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1

LANL spinoff receives NIH grant for respiratory disease diagnostic device  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL spinoff receives NIH grant LANL spinoff receives NIH grant LANL spinoff receives NIH grant for respiratory disease diagnostic device Mesa Tech has been awarded a grant to develop an inexpensive, instrument-free, nucleic-acid testing device to diagnose various respiratory diseases in record time. October 19, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

2

Functional Image-Guided Radiotherapy Planning in Respiratory-Gated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of functional lung image-derived low attenuation area (LAA) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) into respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment planning for lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods and Materials: Eight lung cancer patients with COPD were the subjects of this study. LAA was generated from 4D-CT data sets according to CT values of less than than -860 Hounsfield units (HU) as a threshold. The functional lung image was defined as the area where LAA was excluded from the image of the total lung. Two respiratory-gated radiotherapy plans (70 Gy/35 fractions) were designed and compared in each patient as follows: Plan A was an anatomical IMRT or VMAT plan based on the total lung; Plan F was a functional IMRT or VMAT plan based on the functional lung. Dosimetric parameters (percentage of total lung volume irradiated with {>=}20 Gy [V20], and mean dose of total lung [MLD]) of the two plans were compared. Results: V20 was lower in Plan F than in Plan A (mean 1.5%, p = 0.025 in IMRT, mean 1.6%, p = 0.044 in VMAT) achieved by a reduction in MLD (mean 0.23 Gy, p = 0.083 in IMRT, mean 0.5 Gy, p = 0.042 in VMAT). No differences were noted in target volume coverage and organ-at-risk doses. Conclusions: Functional IGRT planning based on LAA in respiratory-guided IMRT or VMAT appears to be effective in preserving a functional lung in lung cancer patients with COPD.

Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan); Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Multiplex detection of respiratory pathogens  

SciTech Connect

Described are kits and methods useful for detection of respiratory pathogens (influenza A (including subtyping capability for H1, H3, H5 and H7 subtypes) influenza B, parainfluenza (type 2), respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from the respiratory pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

McBride, Mary (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas (Livermore, CA); Birch, James M. (Albany, CA)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Clinical evaluation of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction tool for CT simulations in radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Severe artifacts in kilovoltage-CT simulation images caused by large metallic implants can significantly degrade the conspicuity and apparent CT Hounsfield number of targets and anatomic structures, jeopardize the confidence of anatomical segmentation, and introduce inaccuracies into the radiation therapy treatment planning process. This study evaluated the performance of the first commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction function (O-MAR) for radiation therapy, and investigated its clinical applications in treatment planning. Methods: Both phantom and clinical data were used for the evaluation. The CIRS electron density phantom with known physical (and electron) density plugs and removable titanium implants was scanned on a Philips Brilliance Big Bore 16-slice CT simulator. The CT Hounsfield numbers of density plugs on both uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images were compared. Treatment planning accuracy was evaluated by comparing simulated dose distributions computed using the true density images, uncorrected images, and O-MAR corrected images. Ten CT image sets of patients with large hip implants were processed with the O-MAR function and evaluated by two radiation oncologists using a five-point score for overall image quality, anatomical conspicuity, and CT Hounsfield number accuracy. By utilizing the same structure contours delineated from the O-MAR corrected images, clinical IMRT treatment plans for five patients were computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images, respectively, and compared. Results: Results of the phantom study indicated that CT Hounsfield number accuracy and noise were improved on the O-MAR corrected images, especially for images with bilateral metal implants. The {gamma} pass rates of the simulated dose distributions computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images referenced to those of the true densities were higher than 99.9% (even when using 1% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement criterion), suggesting that dose distributions were clinically identical. In all patient cases, radiation oncologists rated O-MAR corrected images as higher quality. Formerly obscured critical structures were able to be visualized. The overall image quality and the conspicuity in critical organs were significantly improved compared with the uncorrected images: overall quality score (1.35 vs 3.25, P= 0.0022); bladder (2.15 vs 3.7, P= 0.0023); prostate and seminal vesicles/vagina (1.3 vs 3.275, P= 0.0020); rectum (2.8 vs 3.9, P= 0.0021). The noise levels of the selected ROIs were reduced from 93.7 to 38.2 HU. On most cases (8/10), the average CT Hounsfield numbers of the prostate/vagina on the O-MAR corrected images were closer to the referenced value (41.2 HU, an average measured from patients without metal implants) than those on the uncorrected images. High {gamma} pass rates of the five IMRT dose distribution pairs indicated that the dose distributions were not significantly affected by the CT image improvements. Conclusions: Overall, this study indicated that the O-MAR function can remarkably reduce metal artifacts and improve both CT Hounsfield number accuracy and target and critical structure visualization. Although there was no significant impact of the O-MAR algorithm on the calculated dose distributions, we suggest that O-MAR corrected images are more suitable for the entire treatment planning process by offering better anatomical structure visualization, improving radiation oncologists' confidence in target delineation, and by avoiding subjective density overrides of artifact regions on uncorrected images.

Li Hua; Noel, Camille; Chen, Haijian; Harold Li, H.; Low, Daniel; Moore, Kevin; Klahr, Paul; Michalski, Jeff; Gay, Hiram A.; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Philips Healthcare System, Cleveland, Ohio 44143 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

Voice Communication Systems Compatible With Respiratory Protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operating a nuclear power plant requires reliable voice communication among workers and supervisors. In hazardous situations where respiratory protection devices are necessary, improved voice communication can increase worker productivity and decrease radiation exposure. This report provides guidelines for the selection, use, and maintenance of voice communication systems that are compatible with respiratory protection.

1989-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

6

RESPIRATORY DISEASES Prenatal ambient air exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Charlie Matulka, who lost to Senator Chuck Hagel of Nebraska the same year, does not trust the results- counting machines, which happen to have been manufactured by a company Mr. Hagel used to run. Mr. Matulka, against Mr. Matulka, he won more than 80 percent of the vote. What gets conspiracy theorists excited

7

Patient training in respiratory-gated radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Respiratory gating is used to counter the effects of organ motion during radiotherapy for chest tumors. The effects of variations in patient breathing patterns during a single treatment and from day to day are unknown. We evaluated the feasibility of using patient training tools and their effect on the breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility during respiratory-gated radiotherapy. To monitor respiratory patterns, we used a component of a commercially available respiratory-gated radiotherapy system (Real Time Position Management (RPM) System, Varian Oncology Systems, Palo Alto, CA 94304). This passive marker video tracking system consists of reflective markers placed on the patient's chest or abdomen, which are detected by a wall-mounted video camera. Software installed on a PC interfaced to this camera detects the marker motion digitally and records it. The marker position as a function of time serves as the motion signal that may be used to trigger imaging or treatment. The training tools used were audio prompting and visual feedback, with free breathing as a control. The audio prompting method used instructions to 'breathe in' or 'breathe out' at periodic intervals deduced from patients' own breathing patterns. In the visual feedback method, patients were shown a real-time trace of their abdominal wall motion due to breathing. Using this, they were asked to maintain a constant amplitude of motion. Motion traces of the abdominal wall were recorded for each patient for various maneuvers. Free breathing showed a variable amplitude and frequency. Audio prompting resulted in a reproducible frequency; however, the variability and the magnitude of amplitude increased. Visual feedback gave a better control over the amplitude but showed minor variations in frequency. We concluded that training improves the reproducibility of amplitude and frequency of patient breathing cycles. This may increase the accuracy of respiratory-gated radiation therapy.

Kini, Vijay R.; Vedam, Subrahmanya S.; Keall, Paul J.; Patil, Sumukh; Chen, Clayton; Mohan, Radhe

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

Workers Deliver Award-Winning Respiratory Safety | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deliver Award-Winning Respiratory Safety Deliver Award-Winning Respiratory Safety Workers Deliver Award-Winning Respiratory Safety April 2, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers wear air purifying respirators in the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Workers wear air purifying respirators in the Plutonium Finishing Plant. A program developed by employees enhances use of respiratory equipment in the Plutonium Finishing Plant. A program developed by employees enhances use of respiratory equipment in the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Workers wear air purifying respirators in the Plutonium Finishing Plant. A program developed by employees enhances use of respiratory equipment in the Plutonium Finishing Plant. RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers supporting the Richland Operations Office at the Hanford site found a way to make their everyday work even safer.

9

Workers Deliver Award-Winning Respiratory Safety | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workers Deliver Award-Winning Respiratory Safety Workers Deliver Award-Winning Respiratory Safety Workers Deliver Award-Winning Respiratory Safety April 2, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers wear air purifying respirators in the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Workers wear air purifying respirators in the Plutonium Finishing Plant. A program developed by employees enhances use of respiratory equipment in the Plutonium Finishing Plant. A program developed by employees enhances use of respiratory equipment in the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Workers wear air purifying respirators in the Plutonium Finishing Plant. A program developed by employees enhances use of respiratory equipment in the Plutonium Finishing Plant. RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers supporting the Richland Operations Office at the Hanford site found a way to make their everyday work even safer.

10

Respiratory health and lung function of wind and brass musicians.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??[Truncated abstract] Optimum respiratory health is of utmost importance for wind and brass musicians. The creation of musical tone is directly dependant on the musician’s… (more)

Fuhrmann, Anita Grace

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Natural Gas Stove Emissions and Respiratory Health: Evidence...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Stove Emissions and Respiratory Health: Evidence from NHANES III NOTICE Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab websites are accessible, but may not...

12

Gender differences in respiratory symptoms-Does occupation matter?  

SciTech Connect

Little attention has been given to gender differences in respiratory health, particularly in occupational settings. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate gender differences in respiratory morbidity based on surveys of hospitality workers, radiographers, and respiratory therapists. Data were available from mail surveys of 850 hospitality industry workers (participation rate 73.9%; 52.6% female), 586 radiographers (participation rate 63.6%; 85% female), and 275 respiratory therapists (participation rate 64.1%; 58.6% female). Cross-tabulations by gender were evaluated by {chi}{sup 2} analysis and logistic regression with adjustment for personal and work characteristics. Women consistently had greater respiratory morbidity for symptoms associated with shortness of breath, whereas men usually had a higher prevalence of phlegm. There were few differences in work exposures apart from perception of exposure to ETS among hospitality workers. Gender differences in symptoms were often reduced after adjustment for personal and work characteristics but for respiratory therapists there were even greater gender disparities for asthma attack and breathing trouble. Population health findings of elevated symptoms among women were only partially supported by these occupational respiratory health surveys. The influence of differential exposures and personal factors should be considered when interpreting gender differences in health outcomes.

Dimich-Ward, Helen [Department of Medicine, Respiratory Division, University of British Columbia, VGH Research Pavilion, 390-828 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1L8 (Canada)]. E-mail: hward@interchange.ubc.ca; Camp, Patricia G. [Department of Medicine, Respiratory Division, University of British Columbia, VGH Research Pavilion, 390-828 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1L8 (Canada); James Hogg iCapture Center for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6Z 1Y6 (Canada); Kennedy, Susan M. [School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3 (Canada)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Alterations in mitochondrial respiratory functions, redox metabolism and apoptosis by oxidant 4-hydroxynonenal and antioxidants curcumin and melatonin in PC12 cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellular oxidative stress and alterations in redox metabolisms have been implicated in the etiology and pathology of many diseases including cancer. Antioxidant treatments have been proven beneficial in controlling these diseases. We have recently shown that 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a by-product of lipid peroxidation, induces oxidative stress in PC12 cells by compromising the mitochondrial redox metabolism. In this study, we have further investigated the deleterious effects of 4-HNE on mitochondrial respiratory functions and apoptosis using the same cell line. In addition, we have also compared the effects of two antioxidants, curcumin and melatonin, used as chemopreventive agents, on mitochondrial redox metabolism and respiratory functions in these cells. 4-HNE treatment has been shown to cause a reduction in glutathione (GSH) pool, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), protein carbonylation and apoptosis. A marked inhibition in the activities of the mitochondrial respiratory enzymes, cytochrome c oxidase and aconitase was observed after 4-HNE treatment. Increased nuclear translocation of NF-kB/p65 protein was also observed after 4-HNE treatment. Curcumin and melatonin treatments, on the other hand, maintained the mitochondrial redox and respiratory functions without a marked effect on ROS production and cell viability. These results suggest that 4-HNE-induced cytotoxicity may be associated, at least in part, with the altered mitochondrial redox and respiratory functions. The alterations in mitochondrial energy metabolism and redox functions may therefore be critical in determining the difference between cell death and survival.

Raza, Haider [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University, POBox 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates)], E-mail: h.raza@uaeu.ac.ae; John, Annie [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University, POBox 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Brown, Eric M. [Department of Anatomy, FMHS, Al Ain, UAE University (United Arab Emirates); Benedict, Sheela [Department of Internal Medicine, FMHS, Al Ain, UAE University (United Arab Emirates); Kambal, Amr [Tawam Hospital/Johns Hopkins Medicine International, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Participatory epidemiology : harnessing the HealthMap platform for community-based disease outbreak monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to increasing global trade and travel along with a range of environmental factors, emerging infectious diseases such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), drug-resistant tuberculosis, and 2009 HiNi continue to ...

Freifeld, Clark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Respiratory symptoms in Indian women using domestic cooking fuels  

SciTech Connect

The effect of domestic cooking fuels producing various respiratory symptoms was studied in 3,701 women. Of these, 3,608 were nonsmoking women who used four different types of cooking fuels: biomass, LPG, kerosene, and mixed fuels. The overall respiratory symptoms were observed in 13 percent of patients. Mixed fuel users experienced more respiratory symptoms (16.7 percent), followed by biomass (12.6 percent), stove (11.4 percent), and LPG (9.9 percent). Chronic bronchitis in chulla users was significantly higher than that in kerosene and LPG users (p less than 0.05). Dyspnea and postnasal drip were significantly higher in the women using mixed fuels. Smoking women who are also exposed to cooking fuels experienced respiratory symptoms more often than nonsmokers (33.3 percent vs 13 percent).

Behera, D.; Jindal, S.K. (Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Respiratory sensitization and allergy: Current research approaches and needs  

SciTech Connect

There are currently no accepted regulatory models for assessing the potential of a substance to cause respiratory sensitization and allergy. In contrast, a number of models exist for the assessment of contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Research indicates that respiratory sensitizers may be identified through contact sensitization assays such as the local lymph node assay, although only a small subset of the compounds that yield positive results in these assays are actually respiratory sensitizers. Due to the increasing health concerns associated with occupational asthma and the impending directives on the regulation of respiratory sensitizers and allergens, an approach which can identify these compounds and distinguish them from contact sensitizers is required. This report discusses some of the important contrasts between respiratory allergy and ACD, and highlights several prominent in vivo, in vitro and in silico approaches that are being applied or could be further developed to identify compounds capable of causing respiratory allergy. Although a number of animal models have been used for researching respiratory sensitization and allergy, protocols and endpoints for these approaches are often inconsistent, costly and difficult to reproduce, thereby limiting meaningful comparisons of data between laboratories and development of a consensus approach. A number of emerging in vitro and in silico models show promise for use in the characterization of contact sensitization potential and should be further explored for their ability to identify and differentiate contact and respiratory sensitizers. Ultimately, the development of a consistent, accurate and cost-effective model will likely incorporate a number of these approaches and will require effective communication, collaboration and consensus among all stakeholders.

Boverhof, Darrell R. [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, Dow Chemical Company, 1803 Building, Midland MI 48674 (United States)], E-mail: RBoverhof@dow.com; Billington, Richard [Human Health Assessment, Dow AgroSciences Limited, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Gollapudi, B. Bhaskar; Hotchkiss, John A.; Krieger, Shannon M. [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, Dow Chemical Company, 1803 Building, Midland MI 48674 (United States); Poole, Alan [Dow Europe GmbH. Horgen (Switzerland); Wiescinski, Connie M.; Woolhiser, Michael R. [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, Dow Chemical Company, 1803 Building, Midland MI 48674 (United States)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Ozone, Air Pollution, and Respiratory Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of the outdoor air pollutants regulated by the Clean Air Act of 1970 (and recently revised in 1990), ozone has been the one pollutant most difficult to control within the federal standards. The known human health effects are all on the respiratory system. At concentrations of ozone which occur during summer air-pollution episodes in many urban metropolitan areas of the United States, a portion of the healthy population is likely to experience symptoms and reversible effects on lung function, particularly if exercising heavily outdoors. More prolonged increase in airway responsiveness and the presence of inflammatory cells and mediators in the airway lining fluid may also result from these naturally occurring exposures. Serial exposures to peak levels of ozone on several consecutive days are more characteristic of pollution episodes in the Northeast United States and may be associated with recurrent symptoms. No "high-risk " or more sensitive group has been found, in contrast to the case of sulfur dioxide, to which asthmatics are more susceptible than normals. The occurrence of multiple exposure episodes within a single year over many years in some areas of California has led to studies looking for chronic effects of ozone exposure on the lung. To date, no conclusive studies have been reported, although further work is under way. Much of what we know about the effects of this gas on the lung are based on controlled exposures to pure gas within an environmental exposure laboratory. Interactions between substances which commonly co-occur in air-pollution episodes are also under investigation.

William S

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Natural Gas Stove Emissions and Respiratory Health: Evidence from NHANES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Stove Emissions and Respiratory Health: Evidence from NHANES Natural Gas Stove Emissions and Respiratory Health: Evidence from NHANES III Speaker(s): Ronald Briggs Date: August 15, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Brett Singer Do emissions from natural gas stoves in American homes degrade respiratory health? The combustion of natural gas yields byproducts such as NOx , PM2.5 , and CO that the US EPA regulates outdoors. But while ambient air quality has improved in the US over the last few decades as a consequence of the Clean Air Act of and its amendments, the prevalence of asthma and morbidity and mortality associated with asthma continue to rise (Mannino /et al./, 1998). Concentrations of most air pollutants are higher indoors than outdoors in the US, however, and people in the US spend more than 90%

19

Human torso phantom for imaging of heart with realistic modes of cardiac and respiratory motion  

SciTech Connect

A human torso phantom and its construction, wherein the phantom mimics respiratory and cardiac cycles in a human allowing acquisition of medical imaging data under conditions simulating patient cardiac and respiratory motion.

Boutchko, Rostyslav; Balakrishnan, Karthikayan; Gullberg, Grant T; O'Neil, James P

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

20

Respiratory symptoms in wool textile workers. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This epidemiological study was intended to investigate exposures to inspirable wool dust in selected wool textile mills, the patterns of respiratory symptoms reported by workers in the industry, and the relationships of symptoms to exposure to dust. Fifteen mills in West Yorkshire representing all stages of the woollen and worsted process, and production of carpet yarns, were included in the study, their size ranging from four to nearly four hundred employees.

Love, R.G.; Smith, T.; Jones, C.O.; Gurr, D.; Soutar, C.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Wildlife Diseases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some wildlife diseases can be transmitted to humans. This leaflet explains the causes and symptoms of rabies, giardiasis, bubonic plague, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Lyme disease, tularemia, leptospirosis and histoplasmosis.

Texas Wildlife Services

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

22

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response of Respiratory Cells in Intact Tissues and Reconstituted Response of Respiratory Cells in Intact Tissues and Reconstituted Tissue John Ford Department of Nuclear Engineering Texas A & M University Why this Project? Using the well-established rat trachea model to test the hypothesis that normal respiratory epithelial cells transmit signals to neighboring cells in response to very low dose radiation exposure. Project Goals By comparing the responses shown by cells in these normal rodent respiratory tissues to those seen for human respiratory epithelial cells in reconstituted tissue constructs, it will be possible to better understand the responds in human respiratory cells in vivo. These studies will characterize responses after exposure to a variety of radiation types and dose distributions. Experimental Approach

23

Assessment of Autonomic Control and Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia Using Point Process Models of Human Heart Beat Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tracking the autonomic control and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) from electrocardiogram and respiratory measurements is an important problem in cardiovascular control. We propose a point process adaptive filter algorithm ...

Chen, Zhe

24

Neurological Disease  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron and neurodegenerative disease Iron and neurodegenerative disease A novel technique to study intracerebral iron oxide particles associated with Alzheimer's, Huntington's, and Parkinson's diseases has been developed. Researchers crafted a system of mirrors and lenses to tap one of the high-brightness x-ray sources at the Advanced Photon Source for the purpose of analyzing brain tissue. Mark Davidson (left in the photo), University of Florida, and Joanna Collingwood, Keele University in the United Kingdom (UK, who is supported by a UK Alzheimer's Society Research Fellowship and Dunhill Medical Trust), align a sample of Alzheimer's brain tissue at the microfocus facility, MR-CAT, beamline 10-ID. According to Davidson: "Unusual iron mineral nanoscale deposits have been associated with many neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's,

25

Parkinson's Disease  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parkinson's Disease Parkinson's Disease Name: saabsaab Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: I am interested in collecting information on Parkinson's Disease. Can you help me? Replies: Some possible sources include a neuroscience reference, a neurology text, a neurologist, neuroanatomy references. Basically Parkinson's disease is a movement disorder. It gets more and more difficult to move. One of the primary brain lesions associated with this disease is a shrinkage of an area in the brain stem called the substantia nigra. This is thought to be associated with the neurotransmitter dopamine and there seems to decreased production of the dopamine in this area. Some medications do seem to help including a dopamine replacement medicine called Sinemet. There are some new medicines coming out that may also help. Another exciting area is trying to get new dopamine cells to grow in the substantia nigra area, one way is to insert a needle into the area and inject immature nerve cells into the area and hope they will grow up to be mature dopamine producers, so far it is still considered somewhat experimental. The disease is thought to be caused by progressive cell loss. Some cases have been caused by people who synthesized drugs to abuse and they made a mistake and a bunch of young people took the drug and ended up with the disease. The silver lining of this is that this drug also will do the same thing in rats, so now there is an animal model for Parkinson's.

26

SU?GG?J?18: A Surface?Based Respiratory Surrogate for 4D Imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Real?time acquisition of three?dimensional surface tracking has potential as an external surrogate for respiratory correlated CTimaging and radiation therapy. This study assesses the GateCT surfacetracking system (VisionRT

C Noel; E Klein; K Moore

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Association of residential dampness and mold with respiratory tract infections and bronchitis: a meta-analysis  

SciTech Connect

Dampness and mold have been shown in qualitative reviews to be associated with a variety of adverse respiratory health effects, including respiratory tract infections. Several published meta-analyses have provided quantitative summaries for some of these associations, but not for respiratory infections. Demonstrating a causal relationship between dampness-related agents, which are preventable exposures, and respiratory tract infections would suggest important new public health strategies. We report the results of quantitative meta-analyses of published studies that examined the association of dampness or mold in homes with respiratory infections and bronchitis. For primary studies meeting eligibility criteria, we transformed reported odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) to the log scale. Both fixed and random effects models were applied to the log ORs and their variances. Most studies contained multiple estimated ORs. Models accounted for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed. One set of analyses was performed with all eligible studies, and another set restricted to studies that controlled for age, gender, smoking, and socioeconomic status. Subgroups of studies were assessed to explore heterogeneity. Funnel plots were used to assess publication bias. The resulting summary estimates of ORs from random effects models based on all studies ranged from 1.38 to 1.50, with 95% CIs excluding the null in all cases. Use of different analysis models and restricting analyses based on control of multiple confounding variables changed findings only slightly. ORs (95% CIs) from random effects models using studies adjusting for major confounding variables were, for bronchitis, 1.45 (1.32-1.59); for respiratory infections, 1.44 (1.31-1.59); for respiratory infections excluding nonspecific upper respiratory infections, 1.50 (1.32-1.70), and for respiratory infections in children or infants, 1.48 (1.33-1.65). Little effect of publication bias was evident. Estimated attributable risk proportions ranged from 8% to 20%. Residential dampness and mold are associated with substantial and statistically significant increases in both respiratory infections and bronchitis. If these associations were confirmed as causal, effective control of dampness and mold in buildings would prevent a substantial proportion of respiratory infections.

Fisk, William J.; Eliseeva, Ekaterina A.; Mendell, Mark J.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: Screening for sensitization potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective hazard screening will require the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for the identification of potential sensitizers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential biomarkers that differentiate the response to allergens vs non-allergens following an acute exposure in naive individuals. Female BALB/c mice received a single intratracheal aspiration exposure to Metarhizium anisopliae crude antigen (MACA) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) or HBSS alone. Mice were terminated after 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was evaluated to determine total and differential cellularity, total protein concentration and LDH activity. RNA was isolated from lung tissue for microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. MACA administration induced a rapid increase in BALF neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and total protein compared to BSA or HBSS. Microarray analysis demonstrated differential expression of genes involved in cytokine production, signaling, inflammatory cell recruitment, adhesion and activation in 3 and 12 h MACA-treated samples compared to BSA or HBSS. Further analyses allowed identification of approx 100 candidate biomarker genes. Eleven genes were selected for further assessment by qRT-PCR. Of these, 6 demonstrated persistently increased expression (Ccl17, Ccl22, Ccl7, Cxcl10, Cxcl2, Saa1), while C3ar1 increased from 6-24 h. In conclusion, a single respiratory exposure of mice to an allergenic mold extract induces an inflammatory response which is distinct in phenotype and gene transcription from the response to a control protein. Further validation of these biomarkers with additional allergens and irritants is needed. These biomarkers may facilitate improvements in screening methods.

Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M., E-mail: Pucheu-Haston.Cherie@epa.go [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, CB 7270, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7270 (United States); Copeland, Lisa B.; Vallanat, Beena; Boykin, Elizabeth; Ward, Marsha D.W. [National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 109 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

A Bidirectional Coupling Procedure Applied to Multiscale Respiratory Modeling  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the Modified Newton’s Method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1, 2, 3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a “pressure-drop” residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD-ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural pressure applied to the multiple sets of ODEs. In both the simplified geometry and in the imaging-based geometry, the performance of the method was comparable to that of monolithic schemes, in most cases requiring only a single CFD evaluation per time step. Thus, this new accelerator allows us to begin combining pulmonary CFD models with lower-dimensional models of pulmonary mechanics with little computational overhead. Moreover, because the CFD and lower-dimensional models are totally separate, this framework affords great flexibility in terms of the type and breadth of the adopted lower-dimensional model, allowing the biomedical researcher to appropriately focus on model design. Research funded by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Award 1RO1HL073598.

Kuprat, Andrew P.; Kabilan, Senthil; Carson, James P.; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Respiratory motion sampling in 4DCT reconstruction for radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Phase-based and amplitude-based sorting techniques are commonly used in four-dimensional CT (4DCT) reconstruction. However, effect of these sorting techniques on 4D dose calculation has not been explored. In this study, the authors investigated a candidate 4DCT sorting technique by comparing its 4D dose calculation accuracy with that for phase-based and amplitude-based sorting techniques.Method: An optimization model was formed using organ motion probability density function (PDF) in the 4D dose convolution. The objective function for optimization was defined as the maximum difference between the expected 4D dose in organ of interest and the 4D dose calculated using a 4DCT sorted by a candidate sampling method. Sorting samples, as optimization variables, were selected on the respiratory motion PDF assessed during the CT scanning. Breathing curves obtained from patients' 4DCT scanning, as well as 3D dose distribution from treatment planning, were used in the study. Given the objective function, a residual error analysis was performed, and k-means clustering was found to be an effective sampling scheme to improve the 4D dose calculation accuracy and independent with the patient-specific dose distribution. Results: Patient data analysis demonstrated that the k-means sampling was superior to the conventional phase-based and amplitude-based sorting and comparable to the optimal sampling results. For phase-based sorting, the residual error in 4D dose calculations may not be further reduced to an acceptable accuracy after a certain number of phases, while for amplitude-based sorting, k-means sampling, and the optimal sampling, the residual error in 4D dose calculations decreased rapidly as the number of 4DCT phases increased to 6.Conclusion: An innovative phase sorting method (k-means method) is presented in this study. The method is dependent only on tumor motion PDF. It could provide a way to refine the phase sorting in 4DCT reconstruction and is effective for 4D dose accumulation. Optimized sorting techniques could achieve acceptable residuals (less than 0.5% of the prescription dose) using 6 sorting samples, which is much better than amplitude-based or phase-based sorting. Further increase in sorting phase number exceeding 6 or more may not be necessary when using the k-means sampling or optimal sampling points.

Chi Yuwei; Liang Jian; Qin Xu; Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Respiratory motion of the heart: Implications for magnetic resonance coronary angiography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic resonance(MR) coronary imaging is susceptible to artifacts caused by motion of the heart. The purpose of this thesis was to study the respiratory motion of the coronary arteries and to use the results to develop strategies for improved MRimaging. The first section of the thesis describes a MR motion correction technique for objects undergoing a 3D affine transformation. The remainder of the thesis focuses on measuring the respiratory motion of the heart from free breathing x-ray angiograms. Stereo reconstruction methods are used to generate 3D models of the arteries from biplane angiograms. A method for tracking the motion of the arteries in a sequence of biplane images is presented next. The algorithm uses 3D regularizing constraints on the length changes of the arteries and on the spatial regularity of their motion. The algorithm was validated using a deforming vascular phantom. RMS 3D distance errors were measured between centerline models tracked in the x-ray images and gold-standard models derived from a gated 3D MR acquisition. The mean error was 0.69±0.06? mm for four different orientations of the x-ray system. The motion field recovered from free breathing angiograms is a combination of the cardiac contraction and respiratory motion of the heart. A cardiac respiratory parametric model is formulated to decompose the field into independent cardiac and respiratory components. Results are presented for ten patients imaged during spontaneous tidal breathing. For all patients

Guy Shechter

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Cells in Intact Tissues and Reconstituted Tissue Constructs Authors: John Ford, Amy Maslowski, Alex Redd and Les Braby Institutions: Texas A&M University, College Station, TX We are developing a model of respiratory tissue using a perfusion culture system. We are using this system to quantify the effects of normal tissue architecture, and the interaction of epithelial cells with other cell types, on radiation-induced bystander effects. Tracheal tissue taken from young adult Fischer 344 rats is imbedded in a growth factor enriched agarose matrix. The chamber is designed to allow growth medium to periodically wash the epithelial surface of the tracheal lumen while maintaining the air-interface that is necessary for the normal

33

Detection of chronic respiratory bronchiolitis in oxidant-exposed populations: Analogy to tobacco smoke exposure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies in nonhuman primates indicate that one pathophysiologic consequence of ozone exposure is chronic bronchiolitis in terminal bronchioles. Modeling dosimetry suggests that a similar phenomenon is possible in humans. These findings may constitute an important analogy to the respiratory bronchiolitis that is associated with tobacco smoking in young adults. This analogy could form the basis for future research related to chronic respiratory health effects of ozone. The smoking data are reviewed and several research strategies are proposed that will be developed more fully in subsequent articles in this volume. 15 refs.

Bates, D.V. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Full-spectrum disease response : beyond just the flu.  

SciTech Connect

Why plan beyond the flu: (1) the installation may be the target of bioterrorism - National Laboratory, military base collocated in large population center; and (2) International Airport - transport of infectious agents to the area - Sandia is a global enterprise and staff visit many foreign countries. In addition to the Pandemic Plan, Sandia has developed a separate Disease Response Plan (DRP). The DRP addresses Category A, B pathogens and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The DRP contains the Cities Readiness Initiative sub-plan for disbursement of Strategic National Stockpile assets.

Knazovich, Michael Ward; Cox, Warren B.; Henderson, Samuel Arthur

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Magnesium-based Bioceramics in Orthopedic Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microstructural Characteristics of Nano Calcium Phosphates Doped with Fluoride and Titanium Ions · Microwave Assisted Synthesis of Nano Hydroxyapatite ...

36

International Scholarly Research Network ISRN Orthopedics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

towards bactericidal properties. The electrospun fibers were processed and tested in the presence of light necrosis have been extensively reported [10­14]. Recently, the efficacy of self-standing electrospun TiO2 cells upon brief activation by infrared radiation, was also demonstrated [15­17]. Others have

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

37

Advanced Materials in Dental and Orthopedic Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This symposium provides an opportunity for the medical and dental ... and the patient needs from medical and dental research community perspectives.

38

Four-dimensional radiotherapy planning for DMLC-based respiratory motion tracking  

SciTech Connect

Four-dimensional (4D) radiotherapy is the explicit inclusion of the temporal changes in anatomy during the imaging, planning, and delivery of radiotherapy. Temporal anatomic changes can occur for many reasons, though the focus of the current investigation is respiration motion for lung tumors. The aim of this study was to develop 4D radiotherapy treatment-planning methodology for DMLC-based respiratory motion tracking. A 4D computed tomography (CT) scan consisting of a series of eight 3D CT image sets acquired at different respiratory phases was used for treatment planning. Deformable image registration was performed to map each CT set from the peak-inhale respiration phase to the CT image sets corresponding to subsequent respiration phases. Deformable registration allows the contours defined on the peak-inhale CT to be automatically transferred to the other respiratory phase CT image sets. Treatment planning was simultaneously performed on each of the eight 3D image sets via automated scripts in which the MLC-defined beam aperture conforms to the PTV (which in this case equaled the GTV due to CT scan length limitations) plus a penumbral margin at each respiratory phase. The dose distribution from each respiratory phase CT image set was mapped back to the peak-inhale CT image set for analysis. The treatment intent of 4D planning is that the radiation beam defined by the DMLC tracks the respiration-induced target motion based on a feedback loop including the respiration signal to a real-time MLC controller. Deformation with respiration was observed for the lung tumor and normal tissues. This deformation was verified by examining the mapping of high contrast objects, such as the lungs and cord, between image sets. For the test case, dosimetric reductions for the cord, heart, and lungs were found for 4D planning compared with 3D planning. 4D radiotherapy planning for DMLC-based respiratory motion tracking is feasible and may offer tumor dose escalation and/or a reduction in treatment-related complications. However, 4D planning requires new planning tools, such as deformable registration and automated treatment planning on multiple CT image sets.

Keall, Paul J.; Joshi, Sarang; Vedam, S. Sastry; Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Kini, Vijaykumar R.; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

International Dose-Response Society and Lovelace Respiratory Research Insitue present a Webinar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute and Present a Webinar Radiation Hormesis and Life - Mild Radiation Stress Makes You Stronger May 25, 2010 at 12:00 p.m. (MST), 6:00 p.m. (GMT) Presenter: Bobby R. Scott, PhD, LRRI Senior Scientist 2425 Ridgecrest Drive SE, Albuquerque, NM 87108 USA E-mail: bscott@LRRI.org Register for the webinar using this e-mail address: registration@LRRI.org. Please provide your name, the number of attendees, and your organizational affiliation in the message. Registration is free, but the num- ber of attendees is limited, so please register as soon as possible. After registering, you will receive further instructions for logging onto the website. Questions may be sent

40

Flow cytometric analysis of respiratory tract cells exposed to oil shale and silica particulates. [Hamsters  

SciTech Connect

Flow cytometric techniques were used to measure the cytological and biochemical damage to respiratory tract cells in animals exposed to particulates. Hamsters were exposed to raw and spent oil shale particulates and silica by intratracheal instillation. Exfoliated lung cells were obtained by sacrificing the animals and lavaging the respiratory tract posterior to the trachea with saline. Cell samples were fixed in ethanol and stained with mithramycin for fluorescence analysis of DNA content. DNA content distributions from hamsters exposed to spent oil shale and silica particulates showed atypical changes 28 to 35 days later. Cell counts and total numbers of macrophages, leukocytes, and epithelial cells in the lavage fluid also showed marked changes related to time after exposure.

Steinkamp, J.A.; Wilson, J.S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Respiratory Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recommends 15% Adjustment for Non-Caucasians, Orientals, East Indians Pakistanis o ATS Recommends 12% Race Adjustment for African Americans o Weight Change has Dramatic...

42

Retention of aerosol particles in the human respiratory tract as a function of particle radius  

SciTech Connect

A water--glycerol aerosol of /sup 24/NaCl (approx. 500 mg/m/sup 3/) was inhaled by 7 volunteers to assess retention of monodispersed aerosols in human respiratory tract. Various particle sizes were tested; dispersion method was thought to be effective. Alveolar retention shows two peaks in the 0.3 to 1 ..mu..m range. Maximum alveolar retention is approx. 45%. Total retention decreased linearly with breathing rate, increased linearly with radius from 0.2 to 1.6 ..mu..m.

Wilson, I.B.; LaMer, V.K.

1948-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

A comparison between amplitude sorting and phase-angle sorting using external respiratory measurement for 4D CT  

SciTech Connect

Respiratory motion can cause significant dose delivery errors in conformal radiation therapy for thoracic and upper abdominal tumors. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) has been proposed to provide the image data necessary to model tumor motion and consequently reduce these errors. The purpose of this work was to compare 4D CT reconstruction methods using amplitude sorting and phase angle sorting. A 16-slice CT scanner was operated in cine mode to acquire 25 scans consecutively at each couch position through the thorax. The patient underwent synchronized external respiratory measurements. The scans were sorted into 12 phases based, respectively, on the amplitude and direction (inhalation or exhalation) or on the phase angle (0-360 deg.) of the external respiratory signal. With the assumption that lung motion is largely proportional to the measured respiratory amplitude, the variation in amplitude corresponds to the variation in motion for each phase. A smaller variation in amplitude would associate with an improved reconstructed image. Air content, defined as the amount of air within the lungs, bronchi, and trachea in a 16-slice CT segment and used by our group as a surrogate for internal motion, was correlated to the respiratory amplitude and phase angle throughout the lungs. For the 35 patients who underwent quiet breathing, images (similar to those used for treatment planning) and animations (used to display respiratory motion) generated using amplitude sorting displayed fewer reconstruction artifacts than those generated using phase angle sorting. The variations in respiratory amplitude were significantly smaller (P<0.001) with amplitude sorting than those with phase angle sorting. The subdivision of the breathing cycle into more (finer) phases improved the consistency in respiratory amplitude for amplitude sorting, but not for phase angle sorting. For 33 of the 35 patients, the air content showed significantly improved (P<0.001) correlation with the respiratory amplitude than with the phase angle, suggesting a stronger relationship between internal motion and amplitude. Overall, amplitude sorting performed better than phase angle sorting for 33 of the 35 patients and equally well for two patients who were immobilized with a stereotactic body frame and an abdominal compression plate.

Lu Wei; Parikh, Parag J.; Hubenschmidt, James P.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

The roles of CymA in support of the respiratory flexibility of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shewanella species are isolated from the oxic/anoxic regions of seawater and aquatic sediments where redox conditions fluctuate in time and space. Colonization of these environments is by virtue of flexible respiratory chains, many of which are notable for the ability to reduce extracellular substrates including the Fe(III) and Mn(IV) contained in oxide and phyllosilicate minerals. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 serves as a model organism to consider the biochemical basis of this flexibility. In the present paper, we summarize the various systems that serve to branch the respiratory chain of S. oneidensis MR-1 in order that electrons from quinol oxidation can be delivered the various terminal electron acceptors able to support aerobic and anaerobic growth. This serves to highlight several unanswered questions relating to the regulation of respiratory electron transport in Shewanella and the central role(s) of the tetrahaem-containing quinol dehydrogenase CymA in that process.

