States Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City, Missouri, 64106 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Uranium and thorium processing and milling sites generate wastes (source, byproduct, or technically enhanced naturally occurring material), that contain contaminants that are similar to naturally occurring radioactive material deposits and other industry wastes. This can lead to mis-identification of other materials as Site wastes. A review of methods used by the US Army Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Protection Agency to distinguish Site wastes from potential other sources, enhanced materials, and natural deposits, at three different thorium mills was conducted. Real case examples demonstrate the importance of understanding the methods of distinguishing wastes. Distinguishing between Site wastes and enhanced Background material can be facilitated by establishing and applying a formal process. Significant project cost avoidance may be realized by distinguishing Site wastes from enhanced NORM. Collection of information on other potential sources of radioactive material and physical information related to the potential for other radioactive material sources should be gathered and reported in the Historical Site Assessment. At a minimum, locations of other such information should be recorded. Site decision makers should approach each Site area with the expectation that non site related radioactive material may be present and have a process in place to distinguish from Site and non Site related materials. (authors)

  8. PINS chemical identification software

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caffrey, Augustine J.; Krebs, Kennth M.

    2004-09-14

    An apparatus and method for identifying a chemical compound. A neutron source delivers neutrons into the chemical compound. The nuclei of chemical elements constituting the chemical compound emit gamma rays upon interaction with the neutrons. The gamma rays are characteristic of the chemical elements constituting the chemical compound. A spectrum of the gamma rays is generated having a detection count and an energy scale. The energy scale is calibrated by comparing peaks in the spectrum to energies of pre-selected chemical elements in the spectrum. A least-squares fit completes the calibration. The chemical elements constituting the chemical compound can be readily determined, which then allows for identification of the chemical compound.

  9. CHANGES TO THE CDS FOR 2003-2004 A0. Respondent Information: This item collects respondent name and contact information in case questions arise.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    to include only institutional aid. J. Degrees Conferred: CIP 2000's two-digit categories are now listed application site on the Internet? If so, please specify: A2. Source of institutional control (check one only of students for each of the following categories as of the institution's official fall reporting date

  10. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Fourth quarter 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring Group of the Health Protection Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1988 (October--December), routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations was performed. The drinking water samples were collected from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. Two sets of flagging criteria were established in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. The drinking water samples were analyzed for radioactive constituents.

  11. Site Environmental Report, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` This 1993 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in the Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here.

  12. Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Myers, R.

    2013-07-01

    Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational approach. The WCH project team is working closely with stakeholders and taking a number of steps to meet these challenges in a continuing effort to remediate chromium contaminated soil in an efficient and cost-effective manner. (authors)

  13. System and damage identification of civil structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moaveni, Babak

    2007-01-01

    12 Damage Index Methods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Model Updating for Damage Identification . . . . . . . .298 x Damage Factors and Residual

  14. Pileup per particle identification

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Harris, Philip; Low, Matthew; Tran, Nhan

    2014-10-09

    We propose a new method for pileup mitigation by implementing “pileup per particle identification” (PUPPI). For each particle we first define a local shape ? which probes the collinear versus soft diffuse structure in the neighborhood of the particle. The former is indicative of particles originating from the hard scatter and the latter of particles originating from pileup interactions. The distribution of ? for charged pileup, assumed as a proxy for all pileup, is used on an event-by-event basis to calculate a weight for each particle. The weights describe the degree to which particles are pileup-like and are used tomore »rescale their four-momenta, superseding the need for jet-based corrections. Furthermore, the algorithm flexibly allows combination with other, possibly experimental, probabilistic information associated with particles such as vertexing and timing performance. We demonstrate the algorithm improves over existing methods by looking at jet pT and jet mass. We also find an improvement on non-jet quantities like missing transverse energy.« less

  15. Pileup per particle identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Harris, Philip; Low, Matthew; Tran, Nhan

    2014-10-09

    We propose a new method for pileup mitigation by implementing “pileup per particle identification” (PUPPI). For each particle we first define a local shape ? which probes the collinear versus soft diffuse structure in the neighborhood of the particle. The former is indicative of particles originating from the hard scatter and the latter of particles originating from pileup interactions. The distribution of ? for charged pileup, assumed as a proxy for all pileup, is used on an event-by-event basis to calculate a weight for each particle. The weights describe the degree to which particles are pileup-like and are used to rescale their four-momenta, superseding the need for jet-based corrections. Furthermore, the algorithm flexibly allows combination with other, possibly experimental, probabilistic information associated with particles such as vertexing and timing performance. We demonstrate the algorithm improves over existing methods by looking at jet pT and jet mass. We also find an improvement on non-jet quantities like missing transverse energy.

  16. Weather Charts - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meteorological Station > Met and Climate Data Summary Products > Historical Weather Charts Hanford Meteorological Station Real Time Met Data from Around the Site Current HMS...

  17. Primary and Site Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    electricity reflect the amount of energy actually consumed within the building. Site energy data are most useful to building engineers, energy managers, building owners and others...

  18. 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2002-09-01

    THE SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 2001, AS REQUIRED BY DOE ORDER 231.1.

  19. Site Office Manager, Princeton

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as the Princeton Site Office (PSO) Manager by providing overall executive leadership to the PSO.

  20. Hydrogeologic characterization report for the Rocky Flats environmental technology site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeder, D.C.; Burcar, S.; Smith, R.

    1996-12-31

    The Denver groundwater basin encompasses approximately 6,700 square miles, extending east from the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. This structural basin contains four Cretaceous bedrock aquifers overlain by a regional Quaternary alluvial aquifer. The Rocky Flats Site is located on the northwest margin of the basin. The shallow groundwater system at the Rocky Flats Site is divided into upper and lower hydrostratigraphic units (UHSU and LHSU, respectively). The UHSU at the Rocky Flats site comprises Quaternary alluvium, colluvium, valley-fill alluvium, artificial fill, weathered bedrock of the undifferentiated Arapahoe and Laramie formations and all sandstones that are hydraulically connected with overlying surficial groundwater. The LHSU comprises unweathered claystone with interbedded siltstones and sandstones of the undifferentiated Arapahoe and Laramie formations. The contact separating the UHSU and LHSU is identified as the base of the weathered zone. The separation of hydrostratigraphic units is supported by the contrasting permeabilities of the units comprising the UHSU and LHSU, well hydrograph data indicating that the units respond differently to seasonal recharge events, and geochemical data reflecting distinct major ion chemistries in the groundwaters of the UHSU and LHSU. Surface-water/groundwater interactions at the Rocky Flats site generally respond to seasonal fluctuations in precipitation, recharge, groundwater storage, and stream and ditch flow. Effluent conditions are dominant in the spring along western stream segments and influent conditions are common in the late summer and fall along most stream reaches.

  1. Liquefaction Evaluations at DOE Sites

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Background Purpose and Objective Liquefaction Methods Site Evaluations Aging Conclusions 2 Background 3 Liquefaction at DOE Sites Background Liquefaction...

  2. A Simulation Learning Approach to Training First Responders for Radiological Emergencies ? A Continuation of Work

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lake, Joe E; Cross, Butch; Sanders, Robert Lon

    2008-01-01

    Real-time gaming engines, such as Epic Game's Unreal Engine[1], provide an excellent resource as a training environment. These engines provide an alternate reality that can accurately depict not only real world geometry, but they can also achieve realistic physical effects such as radiation fields and blast physics. The real time photorealistic graphics available through the Unreal Engine add to its applicability to this project's needs. Moreover, this engine provides a very efficient means to modify the game's physics modeling, visual effects, and game play structure to fit the ever-evolving needs of a training curriculum. To this end, we have worked to extend the Unreal Engine to incorporate radiation effects dependent on distance from a radiological source, similar to what one would experience in the real world. In order to help better prepare first responders for using the radiological detection equipment vital for mission success, we have continued work, previously described by Sanders and Rhodes [2], on a Geiger counter readout display being implemented and added to the interface's Heads Up Display (HUD) as well as incorporating a physically accurate model within the engine that will allow the first responder to acclimate themselves to the sounds and possible size of the device. Moreover, the Karma Physics Engine, which works in conjunction with the Unreal Engine 2, accurately simulates fluid physics, blast effects, and basic player movements. It is this physics engine that has been the focus of our continued efforts and has been extended to include realistic modeling of radiological effects.

  3. Learning environment simulator: a tool for local decision makers and first responders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leclaire, Rene J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hirsch, Gary B [CLE, INCORPORATED

    2009-01-01

    The National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC) has developed a prototype learning environment simulator (LES) based on the Critical Infrastructure Protection Decision Support System (CIPDSS) infrastructure and scenario models. The LES is designed to engage decision makers at the grass-roots level (local/city/state) to deepen their understanding of an evolving crisis, enhance their intuition and allow them to test their own strategies for events before they occur. An initial version is being developed, centered on a pandemic influenza outbreak and has been successfully tested with a group of hospital administrators and first responders. LES is not a predictive tool but rather a simulated environment allowing the user to experience the complexities of a crisis before it happens. Users can contrast various approaches to the crisis, competing with alternative strategies of their own or other participants. LES is designed to assist decision makers in making informed choices by functionally representing relevant scenarios before they occur, including impacts to critical infrastructures with their interdependencies, and estimating human health & safety and economic impacts. In this paper a brief overview of the underlying models are given followed by a description of the LES, its interface and usage and an overview of the experience testing LES with a group of hospital administrators and first responders. The paper concludes with a brief discussion of the work remaining to make LES operational.

  4. 2nd RESPOND project Workshop "Id tifi ti d l f k t b d ti"Identification and analyses of market-based response options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (heat pumps, hybrid electric cars) #12;Gross list of response options ­ examples GENERATION DEMAND TRADETechnical adaptation: oVoltage dips oFrecuency variations Wave power converters Heat Production : Heat pumps District, technology) ­ Storage of electricity or heat 4 ­ Storage of electricity or heat ­ New demand technologies

  5. Responding to traveling patients' seasonal demands for health care services in the Veterans Health Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Haque, Shahed

    2013-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) provides care to over eight million Veterans and operates over 1,700 sites of care distributed across twenty-one regional networks in the United States. Health care providers within ...

  6. Site decommissioning management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

    1993-10-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

  7. Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

  8. Valuation of the use of biomarkers predictive of drug efficacy to enrich responders in oncology drug clinical development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wine, David

    2006-01-01

    I study several aspects of the value in performing oncology clinical trials using screening biomarkers to preferentially select and enroll responders. From trial reports and investigational reports on potential biomarkers, ...

  9. DECOMMISSIONING CHALLENGES AT THE ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorr, K. A.; Hoover, J.

    2002-02-25

    This paper presents a discussion of the demolition of the Building 788 cluster at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Golden, Colorado. The Building 788 Cluster was a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage facilities and ancillary structures. Topics covered include the methods employed for Project Planning, Regulatory Compliance, Waste Management, Hazard Identification, Radiological Controls, Risk Management, Field Implementation, and Cost Schedule control, and Lessons Learned and Project Closeout.

  10. THE ROLE OF GROUND TRUTH IN IMPROVED IDENTIFICATION OF MINING EXPLOSION SIGNALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stump, Brian W.

    observations from within the mine. Mines in the Iron Range (IR) of Minnesota, the Powder River Basin (PRBTHE ROLE OF GROUND TRUTH IN IMPROVED IDENTIFICATION OF MINING EXPLOSION SIGNALS UTILIZATION effects; (3) Development of in-mine ground truth through mine records or on site instrumentation; (4

  11. Preliminary Site Characterization Report, Rulsion Site, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This report is a summary of environmental information gathered during a review of the documents pertaining to Project Rulison and interviews with personnel who worked on the project. Project Rulison was part of Operation Plowshare (a program designed to explore peaceful uses for nuclear devices). The project consisted of detonating a 43-kiloton nuclear device on September 10, 1969, in western Colorado to stimulate natural gas production. Following the detonation, a reentry well was drilled and several gas production tests were conducted. The reentry well was shut-in after the last gas production test and was held in standby condition until the general cleanup was undertaken in 1972. A final cleanup was conducted after the emplacement and testing wells were plugged in 1976. However, some surface radiologic contamination resulted from decontamination of the drilling equipment and fallout from the gas flaring during drilling operations. With the exception of the drilling effluent pond, all surface contamination at the Rulison Site was removed during the cleanup operations. All mudpits and other excavations were backfilled, and both upper and lower drilling pads were leveled and dressed. This report provides information regarding known or suspected areas of contamination, previous cleanup activities, analytical results, a review of the regulatory status, the site`s physical environment, and future recommendations for Project Ruhson. Based on this research, several potential areas of contamination have been identified. These include the drilling effluent pond and mudpits used during drilling operations. In addition, contamination could migrate in the gas horizon.

  12. Concealed identification symbols and nondestructive determination of the identification symbols

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A.; Gibbs, Kenneth M.

    2014-09-16

    The concealing of one or more identification symbols into a target object and the subsequent determination or reading of such symbols through non-destructive testing is described. The symbols can be concealed in a manner so that they are not visible to the human eye and/or cannot be readily revealed to the human eye without damage or destruction of the target object. The identification symbols can be determined after concealment by e.g., the compilation of multiple X-ray images. As such, the present invention can also provide e.g., a deterrent to theft and the recovery of lost or stolen objects.

  13. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-54 Animal Farm Pastures, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2008-04-17

    The 100-F-54 waste site, part of the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit, is the soil associated with the former pastures for holding domestic farm animals used in experimental toxicology studies. Evaluation of historical information resulted in identification of the experimental animal farm pastures as having potential residual soil contamination due to excrement from experimental animals. The 100-F-54 animal farm pastures confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of this site to No Action. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  14. Site Map - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment Top Scientific ImpactTechnologies |Site IndexSite MapSite

  15. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program: Fourth quarter 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, C.D.

    1992-06-02

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1991, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from fourth quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  16. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Second quarter, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-10

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1991 EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  17. Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radiological Control Managers’ Council

    2012-03-26

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of low-level radioactive waste and the handling of radioactive sources. Remediation of contaminated land areas may also result in radiological exposures.

  18. Coarticulatory constraints determined by automatic identification from articulograph data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Philip JB

    identification algorithm Critical articulators for vowels Future perspectives Pseudocode description

  19. Plant Site Refrigeration Upgrade 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zdrojewski, R.; Healy, M.; Ramsey, J.

    1999-01-01

    Bayer Corporation operates a multi-division manufacturing facility in Bushy Park, South Carolina. Low temperature refrigeration (-4°F) is required by many of the chemical manufacturing areas and is provided by a Plant Site Refrigeration System...

  20. Techniques for Foundry Identification James B. Wendt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Techniques for Foundry Identification James B. Wendt Computer Science Department, University of California, Los Angeles miodrag@cs.ucla.edu ABSTRACT Foundry identification is essential for many tasks introduce statistical techniques for foundry detection, specifically for identifying from which foundry

  1. UXO DISCRIMINATION AND IDENTIFICATION USING MAGNETOMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    UXO DISCRIMINATION AND IDENTIFICATION USING MAGNETOMETRY Stephen D. Billings, Leonard R. Passion metallic debris, shrapnel and geological variations in ferromagnetic concentration. Methods to discriminate stage procedure for ordnance discrimination and identification. The first stage consists of a local

  2. Transsaccadic identification of highly similar artificial shapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Doug

    ., & Verfaillie, K. (2009). Transsaccadic identification of highly similar artificial shapes. Journal of Vision, 9Transsaccadic identification of highly similar artificial shapes Laboratory of Experimental on postsaccadic perception do indeed occur. We presented subjects with highly similar artificial shapes, preceded

  3. Intent to Develop DOE P 444.1, Preventing and Responding to Violence in the Workplace

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-07-17

    The policy would satisfy the requirement to have a policy on this subject since one does not exist and to establish expectations that each site would develop or review and update local procedures in order to address all the issues covered in the referenced guidance documents.

  4. AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar takes an in-depth look at the latest siting challenges and identify opportunities to reduce risks associated with the siting and operation of wind farms to...

  5. Top Needs of Occupy Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals Occupy Sourcing Top Needs of Occupy Sites Art byand Social Media in Colombia Top Needs of Occupy Sites J.R.Baldwin collects the top needs of Occupy sites across the

  6. Remedial action and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Attachment 2, Geology report: Appendix B, Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    Detailed investigations of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the Burro Canyon site were conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a disposal site for the tailings at two processing sites near the Slick Rock, Colorado, post office. The purposes of these studies are basic site characterization and identification of potential geologic hazards that could affect long-term site stability. Subsequent engineering studies (e.g., analyses of hydrologic and liquefaction hazards) used the data developed in these studies. The geomorphic analysis was employed in the design of effective erosion protection. Studies of the regional and local seismotectonic setting, which included a detailed search for possible capable faults within a 65-km radius of the site, provided the basis for seismic design parameters.

  7. Mammals of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cothran, E.G.; Smith, M.H.; Wolff, J.O.; Gentry, J.B.

    1991-12-31

    This book is designed to be used as a field guide, reference book, bibliography, and introduction to the basic biology and ecology of the 54 mammal species that currently or potentially exist on or near the Savannah River Site (SRS). For 50 of these species, we present basic descriptions, distinguishing morphological features, distribution and habitat preferences, food habits, reproductive biology, social behavior, ecological relationships with other species, and economic importance to man. For those species that have been studied on the SRS, we summarize the results of these studies. Keys and illustrations are provided for whole body and skull identification. A selected glossary defines technical terminology. Illustrations of tracks of the more common larger mammals will assist in field identifications. We also summarize the results of two major long-term SRS studies, ``The Forbearer Census`` and ``White-tailed Deer Studies``. A cross-indexed list of over 300 SRS publications on mammals classifies each publication by 23 categories such as habitat, reproduction, genetics, etc., and also for each mammal species. The 149 Master`s theses and Ph.D. dissertations that have been conducted at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory are provided as additional references.

  8. Mammals of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cothran, E.G.; Smith, M.H.; Wolff, J.O.; Gentry, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    This book is designed to be used as a field guide, reference book, bibliography, and introduction to the basic biology and ecology of the 54 mammal species that currently or potentially exist on or near the Savannah River Site (SRS). For 50 of these species, we present basic descriptions, distinguishing morphological features, distribution and habitat preferences, food habits, reproductive biology, social behavior, ecological relationships with other species, and economic importance to man. For those species that have been studied on the SRS, we summarize the results of these studies. Keys and illustrations are provided for whole body and skull identification. A selected glossary defines technical terminology. Illustrations of tracks of the more common larger mammals will assist in field identifications. We also summarize the results of two major long-term SRS studies, The Forbearer Census'' and White-tailed Deer Studies''. A cross-indexed list of over 300 SRS publications on mammals classifies each publication by 23 categories such as habitat, reproduction, genetics, etc., and also for each mammal species. The 149 Master's theses and Ph.D. dissertations that have been conducted at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory are provided as additional references.

