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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

LANL spinoff receives NIH grant for respiratory disease diagnostic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LANL spinoff receives NIH grant LANL spinoff receives NIH grant for respiratory disease diagnostic device Mesa Tech has been awarded a grant to develop an inexpensive,...

2

Respiratory disease in Utah coal miners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two hundred forty-two Utah underground coal miners volunteered to participate in a respiratory disease study. They were an older group (mean, 56 years of age) and had spent a mean of 29 years in the coal-mining industry. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 57%, and that of coal worker's pneumoconiosis, 25%; only one worker had progressive massive fibrosis. Significant impairment of pulmonary function was found among those with a history of cigarette smoking. Chronic bronchitis or coal worker's penumoconiosis among nonsmokers did not impair pulmonary function. There was a significant association among the nonsmokers between increasing exposure to coal dust and coal worker's pneumoconiosis, but not for changes in pulmonary function. Coal mine dust had a significant influence in causing the symptom complex of chronic cough and sputum production, and coal worker's pneumoconiosis.

Rom, W.N.; Kanner, R.E.; Renzetti, A.D. Jr.; Shigeoka, J.W.; Barkman, H.W.; Nichols, M.; Turner, W.A.; Coleman, M.; Wright, W.E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Respiratory disease in Utah coal miners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two hundred forty-two Utah underground coal miners volunteered to participate in a respiratory disease study. They were an older group (mean, 56 years of age) and had spent a mean of 29 years in the coal-mining industry. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 57%, and that of coal worker's pneumoconiosis, 25%; only one worker had progressive massive fibrosis. Significant impairment of pulmonary function was found among those with a history of cigarette smoking. Chronic bronchitis or coal worker's pneumoconiosis among nonsmokers did not impair pulmonary function. There was a significant association among the nonsmokers between increasing exposure to coal dust and coal worker's pneumoconiosis, but not for changes in pulmonary function. Coal mine dust had a significant influence in causing the symptom complex of chronic cough and sputum production, and coal worker's pneumoconiosis.

Rom, W.N.; Kanner, R.E.; Renzetti, A.D. Jr.; Shigeoka, J.W.; Barkman, H.W.; Nichols, M.; Turner, W.A.; Coleman, M.; Wright, W.E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

E-Print Network 3.0 - apparent respiratory disease Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

San Joaquin Valley College CR BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY Associate of Science -Respiratory Care Course Equivalencies Summary: Current Topics in Respiratory Disease 3 RESPCARE 444...

5

Building-associated risk of febrile acute respiratory diseases in Army trainees  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Airborne transmission of infectious agents and associations of indoor air pollutants with respiratory illnesses are well documented. We hypothesized that energy conservation measures that tighten buildings also increase risks of respiratory infection among building occupants. At four Army training centers during a 47-month period, incidence rates of febrile acute respiratory disease were compared between basic trainees in modern (energy-efficient design and construction) and old barracks. Rates of febrile acute respiratory disease were significantly higher among trainees in modern barracks (adjusted relative risk estimate, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.46 to 1.56), and relative risks were consistent at the four centers. These results support the hypothesis that tight buildings with closed ventilation systems significantly increase risks of respiratory-transmitted infection among congregated, immunologically susceptible occupants.

Brundage, J.F.; Scott, R.M.; Lednar, W.M.; Smith, D.W.; Miller, R.N.

1988-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

6

Respiratory disease and particulate air pollution in Santiago Chile: Contribution of erosion particles from fine sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

August) that make atmospheric conditions highly vulnerable, preventing polluting particles in the airCommentary Respiratory disease and particulate air pollution in Santiago Chile: Contribution pollution Santiago Erosion Sedimentation a b s t r a c t Air pollution in Santiago is a serious problem

7

National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases No More Excuses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to protect yourself and your family. If you miss getting your flu vaccine in the fall, make it a New Year Vaccine WrongThe flu (influenza) is a contagious disease which affects the lungs and can lead to serious protect against non-flu viruses. · Oryoumighthavebeenexposedtoflu after you got vaccinated but before

Liblit, Ben

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - asbestos-associated respiratory disease...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arsenic Health Effects Research Program Collection: Biology and Medicine 13 LAM: A landscape matching algorithm for respiratory data alignment Liangyou Chen, Thomas McKenna,...