Marritt, Sophie; McMillan, Duncan G.; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Richardson, David J.; Jeuken, Lars J.; Butt, Julea N.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Dutch Elm Disease  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dutch Elm Disease Dutch Elm Disease Nature Bulletin No. 411-A March 20, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE DUTCH ELM DISEASE The American elm, far and away our most popular and important shade tree, is facing its most threatening enemy, the Dutch Elm Disease. A large part of them seem to be doomed unless up-to-date methods of control are used. In New England the appearance of whole towns has been changed by the loss of gigantic elms along entire streets. This same havoc is being repeated in most eastern states and, now, as far west as Missouri. The first diseased tree in Illinois was found downstate fifteen years ago. Since then, the infection has spread over most of the state, reaching the Chicago region in 1954.

46

Lyme Disease Lyme Borreliosis,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lyme disease is a tickborne illness that results from infection with members of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. These organisms are maintained in wild animals, but they can affect humans and some species of domesticated animals. Lyme disease was first recognized in the 1970s, when a cluster of juvenile arthritis cases was investigated in the U.S., but its symptoms can be found in European historical records as far back as the early 20th century. This disease has also been detected in Australia, parts of Asia, the province of Ontario, Canada, and recently, the Amazon region of Brazil. Lyme disease in people is readily cured with antibiotics during the initial stage of the illness, when an unusual rash often aids disease recognition. However, people whose infections remain untreated sometimes develop chronic arthritis, neurological signs and other syndromes. Lyme disease in domesticated animals is still poorly understood, and no distinctive rash seems to occur. The illness is best characterized in the dog, where arthritis and nephropathy appear to be the most common sequelae. Clinical signs attributed to Lyme disease have also been reported in other species including horses and cattle.

Lyme Arthritis; Erythema Migrans

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

DOE-STD-1167-2003; Respiratory Acceptance Program for Supplied-Air Suits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1167-2003 OCTOBER 2003 DOE STANDARD THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RESPIRATORY ACCEPTANCE PROGRAM FOR SUPPLIED-AIR SUITS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. ii DOE-STD-1167-2003 FOREWORD This non-mandatory Technical Standard provides the Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor

48

Autophagy sustains the replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory virus in host cells  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we confirmed the autophagy induced by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in permissive cells and investigated the role of autophagy in the replication of PRRSV. We first demonstrated that PRRSV infection significantly results in the increased double-membrane vesicles, the accumulation of LC3 fluorescence puncta, and the raised ratio of LC3-II/{beta}-actin, in MARC-145 cells. Then we discovered that induction of autophagy by rapamycin significantly enhances the viral titers of PRRSV, while inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA and silencing of LC3 gene by siRNA reduces the yield of PRRSV. The results showed functional autolysosomes can be formed after PRRSV infection and the autophagosome-lysosome-fusion inhibitor decreases the virus titers. We also examined the induction of autophagy by PRRSV infection in pulmonary alveolar macrophages. These findings indicate that autophagy induced by PRRSV infection plays a role in sustaining the replication of PRRSV in host cells.

Liu, Qinghao; Qin, Yixian; Zhou, Lei; Kou, Qiuwen; Guo, Xin; Ge, Xinna [Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemiology and Zoonosis of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine and State Key Laboratory of Agribiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China)] [Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemiology and Zoonosis of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine and State Key Laboratory of Agribiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China); Yang, Hanchun, E-mail: yanghanchun1@cau.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemiology and Zoonosis of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine and State Key Laboratory of Agribiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China)] [Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemiology and Zoonosis of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine and State Key Laboratory of Agribiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China); Hu, Hongbo, E-mail: hongbo@cau.edu.cn [College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China)] [College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Four-dimensional image-based treatment planning: Target volume segmentation and dose calculation in the presence of respiratory motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe approaches to four-dimensional (4D) treatment planning, including acquisition of 4D-CT scans, target delineation of spatio-temporal image data sets, 4D dose calculations, and their analysis. Methods and Materials: The study included patients with thoracic and hepatocellular tumors. Specialized tools were developed to facilitate visualization, segmentation, and analysis of 4D-CT data: maximum intensity volume to define the extent of lung tumor motion, a 4D browser to examine and dynamically assess the 4D data sets, dose calculations, including respiratory motion, and deformable registration to combine the dose distributions at different points. Results: Four-dimensional CT was used to visualize and quantitatively assess respiratory target motion. The gross target volume contours derived from light breathing scans showed significant differences compared with those extracted from 4D-CT. Evaluation of deformable registration using difference images of original and deformed anatomic maps suggested the algorithm is functionally useful. Thus, calculation of effective dose distributions, including respiratory motion, was implemented. Conclusion: Tools and methods to use 4D-CT data for treatment planning in the presence of respiratory motion have been developed and applied to several case studies. The process of 4D-CT-based treatment planning has been implemented, and technical barriers for its routine use have been identified.

Rietzel, Eike [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States) and Abteilung Biophysik, Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: eike@rietzel.net; Chen, George T.Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Choi, Noah C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Willet, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Possible involvement of AMP-activated protein kinase in obesity resistance induced by respiratory uncoupling in white fat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Possible involvement of AMP-activated protein kinase in obesity resistance induced by respiratory case by downregulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor c (PPARc; [23]). The role of AMPK Department of Biologically Active Compounds, Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech

Miksik, Ivan

51

Ticks and Human Diseases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

species: principally the Rocky Mountain Wood Tick in the west, and the American Dog Tick here and in eastern states. Tularemia, or rabbit fever, is a disease which is...

52

Dogs and Human Diseases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diseases Name: Doris Status: Other Grade: 9-12 Location: OK Date: NA Question: Can a dog contact the shingles or chicken pox virus from a human? Replies: Hi Doris, Great...

53

Dynamic volume vs respiratory correlated 4DCT for motion assessment in radiation therapy simulation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Conventional (i.e., respiratory-correlated) 4DCT exploits the repetitive nature of breathing to provide an estimate of motion; however, it has limitations due to binning artifacts and irregular breathing in actual patient breathing patterns. The aim of this work was to evaluate the accuracy and image quality of a dynamic volume, CT approach (4D{sub vol}) using a 320-slice CT scanner to minimize these limitations, wherein entire image volumes are acquired dynamically without couch movement. This will be compared to the conventional respiratory-correlated 4DCT approach (RCCT). Methods: 4D{sub vol} CT was performed and characterized on an in-house, programmable respiratory motion phantom containing multiple geometric and morphological ''tumor'' objects over a range of regular and irregular patient breathing traces obtained from 3D fluoroscopy and compared to RCCT. The accuracy of volumetric capture and breathing displacement were evaluated and compared with the ground truth values and with the results reported using RCCT. A motion model was investigated to validate the number of motion samples needed to obtain accurate motion probability density functions (PDF). The impact of 4D image quality on this accuracy was then investigated. Dose measurements using volumetric and conventional scan techniques were also performed and compared. Results: Both conventional and dynamic volume 4DCT methods were capable of estimating the programmed displacement of sinusoidal motion, but patient breathing is known to not be regular, and obvious differences were seen for realistic, irregular motion. The mean RCCT amplitude error averaged at 4 mm (max. 7.8 mm) whereas the 4D{sub vol} CT error stayed below 0.5 mm. Similarly, the average absolute volume error was lower with 4D{sub vol} CT. Under irregular breathing, the 4D{sub vol} CT method provides a close description of the motion PDF (cross-correlation 0.99) and is able to track each object, whereas the RCCT method results in a significantly different PDF from the ground truth, especially for smaller tumors (cross-correlation ranging between 0.04 and 0.69). For the protocols studied, the dose measurements were higher in the 4D{sub vol} CT method (40%), but it was shown that significant mAs reductions can be achieved by a factor of 4-5 while maintaining image quality and accuracy. Conclusions: 4D{sub vol} CT using a scanner with a large cone-angle is a promising alternative for improving the accuracy with which respiration-induced motion can be characterized, particularly for patients with irregular breathing motion. This approach also generates 4DCT image data with a reduced total scan time compared to a RCCT scan, without the need for image binning or external respiration signals within the 16 cm scan length. Scan dose can be made comparable to RCCT by optimization of the scan parameters. In addition, it provides the possibility of measuring breathing motion for more than one breathing cycle to assess stability and obtain a more accurate motion PDF, which is currently not feasible with the conventional RCCT approach.

Coolens, Catherine; Bracken, John; Driscoll, Brandon; Hope, Andrew; Jaffray, David [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3S2 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3S2 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3S2 (Canada) and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Dynamic gating window for compensation of baseline shift in respiratory-gated radiation therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To analyze and evaluate the necessity and use of dynamic gating techniques for compensation of baseline shift during respiratory-gated radiation therapy of lung tumors. Methods: Motion tracking data from 30 lung tumors over 592 treatment fractions were analyzed for baseline shift. The finite state model (FSM) was used to identify the end-of-exhale (EOE) breathing phase throughout each treatment fraction. Using duty cycle as an evaluation metric, several methods of end-of-exhale dynamic gating were compared: An a posteriori ideal gating window, a predictive trend-line-based gating window, and a predictive weighted point-based gating window. These methods were evaluated for each of several gating window types: Superior/inferior (SI) gating, anterior/posterior beam, lateral beam, and 3D gating. Results: In the absence of dynamic gating techniques, SI gating gave a 39.6% duty cycle. The ideal SI gating window yielded a 41.5% duty cycle. The weight-based method of dynamic SI gating yielded a duty cycle of 36.2%. The trend-line-based method yielded a duty cycle of 34.0%. Conclusions: Dynamic gating was not broadly beneficial due to a breakdown of the FSM's ability to identify the EOE phase. When the EOE phase was well defined, dynamic gating showed an improvement over static-window gating.

Pepin, Eric W.; Wu Huanmei; Shirato, Hiroki [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Purdue School of Engineering Technology, IUPUI, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States); Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo, 060-8638 (Japan)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Implications of Respiratory Motion as Measured by Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography for Radiation Treatment Planning of Esophageal Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the respiratory motion of primary esophageal cancers and pathologic celiac-region lymph nodes using time-resolved four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT). Methods and Materials: Respiration-synchronized 4D CT scans were obtained to quantify the motion of primary tumors located in the proximal, mid-, or distal thoracic esophagus, as well as any involved celiac-region lymph nodes. Respiratory motion was measured in the superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and left-right (LR) directions and was analyzed for correlation with anatomic location. Recommended margin expansions were determined for both primary and nodal targets. Results: Thirty patients underwent 4D CT scans at Massachusetts General Hospital for planned curative treatment of esophageal cancer. Measurements of respiratory tumor motion were obtained for 1 proximal, 4 mid-, and 25 distal esophageal tumors, as well as 12 involved celiac-region lymph nodes. The mean (SD) peak-to-peak displacements of all primary tumors in the SI, AP, and LR dimensions were 0.80 (0.45) cm, 0.28 (0.20) cm, and 0.22 (0.23) cm, respectively. Distal tumors were found to have significantly greater SI and AP motion than proximal or mid-esophageal tumors. The mean (SD) SI, AP, and LR peak-to-peak displacements of the celiac-region lymph nodes were 0.92 (0.56) cm, 0.46 (0.27) cm, and 0.19 (0.26) cm, respectively. Conclusions: Margins of 1.5 cm SI, 0.75 cm AP, and 0.75 cm LR would account for respiratory tumor motion of >95% of esophageal primary tumors in the dataset. All celiac-region lymph nodes would be adequately covered with SI, AP, and LR margins of 2.25 cm, 1.0 cm, and 0.75 cm, respectively.

Patel, Abhijit A.; Wolfgang, John A.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Hong, Theodore S.; Yock, Torunn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Choi, Noah C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: nchoi@partners.org

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Maximum-Intensity Volumes for Fast Contouring of Lung Tumors Including Respiratory Motion in 4DCT Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum-intensity volumes (MIV) for fast contouring of lung tumors including respiratory motion. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) data of 10 patients were acquired. Maximum-intensity volumes were constructed by assigning the maximum Hounsfield unit in all CT volumes per geometric voxel to a new, synthetic volume. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on all CT volumes, and their union was constructed. The GTV with all its respiratory motion was contoured on the MIV as well. Union GTVs and GTVs including motion were compared visually. Furthermore, planning target volumes (PTVs) were constructed for the union of GTVs and the GTV on MIV. These PTVs were compared by centroid position, volume, geometric extent, and surface distance. Results: Visual comparison of GTVs demonstrated failure of the MIV technique for 5 of 10 patients. For adequate GTV{sub MIV}s, differences between PTVs were <1.0 mm in centroid position, 5% in volume, {+-}5 mm in geometric extent, and {+-}0.5 {+-} 2.0 mm in surface distance. These values represent the uncertainties for successful MIV contouring. Conclusion: Maximum-intensity volumes are a good first estimate for target volume definition including respiratory motion. However, it seems mandatory to validate each individual MIV by overlaying it on a movie loop displaying the 4DCT data and editing it for possible inadequate coverage of GTVs on additional 4DCT motion states.

Rietzel, Eike [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Abteilung Biophysik, Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)], E-mail: eike@rietzel.net; Liu, Arthur K.; Chen, George T.Y.; Choi, Noah C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Web Sites about Infectious Disease Web Sites about Infectious Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Web Sites about Infectious Disease Web Sites about Infectious Disease Stanford Center for Tuberculosis Research-Site Links http://molepi.stanford.edu/tblinks.html Virology on the World Wide Web http://www.idsociety.org/ file:///C|/Program%20Files/Adobe/Adobe%20Dreamweav...nks/Web%20Sites%20about%20Infectious%20Disease

de Lijser, Peter

58

Air pollutant monitoring for the East Bay Children's Respiratory Health Study  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the methodology and presents the summary results of the air pollutant monitoring program conducted by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in support of the East Bay Children's Respiratory Health Study. The full study is examining the effects of chronic exposure to traffic-related pollutants on respiratory health among 3rd and 4th grade children attending ten neighborhood elementary schools in the San Francisco East Bay Area (Hayward, San Leandro and Oakland, CA). The demographically similar schools are located at varying distances from the I-880 and CA-92 freeways. Several schools were selected because they are located within 300 m in the predominant downwind direction (east) from either of the freeways. Measurements of multiple pollutants were made outdoors at the schools over 1-2 week intervals for 14 weeks in spring and eight weeks in fall 2001 using a custom-designed and validated package of commercially available monitoring equipment. Particulate matter was sampled over all hours (24 h per day) or during schools hours only with battery-operated programmable pumps and inlet devices for PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5}. These pumps were modified to allow for up to 10 days of continuous operation. Fine particle mass and black carbon (BC) were determined from the collected filters. Nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} and NO{sub 2}) were measured with passive samplers. Carbon monoxide (CO) was measured continuously with an electrochemical sensor. Gasoline-related volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured with passive samplers during three 4-week intervals in spring 2001 and two 4-week periods in early 2002. All samplers were deployed in a metal cabinet located outside at each school. Ranges of study average pollutant concentrations (all-hours) at the ten individual schools were: NO{sub x}, 33-68 ppb; NO{sub 2}, 19-31 ppb; PM{sub 10} mass, 27-32 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; PM{sub 2.5} mass, 12-15 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; and BC associated with PM{sub 2.5}, 0.6-1.0 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. Although statistical analysis of the data is yet to be performed, some general observations can be made. Absolute pollutant levels varied by season and week, but the simultaneous sampling design allowed for comparisons of concentrations among schools during each interval. Pollutant concentrations at each school were normalized to the sampling period averages among all schools. The normalized concentrations were generally consistent at each school throughout the entire study, suggesting that measured differences represent ongoing conditions and chronic exposures in the vicinities of the schools. Substantially elevated concentrations of NO{sub x}, NO{sub 2}, and BC, and somewhat elevated concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} were observed at one school located less than 100 meters to the east of I-880. Normalized concentrations of NO{sub x}, NO{sub 2}, and BC were also higher at the three other ''nearby and downwind'' schools relative to those located far from any freeway or other major traffic source. An ancillary monitoring program was implemented to examine the correlation between school-based pollutant measurements and measurements throughout the neighborhoods adjacent to three of the schools. Volunteer households were obtained from among the families of participating schoolchildren. Concentrations of NO{sub x} and NO{sub 2} were measured with passive samplers outside the homes of these volunteers during one of two 1-week periods in spring 2002. Simultaneous measurements were conducted at all ten of the schools and a central monitoring station during each week. The neighborhoods surrounding two schools were predominantly upwind of the I-880 freeway, while the neighborhood surrounding the other school was downwind from I-880. The overall distribution of concentrations observed for the residences near the downwind school appeared to be substantially higher than the regional background concentrations. The variability observed within the neighborhoods appeared to be, at least in part, explained by the proximity of individual residences to the freeway or

Singer, Brett C.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Hodgson, Alfred T.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Genetics of motor neuron disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The number of genes associated with motor neuron degen- eration has increased ... Motor neurons are affected in a large number of neurologic diseases

60

Differentiating Lyme Disease from Syphilis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of the humoral response to the flagellin protein of Borrelia burgdorferi: cloning of regions capable of differentiating Lyme disease from syphilis.

J M Robinson; T J Pilot-matias; S D Pratt; C B Patel; T S Bevirt; J C Hunt; J. Clin Microbiol; Terry S. Bevirt; J. C. Hunt

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Functional Description of CymA, an Electron Transfer Hub Supporting Anaerobic Respiratory Flexibility in Shewanella  

SciTech Connect

CymA is a member of the NapC/NirT family of quinol dehydrogenases. Essential for the anaerobic respiratory flexibility of shewanellae, CymA transfers electrons from menaquinol to various dedicated systems for the reduction of terminal electron acceptors including fumarate and insoluble minerals of Fe(III). Spectroscopic characterization of CymA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 identifies three low-spin His/His coordinated c-hemes and a single high-spin c-heme with His/H{sub 2}O coordination lying adjacent to the quinol binding site. At pH 7, binding of the menaquinol analogue, 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide, does not alter the mid-point potentials of the high-spin (ca. {approx}240 mV) and low-spin (ca. {approx}110, {approx}190 and {approx}265 mV) hemes that appear biased to transfer electrons from the high- to low-spin centres following quinol oxidation. CymA is reduced with menadiol (E{sub m} = {approx} 80 mV) in the presence of NADH (E{sub m} = {approx} 320 mV) and an NADH:menadione oxidoreductase, but not by menadiol alone. In cytoplasmic membranes reduction of CymA may then require the thermodynamic driving force from NADH, formate or H{sub 2} oxidation as the redox poise of the menaquinol pool in isolation is insufficient. Spectroscopic studies suggest that CymA requires a nonheme cofactor for quinol oxidation and that the reduced enzyme forms a 1:1 complex with its redox partner Fcc{sub 3}. The implications for CymA supporting the respiratory flexibility of shewanellae are discussed.

Marritt, Sophie; Lowe, Thomas G.; Bye, Jordan; McMillan, Duncan G.; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Richardson, David J.; Cheesman, Myles R.; Jeuken, Lars J.; Butt, Julea N.

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Choline, Phospholipids, Health, and Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proceedings of the 7th International Congress on Phospholipids. Choline, Phospholipids, Health, and Disease Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food food

63

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats will cover the effect of different dietary fats on the development of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancers, inflammation, and immune functions. ...

64

Real-Time Target Position Estimation Using Stereoscopic Kilovoltage/Megavoltage Imaging and External Respiratory Monitoring for Dynamic Multileaf Collimator Tracking  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To develop a real-time target position estimation method using stereoscopic kilovoltage (kV)/megavoltage (MV) imaging and external respiratory monitoring, and to investigate the performance of a dynamic multileaf collimator tracking system using this method. Methods and Materials: The real-time three-dimensional internal target position estimation was established by creating a time-varying correlation model that connected the external respiratory signals with the internal target motion measured intermittently using kV/MV imaging. The method was integrated into a dynamic multileaf collimator tracking system. Tracking experiments were performed for 10 thoracic/abdominal traces. A three-dimensional motion platform carrying a gold marker and a separate one-dimensional motion platform were used to reproduce the target and external respiratory motion, respectively. The target positions were detected by kV (1 Hz) and MV (5.2 Hz) imaging, and external respiratory motion was captured by an optical system (30 Hz). The beam-target alignment error was quantified as the positional difference between the target and circular beam center on the MV images acquired during tracking. The correlation model error was quantified by comparing a model estimate and measured target positions. Results: The root-mean-square errors in the beam-target alignment that had ranged from 3.1 to 7.6 mm without tracking were reduced to <1.5 mm with tracking, except during the model building period (6 s). The root-mean-square error in the correlation model was submillimeters in all directions. Conclusion: A novel real-time target position estimation method was developed and integrated into a dynamic multileaf collimator tracking system and demonstrated an average submillimeter geometric accuracy after initializing the internal/external correlation model. The method used hardware tools available on linear accelerators and therefore shows promise for clinical implementation.

Cho, Byungchul, E-mail: bcho@amc.seoul.k [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Poulsen, Per Rugaard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan; Keall, Paul J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Neurological Findings of Lyme Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neurologic involvement of Lyme disease typically consists of meningitis, cranial neuropathy, and radiculoneuritis, alone or in combination, lasting for months. From 1976 to 1983, we studied 38 patients with Lyme meningitis. Headache and mild neck stiffness, which fluctuated in intensity, and lymphocytic pleocytosis were the common findings. Half of the patients also had facial palsies, which were unilateral in 12 and bilateral in seven. In addition, 12 patients had motor and/or sensory radiculoneuropathies; asymmetric weakness of extremities was the most common finding. Although incomplete presentations of neurologic involvement of Lyme disease may be confused with other entities, the typical constellation of neurologic symptoms represents a unique clinical picture. Three major types of lesions comprise the neurological manifestations of Lyme disease: meningitis, cranial neuropathy, and radiculoneuritis [1]. These three may occur alone or in combination (Fig. 1). In this report, we describe thirty-eight patients who had meningitis sometimes accompanied by cranial neuropathy and/or peripheral radiculoneuropathy, as reported in depth elsewhere [2]. We believe that this constellation of symptoms is unique among neurological diseases.

Andrew R. Pachner; Allen C. Steere

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Chronic disease management: a business intelligence perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chronic disease management is one of the main areas in healthcare that Health Knowledge Management (HKM) can provide beneficial outcomes. Information Communication Technology (ICT) enabled Chronic disease management network (cdmNet) delivers comprehensive ... Keywords: business intelligence, chronic disease management, data mining

Leelani Kumari Wickramasinghe, Damminda Alahakoon, Michael Georgeff, Peter Schattner, Daswin De Silva, Oshadi Alahakoon, Akuh Adaji, Kay Jones, Am Leon Piterman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Coronary Heart Disease, Hypertension, Stroke, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coronary Heart Disease, Hypertension, Stroke, and Diabetes #12;Coronary Heart Disease: Overview by atherosclerosis ­ Narrowing of coronary arteries, the vessels that supply the heart · Disease process: coronary and arms Myocardial infarction - heart attack, ischemia - local blood supply decreased resulting in cell

Meagher, Mary

68

Investigations of Altered Aquatic Ecosystems: Biomonitoring, Disease, and Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

removal of lizards on Lyme disease risk. Proceedings of thereservoirs intervenes in the Lyme disease cycle. Proceedings

Lunde, Kevin Bryce

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Cellular Immune Findings in Lyme Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From 1981 through 1983, we did the first testing of cellular immunity in Lyme disease. Active established Lyme disease was often associated with lymphopenia, less spontaneous suppressor cell activity than normal, and a heightened response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin and Lyme spirochetal antigens. Thus, a major feature of the immune response during active disease seems to be a lessening of suppression, but it is not yet known whether this response plays a role in the pathophysiology of the disease. Lyme disease, a tick-borne spirochetosis [1], is associated with characteristic immune findings. Elevated serum IgM levels in patients with active erythema chronicum migrans (ECM) predict subsequent nervous system, heart, or joint involvement, and serial determinations of IgM are generally the best laboratory indicator of disease activity [2]. In addition, patients with nervous system or joint abnormalities have an increased frequency of the B-cell alloantigen, DR2 [3]. During the last three summers, from 1981 through 1983, we performed the first tests of cellular immunity in Lyme disease. We report here that active Lyme disease is often associated with lymphopenia, less spontaneous suppressor cell activity than normal,

Leonard H. Sigal; Craig M. Moffat; Allen C. Steere; John; M. Dwyer, Ph.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Nanoscale influences on bioactivity : ultrastructure and nanomechanics of model bioactive hydroxyapatite based biomaterials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a significant need for improved synthetic materials as orthopedic implants to replace human bone lost and damaged due to disease or injury. Certain ceramics, such as hydroxyapatite (HA), have the special property ...

Vandiver, Jennifer M. (Jennifer McKeehan)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Cat-scratch disease simulating lyphoma  

SciTech Connect

Cat-scratch disease is the most common cause of benign lymphadenopathy in children and young adults. Rare cases of systemic involvement with deep adenopathy with or without hepatic and/or splenic involvement have been reported. We present an unusual case of cat-scratch disease with imaging findings indistinguishable from lymphoma. Cat-scratch disease should be considered as a possible benign etiology for adenopathy with hepatic or splenic nodules in a young patient, especially if the involved nodes are tender. 5 refs., 1 fig.

Wong, T.Z.; Kruskal, J.; Kane, R.A.; Trey, G. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

REVEALING HEREDITARY DISEASES p.6 SLU GOES GLOBAL p.21  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the transmission of infectious disease to humans, particularly vectorborne diseases such as malaria and Lyme that suggest increasing rates of Borrelia burgdorferi tick infection, the pathogen associated with Lyme disease disease: effects of host diversity and community composition on Lyme disease risk. Proceedings

73

Visualizing Brain Metals in Health and Disease  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visualizing Brain Metals in Health and Visualizing Brain Metals in Health and Disease figure 1 Fig. 1. Rapid-scanning x-ray fluorescence mapping ex perimental setup. Synchrotron x-rays at 11 keV passed through a 50 µm aperture (Ap). The beam intensity was monitored with a N2-filled ion chamber (I0). The brain slice was mounted vertically on a motorized stage (St) at 45° to the incident x-ray beam and raster scanned in the beam. A 13-element Ge detector (Ge) was positioned at a 90° angle to the beam. We all require iron, copper and zinc for normal brain function but metal metabolism becomes dysregulated in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Metals accumulate in Alzheimer's dementia and Parkinson's disease and are deficient in Menkes disease. Whether excess metals appear as a cause or a

74

Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation for Preventing Infectious Disease  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation for Preventing Infectious Disease Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation for Preventing Infectious Disease Transmission Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: February 19, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 The transmission of tuberculosis (TB) and other infectious diseases in health-care buildings has been a recognized hazard for decades. Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) of upper room air is used as an engineering control method to prevent the spread of airborne infectious disease. Under full-scale conditions, the efficacy of UVGI for inactivating airborne bacterial spores and active cells was evaluated. A test room fitted with a modern UVGI system was used to conduct bio-aerosol inactivation experiments. UVGI efficacy can be affected by environmental factors such as relative humidity (RH), and air mixing

75

Metabolic Prosthesis for Treating Ischemic Diseases  

ORNL researchers have developed a new approach for treating ischemic diseases that will deliver oxygen directly to affected tissues by electrolysis of body fluids. Numerous treatments currently exist or have been proposed for treating ischemic ...

76

The Mediterranean Diet: A Protective Effect on Coronary Heart Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Death and Coronary Heart Disease. Cambridge, Mass:the epidemiology of coronary heart disease. JAMA. 1957;164:and long-term coronary heart disease mortality in different

Paravar, Tara

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Behavioral impulsivity and hallucinations : insights from Parkinson's disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related degenerative disease of the brain, characterized by motor, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms. Neurologists and neuroscientists now understand that several symptoms of the disease, ...

Ashourian, Paymon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Women and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Facts on Women and Heart Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States. In 2006, 315,930 women died from it. 1 ? Heart disease killed 26 % of the women who died in 2006—more than one in every four. 1 Although heart disease is sometimes thought of as a "man's disease, " around the same number of women and men die each year of heart disease in the United States. Unfortunately, 36 % of women did not perceive themselves to be at risk for heart disease in a 2005 survey. 2 Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women of most racial/ethnic groups in the United States, including African Americans, American Indians or Alaska Natives, Hispanics, and whites. For Asian American women, heart disease is second only to cancer. 3 In 2006, about 6.9 % of all white women, 8.8 % of black women, and 6.6 % of Mexican American women were living with coronary heart disease. 4

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Chronic Beryllium Disease Awareness Card and Web Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chronic Beryllium Disease Awareness Card and Web Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Awareness The U.S Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) has...

80

Plague Histeria: A Historical Perspective Of The Neurological Component Of Infectious Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Jennifer A. Nields. 1994. “Lyme disease: a neuropsy-of neurolog- ical disease. Lyme disease is a very common

Arnell, Monica

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Global climate change and infectious diseases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of global climate change on infectious diseases are hypothetical until more is known about the degree of change in temperature and humidity that will occur. Diseases most likely to increase in their distribution and severity have three-factor (agent, vector, and human being) and four-factor (plus vertebrate reservoir host) ecology. Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes may move northward and have more rapid metamorphosis with global warming. These mosquitoes transmit dengue virus, and Aedes aegypti transmits yellow fever virus. The faster metamorphosis and a shorter extrinsic incubation of dengue and yellow fever viruses could lead to epidemics in North America. Vibrio cholera is harbored persistently in the estuaries of the U.S. Gulf Coast. Over the past 200 years, cholera has become pandemic seven times with spread from Asia to Europe, Africa, and North America. Global warming may lead to changes in water ecology that could enhance similar spread of cholera in North America. Some other infectious diseases such as LaCrosse encephalitis and Lyme disease are caused by agents closely dependent on the integrity of their environment. These diseases may become less prominent with global warming because of anticipated modification of their habitats. Ecological studies will help as to understand more fully the possible consequences of global warming. New and more effective methods for control of vectors will be needed. 12 refs., 1 tab.

Shope, R. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Binding of the Respiratory Chain Inhibitor Antimycin to theMitochondrial bc1 Complex: A New Crystal Structure Reveals an AlteredIntramolecular Hydrogen-Bonding Pattern  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex.Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28Angstrom resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alpha-A helix.

Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

83

Microdistribution and Long-Term Retention of 239Pu (NO3)4 in the Respiratory Tracts of an Acutely Exposed Plutonium Worker and Experimental Beagle Dogs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-term retention of inhaled soluble forms of plutonium raises concerns as to the potential health effects in persons working in nuclear energy or the nuclear weapons program. The distributions of long-term retained inhaled plutonium-nitrate [239Pu (NO3)4] deposited in the lungs of an accidentally exposed nuclear worker (Human Case 0269) and in the lungs of experimentally exposed beagle dogs with varying initial lung depositions were determined via autoradiographs of selected histological lung, lymph node, trachea, and nasal turbinate tissue sections. These studies showed that both the human and dogs had a non-uniform distribution of plutonium throughout the lung tissue. Fibrotic scar tissue effectively encapsulated a portion of the plutonium and prevented its clearance from the body or translocation to other tissues and diminished dose to organ parenchyma. Alpha radiation activity from deposited plutonium in Human Case 0269 was observed primarily along the sub-pleural regions while no alpha activity was seen in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of this individual. However, relatively high activity levels in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of the beagles indicated the lymphatic system was effective in clearing deposited plutonium from the lung tissues. In both the human case and beagle dogs, the appearance of retained plutonium within the respiratory tract was inconsistent with current biokinetic models of clearance for soluble forms of plutonium. Bound plutonium can have a marked effect on the dose to the lungs and subsequent radiation exposure has the potential increase in cancer risk.

Nielsen, Christopher E.; Wilson, Dulaney A.; Brooks, Antone L.; McCord, Stacey; Dagle, Gerald E.; James, Anthony C.; Tolmachev, Sergei Y.; Thrall, Brian D.; Morgan, William F.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Neural networks for longitudinal studies in Alzheimer's disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: Alzheimer's disease affects a growing population of elderly people today. The predictions about the course of the disease is a key component of health care decision making for patients with Alzheimer's. The physician's prognosis and predicted ... Keywords: Disease course, Longitudinal, Misclassification, Mixed effects, Neurodegenerative diseases, Prognosis, Random effects

Reeti Tandon; Sudeshna Adak; Jeffrey A. Kaye

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

A Computational Model of Mitigating Disease Spread in Spatial Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the problem of disease spreading and containment in spatial networks, where the computational model is capable of detecting disease progression to initiate processes mitigating infection spreads. This paper focuses on disease spread ... Keywords: Computational Epidemiology, Computer Viruses, Disease Progression, Forest Fires, Spatial Networks

Taehyong Kim; Kang Li; Aidong Zhang; Surajit Sen; Murali Ramanathan

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Review Lyme disease and current aspects of immunization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lyme disease is a tick-borne multisystem disease that affects primarily the skin, nervous system, heart and joints. At least three species of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, namely Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia garinii, and Borrelia afzelii, can cause the disease. This review will focus mainly on the pathophysiology of Lyme arthritis, the long-term outcome of Lyme disease, and the recently licensed vaccine against Lyme disease.

Thomas Kamradt

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Chemicals for Plant Disease Control at Home  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication helps retailers and consumers identify products that control plant diseases. To clear up confusion about the names of the chemicals, the publication cross-references their common names with their chemical terms. It also lists the products commonly available in Texas retail stores and the companies that sell fungicides in small packages for homeowners.

Ong, Kevin

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

Gallium-positive Lyme disease myocarditis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the course of a work-up for fever of unknown origin associated with intermittent arrhythmias, a gallium scan was performed which revealed diffuse myocardial uptake. The diagnosis of Lyme disease myocarditis subsequently was confirmed by serologic titers. One month following recovery from the acute illness, the abnormal myocardial uptake completely resolved.

Alpert, L.I.; Welch, P.; Fisher, N.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Lyme disease in an experimental mouse model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research was directed at developing a murine model for the investigation of Lyme disease. This study sought to define the route of inoculation necessary to establish infection or disease in susceptible C3H/HeJ mice and also, to determine the virulence of four Borrelia burgdorferi isolates. Further, the influence of MHC Class I and Class 11 genes of the mouse H-2 complex on the susceptibility and/or resistance to Lyme disease was studied. This thesis demonstrates the development of multisysternic infection in the mouse model, namely, dermatological, cardiac, and arthritic lesions in C3HJHeJ mouse. It also demonstrates the involvement of Class I genes (K and D regions) and Class 11 genes (I-A and I-E regions) of the mouse H-2 complex on the quantitative antibody titers. This was achieved by using genetically stable B IO congenic and recombinant strains. The data presented in this thesis strongly supports use of C3HJHeJ and BIO congenic and recombinant strains as potential laboratory animal models for Lyme disease research.

Reddy, Sunitha

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Treatment of Anthrax Disease Frequently Asked Questions  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a summary of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on the treatment of anthrax disease caused by a wide-area release of Bacillus anthracis spores as an act bioterrorism. These FAQs are intended to provide the public health and medical community, as well as others, with guidance and communications to support the response and long-term recovery from an anthrax event.

Judd, Kathleen S.; Young, Joan E.; Lesperance, Ann M.; Malone, John D.

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

91

Isotoxic Dose Escalation in the Treatment of Lung Cancer by Means of Heterogeneous Dose Distributions in the Presence of Respiratory Motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To test, in the presence of intrafractional respiration movement, a margin recipe valid for a homogeneous and conformal dose distribution and to test whether the use of smaller margins combined with heterogeneous dose distributions allows an isotoxic dose escalation when respiratory motion is considered. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer patients underwent four-dimensional computed tomography scanning. The gross tumor volume and clinical target volume (CTV) were outlined in the mid-ventilation phase. The CTV-to-planning target volume (PTV) margin was calculated by use of a standard margin recipe and the patient-specific respiration pattern. Standard three-dimensional treatment plans were generated and recalculated on the remaining respiration phases. The planning was repeated for a CTV-to-PTV margin decreased by 2.5 and 5 mm relative to the initial margin in all directions. Time-averaged dose-volume histograms (four-dimensional dose-volume histograms) were calculated to evaluate the CTV-to-PTV margin. Finally, the dose was escalated in the plans with decreased PTV such that the mean lung dose (predictor of radiation-induced pneumonitis) was equal to mean lung dose in the plan by use of the initially calculated margin. Results: A reduction of the standard margin by 2.5 mm compared with the recipe resulted in too low of a minimum dose for some patients. A combination of dose escalation and use of heterogeneous dose distribution was able to increase the minimum dose to the target by approximately 10% and 20% for a CTV-to-PTV margin reduction of 2.5 mm and 5.0 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The margin recipe is valid for intrafractional respiration-induced tumor motions. It is possible to increase the dose to the target without increased mean lung dose with an inhomogeneous dose distribution.

Baker, Mariwan; Nielsen, Morten [Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Hansen, Olfred [Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Jahn, Jonas Westberg [Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Korreman, Stine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Brink, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.brink@ouh.regionsyddanmark.dk [Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Textile-Based Sensor Development for the Continuous Monitoring of Proper Orthopedic Cast Fit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ran 107 milliamps at 0.5 volts for 5 minutes. This ensureda failure when stressed to 6 volts and 1.1amps. This isby the circuit is 2.9 volts DC. The first choice based

Umsted, Carson Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Textile-Based Sensor Development for the Continuous Monitoring of Proper Orthopedic Cast Fit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constructing a platform out of plywood and two by two inchLength Pipe N/A 3’x4’x0.5” Plywood Sheet N/A 2”x2”x8’ Pine

Umsted, Carson Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

SmartCast - Novel Textile Sensors for Embedded Pressure Sensing of Orthopedic Casts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

e.g. polyester w/ woven carbon fibers or Velostat Layer 4.of polyester with woven carbon fibers, and Layer 5 has beenthan polyester with carbon fibers. Conductive thread was

Danilovic, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Textile-Based Sensor Development for the Continuous Monitoring of Proper Orthopedic Cast Fit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be a fair amount of the battery capacity. A thought was toidentical in each case. Battery Capacity Consumed Per Wake,sd_off,'k') ylabel('Battery Capacity Consumed Per Wake,

Umsted, Carson Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Women and Heart Disease: Neglected Directions for Future Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

009-9110-0 Women and Heart Disease: Neglected Directions forage 65, women have less heart disease than men. For many1980s showed a lower risk of heart attacks in postmenopausal

Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Characterization of a Drosophila model of Huntington's disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurological disorder caused by a polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat expansion in the huntingtin (Htt) protein. The disease is characterized by neurodegeneration and formation ...

Lee, Wyan-Ching Mimi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation book has four main focuses and sections. Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats divis

99

Infectious Disease Modeling of Social Contagion in Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many behavioral phenomena have been found to spread interpersonally through social networks, in a manner similar to infectious diseases. An important difference between social contagion and traditional infectious diseases, ...

Hill, Alison Lynn

100

Increase in Diarrheal Disease Associated with Arsenic Mitigation in Bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Kosek M, Bern C, Guerrant RL (2003) The global burden of diarrhoeal disease, as estimated from studies

van Geen, Alexander

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Review: A review of advanced techniques for detecting plant diseases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diseases in plants cause major production and economic losses in agricultural industry worldwide. Monitoring of health and detection of diseases in plants and trees is critical for sustainable agriculture. To the best of our knowledge, there is no sensor ... Keywords: GC-MS, Imaging techniques, Plant diseases, Spectroscopy, Volatile profiling

Sindhuja Sankaran; Ashish Mishra; Reza Ehsani; Cristina Davis

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Enzymes of respiratory iron oxidation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes experimental progress in characterizing and identifying redox proteins in a number of iron-oxidizing bacteria. Sections of the paper are entitled (1) In Situ electrolysis was explored to achieve enhanced yields of iron-oxidizing bacteria, (2)Structure/function studies were performed on redox-active biomolecules from Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, (3) Novel redox-active biomolecules were demonstrated in other iron autotrophs, and (4) New probes of metalloprotein electron-transfer reactions were synthesized and characterized.