  9. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-10

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1991 EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  10. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

  11. Small Wind Site Assessment Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Tim; Preus, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Site assessment for small wind energy systems is one of the key factors in the successful installation, operation, and performance of a small wind turbine. A proper site assessment is a difficult process that includes wind resource assessment and the evaluation of site characteristics. These guidelines address many of the relevant parts of a site assessment with an emphasis on wind resource assessment, using methods other than on-site data collection and creating a small wind site assessment report.

  12. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.M. Simmons

    2004-04-16

    The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

  13. Site Map - Pantex Plant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment Top Scientific ImpactTechnologies |Site IndexSite

  14. Site Map | DOEpatents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species3 Outlook forSimulationsSite Map TUNL pdf'sSite

  15. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2Geological Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-02-23

    Several technological options have been proposed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2}. One proposed remedy is to separate and capture CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel power plants and other stationary industrial sources and to inject the CO{sub 2} into deep subsurface formations for long-term storage and sequestration. Characterization of geologic formations for sequestration of large quantities of CO{sub 2} needs to be carefully considered to ensure that sites are suitable for long-term storage and that there will be no adverse impacts to human health or the environment. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (Final Draft, October 2005) states that ''Site characterization, selection and performance prediction are crucial for successful geological storage. Before selecting a site, the geological setting must be characterized to determine if the overlying cap rock will provide an effective seal, if there is a sufficiently voluminous and permeable storage formation, and whether any abandoned or active wells will compromise the integrity of the seal. Moreover, the availability of good site characterization data is critical for the reliability of models''. This International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO{sub 2} Geological Storage (CO2SC) addresses the particular issue of site characterization and site selection related to the geologic storage of carbon dioxide. Presentations and discussions cover the various aspects associated with characterization and selection of potential CO{sub 2} storage sites, with emphasis on advances in process understanding, development of measurement methods, identification of key site features and parameters, site characterization strategies, and case studies.

  16. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, first quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During first quarter 1989 (January--March), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the first quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from first quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  17. Annual site environmental report, period: January 1994 to June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The environmental management program at the US Department of Energy (DOE), Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), addresses all areas of environmental concern, including surface water and groundwater quality, air quality, and solid and hazardous waste disposal. The program focuses primarily on the treatment and disposal of industrial, contaminated, and sanitary wastewaters; the disposal of solid and hazardous wastes; minimizing air pollutant emissions; the monitoring of surface water, groundwater, and air quality on the METC site and in the surrounding area; the decommissioning, decontamination, and disposal of on-site research facilities no longer in use; and the identification, characterization, and cleanup of off-site property where METC sponsored research and development activities. The environmental management program is conducted to meet the requirements of all applicable Federal, state, and local laws and regulations.

  18. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  19. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1989 (July--September), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the third quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from third quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  20. Application for Permit to Operate a Class II Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site - U10c Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-03-31

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS and National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The site will be used for the disposal of refuse, rubbish, garbage, sewage sludge, pathological waste, Asbestos-Containing Material (ACM), industrial solid waste, hydrocarbon-burdened soil, hydrocarbon-burdened demolition and construction waste, and other inert waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids or regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. Waste regulated under the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA), excluding Polychlorinated Biphenyl [PCB], Bulk Product Waste (see Section 6.2.5) and ACM (see Section 6.2.2.2) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. The disposal site will be used as the sole depository of permissible waste which is: (1) Generated by entities covered under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (2) Generated at sites identified in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO); (3) Sensitive records and media, including documents, vugraphs, computer disks, typewriter ribbons, magnetic tapes, etc., generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors; (4) ACM generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors according to Section 6.2.2.2, as necessary; (5) Hydrocarbon-burdened soil and solid waste from areas covered under the EPA Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (6) Other waste on a case-by-case concurrence by NDEP/BFF. The generator of permissible waste is responsible for preparing documentation related to waste acceptance criteria, waste characterization, and load verification. Waste and Water (WW) personnel are responsible for operating the disposal site and reviewing documentation to determine if the waste is acceptable.

  1. Identification of Astrophysical Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandip K. Chakrabarti

    1998-03-19

    Black holes are by definition black, and therefore cannot be directly observed by using electromagnetic radiations. Convincing identification of black holes must necessarily depend on the identification of a very specially behaving matter and radiation which surround them. A major problem in this subject of black hole astrophysics is to quantify the behaviour of matter and radiation close to the horizon. In this review, the subject of black hole accretion and outflow is systematically developed. It is shown that both the stationary as well as the non-stationary properties of the observed spectra could be generally understood by these solutions. It is suggested that the solutions of radiative hydrodynamic equations may produce clear spectral signatures of black holes. Other circumstantial evidences of black holes, both in the galactic centers as well as in binary systems, are also presented.

  2. Savannah River Site Robotics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  3. Solar Site Survey Toolkit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    After a couple outings, a principal technologist at Sandia National Laboratories saw a need for a travel kit that would have the necessary tools to make the task of site surveys more manageable and safer. They have had great success using the kit in the field already.

  4. Proposed Drill Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Proposed drill sites for intermediate depth temperature gradient holes and/or deep resource confirmation wells. Temperature gradient contours based on shallow TG program and faults interpreted from seismic reflection survey are shown, as are two faults interpreted by seismic contractor Optim but not by Oski Energy, LLC.

  5. Proposed Drill Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Proposed drill sites for intermediate depth temperature gradient holes and/or deep resource confirmation wells. Temperature gradient contours based on shallow TG program and faults interpreted from seismic reflection survey are shown, as are two faults interpreted by seismic contractor Optim but not by Oski Energy, LLC.

  6. 2014 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paquette, Douglas; Remien, Jason; Foley, Brian; Burke, John; Dorsch, William; Ratel, Karen; Howe, Robert; Welty, Tim; Williams, Jeffrey; Pohlpt, Peter; Lagattolla, Richard; Metz, Robert; Milligan, James; Lettieri, Lawrence

    2015-10-01

    BNL prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory’s environmental performance during the calendar year in review.

  7. Site Energy Reduction Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagen, P. R.

    2007-01-01

    /LB basis. By 2004, overall progress had slowed, energy consumption increased slightly, and area results were mixed. It was time to shake things up with a new perspective. A coordinated site energy program was launched. In 2005, the first full year...

  8. Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel from Shutdown Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Best, Ralph E.; Ross, Steven B.; Buxton, Kenneth A.; England, Jeffery L.; McConnell, Paul E.; Massaro, Lawrence M.; Jensen, Philip J.

    2014-10-01

    This report presents a preliminary evaluation of removing used nuclear fuel (UNF) from 12 shutdown nuclear power plant sites. At these shutdown sites the nuclear power reactors have been permanently shut down and the sites have been decommissioned or are undergoing decommissioning. The shutdown sites are Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, Zion, Crystal River, Kewaunee, and San Onofre. The evaluation was divided into four components: characterization of the UNF and greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC waste) inventory; a description of the on-site infrastructure and conditions relevant to transportation of UNF and GTCC waste; an evaluation of the near-site transportation infrastructure and experience relevant to shipping transportation casks containing UNF and GTCC waste, including identification of gaps in information; and, an evaluation of the actions necessary to prepare for and remove UNF and GTCC waste. The primary sources for the inventory of UNF and GTCC waste are the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) RW-859 used nuclear fuel inventory database, industry sources such as StoreFUEL and SpentFUEL, and government sources such as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The primary sources for information on the conditions of site and near-site transportation infrastructure and experience included observations and information collected during visits to the Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, and Zion sites; information provided by managers at the shutdown sites; Facility Interface Data Sheets compiled for DOE in 2005; Services Planning Documents prepared for DOE in 1993 and 1994; industry publications such as Radwaste Solutions; and Google Earth. State and Regional Group representatives, a Tribal representative, and a Federal Railroad Administration representative participated in six of the shutdown site visits. Every site was found to have at least one off-site transportation mode option for removing its UNF and GTCC waste; some have multiple options. Experience removing large components during reactor decommissioning provided an important source of information used to identify the transportation mode options for the sites. Especially important in conducting the evaluation were site visits, through which information was obtained that would not have been available otherwise. Extensive photographs taken during the site visits proved to be particularly useful in documenting the current conditions at or near the sites. Additional conclusions from this evaluation include: The 12 shutdown sites use designs from 4 different suppliers involving 9 different (horizontal and vertical) dry storage systems that would require the use of 8 different transportation cask designs to remove the UNF and GTCC waste from the shutdown sites; Although there are common aspects, each site has some unique features and/or conditions; Although some regulatory actions will be required, all UNF at the initial 9 shutdown sites (Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, and Zion) is in licensed systems that can be transported, including a small amount of high-burnup fuel; Each site indicated that 2-3 years of advance time would be required for its preparations before shipments could begin; Most sites have more than one transportation option, e.g., rail, barge, or heavy haul truck, as well as constraints and preferences. It is expected that additional site visits will be conducted to add to the information presented in the evaluation.

  9. The ArcSDE GIS Dynamic Population Model Tool for Savannah River Site Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCLANE, TRACY; JONES, DWIGHT

    2005-10-03

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile Department of Energy site located near Aiken, South Carolina. With a workforce of over 10,000 employees and subcontractors, SRS emergency personnel must be able to respond to an emergency event in a timely and effective manner, in order to ensure the safety and security of the Site. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provides the technology needed to give managers and emergency personnel the information they need to make quick and effective decisions. In the event of a site evacuation, knowing the number of on-site personnel to evacuate from a given area is an essential piece of information for emergency staff. SRS has developed a GIS Dynamic Population Model Tool to quickly communicate real-time information that summarizes employee populations by facility area and building and then generates dynamic maps that illustrate output statistics.

  10. Does the Giant Wood Spider Nephila pilipes Respond to Prey Variation by Altering Web or Silk Properties?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackledge, Todd

    Does the Giant Wood Spider Nephila pilipes Respond to Prey Variation by Altering Web or Silk Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan Introduction Historically, orb webs constructed by spiders to construct webs are easy to quantify (Eber- hard 1990; Craig 1992; Pasquet et al. 1994; Sandoval 1994

  11. Summary Pinus taeda L. stomata respond slowly to changes in irradiance. Because incident irradiance on a leaf varies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teskey, Robert O.

    Summary Pinus taeda L. stomata respond slowly to changes in irradiance. Because incident irradiance on a leaf varies constantly, the rate of change in stomatal conductance to fluc- tuating irradiance may have with very different irradiance patterns, assuming that rates of stomatal opening and closing were similar

  12. Complex cytokine responses to hepatitis B surface antigen and tetanus toxoid in responders, nonresponders and subjects naive to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alper, Chester A.

    Complex cytokine responses to hepatitis B surface antigen and tetanus toxoid in responders, nonresponders and subjects naive to hepatitis B surface antigen Charles E. Larsena, c , Jianhua Xua, e , Susan; accepted 23 February 2000 Abstract Some human subjects vaccinated with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBs

  13. August 1, 2012 Thank you for the opportunity to review and respond to the RTI Grants Program Consultation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    August 1, 2012 Thank you for the opportunity to review and respond to the RTI Grants Program the future direction of investments in support of the Research Tools and Instruments (RTI) Grants Program in available program funding, enabling researchers to continue to utilize the RTI grant to foster and enhance

  14. change. Similar (and statistically indistinguishable: x2 1:99; df 2; P 0:57) proportions of respondents thought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basset, Yves

    change. Similar (and statistically indistinguishable: x2 ¼ 1:99; df ¼ 2; P ¼ 0:57) proportions by respondents who had a smaller proportion of papers accepted without rejection (x2 ¼ 19:12; df ¼ 1; P , 0:001), and a greater proportion of papers submitted multiple times before publication (x2 ¼ 22:83; df ¼ 1; P , 0

  15. Identification of Selected Areas to Support Federal Clean Energy Goals Using Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belles, R. J. [ORNL; Mays, G. T. [ORNL; Omitaomu, O. A. [ORNL; Poore, W. P. [ORNL

    2013-12-30

    Beginning in late 2008, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) responded to ongoing internal and external studies addressing key questions related to our national electrical energy supply. This effort has led to the development and refinement of Oak Ridge Siting Analysis for power Generation Expansion (OR-SAGE), a tool to support power plant siting evaluations. The objective in developing OR-SAGE was to use industry-accepted approaches and/or develop appropriate criteria for screening sites and employ an array of geographic information systems (GIS) data sources at ORNL to identify candidate areas for a power generation technology application. The basic premise requires the development of exclusionary, avoidance, and suitability criteria for evaluating sites for a given siting application, such as siting small modular reactors (SMRs). For specific applications of the tool, it is necessary to develop site selection and evaluation criteria (SSEC) that encompass a number of key benchmarks that essentially form the site environmental characterization for that application. These SSEC might include population density, seismic activity, proximity to water sources, proximity to hazardous facilities, avoidance of protected lands and floodplains, susceptibility to landslide hazards, and others.

  16. Responding to Terrorist Incidents in Your Community: Flammable-Liquid Fire Fighting Techniques for Municipal and Rural Firefighters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denise Baclawski

    2010-03-08

    The University of Nevada, Reno Fire Science Academy (FSA) applied for grant funding to develop and deliver programs for municipal, rural, and volunteer firefighters. The FSA specializes in preparing responders for a variety of emergency events, including flammable liquid fires resulting from accidents, intentional acts, or natural disasters. Live fire training on full scale burnable props is the hallmark of FSA training, allowing responders to practice critical skills in a realistic, yet safe environment. Unfortunately, flammable liquid live fire training is often not accessible to municipal, rural, or volunteer firefighters due to limited department training budgets, even though most department personnel will be exposed to flammable liquid fire incidents during the course of their careers. In response to this training need, the FSA developed a course during the first year of the grant (Year One), Responding to Terrorist Incidents in Your Community: Flammable-Liquid Fire Fighting Techniques for Municipal and Rural Firefighters. During the three years of the grant, a total of 2,029 emergency responders received this training. In Year Three, two new courses, a train-the-trainer for Responding to Terrorist Incidents in Your Community and Management of Large-Scale Disasters for Public Officials were developed and pilot tested during the Real-World Disaster Management Conference held at the FSA in June of 2007. Two research projects were conducted during Years Two and Three. The first, conducted over a two year period, evaluated student surveys regarding the value of the flammable liquids training received. The second was a needs assessment conducted for rural Nevada. Both projects provided important feedback and a basis for curricula development and improvements.

  17. Identification of Hazards, 3/9/95

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs.  Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety...

  18. 1994 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  19. MEMORANDUM TO: FILE SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and MyersHr. Anthony V. Andolina:I.)p' : , .; 'SITE

  20. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better AnodeThe Influence of Clouds,convection defined by theNiamey, Niger,govSitesNorth Slope of

  1. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better AnodeThe Influence of Clouds,convection defined by theNiamey, Niger,govSitesNorth Slope

  2. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better AnodeThe Influence of Clouds,convection defined by theNiamey, Niger,govSitesNorth

  3. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better AnodeThe Influence of Clouds,convection defined by theNiamey, Niger,govSitesNorthExtended

  4. ARM - Site Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better AnodeThe Influence of Clouds,convection defined by theNiamey,Manus Site-InactiveInstruments

  5. Oak Ridge Site Specific

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to ApplytheExecutive71.1 OMB ControlOak ofSite Specific adviSORy

  6. Berkeley Lab Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1BenBerkeley Lab ParticleSiteAbout

  7. Contracting - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsClusterInformationContract Management Princeton Site

  8. ORISE: Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxideUser WorkEP PowerresourcesScientific PeerSite

  9. ARM - Cool Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us agovInstrumentswrf-chem Comments?govPublicationsContactsSites

  10. Summary Site Environmental Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect PhotovoltaicsStructureInnovationEnergy ConversionLans 401(K) SavingsSite

  11. Site Sustainability Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShiftwater vaporRisks: ï‚· Radiation -Site5 DOE

  12. Site Map | Geothermal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding access toSmallTechnicalSheldon Glashow and the ElectroweakSite Map

  13. ARM - Site Index

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery Act Recovery Act Logo SubscribegovSite Index Expand |

  14. Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES Pursuant toPower WindDepartment of Energy SiteFee09

  15. Land Management - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate studentScienceLaboratory program Labs and Field SiteLand

  16. Getting Started - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUseful Links Useful Links:Getthe NextSite

  17. Exhibitor Information - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesof Energy8) WignerEnergyAbout Us Hanford Site Wide

  18. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species3 Outlook forSimulationsSite Map TUNLMaps

  19. Sandia Energy - Siting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel Magnetization and Laser HeatingSeminarsSimulatingSiting

  20. Maintaining STAR - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)MaintainingSite

  1. LIQUEFACTION EVALUATIONS AT DOE SITES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Liquefaction Evaluations at DOE Sites M. Lewis, M. McHood, R. Williams, B. Gutierrez October 25, 2011

  2. Additional Web Sites - Purdue University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... US Food and Drug Administration · Center for Disease Control · US Pharmacopeia · Diabetes Internet Site · Exercise and Injury Prevention · American Health ...

  3. King has no clothes: The role of the military in responding to a terrorist chemical/biological attack. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osterman, J.L.

    1996-06-14

    The United States has begun a program of counterproliferation in order to preempt the use of WMD by such elements, however, the ability to respond to the terrorist employment of biological/chemical weapons is absent. Given the structure, capability and technical expertise in the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Department of Defense (DoD) will be tasked to conduct the response to such an incident. The geographical Commander in Chief (CINC) and the appointed Joint Task Force (JTF) commander will ultimately be assigned the response mission. Planning, training and coordination is required to develop a force capable of responding in a timely and coordinated manner.

  4. 1996 Site environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The FEMP is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the FEMP in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the FEMP. The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. This 1996 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the FEMP progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in this Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish are presented here. All information presented in this summary is discussed more fully in the main body of this report.

  5. 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ENVIRONMENT AND WASTE MANAGMENT SERVICES DIVISION; ET AL.

    2004-10-01

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a multi-program national laboratory, prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SER is written to inform outside regulators, the public, and Laboratory employees of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review, and to summarize BNL's on-site environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), state, and local regulations; and environmental, restoration, and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. This report is intended to be a technical document. It is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.ser.htm. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview, and is distributed with a CD version of the full-length SER. The summary supports BNL's educational and community outreach program.

  6. The NORM technology connection web site : streamlined access to NORM-related service company and regulatory information.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K. P.; Richmond, P.; LePoire, D. J.; Arnish, J. J.; Johnson, R.