9

E-Print Network 3.0 - allergic respiratory diseases Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a health and safety program... ) Hard hat Goggles Hearing protectors Safety boots T-shirts with 4 inch sleeves Respiratory... , including allergic rhinitis (a...

10

Prevalence of respiratory symptoms and diseases in schoolchildren living in a polluted and in a low polluted area in Israel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Second and fifth grade schoolchildren living in two communities with different levels of air pollution were studied. The parents of these children filled out ATS-NHLI health questionnaires. The prevalence of reported respiratory symptoms and pulmonary diseases was found to be significantly higher among children growing up in the polluted community (Ashdod) as compared with the low-pollution area (Hadera). Logistic models fitted for the respiratory conditions which differed significantly between both areas of residence also included background variables that could be responsible for these differences. Relative risk values, which were calculated from the logistic models, were in the range of 1.47 for cough without cold to 2.66 for asthma for children from Ashdod, as compared with 1.00 for children from Hadera.

Goren, A.I.; Hellmann, S.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Correlation of Klebsiella pneumoniae Comparative Genetic Analyses with Virulence Profiles in a Murine Respiratory Disease Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Klebsiella pneumoniae is a bacterial pathogen of worldwide importance and a significant contributor to multiple disease presentations associated with both nosocomial and community acquired disease. ATCC 43816 is a well-studied ...

Fodah, Ramy A.

12

acidosis respiratory: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pulmonary Disease (COPD) as a proxy for respiratory across small urban areas or individuals. Keywords: Respiratory health, Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Cities,...

13

Effects of Air Pollution on Respiratory Disease Asthma, closely associated with air pollution, affects nearly 15 million people in the United States, one-third of them  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dimension to our understanding the health effects of air pollution. Contact: Trina Wood, (530) 752-5257 3Effects of Air Pollution on Respiratory Disease Asthma, closely associated with air pollution as a greater understanding of the types of air pollutants that cause the most harm. Seminal findings

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

14

Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr). Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.

Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru; Oku, Takeo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

deprivation respiratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measured oxidation administration mechanism capacity binding intake pregnancy system deficient quality activity nocturnal treatment duration respiratory daytime pattern circadian normal problem function mechanism baseline disturbance apnoea cat delta analysis temperature parameter shift human states

Yang, Junfeng

16

Executive Summary The University of Wisconsin Orthopedic Funds are part of the University of Wisconsin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Executive Summary The University of Wisconsin Orthopedic Funds are part of the University, and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries and conditions. Vision The University of Wisconsin Orthopedic Funds possible care for patients. Strategic Priorities The University of Wisconsin Orthopedic Funds will support

Sheridan, Jennifer

17

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult respiratory distress Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

syndrome. Ameri- can Review of Respiratory Disease... . Objectives To ... Source: Solomon, Patty - School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Adelaide Collection:...

18

About the Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program The Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program of the National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

About the Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program The Air Pollution and Respiratory Health public health agencies. For example, CDC staff are currently studying the effect of outdoor air pollution for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, the Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program supports

19

SmartCast - Novel Textile Sensors for Embedded Pressure Sensing of Orthopedic Casts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Kaiser, Chair An orthopedic plaster or fiberglass cast is1 - Introduction 1.1 Background A plaster or fiberglass castunderstand how well a plaster or fiberglass cast fits over

Danilovic, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Improved performance of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene for orthopedic applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A considerable number of total-joint replacement devices used in orthopedic medicine involve articulation between a metallic alloy and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Though this polymer has excellent wear resistance, the wear...

Plumlee, Kevin Grant

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-cancer orthopedic applications Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anti-cancer orthopedic applications Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 14 Health Sciences Report Winter...

22

Respiratory Mechanisms of Support  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Respiratory Mechanisms of Support Nasal Cannula Hi Flow Nasal Cannula CPAP Continuous positive the respiratory system is working to compensate for a metabolic issue so as to normalize the blood pH. HCO3 - 22 uses PIP Mechanical Ventilation: Volume vs. Pressure: Volume Control Pressure Control Cycle Volume Time

Kay, Mark A.