Blake, R. II.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Cluster analysis of genome-wide expression differences in disease-unaffected ileal mucosa in inflammatory bowel diseases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whole human genome (Agilent) expression profiling was conducted on disease-unaffected ileal RNA collected from the proximal margin of resected ileum from 47 ileal Crohn's disease (CD), 27 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 25 control patients without inflammatory ...

Tianyi Zhang; Robert A. DeSimone; Hongyan Chen; Christina M. Hamm; Jeffrey Yuan; Qing Qing Gong; Steven R. Hunt; Themistocles Dassopoulos; Rodney D. Newberry; Daniel N. Frank; Charles E. Robertson; Norman R. Pace; Erica Sodergren; George Weinstock; Xiangmin Jiao; Wei Zhu; Ellen Li

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 7 Dietary Fatty Acids in Cardiovascular Disease in Women  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 7 Dietary Fatty Acids in Cardiovascular Disease in Women Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

105

Analysis of Dose Response for Circulatory Disease After Radiotherapy for Benign Disease  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the shape of the dose-response for various circulatory disease endpoints, and modifiers by age and time since exposure. Methods and Materials: This was an analysis of the US peptic ulcer data testing for heterogeneity of radiogenic risk by circulatory disease endpoint (ischemic heart, cerebrovascular, other circulatory disease). Results: There were significant excess risks for all circulatory disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.082 (95% CI 0.031-0.140), and ischemic heart disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.102 (95% CI 0.039-0.174) (both p = 0.01), and indications of excess risk for stroke. There were no statistically significant (p > 0.2) differences between risks by endpoint, and few indications of curvature in the dose-response. There were significant (p < 0.001) modifications of relative risk by time since exposure, the magnitude of which did not vary between endpoints (p > 0.2). Risk modifications were similar if analysis was restricted to patients receiving radiation, although the relative risks were slightly larger and the risk of stroke failed to be significant. The slopes of the dose-response were generally consistent with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in occupationally and medically exposed groups. Conclusions: There were excess risks for a variety of circulatory diseases in this dataset, with significant modification of risk by time since exposure. The consistency of the dose-response slopes with those observed in radiotherapeutically treated groups at much higher dose, as well as in lower dose-exposed cohorts such as the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and nuclear workers, implies that there may be little sparing effect of fractionation of dose or low-dose-rate exposure.

Little, Mark P., E-mail: mark.little@nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Kleinerman, Ruth A. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mabuchi, Kiyohiko [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Smoking and Ischemic Heart Disease Disparities Between Studies, Genders, Times, and Socioeconomic Strata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

predictors of coronary heart disease among women. Americanon the risk for coronary heart disease even stronger thanx Smoking and Ischemic Heart Disease Disparities Between

Leistikow, Bruce N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Impact of Palivizumab on RSV Hospitalizations for Children with Hemodynamically Significant Congenital Heart Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in infants with congenital heart disease. Pediatrics 114:children with congenital heart disease. The Cardiac StudySigni?cant Congenital Heart Disease Ruey-Kang R. Chang •

Chang, Ruey-Kang R.; Chen, Alex Y.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Vessel Sanitation Program is proud to bring to you the following  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pneumophila · Bacteria growing in cooling tower were introduced in the hotel HVAC system NEJM, 297:1189-1197 #12;Mechanisms of Legionella Transmission Showers Humidifiers Cooling towers Respiratory therapy

109

Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) meets the requirements and management practices of federal regulation 10 CFR 850, 'Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP).' This revision of the LLNL CBDPP incorporates clarification and editorial changes based on lessons learned from employee discussions, observations and reviews of Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and commercial industry beryllium (Be) safety programs. The information is used to strengthen beryllium safety practices at LLNL, particularly in the areas of: (1) Management of small parts and components; and (2) Communication of program status to employees. Future changes to LLNL beryllium activities and on-going operating experience will be incorporated into the program as described in Section S, 'Performance Feedback.'

Lee, S

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

110

Gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of gallium 67 scintigraphy in glomerular disease, 45 patients with various glomerulopathies, excluding lupus nephritis and renal vasculitis, were studied. Persistent renal visualization 48 hours after the gallium injection, a positive scintigram, was graded as + (less than), ++ (equal to), and +++ (greater than) the hepatic uptake. Positive scintigrams were seen in ten of 16 cases of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, six of 11 cases of proliferative glomerulonephritis, and one case of minimal change, and one of two cases of membranous nephropathy; also in three of six cases of sickle glomerulopathy, two cases of diabetic neuropathy, one of two cases of amyloidosis, and one case of mild chronic allograft rejection. The 25 patients with positive scans were younger than the 20 with negative scans (31 +/- 12 v 42 +/- 17 years; P less than 0.01), and exhibited greater proteinuria (8.19 +/- 7.96 v 2.9 +/- 2.3 S/d; P less than 0.01) and lower serum creatinine values (2 +/- 2 v 4.1 +/- 2.8 mg/dL; P less than 0.01). The amount of proteinuria correlated directly with the intensity grade of the gallium image (P less than 0.02), but there was no correlation between the biopsy diagnosis and the outcome of the gallium scan. It was concluded that gallium scintigraphy is not useful in the differential diagnosis of the glomerular diseases under discussion. Younger patients with good renal function and heavy proteinuria are likely to have a positive renal scintigram regardless of the underlying glomerulopathy.

Bakir, A.A.; Lopez-Majano, V.; Levy, P.S.; Rhee, H.L.; Dunea, G.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

What Connects Rat Tails to Cancer and Heart Disease?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What Connects Rat Tails to Cancer and Heart Disease? Collagen is the main (and most abundant) protein in all mammalian connective tissues, including those of the heart, lungs,...

112

Optimization Methods for Disease Prevention and Epidemic Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 29, 2013 ... Abstract: This paper investigates problems of disease prevention and epidemic control (DPEC), in which we optimize two sets of decisions: (i) ...

113

The political economy of health: death, disease and distribution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Death and disease exact a heavy toll on citizens in democracies. In response, citizens expect elected politicians to alleviate their suffering by providing public health… (more)

Meserve, Stephen A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Genomics of emerging infectious disease: A PLoS collection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Origins and evolutionary genomics of the 2009 swine-originan Infectious Diseases Genomics Project predict and preventRavel J (2009) The role of genomics in the identification,

Eisen, Jonathan A; MacCallum, Catriona J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

High-Resolution Serum Proteomic Profiling of Alzheimer Disease Samples Reveals Disease- Specific, Carrier-Protein–Bound Mass Signatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Researchers typically search for disease markers using a “targeted ” approach in which a hypothesis about the disease mechanism is tested and experimental results either confirm or disprove the involvement of a particular gene or protein in the disease. Recently, there has been interest in developing disease diagnostics based on unbiased quantification of differences in global patterns of protein and peptide masses, typically in blood from individuals with and without disease. We combined a suite of methods and technologies, including novel sample preparation based on carrier-protein capture and biomarker enrichment, highresolution mass spectrometry, a unique cohort of wellcharacterized persons with and without Alzheimer disease (AD), and powerful bioinformatic analysis, that add statistical and procedural robustness to biomarker discovery from blood. Methods: Carrier-protein–bound peptides were isolated from serum samples by affinity chromatography, and peptide mass spectra were acquired by a matrixassisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) orthogo-

Mary F. Lopez; Alvydas Mikulskis; Scott Kuzdzal; David A. Bennett; Jeremiah Kelly; Eva Golenko; Joseph Dicesare; Eric Denoyer; Wayne F. Patton; Richard Ediger; Tillmann Ziegert; Christopher Lynch; Susan Kramer; Gordon R. Whiteley; Michael R. Wall; David P. Mannion; John S. Rakitan; Gershon M. Wolfe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

A hybrid tele-diagnosis system on fish disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fish disease diagnosis is a complicated process and requires high level of expertise, an expert system for fish disease diagnosis is considered as an effective tool to help fish farmers. However, many farmers have no computers and are not able to access ... Keywords: call centre, expert system, group decision support system, machine learning

Daoliang Li; Wei Zhu; Zetian Fu

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Computational intelligence techniques: a study of scleroderma skin disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of microarray gene expression data from patients with and without scleroderma skin disease using computational intelligence and visual data mining techniques. Virtual reality spaces are used for providing unsupervised ... Keywords: Scleroderma disease, clustering, differential evolution, genetic programming, genomics, grid computing, hybrid evolutionary-classical optimization, particle swarm optimization, rough sets, similarity structure preservation, virtual reality spaces, visual data mining

Julio J. Valdes; Alan J. Barton

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

DISEASE SUPPRESSION WITH COMPOST: HISTORY, PRINCIPLES AND FUTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composts have been used for centuries to maintain soil fertility and plant health. Even so, the mechanisms by which diseases are controlled by composts are just now being elucidated. This paper reviews the recent history on control of plant diseases with composts. Furthermore, the present state of knowledge in this field is reviewed. Finally, potential future opportunities for

Harry A. J. Hoitink; Professor Emeritus; Ligia Zuniga De Ramos; Senior Fullbright

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Computer aided diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease using component based SVM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder first affecting memory functions and then gradually affecting all cognitive functions with behavioural impairments and eventually causing death. Functional brain imaging as ... Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Computer aided diagnosis, Single photon emission computed tomography, Support vector machines

I. A. Illán; J. M. Górriz; M. M. López; J. Ramírez; D. Salas-Gonzalez; F. Segovia; R. Chaves; C. G. Puntonet

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Do changes in traditional coronary heart disease risk factors over time explain the association between socio-economic status and coronary heart disease?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

case-control study. Heart 2009, Franks P, Tancredi DJ,status in coronary heart disease risk estimation. Ann Famstatus and coronary heart disease risk prediction. JAMA

Franks, Peter; Winters, Paul C; Tancredi, Daniel J; Fiscella, Kevin A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Proteins' Amazing Origami Powers: Insight for Potential Disease Treatments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proteins' Amazing Origami Powers: Insight for Potential Disease Proteins' Amazing Origami Powers: Insight for Potential Disease Treatments Proteins' Amazing Origami Powers: Insight for Potential Disease Treatments October 4, 2011 - 12:46pm Addthis This is a visualization of drug molecules ("parade day-like balloons") in a simulated attack of the ribbon-like protein fibrils that are believed to be the cause of Alzheimer’s disease. Click here to see more amazing supercomputer simulations. | Image courtesy of ORNL. This is a visualization of drug molecules ("parade day-like balloons") in a simulated attack of the ribbon-like protein fibrils that are believed to be the cause of Alzheimer's disease. Click here to see more amazing

122

Status Report, Department of Energy's Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Status Report, Department of Energy's Chronic Beryllium Disease Status Report, Department of Energy's Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program - February 2006 Status Report, Department of Energy's Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program - February 2006 February 2006 Report on Implementation of 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program During calendar year 2005, the Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance, evaluated the effectiveness of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chronic beryllium disease protection programs (CBDPPs) at five sites as part of regularly scheduled inspections. These reviews focused on site programs for ensuring that workers are protected in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 850. This report summarizes the observations, insights, and lessons learned from

123

Status Report, Department of Energy's Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Status Report, Department of Energy's Chronic Beryllium Disease Status Report, Department of Energy's Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program - February 2006 Status Report, Department of Energy's Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program - February 2006 February 2006 Report on Implementation of 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program During calendar year 2005, the Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance, evaluated the effectiveness of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chronic beryllium disease protection programs (CBDPPs) at five sites as part of regularly scheduled inspections. These reviews focused on site programs for ensuring that workers are protected in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 850. This report summarizes the observations, insights, and lessons learned from

124

Development and Characterization of A Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed candidate multiplexed assays that may potentially be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the ability to improve our nation's capability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect food and agricultural resources with a diagnostic test which could enhance the nation's capabilities for early detection of a foreign animal disease. In FY2005 with funding from the DHS, LLNL developed the first version (Version 1.0) of a multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based RT-PCR assay that included signatures for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases (FADs) of swine, Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease Virus (SVDV), and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus [BPSV], Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). In FY06, LLNL has developed Bovine and Porcine species-specific panel which included existing signatures from Version 1.0 panel as well as new signatures. The MUX RT-PCR porcine assay for detection of FMDV includes the FADs, VESV and SVD in addition to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). LLNL has also developed a MUX RT-PCR bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine FADs malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitus virus (BHV-1), bluetongue virus (BTV), and the Parapox viruses (which are of two bovine types) bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) and psuedocowpox (PCP). A timeline for this development is presented in Table 1. The development of the Version 1.0 panel for FMDV rule-out and the most current efforts aimed to designed species specific panels has spanned over 2 1/2 years with multiple collaborative partnerships. This document provides a summary of the development, testing and performance data at OIE Stage 1 Feasibility into Stage 2 Assay Development and Standardization1 (see Table 2), gathered as of June 30th, 2007 for the porcine and bovine MUX assay panels. We present an overview of the identification and selection of candidate genetic signatures, the assay development process, and preliminary performance data for each of the individual signatures as characterized in the multiplexed format for the porcine and bovine panels. The Stage 1 Feasibility data of the multiplexed panels is presented in this report also includes relevant data acquired from the Version 1.0 panel as supporting information where appropriate. In contrast to last years effort, the development of the bovine and porcine panels is pending additional work to complete analytical characterization of FMDV, VESV, SVD, RPV and MCF. The signature screening process and final panel composition impacts this effort. The unique challenge presented this year was having strict predecessor limitations in completing characterization, where efforts at LLNL must precede efforts at PIADC, such challenges were alleviated in the 2006 reporting by having characterization data from the interlaboratory comparison and at Plum Island under AgDDAP project. We will present an addendum at a later date with additional data on the characterization of the porcine and bovine multiplex assays when that data is available. As a summary report, this document does not provide the details of signature generation, evaluation, and testing, nor does it provide spec

Smith, S M; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Vitalis, B; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

125

Development and Characterization of a Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out Supplemental Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed advanced rapid diagnostics that may be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the potential to improve our nation's ability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect animal populations of high economic importance in the United States. Under 2005 DHS funding we have developed multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based PCR assays that combine foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease (SVD) and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1 or Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitus IBR), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus BPSV, Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). Under 2006 funding we have developed a Multiplexed PCR [MUX] porcine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for VESV and SVD foreign animal diseases in addition to one other domestic vesicular animal disease vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and one domestic animal disease of swine porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). We have also developed a MUX bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine foreign animal diseases malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitus virus (BHV-1), bluetongue virus (BTV), and the Parapox viruses which are of two bovine types bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) and psuedocowpox (PCP). This document provides details of signature generation, evaluation, and testing, as well as the specific methods and materials used. A condensed summary of the development, testing and performance of the multiplexed assay panel was presented in a 126 page separate document, entitled 'Development and Characterization of A Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out'. This supplemental document provides additional details of large amount of data collected for signature generation, evaluation, and testing, as well as the specific methods and materials used for all steps in the assay development and utilization processes. In contrast to last years effort, the development of the bovine and porcine panels is pending additional work to complete analytical characterization of FMDV, VESV, VSV, SVD, RPV and MCF. The signature screening process and final panel composition impacts this effort. The unique challenge presented this year was having strict predecessor limitations in completing characterization, where efforts at LLNL must preceed efforts at PIADC, such challenges were alleviated in the 2006 reporting by having characterization data from the interlaboratory comparison and at Plum Island under AgDDAP project. We will present an addendum at a later date with additional data on the characterization of the porcine and bovine multiplex assays when that data is available.

Smith, S; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

126

Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms Counting small RNA in disease-causing organisms Los Alamos researchers demonstrated improved technical methods capable of directly counting small RNA molecules in pathogenic (disease-causing) bacteria. June 17, 2013 Artist's concept of the fluorescence labeling and detection of small RNA in pathogenic bacteria. Artist's concept of the fluorescence labeling and detection of small RNA in pathogenic bacteria. The new technique reduced the number of false positives, which improved the accuracy of the count statistics, and it significantly reduced the image processing time. Small molecules of RNA (tens to hundreds of nucleotides in length) play a key regulatory role in bacteria. Due to their small size, directly

127

Retinal Diseases: Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Retinitis Pigmentosa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retinal Diseases: Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Retinitis Pigmentosa Retinal Diseases: Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Retinitis Pigmentosa Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is an eye disease primarily affecting the central vision regions in people age 60 and older. According to the Macular Degeneration Research Fund, a case of AMD is diagnosed in the United States every 3 minutes. Each year, 1.2 million of the estimated 12 million people with AMD will suffer severe vision loss. Patients with AMD have dark areas in their vision caused by fluid leakage or bleeding in the macula, the center of the retina that produces the sharpest vision. The brain initially compensates for these dark patches. Early cellular dysfunction or spotting in the macula may go undetected until the disease is in advanced stages.

128

Medicating race : heart disease and durable preoccupations with difference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation is an examination of intersections of race, pharmaceuticals, and heart disease over the course of the 20th century and today. Each of these parts has had a dynamic history, and when they are invoked ...

Pollock, Anne, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Indoor CO2 and Communicable Disease Transmission in Offices and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor CO2 and Communicable Disease Transmission in Offices and Non-Industrial Environments Speaker(s): Don Milton Date: October 16, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host...

130

Threshold Relative Humidity Duration Forecasts for Plant Disease Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Duration of high relative humidity periods is an important component of many plant disease development models. Performance of forecasts of this quantity, based on the model output statistics 3-h temperature and dewpoint forecasts produced by the ...

Daniel S. Wilks; Karin W. Shen

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Simulating Lyme disease using parallel discrete event simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lyme Disease affects many people in the northeastern United States. One of the most important mech anisms that sustains the epidemic is the interaction between white-footed mice (Peromyscus leuco pus) and deer ticks (Ixodes scapularis). When mice move ...

Ewa Deelman; Boleslaw K. Szymanski; Thomas Caraco

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Accelerating Spatially Explicit Simulations of Spread of Lyme Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The factors influencing spread of Lyme disease are often studied using computer-based simulations and spatially explicit models. However, simulating large and complex models is a time consuming task, even when parallel simulation techniques are employed. ...

Dhananjai M. Rao; Philip A. Wilsey

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Classification and Localisation of Diabetic-Related Eye Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Retinal exudates are a characteristic feature of many retinal diseases such as Diabetic Retinopathy. We address the development of a method to quantitatively diagnose these random yellow patches in colour retinal images automatically. After a colour ...

Alireza Osareh; Majid Mirmehdi; Barry T. Thomas; Richard Markham

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

6 DISEASE-PRONE CROWS Study of inbred crows has  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the determinants of transmission of diseases to humans, non- human animals, or plants; the spread of pathogens processing methods such as molding, forging, casting, welding, hydroforming, composite layup, and other

Keinan, Alon

135

Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

136

Rheumatic Heart Disease and Beta-hemolytic Streptococci in Salvador, Brazil: A Study of Slum Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Africa. S Afrthe chain that links the heart to the throat? Lancet Infectchildren with rheumatic heart disease. J Thorac Cardiovasc

Tartof, Sara Yee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease - model intercomparison  

SciTech Connect

Foot-and-mouth disease is a highly infectious vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals caused by foot-and-mouth disease virus. It spreads by direct contact between animals, by animal products (milk, meat and semen), by mechanical transfer on people or fomites and by the airborne route - with the relative importance of each mechanism depending on the particular outbreak characteristics. Over the years a number of workers have developed or adapted atmospheric dispersion models to assess the risk of foot-and-mouth disease virus spread through the air. Six of these models were compared at a workshop hosted by the Institute for Animal Health/Met Office during 2008. A number of key issues emerged from the workshop and subsequent modelling work: (1) in general all of the models predicted similar directions for 'at risk' livestock with much of the remaining differences strongly related to differences in the meteorological data used; (2) determination of an accurate sequence of events is highly important, especially if the meteorological conditions vary substantially during the virus emission period; and (3) differences in assumptions made about virus release, environmental fate, and subsequent infection can substantially modify the size and location of the downwind risk area. Close relationships have now been established between participants, which in the event of an outbreak of disease could be readily activated to supply advice or modelling support.

Gloster, J; Jones, A; Redington, A; Burgin, L; Sorensen, J H; Turner, R; Dillon, M; Hullinger, P; Simpson, M; Astrup, P; Garner, G; Stewart, P; D'Amours, R; Sellers, R; Paton, D

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

138

Title 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wednesday Wednesday December 8, 1999 Part III Department of Energy 10 CFR Part 850 Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program; Final Rule VerDate 29-OCT-99 10:58 Dec 07, 1999 Jkt 190000 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\A08DE0.189 pfrm04 PsN: 08DER3 68854 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 235 / Wednesday, December 8, 1999 / Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 850 [Docket No. EH-RM-98-BRYLM] RIN 1901-AA75 Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program AGENCY: Office of Environment, Safety and Health, Department of Energy. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) is today publishing a final rule to establish a chronic beryllium disease prevention program (CBDPP) to reduce the number of workers currently exposed to beryllium in the course of their work at DOE facilities managed by

139

Bush Administration to Expand Beryllium Disease Screening Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bush Administration to Expand Beryllium Disease Screening Program Bush Administration to Expand Beryllium Disease Screening Program Bush Administration to Expand Beryllium Disease Screening Program February 23, 2005 - 10:27am Addthis Former employees of DOE vendors eligible for free screening WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced the Department of Energy (DOE) will expand a beryllium screening program to include former employees of now-defunct DOE beryllium vendor companies across the country. Beryllium is a component used in nuclear weapons built by the Department of Energy. "Through no fault of their own, these Cold Warriors were left out in the cold when their former employers went out of business. By expanding this screening program, President Bush and the Department of Energy honor these

140

Investigation of saliva of patients with periodontal disease using NAA  

SciTech Connect

In this study the non-stimulated whole saliva of 26 healthy subjects (mean age 33.9 {+-} 11.0 years, range: 26 to 49 years) and 11 patients with periodontal disease (mean age 41.7 {+-} 11.5 years; range 29 to 55 years) was investigated using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique. The samples were obtained from donors at Sao Paulo city (Brazil). The analyses were performed in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 (3.5-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN/CNEN-SP (Brazil). Considerable changes in Ca and S saliva's level were identified in patients with periodontal disease suggesting they can be used as monitors of periodontal diseases.

Zamboni, C. B.; Metairon, S.; Medeiros, I. M. M. A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN - CNEN/SP Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242- 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lewgoy, H. R. [Universidade Anhanguera Bandeirante, UNIBAN R. Maria Candida, 1813, Bloco G / 6o andar - 02071-013 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

LLNL Chronic Beryllium Disease Protection Program Effectiveness Review, March 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LLNL-2011-03-25 LLNL-2011-03-25 Site: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Effectiveness Review Dates of Activity : 03/14/2011 - 03/25/2011 Report Preparer: Marvin Mielke Activity Description/Purpose: The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Livermore Site Office (LSO) chartered a team to conduct an effectiveness review of the issues identified with the LLNL Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP). The team included members and observers from LLNL, LSO, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and the

142

LLNL Chronic Beryllium Disease Protection Program Effectiveness Review, March 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LLNL-2011-03-25 LLNL-2011-03-25 Site: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Effectiveness Review Dates of Activity : 03/14/2011 - 03/25/2011 Report Preparer: Marvin Mielke Activity Description/Purpose: The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Livermore Site Office (LSO) chartered a team to conduct an effectiveness review of the issues identified with the LLNL Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP). The team included members and observers from LLNL, LSO, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and the

143

Detecting disease genes based on semi-supervised learning and protein-protein interaction networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: Predicting or prioritizing the human genes that cause disease, or ''disease genes'', is one of the emerging tasks in biomedicine informatics. Research on network-based approach to this problem is carried out upon the key assumption of ''the ... Keywords: Disease gene neighbours, Disease-causing gene prediction, Multiple data resources integration, Protein-protein interaction network, Semi-supervised learning

Thanh-Phuong Nguyen; Tu-Bao Ho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Development of a smart e-health portal for chronic disease management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In developed countries, chronic disease now accounts for more than 75% of health care expenditure and nearly an equivalent percentage of disease related deaths. In response to these changes in disease demographics and the economic imperatives caused ... Keywords: chronic disease, decision support, e-health portal

Maryam Haddad; Girija Chetty

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 15 Perinatal Supplementation of Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids as a Strategy to Prevent Adult Diseases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 15 Perinatal Supplementation of Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids as a Strategy to Prevent Adult Diseases Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Pr

146

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 5 Fatty Acids in Corn Oil: Role in Heart Disease Prevention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 5 Fatty Acids in Corn Oil: Role in Heart Disease Prevention Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

147

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 22 Fatty Acids in Immunomodulation: Role in Disease Prevention and Causation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 22 Fatty Acids in Immunomodulation: Role in Disease Prevention and Causation Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press D

148

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 2 Nutrition and Cardiovascular Disease in American Indians and Alaska Natives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 2 Nutrition and Cardiovascular Disease in American Indians and Alaska Natives Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

149

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 8 Free Fatty Acids: Role in Insulin Resistance, Type 2 Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 8 Free Fatty Acids: Role in Insulin Resistance, Type 2 Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

150

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 18 Fatty Acids in Membrane Lipids: Role in Disease Causation and Prevention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 18 Fatty Acids in Membrane Lipids: Role in Disease Causation and Prevention Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Do

151

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 13 Trans and Other Fatty Acids: Role in Diabetic Disease and Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 13 Trans and Other Fatty Acids: Role in Diabetic Disease and Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadab

152

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 9 Gender Differences in Gene Expression Due to Fatty Acids: Role in Atherosclerosis and Cardiovascular Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 9 Gender Differences in Gene Expression Due to Fatty Acids: Role in Atherosclerosis and Cardiovascular Disease Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Bio

153

Comparing disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression in Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression in Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus William Liu 1 , Benjamin Haley 1 , Mary J. Kwasny 2 , Tatjana Paunesku 1 , Gayle Woloschak 1 1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 2. Department of Preventative Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 From 1969 to 1992, the Janus program at Argonne National Laboratory performed a large series of radiobiology experiments, examining the effects of varying doses of neutron and gamma radiation on two disparate species of mice, Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus. Much of this data has since been digitized and made freely accessible online. This study aims to revisit

154

Managing Complexity: Disease Control as a Complex Adaptive System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trends in computer and communications technologies are enabling increased globalization and integration of enterprises, and corresponding increases of enterprise complexity.ï¾ ï¾ This article addresses management of this complexity using a complex adaptive ... Keywords: complex adaptive systems, disease control, strategic management, complexity, system models

William B. Rouse

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Virus Specificity in Disease Systems: Are Species Redundant?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

studies have stressed the prevalence of viruses in natural plant populations (e.g., Power and Remold 1996 the growth, survivorship, and reproduction of nondomesticated plants (Friess and Maillet 1996, 1997; FunayamaChapter 17 m Virus Specificity in Disease Systems: Are Species Redundant? Alison G. Power

Flecker, Alex

156

452 Plant Disease / Vol. 82 No. 5 A. R. Biggs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

452 Plant Disease / Vol. 82 No. 5 A. R. Biggs West Virginia University, Kearneysville G. G. Grove with information sharing in plant pathology extension via the World Wide Web; (ii) provide background on hardware of current and future web-based technologies that potentially influence extension plant pathology. West

Biggs, Alan R.

157

Ensemble transcript interaction networks: A case study on Alzheimer's disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systems biology techniques are a topic of recent interest within the neurological field. Computational intelligence (CI) addresses this holistic perspective by means of consensus or ensemble techniques ultimately capable of uncovering new and relevant ... Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Bayesian network classifiers, High-throughput data, Interaction networks

RubéN ArmañAnzas; Pedro LarrañAga; Concha Bielza

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Evaluation of various dietary supplements and strategies to enhance growth and disease management of hybrid striped bass Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The US hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis) industry has been negatively impacted by infectious diseases because there are very few approved drugs and vaccines. Therefore, a series of experiments was conducted to explore the potential use of various dietary supplements including autolyzed brewers yeast, the commercial prebiotic GroBiotic®, oligonucleotides and levamisole for improvement of hybrid striped bass growth, immunity and resistance to disease caused by various pathogenic bacteria. In two trials with brewers yeast, fish fed diets supplemented with yeast at 2% generally showed enhanced weight gain and feed efficiency compared with those fed a basal diet. Brewers yeast also positively influenced resistance to S. iniae infection. In addition, results of immune response assays demonstrated that brewers yeast can be administered for relatively long periods without causing immunosuppression. GroBiotic® (Grobiotic) also resulted in significantly enhanced weight gain, innate immune responses and resistance of juvenile hybrid striped bass to S. iniae infection. An additional experiment with sub-adult fish showed significantly reduced mortality of fish fed a diet supplemented with GroBiotic® at 2% when subjected to an in-situ Mycobacterium marinum challenge. This is the first report of positive effects from dietary prebiotics for fish health management, although many fundamental questions should be pursued further. Dietary supplementation of a commercial oligonucleotide product (Ascogen P®) at 0.5% of the diet was shown to enhance resistance of hybrid striped bass against S. iniae infection and increased their neutrophil oxidative radical production. However, the effect on growth was marginal. Dietary levamisole supplementation at a low level (100 mg/kg) enhanced the growth and feed efficiency of juvenile hybrid striped bass. However, an elevated dosage (1000 mg/kg diet) strongly suppressed growth, feed intake and feed efficiency. Hypothesized beneficial influences, including antibody production and resistance to S. iniae and A. hydrophila were not substantiated. Although dietary levamisole increased fish macrophage respiratory burst, an in vitro study failed to show a direct effect on cultured macrophages. This suite of studies demonstrated the potential use of some dietary supplements to enhance hybrid striped bass production. Thus, immunonutrition represents a valuable strategy to apply in aquaculture.

Li, Peng

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

A 3-D Link between Antibiotic Resistance and Brain Disease  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A 3-D Link between Antibiotic Resistance and Brain Disease A 3-D Link between Antibiotic Resistance and Brain Disease The story of what makes certain types of bacteria resistant to a specific antibiotic has a sub-plot that gives insight into the cause of a rare form of brain degeneration among children, according to investigators at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. The story takes a twist as key differences among the structures of its main molecular characters disappear and reappear as they are assembled in the cell. The story is based on a study of the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of an enzyme called pantothenate kinase, which triggers the first step in the production coenzyme A (CoA), a molecule that is indispensable to all forms of life. Enzymes are proteins that speed up biochemical reactions. CoA plays a pivotal role in the cells' ability to extract energy from fatty

160

Women and Heart Disease: Neglected Directions for Future Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Before age 65, women have less heart disease than men. For many years, estrogen was the most popular explanation for this female advantage, and observational studies through the 1980s showed a lower risk of heart attacks in postmenopausal women taking “replacement” estrogen. But the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), the first placebo-controlled trials of hormone therapy with the size and statistical power necessary to study clinical cardiovascular outcomes, did not confirm the hormone-healthy heart hypothesis. Now, at least 5 years later, the most unexpected WHI result may be how resilient the estrogen hypothesis has been. Where, beyond estrogen therapy, should we go from here to explain the striking sex differences in heart disease rates? A broader spectrum of research about the female cardiovascular advantage and its translation is needed.

Elizabeth Barrett-connor

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Perspectives Editorial Guest Editorial Emerging Diseases Threaten Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

suddenly, sending shockwaves throughout public health systems and economies worldwide. By July 2003, 8,439 cases had been reported worldwide, with 812 deaths; the economic impacts were estimated to be $50–$100 billion (U.S.) (Newcomb 2003). Although public attention was focused on this explosive pandemic, more than 30 such diseases new to medicine have emerged since 1976 [World Health Organization (WHO) 1996]. Historically, waves of infections have often accompanied periods of social and environmental transition (Epstein 1992). Such upsurges include influenza in the aftermath of World War I and the plague during the Middle Ages. Tuberculosis, smallpox, and cholera appeared in concert among the teeming urban centers of Charles Dickens’s 19thcentury England. In the past three decades, previously unknown diseases have surfaced at a pace without precedent in the annals of medicine. Indeed, such a

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

ALS: a disease of motor neurons and their nonneuronal neighbors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a late-onset progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons. The etiology of most ALS cases remains unknown, but 2 % of instances are due to mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Since sporadic and familial ALS affects the same neurons with similar pathology, it is hoped that therapies effective in mutant SOD1 models will translate to sporadic ALS. Mutant SOD1 induces non-cell-autonomous motor neuron killing by an unknown gain of toxicity. Selective vulnerability of motor neurons likely arises from a combination of several mechanisms, including protein misfolding, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage, defective axonal transport, excitotoxicity, insufficient growth factor signaling, and inflammation. Damage within motor neurons is enhanced by damage incurred by nonneuronal neighboring cells, via an inflammatory response that accelerates disease progression. These findings validate therapeutic approaches aimed at nonneuronal cells.

Séverine Boillée; Christine V; E Velde; Don W. Clevel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Commentary Meningococcal disease: identifying high-risk cases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the previous issue of Critical Care, Vermont and colleagues presented a simple but well-executed observational study describing the levels of chemokines in the serum of 58 children with meningococcal sepsis. The chemokine levels correlated with disease severity and outcome. Significant correlations were demonstrated between admission chemokine levels and the Paediatric Risk of Mortality score, the Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy score, the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score and laboratory parameters of disease severity. Additionally, nonsurvivors had much higher levels of chemokines compared with survivors, and the chemokine levels predicted mortality with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. The findings are important as they indicate a possible mechanism for risk stratification in future trials of novel therapies in human sepsis, which as yet have not

David Inwald; Mark Peters

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Analysis of Heart Diseases Dataset using Neural Network Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the important techniques of Data mining is Classification. Many real world problems in various fields such as business, science, industry and medicine can be solved by using classification approach. Neural Networks have emerged as an important tool for classification. The advantages of Neural Networks helps for efficient classification of given data. In this study a Heart diseases dataset is analyzed using Neural Network approach. To increase the efficiency of the classification process parallel approach is also adopted in the training phase.

Rani, K Usha

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Travel and migration associated infectious diseases morbidity in Europe, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infect 2009, 11:1177-1185. 19. NaTHNaC Clinical Update: Tropical Cyclone Nargis in Myanmar - advice for relief workers and other travellers to affected areas. 2008 [http:// www.nathnac.org/pro/clinical_updates/cyclonemyanmar_070508.htm], (Accessed January... ://www.eurotravnet.eu, a network of clinical specialists in tropical and travel medicine was founded in 2008, to assist the European Centre for Dis- ease Prevention & Control (ECDC) for the detection, verification, assessment and communication of commu- nicable diseases...

Field, Vanessa; Gautret, Philippe; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Burchard, Gerd-Dieter; Caumes, Eric; Jensenius, Mogens; Castelli, Francesco; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Weld, Leisa; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio; de Vries, Peter; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Loutan, Louis; Parola, Philippe; Network, the EuroTravNet

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

166

Towards landscape design guidelines for reducing Lyme disease risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background Incidence of Lyme disease in the US continues to grow. Low-density development is also increasing in endemic regions, raising questions about the relationship between development pattern and disease. This study sought to model Lyme disease incidence rate using quantitative, practical metrics of regional landscape pattern. The objective was to progress towards the development of design guidelines that may help minimize known threats to human and environmental health. Methods Ecological analysis was used to accommodate the integral landscape variables under study. Case data derived from passive surveillance reports across 12 counties in the US state of Maryland during 1996–2000; 2137 cases were spatially referenced to residential addresses. Major roads were used to delineate 514 landscape analysis units from 0.002 to 580 km 2. Results The parameter that explained the most variation in incidence rate was the percentage of land-cover edge represented by the adjacency of forest and herbaceous cover [R 2 5 0.75; rate ratio 5 1.34 (1.26–1.43); P, 0.0001]. Also highly significant was the percentage of the landscape in forest cover (cumulative R 2 5 0.82), which exhibited a quadratic relationship with incidence rate. Modelled relationships applied throughout the range of landscape sizes. Conclusions Results begin to provide quantitative landscape design parameters for reducing casual peridomestic contact with tick and host habitat. The final model suggests that clustered forest and herbaceous cover, as opposed to high forest-herbaceous interspersion, would minimize Lyme disease risk in low-density residential areas. Higher-density development that precludes a large percentage of forestherbaceous edge would also limit exposure.

Laura E Jackson; Elizabeth D Hilborn; James C Thomas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Lyme Disease in New Jersey, 1978-1982  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occurred in a four-township area in central Monmouth County. The proportion of cases with arthritis decreased in 1982 because of early antibiotic treatment and better reporting of milder cases. The proportion of cases with positive serology increased with severity of the clinical syndrome. About 25 percent of patients had exposure to ticks because of occupations that required outdoor activities. Lyme disease is a growing public health problem in New Jersey.

G. Stephen Bowen; Terry L. Schulze, Ph.D.; William; L. Parkin; Dr. P. H

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Mapping local hippocampal changes in Alzheimer's disease and normal ageing with MRI at 3 Tesla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mapping local hippocampal changes in Alzheimer's disease and normal ageing with MRI at 3 Tesla and Alzheimer's disease based on high resolution MRI at 3 Tesla. T1-weighted images were acquired from 19

Thompson, Paul

169

A common allele on chromosome 9 associated with coronary heart disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. Appleyard, European Heart Journal 3, Suppl H. , H1 (associated with Coronary Heart Disease in whites. Minor9 associated with coronary heart disease Ruth McPherson 1* ,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The power of linkage analysis of a disease-related endophenotype using asymmetrically ascertained sib pairs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linkage study of a qualitative disease endophenotype in a sample of sib pairs, consisting of one disease affected proband and one sibling is considered. The linkage statistic compares marker allele sharing with the proband in siblings with an abnormal ...

Heejong Sung; Fei Ji; Deborah L. Levy; Steven Matthysse; Nancy Role Mendell

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study Final Report June 21, 2002 #12;Communications Plan for releasing the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study Final Report Table of Contents Introduction ........................................................................................................ 15 Hanford Area Public

172

ORIGINAL PAPER Invading with biological weapons: the role of shared disease in ecological invasion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Theory has been developed that examines the role of infectious disease in ecological invasions for particular natural systems. However, a general understanding of the role that shared disease may play in invasions is lacking. Here, we develop a strategic theoretical framework to determine the role of disease, in addition to competition, in ecological invasions and the expansion of species ’ spatial range. We investigate the effect of different disease parameters on the replacement time of a native species by an alien invader. The outcome is critically dependent on the relative effects that the disease has on the two species and less dependent on the basic epidemiological characteristics of the interaction. This framework is also used to investigate the effect of disease on the spatial spread of the invader. Our results show an interesting phenomenon where a wave of disease spreads through the landscape ahead of the wave of replacement. Keywords Disease models. Spatial. Multi-species. Ecological invasions. Squirrelpox. Travelling waves

Sally S. Bell; Andrew White; Jonathan A. Sherratt; Mike Boots

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Computational, statistical and graph-theoretical methods for disease mapping and cluster detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Epidemiology, the study of disease risk factors in populations, emerged between the 16th and 19th centuries in response to terrifying epidemics of infectious diseases such as yellow fever, cholera and bubonic plague. ...

Wieland, Shannon Christine

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

DCGene: a novel predicting approach of the disease related genes on functional annotation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disease Candidate Genes (DCGene) is an advanced system for predicting the disease related genes, It is a novel computational approach by using the GO annotation information. The performance of the DCGene is evaluated in a set containing 1057 test samples, ...