    2000-11-08

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed an Internet web site providing access to critical information needed to support decisions on the management and disposal of wastes containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The NORM Technology Connection web site provides current information on (1) service companies that provide support on NORM issues (e.g., site characterization and remediation, sample analysis, radiation safety training, disposal) and (2) existing applicable NORM regulations and guidelines. A third element of the site is an electronic mail list that allows users to post or respond to questions about the management of NORM. Development of the NORM Technology Connection web site was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. It is hosted and maintained by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The web site is publicly available; access is free, as is participation by any of the service companies.

  7. Systems engineering identification and control of mixed waste technology development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beitel, G.A.

    1997-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA) to develop technologies required to meet the Department`s commitments for treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes. Waste treatment includes all necessary steps from generation through disposal. Systems engineering was employed to reduce programmatic risk, that is, risk of failure to meet technical commitments within cost and schedule. Customer needs (technology deficiencies) are identified from Site Treatment Plans, Consent Orders, ten year plans, Site Technical Coordinating Groups, Stakeholders, and Site Visits. The Technical Baseline, a prioritized list of technology deficiencies, forms the basis for determining which technology development activities will be supported by the MWFA. Technology Development Requirements Documents are prepared for each technology selected for development. After technologies have been successfully developed and demonstrated, they are documented in a Technology Performance Report. The Technology Performance Reports are available to any of the customers or potential users of the technology, thus closing the loop between problem identification and product development. This systematic approach to technology development and its effectiveness after 3 years is discussed in this paper.

  8. Method Development: Identification of the Soluble Organic Fraction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Method Development: Identification of the Soluble Organic Fraction of Particulate Matter on DPF Soot Method Development: Identification of the Soluble Organic Fraction of...

  9. Fast 3D Scanning for Biometric Identification and Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McShea, Daniel W.

    Fast 3D Scanning for Biometric Identification and Verification June 2011 Authors Anselmo., & Chen, A. (2011). Fast 3D Scanning for Biometric Identification and Verification. (Prepared by RTI

  10. Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Markets Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen Proton...

  11. SAFETY DATA SHEET 1. Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wikswo, John

    -, (+-)- Recommended use Specified quality tests and assay use only. Recommended restrictions Not for use as a drug for breathing. If in eyes: Rinse cautiously with water for several minutes. Remove contact lenses, if present closed. Store locked up. Disposal Dispose of contents/container to an approved disposal site

  12. 2006 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; RATEL,K.

    2007-10-01

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

  13. 2009 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratel, K.M.; Brookhaven National Laboratory

    2010-09-30

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

  14. 2005 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2006-08-29

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

  15. 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2003-10-01

    The 2002 Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting'', and summarizes the status of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental programs and performance and restoration efforts, as well as any impacts, both past and present, that Laboratory operations have had on the environment. The document is intended to be technical in nature. A summary of the report is also prepared as a separate document to provide a general overview and includes a CD version of the full report. Operated by Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) for the Department of Energy (DOE), BNL manages its world-class scientific research with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues. BNL's motto, ''Exploring Life's Mysteries...Protecting its Future'', reflects BNL's management philosophy to fully integrate environmental stewardship into all facets of its missions, with a health balance between science and the environment.

  16. Site Management Guide (Blue Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (Department) Office of Legacy Management (LM), established in 2003, manages the Department’s postclosure responsibilities and ensures the future protection of human health and the environment. During World War II and the Cold War, the Federal government developed and operated a vast network of industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Since 1989, the Department has taken an aggressive accelerated cleanup approach to reduce risks and cut costs. At most Departmental sites undergoing cleanup, some residual hazards will remain at the time cleanup is completed due to financial and technical impracticality. However, the Department still has an obligation to protect human health and the environment after cleanup is completed. LM fulfills DOE’s postclosure obligation by providing long-term management of postcleanup sites which do not have continuing missions. LM is also responsible for sites under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Currently, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for site surveys and remediation at FUSRAP sites. Once remediation is completed, LM becomes responsible for long-term management. LM also has responsibility for uranium processing sites addressed by Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA). UMTRCA Title II sites are sites that were commercially owned and are regulated under a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license. For license termination, the owner must conduct an NRC-approved cleanup of any on-site radioactive waste remaining from former uranium ore-processing operations. The site owner must also provide full funding for inspections and, if necessary, ongoing maintenance. Once site cleanup is complete, LM accepts title to these sites on behalf of the United States and assumes long-term management.

  17. Enhancer Identification through Comparative Genomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visel, Axel; Bristow, James; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2006-10-01

    With the availability of genomic sequence from numerousvertebrates, a paradigm shift has occurred in the identification ofdistant-acting gene regulatory elements. In contrast to traditionalgene-centric studies in which investigators randomly scanned genomicfragments that flank genes of interest in functional assays, the modernapproach begins electronically with publicly available comparativesequence datasets that provide investigators with prioritized lists ofputative functional sequences based on their evolutionary conservation.However, although a large number of tools and resources are nowavailable, application of comparative genomic approaches remains far fromtrivial. In particular, it requires users to dynamically consider thespecies and methods for comparison depending on the specific biologicalquestion under investigation. While there is currently no single generalrule to this end, it is clear that when applied appropriately,comparative genomic approaches exponentially increase our power ingenerating biological hypotheses for subsequent experimentaltesting.

  18. Identification of process suitable diluent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean R. Peterman

    2014-01-01

    The Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation (STMAS) was formed within the USDOE Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program in order to develop more efficient methods for the separation of americium and other minor actinides (MA) from used nuclear fuel. The development of processes for MA separations is driven by the potential benefits; reduced long-term radiotoxicty of waste placed in a geologic repository, reduced timeframe of waste storage, reduced repository heat load, the possibility of increased repository capacity, and increased utilization of energy potential of used nuclear fuel. The research conducted within the STMAS framework is focused upon the realization of significant simplifications to aqueous recycle processes proposed for MA separations. This report describes the research efforts focused upon the identification of a process suitable diluent for a flowsheet concept for the separation of MA which is based upon the dithiophosphinic acid (DPAH) extractants previously developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  19. Alternative Evaluation Study: Methods to Mitigate/Accommodate Subsidence for the Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County Nevada, with Special Focus on Disposal Cell U-3ax/bl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, L.

    1997-09-01

    An Alternative Evaluation Study is a type of systematic approach to problem identification and solution. An Alternative Evaluation Study was convened August 12-15, 1997, for the purpose of making recommendations concerning closure of Disposal Cell U-3ax/bl and other disposal cells and mitigation/accommodation of waste subsidence at the Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site. This report includes results of the Alternative Evaluation Study and specific recommendations.

  20. Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Kayser-Ames Laboratory

    2007-12-31

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2007. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies 11 buildings owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). See the Laboratory's Web page at www.external.ameslab.gov for locations and Laboratory overview. The Laboratory also leases space in ISU owned buildings. In 2007, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled according to all applicable EPA, State, Local and DOE Orders. In 2006 the Laboratory reduced its generator status from a Large Quantity Generator (LQG) to a Small Quantity Generator (SQG). EPA Region VII was notified of this change. The Laboratory's RCRA hazardous waste management program was inspected by EPA Region VII in April 2006. There were no notices of violations. The inspector was impressed with the improvements of the Laboratory's waste management program over the past ten years. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2007. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2007. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. As indicated in prior SERs, pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs have been in practice since 1990, with improvements implemented most recently in 2003. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil, styrofoam peanuts, batteries, fluorescent lamps and telephone books. Ames Laboratory reported to DOE-Ames Site Office (AMSO), through the Laboratory's Self Assessment Report, on its Affirmative Procurement Performance Measure. A performance level of 'A' was achieved in 2007 for Integrated Safety, Health, and Environmental Protection. As reported in Site Environmental Reports for prior years, the Laboratory's Environmental Management System has been integrated into the Laboratory's Integrated Safety Management System since 2005. The integration of EMS into the way the Laboratory does business allows the Laboratory to systematically review, address and respond to the Laboratory's environmental impacts.

  1. Location and identification of radioactive waste in Massachusetts Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colton, D.P.; Louft, H.L.

    1993-12-31

    The accurate location and identification of hazardous waste materials dumped in the world`s oceans are becoming an increasing concern. For years, the oceans have been viewed as a convenient and economical place to dispose of all types of waste. In all but a few cases, major dump sites have been closed leaving behind years of accumulated debris. The extent of past environmental damage, the possibility of continued environmental damage, and the possibility of hazardous substances reaching the human food chain need to be carefully investigated. This paper reports an attempt to accurately locate and identify the radioactive component of the waste material. The Department of Energy`s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL), in support of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), provided the precision navigation system and prototype underwater radiological monitoring equipment that were used during this project. The paper also describes the equipment used, presents the data obtained, and discusses future equipment development.

  2. Hazardous waste sites and housing appreciation rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Jill; Rausser, Gordon C.

    2000-01-01

    WORKING PAPER NO. 906 HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES AND HOUSINGEconomics January 2000 Hazardous Waste Sites and Housingand RF. Anderson, Hazardous waste sites: the credibility

  3. Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackner, Regina

    2009-01-01

    Page SW-2 • Site Environmental Report for 2008 StormwaterPage SD-1 • Site Environmental Report for 2008 SedimentNational Laboratory Site Environmental Report for 2008

  4. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy A. Wills

    2009-09-01

    This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2009a). Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  5. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009, Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills, ed.

    2010-09-13

    This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009. Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  6. Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project : Final Siting Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, James M.

    1992-04-01

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of satellite and release facilities for the Umatilla Basin hatchery program. The Umatilla Basin hatchery program consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in the Umatilla River as defined in the Umatilla master plan approved in 1989 by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult salmon broodstock holding and spawning facilities, facilities for recovery, acclimation, and/or extended rearing of salmon juveniles, and development of river sites for release of hatchery salmon and steelhead. The historic and current distribution of fall chinook, summer chinook, and coho salmon and steelhead trout was summarized for the Umatilla River basin. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Twenty seven sites were evaluated for the potential and development of facilities. Engineering and environmental attributes of the sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  7. 2007 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratel,K.

    2008-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in this volume in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the-length report.

  8. 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; SER TEAM; ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SERVICES GROUP; ENVIROMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION FIELD SAMPLING TEAM

    2005-08-22

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SER is written to inform the public, regulators, Laboratory employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The report summarizes BNL's environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The SER is intended to be a technical document. It is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/esd/SER.htm. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD version of the full report. The summary supports BNL's educational and community outreach program.

  9. Waste Specification Records - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Specification Records About Us Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program What's New Acceptance Criteria Acceptance Process Becoming a new Hanford Customer Annual Waste Forecast...

  10. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Siting Guide, Site selection and evaluation criteria for an early site permit application. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-24

    In August 1991, the Joint Contractors came to agreement with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Department of Energy (DOE) on a workscope for the cost-shared Early Site Permit Demonstration Program. One task within the scope was the development of a guide for site selection criteria and procedures. A generic Siting Guide his been prepared that is a roadmap and tool for applicants to use developing detailed siting plans for their specific region of the country. The guide presents three fundamental principles that, if used, ensure a high degree of success for an ESP applicant. First, the site selection process should take into consideration environmentally diverse site locations within a given region of interest. Second, the process should contain appropriate opportunities for input from the public. Third, the process should be applied so that it is clearly reasonable to an impartial observer, based on appropriately selected criteria, including criteria which demonstrate that the site can host an advanced light water reactor (ALWR). The Siting Guide provides for a systematic, comprehensive site selection process in which three basic types of criteria (exclusionary, avoidance, and suitability) are presented via a four-step procedure. It provides a check list of the criteria for each one of these steps. Criteria are applied qualitatively, as well as presented numerically, within the guide. The applicant should use the generic guide as an exhaustive checklist, customizing the guide to his individual situation.

  11. Tank Integrity Reports - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Documents > Tank Integrity Reports Documents DOE - RL ContractsProcurements DOE-ORP ContractsProcurements CERCLA Five-Year Review Hanford Site Safety Standards NEPA - Categorical...

  12. AMH Web Site What's New

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Whatsnew AMH Web Site What's New Training & Events http:www.hanford.govhealthpage.cfmTraining We are happy to visit your workgroup to present on many health & wellness...

  13. QA Checklist for Partnership Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is the Quality Assurance (QA) Checklist for all EERE Web sites that are not in the standard EERE Web template.

  14. Site environmental report - CY 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    Environmental compliance activities are described for the NPR-3 site from January 1997 through December 1997. Hazardous waste storage activities and storage tank testing are included.

  15. Multi-site environmental assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tillman, J.E.

    1993-06-01

    When a commercial or industrial property transfer occurs today, there is almost always an environmental assessment performed. These assessments are requested by buyers, sellers, lenders, insurers, corporate counsel and corporate managers responsible for environmental problems. The scope of these assessments varies widely depending on the objectives, types of sites and number of sites involved. When a single site is being evaluated, the assessment can be highly customized with a great deal of attention paid to the specific use, history of the site, and adjacent properties. In contrast, when multiple sites must be evaluated the luxury of time required to customize each assessment is not always practical. A standardized approach may be the only option to accomplish the assessments in a timely and cost effective manner. Properly performed, a standardized approach can provide adequate and useful comparative data between sites. If the sites are similar in nature standardized data sets provide far more insight about the nature of contamination than can be achieved with data from a single site. Defining the objective of the environmental assessment is necessary to design the type of survey to be performed. In many acquisitions, assessments are done to let the buyers know whether they are buying into a current liability that could cost them hundreds of thousands of dollars to clean up. This objective requires an assessment that provides for thorough coverage of the site until a problem is identified; no characterization is required.

  16. Mem ber Login site search Gardening Resources Gardening Programs About Us About River Farm Ways to Give JOIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    to Give JOIN Edit This Hom e Gardening Program s Internship Program s Horticu ltu ral Horticultural GrowMem ber Login site search Gardening Resources Gardening Programs About Us About River Farm Ways programs; integrated pest management; seasonal exhibits and displays; and plant identification

  17. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005, Attachment A - Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy A. Wills

    2006-10-01

    This appendix to the ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005'', dated October 2006 (DOE/NV/11718--1214; DOE/NV/25946--007) expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction. Included are subsections that summarize the site?s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This appendix complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  18. Ten Year Site Plans | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Ten Year Site Plans Ten Year Site Plans A Ten Year Site Plan (TYSP) is the essential planning document linking a site's real property requirements to its mission in support of the...

  19. Runtime Identification of Microprocessor Energy Saving Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    Runtime Identification of Microprocessor Energy Saving Opportunities W. L. Bircher, M. Valluri, J. Law, and L. K. John Laboratory for Computer Architecture Department of Electrical and Computer power consumption and low energy efficiency have become significant impediments to future performance

  20. Security approaches for Radio Frequency Identification systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foley, Joseph Timothy, 1976-

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, I explore the challenges related to the security of the Electronic Product Code (EPC) class of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags and associated data. RFID systems can be used to improve supply chain ...

  1. Identification and control of a flexible structure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiming

    1998-01-01

    This thesis describes the identification and vibration ics. control of a cantilevered beam with piezoelectric material as actuators and sensors. The Euler-Bernoulli beam equation is used and gravity contribution to the stiffness matrix is included...

  2. Access Versus Integrity in Voter Identification Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ansolabehere, Stephen

    The Help America Vote Act hit a nearly fatal snag during the final stages of congressional negotiations over the bill in 2002. The problem? Voter identification requirements. Many conservatives in Congress insisted on the ...

  3. Site Environmental Report for 2007 Volume II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackner, Regina E

    2008-01-01

    TRAVEL BLANK Page RW-1 • Site Environmental Report for 2007Sample Sample Page RW-2 • Site Environmental Report for 2007

  4. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Filley, T.H.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Cleland, J.H.

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. In the 1970s, the US Department of Energy (DOE) began investigating more efficient and cost-effective enrichment technologies. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. Initial facility operation is anticipated for 1999. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. The final evaluation, which included sensitivity studies, identified the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) site as having significant advantages over the other sites considered. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PORTS site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). This report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during site visits. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use. Socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3.

  5. Site environmental report for 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R.C.

    1997-08-01

    To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant airborne and liquid effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site environmental monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California`s Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of radioactive and hazardous materials in ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sewage, soil, vegetation, and locally produced food-stuffs. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. Each year, the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program are published in this report, the Site Environmental Report. This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment and estimated radiation doses to the public from site emissions. Chapter 3, {open_quotes}Compliance Summary,{close_quotes} reviews the site`s various environmental protection activities and compliance status, with applicable environmental regulations. The effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results for 1996 show that SNL/California operations had no harmful effects on the environment or the public. 37 figs., 12 tabs.

  6. Characterizing Commercial Sites Selected for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as solar thermal absorption chillers, building energy management systems, and advanced lighting. The twoCharacterizing Commercial Sites Selected for Energy Efficiency Monitoring This report presents data of Commercial Sites Selected for Energy Efficiency Monitoring Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office

  7. RECERTIFICATION OVERVIEW The WIPP Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RECERTIFICATION OVERVIEW The WIPP Site The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, or WIPP, is the world and production of nuclear weapons. The WIPP site is located outside of Carlsbad, New Mexico, where TRU waste the country will ultimately be disposed of at WIPP. However, that number may increase as high as the WIPP

  8. Genome-Wide Quantitative Identification of DNA Differentially Methylated Sites in Arabidopsis Seedlings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan M.

    the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the United States Department of Energy through the grant DE

  9. Identification of Highly Active Fe Sites in (Ni,Fe)OOH for Electrocata...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have near-optimum binding energies for OER intermediates. The conversion of solar energy and water to hydrogen is a key element to a renewable fuel infrastructure, in which...

  10. Genome-Wide Identification of Transcriptional Start Sites in the Plant Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Chris

    syringae pv. tomato str. DC3000 Melanie J. Filiatrault1,2 *, Paul V. Stodghill1,2 , Christopher R. Myers3 identified 59-ends of transcripts for the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato str. DC3000. Citation: Filiatrault MJ, Stodghill PV, Myers CR, Bronstein PA, Butcher BG, et al. (2011) Genome

  11. Structural Studies of Wnts and Identification of an LRP6 Binding Site

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback System inStatus of theSciTech Connect Book:

  12. Identification of Highly Active Fe Sites in (Ni,Fe)OOH for Electrocatalytic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHussein KhalilResearch88 SignPriceresponse |Water Splitting |

  13. A Ten Step Protocol and Plan for CCS Site Characterization, Based on an Analysis of the Rocky Mountain Region, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McPherson, Brian; Matthews, Vince

    2013-09-15

    This report expresses a Ten-Step Protocol for CO2 Storage Site Characterization, the final outcome of an extensive Site Characterization analysis of the Rocky Mountain region, USA. These ten steps include: (1) regional assessment and data gathering; (2) identification and analysis of appropriate local sites for characterization; (3) public engagement; (4) geologic and geophysical analysis of local site(s); (5) stratigraphic well drilling and coring; (6) core analysis and interpretation with other data; (7) database assembly and static model development; (8) storage capacity assessment; (9) simulation and uncertainty assessment; (10) risk assessment. While the results detailed here are primarily germane to the Rocky Mountain region, the intent of this protocol is to be portable or generally applicable for CO2 storage site characterization.