23

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspirin exacerbated respiratory Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

illness, malaria, measles, tetanus 12... Human Transport of Disease SARS The Cough Heard Round the World Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome 2003 1... you - How many...

24

Bovine Respiratory Disease Max Irsik DVM, MAB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The clinical signs are usually mild and involve coughing, nasal discharge, fever and a decreased appetite signs of BRD are nasal and eye discharges, coughing, fever, depressed appetite, varying degrees

Watson, Craig A.

25

Investigation of a HA/PDLGA/Carbon Foam Material System for Orthopedic Fixation Plates Based on Time-Dependent Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

throughout healing while maintaining fracture stability. The primary aim of this study is to quantify the degradation rate of a bioresorbable material system, then use this degradation rate to determine the material response of an orthopedic device made...

Rodriguez, Douglas E.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

26

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute coronary disease Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

under... Pediatrics, Pulmonary Medicine Improved Diagnosis and Management of Pediatric Respiratory Diseases using... , Implications and Treatment in Patients with...

27

OmniBrace: A Fast Acting Expanding Foam Splint for Orthopedic Injuries Anisha Bapna, Margaret Lees, William Littlefield, Harrison Rose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utilizes expanding polyurethane foam technology to provide immediate temporary immobilization to orthopedic professionals · Emergency responders · Sports medics · Military field medics There are 225,000 registered EMS personnel in the US alone, as well as nearly 20,000 sports medics, all requiring immobilization equipment

McGaughey, Alan

28

MULTISCALE MODELING OF THE RESPIRATORY TRACT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

correspond to dierent mechanical models. The resulting system is described by the NavierStokes equation of the respiratory tree into three stages where dierent models will be exploited and in which the mechanicalMULTISCALE MODELING OF THE RESPIRATORY TRACT LEONARDO BAFFICO Laboratoire de Mathematiques N

Maury, Bertrand

29

NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY RESPIRATORY CARE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY RESPIRATORY CARE PROGRAM STUDENT HANDBOOK 2013 1.0 Introduction Welcome to the Respiratory Care Program at Northern Kentucky University! We are happy that you have with the Northern Kentucky University Undergraduate Catalog and the Northern Kentucky University Student Handbook

Boyce, Richard L.

30

Effects of air pollution on the respiratory health of children: a cross-sectional study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate the effects of air pollution on the respiratory health of children, a subject of some controversy, a comparative study was undertaken of 2,385 school children who lived in central urban, peripheral urban, and suburban areas. Daily monitoring of sulfur dioxide and total suspended particle concentrations in all areas showed that pollutant concentrations in central and peripheral urban areas were above commonly accepted safety levels for respiratory health, while concentrations in the suburban area were within acceptable limits. A questionnaire administered to each mother assessed environmental exposure to pollutants in the household, the occurrence of respiratory symptoms as well as lung diseases as diagnosed by a physician, and general information. Children were interviewed about smoking habits and any acute respiratory symptoms. Children also performed standard lung function tests. Results showed that children from both urban areas had lessened pulmonary function and a higher prevalence of bronchial secretion with common colds than did those from the suburban area. These differences persisted after corrections for exposure to indoor pollutants, active or passive smoking, socioeconomic status, and sex. Parental cigarette smoking was related to a fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 second and an increased incidence of acute respiratory illnesses and chronic cough in children. Although boys had higher lung volumes and lower air flow, regression analysis showed no significant influence of the interactions sex-geographic area and sex-smoking on lung function. It was concluded that air pollution has a significant effect on the respiratory health of children.

Spinaci, S.; Arossa, W.; Bugiani, M.; Natale, P.; Bucca, C.; de Candussio, G.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The explosive outbreak and intercontinental spread of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) shows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The explosive outbreak and intercontinental spread of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS (Mills and Childs 1998). Monkeypox, hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), Lassa fever, Argentine evidence for top-down regulation of zoonotic disease reservoirs Richard S Ostfeld1 and Robert D Holt2

32

Elec 331 -Respiratory System SRC: AnatomyWarehouse.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Respiratory System 4 Mechanics of Breathing Lung Visceral Pleura (attached to lung) Parietal Pleura (attachedElec 331 - Respiratory System 1 SRC: AnatomyWarehouse.com C-V / Respiratory System Hot Water #12;Elec 331 - Respiratory System 2 Alveoli Pharynx (throat) Larynx (voice box / Adam's Apple) Trachea

Pulfrey, David L.