Yuan Fang; Hui Wang

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

South Carolina Pest Management Handbook for Field Crops -2013 SOYBEAN DISEASE CONTROL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-20.5 2 (42) Rust + other diseases Quilt Xcel SE Azoxystrobin + Propiconazole 14 - 21 2 (42) Rust + other

Stuart, Steven J.

176

Real-Time Particulate Monitoring – Detecting Respiratory ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... They are found in older transformers and other ... HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning) inspections and ... This set of conditions is not likely ...

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

177

The picture of health: map-based, collaborative spatio-temporal disease tracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disease outbreaks are intimately tied to geographic locations and to times, and as a result, health-related GIS along with open, Web-based data sources are increasingly crucial for public health. One such data source, ProMED-mail, offers disease reports ... Keywords: GIS, disease tracking, geotagging, spatio-temporal

Rongjian Lan; Michael D. Lieberman; Hanan Samet

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Utilization of Discretization method on the diagnosis of optic nerve disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optic nerve disease is an important disease that appears commonly in public. In this paper, we propose a hybrid diagnostic system based on discretization (quantization) method and classification algorithms including C4.5 decision tree classifier, ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, C4.5 decision tree classifier, Discretization method, Hybrid systems, Least square support vector machine, Optic nerve disease, VEP signals

Kemal Polat; Sad?k Kara; Ay?egül Güven; Salih Güne?

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

I N T H I S I S S U E Lyme disease communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I N T H I S I S S U E · Lyme disease communication to countryside users · Providing public benefits in private woodlands, causes of wildfires in South Wales and communicating animal disease (Lyme) risks in rural areas within a framework of risk communication. It focuses on Lyme disease, an infection caused

180

Research Summary Assessing and communicating animal disease risks for countryside users  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

initially on Lyme disease, an infection caused by a spiral bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi that is found in a number of wild animal hosts and which can be transferred to humans by infected ticks. Lyme disease in Lyme disease resulting from changes in environmental factors mdevelop appropriate risk assessment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

SVM feature selection for classification of SPECT images of Alzheimer's disease using spatial information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alzheimer's disease is the most frequent type of dementia for elderly patients. Due to aging populations, the occurrence of this disease will increase in the next years. Early diagnosis is crucial to be able to develop more powerful treatments. Brain ... Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Mathematical programming, Medical imaging, Support vector machines

Glenn Fung; Jonathan Stoeckel

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Computational intelligence for genetic association study in complex diseases: review of theory and applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comprehensive evaluation of common genetic variations through association of SNP structure with common complex disease in the genome-wide scale is currently a hot area in human genome research thanks for the recent development of the Human Genome ... Keywords: SNP, common complex diseases, computational intelligence, disease mapping, epistasis, genetic association, genetic variations, haplotype data, human genome research, single nucleotide polymorphisms

Arpad Kelemen; Athanasios V. Vasilakos; Yulan Liang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Heart . Author manuscript Effects of depressive symptoms and coronary heart disease and their  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heart . Author manuscript Page /1 11 Effects of depressive symptoms and coronary heart disease separately in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and in populations healthy at study inception and CHD status. OBJECTIVE To examine effects of depressive symptoms and coronary heart disease

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

184

Eur Heart J. Author manuscript History of coronary heart disease and cognitive performance in midlife: the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eur Heart J. Author manuscript Page /1 9 History of coronary heart disease and cognitive: Archana Singh-Manoux Abstract Aims Some studies show coronary heart for this association. Coronary heart disease is a global problem, with the risk of disease shown to increase as12

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

185

New England Foot and Mouth Disease Tabletop Exercise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Multiscale Epidemiologic/Economic Simulation and Analysis (MESA) Decision Support System (DSS) is the product of investments that began in FY05 by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate and continue today with joint funding by both DHS and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). The DSS consists of a coupled epidemiologic/economic model, a standalone graphical user interface (GUI) that supports both model setup and post-analysis, and a Scenario Bank archive to store all content related to foreign animal disease (FAD) studies (Figure 1). The MESA epi model is an object-oriented, agent-based, stochastic, spatio-temporal simulator that parametrically models FAD outbreaks and response strategies from initial disease introduction to conclusion over local, regional, and national scales. Through its output database, the epi model couples to an economic model that calculates farm-level impacts from animal infections, responsive control strategies and loss of trade. The MESA architecture contains a variety of internal models that implement the major components of the epi simulation, including disease introduction, intra-herd spread, inter-herd spread (direct and indirect), detection, and various control strategies (movement restrictions, culling, vaccination) in a highly configurable and extensible fashion. MESA will produce both overall and daily summary statistics for the outbreak, epidemic curves, and costs associated with the outbreak. This information can be used to reconstruct and analyze the course of the outbreak. Geographical information produced by MESA can be used to produce maps and movies as visual aids to understand the distribution characteristics of a simulated outbreak.

Hullinger, P

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Diet-Heart Hypothesis: a critical appraisal of the relationship between diet and coronary artery disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease. JAMA. 2002;288:M. Fish consumption and coronary heart disease mortality: aacid and risk of ischemic heart disease among women. Am J

Jurewitz, Daniel L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

CHANGES OF ARTERIAL BLOOD PRESSURE IN ACUTE RADIATION DISEASE  

SciTech Connect

Acute experiments were done in cats and chronic experiments in dogs. The cats were subjected to whole-body x irradiation with a dose of 1500 r, and were examined on the third day after irradiation, when radiation disease was fully developed. Reflexes from the baro- and chemoreceptors were investigated, and arterial blood pressure was recorded in the irradiated cats after intravenous administration of adrenaline, noradrenaline, serotonin, acetylcholine, histamine, Regitine, atropine, or Pendiomid. Dogs were subjected to whole-body irradiation with 800 r,; changes in arterial blood pressure, which occurred after the administration of neurohormones, were investigated before and after irradiation. Pressor reflexes in irradiated cats, elicited by clamping and unclamping of both common carotid arteries, corresponded to a rise from 129.6 to 141.4 mm Hg, as compared to pressor reflexes in nonirradiated cats from 106.6 to 146. Reflexes from carotid sinus chemoreceptors evoked by 0.5% KCl were also weaker in irradiated cats. The results of both the acute and chronic experiments indicate that circulatory changes occur in radiation disease. The changes mainly involve responses of the circulatory system to neurohormones and stimulation of vascular baro- and chemoreceptors. (TCO)

Ryzewski, J.

1962-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

SENSITIZATION AND EXACERBATION OF ALLERGIC DISEASES BY DIESEL ENGINE PARTICLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most studies of the health effects of diesel exhaust have focused on the controversial issue of its role in cancer. However, recently the role of combustion products such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP) in modulating the immune response has garnered much attention. In particular the effect of DEP on allergic and asthmatic diseases has been the focus of many studies. A link between industrialization and allergic disease has long been presumed. Indeed, only 50 years after the first recorded reported case of allergy in 1819, Charles Blackely wrote that the ''hay-fever epidemic'' was associated with the movement of people from the country into the cities. Ishizaki et al. (1987) found that people in Japan living on busy roads lined with cedar trees have more allergies to cedar than residents living on similar streets with much less traffic. Since that time other epidemiological studies have reported similar findings. Kramer, et al., showed that hay fever is greater in residential areas with heavy truck traffic, while Weiland, et al., reported that allergic symptoms correlate with the distance of residences to roads with heavy traffic.

Diaz-Sanchez, David

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

189

Loss of Hsp70 Exacerbates Pathogenesis But Not Levels of Fibrillar Aggregates in a Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Endogenous protein quality control machinery has long been suspected of influencing the onset and progression of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of misfolded proteins. Huntington's disease (HD) ...

Lindquist, Susan

190

Bead-based microfluidic immunoassay for diagnosis of Johne's disease  

SciTech Connect

Microfluidics technology offers a platform for development of point-of-care diagnostic devices for various infectious diseases. In this study, we examined whether serodiagnosis of Johne s disease (JD) can be conducted in a bead-based microfluidic assay system. Magnetic micro-beads were coated with antigens of the causative agent of JD, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The antigen-coated beads were incubated with serum samples of JD-positive or negative serum samples and then with a fluorescently-labeled secondary antibody (SAB). To confirm binding of serum antibodies to the antigen, the beads were subjected to flow cytometric analysis. Different conditions (dilutions of serum and SAB, types of SAB, and types of magnetic beads) were optimized for a great degree of differentiation between the JD-negative and JD-positive samples. Using the optimized conditions, we tested a well-classified set of 155 serum samples from JD negative and JD-positive cattle by using the bead-based flow cytometric assay. Of 105 JD-positive samples, 63 samples (60%) showed higher antibody binding levels than a cut-off value determined by using antibody binding levels of JD-negative samples. In contrast, only 43-49 JD-positive samples showed higher antibody binding levels than the cut-off value when the samples were tested by commercially-available immunoassays. Microfluidic assays were performed by magnetically immobilizing a number of beads within a microchannel of a glass microchip and detecting antibody on the collected beads by laser-induced fluorescence. Antigen-coated magnetic beads treated with bovine serum sample and fluorescently-labeled SAB were loaded into a microchannel to measure the fluorescence (reflecting level of antibody binding) on the beads in the microfluidic system. When the results of five bovine serum samples obtained with the system were compared to those obtained with the flow cytometer, a high level of correlation (linear regression, r2 = 0.994) was observed. In a further experiment, we magnetically immobilized antigen-coated beads in a microchannel, reacted the beads with serum and SAB in the channel, and detected antibody binding to the beads in the microfluidic system. A strong antibody binding in JD-positive serum was detected, whereas there was only negligible binding in negative control experiments. Our data suggest that the bead-based microfluidic system may form a basis for development of an on-site serodiagnosis of JD. Key Words: Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis, Johne s disease, microfluidics, lab-on-a-chip.

Wadhwa, Ashutosh [University of Tennessee, Center for Wildlife Health, Department of Forestry; Foote, Robert [ORNL; Shaw, Robert W [ORNL; Eda, Shigetoshi [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Modifying Proteins to Combat Disease | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Higher Temperature at the Earth's Core Higher Temperature at the Earth's Core Clues about Rheumatoid Arthritis Damage Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Modifying Proteins to Combat Disease JANUARY 22, 2013 Bookmark and Share Structure of the human PRMT5:MEP50 hetero-octameric complex bound to a substrate peptide and a cofactor analog. Cartoon representations of the PRMT5 monomers are colored blue, green, wheat, and yellow, while the MEP50 molecules are in red. Highlighted in stick representation are the substrate peptide derived from histone H3 in magenta, and the cofactor analog in orange. Transmitting from one generation to the next the genetic message encoded in

192

THE BEHAVIOUR OF VASCILAR REACTIONS IN ACUTE IRRADIATION DISEASE  

SciTech Connect

Acute experiments were made with cats, and chronic experiments with dogs. The a cute experiments numbered 377 and concerned 65 rats of either sex and different weights in urethan anesthesia. Another 22 cats were used for 65 control experiments. The cats received a total dose of 1500 r from a therapeutic x-ray unit. The conditions were: distance, 60 cm; O.5 mm copper filter; 160 kv; 20 ma; 29 r/min. The cats were examined on the third day after irradiation, when the irradiation disease picture was developed. Vascular reflexes from the interoceptors of the carotid sinus were investigated after Heymans's method, reflexes from the interoceptors of spleen and intestinal loop vessels after Czernigowski's method, and reflexes from interoceptors of hind-leg vessels after the author's method. Adrenaline, noradrenaline, serotonin, acetylcho-line, potassium chloride, and lactic acid were used to stimulate interoceptors. To stimulate the proximal section of the sciatic nerve and peripheral part of the splanchnic nerve, electric current was used --3 to 6 volts, 20 ma, 20 sec. Furthermore, arterial blood pressure was measured in irradiated cats after intravenous administration of adrenaline, noradrenaline, serotonin, acetylcholine, or histamine. Experiments were also made with cats poisoned with phentolamine, atropine, or pendiomid. The experimental material was analyzed statistically. Chronic experiments numbered 165 and concerned 6 dogs. Before irradiation, the dogs were opperated upon after the author's method to enable blood pressure to be measured by intravascular technique, and subsequently standards of arterial blood pressure reaction to adrenaline, noradrenaline, serotonin, acetylcholine, and histamine were determin+d. In the experiments, the dogs received a total dose of 800 r from a therapeutic x ray unit. Conditions were: distance, 80 cm; O.5 mm Cu filter; l60 Kv; 20 ma; 21 r/min. Alrterial blood pressure reaction to the above neurohormones was investigated in the irradiated dogs daily. Experiments with dogs poisoned with phentolamine or pendiomid were also carried out. The experiments referred to showed ionizing radiation to reduce considerably reflexes from vascular chemoreceptors to neurohormones, potassium chloride, and lactic acid. In irradiated cats, pressor reflexes from carotid sinus mechanoreceptors were diminished, and so were pressor reflexes to electric stimulation of the sciatic and splanchnic nerves. Neurohormones, such as adrenaline and noradrenaline, caused in cats and dogs lower-than-standard effects. Depressor effects of serotonin were in irradiated and noniirradiated cats equal in strength. In dogs, on the other hand, pressor effects of serotonin diminished in strength with the progress of irradiation disease. Pressure fall evoked by aby acetylcholine and histamine was the same in irradiated and nonirradiated cats and dogs, but of considerably longer duration in irradiated animals. Phentolamine diminished pressor effects of adrenaline in irradiated cats and dogs, and also weakened in dogs the pressor effects of serotonin. Atropine and phentolamine increased in irradiated cats and dogs pressor effects of adrenaline and noradrenaline, and pressor effects of serotonin in dogs. It was concluded that in acute irradiation disease the adrenergic part of the autonomic nervous system, first of all sensory and vasomotor terminals, is injured. Also, preserved vasomotor reflexes, even though weakened, enable in this disease an influence to be exerted on the functional efficiency of the circulatory system. (auth)

Ryzewski, J.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Heart Rate Variability in Mice with Coronary Heart Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heart rate variability (HRV), the beat-to-beat fluctuation of the heart rate, is a noninvasive test that measures the autonomic regulation of the heart. Assessment of HRV has been shown to predict the risk of mortality in patients after an acute myocardial infarction. Recently, the Krieger lab at MIT developed genetically engineered double knockout (dKO) mice that develop coronary artery disease accompanied by spontaneous myocardial infarctions and die at a very young age. This thesis investigated whether HRV could function as a prognostic indicator in the dKO mouse. A novel method for estimating physiological state of the mouse from the electrocardiogram using an innovative activity index was developed in order to compare HRV variables at different times while controlling for physiologic state. Traditional time and frequency domain variables were used to assess the prognostic power of HRV. Results have shown that none of the HRV variables were helpful in predicting

Laurence Zapanta; Roger G. Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Altered mental status, an unusual manifestation of early disseminated Lyme disease: A case report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Early disseminated Lyme disease can have a myriad of central nervous system manifestations. These run the gamut from meningitis to radiculopathy and cranial neuropathy. Here we present a case that manifested with only acute mental status change in the setting of central nervous system involvement with Lyme disease. A paucity of other central nervous system manifestations is rare, especially with positive serum and cerebrospinal fluid markers. This article underscores the importance of a high index of clinical suspicion in detection of Lyme disease related manifestations in endemic areas. Background Lyme disease is a multisystem inflammatory disease caused by spirochetes, known collectively as Borrelia burgdorferi, which are spread by the bite of infected Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease was first described in studies of an outbreak of "juvenile rheumatoid arthritis " in Connecticut [1]. It is endemic in the states of Massachusetts, Connecticut,

Shiven B Chabria; Jock Lawrason

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

doi:10.4061/2011/747861 Review Article Metabolic Syndrome, Chronic Kidney Disease, and Cardiovascular Disease: A Dynamic and Life-Threatening Triad  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The metabolic syndrome (MS) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) have both become global public health problems, with increasing social and economic impact due to their high prevalence and remarkable impact on morbidity and mortality. The causality between MS and CKD, and its clinical implications, still does remain not completely understood. Moreover, prophylactic and therapeutic interventions do need to be properly investigated in this field. Herein, we critically review the existing clinical evidence that associates MS with renal disease and cardiovascular disease, as well as the associated pathophysiologic mechanisms and actual treatment options. 1.

Mário Raimundo; Joséantónio Lopes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Nutrition and Biochemistry of PhospholipidsChapter 2 Stimulation of Lipases and Phospholipases in Alzheimer Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutrition and Biochemistry of Phospholipids Chapter 2 Stimulation of Lipases and Phospholipases in Alzheimer Disease Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadable pdf ...

197

Development of an ELISA to determine Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) capsid protein antibody titers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) is a naturally occurring, autonomous parvovirus that is capable of infecting some members of the Mustelidae family. Although this virus… (more)

Pennick, Kate Elizabeth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Development of a Method for the Detection of Aleutian Mink Disease Virus in Water Samples.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) causes significant loss to the mink industry in Nova Scotia (NS). Contaminated water is a speculated virus source therefore my… (more)

Larsen, Sophie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Methods of treating parkinson's disease using viral vectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of delivering viral vectors, particularly recombinant AAV virions, to the CNS are provided. Also provided are methods of treating Parkinson's Disease.

Bankiewicz, Krys (Garrett Park, MD); Cunningham, Janet (Alameda, CA)

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

200

Nutrition and Biochemistry of PhospholipidsChapter 11 The Benefits of Lecithin on Cardiovascular Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutrition and Biochemistry of Phospholipids Chapter 11 The Benefits of Lecithin on Cardiovascular Disease Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Compost teas and compost amended container media for plant disease control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The primary goal of this dissertation research was to assess the use of compost for the control of several foliar and soil borne diseases commercially… (more)

[No author

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Efficacy of compost amendments and extracts in the control of foliar disease in organic tomato production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Effects of compost amendments and extracts on tomato foliar disease severity and yield were assessed in greenhouse and field experiments. Aerated and nonaerated compost tea… (more)

Murray, William Kraft.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Edge effects, not connectivity, determine the incidence and development of a foliar fungal plant disease.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a model plant-pathogen system in a large-scale habitat corridor experiment, we found that corridors do not facilitate the movement of wind-dispersed plant pathogens, that connectivity of patches does not enhance levels of foliar fungal plant disease, and that edge effects are the key drivers of plant disease dynamics. Increased spread of infectious disease is often cited as a potential negative effect of habitat corridors used in conservation, but the impacts of corridors on pathogen movement have never been tested empirically. Using sweet corn (Zea mays) and southern corn leaf blight (Cochliobolus heterostrophus) as a model plant-pathogen system, we tested the impacts of connectivity and habitat fragmentation on pathogen movement and disease development at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, USA. Over time, less edgy patches had higher proportions of diseased plants, and distance of host plants to habitat edges was the greatest determinant of disease development. Variation in average daytime temperatures provided a possible mechanism for these disease patterns. Our results show that worries over the potentially harmful effects of conservation corridors on disease dynamics are misplaced, and that, in a conservation context, many diseases can be better managed by mitigating edge effects.

Johnson, Brenda, L.; Haddad, Nick, M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Development and application of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics methods for disease biomarker identification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human societies face diverse health challenges including a rapidly aging population, rising incidence of metabolic disease, and increasing antibiotic resistance. These problems involve complex interactions between genes ...

Tong, Lily Victoria

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 21 Carotenoids and Cadiovascular Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 21 Carotenoids and Cadiovascular Disease Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   Downloadable pd

206

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 12 Lycopene and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 12 Lycopene and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   Download

207

Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oversight Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program February 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of...

208

Conventional and molecular assays aid diagnosis of crop diseases and fungicide resistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

orchards in California. Crop Protec Ma Z, Yoshimura MA,assays aid diagnosis of crop diseases and fungicidemonitor, diagnose and quantify crop pathogens. We have also

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

"The CardioRespiratory Human System:The Cardio Respiratory Human System: a simulation study"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Routes bloodRoutes blood Heart separates pulmonary and systemic circulationHeart separates pulmonary; Separated bySeparated by The ChambersThe Chambers Separated bySeparated by InteratrialInteratrial Septum fillingfilling resistanceresistancegg 52PASI 2011 - A. Bandoni #12;Ql a Ql vRla Lla Llv pas E plv pla M V AV

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

210

How someone with a neuromuscular disease experiences operating a PC (and how to successfully counteract that)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the experiences of the first author, who has been diagnosed with the neuromuscular disease Friedreich's Ataxia more than 25 years ago, with the innovative approach to human-computer interaction characterized by the software tool ... Keywords: Friedreich's Ataxia, ambiguous keyboard, dysarthria, human-computer interaction, keyboard replacement, mouse emulator, neuromuscular disease, word prediction

Torsten Felzer, Stephan Rinderknecht

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

A common interface to transfer data between telemedicine devices and smartphones for monitoring of chronic diseases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important part of chronic patients care is continuous monitoring of relevant parameters according to a particular disease. The subject of the work is an implementation of a common interface to exchange data between various medical devices and smartphones ... Keywords: Bluetooth, Java Android programming, Java programming, chronic disease, mobile care, smartphone

Jacek Da?da; Dominik Kobylarz

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A medical game changer New device shows early promise for detecting heart disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fall 2012 A medical game changer New device shows early promise for detecting heart disease It as a functional test for people at high risk of developing heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United for enhancing auscultation (listening to heart sounds). Her husband, Robert Guion, was a convenient, good

Minnesota, University of

213

Interdisciplinary design of an electronic organizer for persons with alzheimer's disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of cognitive problems, it is very difficult for individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) to manage their time. Consequently, they are dependent on their caregivers or use pen-and-paper organizers, both of which have limitations. A more interesting ... Keywords: alzheimer's disease, compensatory memory device, electronic organizer, interdisciplinary approach, memory deficits

Hélène Imbeault; Hélène Pigot; Nathalie Bier; Lise Gagnon; Nicolas Marcotte; Sylvain Giroux; Tamas Fülöp

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Predicting Severity of Parkinson's Disease from Speech Meysam Asgari and Izhak Shafran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of progression of the disease. There is a growing interest in home-based assessment tools for measuring severity applications such as in home-based assessment or in telemonitoring of Parkinson's disease. I. INTRODUCTION. Not surprisingly, there has been a growing interest in creating tools and methods for alternative home-based

Shafran, Izhak

215

Dynamic Policy Modeling for Chronic Diseases: Metaheuristic-Based Identification of Pareto-Optimal Screening Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a risk-group oriented chronic disease progression model embedded within a metaheuristic-based optimization of the policy variables. Policy-makers are provided with Pareto-optimal screening schedules for risk groups by considering cost and ... Keywords: chronic disease policy analysis, decision analysis, dynamic resource allocation, health care, metaheuristics, multicriteria optimization, prevention

Marion S. Rauner; Walter J. Gutjahr; Kurt Heidenberger; Joachim Wagner; Joseph Pasia

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Proceedings of the 2nd workshop on lyme disease in the Southeast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume provides author prepared abstracts of oral presentation at the Second Workshop on Lyme Disease in the Southeast head in Raleigh, North Carolina September 7-9, 1993. The 33 presentations covered various aspects of the epidemic including geographical distribution of various species of ticks, transmission risks, Lyme Disease epidemiology, and taxonomic aspects.

Apperson, C.S. [ed.] [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Entomology; Levine, J.F. [ed.] [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Microbiology, Pathology, and Parasitology; Snoddy, E.L. [ed.] [Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, AL (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Projecting independent components of SPECT images for computer aided diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Finding sensitive and appropriate technologies for early detection of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) are of fundamental importance to develop early treatments. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) images are non-invasive observation tools ... Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Computer aided diagnosis, Independent Component Analysis, Supervised learning, Support vector machine

I. Álvarez Illán; J. M. Górriz; J. Ramírez; D. Salas-Gonzalez; M. López; F. Segovia; P. Padilla; C. G. Puntonet

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Differential automatic diagnosis between Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia based on perfusion SPECT images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are among the most frequent neurodegenerative cognitive disorders, but their differential diagnosis is difficult. The aim of this study was to evaluate an automatic method returning ... Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Brain SPECT, Computer-aided diagnosis, Frontotemporal dementia, k-Nearest neighbours

Jean-François Horn; Marie-Odile Habert; Aurélie Kas; Zoulikha Malek; Philippe Maksud; Lucette Lacomblez; Alain Giron; Bernard Fertil

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Neurobiology of Disease Loss of ALS2 Function Is Insufficient to Trigger Motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neurobiology of Disease Loss of ALS2 Function Is Insufficient to Trigger Motor Neuron Degeneration, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the most common motor neuron disease, is caused by a selective loss of motor neurons in the CNS. MutationsintheALS2

Blackshaw, Seth

220

Coronary Heart Disease: Overview #1 Killer in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Coronary Heart Disease: Overview · #1 Killer in the U.S. · Accounts for more than one in five, the vessels that supply the heart · Disease process: coronary atherosclerosis (plagues in artery) involves flow, shortage of oxygen, pain that radiates across the chest and arms Myocardial infarction - heart

Meagher, Mary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Lyme Disease In New York State: Spatial Pattern At A Regional Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lyme disease occurs commonly in New York State, but its geographic distribution is heterogeneous. For each of nine consecutive years, incidence rates from 57 New York State counties were subjected to spatial autocorrelation analysis. Although the epidemic advanced during the study period, the analyses reveal a consistent pattern of spatial dependence. The correlation distance, the distance over which incidence rates covary positively, remained near 120 km over the nine years. A local spatial analysis around Westchester County, a major disease focus, indicated that the global correlation distance matched the extent of the most intense local clustering; statistically weaker clustering extended to 200 km from Westchester. Analyzing the spatial character of the epidemic may reveal the epizootic processes underlying patterns in human infection, and may help identify a spatial scale for regional control of disease. Lyme disease remains the most frequently reported vector-borne disease in the Northern Hemisphere, and the world's most common tick-borne infection.

Stephan Glavanakov; Dennis J. White; Thomas Caraco; Andrei Lapenis; George Robinson; Boleslaw K. Szymanski; William; A. Maniatty

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Existence of patchiness in constricted lungs : from experiments to complex system modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding asthma pathophysiology can directly help researchers and physicians pinpoint mechanisms that govern airway hyperresponsiveness and effectively treat complex respiratory diseases such as asthma. The advancement ...

Wongviriyawong, Chanikarn Mint

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Development of polymerase chain reaction primer sets for diagnosis of Lyme disease and for species-specific identification of Lyme disease isolates by 16S rRNA signature nucleotide analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

polymerase chain reaction primer sets for diagnosis of Lyme disease and for species-specific identification of Lyme disease isolates by 16S rRNA signature nucleotide analysis.

R T Marconi; C F Garon; Richard T. Marconi; Claude; F. Garon

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Postoperative Radiotherapy After Surgical Resection of Thymoma: Differing Roles in Localized and Regional Disease  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry data to determine the impact of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) for thymoma and thymic carcinoma (T/TC). Methods and Materials: Patients with surgically resected localized (LOC) or regional (REG) malignant T/TC with or without PORT were analyzed for overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) by querying the SEER database from 1973-2005. Patients dying within the first 3 months after surgery were excluded. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate analyses with Cox proportional hazards were performed. Results: A total of 901 T/TC patients were identified (275 with LOC disease and 626 with REG disease). For all patients with LOC disease, PORT had no benefit and may adversely impact the 5-year CSS rate (91% vs. 98%, p = 0.03). For patients with REG disease, the 5-year OS rate was significantly improved by adding PORT (76% vs. 66% for surgery alone, p = 0.01), but the 5-year CSS rate was no better (91% vs. 86%, p = 0.12). No benefit was noted for PORT in REG disease after extirpative surgery (defined as radical or total thymectomy). On multivariate OS and CSS analysis, stage and age were independently correlated with survival. For multivariate CSS analysis, the outcome of PORT is significantly better for REG disease than for LOC disease (hazard ratio, 0.167; p = 0.001). Conclusions: Our results from SEER show that PORT for T/TC had no advantage in patients with LOC disease (Masaoka Stage I), but a possible OS benefit of PORT in patients with REG disease (Masaoka Stage II-III) was found, especially after non-extirpative surgery. The role of PORT in T/TC needs further evaluation.

Forquer, Jeffrey A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Rong Nan [Department of Public Health, Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Fakiris, Achilles J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Loehrer, Patrick J. [Department of Hematology Oncology, Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Johnstone, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Heart DiseaseHeart Disease--Learn to Love YourLearn to Love Your Michael McKee, M.D.Michael McKee, M.D.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heart DiseaseHeart Disease-- Learn to Love YourLearn to Love Your HeartHeart Michael McKee, M.D.Michael McKee, M.D. March 19, 2010March 19, 2010 #12;GoalsGoals ·· Learn more about heart disease for yourself andLearn more about heart disease for yourself and for your studentsfor your students ·· Learn

Goldman, Steven A.

226

Whole-Genome Sequences of Two Borrelia afzelii and Two Borrelia garinii Lyme Disease Agent Isolates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human Lyme disease is commonly caused by several species of spirochetes in the Borrelia genus. In Eurasia these species are largely Borrelia afzelii, B. garinii, B. burgdorferi, and B. bavariensis sp. nov. Whole-genome sequencing is an excellent tool for investigating and understanding the influence of bacterial diversity on the pathogenesis and etiology of Lyme disease. We report here the whole-genome sequences of four isolates from two of the Borrelia species that cause human Lyme disease, B. afzelii isolates ACA-1 and PKo and B. garinii isolates PBr and Far04.

Casjens, S.R.; Dunn, J.; Mongodin, E. F.; Qiu, W.-G.; Luft, B. J.; Fraser-Liggett, C. M.; Schutzer, S. E.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Coral Health and Disease: A Comparison of Cook's and Opunohu Bays in Mo'orea,French Polynesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coral and coralline algae  disease/lesions  in  the and  nutrients.   Many species of algae also carry  disease­assessed for substrate, algae, and coral composition as 

Shea, Alessandra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

CORAL HEALTH AND DISEASE: A COMPARISON OF COOK’S AND ‘OPUNOHU BAYS IN MOOREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coral and coralline algae  disease/lesions  in  the and  nutrients.   Many species of algae also carry  disease­assessed for substrate, algae, and coral composition as 

Shea, Alessandra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Scenarios, personas and user stories: User-centered evidence-based design representations of communicable disease investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Despite years of effort and millions of dollars spent to create unified electronic communicable disease reporting systems, the goal remains elusive. A major barrier has been a lack of understanding by system designers of communicable disease ... Keywords: Communicable disease reporting, Human centered design, Information workflow, Personas, Public health informatics

Anne M. Turner, Blaine Reeder, Judith Ramey

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

What's Strange About Recent Events (WSARE): An Algorithm for the Early Detection of Disease Outbreaks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional biosurveillance algorithms detect disease outbreaks by looking for peaks in a univariate time series of health-care data. Current health-care surveillance data, however, are no longer simply univariate data streams. Instead, a wealth of spatial, ...

Weng-Keen Wong; Andrew Moore; Gregory Cooper; Michael Wagner

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Monitoring Motor Fluctuations in Patients With Parkinson's Disease Using Wearable Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a pilot study to assess the feasibility of using accelerometer data to estimate the severity of symptoms and motor complications in patients with Parkinson's disease. A support vector ...

Patel, Shyamal

232

Development of Regional Models that Use Meteorological Variables for Predicting Stripe Rust Disease on Winter Wheat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological variables can be used to predict stripe rust, a disease of wheat caused by Puccinia striiformis West., at Lind, Pullman, and Walla Walla, Washington and Pendleton, Oregon in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Regional ...

Stella Melugin Coakley; William S. Boyd; Roland F. Line

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Automated MRI measures identify individuals with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mild cognitive impairment can represent a transitional state between normal ageing and Alzheimer's disease. Non-invasive diagnostic methods are needed to identify mild cognitive impairment individuals for early therapeutic ...

Desikan, Rahul S.

234

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 3 Fish Oils and Stroke  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 3 Fish Oils and Stroke Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Fish Oils and St

235

Cognition in healthy aging and Parkinson's disease : structural and functional integrity of neural circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation documents how healthy aging and Parkinson's disease (PD) affect brain anatomy and physiology and how these neural changes relate to measures of cognition and perception. While healthy aging and PD are ...

Ziegler, David A. (David Allan)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 1 Trans Fatty Acid Effects on Cardiovascular Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 1 Trans Fatty Acid Effects on Cardiovascular Disease Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS 7D1218959FAE1721B6FEA28

237

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & EChapter 6 Serum Ascorbic Acid and Disease Prevalence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & E Chapter 6 Serum Ascorbic Acid and Disease Prevalence Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Serum Ascorbic Ac

238

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & EChapter 19 Vitamin E in Disease Prevention and Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & E Chapter 19 Vitamin E in Disease Prevention and Therapy Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 19 Vitamin E in

239

Computational studies of tau protein : implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tau protein is the primary constituent of protein aggregates known as neurofibrillary tangles, a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies suggest that tau protein may play a contributing role in ...

Huang, Austin V., 1980-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & EChapter 7 Vitamin C Status and Cardiovascular Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & E Chapter 7 Vitamin C Status and Cardiovascular Disease Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 7 Vitamin C Status

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Oxidation-specific epitopes are targets of innate natural antibodies : potential implications in health and disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Disease by Meng-Yun Sandy Chou Doctor of Philosophy inSciences by Meng-Yun Sandy Chou Committee in charge:Victor Nizet Copyright Meng-Yun Sandy Chou, 2009 All rights

Chou, Meng-Yun Sandy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

GMM based SPECT image classification for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a novel classification method of SPECT images based on Gaussian mixture models (GMM) for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. The aims of the model-based approach for density estimation is to automatically select regions of interest (ROIs) ... Keywords: 87.19.xr, 87.57.R-, 87.57.nm, 87.57.uh, Alzheimer's disease, EM algorithm, Gaussian mixture model, SPECT, Support vector machines (SVMs)

J. M. Górriz; F. Segovia; J. Ramírez; A. Lassl; D. Salas-Gonzalez

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Diagnostic evaluation of a multiplexed RT-PCR microsphere array assay for the detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus and look-alike disease viruses  

SciTech Connect

A high-throughput multiplexed assay was developed for the differential laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) from viruses which cause clinically similar diseases of livestock. This assay simultaneously screens for five RNA and two DNA viruses using multiplexed reverse transcription PCR (mRT-PCR) amplification coupled with a microsphere hybridization array and flow-cytometric detection. Two of the seventeen primer-probe sets included in this multiplex assay were adopted from previously characterized real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays for FMDV. The diagnostic accuracy of the mRT-PCR was evaluated using 287 field samples, including 248 (true positive n= 213, true negative n=34) from suspect cases of foot-and-mouth disease collected from 65 countries between 1965 and 2006 and 39 true negative samples collected from healthy animals. The mRT-PCR assay results were compared with two singleplex rRT-PCR assays, using virus isolation with antigen-ELISA as the reference method. The diagnostic sensitivity of the mRT-PCR assay for FMDV was 93.9% [95% C.I. 89.8-96.4%], compared to 98.1% [95% C.I. 95.3-99.3%] for the two singleplex rRT-PCR assays used in combination. In addition, the assay could reliably differentiate between FMDV and other vesicular viruses such as swine vesicular disease virus and vesicular exanthema of swine virus. Interestingly, the mRT-PCR detected parapoxvirus (n=2) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (n=2) in clinical samples, demonstrating the screening potential of this mRT-PCR assay to identify viruses in FMDV-negative material not previously recognized using focused single-target rRT-PCR assays.

Hindson, B J; Reid, S M; Baker, B R; Ebert, K; Ferris, N P; Bentley Tammero, L F; Lenhoff, R J; Naraghi-Arani, P; Vitalis, E A; Slezak, T R; Hullinger, P J; King, D P

2007-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

244

Epidemiological and Clinical Features of 1,149 Persons with Lyme Disease Identified by Laboratory-Based Surveillance in Connecticut  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3,098 persons with suspected Lyme disease; 1,149 were defined as cases. Lyme disease incidence in Connecticut towns ranged from none to 1,407 cases per 100,000 population in 1985. A comparison of 1985 data with data from 1977 epidemiologic studies indicated that incidence increased by 129 percent to 453 percent in towns previously known to be endemic for Lyme disease and that Lyme disease had spread northward into towns thought to be free of Lyme disease in 1977. Children aged five to 14 years had the highest incidence. Of persons with Lyme disease, 83 percent had erythema migrans, 24 percent had arthritis, 8 percent had neurologic sequelae, and 2 percent had cardiac sequelae. The distribution of symptoms was age-dependent: case-persons Lyme disease is increasing in incidence and geographic distribution in Connecticut. Of those with Lyme disease, children may be more likely than adults to develop arthritis and have it as their first major disease manifestation. Lyme disease, discovered in 1975 in Connecticut, is now endemic in at least 19

Lyle R. Petersen; A Anne H. Sweeney; Patricia J. Checko; C Louis; A. Magnarelli, Ph.D.; Patricia A. Mshar; C Robert; A. Gunn; James; L. Hadler

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Nonlinear Dynamics of Infectious Diseases Transfer with Possible Applications for Tubercular Infection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we model a nonlinear dynamics of infectious diseases transfer. Particularly, we study possible applications to tubercular infection in models with different profiles (peak values) of the population density dependence on spatial coordinates. Our approach is based on the well known method of instantons which has been used by the authors to describe kinetics of adiabatic chemical reactions as a function of the heat-bath temperature and other system parameters. In our approach, we use "social temperature" T as one of the controlling parameters. Increase of T leads to acceleration of the infectious diseases transfer. The "blockage" effect for the infectious diseases transfer has been demonstrated in the case when peak values (in the population density) are equal to one and under condition that the "social temperature" is low. Existence of such effect essentially depends from environment "activity" (social and prophylactic). Results of our modeling qualitatively meet the tuberculosis dynamic spread d...

Krevchik, V D; Dahnovsky, Yu I; Semenov, M B; Shcherbakova, E V; Yamamoto, Kenji

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Sci Protek Signs Licensing Deal for Technology that Reduces Plant Disease |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sci Protek Signs Licensing Deal for Technology that Reduces Plant Disease Sci Protek Signs Licensing Deal for Technology that Reduces Plant Disease January 06, 2011 A California based small business, Sci Proteck, Inc, has recently licensed technology developed at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Chicago (UChicago) to protect plants from crop diseases. Research on this new method for inducing plant pathogen resistance began in 2005 following a grant from the National Science Foundation and research support from the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy. Principal developers include Timothy Tschaplinski at ORNL and Drs. Jean Greenberg and Ho Won Jung at the UChicago. ORNL and UChicago entered into an Inter-Institutional Agreement for licensing, patent prosecution, and royalty sharing.

247

Geek-Up[04.01.2011]: A Discovery to Fight Cancer and Other Diseases |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4.01.2011]: A Discovery to Fight Cancer and Other Diseases 4.01.2011]: A Discovery to Fight Cancer and Other Diseases Geek-Up[04.01.2011]: A Discovery to Fight Cancer and Other Diseases April 1, 2011 - 5:52pm Addthis Two structures of the Mre11-Rad50 complex were solved independently and overlaid, further revealing a flexible hinge in Rad50 near the Mre11 binding site | Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Two structures of the Mre11-Rad50 complex were solved independently and overlaid, further revealing a flexible hinge in Rad50 near the Mre11 binding site | Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Researchers discovered that a cell's speedy ability to repair damaged DNA relies on the remarkable flexibility of a molecular motor.