  14. Siting landfills and incinerators in areas of historic unpopularity: Surveying the views of the next generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Feo, Giovanni; Williams, Ian D.

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Opinions and knowledge of young people in Italy about waste were studied. • Historic opposition to construction of waste facilities is difficult to overcome. • Awareness of waste management develops with knowledge of environmental issues. • Many stakeholders’ views are needed when siting a new waste management facility. • Respondents’ opinions were influenced by their level of environmental knowledge. - Abstract: The Campania Region in Southern Italy has suffered many problems with municipal solid waste management since the mid-1990s, leading to significant public disturbances and subsequent media coverage. This paper reports on the current views and knowledge of young people (university students) in this region about waste management operations and facilities, specifically the siting of landfills and incinerators. By means of a structured questionnaire, opinion and knowledge were systematically examined by degree type and course year. The study took place in 2011 at the University of Salerno campus. A sample of 900 students, comprising 100 students for each of the nine considered faculties, and 20 students for every academic course year, was randomly selected. Only about a quarter of respondents were not opposed to the siting of a landfill or an incinerator in their city. This clearly highlights that historic opposition to the construction of waste facilities is difficult to overcome and that distrust for previous poor management or indiscretions is long-lived and transcends generations. Students from technical faculties expressed the most reasonable opinion; opinion and knowledge were statistically related (Chi-square test, p < 0.05) to the attended faculty, and the knowledge grew linearly with progression through the university. This suggests that awareness of waste management practices develops with experience and understanding of environmental issues. There is general acceptance that many stakeholders – technicians, politicians and citizens – all have to be part of the decision process when siting a new waste management facility. The opinions of the young respondents were significantly influenced by their level of environmental knowledge.

  15. 2010 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratel, K.; Lee, R; Remien, J; Hooda, B; Green, T; Williams, J; Pohlot, P; Dorsch, W; Paquette, D; Burke, J

    2011-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection, of this volume. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the full report. BNL is operated and managed for DOE's Office of Science by Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA), a partnership formed by Stony Brook University and Battelle Memorial Institute. For more than 60 years, the Laboratory has played a lead role in the DOE Science and Technology mission and continues to contribute to the DOE missions in energy resources, environmental quality, and national security. BNL manages its world-class scientific research with particular sensitivity to environmental issues and community concerns. The Laboratory's motto, 'Exploring Life's Mysteries...Protecting its Future,' and its Environmental, Safety, Security and Health Policy reflect the commitment of BNL's management to fully integrate environmental stewardship into all facets of its mission and operations.

  16. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills

    2008-09-01

    This appendix expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 2008). Included are subsections that summarize the site's geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  17. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Gunnison, Colorado. Attachment 2, Geology report: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Detailed investigations of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the Landfill disposal site were conducted. The purpose of these studies was basic site characterization and identification of potential geologic hazards that could affect long-term site stability. Subsequent engineering studies, such as analyses of hydrologic and liquefaction hazards, used the data developed in these studies. The geomorphic analysis was employed in the design of effective erosion protection. Studies of the regional and local seismotectonic setting, which included a detailed search for possible capable faults within a 65-kilometer (km) (40-mile) radius of the site, provided the basis for seismic design parameters. The scope of work performed included the following: Compilation and analysis of previous published and unpublished geologic literature and maps. Review of historical and instrumental earthquake data. Review of site-specific subsurface geologic data, including lithologic and geophysical logs of exploratory boreholes advanced in the site area. Photogeologic interpretations of existing conventional aerial photographs. Ground reconnaissance and mapping of the site region.

  18. Ice Sheets: Byrd Polar Outreach & Education February 2013 You might remember I mentioned taking Wilderness First Responder (WFR) training in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    mentioned taking Wilderness First Responder (WFR) training in the December newsletter and found I carry a well-stocked first-aid kit in my car, the car we were driving in did not have such a kit

  19. Annual Hanford Site environmental permitting status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnichsen, J.C.

    1998-09-17

    The information contained and/or referenced in this Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report (Status Report) addresses the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) of 1971 and Condition II.W. of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 Permit, Dangerous Waste Portion (DW Portion). Condition II.W. of the RCRA Permit specifies the Permittees are responsible for all other applicable federal, state, and local permits for the development and operation of the Hanford Facility. Condition II.W. of the RCRA Permit specifies that the Permittees are to use their best efforts to obtain such permits. For the purposes of permit condition, `best efforts` means submittal of documentation and/or approval(s) in accordance with schedules specified in applicable regulations, or as determined through negotiations with the applicable regulatory agencies. This Status Report includes information on all existing and anticipated environmental permitting. Environmental permitting required by RCRA, the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) of 1984, and non-RCRA permitting (solid waste handling, Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, Clean Water Act Amendments of 1987, Washington State waste discharge, and onsite sewage system) is addressed. Information on RCRA and non-RCRA is current as of July 31, 1998. For the purposes of RCRA and the State of Washington Hazardous Waste Management Act of 1976 [as administered through the Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Active Code (WAC) 173-303], the Hanford Facility is considered a single facility. As such, the Hanford Facility has been issued one US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)/State Identification Number (WA7890008967). This EPA/State identification number encompasses over 60 treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) units. The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) has been delegated authority by the EPA to administer the RCRA, including mixed waste authority. The RCRA permitting approach for the Hanford Facility is addressed in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). Pursuant to the Tri-Party Agreement, a single RCRA permit was issued by Ecology and the EPA to cover the Hanford Facility. The RCRA Permit, through the permit modification process, eventually will incorporate all TSD units.

  20. LAYNE, HOSPEDALES, GONG: PERSON RE-IDENTIFICATION BY ATTRIBUTES 1 Person Re-identification by Attributes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Shaogang

    LAYNE, HOSPEDALES, GONG: PERSON RE-IDENTIFICATION BY ATTRIBUTES 1 Person Re-identification by Attributes Ryan Layne rlayne@eecs.qmul.ac.uk Timothy Hospedales tmh@eecs.qmul.ac.uk Shaogang Gong sgg unchanged freely in print or electronic forms. #12;2 LAYNE, HOSPEDALES, GONG: PERSON RE

  1. The role of the United States Water Resources Engineering Community in responding to the water related needs of the developing world 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ormond, Timothy Paul

    1993-01-01

    THK ROLE OF THK UNITED STATES WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING COMMUNITY IN RESPONDING TO THE WATER- RELATED NEEDS OF THK DEVELOPING WORLD A Thesis by TIMOTHY PAUL ORMOND Submitted to thc Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AdtM Vnivcrsdy... in partial fulfdlmcnt of the requirements for thc dcgrcc of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THF. ROLE OF THE UNITED STATES WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING COMMUNITY IN RESPONDING TO THE WATER-RELATED NEEDS OF THE DEVELOPING...

  2. Site Sustainability Plan (SSP) 2010 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Site Sustainability Plan (SSP) 2010 Site Sustainability Plan (SSP) 2010 Site Sustainability Plan (SSP) 2010 2010 More Documents & Publications 2015 Site Sustainability Plan Site...

  3. Radio-frequency identification could help reduce the spread of plant pathogens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luvisi, Andrea; Panattoni, Alessandra; Triolo, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    ReVIEW Article Radio-frequency identification could helpcertified nursery stock. Radio- frequency identification (Panattoni and Enrico Triolo Radio-frequency identification (

  4. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology, with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate the U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts (Wolsko et al. 1991). The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were then subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the ORGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use, socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3. Following the site description and additional data requirements, Sec. 4 provides a short, qualitative assessment of potential environmental issues. 37 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs.

  5. Building public trust: Actions to respond to the report of the Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Democratic government requires trust: people need to know and believe that the government is telling the truth. Without information about what the government is doing and why, citizens cannot exercise democratic control over government institutions. During his first year in office, President Clinton became concerned about reports that the government had conducted unethical secret human radiation experiments during the Cold War. To address this issue, in January 1994, President Clinton established the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE), chaired by bioethicist Dr. Ruth Faden of Johns Hopkins University. The President also directed all Federal agencies to search for records related to human subjects radiation research and provide them to the Advisory Committee. This report presents the Administration`s actions to respond to the ACHRE`s findings and recommendations.

  6. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Newcomer, D.R.; Evans, J.C.; Webber, W.D.; Spane, F.A. Jr.; Raymond, R.G.; Opitz, B.E.

    1993-06-01

    Monitoring activities were conducted to determine the distribution of radionuclides and hazardous chemicals present in ground water as a result of Hanford Site operations and, whenever possible, relate the distribution of these constituents to Site operations. A total of 720 wells were sampled during 1992 by all Hanford ground-water monitoring activities. The Ground-Water Surveillance Project prepared water-table maps of DOE`s Hanford Site for June 1992 from water-level elevations measured in 287 wells across the Hanford Site and outlying areas. These maps are used to infer ground-water flow directions and gradients for the interpretation of contaminant transport. Water levels beneath the 200 Areas decreased as much as 0.75 m (2.5 ft) between December 1991 and December 1992. Water levels in the Cold Creek Valley decreased approximately 0.5 m in that same period. The water table adjacent to the Columbia River along the Hanford Reach continues to respond significantly to fluctuations in river stage. These responses were observed in the 100 and 300 areas. The elevation of the ground-water mound beneath B Pond did not change significantly between December 1991 and December 1992. However, water levels from one well located at the center of the mound indicate a water-level rise of approximately 0.3 m (1 ft) during the last quarter of 1992. Water levels measured from unconfined aquifer wells north and east of the Columbia River in 1992 indicate that the primary source of recharge is from irrigation practices.

  7. Hanford Site Environmental Report 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TM Poston; RW Hanf; RL Dirkes

    2000-09-28

    This Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, to describe environmental management performance, to demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and to highlight major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to: (1) describe the Hanford Site and its mission; (2) summarize the status of compliance with environmental regulations; (3) describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; (4) discuss the estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1999 Hanford Site activities; (5) present the effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, groundwater protection and monitoring information; and (6) discuss the activities to ensure quality.

  8. Hanford Site 1998 Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RL Dirkes; RW Hanf; TM Poston

    1999-09-21

    This Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, to describe environmental management performance, to demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and to highlight major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to: describe the Hanford Site and its mission; summarize the status of compliance with environmental regulations; describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; discuss the estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1998 Hanford Site activities; present the effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, and groundwater protection and monitoring information; and discuss the activities to ensure quality.

  9. Photos on This Web Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Most of the geothermal energy photos used on this web site can be obtained from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Photographic Information eXchange (PIX). Before using a photo, please read...

  10. Contractor Fee Payments- Small Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    See the amount of fees earned on EM's major contracts for each evaluated fee period and the total contract to date at the Small Sites office on these charts.

  11. Site environmental report for 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brekke, D.D.; Holland, R.C.; Gordon, K.W. [ed.

    1995-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant airborne and liquid effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site environmental monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California`s Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of radioactive and hazardous materials in ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sewage, soil, vegetation, and locally-produced food-stuffs. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. Each year, the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program are published in this report, the Site Environmental Report This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment and estimated radiation doses to the public from site emissions. Chapter 3, {open_quotes}Compliance Summary,{close_quotes} reviews the site`s various environmental protection activities and compliance status with applicable environmental regulations. The effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results for 1994 show that SNL/California operations had no harmful effects on the environment or the public. A summary of the findings is provided below.

  12. Paducah Site | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyAprilEnergy EEREPlateauFolsomProgressPaducah SiteBackgroundSite

  13. Portsmouth Site | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyAprilEnergyPartnershipSite BackgroundMarch PortsmouthSite

  14. Site Environmental Report for 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R.C.

    1999-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site external radiation monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California's Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of hazardous materials in groundwater, stormwater, and sewage. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. Each year, the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program are published in this report, the Site Environmental Report. This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment. Chapter 3, ''Compliance Summary,'' reviews the site's various environmental protection activities and compliance status with applicable environmental regulations. The effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results for 1998 show that SNL/California operations had no harmful effects on the environment or the public.

  15. Chariot, Alaska Site Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-01-16

    The Chariot site is located in the Ogotoruk Valley in the Cape Thompson region of northwest Alaska. This region is about 125 miles north of (inside) the Arctic Circle and is bounded on the southwest by the Chukchi Sea. The closest populated areas are the Inupiat villages of Point Hope, 32 miles northwest of the site, and Kivalina,41 miles to the southeast. The site is accessible from Point Hope by ATV in the summer and by snowmobile in the winter. Project Chariot was part of the Plowshare Program, created in 1957 by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to study peaceful uses for atomic energy. Project Chariot began in 1958 when a scientific field team chose Cape Thompson as a potential site to excavate a harbor using a series of nuclear explosions. AEC, with assistance from other agencies, conducted more than40 pretest bioenvironmental studies of the Cape Thompson area between 1959 and 1962; however, the Plowshare Program work at the Project Chariot site was cancelled because of strong public opposition. No nuclear explosions were conducted at the site.

  16. The Hanford Site focus, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, J.M.

    1994-03-01

    This report describes what the Hanford Site will look like in the next two years. We offer thumbnail sketches of Hanford Site programs and the needs we are meeting through our efforts. We describe our goals, some recent accomplishments, the work we will do in fiscal year (FY) 1994, the major activities the FY 1995 budget request covers, and the economic picture in the next few years. The Hanford Site budget shows the type of work being planned. US Department of Energy (DOE) sites like the Hanford Site use documents called Activity Data Sheets to meet this need. These are building blocks that are included in the budget. Each Activity Data Sheet is a concise (usually 4 or 5 pages) summary of a piece of work funded by the DOE`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management budget. Each sheet describes a waste management or environmental restoration need over a 5-year period; related regulatory requirements and agreements; and the cost, milestones, and steps proposed to meet the need. The Hanford Site is complex and has a huge budget, and its Activity Data Sheets run to literally thousands of pages. This report summarizes the Activity Data Sheets in a less detailed and much more reader-friendly fashion.

  17. Hanford Site environmental management specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grygiel, M.L.

    1998-06-10

    The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) uses this Hanford Site Environmental Management Specification (Specification) to document top-level mission requirements and planning assumptions for the prime contractors involved in Hanford Site cleanup and infrastructure activities under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management. This Specification describes at a top level the activities, facilities, and infrastructure necessary to accomplish the cleanup of the Hanford Site and assigns this scope to Site contractors and their respective projects. This Specification also references the key National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), and safety documentation necessary to accurately describe the cleanup at a summary level. The information contained in this document reflects RL`s application of values, priorities, and critical success factors expressed by those involved with and affected by the Hanford Site project. The prime contractors and their projects develop complete baselines and work plans to implement this Specification. These lower-level documents and the data that support them, together with this Specification, represent the full set of requirements applicable to the contractors and their projects. Figure 1-1 shows the relationship of this Specification to the other basic Site documents. Similarly, the documents, orders, and laws referenced in this specification represent only the most salient sources of requirements. Current and contractual reference data contain a complete set of source documents.

  18. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shera, E.B.

    1993-05-11

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  19. Scaling the Web Scaling Web Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menascé, Daniel A.

    Scaling the Web Scaling Web Sites Through Caching A large jump in a Web site's traffic may indi, pushing the site's through- put to its maximum point. When a Web site becomes overloaded, cus- tomers grow-generated revenue and may even tarnish the reputation of organizations relying on Web sites to support mission

  20. Assessor Training Evaluating OnSite Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NVLAP Assessor Training Evaluating OnSite Reports and Corrective Actions #12;Assessor Training 2009Site Report form ·NVLAP OnSite Assessment Review form #12;Assessor Training 2009: Evaluating OnSite Reports · Nonconformities cited #12;Assessor Training 2009: Evaluating OnSite Reports & Corrective Actions 44 Evaluating

  1. 2012 Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2012 Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, requires that each DOE site prepare an Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) documenting the site’s environmental conditions. The ASER is submitted to DOE-Headquarters annually and is available to the public.

  2. Responds to Hurricane Sandy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    and Control Vehicle that was parked in Battery Park near the Staten Island Ferry Terminal in the immediate Editing and Design Chris Gardner Christopher.P.Gardner@ usace.army.mil Graphics and Images Daniel Desmet. 29, 2012, I was standing in Battery Park watching the nine-foot swells from Hurricane Sandy barely

  3. responding to emergencies

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en46Afedkcp8/%2A4/%2A6/%2A en/%2A

  4. WORKSHEET AND RESPONDENT QUESTIONS

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices Globaldieselgasolinemonthlysummer gasolineall

  5. Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayser, Dan

    2011-01-31

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2010. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. In 2010, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled according to all applicable EPA, State, Local regulations and DOE Orders. In 2006 the Laboratory reduced its generator status from a Large Quantity Generator (LQG) to a Small Quantity Generator (SQG). EPA Region VII was notified of this change. The Laboratory's RCRA hazardous waste management program was inspected by EPA Region VII in April 2006. There were no notices of violations. The inspector was impressed with the improvements of the Laboratory's waste management program over the past ten years. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2010. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2010. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. As indicated in prior SERs, pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs have been in practice since 1990, with improvements implemented most recently in 2010. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, miscellaneous electronic office equipment, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling and corrugated cardboard recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil, foamed polystyrene peanuts, batteries, fluorescent lamps and telephone books. Ames Laboratory reported to DOE-Ames Site Office (AMSO), through the Laboratory's Performance Evaluation Measurement Plan, on its Affirmative Procurement Performance Measure. A performance level of 'A-' was achieved in 2010 for Integrated Safety, Health and Environmental Protection. As reported in Site Environmental Reports for prior years, the Laboratory's Environmental Management System (EMS) has been integrated into the Laboratory's Integrated Safety Management System since 2005. The integration of EMS into the way the Laboratory does business allows the Laboratory to systematically review, address and respond to the Laboratory's environmental impacts. The Laboratory's EMS was audited in April 2009 by DOE-CH. There were four 'Sufficiently in Conformity' findings as a result of the audit. All four findings were tracked in the Laboratory's corrective action database for completion. Beryllium was used routinely at Ames Laboratory in the 1940's and 1950's in processes developed for the production of highly pure uranium and thorium in support of the historic Manhattan Project. Laboratory metallurgists also worked on a process to produce pure beryllium metal from beryllium fluoride. In the early 1950's, beryllium oxide powder was used to produce shaped beryllium and crucibles. As a result of that work, beryllium contamination now exists in many interstitial spaces (e.g., utility chases) and ventilation systems in Wilhelm, Spedding and Metals Development buildings. Extensive characterization and remediation efforts have occurred in 2009 and 2010 in order to better understand the extent of the contamination. Analysis of extensive sampling data suggests that a fairly wide dispersion of beryllium occurred (most likely in the 1950's and 60's) in Wilhelm Hall and in certain areas of Spedding Hall and Metals Development. Area air-sampling results and work-area surface characterizations indicate the exposure potential to current workers, building visitors and the public remains extremely low. This information is now used to guide cleaning efforts and to provide worker protection during remodeling and maintenance activities. Results were shared with the DOE's Former Worker Program to support former worker medical test

  6. 2011 Groundwater Monitoring and Inspection Report Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-02-01

    Gnome-Coach was the site of a 3-kiloton underground nuclear test in 1961. Surface and subsurface contamination resulted from the underground nuclear testing, post-test drilling, and groundwater tracer test performed at the site. The State of New Mexico is currently proceeding with a conditional certificate of completion for the surface. As for the subsurface, monitoring activities that include hydraulic head monitoring and groundwater sampling of the wells onsite are conducted as part of the annual site inspection. These activities were conducted on January 19, 2011. The site roads, monitoring well heads, and the monument at surface ground zero were observed as being in good condition at the time of the site inspection. An evaluation of the hydraulic head data obtained from the site indicates that water levels in wells USGS-4 and USGS-8 appear to respond to the on/off cycling of the dedicated pump in well USGS-1 and that water levels in wells LRL-7 and DD-1 increased during this annual monitoring period. Analytical results obtained from the sampling indicate that concentrations of tritium, strontium-90, and cesium-137 were consistent with concentrations from historical sampling events.