33

LANL spinoff receives NIH grant for respiratory disease diagnostic device  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs &Jeff Yarbrough joinsLANL shatters records

34

Ann Occup Hyg . Author manuscript Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ann Occup Hyg . Author manuscript Page /1 7 Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics Abstract Purpose Automobile mechanics have been exposed to asbestos number of automobile mechanics, little is known about the non-malignant respiratory diseases observed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

35

Measuring the mechanical properties of the respiratory system in patients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring the mechanical properties of the respiratory system in patients on mechanical ventilators's lungs. Only system capable of convenient, ongoing assessment of respiratory mechanical function is currently widely performed by measuring pressure and flow delivered by a mechanical ventilator. However

Hayden, Nancy J.

36

Modeling the Dynamics of Fermentation and Respiratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, denitrification, and SO4-reduction). The accumulation of acetate as a fermentation product within the plume species, e.g., H2(aq) or acetate, followed by respiration by other groups of organisms where fermentationModeling the Dynamics of Fermentation and Respiratory Processes in a Groundwater Plume of Phenolic

Sheffield, University of

37

REGULAR ARTICLE A Simple Dynamic Model of Respiratory Pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Mathematical models are used to understand these interactions and the mechanics of respiratory system better) and introduce some dynamic properties of the respiratory system. The passive elements (rib cage and abdomen not take into account the dynamic component of the system, it appears valid for different respiratory

Fontecave-Jallon, Julie

38

Thiacetarsamide therapy of heartworm disease in cats: a pharmacokinetic study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. An idiopathic acute respiratory distress syndrome occurred in 3 of the treated cats, causing fulminant pulmonary edema, respiratory failure, and death within 1 to 3 hours after the second dose of thi acetarsamide. Administration of thi acetarsamide... OF THE LITERATURE Heartworm Disease Overview Dirof i 1 ari asi s is one of the most common infectious diseases requiring clinical evaluation and treatment in veterinary medicine. The heartworm, Di rofi lari a immiti s, is ubiquitous in both tropical...

Turner, Janet Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

39

Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illnesses in infants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrogen dioxide is an oxidant gas that contaminates outdoor air and indoor air in homes with unvented gas appliances. A prospective cohort study was carried out to test the hypothesis that residential exposure to NO2 increases incidence and severity of respiratory illnesses during the first 18 months of life. A cohort of 1,205 healthy infants from homes without smokers was enrolled. The daily occurrence of respiratory symptoms and illnesses was reported by the mothers every 2 wk. Illnesses with wheezing or wet cough were classified as lower respiratory tract. Indoor NO2 concentrations were serially measured with passive samplers place in the subjects' bedrooms. In stratified analyses, illness incidence rates did not consistently increase with exposure to NO2 or stove type. In multivariate analyses that adjusted for potential confounding factors, odds ratios were not significantly elevated for current or lagged NO2 exposures, or stove type. Illness duration, a measure of illness severity, was not associated with NO2 exposure. The findings can be extended to homes with gas stoves in regions of the United States where the outdoor air is not heavily polluted by NO2.

Samet, J.M.; Lambert, W.E.; Skipper, B.J.; Cushing, A.H.; Hunt, W.C.; Young, S.A.; McLaren, L.C.; Schwab, M.; Spengler, J.D. (Univ. of New Mexico Medical Center, Albuquerque (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

A software toolkit for acoustic respiratory analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Millions of Americans suffer from pulmonary diseases. According to recent statistics, approximately 17 million people suffer from asthma, 16.4 million from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 12 million from sleep apnea, ...

Yi, Gina Ann

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Respiratory and Cardiovascular Adjustments to Exercise in Reptiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

challenges to the respiratory system of reptiles. Incrementing aerobic metabolism above resting levelsRespiratory and Cardiovascular Adjustments to Exercise in Reptiles T.T. GLEESON ' and A.F. BEN NETT all levels of activity (Fig. lb). The mechanism for an- aerobic energy production during exercise

Bennett, Albert F.