248

A Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating the Pathogen-Host Research Paradigm  

SciTech Connect

The 20th century was marked by extraordinary advances in our understanding of microbes and infectious disease, but pandemics remain, food and water borne illnesses are frequent, multi-drug resistant microbes are on the rise, and the needed drugs and vaccines have not been developed. The scientific approaches of the past—including the intense focus on individual genes and proteins typical of molecular biology—have not been sufficient to address these challenges. The first decade of the 21st century has seen remarkable innovations in technology and computational methods. These new tools provide nearly comprehensive views of complex biological systems and can provide a correspondingly deeper understanding of pathogen-host interactions. To take full advantage of these innovations, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases recently initiated the Systems Biology Program for Infectious Disease Research. As participants of the Systems Biology Program we think that the time is at hand to redefine the pathogen-host research paradigm.

Aderem, Alan; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Galagan, James; Kaiser, Shari; Korth, Marcus J.; Law, G. L.; McDermott, Jason E.; Proll, Sean; Rosenberger, Carrie; Schoolnik, Gary; Katze, Michael G.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Development of a Vaccine for Bacterial Kidney Disease in Salmon, 1986 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bacterial kidney disease (BRD) has been and remains a chronic contributory problem limiting the productivity of salmon of the Columbia River Basin. Control of this disease will not come easily, but it would lead to a tremendous increase in the health and numbers of salmon populations. Vaccination of salmon of Renibacterium salmoninarum (KDB) is a potentially successful method of controlling this disease. To date, however, no successful vaccine has been developed for general use. A possible solution to this problem,and thus the goal of this research, is to isolate the antigenic components of KDB and enhance their ability to activate the host defenses. This will be accomplished by the chemical modification of these antigens with potent immunomodulatory substances. These modified antigens will then be tested for their effectiveness in inducing immunity to BKD and thereby preventing the disease. The goal of the project's third year was to test the immunogenicity and prophylactic value in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) of various chemical conjugates of Renibacterium salmoninarum cells and major antigens. This was accomplished by assessing the serum antibody response, the cellular immune response (cellular proliferation), and the kinetics of mortality after Lethal injections of the bacterium. An important facet of this research is the identification and isolation of virulence factors. These studies are not only important to the dissection of the mechanism of pathogenesis of bacterial kidney disease, but the purification of such a factor(s) will insure the production of a more potent vaccine. The studies completed this year have: (1) identified antigenic material which protect; (2) identified antigenic material which can exacerbate the disease; (3) identified a possibly major mechanism of pathogenesis via the interference with antibody; (4) the general ability to produce delineated a western blot technique for identification of infected fish; (5) described the use of monoclonal antibodies for antigenic analysis; and (6) identified an unusual and dramatic effect of R. salmoninarum cells on phagocytic function.

Kaattari, Stephen L.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Gas Bubble Disease Monitoring and Research of Juvenile Salmonids : Annual Report 1996.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the project activities 1996--1997 contract year. This report is composed of three chapters which contain data and analyses of the three main elements of the project: field research to determine the vertical distribution of migrating juvenile salmonids, monitoring of juvenile migrants at dams on the Snake and Columbia rivers, and laboratory experiments to describe the progression of gas bubble disease signs leading to mortality. The major findings described in this report are: A miniature pressure-sensitive radio transmitter was found to be accurate and precise and, after compensation for water temperature, can be used to determine the depth of tagged-fish to within 0.32 m of the true depth (Chapter 1). Preliminary data from very few fish suggest that depth protects migrating juvenile steelhead from total dissolved gas supersaturation (Chapter 1). As in 1995, few fish had any signs of gas bubble disease, but it appeared that prevalence and severity increased as fish migrated downstream and in response to changing gas supersaturation (Chapter 2). It appeared to gas bubble disease was not a threat to migrating juvenile salmonids when total dissolved gas supersaturation was < 120% (Chapter 2). Laboratory studies suggest that external examinations are appropriate for determining the severity of gas bubble disease in juvenile salmonids (Chapter 3). The authors developed a new method for examining gill arches for intravascular bubbles by clamping the ventral aorta to reduce bleeding when arches were removed (Chapter 3). Despite an outbreak of bacterial kidney disease in the experimental fish, the data indicate that gas bubble disease is a progressive trauma that can be monitored (Chapter 3).

Maule, Alec G.; Beeman, John W.; Hans, Karen M.; Mesa, M.G.; Haner, P.; Warren, J.J. [Geological Survey, Cook, WA (United States). Columbia River Research Lab.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Independent Oversight Inspection of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program June 2010 Office of Independent Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS x Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program | i Abbreviations iii Executive Summary v 1 Introduction 1 2 Management and Oversight 3 3 Findings Requiring Corrective Action 14 4 Conclusions and Cross-Cutting Opportunities for Improvement 17 Appendix A - Supplemental Information 23 Appendix B - Background Information 26 Appendix C - AdvanceMed Hanford Beryllium Medical Support Program 32 Appendix D - CH2M-Hill Plateau Remediation Company 48 Appendix E - Mission Support Alliance 57 Appendix F - Washington Closure Hanford 71

252

Integrating domain knowledge with statistical and data mining methods for high-density genomic SNP disease association analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Genome-wide association studies can help identify multi-gene contributions to disease. As the number of high-density genomic markers tested increases, however, so does the number of loci associated with disease by chance. Performing a brute-force test ... Keywords: Data integration, Data mining, False discovery rate (FDR), Genome-wide association (GWA), Pathway-based disease association, Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP)

Valentin Dinu; Hongyu Zhao; Perry L. Miller

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Predicting Conversion from Mild Cognitive Impairment to Alzheimer’s Disease using Partially Ordered Models of Neuopsychological Measurements.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Background: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a risk factor for conversion to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Objectives: To identify predictors of the conversion of MCI to… (more)

Yang, Yan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health IssuesChapter 17 Vitamin A in Health and Disease in Developing Countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carotenoids & Retinoids; Molecular Aspects and Health Issues Chapter 17 Vitamin A in Health and Disease in Developing Countries Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   ...

255

General Counsel Legal Interpretation Regarding Medical Removal Protection Benefits Pursuant to 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following document is the Office of the General Counsel (GC) interpretation regarding Medical Removal Protection Benefits Pursuant to 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program.

256

Discovering genes-diseases associations from specialized literature using the grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a novel method for text mining on the Grid, aimed at pointing out hidden relationships for hypothesis generation and suitable for semi-interactive querying. The method is based on unsupervised clustering and the outputs are visualized ... Keywords: Grid, genes-diseases association, knowledge discovery, text mining, unsupervised clustering

Alberto Faro; Daniela Giordano; Francesco Maiorana; Concetto Spampinato

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Higher coronary heart disease and heart attack morbidity in Appalachian coal mining regions  

SciTech Connect

This study analyzes the U.S. 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data (N = 235,783) to test whether self-reported cardiovascular disease rates are higher in Appalachian coal mining counties compared to other counties after control for other risks. Dependent variables include self-reported measures of ever (1) being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with a specific form of CVD including (2) stroke, (3) heart attack, or (4) angina or coronary heart disease (CHD). Independent variables included coal mining, smoking, BMI, drinking, physician supply, diabetes co-morbidity, age, race/ethnicity, education, income, and others. SUDAAN Multilog models were estimated, and odds ratios tested for coal mining effects. After control for covariates, people in Appalachian coal mining areas reported significantly higher risk of CVD (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14-1.30), angina or CHO (OR = 1.29, 95% C1 = 1.19-1.39) and heart attack (OR = 1.19, 95% C1 = 1.10-1.30). Effects were present for both men and women. Cardiovascular diseases have been linked to both air and water contamination in ways consistent with toxicants found in coal and coal processing. Future research is indicated to assess air and water quality in coal mining communities in Appalachia, with corresponding environmental programs and standards established as indicated.

Hendryx, M.; Zullig, K.J. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Community Medicine

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

DISMON: Using Social Web and Semantic Technologies to Monitor Diseases in Limited Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information technology and, more precisely, the internet represent challenges and opportunities for medicine. Technology-driven medicine has changed how practitioners perform their roles in and medical information systems have recently gained momentum ... Keywords: Crawler, Diseases, Limited Environments, Medical Prediction, Ontology, Semantic Technologies, Social Web

Ricardo Colomo-Palacios; Ángel García-Crespo; Juan Miguel Gómez-Berbís; Ángel M. Lagares-Lemos; Miguel Lagares-Lemos

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A set of ontologies to drive tools for the control of vector-borne diseases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are developing a set of ontologies dealing with vector-borne diseases as well as the arthropod vectors that transmit them. After building ontologies for mosquito and tick anatomy we continued this project with an ontology of insecticide resistance ... Keywords: Anatomy, Arthropod vector, Database, Decision support system, Insecticide resistance, Malaria, Mosquito, Tick, Transmission

Pantelis Topalis; Emmanuel Dialynas; Elvira Mitraka; Elena Deligianni; Inga Siden-Kiamos; Christos Louis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Fracture, aging, and disease in bone J.W. Ager III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fracture, aging, and disease in bone J.W. Ager III Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley-known increase with age in fracture risk of human bone is essential. This also represents a challenge from accompanying the process of aging using appropriate multiscale experimental methods and relating them

Ritchie, Robert

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Genomics-enabled sensor platform for rapid detection of viruses related to disease outbreak.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioweapons and emerging infectious diseases pose growing threats to our national security. Both natural disease outbreak and outbreaks due to a bioterrorist attack are a challenge to detect, taking days after the outbreak to identify since most outbreaks are only recognized through reportable diseases by health departments and reports of unusual diseases by clinicians. In recent decades, arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) have emerged as some of the most significant threats to human health. They emerge, often unexpectedly, from cryptic transmission foci causing localized outbreaks that can rapidly spread to multiple continents due to increased human travel and trade. Currently, diagnosis of acute infections requires amplification of viral nucleic acids, which can be costly, highly specific, technically challenging and time consuming. No diagnostic devices suitable for use at the bedside or in an outbreak setting currently exist. The original goals of this project were to 1) develop two highly sensitive and specific diagnostic assays for detecting RNA from a wide range of arboviruses; one based on an electrochemical approach and the other a fluorescent based assay and 2) develop prototype microfluidic diagnostic platforms for preclinical and field testing that utilize the assays developed in goal 1. We generated and characterized suitable primers for West Nile Virus RNA detection. Both optical and electrochemical transduction technologies were developed for DNA-RNA hybridization detection and were implemented in microfluidic diagnostic sensing platforms that were developed in this project.

Brozik, Susan Marie; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Edwards, Thayne L.; Anderson, John Moses; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant; Branch, Darren W.; Wheeler, David Roger; Polsky, Ronen; Lopez, DeAnna M.; Ebel, Gregory D. [Colorado State University; Prasad, Abhishek N. [Colorado State University; Brozik, James A. [Washington State University; Rudolph, Angela R. [Washington State University; Wong, Lillian P. [Washington State University

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Scintigraphic evaluation of Lyme disease: Gallium-67 imaging of Lyme myositis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A patient suffering from Lyme disease had cardiac conduction abnormalities, symptoms of arthritis, and myalgia. A Ga-67 image showed evidence of endomyocarditis, but intense skeletal muscle uptake pointed to Lyme myositis. Reference is made to two other case reports of Lyme myositis.

Kengen, R.A.; v.d. Linde, M.; Sprenger, H.G.; Piers, D.A. (Univ. Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Discovery of temporal variation of arsenic in a historical blackfoot disease territory by time series analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time series analysis is useful tool for extracting interesting pattern from ordered sequence of observations. The Chianan Blackfoot disease region was selected as study area, and the monitoring data of arsenic in groundwater during the period of 2003 ... Keywords: arsenic, data mining, groundwater management, time series analysis, water quality

Jan-Yee Lee; Ting-Nien Wu

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Discovery of Temporal Variation of Arsenic in a Historical Blackfoot Disease Territory by Time Series Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time series analysis is useful tool for extracting interesting pattern from ordered sequence of observations. The Chianan Blackfoot disease region was selected as study area, and the monitoring data of arsenic in groundwater during the period of 2003 ... Keywords: groundwater management, data mining, time series analysis, arsenic, water quality

Jan-Yee Lee; Ting-Nien Wu

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

NMF-Based analysis of SPECT brain images for the diagnosis of alzheimer's disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper offers a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) technique for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by means of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) image classification The SPECT database for different patients is analyzed ... Keywords: biomedical engineering, image classification, non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), support vector machines (SVM)

Pablo Padilla; Juan-Manuel Górriz; Javier Ramírez; Elmar Lang; Rosa Chaves; Fermin Segovia; Ignacio Álvarez; Diego Salas-González; Miriam López

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Classification of SPECT Images of Normal Subjects versus Images of Alzheimer's Disease Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work aims at providing a tool to assist the interpretation of SPECT images for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Our approach is to test classifiers, which uses the intensity values of the images, without any prior information. Such a classifier ...

Jonathan Stoeckel; Grégoire Malandain; Octave Migneco; Pierre Malick Koulibaly; Philippe Robert; Nicholas Ayache; Jacques Darcourt

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

MAPKKKa is a positive regulator of cell death associated with both plant immunity and disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cell death (the hypersensitive response; HR) also occurs in disease-resistant plants, but this response kinase kinase kinase gene (MAPKKKa) that is required for the HR and resistance against Pseudomonas P. syringae infection. Over- expression of MAPKKKa in leaves activated MAPKs and caused pathogen

Pawlowski, Wojtek

268

Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin, 1983 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Microbiology at Oregon State University with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration conducted a study relating to the epidemiology and control of three fish diseases of salmonids in the Columbia River Basin. These three diseases were ceratomyxosis which is caused by the myxosporidan parasite Ceratomyxa shasta, bacterial kidney disease, the etiological agent of which is Renibacterium salmoninarum, and infectious hematopoietic necrosis, which is caused by a rhabdovirus. Each of these diseases is highly destructive and difficult or impossible to treat with antimicrobial agents. The presence of ceratomyxosis in rainbow trout exposed at McNary and Little Goose Dams extends the range of this disease about 200 miles further up the Columbia River and into the Snake River drainage. Wallowa steelhead trout were less resistant to this disease than other upriver stocks tested. Juvenile salmonids entering the Columbia River estuary were collected periodically between May to September, 1983. Nine percent of the beach seined chinook salmon and 5, 11 and 12%, respectively, of the purse seined coho and chinook salmon and steelhead trout were infected with Ceratomyxa shasta. Experiments indicated ceratomyxosis progresses in salt water at the same rate as in fresh water once the fish have become infected. These data indicate a longer exposure to infective stages of C. shasta than previously identified and that approximately 10% of the migrating salmonids are infected and will probably die from this organism after entering salt water. Since sampling began in 1981 the bacterial kidney disease organism, Renibacterium salmoninarum, has been detected by the fluorescent antibody test in seven salmonid species caught in the open ocean off the coasts of Washington and Oregon. The bacterium has been found primarily in chinook salmon (11%) with lesions in 2.5% of these fish. This disease was also detected at levels ranging from 17% in coho salmon to 25% in chinook salmon seined from the Columbia River just before entering the estuary. Interpretation of these numbers suggests an even greater economic impact on Columbia River salmonid stocks than that proposed for C. shasta. Fertilized eggs from bacterial kidney disease infected parents examined after one month of incubation revealed the presence of bacteria with identical morphology to R. salmoninarum on or in the egg wall further reinforcing the proposed vertical transmission of this disease organism. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus was recovered at the 67% level from seeded water samples supplemented with 1% fetal calf serum. Virus injected into unfertilized eggs survived for over two weeks; in eyed eggs the virus also replicated. Epizootics caused by IHNV occurred in two of the 8 separate groups of steelhead trout fingerlings held in LJV treated water at Round Butte Hatchery. Comparing these results to those in the vertical transmission experiment where none of the groups developed IHNV suggests that vertical transmission of IHNV, if it occurs, is a very infrequent or random event. On three occasions IHNV was detected in ovarian fluid samples after storage for 6--9 days at 4 C. No virus had been detected in these samples at spawning. This suggests the presence of an interfering substance, perhaps anti-IHNV antibody in ovarian fluid. This observation raises the possibility that IHNV is much more widespread throughout Columbia River Basin salmonid stocks than previously believed.

Fryer, John L.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Why my disease is important: metrics of disease occurrence used in the introductory sections of papers in three leading general medical journals in 1993 and 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, et al: Population health metrics: crucial inputs to the development of evidence for health policy. Popul Health Metr 2003, 1:6. 2. Murray CJL, Frenk J: Health metrics and evaluation: strengthening the science. Lancet 2008, 371:1191-9. 3. Reynolds K... , Lewis LB, Nolen , et al: Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Stroke: A Meta-analysis. J Am Med Assoc 2003, 289:579-88. 4. Gross C, Anderson GF, Powe NR: The relation between funding by the national institutes of health and the burden of disease. N Engl J Med...

Gouda, Hebe N; Powles, John W

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

270

Development of a Vaccine for Bacterial Kidney Disease in Salmon, 1985 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bacterial kidney disease (BRD) has been and remains a chronic contributory problem limiting the productivity of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. Control of this disease will not come easily, but it would lead to a tremendous increase in the health and numbers of salmon populations. Vaccination of salmon to Renibacterium salmoninarum (KDB) is a potentially successful method of controlling this disease. To date, however, no successful vaccine has been developed for general use. A possible solution to this problem, and thus the goal of this research, is to isolate the antigenic components of KDB and enhance their ability to activate the host defenses. This will be accomplished by the chemical modification of these antigens with potent immunomodulatory substances. These modified antigens will then be tested for their effectiveness in inducing immunity to BKD and thereby preventing the disease. The goal of the project's second year was to chemically modify the major antigens of Renibacteirium salmoninarum, immunize coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), and to test the immunogenicity of the preparations used. Immunogenicity of the antigenic material was tested by (1) admixture experiments, using whole KD cells with muramyl dipepetide, Vibrio anguillarum extract, E. coli lipopolysaccharide, or Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Freund's complete adjuvant. In addition to these goals a number of important techniques have been developed in order to facilitate the production of the vaccine. These procedures include: (1) the use of the soluble antigen for diagnosis in the ELISA and Western blot analysis, (2) detection of salmonid anti-KD antibodies by an ELISA technique, (3) detection of cellular immune responses to the soluble antigen, and (4) development of immersion challenge procedures for bacterial kidney disease (BKD).

Kaattari, Stephen L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

their Natural Regulators Production by PMN and PBMC in Patients with Lyme Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, it has been reported that TLR2 on macrophages plays a unique role in the inflammatory response and host defense to infection with Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) which is an etiologic agent of Lyme disease. Experimental studies show that PMNs also play an essential role in infection control by Bb. However, there is no available data about TLR2 expression on PMN in the course of Lyme disease. In the present study, TLR2 expression and production of IL-1? and IL-6 as well as their natural regulators (sIL-1RII, IL-1Ra and sIL-6R?, sgp130, resp) by PMN of peripheral blood in patients with Lyme disease were examined. For the purpose of comparison, the same activity of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was estimated. An effect of rhIL-15 on TLR2 and cytokine secretion was also studied. Increased TLR2 expression in unstimulated neutrophils suggests an important role of these cells in mechanism recognition of Bburgdorferiin patients with Lyme disease. The relationship between IL-1? and IL-6 as well as their regulators by unstimulated PMN and PBMC, observed in the present study, may lead to enhanced IL-6and to inhibition of IL-1?-mediated reactions in this patient group. Changes in the TLR2 expression after rhIL-15 stimulation appear to have a favorable effect on mechanism recognition of Bb. The relations between IL-6 and its regulators (sIL-6R? and sgp130) as well as between IL-1? and its regulators (IL-1Ra and sIL-1RII) after rhIL-15 stimulation may lead to enhanced IL-1?and IL-6-mediated inflammatory reactions in the course of Lyme disease. Copyright © 2006 E. Jablonska and M. Marcinczyk. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Ewa Jablonska; Magdalena Marcinczyk

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin, 1986 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Microbiology at Oregon State University with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration conducted a study relating to the epidemiology and control of three fish diseases of salmonids in the Columbia River Basin. These three diseases were ceratomyxosis caused by the myxosporidan parasite Ceratomyxa Shasta, bacterial kidney disease, the causative agent Renibacterium salmoninarum, and infectious hematopoietic necrosis, caused by a rhabdovirus. Each of these diseases is highly destructive and difficult or impossible to treat with antimicrobial agents. The geographic range of the infectious stage of C. Shasta has been extended to include the Snake River to the Oxbow and Hells Canyon Dams. These are the farthest upriver sites tested. Infections of ceratomyxosis were also initiated in the east fork of the Lewis River and in the Washougal River in Washington. Laboratory studies with this parasite failed to indicate that tubeficids are required in its life cycle. Bacterial kidney disease has been demonstrated in all life stages of salmonids: in the eggs, fry, smolts, juveniles and adults in the ocean, and in fish returning to fresh water. Monoclonal antibodies produced against R. salmoninarum demonstrated antigenic differences among isolates of the bacterium. Monoclonal antibodies also showed antigens of R. salmoninarum which are similar to those of a wide variety of gram positive and gram negative bacteria. A demonstration project at Round Butte Hatchery showed U V treatment to be an effective method for reducing the microbial population of the water supply and could reduce risks of IHNV. Tangential flow filtration was used successfully to concentrate IHNV from environmental water. At Round Butte Hatchery the carrier rate of IHNV in adults was very low and there was no subsequent mortality resulting from IHN in juveniles.

Fryer, John L.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Application of Paraconsistent Artificial Neural Networks as a Method of Aid in the Diagnosis of Alzheimer Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The visual analysis of EEG has shown useful in helping the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD) when the diagnosis remains uncertain, being used in some clinical protocols. However, such analysis is subject to the inherent equipment imprecision, patient ... Keywords: Alzheimer disease, Artificial neural network, Electroencephalogram, Paraconsistent logic, Pattern recognition

Helder Frederico Silva Lopes; Jair M. Abe; Renato Anghinah

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Nano/Microfluidics for diagnosis of infectious diseases in developing countries Won Gu Lee a,b,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nano/Microfluidics for diagnosis of infectious diseases in developing countries Won Gu Lee a,b,1 history: Received 15 June 2009 Accepted 14 September 2009 Available online 30 November 2009 Keywords: Nano/Microfluidics Infectious diseases HIV/AIDS Point-of-care Diagnostics Global health Nano/Microfluidic technologies

Demirci, Utkan

275

Outbreak of Minamata Disease (methyl mercury poisoning) in cats on northwestern Ontario Reserves  

SciTech Connect

Pathological, histochemical, and analytical studies have confirmed the presence of Minamata Disease in at least one of two cats that lived on or near Indian Reserves in Northwestern Ontario, Canada. These symptoms parallel the Japanese experience in the 1950s and raise ominous health considerations for the Indians who share their diet of fish. After being fed a diet that primarily consisted of fish from the English River, one cat developed such acute neurological symptoms as an ataxic gait, other abnormal movements, uncontrolled howling, and seizures. The total mercury analyses showed high levels in all tissues with 16.4 mg/kg in the brain comparable with symptomatic cats in Japan. A second cat that appeared normal had 6.9 mg/kg in its brain tissues, and pathological studies confirmed the presence of latent Minamata Disease.

Takeuchi, T. (Kumamoto Univ., Japan); D' Itri, F.M.; Fischer, P.V.; Annett, C.S.; Okabe, M.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Outbreak of minamata disease (methyl mercury poisoning) in cats on Northwestern Ontario reserves  

SciTech Connect

Pathological, histochemical, and analytical studies have confirmed the presence of Minamata Disease in at least one of two cats that lived on or near Indian Reserves in Northwestern Ontario, Canada. These symptoms parallel the Japanese experience in the 1950s and raise ominous health considerations for the Indians who share their diet of fish. After being fed a diet that primarily consisted of fish from the English River, one cat developed such acute neurological symptoms as an ataxic gait, other abnormal movements, uncontrolled howling, and seizures. The total mercury analyses showed high levels in all tissues with 16.4 mg/kg in the brain comparable with symptomatic cats in Japan. A second cat that appeared normal had 6.9 mg/kg in its brain tissues, and pathological studies confirmed the presence of latent Minamata Disease.

Takeuchi, T. (Kumamoto Univ., Japan); D' Itri, F.M.; Fischer, P.V.; Annett, C.S.; Okabe, M.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Interactions of phagocytes with the Lyme disease spirochete: role of the Fc receptor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phagocytic capacity of murine and human mononuclear and polymorphonuclear phagocytes (including peripheral blood monocytes and neutrophils), rabbit and murine peritoneal exudate cells, and the murine macrophage cell line P388D1 against the Lyme disease spirochete was studied. All of these cells were capable of phagocytosing the spirochete; phagocytosis was measured by the uptake of radiolabeled spirochetes, the appearance of immunofluorescent bodies in phagocytic cells, and electron microscopy. Both opsonized and nonopsonized organisms were phagocytosed. The uptake of opsonized organisms by neutrophils was blocked by a monoclonal antibody specific for the Fc receptor and by immune complexes; these findings suggested that most phagocytosis is mediated by the Fc receptor. Similarly, the uptake of opsonized organisms by human monocytes was inhibited by human monomeric IgG1 and by immune complexes. These results illustrate the role of immune phagocytosis of spirochetes in host defense against Lyme disease.

Benach, J.L.; Fleit, H.B.; Habicht, G.S.; Coleman, J.L.; Bosler, E.M.; Lane, B.P.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Microbiology at Oregon State University with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration has conducted a study since 1983 relating to the epidemiology and control of three diseases of salmonids in the Columbia River Basin. These diseases are ceratomyxosis, caused by the protozoan parasite Ceratomyxa Shasta, bacterial kidney disease, the etiological agent of which is Renibacterium salmoninarum and infectious hematopoietic necrosis which is caused by a rhabdovirus. Each of these diseases is difficult or impossible to treat with antimicrobial agents. The presence of the infectious stage of C. shasta was again detected at Little Goose Dam on the Snake River. The prevalence of ceratomyxosis increased from 1.1% in 1984 to 10% in 1985. None of the susceptible rainbow trout exposed in the Yakima and Umatilla Rivers died of this disease. Ceratomyxosis in resistant chinook salmon smolts seined from the Columbia River just above the estuary seems dependent on whether or not they are held after capture in fresh or salt water. In fresh water the disease incidence ranged from 7--19%, whereas in salt water it ranged from 0--3%. These results which suggest that recovery from ceratomyxosis may occur after the smolts enter salt water are different from those obtained with susceptible Alsea steelhead trout where experimental groups in salt water have died at the same rate as those in fresh water. Comparing data from groups of Columbia River chinook smolts held after capture in either fresh or salt water, R. salmoninarum is a much more effective pathogen in the salt water environment. After four years of sampling smolts in the open ocean, numbers of this microorganism sufficient to cause death have been detected in chinook (7%) and, coho salmon (2%) and steelhead trout (1%). Results from three years of sampling have consistently indicated that additional fish infected with R. salmoninarum will be detected if egg washings are included in the procedures for monitoring bacterial kidney disease in adults. Antigenic differences among strains of R. salmoninarum and common antigens present on both R. salmoninarum and other Gram positive bacteria have been demonstrated for the first time using monoclonal antibodies. All of the monoclonal antibodies belong to the murine IgGl, IgG3 or TgG2a class and subclass. Field studies at Round Butte Hatchery with the molecular filtration apparatus detected IHNV in effluent water from the adult holding pond and in water from a tank containing steelhead trout fry infected with IHN disease. The concentrations of IHNV detected in these samples suggested that in the order of 10{sup 10} virions are being released each day into the Deschutes River at the peak of steelhead trout spawning at Round Butte Hatchery. Isolation of IHNV from dead eggs suggested that virus replication during incubation may be a possible cause of egg mortality. Two possible reasons for inconsistencies in the data from the IHNV transmission studies at Round Butte Hatchery are: (1) UV treatment does not completely sterilize the water and (2) vertical transmission occurs but under, as yet, undescribed conditions. Constant IHNV production over a prolonged period has been recorded in unfiltered ovarian fluid samples. Filtration eliminates this virus production. These observations suggest that cellular components in ovarian fluid are responsible for producing the delayed appearance of IHNV after storage at 4 C for 8 to 16 days.

Fryer, John L.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Application of Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) on DaTSCAN SPECT images to explore Parkinson Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parkinsonism is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. It includes several pathologies with similar symptoms, what makes the diagnosis really difficult. I-ioflupane allows to obtain in vivo images of the brain that can be used to assist the ... Keywords: Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD), DaTSCAN, Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD), Independent Component Analysis (ICA), Parkinson Disease (PD), Parkinsonian Syndrome (PS), Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Support Vector Machines (SVM)

A. Rojas; J. M. GóRriz; J. RamíRez; I. A. IlláN; F. J. MartíNez-Murcia; A. Ortiz; M. GóMez RíO; M. Moreno-Caballero

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program, February 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Independent Oversight Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program February 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope...................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results.................................................................................................................................... 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A standard dose of radiation for microscopic disease is not appropriate  

SciTech Connect

Elective irradiation of sites of potential occult tumor spread is often part of a patient's radiation therapy program. The required radiation dose (D) depends on the probability that occult disease exists (P(occ)), the number of sites at risk (A), the number of tumor clonogens present (Ni), their radiation sensitivity, and the desired control rate. An exponential model of cell survival is used to quantify the importance of these factors. Control Probability = (1 - Pocc x (1 - e-Ni x (SF2)D/2))A; SF2 = surviving fraction after 2 Gy. Implications for clinical radiation therapy include: 1. Since the number of clonogens in an occult site may vary from 10 degrees to 10(8), Ni is the major determinant of the required dose. The intrinsic radiation sensitivity of the clonogens (SF2) is also extremely important in determining the dose. Other factors are less influential since they vary less. 2. The variability of Ni (8 logs) is larger than the variation in cell number seen with gross disease (1 cm3 versus 1000 cm3, 3 logs). When Ni approximately 10(8), the required dose approaches that needed for small volume gross disease (10(9) cells, 1 cm3). 3. The dose prescribed to elective sites should reflect the risk of occult disease based on the primary tumor site, stage, and grade. 4. Regions where clinicoradiologic evaluation is difficult (e.g., pelvis and obese neck) require higher doses because macroscopic tumor deposits may exist. 5. Relatively low doses (10 to 30 Gy) are often thought to be inadequate for microscopic tumor. However, similar doses have been reported to sterilize microscopic tumor in ovarian, rectal, bladder, breast, and head and neck carcinomas. Relatively low doses should not be discounted since they may be useful in select cases when normal tissue tolerances and/or previous irradiation treatment limit the radiation dose.

Marks, L.B. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA))

1990-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

In silico approach to discover multi-target-directed ligands for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-target directed (MTD) drugs have been found to be very effective in controlling neurodegenerative diseases. We have developed an in silico strategy to screen molecules for both AChE and BACE-1 enzyme dual inhibition. Pharmacophore model ... Keywords: ?-secretase, in silico drug design, ADMET screening, GOLD, GOLD score, HIPHOP, Lipinski's rule, acetylcholinesterase, blood-brain barrier, cholinesterase inhibitors, discovery studio, docking, pharmacophore modeling, protein data bank, virtual screening

Ankit Tyagi; Shikhar Gupta; C. Gopi Mohan

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Epithelioid Angiosarcoma With Metastatic Disease After Endovascular Therapy of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Malignancies of the aortic wall represent a rare condition, and only a few reports have covered cases of sarcomas arising at the site of a prosthesis made of Dacron. A coincidence with endovascular repair has only been reported in one case to date. We report a patient with epithelioid angiosarcoma and metastatic disease, which was found in an aneurysmal sac after endovascular aortic repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

Schmehl, Joerg, E-mail: joerg.schmehl@med.uni-tuebingen.de [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Scharpf, Marcus [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Institute of Pathology and Neuropathology (Germany); Brechtel, Klaus [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Kalender, Guenay [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Germany); Heller, Stephan; Claussen, Claus D. [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Lescan, Mario [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Germany)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Spatio-temporal relationships between feral hogs and cattle with implicatons for disease transmission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is widely recognized that livestock industries are vulnerable to intentional or accidental introductions of Foreign Animal Diseases (FADs). Combating disease is difficult because of unknown wildlife-livestock interactions. Feral hogs (Sus scrofa) could harbor and shed disease in areas used by domestic livestock such as cattle (Bos taurus). Extent of risk logically depends on spatio-temporal interactions between species. I used Global Positioning System (GPS) collars on cattle and hogs in combination with a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for detailed analysis on movement patterns of these 2 species on a ranch in southwestern Texas, USA. Motion-triggered video recorders were also utilized to determine interspecific activity patterns. I tested hypotheses that spatio-temporal distributions of domestic cattle and feral hogs on rangeland overlap and that interspecific contact occurs. If these posits are true, it is possible that introduced pathogens like foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) could be transmitted from feral hogs to cattle. Using a rate of 1 GPS fix/15 min (96 fixes/day), I found that spatial distribution of individual hogs and cattle overlapped on both the 95% and 50% kernel area use among 4 seasons. Both cows and feral hogs used Clay Flat, Clay Loam, and Rolling Hardland more so than other range sites. During Summer 2004, riparian zones were the most used feature, identified at 14% (2,760/19,365) of cattle and 70% (445/632) of hog fixes. Other than brush strips, cattle and feral hogs primarily interacted at riparian zones, fencelines, and roads. There were no direct interspecific contacts evident from GPS data, but 3 cases were recorded from video data. Indirect interspecific contacts that may be sufficient for disease transmission occurred much more frequently (GPS = 3.35 indirect contacts/day, video = cows follow hogs: 0.69 indirect contacts/day and hogs follow cows: 0.54 indirect contacts/day). Research results suggested that both species often travel along the same roads and fencelines to water and food sources, especially during extreme heat and low-precipitation conditions. This research provides basic information needed to improve models for management of FAD outbreaks in the U.S., based on specific knowledge of landscape usage and movement patterns of feral hogs and cattle.

Deck, Aubrey Lynn

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 19 Functionalities and Production with Biocatalysis of Two Highly Polyunsaturated Phospholipids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 19 Functionalities and Production with Biocatalysis of Two Highly Polyunsaturated Phospholipids Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

286

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 6 Effect of Pests and Diseases on Oil Palm Yield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 6 Effect of Pests and Diseases on Oil Palm Yield Food Science Health Nutrition Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Process

287

Flow cytometry quantitation of dopamine receptor D2 loss as a sensitive measure of Huntington's Disease progression in mouse neurons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mouse models of Huntington's Disease (HD) are often used for testing potential therapeutic compounds. These experiments require substantial investments in time and resources, and have yet to produce any intervention that ...

Crook, Zachary R. (Zachary Ryan)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 19 Linoleic Acids and Cancer Cell Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 19 Linoleic Acids and Cancer Cell Functions Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapt

289

Targeted drug delivery by novel polymer-drug conjugates containing linkers cleavable by disease-associated enzymes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have conceptualized a new class of polymer-linker-drug conjugates to achieve targeted drug delivery for the systemic treatment of cancer and other inflammatory diseases. The physiochemical properties of the polymer allow ...

Chau, Ying

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 16 Health Benefits of Dietary Diacylglycerol In Practical Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 16 Health Benefits of Dietary Diacylglycerol In Practical Use Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of

291

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 12 a-Linolenic Acid and Heart Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 12 a-Linolenic Acid and Heart Disease Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable

292

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 16 Flaxseed and Flaxseed Products in Kidney Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 16 Flaxseed and Flaxseed Products in Kidney Disease Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

293

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 1 Seeking Better Dietary Fats for Human Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 1 Seeking Better Dietary Fats for Human Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 1 Seeki

294

Changes in Gas Bubble Disease Signs for Migrating Juvenile Salmonids Experimentally Exposed to Supersaturated Gasses, 1996-1997 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to answer the question of whether gas bubble disease (GBD) signs change as a result of the hydrostatic conditions juvenile salmonids encounter when they enter the turbine intake of hydroelectric projects during their downstream migration.

Absolon, Randall F.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 15 Flaxseed, Fiber and Coronary Heart Disease: Clinical Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 15 Flaxseed, Fiber and Coronary Heart Disease: Clinical Studies Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

296

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 11 Trans Fatty Acids and Cardiometabolic Syndrome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 11 Trans Fatty Acids and Cardiometabolic Syndrome Health Nutrition Biochemistry Trans eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

297

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 27 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Effects on Steroid-hormone Biosynthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 27 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Effects on Steroid-hormone Biosynthesis Health eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Ch

298

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 31 Food Sources and Intakes of Omega-3 Fatty Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 31 Food Sources and Intakes of Omega-3 Fatty Acids Health Nutrition Biochemistry Omega 3 eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

299

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 21 Fatty Acids and Lipids in Neurobiology: A Brief Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 21 Fatty Acids and Lipids in Neurobiology: A Brief Overview Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

300

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 17 Fatty Acid Metabolism and Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 17 Fatty Acid Metabolism and Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptors Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downl

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 10 Fatty Acids in Nuts: Cardiometabolic Health Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 10 Fatty Acids in Nuts: Cardiometabolic Health Benefits Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

302

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 4 Fatty Acids and Cardiac Ischemia-reperfusion Injury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 4 Fatty Acids and Cardiac Ischemia-reperfusion Injury Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

303

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 1 Trans and Other Fatty Acids: Effects on Endothelial Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 1 Trans and Other Fatty Acids: Effects on Endothelial Functions Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable p

304

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 2 Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids And Cancer Cachexia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 2 Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids And Cancer Cachexia Health Nutrition Biochemistry Omega 3 eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

305

Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin, 1987 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Microbiology at Oregon State University with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration has been conducting a study concerning the epidemiology and control of three fish pathogens which cause major disease problems in salmonids of the Columbia River basin. The pathogens studied include Cera to myxa Shasta, the myxosporean parasite which causes ceratomyxosis; Renibacterium salmoninarum, the bacterium which is the etiological agent of bacterial kidney disease; and the rhabdovirus which causes infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN). During this project, the host and geographic range of C. Shasta have been more precisely determined and the known geographic range has been significantly expanded. The effects of the parasite on fish migrating through the Columbia River and on their introduction into salt water have been examined. Similar studies have been conducted with R. salmoninarum and it has been shown that bacterial kidney disease occurs at all life stages of salmonids and is responsible for mortality in both fresh and salt water. It has also been demonstrated that different isolates of R. salmoninarum have different antigenic composition. Results of demonstration projects designed to control IHN by using UV treated water for early rearing of salmonid fry were equivocal. The scope of the project was considerably narrowed and focused during the past two years The project has concentrated on a study concerning the biology of C. Shasta and the identification of potential chemotherapeutants for control of bacterial kidney disease. The emphasis of work on C. Shasta has been its pathogenesis. This aspect of the parasite has been investigated using histopathologic and immunologic methodology. Mode of transmission, the nature of the infectious stage, and potential intermediate hosts of the parasite have also been areas of active research. Classes of chemotherapeutants with the highest potential for efficacy against R. salmoninarum have been identified through literature searches and consultation with pharmacologists. Experimental drugs have been requested and received from several pharmaceutical manufacturers. The in vitro sensitivity of R. salmoninarum and other selected fish pathogens to more than 100 antimicrobial compounds has been tested. The project is related to measure 704(h)(2)(d) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The results will contribute to fish health which will directly contribute to the protection of fish.