  7. Handheld Face Identification Technology in a Pervasive Computing Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    Handheld Face Identification Technology in a Pervasive Computing Environment Eugene Weinstein1 of Technology, Laboratory for Computer Science, 200 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA {ecoder, steele face identification framework in the context of a pervasive computing environment including handheld

  8. INSTANTANEOUS DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION AND LOCALIZATION THROUGH SPARSE LASER ULTRASONIC SCANNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    INSTANTANEOUS DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION AND LOCALIZATION THROUGH SPARSE LASER ULTRASONIC SCANNING This study proposes an instantaneous damage identification and localization technique through sparse laser ultrasonic signals are obtained, a damage index (DI) representing the violation of the linear reciprocity

  9. Fungal Diversity Identification of Botryosphaeriaceae from Eucalyptus, Acacia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fungal Diversity 103 Identification of Botryosphaeriaceae from Eucalyptus, Acacia and Pinus). Identification of Botryosphaeriaceae from Eucalyptus, Acacia and Pinus in Venezuela. Fungal Diversity 25: 103, Eucalyptus and Pinus. Some anamorphs associated with the Botryosphaeriaceae have been reported from Venezuela

  10. Supply Chain Performance Assessment and Supplier and Component Importance Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Supply Chain Performance Assessment and Supplier and Component Importance Identification and Motivation The Multitiered Supply Chain Network Game Theory Model with Suppliers Supply Chain Network Performance Measures and Supplier and Component Importance Identification The Algorithm Numerical Examples

  11. Certification of Taxpayer Identification Number for Individuals Please check one

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zallen, Richard

    Substitute Form W-9 Certification of Taxpayer Identification Number for Individuals Please check: ________________________ Middle: _____________________ Last: _______________________________ 2. U.S. taxpayer identification statements are true, correct, and complete and that: 1. The number shown on this form is my correct taxpayer

  12. Electronic Vehicle Identification: Industry Standards, Performance, and Privacy Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    0-5217-P2 Electronic Vehicle Identification: Industry Standards, Performance, and Privacy Issues Administration and the Texas Department of Transportation. Abstract: In this research product, industry standards functions. Keywords: Tolling, electronic vehicle identification, DSRC, standards, performance, electronic

  13. Sandia Energy - Siting and Barrier Mitigation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Siting and Barrier Mitigation Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Siting and Barrier Mitigation Siting and Barrier MitigationTara Camacho-Lopez2015-08-12...

  14. Site Environmental Report for 2009, Volume 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Suying

    2010-01-01

    the "RW-1 • Site Environmental Report for 2009the "RW-2 • Site Environmental Report for 2009RW CR SW SE FT SO SD VT Volume I Section A-1 Page A-2 • Site Environmental Report

  15. Site Environmental Report for 2007 Volume II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackner, Regina E

    2008-01-01

    pH Page SW-4 • Site Environmental Report for 2007 StormwaterPage SW-5 • Site Environmental Report for 2007 StormwaterPage SD-1 • Site Environmental Report for 2007 Sediment

  16. Pennsylvania state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1980-12-31

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and State levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Pennsylvania. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  17. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program: Fourth quarter 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, C.D. )

    1992-06-02

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1991, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from fourth quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  18. Iowa state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-02-09

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, By Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the state of Iowa. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; the full test of relevant statutes and regulations.

  19. Environmental restoration and waste management Site-Specific Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-15

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to achieving and maintaining environmental regulatory compliance while responding to public concerns and emphasizing waste minimization. DOE publishes the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) annually to document its progress towards these goals. The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe the activities undertaken to implement the FYP goals at the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE/OR) installations and programs specifically for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding areas. This SSP addresses activities and goals to be accomplished during FY93 even through the FYP focuses on FY94.

  20. Siting analyses for existing facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, K.; Mannan, M. [RMT/Jones and Neuse, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The term {open_quotes}facility siting{close_quotes} refers to the spacial relationships between process units, process equipment within units, and the location of buildings relative to process equipment. Facility siting is an important consideration for the safe operation of manufacturing facilities. Paragraph (d) of the Process Safety Management (PSM) rule (29 CFR 1910.119) requires employers to document the codes and standards used for designing process equipment. This documentation includes facility siting. The regulation also requires employers to document that the design of the facility complies with recognized and generally accepted good engineering practices. In addition, paragraph (e) of the PSM regulation requires that facility siting be evaluated during Process Hazard Analyses. Facility siting issues may also need to be considered in emergency planning and response which are required under paragraph (n) of the PSM rule. This paper will demonstrate, by utilizing an example, one technique for evaluating whether buildings could be affected by a catastrophic incident and for determining if these buildings should be included in the PSM programs developed at the facility such as Process Hazard Analysis and Mechanical Integrity. In addition, this example will illustrate a methodology for determining if the buildings are designed and located in accordance with good engineering practice and industry standards.

  1. Instrumentation for CTA site characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fruck, Christian; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Mandát, Dušan; Schweizer, Thomas; Häfner, Dennis; Bulik, Tomasz; Cieslar, Marek; Costantini, Heide; Dominik, Michal; Ebr, Jan; Garczarczyk, Markus; Lorentz, Eckart; Pareschi, Giovanni; Pech, Miroslav; Puerto-Giménez, Irene; Teshima, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Many atmospheric and climatic criteria have to be taken into account for the selection of a suitable site for the next generation of imaging air-shower Cherenkov telescopes, the "Cherenkov Telescope Array" CTA. Such data are not available with sufficient precision or the comparability to allow for a comprehensive characterization of the proposed sites to be made. Identical cross-calibrated instruments have been developed which allow for precise comparison between sites, the cross-validation of existing data, and the ground-validation of satellite data. The site characterization work package of the CTA consortium opted to construct and deploy 9 copies of an autonomous multi-purpose weather sensor, incorporating an infrared cloud sensor a newly developed sensor for measuring the light of the night sky, and an All-Sky-Camera, the whole referred to as Autonomous Tool for Measuring Observatory Site COnditions PrEcisely (ATMOSCOPE). We present here the hardware that was combined into the ATMOSCOPE and characterize ...

  2. Expedited Site Characterization | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expedited Site Characterization Working to save time and money in the characterization of DOE sites, Ames Lab scientists are advancing adoption of innovative technologies along...

  3. High Impact Technology Hub- Host a Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    We are always looking for partners to host technology demonstrations.  Host site participants receive recognition by the Department of Energy, site applicability analysis as well as the opportunity...

  4. Sandia Energy - Test Site Operations & Maintenance Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test Site Operations & Maintenance Safety Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy SWiFT Facility & Testing Test Site Operations & Maintenance Safety Test...

  5. Top Three Topics and Achievements by Site

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to support future site use decisions Savannah River Site Receipt of additional research reactor spent nuclear fuel and continued long-term storage of existing inventories with no...

  6. Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackner, Regina

    2009-01-01

    the "RW-1 • Site Environmental Report for 2008RW CR SW SE FT SO Volume I Section A-1 Page A-2 • Site Environmental Report

  7. Google Archives by Fiscal Year — Mobile Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, retired Google Analytics profile for the Mobile site for fiscal year 2012-13.

  8. Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Generalized...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Generalized Siting Process Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Chart: Washington Energy...

  9. ORNL Crowdsourcing Site Advances Building Technologies Ideas...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Crowdsourcing Site Advances Building Technologies Ideas to the Market ORNL Crowdsourcing Site Advances Building Technologies Ideas to the Market September 24, 2015 - 4:09pm Addthis...

  10. Hanford Site Confined Space Procedure (HSCSP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Health Regulations for Construction." 7.2 References 1. DOE-0336, Hanford Site LockoutTagout 2. DOE-0344, Hanford Site Excavation Trenching & Shoring Procedure 3. National...

  11. Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Terrel J. Spears Assistant Manager Waste Disposition Project DOE Savannah River Operations Office Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project Waste...

  12. Google Archives by Fiscal Year — Multimedia Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, retired Google Analytics profile for the Multimedia site for fiscal years 2012-14.

  13. Independent Oversight Investigation, Hanford Site - April 2004...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Independent Oversight Investigation, Hanford Site - April 2004 Independent Oversight Investigation, Hanford Site - April 2004 April 2004 Investigation of Worker Vapor Exposure and...

  14. Independent Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site -...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    December 2012 Independent Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site - December 2012 December 2012 Nevada National Security Site Operational Awareness Visit HIAR...

  15. Google Archives by Fiscal Year — Kids Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, retired Google Analytics profile for the Kids site for fiscal year 2012-13.

  16. Hazardous Material Code Identification NFPA 704, 1996 Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Hazardous Material Code Identification NFPA 704, 1996 Edition Identification of Health Hazard Color offer no hazard. 00 Materials that will not burn. 00 Materials that in themselves are normally stable DAMAGE TO LIVING TISSUE. MATERIALS POSSESSING RADIOACTIVITY HAZARDS. The identification systems

  17. Autonomous Airborne Geomagnetic Surveying and Target Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Positioning System (GPS) technology, and sensors (video and infrared cameras, magnetometers) coupled and identification of magnetic anomalies are evaluated. A combination of a particle filter and a neural network Airspeed w Weight on particle x State of agent with respect to target z Sensor measurement Subscript t Time

  18. Autonomous Airborne Geomagnetic Surveying and Target Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lum, Christopher

    in miniaturized electronics, Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, and sensors (video and infrared cameras and identification of magnetic anomalies are evaluated. A combination of a particle filter and a neural network Airspeed w Weight on particle x State of agent with respect to target z Sensor measurement Subscript t Time

  19. Aircraft System Identification Using Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    Aircraft System Identification Using Artificial Neural Networks Kenton Kirkpatrick Jim May Jr. John Networks 2 Artificial Neural Networks ANNSID Conclusions and Open Challenges #12;Motivation 3 #12;Motivating Questions Is it possible to use artificial neural networks to determine a linear model

  20. Automatic Identification of Class Stereotypes Natalia Dragan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maletic, Jonathan I.

    Automatic Identification of Class Stereotypes Natalia Dragan Department of Computer Science Kent to automatically determine a class's stereotype. The stereotype is based on the frequency and distribution of method stereotypes in the class. Method stereotypes are automatically determined using a defined taxonomy

  1. Ads-Portal Domains: Identification and Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xiaowei

    4 Ads-Portal Domains: Identification and Measurements MISHARI ALMISHARI University of California, Irvine and XIAOWEI YANG Duke University An ads-portal domain refers to a Web domain that shows only develop a machine-learning- based classifier to identify ads-portal domains, which has 96% accuracy. We

  2. PSO assisted NURB neural network identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng

    PSO assisted NURB neural network identification X. Hong1 and S. Chen2 1 School of Systems the shaping parameters in NURB network are esti- mated using a particle swarm optimization (PSO) procedure in the Hammerstein system. #12;II The PSO [15,16] constitutes a population based stochastic optimisation tech- nique

  3. AUTOMATIC IDENTIFICATION OF ENVIRONMENT HAPTIC PROPERTIES1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dupont, Pierre

    AUTOMATIC IDENTIFICATION OF ENVIRONMENT HAPTIC PROPERTIES1 Pierre E. Dupont Capt Timothy M sensory information collected during telemanipulation tasks in order to automatically identify properties, is considered. An algorithm is presented which automatically segments the data collected during the task, given

  4. IDENTIFICATIONS AND APPLICATIONS OF COUPLED CLIMATE MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Jin-Yi

    IDENTIFICATIONS AND APPLICATIONS OF COUPLED CLIMATE MODELS Jin-Yi Yu Department of Earth System of environmental system models. 1. Introduction The Earth climate system consists of several major components of global warming, all four components of the Earth climate system are involved. Coupled climate models

  5. Tier identification (TID) for tiered memory characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jichuan; Lim, Kevin T; Ranganathan, Parthasarathy

    2014-03-25

    A tier identification (TID) is to indicate a characteristic of a memory region associated with a virtual address in a tiered memory system. A thread may be serviced according to a first path based on the TID indicating a first characteristic. The thread may be serviced according to a second path based on the TID indicating a second characteristic.

  6. Material identification employing a grating spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gornushkin, Ignor B.; Winefordner, James D.; Smith, Benjamin W.

    2007-01-09

    Multi-ordered spectral data is obtained from various known substances and is stored in a spectral library. The identification of an unknown material is accomplished by correlating the sample's multi-ordered spectrum against all or a portion of the spectrum in the library, and finding the closest match.

  7. Spectroscopic Identification of Carbonate Minerals in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandfield, Joshua L.

    local climatic conditions in the martian past suitable for sustaining life. Carbonate minerals have­10). Researchers used the Viking labeled re- lease experiment to limit the concentration of carbonates presentSpectroscopic Identification of Carbonate Minerals in the Martian Dust Joshua L. Bandfield

  8. groundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    groundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation The Seymour Aquifer is a shallow aquifer, the Seymour Aquifer has the highest groundwater pollution potential of all the major aqui- fers in Texas drinking water standards. Potential sources of nitrate in groundwater include atmospheric deposi- tion

  9. National Register of Historic Places multiple property documentation form -- Historic, archaeological, and traditional cultural properties of the Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickens, P.R.

    1997-08-01

    The US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site encompasses an area of 560 square miles on the Columbia River in southeastern Washington. Since 1943, the Hanford Site has existed as a protected area for activities primarily related to the production of radioactive materials for national defense uses. For cultural resources on the Hanford Site, establishment of the nuclear reservation as a high security area, with public access restricted, has resulted in a well-protected status, although no deliberate resource protection measures were in effect to mitigate effects of facilities construction and associated activities. Thus, the Hanford Site contains an extensive record of aboriginal archaeological sites and Native American cultural properties, along with pre-Hanford Euro-American sites (primarily archaeological in nature with the removal of most pre-1943 structures), and a considerable number of Manhattan Project/Cold War era buildings and structures. The recent mission change from production to clean up and disposal of DOE lands created a critical need for development and implementation of new and different cultural resource management strategies. DOE-RL has undertaken a preservation planning effort for the Hanford Site. The intent of this Plan is to enable DOE-RL to organize data and develop goals, objectives, and priorities for the identification, evaluation, registration, protection, preservation, and enhancement of the Site`s historical and cultural properties. Decisions made about the identification, evaluation, registration and treatment of historic properties are most aptly made when relationships between individual properties and other similar properties are considered. The historic context and the multiple property documentation (NTD) process provides DOE-RL the organizational framework for these decisions. Once significant patterns are identified, contexts developed, and expected properties are defined, the NTD process provides the foundation for future decisions concerning the management of significant cultural resources on the Hanford Site.

  10. Hanford Site Environmental Report 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirkes, R.L.; Hanf, R.W.; Woodruff, R.K.

    1994-06-01

    The Hanford Site Environmental Report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, describe environmental management performance, and demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations. The report also highlights major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet reporting requirements and Guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) an to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to (a) describe the Hanford Site and its mission, (b) summarize the status in 1993 of compliance with environmental regulations, (c) describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site, (d) discuss estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1993 Hanford activities, (e) present information on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance, including ground-water protection and monitoring, (f) discuss activities to ensure quality. More detailed information can be found in the body of the report, the appendixes, and the cited references.

  11. 2011 ANNUAL SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, A.; Eddy, T.; Jannik, T.; Terry, B.; Cauthen, K.; Coward, L.; Dunaway-Ackerman, J.; Wilson, M.; Hutchison, J.; O'Quinn, S.

    2012-10-01

    The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2011 (SRNS-STI-2012-00200) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1 B, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting." The annual SRS Environmental Report has been produced for more than 50 years. Several hundred copies are and interested individuals. The report’s purpose is to: present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; describe compliance status with respect to environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant programs and efforts.

  12. Site survey method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oldham, J.G.; Spencer, C.R.; Begley, C.L.; Meyer, H.R.

    1991-06-18

    The disclosure of the invention is directed to a site survey ground vehicle based apparatus and method for automatically detecting source materials, such as radioactivity, marking the location of the source materials, such as with paint, and mapping the location of the source materials on a site. The apparatus of the invention is also useful for collecting and analyzing samples. The apparatus includes a ground vehicle, detectors mounted at the front of the ground vehicle, and individual detector supports which follow somewhat irregular terrain to allow consistent and accurate detection, and autolocation equipment. 19 figures.