42

Multiscale modelling of the respiratory tract C. Grandmont  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to different mechanical models. The resulting system is described by the Navier-Stokes equation coupledMultiscale modelling of the respiratory tract L. Baffico C. Grandmont B. Maury February 20, 2009 Abstract We propose here a decomposition of the respiratory tree into three stages which correspond

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

43

INTRODUCTION Insects breathe using a tracheal respiratory system. The tracheal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2293 INTRODUCTION Insects breathe using a tracheal respiratory system. The tracheal system consists of the spiracular valves convectively deliver oxygen to the tissues. The tracheal respiratory system is efficient flow through the tracheal system (Harrison, 2009). During hypoxia, abdominal pumping often increases

Socha, Jake

44

The effects of mechanical ventilation on the development of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a severe lung illness characterized by inflammation and fluid accumulation in the respiratory system. Historically, ARDS and other forms of respiratory failure have been treated ...

Jia, Xiaoming, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe-S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

Richey, Christine [Department of Biological Sciences, Duquesne University, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States)] [Department of Biological Sciences, Duquesne University, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Chovanec, Peter [Department of Biological Sciences, Duquesne University, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States) [Department of Biological Sciences, Duquesne University, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Hoeft, Shelley E.; Oremland, Ronald S. [U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 480, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 480, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Basu, Partha [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Stolz, John F., E-mail: stolz@duq.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Duquesne University, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Chronic respiratory effects of indoor formaldehyde exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6-15 years of age) and 613 adults. HCHO measurements were made with passive samplers two one-week periods. Data on chronic cough and phlegm, wheeze, attacks of breathlessness, and doctor diagnoses of chronic bronchitis and asthma were collected with self-completed questionnaires. Peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) were obtained during the evenings and mornings for up to 14 consecutive days for each individual. Significantly greater prevalence rates of asthma and chronic bronchitis were found in children from houses with HCHO levels 60-120 ppb than in those less exposed, especially in children also exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. In children, levels of PEFR linearly decreased with HCHO exposure, with estimated decrease due to 60 ppb of HCHO equivalent to 22% of PEFR level in nonexposed children.

Krzyzanowski, M.; Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

NICS report links VOCs to respiratory problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Children who live near the chemical plants of Kanawha Valley, WV, suffer more acute and chronic respiratory aliments than those farther away, says a Harvard University School of Public Health report. In the $1-million, five-year study commissioned by the National Institute for Chemical Studies (NICS:Charleston, WV) and funded by the Environmental Protection Agency, proximity to chemical plants that emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was linked to higher incidence of asthma, acute eye irritation, shortness of breath, and chronic cough. The researchers say they adjusted for most other factors, such as parental smoking and petroleum. {open_quotes}The research hypothesis was whether children in the valley had more symptoms,{close_quotes} says NICS president Paul Hill. {open_quotes}Yes, there is a difference.{close_quotes} The study showed that some ailments were up to 28% more prevalent in children in the valley than in other Kanawha County children.

Kirschner, E.

1992-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Relationship Between the Prevalence of Respiratory Illness and Dermatitis and Infant Diet in the First Year of Life  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for asthma and allergic disease since the 12th century when a Jewish physician and philosopher, Maimonides, produced a remedy of Rhazes to ?clear the lungs of moisture, ease respiration and eliminate the cough? (32). The relationship of the environment...-wheezing lower respiratory infections included chest infection, pneumonia, whooping cough, chronic cough, or croup. As a check for reliability and validity of parental reporting of illnesses, the investigators compared 100 hospital medical records against...

Kunz, Lara

2009-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

49

Participatory epidemiology : harnessing the HealthMap platform for community-based disease outbreak monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to increasing global trade and travel along with a range of environmental factors, emerging infectious diseases such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), drug-resistant tuberculosis, and 2009 HiNi continue to ...

Freifeld, Clark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. Author manuscript A model of ventilation used to interpret newborn lamb respiratory signals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanics ; physiology ; Sheep Introduction Respiratory problems are particularly frequent in the neonatal of the neonatal respiratory system is yet available.. Mathematical modeling, which integrates interacting respiratory dynamics. Functionally, the mammalian respiratory system is made of three components: ventilation

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

51

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute respiratory illness Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 2 Why should I cover my cough? Serious respiratory illnesses like influenza, respiratory Summary: Why should I cover...