Fryer, John L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Two-transcript gene expression classifiers in the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ral ssBioMed CentBMC Genomics Open AcceResearch article Two-transcript gene expression classifiers in the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases Lucas B Edelman1,2,6, Giuseppe Toia1,2, Donald Geman4, Wei Zhang5 and Nathan D Price*1,2,3 Address... : 1Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA, 2Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA, 3Department of Chemical and Biomolecular...

Edelman, Lucas B; Toia, Giuseppe; Geman, Donald; Zhang, Wei; Price, Nathan D

2009-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

307

A Hybrid Sensitivity Analysis Approach for Agent-based Disease Spread Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agent-based models (ABM) have been widely deployed in different fields for studying the collective behavior of large numbers of interacting agents. Of particular interest lately is the application of agent-based and hybrid models to epidemiology, specifically Agent-based Disease Spread Models (ABDSM). Validation (one aspect of the means to achieve dependability) of ABDSM simulation models is extremely important. It ensures that the right model has been built and lends confidence to the use of that model to inform critical decisions. In this report, we describe our preliminary efforts in ABDSM validation by using hybrid model fusion technology.

Pullum, Laura L [ORNL; Cui, Xiaohui [New York Institute of Technology (NYIT)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Essays on Modeling the Economic Impacts of a Foreign Animal Disease on the United States Agricultural Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foreign animal disease can cause serious damage to the United States (US) agricultural sector and foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), in particular, poses a serious threat. FMD causes death and reduced fecundity in infected animals, as well as significant economic consequences. FMD damages can likely be reduced through implementing pre-planned response strategies. Empirical studies have evaluated the economic consequences of alternative strategies, but typically employ simplified models. This dissertation seeks to improve US preparedness for avoiding and/or responding to an animal disease outbreak by addressing three issues related to strategy assessment in the context of FMD: integrated multi region economic and epidemic evaluation, inclusion of risk, and information uncertainty. An integrated economic/epidemic evaluation is done to examine the impact of various control strategies. This is done by combining a stochastic, spatial FMD simulation model with a national level, regionally disaggregated agricultural sector mathematical programming economic model. In the analysis, strategies are examined in the context of California's dairy industry. Alternative vaccination, disease detection and movement restriction strategies are considered as are trade restrictions. The results reported include epidemic impacts, national economic impacts, prices, regional producer impacts, and disease control costs under the alternative strategies. Results suggest that, including trade restrictions, the median national loss from the disease outbreak is as much as $17 billion when feed can enter the movement restriction zone. Early detection reduces the median loss and the standard deviation of losses. Vaccination does not reduce the median disease loss, but does have a smaller standard deviation of loss which would indicate it is a risk reducing strategy. Risk in foreign animal disease outbreaks is present from several sources; however, studies comparing alternative control strategies assume risk neutrality. In reality, there will be a desire to minimize the national loss as well as minimize the chance of an extreme outcome from the disease (i.e. risk aversion). We perform analysis on FMD control strategies using breakeven risk aversion coefficients in the context of an outbreak in the Texas High Plains. Results suggest that vaccination while not reducing average losses is a risk reducing strategy. Another issue related to risk and uncertainty is the response of consumers and domestic markets to the presence of FMD. Using a highly publicized possible FMD outbreak in Kansas that did not turn out to be true, we examine the role of information uncertainty in futures market response. Results suggest that livestock futures markets respond to adverse information even when that information is untrue. Furthermore, the existence of herding behavior and potential for momentum trading exaggerate the impact of information uncertainty related to animal disease.

Hagerman, Amy Deann

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Risk of Developing Cardiovascular Disease After Involved Node Radiotherapy Versus Mantle Field for Hodgkin Lymphoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors are known to have increased cardiac mortality and morbidity. The risk of developing cardiovascular disease after involved node radiotherapy (INRT) is currently unresolved, inasmuch as present clinical data are derived from patients treated with the outdated mantle field (MF) technique. Methods and Materials: We included all adolescents and young adults with supradiaphragmatic, clinical Stage I-II HL treated at our institution from 2006 to 2010 (29 patients). All patients were treated with chemotherapy and INRT to 30 to 36 Gy. We then simulated a MF plan for each patient with a prescribed dose of 36 Gy. A logistic dose-response curve for the 25-year absolute excess risk of cardiovascular disease was derived and applied to each patient using the individual dose-volume histograms. Results: The mean doses to the heart, four heart valves, and coronary arteries were significantly lower for INRT than for MF treatment. However, the range in doses with INRT treatment was substantial, and for a subgroup of patients, with lymphoma below the fourth thoracic vertebrae, we estimated a 25-year absolute excess risk of any cardiac event of as much as 5.1%. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates a potential for individualizing treatment by selecting the patients for whom INRT provides sufficient cardiac protection for current technology; and a subgroup of patients, who still receive high cardiac doses, who would benefit from more advanced radiation technique.

Maraldo, Maja V., E-mail: dra.maraldo@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Brodin, Nils Patrik; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Aznar, Marianne C.; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Petersen, Peter M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Specht, Lena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

0 A Data-Adaptive Sum Test for Disease Association with Multiple Common or Rare Variants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Given typically weak associations between complex diseases and common variants, and emerging approaches to genotyping rare variants (e.g. by next-generation resequencing), there is an urgent demand to develop powerful association tests that are applicable to detecting disease association with both common and rare variants. In this article we develop such a test. It is based on data-adaptive modifications to a so-called Sum test originally proposed for common variants, which aims to strike a balance in utilizing information in multiple markers in linkage disequilibrium (LD) while reducing the cost of large degrees of freedom (DF) or of multiple testing adjustment. When applied to multiple common or rare variants in a candidate region, the proposed test is easy to use with DF=1 and without need for multiple testing adjustment. We show that the proposed test has high power across a wide range of scenarios with either common or rare variants, or both. In particular, under some situations the proposed test performs better than several commonly used methods. Key words: Genome-wide association study; GWAS; logistic regression; multi-marker analysis; SNP 1

Fang Han; Wei Pan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Resected Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Patterns of Failure and Disease-Related Outcomes With or Without Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are rare and have better disease-related outcomes compared with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Surgical resection remains the standard of care, although many patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Little is known regarding the use of radiotherapy in the prevention of local recurrence after resection. To better define the role of radiotherapy, we performed an analysis of resected patients at our institution. Methods: Between 1994 and 2009, 33 patients with NET of the pancreatic head and neck underwent treatment with curative intent at Duke University Medical Center. Sixteen patients were treated with surgical resection alone while an additional 17 underwent resection with adjuvant or neoadjuvant radiation therapy, usually with concurrent fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy (CMT). Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy and median follow-up 28 months. Results: Thirteen patients (39%) experienced treatment failure. Eleven of the initial failures were distant, one was local only and one was local and distant. Two-year overall survival was 77% for all patients. Two-year local control for all patients was 87%: 85% for the CMT group and 90% for the surgery alone group (p = 0.38). Two-year distant metastasis-free survival was 56% for all patients: 46% and 69% for the CMT and surgery patients, respectively (p = 0.10). Conclusions: The primary mode of failure is distant which often results in mortality, with local failure occurring much less commonly. The role of radiotherapy in the adjuvant management of NET remains unclear.

Zagar, Timothy M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); White, Rebekah R. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Tyler, Douglas S. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Papavassiliou, Paulie [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Papalezova, Katia T. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Guy, Cynthia D. [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Clough, Robert W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Czito, Brian G., E-mail: czito001@mc.duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Biodiversity of Borrelia burgdorferi Strains in Tissues of Lyme Disease Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plant and animal biodiversity are essential to ecosystem health and can provide benefits to humans ranging from aesthetics to maintaining air quality. Although the importance of biodiversity to ecology and conservation biology is obvious, such measures have not been applied to strains of an invasive bacterium found in human tissues during infection. In this study, we compared the strain biodiversity of Borrelia burgdorferi found in tick populations with that found in skin, blood, synovial fluid or cerebrospinal fluid of Lyme disease patients. The biodiversity of B. burgdorferi strains is significantly greater in tick populations than in the skin of patients with erythema migrans. In turn, strains from skin are significantly more diverse than strains at any of the disseminated sites. The cerebrospinal fluid of patients with neurologic Lyme disease harbored the least pathogen biodiversity. These results suggest that human tissues act as niches that can allow entry to or maintain only a subset of the total pathogen population. These data help to explain prior clinical observations on the natural history of B. burgdorferi infection and raise several questions that may help to direct future research to better understand the pathogenesis of this infection.

Dustin Brisson; Nilofer Baxamusa; Ira Schwartz; Gary P. Wormser

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Proteomic Analysis of Lyme Disease: Global Protein Comparison of Three Strains of Borrelia burgdorferi  

SciTech Connect

The Borrelia burgdorferi spirochete is the causative agent of Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne disease in the United States. It has been studied extensively to help understand its pathogenicity of infection and how it can persist in different mammalian hosts. We report the proteomic analysis of the archetype B. burgdorferi B31 strain and two other strains (ND40, and JD-1) having different Borrelia pathotypes using strong cation exchange fractionation of proteolytic peptides followed by high-resolution, reversed phase capillary liquid chromatography coupled with ion trap tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Protein identification was facilitated by the availability of the complete B31 genome sequence. A total of 665 Borrelia proteins were identified representing {approx}38% coverage of the theoretical B31 proteome. A significant overlap was observed between the identified proteins in direct comparisons between any two strains (>72%), but distinct differences were observed among identified hypothetical and outer membrane proteins of the three strains. Such a concurrent proteomic overview of three Borrelia strains based upon only the B31 genome sequence is shown to provide significant insights into the presence or absence of specific proteins and a broad overall comparison among strains.

Jacobs, Jon M.; Yang, Xiaohua; Luft, Benjamin J.; Dunn, John J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Neonatal chronic lung disease in extremely immature baboons. Am J Respir Crit Care Med  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A borderline viability model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD)/chronic lung disease of infancy (CLD) with pathophysiologic parameters consistent with those in extremely immature humans with BPD/CLD is described. After prenatal steroid treatment of pregnant dams, 12 premature baboons were delivered by cesarean-section at 125 d (term gestation, 185 d), treated with exogenous surfactant, and maintained on appropriate oxygen and positive pressure ventilation for at least 1 to 2 mo. In spite of appropriate oxygenation (median FI O2 at 28 d ? 0.32; range, 0.21 to 0.50) and ventilatory strategies to prevent volutrauma, the baboons exhibited pulmonary pathologic lesions known to occur in extremely immature humans of less than 1,000 g: alveolar hypoplasia, variable saccular wall fibrosis, and minimal, if any, airway disease. The CLD baboon lungs showed significantly decreased alveolization and internal surface area measurements when compared with term and term ? 2-mo air-breathing controls. A decrease in capillary vasculature was evident by PECAM staining, accompanied by dysmorphic changes. Significant elevations of TNF-?, IL-6, IL-8 levels, but not of IL-1 ? and IL-10, in tracheal aspirate fluids were present at various times during the period of ventilatory support, supporting a role for mediator-induced autoinflammation. IL-8 levels were elevated in necropsy lavages of animals with significant lung infection. This model demonstrates that impaired alveolization

Jacqueline J. Coalson; Vicki T. Winter; Theresa Siler-khodr; Bradley A. Yoder

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Percutaneous Image-Guided Aspiration and Sclerosis of Adventitial Cystic Disease of the Femoral Vein  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adventitial cystic disease (ACD), also known as cystic mucoid or myxomatous degeneration, is a rare vascular disease mainly seen in arteries. Seventeen cases have been reported in the world literature. We report the first known case of ACD successfully treated with percutaneous image-guided ethanol sclerosis. Computed tomography showed a cystic mass adherent to the wall of the common femoral vein. An ultrasound examination revealed a deep venous thrombosis of the leg, secondary to extrinsic compression of the common femoral vein. Three years prior to our procedure, the cyst was aspirated, which partially relieved the patient's symptoms. Over the following 3 years the patient's symptoms worsened and a 10-cm discrepancy in thigh size developed, in addition to the deep venous thrombosis associated with lower-extremity edema. Using ultrasound guidance and fluoroscopic control, the cyst was drained and then sclerosed with absolute ethanol. The patient's symptoms and leg swelling resolved completely within several weeks. Follow-up physical examination and duplex ultrasound 6 months following sclerosis demonstrated resolution of the symptoms and elimination of the extrinsic compression effect of the ACD on the common femoral vein.

Johnson, Jason M. [University of Vermont College of Medicine, Fletcher Allen Health Care, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Kiankhooy, Armin; Bertges, Daniel J. [Fletcher Allen Health Care, Section of Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery (United States); Morris, Christopher S., E-mail: Christopher.Morris@vtmednet.or [University of Vermont College of Medicine, Fletcher Allen Health Care, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

MODELING HOST-PATHOGEN INTERACTIONS: COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY AND BIOINFORMATICS FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASE RESEARCH (Session introduction)  

SciTech Connect

Pathogenic infections are a major cause of both human disease and loss of crop yields and animal stocks and thus cause immense damage to the worldwide economy. The significance of infectious diseases is expected to increase in an ever more connected warming world, in which new viral, bacterial and fungal pathogens can find novel hosts and ecologic niches. At the same time, the complex and sophisticated mechanisms by which diverse pathogenic agents evade defense mechanisms and subvert their hosts networks to suit their lifestyle needs is still very incompletely understood especially from a systems perspective [1]. Thus, understanding host-pathogen interactions is both an important and a scientifically fascinating topic. Recently, technology has offered the opportunity to investigate host-pathogen interactions on a level of detail and scope that offers immense computational and analytical possibilities. Genome sequencing was pioneered on some of these pathogens, and the number of strains and variants of pathogens sequenced to date vastly outnumbers the number of host genomes available. At the same time, for both plant and human hosts more and more data on population level genomic variation becomes available and offers a rich field for analysis into the genetic interactions between host and pathogen.

McDermott, Jason E.; Braun, Pascal; Bonneau, Richard A.; Hyduke, Daniel R.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Development of a Vaccine for Bacterial Kidney Disease in Salmon, 1988 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bacterial kidney disease of salmonids is a very complex disease which appears to exploit a variety of pathogenic mechanisms. An understanding of these mechanisms is essential to the development of efficacious vaccines. It has become well established from the studies published .in this report and those of others that soluble antigens which are secreted by Renibacterium salmoninarum have toxigenic potential. If they are found to be responsible for mortality, the development of toxoid(s) could be paramount to the production of a vaccine. One must, however, be circumspect in producing a vaccine. A thorough knowledge, not only of the pathogen, but also of the immune system of the host is an absolute requirement. This becomes of particular importance when dealing with fish diseases, since the field of fish immunology is still within its infancy. This lack of knowledge is particularly felt when the induction of a prophylactic immune response concomitantly leads to pathological side effects which may be as destructive as the original infection. Indeed, it appears that some aspects of BKD may be due to the induction of hypersensitivity reactions. If such immunopathologies are expressed, it is prudent to thoroughly evaluate the nature of the immunoprophylaxis to insure that these harmful sequelae do not occur. Evaluation of a variety of antigens, adjuvants, immune responses, and survival data leads us to recommend that attempts at prophylaxis against BKD should center upon the elicitation of cellular immunity utilizing preparations of Mycobacterium chelonii. The choice of this species of mycobacteria was made because of its effectiveness, ease of maintenance and production, and the lack of need for its propagation within containment facilities. These assets are important to consider if large scale vaccine production is to be profitable. As can be seen from the data provided, M. chelonii alone is capable of producing prophylaxis to BKD, however, this is likely due to the induction of non-specific immunity and not to the existence of crossreactive antigens. Therefore, future studies should be devoted to further work on the induction of specific immunoprophylaxis incorporating this agent.

Kaattari, Stephen L.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

EA-0896; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) Center For Nuclear Medicine Research In Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West 6; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 DOCUMENT SUMMARY 1.1. Description 1.2 Alternatives 1.3 Affected Environment 1.4 Construction Impacts 1.5 Operating Impacts 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION 3.0 DESCRIPTION OF ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION 3.1 Description of the Proposed Action 3.2.1 Construction Activities 3.2.2 Operation Activities 3.3 The No Action Alternative 3.4 Site Alternatives 4.0 THE AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 5.0 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 5.1 Construction Impacts 5.1.1 Sensitive Resources

319

X-ray Method Shows How Frog Embryos Could Help Thwart Disease  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanocrystals Grow from Liquid Interface Nanocrystals Grow from Liquid Interface Eleventh Arthur H. Compton Award Announced Borland Awarded ACFA-IPAC'13 Prize for Accelerator Science President Obama at the Advanced Photon Source Von Dreele Receives Hanawalt Award APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed X-ray Method Shows How Frog Embryos Could Help Thwart Disease MAY 20, 2013 Bookmark and Share X-ray phase-contrast tomography: Early frog embryo in cellular resolution (left) and cell and tissue motion captured and visualized using flow analysis (right). Image: Alexey Ershov/KIT From R&D Magazine online: An international team of scientists using a new X-ray method recorded the internal structure and cell movement inside a living frog embryo in greater

320

"Artificial" brains, electrical grids, and disease modeling: Los Alamos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science discoveries unveiled Science discoveries unveiled "Artificial" brains, electrical grids, and disease modeling: Los Alamos science discoveries unveiled September 15 The event is an opportunity for business leaders and community members to learn about where science is heading, as well as for students to discover potential new career directions. September 8, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Detecting Lyme Disease Using Antibody-Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Transistors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examined the potential of antibody-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistors (FETs) for use as a fast and accurate sensor for a Lyme disease antigen. Biosensors were fabricated on oxidized silicon wafers using chemical vapor deposition grown carbon nanotubes that were functionalized using diazonium salts. Attachment of Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme) flagellar antibodies to the nanotubes was verified by Atomic Force Microscopy and electronic measurements. A reproducible shift in the turn-off voltage of the semiconducting SWNT FETs was seen upon incubation with Borrelia burgdorferi flagellar antigen, indicative of the nanotube FET being locally gated by the residues of flagellar protein bound to the antibody. This sensor effectively detected antigen in buffer at concentrations as low as 1 ng/ml, and the response varied strongly over a concentration range coinciding with levels of clinical interest. Generalizable binding chemistry gives this biosensing platform the potential to...

Lerner, Mitchell B; Goldsmith, Brett R; Brisson, Dustin; Johnson, A T Charlie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Review Article Ventilation/Perfusion SPECT for Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism and Other Diseases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. V/PSPECT has the potential to become a first hand tool for diagnosis of pulmonary embolism based on standardized technology and new holistic interpretation criteria. Pretest probability helps clinicians choose the most appropriate objective test for diagnosis or exclusion of PE. Interpretation should also take into account all ventilation and perfusion patterns allowing diagnosis of other cardiopulmonary diseases than PE. In such contexts, V/PSPECT has excellent sensitivity and specificity. Nondiagnostic reports are ?3%. V/PSPECT has no contraindication; it is noninvasive and has very low radiation exposure. Moreover, acquisition time for V/PSPECT is only 20 minutes. It allows quantification of PE extension which has an impact on individual treatment. It is uniquely useful for followup and research. 1.

Marika Bajc; Björn Jonson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Low Prevalence of Chronic Beryllium Disease among Workers at a Nuclear Weapons Research and Development Facility  

SciTech Connect

To study the prevalence of beryllium sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) in a cohort of workers from a nuclear weapons research and development facility. We evaluated 50 workers with BeS with medical and occupational histories, physical examination, chest imaging with HRCT (N=49), and pulmonary function testing. Forty of these workers also underwent bronchoscopy for bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and transbronchial biopsies. The mean duration of employment at the facility was 18 yrs and the mean latency (from first possible exposure) to time of evaluation was 32 yrs. Five of the workers had CBD at the time of evaluation (based on histology or HRCT); three others had evidence of probable CBD. These workers with BeS, characterized by a long duration of potential Be exposure and a long latency, had a low prevalence of CBD.

Arjomandi, M; Seward, J P; Gotway, M B; Nishimura, S; Fulton, G P; Thundiyil, J; King, T E; Harber, P; Balmes, J R

2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

324

Prognostic Factors Depicting Disease-Specific Survival in Parotid-Gland Tumors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To identify significant prognostic factors that can be used in clinical decision-making with regard to parotid cancer, which is characterized by a complex and diverse group of tumors with variable outcomes. Methods and Materials: A historical cohort of 184 patients with parotid-gland malignancy, who had been registered in the Province of Manitoba from 1970 to 2003, was examined. Survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier curves and a log-rank test for comparing subgroups. The independent effect of factors that predicted survival at the bivariate level was determined using a Cox proportional hazard model. Results: The mean age at presentation was 62 years. The mean follow-up was 64 months. Absolute and disease-specific survival at 5 years was 41.70% and 57.94%, respectively. Survival for Stages I-IV at 5 years was 85.35%, 76.9%, 56.1%, and 8.4%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Factors with an independent effect on survival (p < 0.05) included age, tumor size, local invasion (Stages T4 vs. T1), and distant metastasis at presentation, tumor differentiation, and treatment. Adjuvant radiotherapy vs. surgery alone reduced the risk of death from disease at 5 years by 50% (hazard ratio [HR], 0.5; 95% confidence interval, 0.228-0.995; p = 0.0486). Conclusions: Despite the variety of malignant parotid tumors, easily identifiable prognostic indicators such as advanced age, tumor size, local invasion, and tumor differentiation have a significant impact on outcome. Patients with adverse prognostic factors benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy. The threshold for the use of adjuvant radiotherapy in managing parotid malignancy should be low.

Koul, Rashmi [Department of Radiation Oncology, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Dubey, Arbind [Department of Radiation Oncology, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Butler, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Cooke, Andrew L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Abdoh, Ahmed [Department of Surgical Oncology, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Nason, Richard [Department of Surgical Oncology, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)]. E-mail: nasonrw@cc.umanitoba.ca

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Geographical Distribution and Density of Ixodes dammini (Acari: Ixodidae) and Relationship to Lyme Disease Transmission in New Jersey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of continuing studies of Lyme disease, deer were surveyed during three hunting seasons in 1981 to obtain information on geographic distribution and density of. dammini in New Jersey. I. dammini occurred throughout central and southern New Jersey. Four deer management zones (DMZs) were shown to have high tick densities. Geographical distribution and density data were independently regressed against 25 environmental and physical factors. Elevation was shown to be the most important factor in explaining the variability in both I. dammini distribution and density. Lyme disease cases were closely associated with the distribution of I. dammini and 57.3 percent of 117 Lyme disease cases occurred in the four DMZs previously identified as having the highest tick density.

Terry L. Schulze, Ph.D.; A G. Stephen Bowen; Michael F. Lakat; A William E. Parkin; Dr. P. H; A; Joseph K. Shisler, Ph.D.; C

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Method and system for the diagnosis of disease using retinal image content and an archive of diagnosed human patient data  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for diagnosing diseases having retinal manifestations including retinal pathologies includes the steps of providing a CBIR system including an archive of stored digital retinal photography images and diagnosed patient data corresponding to the retinal photography images, the stored images each indexed in a CBIR database using a plurality of feature vectors, the feature vectors corresponding to distinct descriptive characteristics of the stored images. A query image of the retina of a patient is obtained. Using image processing, regions or structures in the query image are identified. The regions or structures are then described using the plurality of feature vectors. At least one relevant stored image from the archive based on similarity to the regions or structures is retrieved, and an eye disease or a disease having retinal manifestations in the patient is diagnosed based on the diagnosed patient data associated with the relevant stored image(s).

Tobin, Kenneth W; Karnowski, Thomas P; Chaum, Edward

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

327

Cost effective interventions for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in low and middle income countries: a systematic review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Rexrode KM, Kumanyika SK, Appel LJ, Whelton PK: Long term effects of dietary sodium reduction on cardiovascular disease outcomes: observational follow-up of the trials of hypertension prevention (TOHP). BMJ 2007, 334(7599):885–888. 7. Mendis S, Fukino K... , Rexrode KM, Kumanyika SK, Appel LJ, Whelton PK: Long term effects of dietary sodium reduction on cardiovascular disease outcomes: observational follow-up of the trials of hypertension prevention (TOHP). BMJ 2007, 334(7599):885–888. 7. Mendis S, Fukino K...

Shroufi, Amir; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Anchala, Raghupathy; Stevens, Sarah; Blanco, Patricia; Han, Tha; Niessen, Louis; Franco, Oscar H

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

328

Using family history information to promote healthy lifestyles and prevent diseases;a discussion of the evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information. Phy- sicians have reported time restrictions, lack of reimburse- ment, and the complexity of familial risk interpretation as barriers to the routine and systematic collection and use of family history for disease prevention [68]. Decision support... :248 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/10/248 Page 6 of 7 30. Valdez R, Yoon PW, Qureshi N, Green RF, Khoury MJ: Family history in public health practice; a genomic tool for disease prevention and health promotion. Annu Rev Public Health 2010, 31...

Claassen, Liesbeth; Henneman, Lidewij; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Wijdenes-Pijl, Miranda; Qureshi, Nadeem; Walter, Fiona M; Yoon, Paula W; Timmermans, Danielle R M

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

329

Variable serum immunoglobulin responses against different Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato species in a population at risk for and patients with Lyme disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Variable serum immunoglobulin responses against different Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato species in a population at risk for and patients with Lyme disease.

J Bunikis; B Olsén; G Westman; S Bergstroöm; J. Clin Microbiol; Jonas Bunikis; Björn Olsén; Göran Westman; Sven Bergström

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

DOE G 440.1-7A, Implementation Guide for use with 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Department of Energy (DOE) has established regulatory requirements for the Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) in Title 10 of the Code of ...

2001-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

331

Determining thyroid {sup 131}I effective half-life for the treatment planning of Graves' disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Thyroid {sup 131}I effective half-life (T{sub eff}) is an essential parameter in patient therapy when accurate radiation dose is desirable for producing an intended therapeutic outcome. Multiple {sup 131}I uptake measurements and resources from patients themselves and from nuclear medicine facilities are requisites for determining T{sub eff}, these being limiting factors when implementing the treatment planning of Graves' disease (GD) in radionuclide therapy. With the aim of optimizing this process, this study presents a practical, propitious, and accurate method of determining T{sub eff} for dosimetric purposes. Methods: A total of 50 patients with GD were included in this prospective study. Thyroidal {sup 131}I uptake was measured at 2-h, 6-h, 24-h, 48-h, 96-h, and 220-h postradioiodine administration. T{sub eff} was calculated by considering sets of two measured points (24-48-h, 24-96-h, and 24-220-h), sets of three (24-48-96-h, 24-48-220-h, and 24-96-220-h), and sets of four (24-48-96-220-h). Results: When considering all the measured points, the representative T{sub eff} for all the patients was 6.95 ({+-}0.81) days, whereas when using such sets of points as (24-220-h), (24-96-220-h), and (24-48-220-h), this was 6.85 ({+-}0.81), 6.90 ({+-}0.81), and 6.95 ({+-}0.81) days, respectively. According to the mean deviations 2.2 ({+-}2.4)%, 2.1 ({+-}2.0)%, and 0.04 ({+-}0.09)% found in T{sub eff}, calculated based on all the measured points in time, and with methods using the (24-220-h), (24-48-220-h), and (24-96-220-h) sets, respectively, no meaningful statistical difference was noted among the three methods (p > 0.500, t test). Conclusions: T{sub eff} obtained from only two thyroid {sup 131}I uptakes measured at 24-h and 220-h, besides proving to be sufficient, accurate enough, and easily applicable, attributes additional major cost-benefits for patients, and facilitates the application of the method for dosimetric purposes in the treatment planning of Graves' disease.

Willegaignon, Jose; Sapienza, Marcelo T.; Barberio Coura Filho, George; Buchpiguel, Carlos A. [Cancer Institute of Sao Paulo State (ICESP), Clinical Hospital, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Nuclear Medicine Service, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Traino, Antonio C. [Unit of Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa 56126 (Italy)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Most of rare missense alleles in humans are deleterious:implications for evolution of complex disease and associationstudies  

SciTech Connect

The accumulation of mildly deleterious missense mutations inindividual human genomes has been proposed to be a genetic basis forcomplex diseases. The plausibility of this hypothesis depends onquantitative estimates of the prevalence of mildly deleterious de novomutations and polymorphic variants in humans and on the intensity ofselective pressure against them. We combined analysis of mutationscausing human Mendelian diseases, human-chimpanzee divergence andsystematic data on human SNPs and found that about 20 percent of newmissense mutations in humans result in a loss of function, while about 27percent are effectively neutral. Thus, more than half of new missensemutations have mildly deleterious effects. These mutations give rise tomany low frequency deleterious allelic variants in the human populationas evident from a new dataset of 37 genes sequenced in over 1,500individual human chromosomes. Surprisingly, up to 70 percent of lowfrequency missense alleles are mildly deleterious and associated with aheterozygous fitness loss in the range 0.001-0.003. Thus, the low allelefrequency of an amino acid variant can by itself serve as a predictor ofits functional significance. Several recent studies have reported asignificant excess of rare missense variants in disease populationscompared to controls in candidate genes or pathways. These studies wouldbe unlikely to work if most rare variants were neutral or if rarevariants were not a significant contributor to the genetic component ofphenotypic inheritance. Our results provide a justification for thesetypes of candidate gene (pathway) association studies and imply thatmutation-selection balance may be a feasible mechanism for evolution ofsome common diseases.

Kryukov, Gregory V.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

333

Combining Image and Non-Image Data for Automatic Detection of Retina Disease in a Telemedicine Network  

SciTech Connect

A telemedicine network with retina cameras and automated quality control, physiological feature location, and lesion/anomaly detection is a low-cost way of achieving broad-based screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR) and other eye diseases. In the process of a routine eye-screening examination, other non-image data is often available which may be useful in automated diagnosis of disease. In this work, we report on the results of combining this non-image data with image data, using the protocol and processing steps of a prototype system for automated disease diagnosis of retina examinations from a telemedicine network. The system includes quality assessments, automated physiology detection, and automated lesion detection to create an archive of known cases. Non-image data such as diabetes onset date and hemoglobin A1c (HgA1c) for each patient examination are included as well, and the system is used to create a content-based image retrieval engine capable of automated diagnosis of disease into 'normal' and 'abnormal' categories. The system achieves a sensitivity and specificity of 91.2% and 71.6% using hold-one-out validation testing.

Aykac, Deniz [ORNL; Chaum, Edward [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Fox, Karen [Delta Health Alliance; Garg, Seema [University of North Carolina; Giancardo, Luca [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL; Li, Yaquin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nichols, Trent L [ORNL; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Challenges in Improving Sensitivity for Quantification of PET Data in Alzheimer's Disease Studies: Image Restoration and Registration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Aging, [8], recently published recom- mendations for studies on aging that utilize imaging data, ac the lives of those with the disease and their care givers, as well as the entire medical infrastructure analysis · Utilizing Results: longitudinal, comparitive studies · Studies collect images, not original

Renaut, Rosemary

335

Two approaches to selecting set of voxels for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease using brain SPECT images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a computer-aided diagnosis technique for improving the accuracy of the early diagnosis of the Alzheimer type dementia. The first proposed methodology is based on the selection of those voxels which present a greater difference between ... Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Computer aided diagnosis, SPECT brain images

D. Salas-Gonzalez; J. M. Górriz; J. Ramírez; I. Álvarez; M. López; F. Segovia; C. G. Puntonet

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Photographer: Unknown Prepared by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

serves the public by using the best science, taking responsive public health actions, and providing trusted health information to prevent harmful exposures and diseases related to toxic substances. You may contact ATSDR toll free at 800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Effects of Anti-Hypertensive Drugs Evaluated Using Markov Modelling for Northern Ireland Chronic Kidney Disease Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to use Markov modelling to investigate survival for particular types of kidney patients in relation to their exposure to anti-hypertensive treatment drugs. In order to monitor kidney function an intuitive three point assessment ... Keywords: Markov Modelling, Chronic Kidney Disease, Anti-Hypertensive Drugs

Andrea Rainey; Karen Carins; Adele Marshall; Michael Quinn; Gerard Savage; Damian Fogarty

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Duodenal prostaglandin synthesis and acid load in health and in duodenal ulcer disease  

SciTech Connect

We sought to test the hypothesis that duodenal ulcer disease results from an imbalance between duodenal acid load, an injurious force, and mucosal prostaglandin generation, a protective factor. Ten patients with duodenal ulcer and 8 healthy controls were studied. The duodenal acid load after an amino acid soup was quantified by a double-marker technique. Mucosal biopsy specimens were taken endoscopically from the duodenal bulb before and after the test meal. Prostaglandin synthesis activity was measured by incubating biopsy homogenates in excess (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid. Although mean duodenal acid load was higher in duodenal ulcer, ranges overlapped. Neither the qualitative nor quantitative profile of mucosal prostaglandin synthesis activities differed significantly between test groups. Prostaglandin synthesis activities, however, tended to increase post cibum in controls, but change little or decrease in duodenal ulcer. Only by comparing the responses with a meal of both parameters together (duodenal acid load and the change in prostaglandin synthesis activities) was there complete or nearly complete separation of duodenal ulcer from controls. Greatest discrimination was observed with prostacyclin (6-keto-PGF1 alpha). We conclude that in health, mucosal prostaglandin generation in the duodenum is induced post cibum in relation to duodenal acid load; this may be a physiologic example of adaptive cytoprotection. In duodenal ulcer there may be a defect in such a mechanism.

Ahlquist, D.A.; Dozois, R.R.; Zinsmeister, A.R.; Malagelada, J.R.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease RegistryForeword: ATSDR’s National Asbestos Exposure Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

now know that this vermiculite, which was shipped to many locations around the U.S. for processing, contained asbestos. The National Asbestos Exposure Review (NAER) is a project of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). ATSDR is working with other federal, state, and local environmental, and public health agencies to evaluate public health impacts at sites that processed Libby vermiculite. The evaluations focus on the processing sites and on human health effects that might be associated with possible past or current exposures. They do not consider commercial or consumer use of the products of these facilities. The sites that processed Libby vermiculite will be evaluated by (1) identifying ways people could have been exposed to asbestos in the past and ways that people could be exposed now and (2) determining whether the exposures represent a public health hazard. ATSDR will use the information gained from the site-specific investigations to recommend further public health actions as needed. Site evaluations are progressing in two phases: Phase 1: ATSDR has selected 28 sites for the first phase of reviews on the basis of the following

Vermiculite Northwest

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Genomic deletion of a long-range bone enhancer misregulatessclerostin in Van Buchem disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mutations in distant regulatory elements can negatively impact human development and health, yet due to the difficulty of detecting these critical sequences we predominantly focus on coding sequences for diagnostic purposes. We have undertaken a comparative sequence-based approach to characterize a large noncoding region deleted in patients affected by Van Buchem disease (VB), a severe sclerosing bone dysplasia. Using BAC recombination and transgenesis we characterized the expression of human sclerostin (sost) from normal (hSOSTwt) or Van Buchem(hSOSTvb D) alleles. Only the hSOSTwt allele faithfully expressed high levels of human sost in the adult bone and impacted bone metabolism, consistent with the model that the VB noncoding deletion removes a sost specific regulatory element. By exploiting cross-species sequence comparisons with in vitro and in vivo enhancer assays we were able to identify a candidate enhancer element that drives human sost expression in osteoblast-like cell lines in vitro and in the skeletal anlage of the E14.5 mouse embryo, and discovered a novel function for sclerostin during limb development. Our approach represents a framework for characterizing distant regulatory elements associated with abnormal human phenotypes.

Loots, Gabriela G.; Kneissel, Michaela; Keller, Hansjoerg; Baptist, Myma; Chang, Jessie; Collette, Nicole M.; Ovcharenko, Dmitriy; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Rubin, Edward M.

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Characterization of FUS Mutations in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Using RNA-Seq  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease resulting in severe muscle weakness and eventual death by respiratory failure. Although little is known about its pathogenesis, mutations in fused in ...

van Blitterswijk, Marka

342

Flu Terms Defined  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flu Terms Defined H1N1 Influenza is a respiratory disease of pigs caused by type A influenza viruses that causes regular outbreaks in pigs. People do not normally get H1N1 flu, but...

343

Spectral Imaging II: Plant disease detection based on data fusion of hyper-spectral and multi-spectral fluorescence imaging using Kohonen maps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to develop a ground-based real-time remote sensing system for detecting diseases in arable crops under field conditions and in an early stage of disease development, before it can visibly be detected. This was achieved ...

D. Moshou; C. Bravo; R. Oberti; J. West; L. Bodria; A. McCartney; H. Ramon

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

If you have heart disease, or think you do, there's a lot you can do to protect your heart health. This fact sheet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If you have heart disease, or think you do, there's a lot you can do to protect your heart health. This fact sheet gives you the key steps to control the disease, including how to survive a heart attack and prevent serious dam- age to heart muscle. Caring for your heart is worth the effort. Use the information

Bandettini, Peter A.

345

An improved assay for the determination of Huntington`s disease allele size  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hallmark of Huntington`s disease (HD) is the expansion of a polymorphic (CAG)n repeat. Several methods have been published describing PCR amplification of this region. Most of these assays require a complex PCR reaction mixture to amplify this GC-rich region. A consistent problem with trinucleotide repeat PCR amplification is the presence of a number of {open_quotes}stutter bands{close_quotes} which may be caused by primer or amplicon slippage during amplification or insufficient polymerase processivity. Most assays for HD arbitrarily select a particular band for diagnostic purposes. Without a clear choice for band selection such an arbitrary selection may result in inconsistent intra- or inter-laboratory findings. We present an improved protocol for the amplification of the HD trinucleotide repeat region. This method simplifies the PCR reaction buffer and results in a set of easily identifiable bands from which to determine allele size. HD alleles were identified by selecting bands of clearly greater signal intensity. Stutter banding was much reduced thus permitting easy identification of the most relevant PCR product. A second set of primers internal to the CCG polymorphism was used in selected samples to confirm allele size. The mechanism of action of N,N,N trimethylglycine in the PCR reaction is not clear. It may be possible that the minimal isostabilizing effect of N,N,N trimethylglycine at 2.5 M is significant enough to affect primer specificity. The use of N,N,N trimethylglycine in the PCR reaction facilitated identification of HD alleles and may be appropriate for use in other assays of this type.

Reeves, C.; Klinger, K.; Miller, G. [Intergrated Genetics, Framingham, MA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Studies on Pentoxifylline and Tocopherol Combination for Radiation-Induced Heart Disease in Rats  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate whether the application of pentoxifylline (PTX) and tocopherol l (Vit. E) could modify the development of radiation-induced heart disease and downregulate the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}1mRNA in rats. Methods and Materials: A total of 120 Sprague-Dawley rats were separated into four groups: control group, irradiated group, experimental group 1, and experiment group 2. Supplementation was started 3 days before irradiation; in experimental group 1, injection of PTX (15 mg/kg/d) and Vit. E (5.5 mg/kg/d) continued till the 12th week postirradiation, whereas in experimental group 2 it was continued until the 24th week postirradiation. All rats were administrated a single dose of 20 Gy irradiation to the heart except the control group. Histopathologic evaluation was performed at various time points (Days 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 and 24th week) up to 24 weeks after irradiation. Changes of levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were also investigated at the same time points using competitive polymerase chain reaction. Results: Compared with the irradiated group, levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA of the rat hearts were relatively low in the two experimental groups on the 12th week postirradiation. In experimental group 1, there was a rebound expression of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA on the 24th week postirradiation, whereas that of the experimental group 2 remained low (p < 0.05). The proportions of collagen fibers of the two experimental groups were lower than that of irradiated group (p < 0.05). A rebound could be observed in the experimental group 1. Conclusion: PTX and Vit. E downregulated the expression of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA. The irradiated rat hearts showed a marked pathologic response to the drugs. The withdrawal of drugs in the 12th week postirradiation could cause rebound effects of the development of fibrosis.