  13. Cleanup Sites | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I DueBETOoffor use withCleanup Sites Cleanup Sites Center

  14. Cleanup Sites | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I DueBETOoffor use withCleanup Sites Cleanup Sites

  15. Environmental assessment, Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 USC sections 10101-10226) requires the environmental assessment of a proposed site to include a statement of the basis for nominating a site as suitable for characterization. Volume 2 provides a detailed statement evaluating the site suitability of the Deaf Smith County Site under DOE siting guidelines, as well as a comparison of the Deaf Smith County Site to the other sites under consideration. The evaluation of the Deaf Smith County Site is based on the impacts associated with the reference repository design, but the evaluation will not change if based on the Mission Plan repository concept. The second part of this document compares the Deaf Smith County Site to Davis Canyon, Hanford, Richton Dome and Yucca Mountain. This comparison is required under DOE guidelines and is not intended to directly support subsequent recommendation of three sites for characterization as candidate sites. 259 refs., 29 figs., 66 refs. (MHB)

  16. SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700 GJO-2003-411-TACe -' RIDGEcls.-@-Y? ALTERNATE

  17. sites

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2Anational lab |

  18. BUSINESS PLAN LBNL Main Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    Materials Does your facility have on site (for any purpose) at any one me, hazardous materials at or above substance speci ed in 40 CFR Part 355, Appendix A or B; or handle radiological materials in quan es Storage (UST) Does your facility own or operate underground storage tanks? Yes Hazardous Waste Is your

  19. Library Site Finder MAIN LIBRARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    Library Site Finder MAIN LIBRARY Burlington Street Tel: 0161 275 3751 THE ALAN GILBERT LEARNING COMMONS Oxford Road Tel: 0161 306 4306 ART & ARCHAEOLOGY LIBRARY Mansfield Cooper Building Tel: 0161 275 3657 BRADDICK LIBRARY School of Physics & Astronomy Brunswick Street Tel: 0161 275 4078 EDDIE DAVIES

  20. ORGANIZING INFORMATION FOR ECOLOGICAL SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in a way that preserves the greatest possible knowledge base, while making the most efficient and effectiveORGANIZING INFORMATION FOR ECOLOGICAL SITES Society for Range Management Annual Meeting Ecological effectively for planning, restoration, and management. Arranging the various elements within the ecosystem

  1. NGNP SITE 2 HAZARDS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Moe

    2011-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project initiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by the U.S. Department of Energy pursuant to the 2005 Energy Policy Act, is based on research and development activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. The principal objective of the NGNP Project is to support commercialization of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The HTGR is a helium-cooled and graphite-moderated reactor that can operate at temperatures much higher than those of conventional light water reactor (LWR) technologies. Accordingly, it can be applied in many industrial applications as a substitute for burning fossil fuels, such as natural gas, to generate process heat in addition to producing electricity, which is the principal application of current LWRs. Nuclear energy in the form of LWRs has been used in the U.S. and internationally principally for the generation of electricity. However, because the HTGR operates at higher temperatures than LWRs, it can be used to displace the use of fossil fuels in many industrial applications. It also provides a carbon emission-free energy supply. For example, the energy needs for the recovery and refining of petroleum, for the petrochemical industry and for production of transportation fuels and feedstocks using coal conversion processes require process heat provided at temperatures approaching 800 C. This temperature range is readily achieved by the HTGR technology. This report summarizes a site assessment authorized by INL under the NGNP Project to determine hazards and potential challenges that site owners and HTGR designers need to be aware of when developing the HTGR design for co-location at industrial facilities, and to evaluate the site for suitability considering certain site characteristics. The objectives of the NGNP site hazard assessments are to do an initial screening of representative sites in order to identify potential challenges and restraints to be addressed in design and licensing processes; assure the HTGR technology can be deployed at variety of sites for a range of applications; evaluate potential sites for potential hazards and describe some of the actions necessary to mitigate impacts of hazards; and, provide key insights that can inform the plant design process. The report presents a summary of the process methodology and the results of an assessment of hazards typical of a class of candidate sites for the potential deployment of HTGR reactor technology. The assessment considered health and safety, and other important siting characteristics to determine the potential impact of identified hazards and potential challenges presented by the location for this technology. A four reactor module nuclear plant (2000 to 2400 MW thermal), that co-generates steam, electricity for general use in the plant, and hot gas for use in a nearby chemical processing facility, to provide the requisite performance and reliability was assumed for the assessment.

  2. Cloud Monitoring for Large Cosmic Ray Sites R.W. Clay, B.R. Dawson, R.T. Pace, D.S. Riordan, A.G.K. Smith, N.R. Wild

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OG 4.5.23 Cloud Monitoring for Large Cosmic Ray Sites R.W. Clay, B.R. Dawson, R.T. Pace, D monitoring of the cloud distribution in the night sky within the experimental fiducial volume. We have developed infra-red detectors which are capa- ble of responding to cloud in daytime or night-time. We

  3. Savannah River Site Environmental Data for 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.

    1999-06-09

    This document presents data from Savannah River Site routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs.

  4. Small Wind Site Assessor Guidelines Document (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preus, R.

    2014-12-01

    Presentation on what the small wind site assessor guidelines document will cover and timeline for completion.

  5. Independent Oversight Investigation, Hanford Site- April 2004

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Investigation of Worker Vapor Exposure and Occupational Medicine Program Allegations at the Hanford Site

  6. Idaho Site Contractor Achieves Treatment Project Milestone

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – The Idaho site’s main cleanup contractor recently achieved a major performance milestone by successfully passing an operational readiness review for a first-of-a-kind facility that will treat the remaining 900,000 gallons of liquid radioactive waste generated by the site’s legacy cleanup mission.

  7. UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT CATERING WEB SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Laura Hill

    UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT CATERING WEB SITE Food Venue Manual #12;Sodexo - Food Venue of 1 STATEMENT Services at the University of Vermont. #12;Sodexo - Food Venue of 1 WEB SITE ADDRESS;Sodexo - Food Venue 4 of 1 WEB SITE ADDRESS Connect to University Dining Services Catering Web site

  8. Adaptive Web Sites: Automatically Synthesizing Web Pages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Etzioni, Oren

    Adaptive Web Sites: Automatically Synthesizing Web Pages Mike Perkowitz Oren Etzioni Department interfaces Abstract The creation of a complex web site is a thorny problem in user interface design. In IJCAI '97, we challenged the AI community to address this problem by creating adaptive web sites: sites

  9. Automated identification of elemental ions in macromolecular crystal structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echols, Nathaniel, E-mail: nechols@lbl.gov; Morshed, Nader; Afonine, Pavel V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-8235 (United States); McCoy, Airlie J. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Wellcome Trust/MRC Building, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Miller, Mitchell D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Joint Center for Structural Genomics, (United States); Read, Randy J. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Wellcome Trust/MRC Building, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Richardson, Jane S. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Terwilliger, Thomas C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545-0001 (United States); Adams, Paul D. [University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1762 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-8235 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The solvent-picking procedure in phenix.refine has been extended and combined with Phaser anomalous substructure completion and analysis of coordination geometry to identify and place elemental ions. Many macromolecular model-building and refinement programs can automatically place solvent atoms in electron density at moderate-to-high resolution. This process frequently builds water molecules in place of elemental ions, the identification of which must be performed manually. The solvent-picking algorithms in phenix.refine have been extended to build common ions based on an analysis of the chemical environment as well as physical properties such as occupancy, B factor and anomalous scattering. The method is most effective for heavier elements such as calcium and zinc, for which a majority of sites can be placed with few false positives in a diverse test set of structures. At atomic resolution, it is observed that it can also be possible to identify tightly bound sodium and magnesium ions. A number of challenges that contribute to the difficulty of completely automating the process of structure completion are discussed.

  10. Regional issue identification and assessment: study methodology. First annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The overall assessment methodologies and models utilized for the first project under the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) program are described. Detailed descriptions are given of the methodologies used by lead laboratories for the quantification of the impacts of an energy scenario on one or more media (e.g., air, water, land, human and ecology), and by all laboratories to assess the regional impacts on all media. The research and assessments reflected in this document were performed by the following national laboratories: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report contains five chapters. Chapter 1 briefly describes the overall study methodology and introduces the technical participants. Chapter 2 is a summary of the energy policy scenario selected for the RIIA I study and Chapter 3 describes how this scenario was translated into a county-level siting pattern of energy development. The fourth chapter is a detailed description of the individual methodologies used to quantify the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of the scenario while Chapter 5 describes how these impacts were translated into comprehensive regional assessments for each Federal Region.

  11. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year - Social Media Site | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Social Media Site Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year - Social Media Site From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, Webtrends archives for the Social Media site for...

  12. DOE Issues Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada National Security Site DOE Issues Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada National Security Site...

  13. Bromocriptine increased operant responding for high fat food but decreased chow intake in both obesity-prone and resistant rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thanos, P.K.; Wang, G.; Thanos, P.K.; Cho, J. Kim, R.; Michaelides, M.; Primeaux, S.; Bray, G.; Wang, G.-J.; Volkow, N.D.

    2010-10-27

    Dopamine (DA) and DAD{sub 2} receptors (D2R) have been implicated in obesity and are thought to be involved in the rewarding properties of food. Osborne-Mendel (OM) rats are susceptible to diet induced obesity (DIO) while S5B/P (S5B) rats are resistant when given a high-fat diet. Here we hypothesized that the two strains would differ in high-fat food self-administration (FSA) and that the D2R agonist bromocriptine (BC) would differently affect their behavior. Ad-libitum fed OM and S5B/P rats were tested in a FSA operant chamber and were trained to lever press for high-fat food pellets under a fixed-ratio (FR1) and a progressive ratio (PR) schedule. After sixteen days of PR sessions, rats were treated with three different doses of BC (1, 10 and 20 mg/kg). No significant differences were found between the two strains in the number of active lever presses. BC treatment (10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg) increased the number of active lever presses (10 mg/kg having the strongest effect) whereas it decreased rat chow intake in the home cage with equivalent effects in both strains. These effects were not observed on the day of BC administration but on the day following its administration. Our results suggest that these two strains have similar motivation for procuring high fat food using this paradigm. BC increased operant responding for high-fat pellets but decreased chow intake in both strains, suggesting that D2R stimulation may have enhanced the motivational drive to procure the fatty food while correspondingly decreasing the intake of regular food. These findings suggest that susceptibility to dietary obesity (prior to the onset of obesity) may not affect operant motivation for a palatable high fat food and that differential susceptibility to obesity may be related to differential sensitivity to D2R stimulation.

  14. Testing Novel CR-39 Detector Deployment System For Identification of Subsurface Fractures, Soda Springs, ID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLing, Travis; Carpenter, Michael; Brandon, William; Zavala, Bernie

    2015-06-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has teamed with Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to facilitate further testing of geologic-fracture-identification methodology at a field site near the Monsanto Superfund Site located in Soda Springs, Idaho. INL has the necessary testing and technological expertise to perform this work. Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) has engaged INL to perform this work through a Work for Others (WFO) Agreement. This study continues a multi-year collaborative effort between INL and EPA to test the efficacy of using field deployed Cr-39 radon in soil portals. This research enables identification of active fractures capable of transporting contaminants at sites where fractures are suspected pathways into the subsurface. Current state of the art methods for mapping fracture networks are exceedingly expensive and notoriously inaccurate. The proposed WFO will evaluate the applicability of using cheap, readily available, passive radon detectors to identify conductive geologic structures (i.e. fractures, and fracture networks) in the subsurface that control the transport of contaminants at fracture-dominated sites. The proposed WFO utilizes proven off-the-shelf technology in the form of CR-39 radon detectors, which have been widely deployed to detect radon levels in homes and businesses. In an existing collaborative EPA/INL study outside of this workscope,. CR-39 detectors are being utilized to determine the location of active transport fractures in a fractured granitic upland adjacent to a landfill site at the Fort Devens, MA that EPA-designated as National Priorities List (NPL) site. The innovative concept of using an easily deployed port that allows the CR-39 to measure the Rn-222 in the soil or alluvium above the fractured rock, while restricting atmospheric Rn-222 and soil sourced Ra from contaminating the detector is unique to INL and EPA approach previously developed. By deploying a series of these inexpensive detector-casing combinations statistical samples of the Rn-222 flux can be measured, elucidating the most communicative fractures (i.e. fractures that are actively transporting water and gasses). The Rn-222 measurements can then be used as an input to create a more accurate conceptual model to be used for transport modeling and related cleanup activities. If the team’s approach is demonstrated to be applicable to a wide variety of rock types and soil conditions it might potentially offer significant cost saving without a reduction in data quality at Monsanto Superfund and other sites underlain by fracture-dominated bedrock.

  15. "In terms of the long-term outlook for biomass and biofuels, the largest proportion of Business Insights industry survey respondents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    production and consumption expansion will depend heavily on incentives frameworks in order to stimulate and hydrogen and production, storage and consumption issues. What impact will biofuels production have fuel production by 2017. A further 25% of respondents thought that biofuels would account for 2

  16. 21.1 Introduction A sensor is a device that provides an electrical output responding to a stimulation of a nonelectrical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilamowski, Bogdan Maciej

    21-1 21.1 Introduction A sensor is a device that provides an electrical output responding to a stimulation of a nonelectrical signal. It converts a physical parameter into a signal suitable for processing/28/2010 7:55:10 PM #12;21-2 Control and Mechatronics The time cost for the light traveling through

  17. REPORTS FROM PROFESSIONAL, STATUTORY AND REGULATORY BODIES 1.1 The purpose of this procedure is to ensure that the College responds to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, Monica A.

    REPORTS FROM PROFESSIONAL, STATUTORY AND REGULATORY BODIES 1. PURPOSE 1.1 The purpose of this procedure is to ensure that the College responds to reports on its academic provision from professional.1 This procedure currently encompasses reports from RCVS, AVMA, EAEVE, QAA, the Society of Biology, and any other

  18. U of A responds to community (Edmonton) Economic development in Alberta has received a boost from the University of Alberta, with a new community planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    U of A responds to community (Edmonton) Economic development in Alberta has received a boost from the University of Alberta, with a new community planning program that will help to fill a critical planners in Alberta where the scarcity of planners stymies development, he says, and can result in projects

  19. Missouri State information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-12-31

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Missouri. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; a description of the organization and structure of local governments affected by remedial action at the St. Louis area sites; a summary of relevant local ordinances and regulations; an identification of relevant public interest groups; a list of radio stations, television stations, and newspapers that provide public information to the St. Louis area or to Jefferson City; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  20. Identification of Key Barriers in Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-03-31

    This report documents the identification of key barriers in the development of an adequate national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project, being performed under a Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration grant. Many barriers exist that prevent the development of an adequate number of propertly trained national security personnel. Some barriers can be eliminated in a short-term manner, whereas others will involve a long-term strategy that takes into account public policy.

  1. Event identification by acoustic signature recognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dress, W.B.; Kercel, S.W.

    1995-07-01

    Many events of interest to the security commnnity produce acoustic emissions that are, in principle, identifiable as to cause. Some obvious examples are gunshots, breaking glass, takeoffs and landings of small aircraft, vehicular engine noises, footsteps (high frequencies when on gravel, very low frequencies. when on soil), and voices (whispers to shouts). We are investigating wavelet-based methods to extract unique features of such events for classification and identification. We also discuss methods of classification and pattern recognition specifically tailored for acoustic signatures obtained by wavelet analysis. The paper is divided into three parts: completed work, work in progress, and future applications. The completed phase has led to the successful recognition of aircraft types on landing and takeoff. Both small aircraft (twin-engine turboprop) and large (commercial airliners) were included in the study. The project considered the design of a small, field-deployable, inexpensive device. The techniques developed during the aircraft identification phase were then adapted to a multispectral electromagnetic interference monitoring device now deployed in a nuclear power plant. This is a general-purpose wavelet analysis engine, spanning 14 octaves, and can be adapted for other specific tasks. Work in progress is focused on applying the methods previously developed to speaker identification. Some of the problems to be overcome include recognition of sounds as voice patterns and as distinct from possible background noises (e.g., music), as well as identification of the speaker from a short-duration voice sample. A generalization of the completed work and the work in progress is a device capable of classifying any number of acoustic events-particularly quasi-stationary events such as engine noises and voices and singular events such as gunshots and breaking glass. We will show examples of both kinds of events and discuss their recognition likelihood.

  2. Cascade Training Technique for Particle Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong Liu; Ion Stancu

    2006-11-27

    The cascade training technique which was developed during our work on the MiniBooNE particle identification has been found to be a very efficient way to improve the selection performance, especially when very low background contamination levels are desired. The detailed description of this technique is presented here based on the MiniBooNE detector Monte Carlo simulations, using both artifical neural networks and boosted decision trees as examples.

  3. Ligand identification using electron-density mapcorrelations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Cohn,Judith D.

    2006-12-01

    A procedure for the identification of ligands bound incrystal structuresof macromolecules is described. Two characteristics ofthe density corresponding to a ligand are used in the identificationprocedure. One is the correlation of the ligand density with each of aset of test ligands after optimization of the fit of that ligand to thedensity. The other is the correlation of a fingerprint of the densitywith the fingerprint of model density for each possible ligand. Thefingerprints consist of an ordered list of correlations of each the testligands with the density. The two characteristics are scored using aZ-score approach in which the correlations are normalized to the mean andstandard deviation of correlations found for a variety of mismatchedligand-density pairs, so that the Z scores are related to the probabilityof observing a particular value of the correlation by chance. Theprocedure was tested with a set of 200 of the most commonly found ligandsin the Protein Data Bank, collectively representing 57 percent of allligands in the Protein Data Bank. Using a combination of these twocharacteristics of ligand density, ranked lists of ligand identificationswere made for representative (F-o-F-c) exp(i phi(c)) difference densityfrom entries in the Protein Data Bank. In 48 percent of the 200 cases,the correct ligand was at the top of the ranked list of ligands. Thisapproach may be useful in identification of unknown ligands in newmacromolecular structures as well as in the identification of whichligands in a mixture have bound to a macromolecule.

  4. Y-12 Site Sustainability Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Charles G

    2012-12-01

    The accomplishments to date and the long-range planning of the Y-12 Energy Management and Sustainability and Stewardship programs support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) vision for a commitment to energy effi ciency and sustainability and to achievement of the Guiding Principles. Specifi cally, the Y-12 vision is to support the Environment, Safety and Health Policy and the DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan, while promoting overall sustainability and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The mission of the Y-12 Energy Management program is to incorporate energy-effi cient technologies site-wide and to position Y-12 to meet NNSA energy requirement needs through 2025 and beyond. The plan addresses greenhouse gases, buildings, fleet management, water use, pollution prevention, waste reduction, sustainable acquisition, electronic stewardship and data centers, site innovation and government-wide support.

  5. Preliminary site characterization - final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, D.; Smith, L.B.

    1993-12-01

    This report summarizes the ecological unit reconnaissance conducted at the F-Area Burning/Rubble Pit(s) RCRA/CERCLA Unit (F-Area BRP) on August 30 and 31, 1993 as part of the RFI/RI baseline risk assessment for the waste unit The baseline risk assessment will assess the potential endangerment to human health and the environment associated with the unit and will be used to evaluate remediation criteria, if needed. The information presented in this report will be used in subsequent stages of the ecological risk assessment to refine the conceptual site model, assist in the selection of contaminants of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and evaluate trophic relationships and other exposure pathways. The unit reconnaissance survey was conducted in accordance with Specification No. E-18272, Rev. 1 dated August 5, 1993, and the Draft {open_quotes}Ecological Risk Assessment Program Plan for Evaluation of Waste Sites on the Savannah River Site{close_quotes}. The objectives of the site reconnaissance were to: Assess the general characteristics of on-unit biological communities including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and any aquatic communities present. Determine the location, extent, and characteristics of on-unit ecological resources, such as forested areas and wetlands, that could serve as important wildlife habitat or provide other ecological functions. Identify any overt effects of contamination on biological communities. The field investigations included mapping and describing all wetland and terrestrial habitats; recording wildlife observations of birds, mammals, and reptiles; and investigating ecological resources in nearby downgradient and downstream areas which could be affected by mobile contaminants or future remedial actions. In preparation for the field investigation, existing unit information including aerial photographs and reports were reviewed to help identify and describe ecological resources at the waste unit.

  6. Idaho Site | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuelBConservation Standards and TestEquipment:Ian Kalin AboutIdaho Site

  7. Site maps and facilities listings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    In September 1989, a Memorandum of Agreement among DOE offices regarding the environmental management of DOE facilities was signed by appropriate Assistant Secretaries and Directors. This Memorandum of Agreement established the criteria for EM line responsibility. It stated that EM would be responsible for all DOE facilities, operations, or sites (1) that have been assigned to DOE for environmental restoration and serve or will serve no future production need; (2) that are used for the storage, treatment, or disposal of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed hazardous waste materials that have been properly characterized, packaged, and labelled, but are not used for production; (3) that have been formally transferred to EM by another DOE office for the purpose of environmental restoration and the eventual return to service as a DOE production facility; or (4) that are used exclusively for long-term storage of DOE waste material and are not actively used for production, with the exception of facilities, operations, or sites under the direction of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. As part of the implementation of the Memorandum of Agreement, Field Offices within DOE submitted their listings of facilities, systems, operation, and sites for which EM would have line responsibility. It is intended that EM facility listings will be revised on a yearly basis so that managers at all levels will have a valid reference for the planning, programming, budgeting and execution of EM activities.

  8. Rulison Site corrective action report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Project Rulison was a joint US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and Austral Oil Company (Austral) experiment, conducted under the AEC`s Plowshare Program, to evaluate the feasibility of using a nuclear device to stimulate natural gas production in low-permeability gas-producing geologic formations. The experiment was conducted on September 10, 1969, and consisted of detonating a 40-kiloton nuclear device at a depth of 2,568 m below ground surface (BGS). This Corrective Action Report describes the cleanup of petroleum hydrocarbon- and heavy-metal-contaminated sediments from an old drilling effluent pond and characterization of the mud pits used during drilling of the R-EX well at the Rulison Site. The Rulison Site is located approximately 65 kilometers (40 miles) northeast of Grand Junction, Colorado. The effluent pond was used for the storage of drilling mud during drilling of the emplacement hole for the 1969 gas stimulation test conducted by the AEC. This report also describes the activities performed to determine whether contamination is present in mud pits used during the drilling of well R-EX, the gas production well drilled at the site to evaluate the effectiveness of the detonation in stimulating gas production. The investigation activities described in this report were conducted during the autumn of 1995, concurrent with the cleanup of the drilling effluent pond. This report describes the activities performed during the soil investigation and provides the analytical results for the samples collected during that investigation.

  9. Report of early site suitability evaluation of the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younker, J.L.; Andrews, W.B.; Fasano, G.A.; Herrington, C.C.; Mattson, S.R.; Murray, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ballou, L.B.; Revelli, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Ducharme, A.R.; Shephard, L.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dudley, W.W.; Hoxie, D.T. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Herbst, R.J.; Patera, E.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Judd, B.R. [Decision Analysis Co., Portola Valley, CA (United States); Docka, J.A.; Rickertsen, L.D. [Weston Technical Associates, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This study evaluated the technical suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste. The evaluation was conducted primarily to determine early in the site characterization program if there are any features or conditions at the site that indicate it is unsuitable for repository development. A secondary purpose was to determine the status of knowledge in the major technical areas that affect the suitability of the site. This early site suitability evaluation (ESSE) was conducted by a team of technical personnel at the request of the Associate Director of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Geologic Disposal, a unit within the DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The Yucca Mountain site has been the subject of such evaluations for over a decade. In 1983, the site was evaluated as part of a screening process to identify potentially acceptable sites. The site was evaluated in greater detail and found suitable for site characterization as part of the Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE, 1986) required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). Additional site data were compiled during the preparation of the Site Characterization Plan (SCP) (DOE, 1988a). This early site suitability evaluation has considered information that was used in preparing both-documents, along with recent information obtained since the EA and SCP were published. This body of information is referred to in this report as ``current information`` or ``available evidence.``

  10. In Silico Identification Software (ISIS): A Machine Learning Approach to Tandem Mass Spectral Identification of Lipids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kangas, Lars J.; Metz, Thomas O.; Isaac, Georgis; Schrom, Brian T.; Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Wang, Luning; Tan, Li; Lewis, Robert R.; Miller, John H.

    2012-05-15

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics has gained importance in the life sciences, yet it is not supported by software tools for high throughput identification of metabolites based on their fragmentation spectra. An algorithm (ISIS: in silico identification software) and its implementation are presented and show great promise in generating in silico spectra of lipids for the purpose of structural identification. Instead of using chemical reaction rate equations or rules-based fragmentation libraries, the algorithm uses machine learning to find accurate bond cleavage rates in a mass spectrometer employing collision-induced dissocia-tion tandem mass spectrometry. A preliminary test of the algorithm with 45 lipids from a subset of lipid classes shows both high sensitivity and specificity.

  11. The siting record: An account of the programs of federal agencies and events that have led to the selection of a potential site for a geologic respository for high-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomenick, T.F.

    1996-03-01

    This record of siting a geologic repository for high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) and spent fuel describes the many investigations that culminated on December 22, 1987 in the designation of Yucca Mountain (YM), as the site to undergo detailed geologic characterization. It recounts the important issues and events that have been instrumental in shaping the course of siting over the last three and one half decades. In this long task, which was initiated in 1954, more than 60 regions, areas, or sites involving nine different rock types have been investigated. This effort became sharply focused in 1983 with the identification of nine potentially suitable sites for the first repository. From these nine sites, five were subsequently nominated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as suitable for characterization and then, in 1986, as required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), three of these five were recommended to the President as candidates for site characterization. President Reagan approved the recommendation on May 28, 1986. DOE was preparing site characterization plans for the three candidate sites, namely Deaf Smith County, Texas; Hanford Site, Washington; and YM. As a consequence of the 1987 Amendment to the NWPA, only the latter was authorized to undergo detailed characterization. A final Site Characterization Plan for Yucca Mountain was published in 1988. Prior to 1954, there was no program for the siting of disposal facilities for high-level waste (HLW). In the 1940s and 1950s, the volume of waste, which was small and which resulted entirely from military weapons and research programs, was stored as a liquid in large steel tanks buried at geographically remote government installations principally in Washington and Tennessee.

  12. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

    2008-02-22

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year (CY) of 2006 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year; i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2006/2007 (October 2006 through May 2007), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. SLAC continued to follow the path to self-declare an environmental management system under DOE Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program' and effectively applied environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that Worker safety and health are protected; The environment is protected; and Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2006, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems. These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing 'greening of the government' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. The SLAC Office of Assurance was created during 2006 in response to DOE Order 226.1. During 2006, there were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations, and there were no Notice of Violations issued to SLAC from any of the regulatory agencies that oversee SLAC. In addition, many improvements in waste minimization, recycling, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and SLAC's chemical management system (CMS) were continued during 2006 to better manage chemical use. Program-specific details are discussed below. SLAC operates its air quality management program in compliance with its established permit conditions. The Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) did not conduct a facility inspection of SLAC during 2006, though it did visit the site on four different occasions. The BAAQMD did compliment SLAC for the overall configuration of SLAC's gasoline dispensing facility and of SLAC's asbestos/demolition notification program during two of the visits. DOE awarded SLAC the 2006 Best in Class for Pollution Prevention and Environmental Stewardship Accomplishment in recognition of SLAC's CMS program which manages the procurement and use of chemicals. As an example of the efficiency of the CMS, SLAC reviewed its use of gases and associated tanks and phased out numerous gas tanks that were no longer needed or were not acceptable for long-term storage, in turn, reducing SLAC's on-site chemical inventory. As part of SLAC's waste minimization and management efforts, more than one thousand tons of municipal solid waste was recycled by SLAC during 2006. SLAC operates its industrial and sanitary wastewater management program in compliance with established permit conditions. During 2006, SLAC obtained a new facility-wide wastewater discharge permit which replaced four separate permits that were previously issued to SLAC. In 2006, no radiological incidents occurred that increased radiation levels or released radioactivity to the environment. In addition to managing its radioactive wastes safely and responsibly, SLAC worked to reduce the amount of waste generated. SLAC has implemented programs and systems to ensure compliance with all radiological requirements related to the environment. The Environmental Restoration Program continued work on site characterization and evaluation of remedial alternatives at four sites with volatile organic compounds in groundwater and several areas with polychlorinated biphenyls and low concentrations of lead in soil. SLAC is regulated under a site cleanup requirements order (board or

  13. Savannah River Site`s Site Specific Plan. Environmental restoration and waste management, fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

  14. Site Selection for Concrete Batch Plant to Support Plutonium Disposition Facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L.D.

    2001-06-15

    WSRC conducted a site selection study to identify, assess, and rank candidate sites for an onsite concrete batch plant at the Savannah River Site in the vicinity of F-Area.

  15. Site-Specific Seismic Site Response Model for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, Alan C.; Reidel, Steve P.

    2005-02-24

    This interim report documents the collection of site-specific geologic and geophysical data characterizing the Waste Treatment Plant site and the modeling of the site-specific structure response to earthquake ground motions.

  16. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 1998 Annual Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, B.; Berry, M.

    1998-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office (DOE- SR),has prepared the Site Treatment Plan (STP) for Savannah River Site (SRS) mixed wastes in accordance with RCRA Section 3021(b), and SCDHEC has approved the STP (except for certain offsite wastes) and issued an order enforcing the STP commitments in Volume I. DOE-SR and SCDHEC agree that this STP fulfills the requirements contained in the FFCAct, RCRA Section 3021, and therefore,pursuant to Section 105(a) of the FFCAct (RCRA Section 3021(b)(5)), DOE`s requirements are to implement the plan for the development of treatment capacities and technologies pursuant to RCRA Section 3021.Emerging and new technologies not yet considered may be identified to manage waste more safely, effectively, and at lower cost than technologies currently identified in the plan. DOE will continue to evaluate and develop technologies that offer potential advantages in public acceptance, privatization, consolidation, risk abatement, performance, and life-cycle cost. Should technologies that offer such advantages be identified, DOE may request a revision/modification of the STP in accordance with the provisions of Consent Order 95-22-HW.The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  17. Savannah River Site dose control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, L.S.

    1992-06-01

    Health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) visited the Savannah River Site (SRS) as one of 12 facilities operated by the Department of Energy (DOE) contractors with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). Their charter was to review, evaluate and summarize as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) techniques, methods and practices as implemented. This presentation gives an overview of the two selected ALARA practices implemented at the SRS: Administrative Exposure Limits and Goal Setting. These dose control methods are used to assure that individual and collective occupational doses are ALARA and within regulatory limits.

  18. Untitled Page -- Considered Sites Summary

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth Dakota Edgemont, South Dakota,You are here Home » Sites »

  19. Untitled Page -- Other Sites Summary

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth Dakota Edgemont, South Dakota,You are here Home » Sites »Other

  20. Berkeley Lab Site Construction Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara2.0.1BenBerkeley Lab ParticleSite

  1. Contracts & Procurements - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsClusterInformationContract Management Princeton Site» ContractingOffice

  2. Forensic Sites | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServices »FirstCurrentSites Meetings, Conferences,

  3. Site Map | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShiftwater vapor andParticleRestorationSite

  4. NNSA Sites | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -Department of EnergyNEW1for Acquisition and ProjectNNSA Sites

  5. US NE MA Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers inYear JanSales Type: Sales120NE MA Site

  6. Completed Sites | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I DueBETOofforCompany TemplateCompleted Sites Completed

  7. Site Map | DOE Data Explorer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species3 Outlook forSimulationsSite Map TUNL pdf's

  8. Site Map | ScienceCinema

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species3 Outlook forSimulationsSite Map TUNL

  9. Site selection for the Salt Disposition Facility at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowers, J.A.

    2000-01-03

    The purpose of this report is to identify, assess, and rank potential sites for the proposed Salt Disposition Facility (SDF) at the Savannah River Site.

  10. O.A.R. 345-015 - Energy Facility Siting Council Site Certification...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Procedures (2014). Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleO.A.R.345-015-EnergyFacilitySitingCouncilSiteCertificationProcedures&oldid789924" ...

  11. Site Selection for Surplus Plutonium Disposition Facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L.D.

    2000-12-13

    The purpose of this study is to identify, assess, and rank potential sites for the proposed Surplus Plutonium Disposition Facilities complex at the Savannah River Site.

  12. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

  13. Current DOE and OSHA VPP Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Need to know which sites are current DOE-VPP or OSHA VPP Sites? The link, below, will take you to a Voluntary Protection Programs Participant's Association web page where you may search for current...

  14. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Waste Acceptance Criteria

    1999-05-01

    This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the Nevada Test Site.

  15. Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A.R.

    1998-08-01

    The mission at the Savannah River Site has changed from the production of nuclear weapons materials for national defense to the management of waste, restoration of the environment, and the development of industry in and around the site.

  16. Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    1999-12-14

    The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria with in which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP.

  17. Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackner, Regina

    2009-01-01

    Note 5 above. Chapter 3: Environmental Program Summary SeeReferences Site Environmental Report for 2008 R-5 49 . LBNL,amended). References Site Environmental Report for 2008 R-6

  18. SECTION FOUR Site Design Guidelines Bicycle Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    SECTION FOUR Site Design Guidelines Bicycle Systems 26 4, the following should be considered when designa ng bicycle routes on roadways: Vehicular speed limits; SECTION FOUR Site Design Guidelines Bicycle Systems 27 4.2 BIKE LANES Bike lanes

  19. Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    1999-09-09

    The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria within which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP.

  20. Identification of high angle structures controlling the geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Identification of high angle structures controlling the geothermal system at Rye Patch, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  1. TRACE IDENTIFICATION OF CESIUM AND SODIUM IN NEUTRAL BEAM RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruby, L.

    2010-01-01

    TRACE IDENTIFICATION OF CESIUM AND Lawrence Ruby LawrenceBerkeley, California 94720 Cesium and sodium in vapor formthe extent to which the cesium and sodium migrate in the

  2. Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Jump to:...

  3. RESEARCH PAPER Identification of loci affecting flavour volatile emissions in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klee, Harry J.

    RESEARCH PAPER Identification of loci affecting flavour volatile emissions in tomato fruits Denise shown that emissions of carotenoid-derived volatiles were directly correlated with the fruit carotenoid

  4. The Hydrogen Corrosion of Uranium: Identification of Underlying...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Hydrogen Corrosion of Uranium: Identification of Underlying Causes and Proposed Mitigation Strategies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Hydrogen Corrosion of...

  5. Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in spherical tokamak regime Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly...

  6. ECRbase: Database of Evolutionary Conserved Regions, Promoters, and Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Vertebrate Genomes

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Loots, Gabriela G. [LLNL; Ovcharenko, I. [LLNL

    Evolutionary conservation of DNA sequences provides a tool for the identification of functional elements in genomes. This database of evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs) in vertebrate genomes features a database of syntenic blocks that recapitulate the evolution of rearrangements in vertebrates and a comprehensive collection of promoters in all vertebrate genomes generated using multiple sources of gene annotation. The database also contains a collection of annotated transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in evolutionary conserved and promoter elements. ECRbase currently includes human, rhesus macaque, dog, opossum, rat, mouse, chicken, frog, zebrafish, and fugu genomes. (taken from paper in Journal: Bioinformatics, November 7, 2006, pp. 122-124

  7. EM Sites Honored for Bird Protection Practices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – A federal council recently recognized two EM sites for efforts to protect migratory birds.

  8. Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site- September 2006

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management Programs at the Hanford Site Waste Stabilization and Disposition Project

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITE SPECIFIC ADVISORY BOARD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ENERGY ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITE-SPECIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (EM SSAB) HANFORD Application No. (Please leave blank) MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION (December 2015)...

  10. Identification of host response signatures of infection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branda, Steven S.; Sinha, Anupama; Bent, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    Biological weapons of mass destruction and emerging infectious diseases represent a serious and growing threat to our national security. Effective response to a bioattack or disease outbreak critically depends upon efficient and reliable distinguishing between infected vs healthy individuals, to enable rational use of scarce, invasive, and/or costly countermeasures (diagnostics, therapies, quarantine). Screening based on direct detection of the causative pathogen can be problematic, because culture- and probe-based assays are confounded by unanticipated pathogens (e.g., deeply diverged, engineered), and readily-accessible specimens (e.g., blood) often contain little or no pathogen, particularly at pre-symptomatic stages of disease. Thus, in addition to the pathogen itself, one would like to detect infection-specific host response signatures in the specimen, preferably ones comprised of nucleic acids (NA), which can be recovered and amplified from tiny specimens (e.g., fingerstick draws). Proof-of-concept studies have not been definitive, however, largely due to use of sub-optimal sample preparation and detection technologies. For purposes of pathogen detection, Sandia has developed novel molecular biology methods that enable selective isolation of NA unique to, or shared between, complex samples, followed by identification and quantitation via Second Generation Sequencing (SGS). The central hypothesis of the current study is that variations on this approach will support efficient identification and verification of NA-based host response signatures of infectious disease. To test this hypothesis, we re-engineered Sandia's sophisticated sample preparation pipelines, and developed new SGS data analysis tools and strategies, in order to pioneer use of SGS for identification of host NA correlating with infection. Proof-of-concept studies were carried out using specimens drawn from pathogen-infected non-human primates (NHP). This work provides a strong foundation for large-scale, highly-efficient efforts to identify and verify infection-specific host NA signatures in human populations.

  11. Site-specific strategies for cotton management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stabile, Marcelo de Castro Chaves

    2005-08-29

    and their outcomes are promising. Historical yield data from yield monitors and height data from the HMAP (plant height mapping) system were used to select representative areas within the field, and areas of average conditions were used as sampling sites... II USE OF SITE-SPECIFIC DATA FOR COTMAN SITE SELECTION ...................6 Introduction............................................................................................................6 Literature Review...