Liu Hui [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Xiong Mai [Department of Cardiac Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Xia Yunfei; Cui Nianji; Lu Rubiao [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Deng Ling [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Pathology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Lin Yuehao [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Clinical Laboratory, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Rong Tiehua [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Thoracic Surgery, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)], E-mail: esophagus2003@yahoo.com.cn

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Genome Stability of Lyme Disease Spirochetes: Comparative Genomics of Borrelia burgdorferi Plasmids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne human illness in North America. In order to understand the molecular pathogenesis, natural diversity, population structure and epizootic spread of the North American Lyme agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, a much better understanding of the natural diversity of its genome will be required. Towards this end we present a comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the numerous plasmids of B. burgdorferi isolates B31, N40, JD1 and 297. These strains were chosen because they include the three most commonly studied laboratory strains, and because they represent different major genetic lineages and so are informative regarding the genetic diversity and evolution of this organism. A unique feature of Borrelia genomes is that they carry a large number of linear and circular plasmids, and this work shows that strains N40, JD1, 297 and B31 carry related but non-identical sets of 16, 20, 19 and 21 plasmids, respectively, that comprise 33-40% of their genomes. We deduce that there are at least 28 plasmid compatibility types among the four strains. The B. burgdorferi {approx}900 Kbp linear chromosomes are evolutionarily exceptionally stable, except for a short {le}20 Kbp plasmid-like section at the right end. A few of the plasmids, including the linear lp54 and circular cp26, are also very stable. We show here that the other plasmids, especially the linear ones, are considerably more variable. Nearly all of the linear plasmids have undergone one or more substantial inter-plasmid rearrangements since their last common ancestor. In spite of these rearrangements and differences in plasmid contents, the overall gene complement of the different isolates has remained relatively constant.

Casjens S. R.; Dunn J.; Mongodin, E. F.; Qiu, W.-G.; Luft, B. J.; Schutzer, S. E.; Gilcrease, E. B.; Huang, W. M.; Vujadinovic, M.; Aron, J. K.; Vargas, L. C.; Freeman, S.; Radune, D.; Weidman, J. F.; Dimitrov, G. I.; Khouri, H. M.; Sosa, J. E.; Halpin, R. A.; Fraser, C. M.

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

348

Targeted deletion of the 9p21 noncoding coronary artery disease risk interval in mice  

SciTech Connect

Sequence polymorphisms in a 58kb interval on chromosome 9p21 confer a markedly increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD), the leading cause of death worldwide 1,2. The variants have a substantial impact on the epidemiology of CAD and other life?threatening vascular conditions since nearly a quarter of Caucasians are homozygous for risk alleles. However, the risk interval is devoid of protein?coding genes and the mechanism linking the region to CAD risk has remained enigmatic. Here we show that deletion of the orthologous 70kb noncoding interval on mouse chromosome 4 affects cardiac expression of neighboring genes, as well as proliferation properties of vascular cells. Chr4delta70kb/delta70kb mice are viable, but show increased mortality both during development and as adults. Cardiac expression of two genes near the noncoding interval, Cdkn2a and Cdkn2b, is severely reduced in chr4delta70kb/delta70kb mice, indicating that distant-acting gene regulatory functions are located in the noncoding CAD risk interval. Allelespecific expression of Cdkn2b transcripts in heterozygous mice revealed that the deletion affects expression through a cis-acting mechanism. Primary cultures of chr4delta70kb/delta70kb aortic smooth muscle cells exhibited excessive proliferation and diminished senescence, a cellular phenotype consistent with accelerated CAD pathogenesis. Taken together, our results provide direct evidence that the CAD risk interval plays a pivotal role in regulation of cardiac Cdkn2a/b expression and suggest that this region affects CAD progression by altering the dynamics of vascular cell proliferation.

Visel, Axel; Zhu, Yiwen; May, Dalit; Afzal, Veena; Gong, Elaine; Attanasio, Catia; Blow, Matthew J.; Cohen, Jonathan C.; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

New WEBGIS technologies for geolocation of epidemiological data: an application for the surveillance of the risk of Lyme borrelliosis disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a technology for the accurate and fast geo-location of medical data and the creation of central data archives, specifically designed for the development of disease risk maps and of other functions for modern epidemiology and surveillance. A WEBGIS system is configured as an Internet web service integrated with connectivity to a Geographical Information System (GIS). We developed for the ULSS Belluno a WEBGIS for the accurate mapping of tick-borne diseases, with specific attention to Lyme borreliosis, which may cause cardiac manifestations as atrioventricular conduction abnormalities, complete atrioventricular block, myocarditis and dilated cardiomiopathy. A first tree-based predictive model has been developed for risk classification of tick bites from 256 samples (data gathered through the Belluno Lyme WEBGIS), with a descriptive accuracy of 81.9% and a predictive accuracy of 75.1% . An experimental risk GIS map was therefore obtained from the model by considering altitude, week of sampling and vegetation type as predictor variables.

C. Furlanello; Cesare Furlanello; S. Merler; S. Mancuso; S. Menegon; Sebastiano Mancuso; G. Bertiato

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Office of Health, Safety and Security Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Follow-up Review of the Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program May 2011 June 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results .................................................................................................................................... 1

351

THE PATHOGENESIS OF ALEUTIAN DISEASE OF MINK I. IN VlVO VIRAL REPLICATION AND THE HOST ANTIBODY RESPONSE TO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aleutian disease (AD) is a common chronic virus disease of mink, which may cause serious economic losses to commercial ranchers. The most consistent and striking feature of AD is that once a mink has been infected with Aleutian disease virus (ADV), infectious virus may be recovered from the serum, organs, and urine for the remainder of the animal's life (1-4). ADV in the serum of such mink has been shown to exist as an infectious virus-antibody complex (5). The primary lesion of AD is a systemic proliferation of plasma cells. A marked hypergammaglobulinemia, which may change into a monoclonal gammopathy, is secondary to the plasma cell proliferation (6-8). Glomerulonephritis, degenerative arterial lesions, and proliferation of intrahepatic bile ducts are frequently seen in AD (9-11). The markedly increased gamma globulin in AD is the result of overproduction, and has been found to have some degree of specificity (7, 12, 13). However, except for the infectious complexes, antibody to ADV antigens has not been previously demonstrated. The present study was undertaken to define the early and late stages of

Vmal Antigen; Austin E. Larsen; Helen G. Porter

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Natural Product Biosynthesis: Friend or Foe? From Anti-tumor Agent to Disease Causation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biosynthetic natural products are invaluable resources that have been gleaned from the environment for generations, and they play an essential role in drug development. Natural product biosynthesis also possesses the latent ability to affect biological systems adversely. This work implements recent advances in genomic, proteomic and microbiological technologies to understand further biosynthetic molecules that may influence progression of human disease. Azinomycin A and B are antitumor metabolites isolated from the terrestrial bacterium Streptomyces sahachiroi. The azinomycins possess an unusual aziridine [1,2-a] pyrrolidine ring that reacts in concert with an epoxide moiety to produce DNA interstrand cross-links. Genomic sequencing of S. sahachiroi revealed a putative azinomycin resistance protein (AziR). Overexpression of AziR in heterologous hosts demonstrated the protein increases cell viability and decreases DNA damage response in the presence of azinomycin. Fluorescence titration indicated AziR functions as an azinomycin binding protein. An understanding of azinomycin resistance is important for future engineering and drug delivery strategies. Additionally, the S. sahachiroi draft genome obtained via 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina sequencing revealed several silent secondary metabolic pathways that may provide new natural products with biomedical application. ?-lactoglobulin (BLG), the most abundant whey protein in bovine milk, has been observed to promote the self-condensation of retinal and similar ?,?-unsaturated aldehydes. BLG is a possible non-genetic instigator of cycloretinal and A2E accumulation in the macula, a condition associated with age-related macular degeneration. BLG-mediated terpenal condensation has been optimized for in vitro study with the retinal mimic citral. In rabbits fed retinal and BLG or skim milk, cycloretinal formation was detected in the blood by 1H-NMR, and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated BLG was present in blood serum, suggesting the protein survives ingestion and retains catalytic activity. Mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis provided mechanistic insight toward this unusual moonlighting behavior. The experiments described in this dissertation serve to further natural product biosynthesis discovery and elucidation as they relate to consequences for human health. Efforts to solve azinomycin biosynthesis via enzymatic reconstitution, characterize compounds produced by orphan gene clusters within S. sahachiroi, and obtain a clear mechanism for BLG-promoted cycloterpenal formation are immediate goals within the respective projects.

Foulke-Abel, Jennifer

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Case Report Clinics in Orthopedic Surgery 2010;2:186-190 • doi:10.4055/cios.2010.2.3.186 Arthroscopic Treatment of Septic Arthritis of Acromioclavicular Joint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Septic arthritis requires an early diagnosis and proper treatment to prevent the destruction of articular cartilage and joint contracture. This paper presents a rare case of septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint that was treated with arthroscopic debridement and resection of the distal clavicle.

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 7 Dietary Conjugated Linolenic Acid Modifies Body Fat Mass, and Serum and Liver Lipid Levels in Rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 7 Dietary Conjugated Linolenic Acid Modifies Body Fat Mass, and Serum and Liver Lipid Levels in Rats Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

355

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseCh 10 Suppression of Leukotriene B4 Generation by ex vivo Neutrophils Isolated from Asthma Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Ch 10 Suppression of Leukotriene B4 Generation by ex vivo Neutrophils Isolated from Asthma Patients Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

356

The identification of chemical compounds that decrease cellular levels of toxic Huntington's disease protein through a novel cell-based assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive degenerative neurological disorder. Individuals who inherit the IT15 gene with an expansion of the CAG repeat region inevitably succumb to increasingly sever motor, psychological, ...

Coufal, Myra Alfert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 4 A Clinically Relevant Lipid Model for South African Patients with Laryngeal Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 4 A Clinically Relevant Lipid Model for South African Patients with Laryngeal Cancer Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downlo

358

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 18 Is There a Role for Conjugated Linoleic Acid to Aid in the Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 18 Is There a Role for Conjugated Linoleic Acid to Aid in the Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes? Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

359

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 3 Chemopreventive Effect of Bitter Gourd Seed Oil Rich in Conjugated Linolenic Acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 3 Chemopreventive Effect of Bitter Gourd Seed Oil Rich in Conjugated Linolenic Acid Health Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Nutrition Press Downloa

360

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 6 Dairy Products: Role in the Diet and Effects on Cardiovascular Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 6 Dairy Products: Role in the Diet and Effects on Cardiovascular Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downlo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Mutations causing medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 lie in a large VNTR in MUC1 missed by massively parallel sequencing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although genetic lesions responsible for some mendelian disorders can be rapidly discovered through massively parallel sequencing of whole genomes or exomes, not all diseases readily yield to such efforts. We describe the ...

Kirby, Andrew

362

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 17 Docosahexaenoic Acid Intake and Lipid peroxidation in Retinal Membranes of Rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 17 Docosahexaenoic Acid Intake and Lipid peroxidation in Retinal Membranes of Rats Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Download

363

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 20 Effects of Dietary Fatty Acids on Human Microbes: Role in Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 20 Effects of Dietary Fatty Acids on Human Microbes: Role in Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadab

364

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 25 The Importance of the Omega-3 and Omega-6 Ratio: Brain Biochemistry, Cognition, and Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 25 The Importance of the Omega-3 and Omega-6 Ratio: Brain Biochemistry, Cognition, and Behavior Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Pres

365

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 16 Ruminal Metabolism of Fatty Acids: Modulation of Polyunsaturated, Conjugated, and trans Fatty Acids in Meat and Milk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 16 Ruminal Metabolism of Fatty Acids: Modulation of Polyunsaturated, Conjugated, and trans Fatty Acids in Meat and Milk Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrit

366

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 12 Effects of Fatty Acids Containing a trans Double Bond on Body Composition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 12 Effects of Fatty Acids Containing a trans Double Bond on Body Composition eChapters Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 12 Effects of Fatty Acids Contai

367

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 28 Dietary Fat and Fatty Acids in Exercise and Athletic Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 28 Dietary Fat and Fatty Acids in Exercise and Athletic Performance Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadab

368

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 15 Trans Fatty Acids and Oxidative Transformations by Free Radicals: The Role in Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 15 Trans Fatty Acids and Oxidative Transformations by Free Radicals: The Role in Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

369

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 29 Omega-3 versus Omega-6 Fatty Acid Intake and Immunity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 29 Omega-3 versus Omega-6 Fatty Acid Intake and Immunity Health Nutrition Biochemistry Omega 3 eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable

370

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 23 Modulation of Cytokine Action by Fatty Acids: Role in Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 23 Modulation of Cytokine Action by Fatty Acids: Role in Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable p

371

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 14 Effect of Dietary Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Infancy on Both Visual and Neural Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 14 Effect of Dietary Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Infancy on Both Visual and Neural Development Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Bioch

372

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 24 From ADHD to Alzheimer’s: Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Mental Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 24 From ADHD to Alzheimer’s: Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Mental Health Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadabl

373

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 30 Omega-3 Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Obesity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 30 Omega-3 Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Obesity Health Nutrition Biochemistry Omega 3 eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloa

374

Evaluation of miglustat as maintenance therapy after enzyme therapy in adults with stable type 1 Gaucher disease: a prospective, open-label non-inferiority study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[10,11]. During developmental clinical trials, miglustat induced sustained reductions of liver and spleen volumes, with increased hemoglobin concentrations and platelet counts; the plasma activity of the biomarker, chitotriosidase, also decreased [12... five clinical experts in Gaucher disease who were neither investigators nor directly involved in the conduct of the study. This Steering Committee also adjudicated cases of suspected disease worsening during the study, and carried out a final...

Cox, Timothy M; Amato, Dominick; Hollak, Carla EM; Luzy, Cecile; Silkey, Mariabeth; Giorgino, Ruben; Steiner, Robert D; for the Miglustat Maintenance Study Group

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

375

ELISA-Based Segregation of Adult Spring Chinook Salmon for Control of Bacterial Kidney Disease, Annual Report FY 1990.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bacterial kidney disease (BKD), caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum (RS), is a serious disease of salmonid fish worldwide. The disease has a major impact on spring chinook salmon populations in the Columbia River system. There is strong evidence that RS can be transmitted from parent to progeny, and segregation of progeny based on levels of antigen detected in adult fish may obviate this mode of transmission. Results from the second year of a four year study to investigate segregation of broodstock as a tool for controlling BKD are presented. To segregate the progeny of adult fish infected with RS we have used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) optimized in the first year of this project. Gametes from fish either injected with erythromycin or receiving no antibiotic injection were successfully segregated into groups having either high or low levels of the RS soluble antigen. Screening of eggs from infected adults has not revealed any detectable antigen present in the egg tissue. Development of a rapid, field ELISA has been accomplished this year. The field ELISA utilizes monoclonal antibodies currently employed in the monoclonal antibody-based ELISA. The sensitivity of the field ELISA approaches that of the monoclonal ELISA, and has been tested on 150 adult chinook salmon. A high correlation exists between samples assayed by the monoclonal ELISA, field ELISA, and direct FAT. An alternative system for detecting RS soluble antigen, the Western blot, has also been improved. Using a chemiluminescent substrate, the sensitivity of detection has been increase 50--100 fold. 16 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

Winton, James R.; Kaattari, Stephen L.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Expression of genes associated with immunity in the endometrium of cattle with disparate postpartum uterine disease and fertility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of animals with dispa- rate disease outcomes and found that during Period 1, infertile animals had higher levels of IL1A and IL1B, and their cognate IL1R2, compared with fertile animals. Ratio of IL1A and IL1B to IL10 expressionFigure 7 Ratio of IL1A and IL1B... and follicle growth and function in cattle. Reproduction 2002, 123:837-845. 23. Rozen S, Skaletsky H: Primer3 on the WWW for general users and for biologist programmers Totowa, NJ: Humana Press; 2000. 24. Dohmen MJ, Joop K, Sturk A, Bols PE, Lohuis JA...

Herath, Shan; Lilly, Sonia T; Santos, Natalia R; Gilbert, Robert O; Goetze, Leopold; Bryant, Clare; White, John O; Cronin, James; Sheldon, I Martin

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

377

Available Technologies: Mineralization of Biocompatible ...  

For Industry; For Researchers; Success Stories; About Us; ... Unlike the bioinert materials currently used in the fabrication of orthopedic implants ...

378

Is decreased bone mineral density associated with development of scoliosis? A bipedal osteopenic rat model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Orthopedics and Traumatology, Ankara, Turkey. 2 Izmir KentHospital, Cigli, Izmir, Turkey. 3 University of California

Dede, Ozgur; Akel, Ibrahim; Demirkiran, Gokhan; Yalcin, Nadir; Marcucio, Ralph; Acaroglu, Emre

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

influence of cold rolling on microstructure and the passive film of the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Advanced Materials in Dental and Orthopedic Applications. Presentation Title ...

380

Prevalence rate of thyroid diseases among autopsy cases of the atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima, 1951-1985  

SciTech Connect

To examine the radiogenic risk of latent thyroid cancer, thyroid adenoma, colloid/adenomatous goiter and chronic thyroiditis, the date for 3821 subjects collected in the course of autopsies of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima from 1951 to 1985 by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) were analyzed using a logistic model. About 80% of the autopsies were performed at RERF and the remainder at local hospitals. The frequencies of the above diseases were not associated with whether the underlying cause of death was cancer. However, note that our results may be influenced by potentially biasing factors associated with autopsy selection. The relative frequency of latent thyroid cancer (greatest dimension {le}1.5 cm but detectable on a routine microscopic slide of the thyroid gland) increased as the radiation dose increased and was about 1.4-fold greater at 1 Gy than in the 0-Gy dose group. The relative occurrence of thyroid adenoma also increased as radiation dose increased, and was about 1.5-fold greater at 1 Gy than in the 0-Gy dose group. Sex, age at the time of the bombing or period of observation did not significantly modify the radiogenic risks for thyroid adenoma or latent thyroid cancer. No statistically significant association was found between radiation exposure and the rates of colloid/adenomatous goiter and chronic thyroiditis. The possible late effect of atomic bomb radiation on the frequency of benign thyroid diseases is discussed on the basis of these data. 38 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Yoshimoto, Yasuhiko; Ezaki, Haruo [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Etoh, Ryozo [Fukuyama Hospital, Kagoshima (Japan); Hiraoka, Toshio [Kawaishi Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Akiba, Suminori [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

False Heart Rate Feedback and the Perception of Heart Symptoms in Patients with Congenital Heart Disease and Anxiety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

# The Author(s) 2008. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Background Little is known about the mechanisms explaining an increased perception of heart symptoms in congenital heart disease (ConHD). In the present study, it was suggested that a combination of high trait anxiety and disease history increases the perception of heart symptoms. Purpose It was tested whether false heart cues will result in an increased perception of heart symptoms in patients with ConHD and anxiety. Method Thirty-six patients with ConHD and 44 healthy controls performed two exercise tasks. During one of the exercise tasks, participants were exposed to a false heart cue consisting of false heart rate feedback (regular or irregular). Perceived heart symptoms were assessed and heart rate, arterial partial pressure of CO2, and respirator rate were monitored continuously. Results In line with the predictions, false heart rate feedback resulted in an increased perception of heart symptoms in high trait anxious patients with ConHD that could not be explained by acute heart dysfunction. However, unexpectedly, this effect was not observed immediately after the false heart rate feedback task but after a second exercise task without false feedback. Conclusion The results suggest that not the sole presence of ConHD but ConHD in combination with high trait

Petra A. Karsdorp; Merel Kindt; Simon Rietveld; Walter Everaerd; Barbara J. M. Mulder; P. A. Karsdorp; M. Kindt; S. Rietveld; W. Everaerd; B. J. Mulder; P. A. Karsdorp

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Structure and expression of the Huntington's disease gene: Evidence against simple inactivation due to an expanded CAG repeat  

SciTech Connect

Huntington's disease, a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of striatal neurons, is caused by an expanded, unstable trinucleotide repeat in a novel 4p16.3 gene. To lay the foundation for exploring the pathogenic mechanism in HD, the authors have determined the structure of the disease gene and examined its expression. The HD locus spans 180 kb and consists of 67 exons ranging in size from 48 bp to 341 bp with an average of 138 bp. Scanning of the HD transcript failed to reveal any additional sequence alterations characteristic of HD chromosomes. A codon loss polymorphism in linkage disequilibrium with the disorder revealed that both normal and HD alleles are represented in the mRNA population in HD heterozygotes, indicating that the defect does not eliminate transcription. The gene is ubiquitously expressed as two alternatively polyadenylated forms displaying different relative abundance in various fetal and adult tissues, suggesting the operation of interacting factors in determining specificity of cell loss. The HD gene was disrupted in a female carrying a balanced translocation with a breakpoint between exons 40 and 41. The absence of any abnormal phenotype in this individual argues against simple inactivation of the gene as the mechanism by which the expanded trinucleotide repeat causes HD. Taken together, these observations suggest that the dominant HD mutation either confers a new property on the mRNA or, more likely, alters an interaction at the protein level.

Ambrose, C.M.; Duyao, M.P.; Barnes, G.; Lin, C.S.; Srinidhi, J. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)); Bates, G.P.; Baxendale, S.; Hummerich, H.; Lehrach, H. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (United Kingdom)); Altherr, M. (Univ. of California, Irving, CA (United States)) (and others)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Application of DNA hybridization techniques in the assessment of diarrheal disease among refugess in Thailand. [Shigella; Escherichia coli; Campylobacter; Cryptosporidium  

SciTech Connect

The epidemiology and etiology of acute diarrheal disease were determined in a Hmong refugee camp on the Thai-Laotian border from April 11 to May 14, 1985. DNA hybridization techniques were used to detect Shigella species, enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, and enterotoxigenic E. coli. A monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect rotavirus, and standard microbiology was used to detect other enteropathogens. The age-specific diarrheal disease rates were 47 episodes per month per 1000 children less than five years old and 113 episodes per month per 1000 children less than one year old. Rotavirus, enterotoxigenic E. coli, Campylobacter, and Cryptosporidium were the predominant pathogens in children less than two years old. The DNA probe hybridized with 94% of 31 specimens identified as enterotoxigenic E. coli by the standard assays and with none of the specimens in which the standard assays were negative. The probe for Shigella and enteroinvasive E. coli hybridized in eight of 10 stools that contained Shigella and four of 314 stools from which Shigella and enteroinvasive E. coli were not isolated. The use of DNA probes allows specimens to be collected in remote areas with a minimum amount of equipment and technical expertise so that they can be easily transported to a central laboratory for further processing.

Taylor, D.N.; Echeverria, P.; Pitarangsi, C.; Seriwatana, J.; Sethabutr, O.; Bodhidatta, L.; Brown, C.; Herrmann, J.E.; Blacklow, N.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Enhancing the role of veterinary vaccines reducing zoonotic diseases of humans: Linking systems biology with vaccine development  

SciTech Connect

The aim of research on infectious diseases is their prevention, and brucellosis and salmonellosis as such are classic examples of worldwide zoonoses for application of a systems biology approach for enhanced rational vaccine development. When used optimally, vaccines prevent disease manifestations, reduce transmission of disease, decrease the need for pharmaceutical intervention, and improve the health and welfare of animals, as well as indirectly protecting against zoonotic diseases of people. Advances in the last decade or so using comprehensive systems biology approaches linking genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics, and biotechnology with immunology, pathogenesis and vaccine formulation and delivery are expected to enable enhanced approaches to vaccine development. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the role of computational systems biology analysis of host:pathogen interactions (the interactome) as a tool for enhanced rational design of vaccines. Systems biology is bringing a new, more robust approach to veterinary vaccine design based upon a deeper understanding of the host pathogen interactions and its impact on the host's molecular network of the immune system. A computational systems biology method was utilized to create interactome models of the host responses to Brucella melitensis (BMEL), Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP), Salmonella enterica Typhimurium (STM), and a Salmonella mutant (isogenic *sipA, sopABDE2) and linked to the basis for rational development of vaccines for brucellosis and salmonellosis as reviewed by Adams et al. and Ficht et al. [1,2]. A bovine ligated ileal loop biological model was established to capture the host gene expression response at multiple time points post infection. New methods based on Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) machine learning were employed to conduct a comparative pathogenicity analysis of 219 signaling and metabolic pathways and 1620 gene ontology (GO) categories that defined the host's biosignatures to each infectious condition. Through this DBN computational approach, the method identified significantly perturbed pathways and GO category groups of genes that define the pathogenicity signatures of the infectious agent. Our preliminary results provide deeper understanding of the overall complexity of host innate immune response as well as the identification of host gene perturbations that defines a unique host temporal biosignature response to each pathogen. The application of advanced computational methods for developing interactome models based on DBNs has proven to be instrumental in elucidating novel host responses and improved functional biological insight into the host defensive mechanisms. Evaluating the unique differences in pathway and GO perturbations across pathogen conditions allowed the identification of plausible host pathogen interaction mechanisms. Accordingly, a systems biology approach to study molecular pathway gene expression profiles of host cellular responses to microbial pathogens holds great promise as a methodology to identify, model and predict the overall dynamics of the host pathogen interactome. Thus, we propose that such an approach has immediate application to the rational design of brucellosis and salmonellosis vaccines.

Adams, Leslie G.; Khare, Sangeeta; Lawhon, Sara D.; Rossetti, Carlos A.; Lewin, Harris A.; Lipton, Mary S.; Turse, Joshua E.; Wylie, Dennis C.; Bai, Yu; Drake, Kenneth L.

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

385

Is Primary Prostate Cancer Treatment Influenced by Likelihood of Extraprostatic Disease? A Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Patterns of Care Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To examine the patterns of primary treatment in a recent population-based cohort of prostate cancer patients, stratified by the likelihood of extraprostatic cancer as predicted by disease characteristics available at diagnosis. Methods and Materials: A total of 157,371 patients diagnosed from 2004 to 2008 with clinically localized and potentially curable (node-negative, nonmetastatic) prostate cancer, who have complete information on prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score, and clinical stage, were included. Patients with clinical T1/T2 disease were grouped into categories of 50% likelihood of having extraprostatic disease using the Partin nomogram. Clinical T3/T4 patients were examined separately as the highest-risk group. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between patient group and receipt of each primary treatment, adjusting for age, race, year of diagnosis, marital status, Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database region, and county-level education. Separate models were constructed for primary surgery, external-beam radiotherapy (RT), and conservative management. Results: On multivariable analysis, increasing likelihood of extraprostatic disease was significantly associated with increasing use of RT and decreased conservative management. Use of surgery also increased. Patients with >50% likelihood of extraprostatic cancer had almost twice the odds of receiving prostatectomy as those with 50% likelihood of extraprostatic cancer (34%) and clinical T3-T4 disease (24%). The proportion of patients who received prostatectomy or conservative management was approximately 50% or slightly higher in all groups. Conclusions: There may be underutilization of RT in older prostate cancer patients and those with likely extraprostatic disease. Because more than half of prostate cancer patients do not consult with a radiation oncologist, a multidisciplinary consultation may affect the treatment decision-making process.

Holmes, Jordan A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Wang, Andrew Z. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hendrix, Laura H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Rosenman, Julian G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Carpenter, William R. [University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States) [University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Department of Health Policy and Management, University of North Carolina School of Public Health, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Godley, Paul A. [University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States) [University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Chen, Ronald C., E-mail: ronald_chen@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); University of North Carolina-Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The Impact of Local and Regional Disease Extent on Overall Survival in Patients With Advanced Stage IIIB/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Patients with advanced stage IIIB or stage IV non-small cell lung carcinoma are typically treated with initial platinum-based chemotherapy. A variety of factors (eg, performance status, gender, age, histology, weight loss, and smoking history) are generally accepted as predictors of overall survival. Because uncontrolled pulmonary disease constitutes a major cause of death in these patients, we hypothesized that clinical and radiographic factors related to intrathoracic disease at diagnosis may be prognostically significant in addition to conventional factors. The results have implications regarding the selection of patients for whom palliative thoracic radiation therapy may be of most benefit. Methods and Materials: We conducted a pooled analysis of 189 patients enrolled at a single institution into 9 prospective phase II and III clinical trials involving first-line, platinum-based chemotherapy. Baseline clinical and radiographic characteristics before trial enrollment were analyzed as possible predictors for subsequent overall survival. To assess the relationship between anatomic location and volume of disease within the thorax and its effect on survival, the pre-enrollment computed tomography images were also analyzed by contouring central and peripheral intrapulmonary disease. Results: On univariate survival analysis, multiple pulmonary-related factors were significantly associated with worse overall survival, including pulmonary symptoms at presentation (P=.0046), total volume of intrathoracic disease (P=.0006), and evidence of obstruction of major bronchi or vessels on prechemotherapy computed tomography (P<.0001). When partitioned into central and peripheral volumes, central (P<.0001) but not peripheral (P=.74) disease was associated with worse survival. On multivariate analysis with known factors, pulmonary symptoms (hazard ratio, 1.46; P=.042), central disease volume (hazard ratio, 1.47; P=.042), and bronchial/vascular compression (hazard ratio, 1.54; P=.022) remained significant. Conclusions: Patients with bulky central disease, bronchial/vascular compression, and/or pulmonary symptoms exhibited worse overall survival after first-line, platinum-based chemotherapy. A subset of these patients may be studied to determine whether early, planned palliative thoracic radiation could also be of benefit.

Higginson, Daniel S., E-mail: daniel.higginson@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Ronald C.; Tracton, Gregg; Morris, David E.; Halle, Jan; Rosenman, Julian G.; Stefanescu, Mihaela; Pham, Erica [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Socinski, Mark A. [Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

February is American Heart Month. Healthy nutrition and physical activity can help reduce risk for heart disease. Participate in the Heart Smart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

February is American Heart Month. Healthy nutrition and physical activity can help reduce risk for heart disease. Participate in the Heart Smart Challenge to help with your personal accountability · Checking your blood pressure · Completing 20 minutes of physical activity HEART SMART CHALLENGE February 1

Peterson, Blake R.

388

Tissue transglutaminase treatment leads to concentration-dependent changes in dendritic cell phenotype - implications for the role of transglutaminase in coeliac disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007, 357:1731-1743. 14. Jensen K, Sollid LM, Scott H, Paulsen G, Kett K, Thorsby E, Lundin KEA: Gliadin-specific T cell responses in peripheral blood of healthy individuals involve T cells restricted by the coeliac disease associated DQ2 heterodimer...

Dalleywater, William J; Chau, David YS; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

389

New infectious diseases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are doing is weeding out the least drug-resistant microbes. The ones that escape start a new more drug-resistant strain. This (un)natural selection is widely blamed for the recent...

390

Extramammary Paget disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reconstruction and evaluation of occult malignancy. J Urolthe presence of clinically occult extensions. As a result,the presence of clinically occult extensions [ 2 , 5 ]. The

Hartman, Rachael; Chu, Julie; Patel, Rishi; Meehan, Shane; Stein, Jennifer A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Extramammary Paget disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reconstruction and evaluation of occult malignancy. J Urolnegative S. aureus , occult fecal blood was negative, and

Anolik, Robert; Liang, Christine; Wang, Nadia; Rosenman, Karla; Pomeranz, Miriam; Joe, Edwin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Health & Medicine Heart Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in archives: 83,709 Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily's archives for related news topics. 1000+ Degrees! www.EarnMyDegree.com Search ScienceDaily Find with keyword(s): Search Number of stories security measures Arizona murder prompts calls to tighten security Obama previews rhetoric for mid-term

Rogers, John A.

393

Suppressed Expression of T-Box Transcription Factors is Involved in Senescence in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global health problem. The etiology of COPD has been associated with apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. However, understanding of the molecular interactions that modulate COPD pathogenesis remains only partly resolved. We conducted an exploratory study on COPD etiology to identify the key molecular participants. We used information-theoretic algorithms including Context Likelihood of Relatedness (CLR), Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNE), and Inferelator. We captured direct functional associations among genes, given a compendium of gene expression profiles of human lung epithelial cells. A set of genes differentially expressed in COPD, as reported in a previous study were superposed with the resulting transcriptional regulatory networks. After factoring in the properties of the networks, an established COPD susceptibility locus and domain-domain interactions involving protein products of genes in the generated networks, several molecular candidates were predicted to be involved in the etiology of COPD. These include COL4A3, CFLAR, GULP1, PDCD1, CASP10, PAX3, BOK, HSPD1, PITX2, and PML. Furthermore, T-box (TBX) genes and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A), which are in a direct transcriptional regulatory relationship, emerged as preeminent participants in the etiology of COPD by means of senescence. Contrary to observations in neoplasms, our study reveals that the expression of genes and proteins in the lung samples from patients with COPD indicate an increased tendency towards cellular senescence. The expression of the anti-senescence mediators TBX transcription factors, chromatin modifiers histone deacetylases, and sirtuins was suppressed; while the expression of TBX-regulated cellular senescence markers such as CDKN2A, CDKN1A, and CAV1 was elevated in the peripheral lung tissue samples from patients with COPD. The critical balance between senescence and anti-senescence factors is disrupted towards senescence in COPD lungs.

Acquaah-Mensah, George; Malhotra, Deepti; Vulimiri, Madhulika; McDermott, Jason E.; Biswal, Shyam

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

394

The spinal muscular atrophy disease gene product, SMN: a link between snRNP biogenesis and the Cajal (coiled) body  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The spliceosomal snRNAs U1, U2, U4, and U5 are synthesized in the nucleus, exported to the cytoplasm to assemble with Sm proteins, and reimported to the nucleus as ribonucleoprotein particles. Recently, two novel proteins involved in biogenesis of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) were identified, the Spinal muscular atrophy disease gene product (SMN) and its associated protein SIP1. It was previously reported that in HeLa cells, SMN and SIP1 form discrete foci located next to Cajal (coiled) bodies, the so-called “gemini of coiled bodies ” or “gems. ” An intriguing feature of gems is that they do not appear to contain sn-RNPs. Here we show that gems are present in a variable but small proportion of rapidly proliferating cells in culture. In the vast majority of cultured cells and in all primary neurons analyzed, SMN and SIP1 colocalize precisely with snRNPs in the Cajal body. The presence of SMN and SIP1 in Cajal bodies is confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy and by microinjection of antibodies that interfere with the integrity of the structure. The association of SMN with snRNPs and coilin persists during cell division, but at the end of mitosis there is a lag period between assembly of new Cajal bodies in the nucleus and detection of SMN in these structures, suggesting that SMN is targeted to preformed Cajal bodies. Finally, treatment of cells with leptomycin B (a drug that blocks export of U snRNAs to the cytoplasm and consequently import of new snRNPs into the nucleus) is shown to deplete snRNPs (but not SMN or SIP1) from the Cajal body. This suggests that snRNPs flow through the Cajal body during their biogenesis pathway.

Teresa Carvalho; Fátima Almeida; Re Calapez; Miguel Lafarga; Maria T. Berciano; Maria Carmo-fonseca

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Diagnostic evaluation of a multiplexed RT-PCR microsphere array assay for the detection of foot-and-mouth and look-alike disease viruses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-throughput multiplexed assay (Multiplex Version 1.0) was developed for the differential laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) from viruses which cause clinically similar diseases of livestock. This assay simultaneously screens for five RNA and two DNA viruses using multiplexed reverse transcription PCR (mRT-PCR) amplification coupled with a microsphere hybridization array and flow-cytometric detection. Two of the seventeen primer-probe sets included in this multiplex assay were adopted from previously characterized real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays for FMDV. The diagnostic accuracy of the mRT-PCR was evaluated using 287 field samples, including 248 (true positive n= 213, true negative n=34) from suspect cases of foot-and-mouth disease collected from 65 countries between 1965 and 2006 and 39 true negative samples collected from healthy animals. The mRT-PCR assay results were compared with two singleplex rRT-PCR assays, using virus isolation with antigen-ELISA as the reference method. The diagnostic sensitivity of the mRT-PCR assay for FMDV was 93.9% [95% C.I. 89.8-96.4%], compared to 98.1% [95% C.I. 95.3-99.3%] for the two singleplex rRTPCR assays used in combination. In addition, the assay could reliably differentiate between FMDV and other vesicular viruses such as swine vesicular disease virus and vesicular exanthema of swine virus. Interestingly, the mRT-PCR detected parapoxvirus (n=2) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (n=2) in clinical samples, demonstrating the screening potential of this mRT-PCR assay to identify viruses in FMDV-negative material not previously recognized using focused single-target rRT-PCR assays.

Hindson, B J; Baker, B R; Bentley Tammero, L F; Lenhoff, R J; Naraghi-Arani, P; Vitalis, E A; Slezak, T R; Hullinger, P J; Reid, S M; Ebert, K; Ferris, N P; King, D P

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

396

Respiratory and Reproductive Characteristics of Eastern Mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin B. P. Staub, W. A. Hopkins, J. Novak, J. D. Congdon Savannah River 2002/Accepted: 29 March 2002 Abstract. Coal fly ash and effluent from coal ash settling basins viable populations in areas contaminated by coal ash. While eastern mosquitofish are present

Hopkins, William A.

397

Literature review on aerosol-sampling devices for respiratory field studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the first phase of a Respirator Field Performance Factor project for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration/Nuclear Regulatory Commission, a critical review of the literature available on respirator protection studies was completed. Little information was available on experimental conditions, and when the information was available, each study was different in how the aerosol measurements were made and in which parameters were controlled. Under these conditions it is difficult to compare results obtained from different investigators. The literature was also surveyed for characteristics desirable in an aerosol-sampling inlet in order to representatively sample respirable particles. Available ambient aerosol samplers were critically reviewed for their performance characteristics. Recommendations are made to avoid the pitfalls present in many respirator field studies and to help standardize these studies. 57 references, 30 figures, 9 tables.

Sutcliffe, C.R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The Relationship Between the Metabolic Pools of Photosynthetic andRespiratory Intermediates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using radioactive carbon dioxide, an attempt has been made to distinguish the various pools of intermediary metabolism which may be physically or chemically separate within the cell. Some correlation between the structural elements of the cells and these pools appears possible.

Moses, V.; Calvin, M.; Holm-Hansen, O.; Bassham, J.A.