  12. SITE PLAN REVIEW REGULATIONS DURHAM, NEW HAMPSHIRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SITE PLAN REVIEW REGULATIONS of DURHAM, NEW HAMPSHIRE SECTION 1: Authority and Purpose 1 as the SITE PLAN REVIEW REGULATIONS OF DURHAM, NEW HAMPSHIRE, and supercede the Site Plan Regulations, Town of Durham, New Hampshire, Adopted December 12, 1990, as amended prior hereto, and such prior regulations

  13. SECTION ONE Site Design Guidelines Introduc on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    land use, landscape design, transporta on sys- tems and green building techniques. The integraSECTION ONE Site Design Guidelines Introduc on 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION of place. The Site Design Guidelines serve as a guide for all site and landscaping improvements

  14. i 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT September 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    i 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT BNL-52671 September 2002 Prepared by Brookhaven Science Associates Laboratory Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC P.O. Box 5000 Upton, NY 11973-5000 2001 Site Environmental Report EXPL RING EARTH'S MYSTERIES ...PROTECTING ITS FUTURE #12;ii2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

  15. IMPROVE Site Maintenance SOP 226, Version 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Emily V.

    , and Connectors.. .10 9.3.3.4 Pump Maintenance and Equipment ReplacementIMPROVE Site Maintenance SOP 226, Version 2 TI 226A: Site Maintenance for Field Technicians Date: July 2nd, 2013 Page 1 of 13 TI 226A Site Maintenance for Field Technicians Table of Contents 1

  16. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NNSA /NSO Waste Management Project

    2008-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

  17. EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN DEVINE TEST SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    HSE MANUAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN DEVINE TEST SITE EXPLORATION GEOPHYSICS LAB FIELD SITE MEDINA THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN 1 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS MEMORANDUM PAGE 3 MEDICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANS PAGE LIST OF CONTACTS ­ SITE MANAGERS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE PAGE 20 CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION PAGE 21 2 #12

  18. System Identification of Civil Engineering Structures through Wireless Structural Monitoring and Subspace System Identification Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    System Identification of Civil Engineering Structures through Wireless Structural Monitoring of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Civil Engineering) in The University of Michigan 2011 engineers; amazingly, there were many keys which unlocked many civil engineering problems. All achievements

  19. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    sabba, d

    2007-02-03

    This report provides information about environmental programs during 2005 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. SLAC effectively applied environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety and environmental management system (ISEMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that: (1) Worker safety and health are protected; (2) The environment is protected; and (3) Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2005, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing ''greening of the government'' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. There were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations during 2005. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2005, in waste minimization, recycling, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and implementing a chemical management system (CMS) to better manage chemical use. Program-specific details are discussed.

  20. Y-12 Site Sustainability Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherry, T. D.; Kohlhorst, D. P.; Little, S. K.

    2011-12-01

    The accomplishments to date and the long-range planning of the Y-12 Energy Management and Sustainability and Stewardship programs support the DOE and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) vision for a commitment to energy efficiency and sustainability and to achievement of the Guiding Principles. Specifically, the Y-12 vision is to support the Environment, Safety and Health Policy and the DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (SSPP) while promoting overall sustainability and reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Table ES.2 gives a comprehensive overview of Y-12's performance status and planned actions. B&W Y-12's Energy Management mission is to incorporate renewable energy and energy efficient technologies site-wide and to position Y-12 to meet NNSA energy requirement needs through 2025 and beyond. During FY 2011, the site formed a sustainability team (Fig. ES.1). The sustainability team provides a coordinated approach to meeting the various sustainability requirements and serves as a forum for increased communication and consistent implementation of sustainability activities at Y-12. The sustainability team serves as an information exchange mechanism to promote general awareness of sustainability information, while providing a system to document progress and to identify resources. These resources are necessary to implement activities that support the overall goals of sustainability, including reducing the use of resources and conserving energy. Additionally, the team's objectives include: (1) Foster a Y-12-wide philosophy to conserve resources; (2) Reduce the impacts of production operations in a cost-effective manner; (3) Increase materials recycling; (4) Use a minimum amount of energy and fuel; (5) Create a minimum of waste and pollution in achieving Y-12-strategic objectives; (6) Develop and implement techniques, technologies, process modifications, and programs that support sustainable acquisition; (7) Minimize the impacts to resources, including energy/fuel, water, waste, pesticides, and pollution generation; (8) Incorporate sustainable design principles into the design and construction of facility upgrades, new facilities, and infrastructure; and (9) Comply with federal and state regulations, executive orders, and DOE requirements. Y-12 is working to communicate its sustainment vision through procedural, engineering, operational, and management practices. The site will make informed decisions based on the application of the five Guiding Principles for HPSBs to the maximum extent possible.

  1. Study of a transient identification system using a neural network for a PWR plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishihara, Yoshinao; Kasai, Masao; Kambara, Masayuki [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Mitsuda, Hiromichi; Kurata, Toshikazu; Shirosaki, Hidekazu [Inst. of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., Kyoto (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    This paper presents the procedure and results of a system for identifying PWR plant abnormal events, which uses neural network techniques. The neural network recognizes the abnormal event from the patterns of the transient changes of analog data from plant parameters when they deport from their normal state. For the identification of abnormal events in this study, events that cause a reactor to scram during power operation were selected as the design base events. The test data were prepared by simulating the transients on a compact PWR simulator. The simulation data were analyzed to determine how the plant parameters respond after the occurrence of a transient. A method of converting the pattern of the transient changes into characteristic parameters by fitting the data to pre-determined functions was developed. These characteristic parameters were used as the input data to the neural network. The neural network learning procedure used a generalized delta rule, namely a back-propagation algorithm. The neural network can identify the type of an abnormal event from a limited set of events by using these characteristic parameters obtained from the pattern of the changes in the analog data. From the results of this application of a neural network, it was concluded that it would be possible to use the method to identify abnormal events in a nuclear power plant.

  2. Monitoring Soil Erosion on a Burned Site in the Mojave-Great Basin Transition Zone: Final Report for the Jacob Fire Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Julianne DRI; Etyemezian, Vic DRI; Cablk, Mary E. DRI; Shillito, Rose DRI; Shafer, David DOE Grand Junction, Colorado

    2013-06-01

    A historic return interval of 100 years for large fires in the U.S. southwestern deserts is being replaced by one where fires may reoccur as frequently as every 20 to 30 years. The shortened return interval, which translates to an increase in fires, has implications for management of Soil Corrective Action Units (CAUs) and Corrective Action Sites (CASs) for which the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office has responsibility. A series of studies was initiated at uncontaminated analog sites to better understand the possible impacts of erosion and transport by wind and water should contaminated soil sites burn. The first of these studies was undertaken at the Jacob Fire site approximately 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) north of Hiko, Nevada. A lightning-caused fire burned approximately 200 hectares during August 6-8, 2008. The site is representative of a transition between Mojave and Great Basin desert ecoregions on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), where the largest number of Soil CAUs/CASs are located. The area that burned at the Jacob Fire site was primarily a Coleogyne ramosissima (blackbrush) and Ephedra nevadensis (Mormon tea) community, also an abundant shrub assemblage in the similar transition zone on the NNSS. This report summarizes three years of measurements after the fire. Seven measurement campaigns at the Jacob Fire site were completed. Measurements were made on burned ridge (upland) and drainage sites, and on burned and unburned sites beneath and between vegetation. A Portable In-Situ Wind Erosion Lab (PI-SWERL) was used to estimate emissions of suspended particles at different wind speeds. Context for these measurements was provided through a meteorological tower that was installed at the Jacob Fire site to obtain local, relevant environmental parameters. Filter samples, collected from the exhaust of the PI-SWERL during measurements, were analyzed for chemical composition. Runoff and water erosion were quantified through a series of rainfall/runoff simulation tests in which controlled amounts of water were delivered to the soil surface in a specified amount of time. Runoff data were collected from understory and interspace soils on burned ridge and drainage areas. Runoff volume and suspended sediment in the runoff were sampled; the particle size distribution of the sediment was determined by laboratory analysis. Several land surface and soil characteristics associated with runoff were integrated by the calculation of site-specific curve numbers. Several vegetation surveys were conducted to assess post-burn recovery. Data from plots in both burned and unburned areas included species identification, counts, and location. Characterization of fire-affected area included measures at both the landscape scale and at specific sites. Although wind erosion measurements indicate that there are seasonal influences on almost all parameters measured, several trends were observed. PI-SWERL measurements indicated the potential for PM10 windblown dust emissions was higher on areas that were burned compared to areas that were not. Among the burned areas, understory soils in drainage areas were the most emissive, and interspace soils along burned ridges were least emissive. By 34 months after the burn (MAB), at the end of the study, emissions from all burned soil sites were virtually indistinguishable from unburned levels. Like the amount of emissions, the chemical signature of the fire (indicated by the EC-Soil ratio) was elevated immediately after the fire and approached pre-burn levels by 24 MAB. Thus, the potential for wind erosion at the Jacob Fire site, as measured by the amount and type of emissions, increased significantly after the fire and returned to unburned levels by 24 MAB. The effect of fire on the potential for water erosion at the Jacob Fire site was more ambiguous. Runoff and sediment from ridge interspace soils and unburned interspace soils were similar throughout the study period. Seldom, if ever, did runoff and sediment occur in burned drainage area soils. Fo

  3. Technical guidance for siting criteria development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, D.C.; Sprung, J.L.; Alpert, D.J.; Diegert, K.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; Ritchie, L.T.; Strip, D.R.; Johnson, J.D.; Hansen, K.; Robinson, J.

    1982-12-01

    Technical guidance to support the formulation and comparison of possible siting criteria for nuclear power plants has been developed in four areas: (1) consequences of hypothetical severe nuclear-power-plant accidents, (2) characteristics of population distributions about current reactor sites, (3) site availability within the continental United States, and (4) socioeconomic impacts of reactor siting. The impact on consequences of source-term magnitude, meteorology, population distribution, and emergency response have been analyzed. Population distributions about current sites were analyzed to identify statistical characteristics, time trends, and regional differences. A site-availability data bank was constructed for the continential United States. The data bank contains information about population densities, seismicity, topography, water availability, and land-use restrictions. Finally, the socioeconomic impacts of rural-industrialization projects, energy boomtowns, and nuclear power plants were examined to determine their nature, magnitude, and dependence on site demography and remoteness.

  4. Meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiester, T.R.; Pennell, W.T.

    1981-01-01

    This report, which focuses on the meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines (turbines with a rated output exceeding 100 kW), has four main goals. The first is to outline the elements of a siting strategy that will identify the most favorable wind energy sites in a region and that will provide sufficient wind data to make responsible economic evaluations of the site wind resource possible. The second is to critique and summarize siting techniques that were studied in the Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Energy Program. The third goal is to educate utility technical personnel, engineering consultants, and meteorological consultants (who may have not yet undertaken wind energy consulting) on meteorological phenomena relevant to wind turbine siting in order to enhance dialogues between these groups. The fourth goal is to minimize the chances of failure of early siting programs due to insufficient understanding of wind behavior.

  5. Mining Web Site Link Structures for Adaptive Web Site Navigation and Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Jianhan

    Mining Web Site Link Structures for Adaptive Web Site Navigation and Search Jianhan Zhu BSc Faculty of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy October, 2003 #12;University of Ulster Abstract Mining Web Site Link Structures for Adaptive Web Site Navigation and Search by Jianhan Zhu Supervisors: Dr. Jun

  6. USU WEB SITE POLICIES AND GUIDELINES GUIDANCE FOR PUBLISHING CONTENT TO THE USU WEB SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USU WEB SITE POLICIES AND GUIDELINES June, 2015 GUIDANCE FOR PUBLISHING CONTENT TO THE USU WEB SITE/ APPLICATION AND WEB DEVELOPMENT/ USU WEB MASTER #12;CONTENTS USU Web Site Policies and Guidelines..........................................................................................................1 Guidance for Publishing Content to the USU Web Site

  7. U-073: Bugzilla Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting and Cross-Site Request Forgery Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several vulnerabilities were reported in Bugzilla. A remote user can conduct cross-site scripting attacks.

  8. Annual Site Environmental Report, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

    2006-04-19

    This report provides information about environmental programs during 2004 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded, research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. The most noteworthy information in this report is summarized in this section. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety management system (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that worker safety and health are protected; the environment is protected; and compliance is ensured. Throughout 2004, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing ''greening of the government'' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. There were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations during 2004. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2004, in waste minimization, recycling, decreasing air emission rates, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and planning for a chemical management system to manage chemical use better. Program-specific details discussed are: (1) Air Quality--SLAC operates its air quality management program in compliance with its established permit conditions: 2004 was the seventh consecutive year the air quality management program operated without receiving any notices of violation (NOVs) from regulators. (2) Hazardous Waste--The Environmental Health Division of the San Mateo County Health Services Agency is the California certified unified permitting agency (CUPA) responsible for overseeing hazardous materials and waste management at SLAC. The CUPA made no facility inspections of SLAC during 2004. (3) Stormwater and Industrial Wastewater--SLAC operates its industrial and sanitary wastewater management program in compliance with established permit conditions: 2004 was the eighth consecutive year the program operated without receiving any NOVs from program regulators. During 2004 the last 32 unauthorized discharge connections to the stormwater system were eliminated. (4) Hazardous Materials Program--Although SLAC has been successful in meeting the regulatory requirements for managing hazardous materials, it has decided to pursue a more active strategy in reducing its use of such materials. The cornerstone of this effort is the implementation of a chemical management system (CMS). (5) Environmental Radiological Program--In 2004, no radiological incidents occurred that increased radiation levels or released radioactivity to the environment. In addition to managing its radioactive wastes safely and responsibly, SLAC worked to reduce the amount of waste generated. As detailed in Chapter 5, SLAC has implemented programs and systems to ensure compliance with all radiological requirements related to the environment. (6) Groundwater Protection and Environmental Restoration--In general, environmental concerns at SLAC are limited in number, small in scale and are actively being managed or eliminated. The Environmental Restoration Program continued work on site characterization and evaluation of remedial alternatives at four sites with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in groundwater and several areas with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and lead in soil.

  9. WIPP 2004 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC, Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-09-30

    The mission of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is to safely and permanently dispose of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste generated by the production of nuclear weapons and other activities related to the national defense of the United States (U.S.). In 2004, 8,839 cubic meters (m3) of TRU waste were emplaced at WIPP. From the first receipt of waste in March 1999 through the end of 2004, 25,809 m3 of TRU waste had been emplaced at WIPP. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of WIPP environmental resources. DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program; DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 2004 Site Environmental Report (SER) summarizes environmental data from 2004 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with applicable federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, and Guidance for the Preparation of DOE Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) for Calendar Year 2004 (DOE, 2005). The order and the guidance require that DOE facilities submit an annual SER to the DOE Headquarters Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) further requires that the SER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  10. GUIDELINES FOR THE IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT OF LEAD EXPOSURE IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GUIDELINES FOR THE IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT OF LEAD EXPOSURE IN PREGNANT AND LACTATING WOMEN;GUIDELINES FOR THE IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT OF LEAD EXPOSURE IN PREGNANT AND LACTATING WOMEN and Disease Registry Christopher Portier, PhD Director Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning

  11. Understanding Design Concept Identification Ivey Chiu, Filippo A. Salustri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salustri, Filippo A.

    , bioinformatics and education. In this paper, we explore the process of design concept identification and addressUnderstanding Design Concept Identification Ivey Chiu, Filippo A. Salustri Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada In the design literature, the term design concept is often used de facto

  12. Robust Subspace System Identification via Weighted Nuclear Norm Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seshia, Sanjit A.

    Robust Subspace System Identification via Weighted Nuclear Norm Optimization Dorsa Sadigh Henrik via the nuclear norm relaxation. Inspired by robust PCA, we extend this framework to handle outliers, outliers, nuclear norm, sparsity, robust PCA. 1. INTRODUCTION Subspace system identification is a well

  13. A METHODOLOGY FOR IDENTIFICATION OF NARMAX MODELS APPLIED TO DIESEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A METHODOLOGY FOR IDENTIFICATION OF NARMAX MODELS APPLIED TO DIESEL ENGINES 1 Gianluca Zito ,2 Ioan is illustrated by means of an automotive case study, namely a variable geometry turbocharged diesel engine identification procedure is illustrated. In section 3 a diesel engine system, used to test the procedure

  14. Symbolic identification for fault detection in aircraft gas turbine engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    Symbolic identification for fault detection in aircraft gas turbine engines S Chakraborty, S Sarkar and computationally inexpensive technique of component-level fault detection in aircraft gas-turbine engines identification, gas turbine engines, language-theoretic analysis 1 INTRODUCTION The propulsion system of modern

  15. Preprint Version Distributed Target Identification in Robotic Swarms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preprint Version Distributed Target Identification in Robotic Swarms Paolo Stegagno Max Planck of a multi-robot team able to interact with the environment. In most existing systems, the identification systems, constituted by a multitude of small robots with limited sensing and computational capa- bilities

  16. Identification of Human Gene Core Promoters Michael Q. Zhang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    supplement at http://www.genome.org.] As the Human Genome Project enters its large-scale sequencing phaseIdentification of Human Gene Core Promoters in Silico Michael Q. Zhang1 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724 USA Identification of the 5 -end of human genes requires

  17. System Identification and Modelling of a High Performance Hydraulic Actuator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayward, Vincent

    System Identification and Modelling of a High Performance Hydraulic Actuator Benoit Boulet, Laeeque with the experimental identification and modelling of the nonlinear dynamics ofa high performance hydraulic actuator. The actuator properties and performance are also discussed. 1 Introduction Hydraulic actuation used to be

  18. Forensic Bite Mark Identification Using Image Processing Glenn Flora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuceryan, Mihran

    of candidate dental models. The results are compared to identification results by human forensic odontologyForensic Bite Mark Identification Using Image Processing Methods Glenn Flora Department of Computer@iupui.edu Herb Blitzer Indiana Forensic Institute 338 South Arlington Ave, Suite 111 Indianapolis, IN 46219, USA

  19. Automated Identification and Characterization of Landforms on Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    identification of craters from topography. · Overview: Towards global catalog of craters > 3 km. · Focus on Southern hemisphere · Application to distribution of ground water Machine identification of sub well on all types of Martian surfaces. · Fast, permitting generating a catalog of craters over

  20. Optical fuel pin scanner. [Patent application; for reading identifications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirchner, T.L.; Powers, H.G.

    1980-12-09

    This patent relates to an optical identification system developed for post-irradiation disassembly and analysis of fuel bundle assemblies. The apparatus is designed to be lowered onto a stationary fuel pin to read identification numbers or letters imprinted on the circumference of the top fuel pin and cap. (DLC)