1958-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Prediction of Respiratory Tumour Motion for Real-time Image-guided Radiotherapy. Phys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Image guidance in radiotherapy and extracranial radiosurgery offers the potential for precise radiation dose delivery to a moving tumour. Recent work has demonstrated how to locate and track the position of a tumour in real-time using diagnostic x-ray imaging to find implanted radio-opaque markers. However, the delivery of a treatment plan through gating or beam tracking requires adequate consideration of treatment system latencies, including image acquisition, image processing, communication delays, control system processing, inductance within the motor, mechanical damping, etc. Furthermore, the imaging dose given over long radiosurgery procedures or multiple radiotherapy fractions may not be insignificant, which means that we must reduce the sampling rate of the imaging system. This study evaluates various predictive models for reducing tumour localization errors when a realtime tumour-tracking system targets a moving tumour at a slow imaging rate and with large system latencies. We consider 14 lung tumour cases where the

Gregory C Sharp; Steve B Jiang; Shinichi Shimizu; Hiroki Shirato

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

John Widdicombe¿s contribution to respiratory physiology and cough: reminiscences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cough: reminiscences Kian Fan Chung 1* , Jay A Nadel 2 andthree separate pieces from Fan Chung, Jay Nadel and Giovanniof John. Appreciation from Fan Chung Early encounters with

Chung, Kian Fan; Nadel, Jay A; Fontana, Giovanni

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Enzymes of respiratory iron oxidation. Progress report, March 1990--June 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes experimental progress in characterizing and identifying redox proteins in a number of iron-oxidizing bacteria. Sections of the paper are entitled (1) In Situ electrolysis was explored to achieve enhanced yields of iron-oxidizing bacteria, (2)Structure/function studies were performed on redox-active biomolecules from Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, (3) Novel redox-active biomolecules were demonstrated in other iron autotrophs, and (4) New probes of metalloprotein electron-transfer reactions were synthesized and characterized.

Blake, R. II

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 26 The Opposing Effects of Dietary Omega-3 and trans Fatty Acids on Health: A Yin-Yang Effect at the Molecular Level?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 26 The Opposing Effects of Dietary Omega-3 and trans Fatty Acids on Health: A Yin-Yang Effect at the Molecular Level? Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutritio

403

Evaluation of Microscopic Disease in Oral Tongue Cancer Using Whole-Mount Histopathologic Techniques: Implications for the Management of Head-and-Neck Cancers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To map the distribution of microscopic disease (MD) in head-and-neck cancer by analyzing digital images of whole-mounted serial sections of tongue cancer specimens. Methods and Materials: Ten T1-3 oral tongue cancer specimens were evaluated. The specimens were sliced into 3-mm blocks from which one or more 4-{mu}m slides were taken and digitized to create whole-mounted serial sections. Gross tumor and microscopic disease were digitally contoured on each slide. Lines perpendicular to the gross tumor volume (GTV) edge were created at 0.05-mm intervals and the distance between GTV and MD measured. Results: Of 88 slides assessed, 44 (50%) had evidence of MD. Of the 63,809 perpendicular lines drawn along the GTV edges, 2320 (3.6%) encountered microscopic disease along their path. The majority of MD abutted the GTV, and only 26.7% was noncontiguous with the GTV edge. The maximum distance from the border was 7.8 mm. Ninety-nine percent of all MD was within 4.75 mm and 95% was within 3.95 mm of the GTV. Conclusion: In this study we were able to assess the distribution of MD more accurately than has been possible with routine pathologic techniques. The results indicate that when the GTV is correctly identified, there is very little MD to be found outside this volume. This has implications for the volume of tissue resected at surgery and the volume included in the clinical target volume in conformal radiotherapy planning.

Campbell, Sorcha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Poon, Ian, E-mail: Ian.Poon@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Markel, Dan; Vena, Dan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Higgins, Kevin; Enepekides, Dan [Department of Otolaryngology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Rapheal, Simon; Wong, John; Allo, Ghassan; Morgen, Eric [Department of Pathology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Khaoum, Nader; Smith, Ben; Balogh, Judith; MacKenzie, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Davidson, Jean [Department of Otolaryngology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Wang, Dan; Yaffe, Martin [Sunnybrook Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Modelling non-linear exposure-disease relationships in a large individual participant meta-analysis allowing for the effects of exposure measurement error  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of exposures whether it be the measure- ment of biological exposures such as serum creatinine [27], or blood glucose [28]; environmen- tal exposures such as radon [29] or air pollution [30]; dietary exposures such as energy intake [31] or alcohol consumption... cause of death in almost all countries in the world. CHD caused approximately 1 out of every 6 deaths in the United States in 2006; an average of 1 death every 38 seconds [4]. In the United Kingdom cardiovascular disease is the main cause of mortality...

Strawbridge, Alexander Daniel

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

405

Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume III of III; Disease and Physiology Supplements, 1978-1983 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Aquaculture Task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status of the stocks was quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains five previously published papers.

Slatick, Emil; Gilbreath, Lyle G.; Harmon, Jerrel R. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Centr, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

1988-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

406

Low-fat diet and regular, supervised physical exercise in patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease: reduction of stress-induced myocardial ischemia  

SciTech Connect

The effects of physical exercise and normalization of serum lipoproteins on stress-induced myocardial ischemia were studied in 18 patients with coronary artery disease, stable angina pectoris, and mild hypercholesterolemia (total serum cholesterol 242 +/- 32 mg/dl). These patients underwent a combined regimen of low-fat/low-cholesterol diet and regular, supervised physical exercise at high intensity for 12 months. At 1 year serum lipoproteins has been lowered to ideal levels (serum cholesterol 202 +/- 31 mg/dl, low-density lipoproteins 130 +/- 30 mg/dl, very low-density lipoproteins 22 +/- 15 mg/dl, serum triglycerides 105 (69 to 304) mg/dl) and physical work capacity was improved by 21% (p less than .01). No significant effect was noted on high-density lipoproteins, probably as a result of the low-fat/high-carbohydrate diet. Stress-induced myocardial ischemia, as assessed by thallium-201 scintigraphy, was decreased by 54% (p less than .05) despite higher myocardial oxygen consumption. Eighteen patients matched for age and severity of coronary artery disease served as a control group and ''usual medical care'' was rendered by their private physicians. No significant changes with respect to serum lipoproteins, physical work capacity, maximal rate-pressure product, or stress-induced myocardial ischemia were observed in this group. These data indicate that regular physical exercise at high intensity, lowered body weight, and normalization of serum lipoproteins may alleviate compromised myocardial perfusion during stress.

Schuler, G.; Schlierf, G.; Wirth, A.; Mautner, H.P.; Scheurlen, H.; Thumm, M.; Roth, H.; Schwarz, F.; Kohlmeier, M.; Mehmel, H.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p < 10{sup -53}) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

408

Astroglial Inhibition of NF-kB Does Not Ameliorate Disease Onset and Progression in a Mouse Model for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motor neuron death in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is considered a ‘‘non-cell autonomous’ ’ process, with astrocytes playing a critical role in disease progression. Glial cells are activated early in transgenic mice expressing mutant SOD1, suggesting that neuroinflammation has a relevant role in the cascade of events that trigger the death of motor neurons. An inflammatory cascade including COX2 expression, secretion of cytokines and release of NO from astrocytes may descend from activation of a NF-kB-mediated pathway observed in astrocytes from ALS patients and in experimental models. We have attempted rescue of transgenic mutant SOD1 mice through the inhibition of the NF-kB pathway selectively in astrocytes. Here we show that despite efficient inhibition of this major pathway, double transgenic mice expressing the mutant SOD1 G93A ubiquitously and the dominant negative form of IkBa (IkBaAA) in astrocytes under control of the GFAP promoter show no benefit in terms of onset and progression of disease. Our data indicate that motor neuron death in ALS cannot be prevented by inhibition of a single inflammatory pathway because alternative pathways are activated in the

Claudia Crosio; Cristiana Valle; Arianna Casciati; Ciro Iaccarino; Maria Teresa Carrì

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p < 10{sup -53}) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

410

Rat MHC-linked peptide transporter alleles strongly influence peptide binding by HLA-B27 but not B27-associated inflammatory disease  

SciTech Connect

Rats transgenic for the human MHC molecule HLA-B27 were used to study the effect of two alleles, cim{sup a} and cim{sup b}, which are associated with peptide transport by the MHC-encoded Tap2 transporter, on the function of HLA-B27 as a restriction element for CTL recognition of the male H-Y minor H Ag and on the multisystem inflammatory disease characteristic of B27 transgenic rats. Anti-H-Y CTL generated in cim{sup a} B27 transgenic rats lysed male B27 cim{sup b/b} targets significantly less well than cim{sup a/a} or cim{sup a/b} targets. Addition of exogenous H-Y peptides to male B27 cim{sup b/b} targets increased susceptibility to lysis to the level of cim{sup a/a} targets sensitized with exogenous H-Y peptides. {sup 3}H-labeled peptides eluted from B27 molecules of lymphoblasts from rats of two cim{sup b} and three cim{sup a} RT1 haplotypes showed that the cim{sup b} peptide pool favors comparatively longer and/or more hydrophobic peptides. These results indicate that RT1-linked Tap2 polymorphism in the rat strongly influences peptide loading of HLA-B27. Nonetheless, the prevalence and severity of multisystem inflammatory lesions were comparable in backcross rats bearing either cim{sup a/b} or cim{sup b/b}. It thus appears either that binding of specific peptides to B27 is unimportant in the pathogenesis of B27-associated disease or that the critical peptides, unlike H-Y and many others, are not influenced by Tap transporter polymorphism. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Simmons, W.A.; Satumtira, Nimman; Taurog, J.D. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)] [and others

1996-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Impact of Preoperative Radiotherapy on General and Disease-Specific Health Status of Rectal Cancer Survivors: A Population-Based Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To date, few studies have evaluated the impact of preoperative radiotherapy (pRT) on long-term health status of rectal cancer survivors. Using a population-based sample, we assessed the impact of pRT on general and disease-specific health status of rectal cancer survivors up to 10 years postdiagnosis. The health status of older ({>=}75 years old at diagnosis) pRT survivors was also compared with that of younger survivors. Methods and Materials: Survivors identified from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry treated with surgery only (SU) or with pRT between 1998 and 2007 were included. Survivors completed the Short Form-36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaire and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Colorectal 38 (EORTC QLQ-CR38) questionnaire. The SF-36 and EORTC QLQ-CR38 (sexuality subscale) scores of the survivors were compared to an age- and sex-matched Dutch normal population. Results: A total of 340 survivors (response, 85%; pRT survivors, 71%) were analyzed. Overall, survivors had similar general health status. Both short-term (<5 years) and long-term ({>=}5 years) pRT survivors had significantly poorer body image and more problems with gastrointestinal function, male sexual dysfunction, and defecation than SU survivors. Survivors had comparable general health status but greater sexual dysfunction than the normal population. Older pRT survivors had general and disease-specific health status comparable to that of younger pRT survivors. Conclusions: For better survivorship care, rectal cancer survivors could benefit from increased clinical and psychological focus on the possible long-term morbidity of treatment and its effects on health status.

Thong, Melissa S.Y., E-mail: M.Thong@uvt.nl [Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University (Netherlands); Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mols, Floortje [Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University (Netherlands); Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lemmens, Valery E.P.P. [Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rutten, Harm J.T. [Department of Surgery, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Roukema, Jan A. [Department of Surgery, St. Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands); Martijn, Hendrik [Department of Radiotherapy, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de [Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University (Netherlands); Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Disability trajectories : disabled youths' identity development, negotiation of experience and expectation, and sense of agency during transition.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??How do youth with orthopedic impairments negotiate expectations and experiences as they transition from high school to college and from family-delivered supports to independence? And… (more)

Stolz, Suzanne Margaret

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Licenses Available in Energy & Utilities | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surgical Tools and Orthopedic Implants 200000789 Device for Separating CO2 from Fossil Power Plant Emissions 200000791 Wheel Reaction Force Sensing ApparatusWhole-Vehicle Brake...

414

Sintering Behavior of TiH2 for Manufacturing of Titanium Alloys and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Additive Manufacturing of Titanium For Orthopedic Implants · Laser Beam Welding of ATI 425 Titanium · Local Heat Treatment of Titanium Alloys: ...

415

Production of High Translucent Self-Colored Dental Zirconia Blocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Borate Glass Nanofiber/Whiskers in a Hybrid Orthopedic Composite Implants for ... G6: Production of High Translucent Self-Colored Dental Zirconia Blocks.

416

Dealloying of NiTi by Immersion in Metallic Melt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Borate Glass Nanofiber/Whiskers in a Hybrid Orthopedic Composite Implants for ... G6: Production of High Translucent Self-Colored Dental Zirconia Blocks.

417

Radiographic and Histologic Response to Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy in Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Center, Sacramento, CA; 2 Division of OrthopedicDavis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA; 3 Department ofMedical Center, Sacramento, CA; 4 Division of Biostatistics,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

QUICK FACTS Only 22% of the world's fisheries are sustainable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to clean modern energy services is widespread.In many developing countries, women are the primary users. · Scale-up slum upgrading and invest in cheap housing. · Incentives for sustainable conservation practices and providers of energy; so women and children are also more affected by respiratory diseases related to the use

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

419

Ecological predictive maintenance in urban fleets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motor vehicles are one of the largest sources of air pollutants worldwide. Several studies had concluded that particulate matter (PM) are responsible for some respiratory, cardiovascular, lung diseases, increasing in death from heart and may cause lung ... Keywords: HMM, degradation, ecological, environmental, exploitation, maintenance, particulate emissions, pollutant emissions, predictive

António Simões; José Torres Farinha; Inácio Fonseca; Luis Ferreira

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Combining Neural Network and Genetic Algorithm for Prediction of Lung Sounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recognition of lung sounds is an important goal in pulmonary medicine. In this work, we present a study for neural networks--genetic algorithm approach intended to aid in lung sound classification. Lung sound was captured from the chest wall of The subjects ... Keywords: MLP, auscultation, genetic algorithm, lung sounds, neural network, respiratory diseases

?nan Güler; Hüseyin Polat; Uçman Ergün

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Optimization of students' anti-epidemic prophylaxis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A possibility of applying a method of optimal control theory to constructing economical modes of students' prophylaxis during a seasonal growth of acute respiratory diseases is studied. A model of seasonal growth is represented and two schemes are compared: ... Keywords: 02.30.Yy

I. D. Kolesin; E. M. Zhitkova

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Long-Term Results After High-Dose Radiotherapy and Adjuvant Hormones in Prostate Cancer: How Curable Is High-Risk Disease?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To analyze long-term outcome and prognostic factors for high-risk prostate cancer defined by National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria treated with high-dose radiotherapy and androgen deprivation in a single institution. Methods and Materials: A total of 306 patients treated between 1995 and 2007 in a radiation dose-escalation program fulfilled the National Comprehensive Cancer Network high-risk criteria. Median International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements radiation dose was 78 Gy (range, 66.0-84.1 Gy). Long-term androgen deprivation (LTAD) was administered in 231 patients, short-term androgen deprivation (STAD) in 59 patients, and no hormones in 16 patients. The Phoenix (nadir plus 2 ng/mL) consensus definition was used for biochemical control. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine the independent prognostic impact of clinical and treatment factors. Median follow-up time was 64 months (range, 24-171 months). Results: The actuarial overall survival at 5 and 10 years was 95.7% and 89.8%, respectively, and the corresponding biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was 89.5% and 67.2%, respectively. Fourteen patients (4.6%) developed distant metastasis. Multivariate analysis showed that Gleason score >7 (p = 0.001), pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >20 ng/mL (p = 0.037), higher radiation dose (p = 0.005), and the use of adjuvant LTAD vs. STAD (p = 0.011) were independent prognostic factors affecting bDFS in high-risk disease. The 5-year bDFS for patients treated with LTAD plus radiotherapy dose >78 Gy was 97%. Conclusions: For high-risk patients the present series showed that the use of LTAD in conjunction with higher doses (>78 Gy) of radiotherapy was associated with improved biochemical tumor control. We observed that the presence of Gleason sum >7 and pretreatment PSA level >20 ng/mL in the same patient represents a 6.8 times higher risk of PSA failure. These men could be considered for clinical trials with addition of novel agents.

Zapatero, Almudena, E-mail: azapatero.hlpr@salud.madrid.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Vicente, Feliciano [Department of Medical Physics, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain); Martin de Vidales, Carmen; Cruz Conde, Alfonso; Ibanez, Yamile [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, Inmaculada; Rabadan, Mariano [Department of Urology, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid (Spain)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

20 Gy Versus 44 Gy of Supplemental External Beam Radiotherapy With Palladium-103 for Patients With Greater Risk Disease: Results of a Prospective Randomized Trial  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The necessity of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a supplement to prostate brachytherapy remains unknown. We report brachytherapy outcomes for patients with higher risk features randomized to substantially different supplemental EBRT regimens. Methods and Materials: Between December 1999 and June 2004, 247 patients were randomized to 20 Gy vs. 44 Gy EBRT followed by a palladium-103 boost (115 Gy vs. 90 Gy). The eligibility criteria included clinically organ-confined disease with Gleason score 7-10 and/or pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level 10-20 ng/mL. The median follow-up period was 9.0 years. Biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) was defined as a PSA level of {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. The median day 0 prescribed dose covering 90% of the target volume was 125.7%; 80 men received androgen deprivation therapy (median, 4 months). Multiple parameters were evaluated for their effect on bPFS. Results: For the entire cohort, the cause-specific survival, bPFS, and overall survival rates were 97.7%, 93.2%, and 80.8% at 8 years and 96.9%, 93.2%, and 75.4% at 10 years, respectively. The bPFS rate was 93.1% and 93.4% for the 20-Gy and 44-Gy arms, respectively (p = .994). However, no statistically significant differences were found in cause-specific survival or overall survival were identified. When stratified by PSA level of {<=}10 ng/mL vs. >10 ng/mL, Gleason score, or androgen deprivation therapy, no statistically significant differences in bPFS were discerned between the two EBRT regimens. On multivariate analysis, bPFS was most closely related to the preimplant PSA and clinical stage. For patients with biochemically controlled disease, the median PSA level was <0.02 ng/mL. Conclusion: The results of the present trial strongly suggest that two markedly different supplemental EBRT regimens result in equivalent cause-specific survival, bPFS, and overall survival. It is probable that the lack of benefit for a higher supplemental EBRT dose is the result of the high-quality brachytherapy dose distributions.

Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org [Schiffler Cancer Center/Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Healthcare Corporation, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W. [Schiffler Cancer Center/Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Taira, Al V. [Western Radiation Oncology Inc, Mountain View, CA (United States); Orio, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Department of Pathology, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, WV (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Markov blanket-based approach for learning multi-dimensional Bayesian network classifiers: An application to predict the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) from the 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-dimensional Bayesian network classifiers (MBCs) are probabilistic graphical models recently proposed to deal with multi-dimensional classification problems, where each instance in the data set has to be assigned to more than one class variable. ... Keywords: EQ-5D, Markov blanket, Multi-dimensional Bayesian network classifiers, Multi-dimensional classification, PDQ-39, Parkinson's disease

Hanen Borchani; Concha Bielza; Pablo Mart?Nez-Mart?N; Pedro LarrañAga

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Logo Department of Energy Seal Left Tab SEARCH Right Tab TOOLS Right Tab Left Tab HOME Right Tab Left Tab ABOUT US Right Tab Left Tab...

426

Capnographic analysis for disease classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing methods for extracting diagnostic information from carbon dioxide in the exhaled breath are qualitative, through visual inspection, and therefore imprecise. In this thesis, we quantify the CO? waveform, or capnogram, ...

Asher, Rebecca J. (Rebecca Jennie)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Heart Disease Detection Using Wavelets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop a wavelet based method to obtain standardized gray?scale chart of both healthy hearts and of hearts suffering left ventricular hypertrophy. The hypothesis that early bad functioning of heart can be detected must be tested by comparing the wavelet analysis of the corresponding ECD with the limit cases. Several important parameters shall be taken into account such as age

A. González S.; J. L. Acosta P.; M. Sandoval M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Mapping of nodal disease in locally advanced prostate cancer: Rethinking the clinical target volume for pelvic nodal irradiation based on vascular rather than bony anatomy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Toxicity from pelvic irradiation could be reduced if fields were limited to likely areas of nodal involvement rather than using the standard 'four-field box.' We employed a novel magnetic resonance lymphangiographic technique to highlight the likely sites of occult nodal metastasis from prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eighteen prostate cancer patients with pathologically confirmed node-positive disease had a total of 69 pathologic nodes identifiable by lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced MRI and semiquantitative nodal analysis. Fourteen of these nodes were in the para-aortic region, and 55 were in the pelvis. The position of each of these malignant nodes was mapped to a common template based on its relation to skeletal or vascular anatomy. Results: Relative to skeletal anatomy, nodes covered a diffuse volume from the mid lumbar spine to the superior pubic ramus and along the sacrum and pelvic side walls. In contrast, the nodal metastases mapped much more tightly relative to the large pelvic vessels. A proposed pelvic clinical target volume to encompass the region at greatest risk of containing occult nodal metastases would include a 2.0-cm radial expansion volume around the distal common iliac and proximal external and internal iliac vessels that would encompass 94.5% of the pelvic nodes at risk as defined by our node-positive prostate cancer patient cohort. Conclusions: Nodal metastases from prostate cancer are largely localized along the major pelvic vasculature. Defining nodal radiation treatment portals based on vascular rather than bony anatomy may allow for a significant decrease in normal pelvic tissue irradiation and its associated toxicities.

Shih, Helen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States) and Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: hshih@partners.org; Harisinghani, Mukesh [Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Wolfgang, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Saksena, Mansi [Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Weissleder, Ralph [Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Accuracy of two simple methods for estimation of thyroidal {sup 131}I kinetics for dosimetry-based treatment of Graves' disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the major challenges to the more widespread use of individualized, dosimetry-based radioiodine treatment of Graves' disease is the development of a reasonably fast, simple, and cost-effective method to measure thyroidal {sup 131}I kinetics in patients. Even though the fixed activity administration method does not optimize the therapy, giving often too high or too low a dose to the gland, it provides effective treatment for almost 80% of patients without consuming excessive time and resources. In this article two simple methods for the evaluation of the kinetics of {sup 131}I in the thyroid gland are presented and discussed. The first is based on two measurements 4 and 24 h after a diagnostic {sup 131}I administration and the second on one measurement 4 h after such an administration and a linear correlation between this measurement and the maximum uptake in the thyroid. The thyroid absorbed dose calculated by each of the two methods is compared to that calculated by a more complete {sup 131}I kinetics evaluation, based on seven thyroid uptake measurements for 35 patients at various times after the therapy administration. There are differences in the thyroid absorbed doses between those derived by each of the two simpler methods and the ''reference'' value (derived by more complete uptake measurements following the therapeutic {sup 131}I administration), with 20% median and 40% 90-percentile differences for the first method (i.e., based on two thyroid uptake measurements at 4 and 24 h after {sup 131}I administration) and 25% median and 45% 90-percentile differences for the second method (i.e., based on one measurement at 4 h post-administration). Predictably, although relatively fast and convenient, neither of these simpler methods appears to be as accurate as thyroid dose estimates based on more complete kinetic data.

Traino, A. C.; Xhafa, B. [Sezione di Fisica Medica, U.O. Fisica Sanitaria, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, via Roma n. 67, Pisa 56125 (Italy); Sezione di Fisica Medica, U.O. Fisica Sanitaria, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, via Roma n. 67, Pisa 56125 (Italy) and Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina, Bulevardi i deeshmoreeve, 10000 Prishtinee, Republic of Kosova (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome in dynamical small-world networks Naoki Masuda and Norio Konno  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as antiviral drugs are not discovered yet, dynamical features of the epidemics should be clarified SARS is estimated to have started in the Guandong province of the People's Republic of China clarified, which mars developments of antiviral drugs or other means of conclusive medication. Under

Masuda, Naoki

431

THE CONVERSION OF FAT TO CARBOHYDRATE IN THE GERMINATING CASTOR BEAN III. THE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS, AND CORRELATION WITH RESPIRATORY EXCHANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In considering the conversion of fat to carbohydrate in the germinating castor bean, two phases of the problem have been discussed in the preceding papers. The results of chemical analyses made on the beans at various stages of their germination will be presented here. The changes in the fat stores of seeds during germination have been studied by numerous investigators who used many different seeds.

H. B. Pierce; Dorothy E. Sheldon; John; R. Murlin

1933-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Crystallization of Mitochondrial Respiratory Complex II from Chicken Heart: A Membrane-Protein Complex Diffracting to 2.0 Angstrom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The data was collected at SSRL's beamline 9-1 on July 24,beamlines at the ALS and SSRL. Data were processed usingRadiation Laboratory (SSRL), which is operated by the

Huang, Li-shar; Borders, Toni M.; Shen, John T.; Wang, Chung-Jen; Berry, Edward A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Quantitative genetics of growth, carcass-quality traits, and disease resistance in hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops [female] x Morone saxatilis [male])  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 10 x 10 factorial mating design and a ‘common-garden’ rearing approach were employed to examine genetic effects and heritability of growth, carcass-quality traits, and disease resistance, important production traits in the aquaculture of hybrid striped bass (? white bass, Morone chrysops, crossed with ?striped bass, Morone saxatilis). Genotypes at four to ten nuclear-encoded microsatellites were used for parentage assignment and a general, linear-mixed model and a Restricted Maximum Likelihood (REML) algorithm were used to estimate variance components associated with dam, sire, and dam x sire interaction effects. Dam and sire effect on juvenile growth (weight, length and growth rates) were significant, whereas dam by sire interaction effect was not. Estimates of broad-sense heritability for growth, based on family means (h2 f), in dams ranged from 0.60 ± 0.20 to 0.82 ± 0.10 and in sires ranged from 0.43 ± 0.20 to 0.75 ± 0.18. High correlations were found between growth rates measured at two time intervals. Estimates of general combining ability for growth rates differed significantly among dams and among sires, whereas estimates of specific combining ability for each dam × sire combination did not differ significantly from zero. These results suggest that additive-effect genes contributed to the differences in juvenile growth. Dam and sire effect on fillet weight were significant; dam effect on liver weight and sire effect on total viscera weight were also significant. Dam and sire effect on hepatosomatic index and viscerasomatic index were significant, as was dam and sire interaction effect on viscerasomatic index. Phenotypic and genetics correlations between body weight and carcass-quality traits were high (0.85 - 1.00). Phenotypic correlations between body weight and standardized carcass-quality traits were positive but low, ranging from 0.07 to 0.19. Resistance to S. iniae was assessed in a challenge experiment, using the 10 dam x 10 sire factorial mating design. A significant effect of sire on resistance to S. iniae was found, and offspring from one sire had a 2.4 times higher probability of dying than offspring from the ‘average’ sire. Genetic effects on the immune-response parameters and on stress-response parameters assessed were non-significant.

Wang, Xiaoxue

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

An ecological study examining the correlation of end-stage renal disease and ground water heavy metal content in Texas counties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ecological study was conducted to examine the correlation of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the ground water heavy metal level of lead, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and the cumulative level of all four metals in Texas counties. The heavy meal dab was collected from the United States Geologic Survey (USGS) measurement and covered the twenty-one year span 1970- 1990. The ESRD data was gathered from the Texas Department of Health Kidney Program ESRD Registry for the five-year span 1988-1992. This registry included more than 99% of incident ESRD cases over the same time period. The 1990 U.S. Census data was used to estimate county population by age, race and sex. Exposure was defined as residence in a county with ground water measurements that fell in the highest quartile for each metal (mercury 0.297ug/, arsenic 3.216ug/l, lead 4.685ug/l, cadmium 1.423ug/l, cumulative metal level 8.911ug/l). Outcome was defined as an incident case of ESRD between the years 1988-1992 and examined as five-year incidence of ESRD per 10,000 persons. Among 254 Texas counties, 52 had at least 7 years of metal measurements for lead and cadmium, 51 counties had at least 7 years of metal measurements for arsenic and mercury and 50 counties had 7 years of measurements for all four metals. Linear and logistic regression procedures were carried out to examine the relationship between heavy metal ground water levels and incidence of ESRD. None of the metals demonstrated a statistically significant positive relationship with five-year incidence of ESRD per 10,000 persons. Counties with high levels of heavy metals did not indicate an increased odds of having a five-year ESRD incidence per 10,000 persons above the 1988-1992 state average. The percentage of Black or Hispanic persons in a county was a positive predictor of increased five-year incidence of ESRD per 10,000 persons.

Bishop, Scott Alan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Virology Journal BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Respiratory viral infections detected by multiplex PCR among pediatric patients with lower respiratory tract infections seen at an

Preeti Bharaj; Wayne M Sullender; Sushil K Kabra; Kalaivani Mani; John Cherian; Vikas Tyagi; Harendra S Chahar; Er Kaushik; Lalit Dar; Shobha Broor; Shobha Broor

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Thionyl-chloride-induced lung injury and bronchiolitis obliterans  

SciTech Connect

Thionyl-chloride (TCl) is used in the manufacture of lithium batteries, producing SO2 and HCl fumes on contact with water. We report two cases of accidental TCl exposure resulting in lung injury that may vary from a relatively mild and reversible interstitial lung disease to a severe form of bronchiolitis obliterans causing, after a latent period, an acute/chronic respiratory failure as well as other complications (spontaneous pneumothorax and bronchopleural fistula), previously unreported in TCl fume inhalation.

Konichezky, S.; Schattner, A.; Ezri, T.; Bokenboim, P.; Geva, D. (Kaplan Hospital, Rehovot (Israel))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Computer-Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM) Investigation of Respirable Quartz in Air Samples Collected During Power Plant Maintenance Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable methods of determining the amount of respirable, crystalline silica (quartz) in coal fly ash (CFA) are clearly of interest in order to satisfy Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations and to accurately assess the potential risks of workers with prolonged CFA exposure to certain respiratory diseases. Earlier EPRI-sponsored research focused on development of a new method for determining the amount of respirable quartz in bulk CFA samples using computer-controlled scanning e...

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

438

Development of a particle number and particle mass vehicle emissions inventory for an urban fleet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motor vehicles are major emitters of gaseous and particulate matter pollution in urban areas, and exposure to particulate matter pollution can have serious health effects, ranging from respiratory and cardiovascular disease to mortality. Motor vehicle ... Keywords: Emission factors, Motor vehicle inventory, PM 1, PM 10, PM 2.5, Particle emissions, Particle mass, Particle number, South-East Queensland, Traffic modelling, Transport modelling, Ultrafine particles

Diane U. Keogh; Luis Ferreira; Lidia Morawska

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

BMC Infectious Diseases BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article A sensitive one-step real-time PCR for detection of avian influenza viruses using a MGB probe and an internal positive control

Livia Di Trani; Barbara Bedini; Isabella Donatelli; Laura Campitelli; Maria Aless; Ra De Marco; Mauro Delogu; Canio Buonavoglia; Gabriele Vaccari; Open Access

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Oxygen Sensing in Health and Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peripheral chemoreflex responsiveness is increased at elevated levels of carbon dioxide after episodic hypoxia in

Jason H. Mateika; Chris Mendello; Dany Obeid; M. Safwan Badr

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The genetics of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cities in China, non-smoker emphysema death rates are almost 100 times greater than those of the non-smoker in the USA [4]. Exposure to dust in the coal and gold mining industries, and to gas in cadmium mining, has been linked to the development... number of well-charac- terised affected relatives; either extended pedigrees or nuclear families can be used. One of our research groups (EKS) has been focusing on linkage analysis of extended pedigrees of patients with severe, early-onset COPD. A genome...

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

442

Metabolic Prosthesis for Treating Ischemic Diseases  

Chlorine production and pH control can be achieved through a patented pulsed electrochemical technique. Advantages • Safer than introduction of chemicals,

443

microRNA: human disease and development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

microRNAs or miRNAs are an abundant class of highly conversed, small non-coding RNAs that present an entirely new theme of post-transcriptional gene regulation. miRNAs play a key role in diverse biological systems, such as virology, embryogenesis, ... Keywords: bioinformatics, biomarkers, cancer, eukaryotes, gene regulation, immune system development, immune system response, immunity regulation, metabolic pathways, miRNAs, microRNA expression, stem cells, target predictions

Virendra S. Gomase; Akshay N. Parundekar

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Noninvasive Detection of Preclinical Cardiovascular Disease  

Berkeley Lab studies on human subjects have verified that the new method is 37% more sensitive to arterial ... minimizes the possibility of human oper ...

445

20 February 20121 Disease management measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chestnut, ash, holm oak and Japanese larch. The latter is particularly vulnerable and experience to and selling them to processing facilities licensed to handle Phytophthora-affected wood. This may allow you Licence System. Grant Support The grant support package offers grants to woodland owners for both: Agent

446

Antioxidant enzyme gene transfer for ischemic diseases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alam, T. Ritter, H. D. Volk, D. G. Farmer, R. M. Ghobrial,Kaczmarek, T. Ritter, H. D. Volk, G. Tiegs. Heme oxygenase-1

Wu, Jian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Health Hazard Evaluation (HHE) report and any recommendations made herein are for the specific facility evaluated and may not be universally applicable. Any recommendations made are not to be considered as final statements of NIOSH policy or of any agency or individual involved. Additional HHE reports are available at

Nancy Clark Burton

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

ISSUE 55 JULY 2008 Genes and disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

)20 7611 8202 E techtransfer@wellcome.ac.uk www.wellcome.ac.uk/techtransfer/wn TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER FUNDING

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

449

Fracture, aging and disease in bone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and R. O. Ritchie: Effect of aging on the toughness of humanof microstructure in the aging-related deterioration of thestudy of the effect of aging on human cortical bone J.

Ager, J.W.; Balooch, G.; Ritchie, R.O.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

DISEASES OF AQUATIC ORGANISMS Dis Aquat Org  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 , William M. Jones III4 , Kimberly S. Reece4 , Tim Meinke2 , Annette Gendron1 , James A. Rusak2, 5 Institute of Marine Science, The College of William & Mary, Gloucester Point, Virginia 23062, USA 5 Present for recreational angling and boating. The lake has a mean depth of 7.5 m and a broad littoral zone composed largely

Johnson, Pieter

451

Spring 2009 Aerosol particles and lung disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

programmes in Libya, Iran and North Korea to produce uranium and plutonium in forms suitable for nuclear separated substantial plutonium and now boasts of possessing its own nuclear deterrent. In addition to state of the hundreds of tonnes of highly enriched uranium and separated plutonium left over from the former Soviet

Keeler, James

452

Architecture and Viral Disease | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Visiting the APS Mission & Goals Find People Organization Charts Committees Job Openings User Information Prospective Users New Users Current Users APS User Portal...

453

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World Trade Center Health ProgramThis document is in the public domain and may be freely copied or reprinted.

Paul J. Middendorf; Robert E. Mccleery; Richard Niemeier Phd

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ATSDR health consultation is a verbal or written response from ATSDR to a specific request for information about health risks related to a specific site, a chemical release, or the presence of hazardous material. In order to prevent or mitigate exposures, a consultation may lead to specific actions, such as restricting use of or replacing water supplies; intensifying environmental sampling; restricting site access; or removing the contaminated material. In addition, consultations may recommend additional public health actions, such as conducting health surveillance activities to evaluate exposure or trends in adverse health outcomes; conducting biological indicators of exposure studies to assess exposure; and providing health education for health care providers and community members. This concludes the health consultation process for this site, unless additional information is obtained by ATSDR which, in the Agency’s opinion, indicates a need to revise or append the conclusions previously issued.

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A health consultation is a verbal or written response from ATSDR or ATSDR’s Cooperative Agreement Partners to a specific request for information about health risks related to a specific site, a chemical release, or the presence of hazardous material. In order to prevent or mitigate exposures, a consultation may lead to specific actions, such as restricting use of or replacing water supplies; intensifying environmental sampling; restricting site access; or removing the contaminated material. In addition, consultations may recommend additional public health actions, such as conducting health surveillance activities to evaluate exposure or trends in adverse health outcomes; conducting biological indicators of exposure studies to assess exposure; and providing health education for health care providers and community members. This concludes the health consultation process for this site, unless additional information is obtained by ATSDR or ATSDR’s Cooperative Agreement Partner which, in the Agency’s opinion, indicates a need to revise or append the conclusions previously issued.

Borit Asbestos Site

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A health consultation is a verbal or written response from ATSDR or ATSDR’s Cooperative Agreement Partners to a specific request for information about health risks related to a specific site, a chemical release, or the presence of hazardous material. In order to prevent or mitigate exposures, a consultation may lead to specific actions, such as restricting use of or replacing water supplies; intensifying environmental sampling; restricting site access; or removing the contaminated material. In addition, consultations may recommend additional public health actions, such as conducting health surveillance activities to evaluate exposure or trends in adverse health outcomes; conducting biological indicators of exposure studies to assess exposure; and providing health education for health care providers and community members. This concludes the health consultation process for this site, unless additional information is obtained by ATSDR or ATSDR’s Cooperative Agreement Partner which, in the Agency’s opinion, indicates a need to revise or append the conclusions previously issued.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Health Hazard Evaluation (HHE) report and any recommendations made herein are for the specific facility evaluated and may not be universally applicable. Any recommendations made are not to be considered as final statements of NIOSH policy or of any agency or individual involved. Additional HHE reports are available at

Gregory Burr Cih; Scott Brueck

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Molecular regulators of neurogenesis in Alzheimer's disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Pike, C. (1993). Molecular cascades in adaptive versusA. , and Saitoh, T. (1997). Molecular mechanisms of synapticBroeckhoven, C. (1998). Molecular genetics of Alzheimer's

Crews, Leslie Anne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Cell death: protein misfolding and neurodegenerative diseases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off-rate, or what we call a UFO drug—a drug that is presenta new, improved class of UFO drugs that should be both

Nakamura, Tomohiro; Lipton, Stuart A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Integrated Microfluidic Bioprocessors for Infectious Disease Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperature detector (RTD) and microfabricated thin filmresistance temperature detector (RTD) and a modular heater.wafer containing the Ti/Pt RTD elements was thermally bonded

Thaitrong, Numrin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

LLNL Chronic Beryllium Disease Protection Program Effectiveness...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LLNL-2011-03-25 Site: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report...

462

Adiposity measures and risk of cardiovascular disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ratio PAI Plasminogen activator inhibitor PHS Physicians' Health Study PROMIS Pakistan Risk of Myocardial Infarction Study PSC Prospective Studies Collaboration RDR Regression dilution ratio ROS Reactive oxygen species RR Risk ratio SBP Systolic... the arterial wall where they are oxidised by macrophages and smooth muscle cells. Additional mono-nuclear cells such as monocytes are attracted to the site of damage, where they engulf LDL cholesterol and become foam cells.10,13,14 Accumulation of foam cells...

Wormser, David

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

463

Spinal and Epidural Endoscopy: A Historical Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In current-day medicine, endoscopy plays an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of many different conditions. This improving technology has led to new areas of endoscopic visualization, particularly of the epidural space, spinal cord and contiguous structures. A review of the medical literature indicates that clinicians have been working with various types of endoscopes for over sixty years, with varying degrees of success. Only recently has fiberoptic technology been integrated with computer-enhanced imaging to provide a new medium for viewing the central nervous system. The initial results are promising and will likely pave the way for newer, less invasive means of diagnosis and treatment of central nervous system pathology. The direct visualization of the spinal canal and its contents was born in 1931 from the pioneering work of Michael Burman, an orthopedic surgeon from the New York Hospital for Joint Diseases [1]. With each decade since then, myeloscopists and epiduroscopists have attempted to develop a means of fiberoptic visualization that would be easy and safe to apply in medical practice. Unfortunately, until the recent advent of both flexible fiberoptic light sources and optics [2], this could not be achieved. In 1931, Burman removed eleven vertebral columns from cadavera and examined

Lloyd R. Saberskia; Sorin J. Brull; Department Ofanesthesiology The

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Coal home heating and environmental tobacco smoke in relation to lower respiratory illness in Czech children, from birth to 3 years of age  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Czech setting, where coal is still com- monly used inwe found exposure to coal home heating and ETS increasewell studied, residential coal combustion in economically