52

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute respiratory failure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agricultural Research and Cooperative Extension Summary: not only to sneeze and cough but also to develop severe acute respiratory symptoms is more likely... in respiratory...

53

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute hypoxaemic respiratory Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

steps to stay healthy... Summary: , respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are spread... influenza. and prevent the...

54

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-severe acute respiratory Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

steps to stay healthy... Summary: , respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are spread... influenza. and prevent the...

55

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute bacterial respiratory Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

steps to stay healthy... Summary: , respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are spread... influenza. and prevent the...

56

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute hypoxemic respiratory Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

steps to stay healthy... Summary: , respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are spread... influenza. and prevent the...

57

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative respiratory syndromes Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

steps to stay healthy... Summary: , respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are spread... influenza. and prevent the...

58

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute respiratory syndrome Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

steps to stay healthy... Summary: , respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are spread... influenza. and prevent the...

59

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute respiratory syndrome-associated Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

steps to stay healthy... Summary: , respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are spread... influenza. and prevent the...

60

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute viral respiratory Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Get extra rest - viral infections take... , respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are spread... and others sick 12;Why...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

E-Print Network 3.0 - associating respiratory health Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Associate of Science - Respiratory Care Course... HLTHST 432 Critical Review of Health Care Research 3 RESPCARE 403 Respiratory Care Theory V 3 RESPCARE... Current Topics...

62

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute respiratory bronchiolitis Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

steps to stay healthy... Summary: , respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are spread... influenza. and prevent the...

63

Occupational exposures and chronic respiratory symptoms. A population-based study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from a random sample of 8515 white adults residing in 6 cities in the eastern and midwestern United States were used to examine the relationships between occupational exposures to dust or to gases and fumes and chronic respiratory symptoms; 31% of the population had a history of occupational dust exposure and 30% reported exposure to gas or fumes. After adjusting for smoking habits, age, gender, and city of residence, subjects with either occupational exposure had significantly elevated prevalences of chronic cough, chronic phlegm, persistent wheeze, and breathlessness. The adjusted relative odds of chronic respiratory symptoms for subjects exposed to dust ranged from 1.32 to 1.60. Subjects with gas or fume exposure had relative odds of symptoms between 1.27 and 1.43 when compared with unexposed subjects. Occupational dust exposure was associated with a higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as defined by an FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.6, when comparing exposed and unexposed participants (OR = 1.53, 95% Cl = 1.17-2.08). Gas or fume exposure was associated with a small, but not significant, increase in COPD prevalence. Significant trends were noted for wheeze and phlegm with increasing duration of dust exposure. Although 36% of exposed subjects reported exposure to both dust and fumes, there was no evidence of a multiplicative interaction between the effects of the individual exposures. Smoking was a significant independent predictor of symptoms, but did not appear to modify the effect of dust or fumes on symptom reporting. These data, obtained in random samples of general populations, demonstrate that chronic respiratory symptoms and disease can be independently associated with occupational exposures.

Korn, R.J.; Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Ware, J.H.; Ferris, B.G. Jr.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Occupational exposures and chronic respiratory symptoms: a population-based study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from a random sample of 8515 white adults residing in six cities in the eastern and midwestern United States were used to examine the relationships between occupational exposures to dust or to gases and fumes and chronic respiratory symptoms. 31% of the population had a history of occupational dust exposure and 30% reported exposure to gas or to fumes. After adjusting for smoking habits, age, gender, and city of residence, subjects with either occupational exposure had significantly elevated prevalence of chronic cough, chronic phlegm, persistent wheeze, and breathlessness. The adjusted relative odds of chronic respiratory symptoms for subjects exposed to dust ranged from 1.32 to 1.60. Subjects with gas or fume exposure had relative odds of symptoms between 1.27 and 1.43 when compared to unexposed subjects. Occupational dust exposure was associated with a higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as defined by an FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.6, when comparing exposed and unexposed participants (OR=1.53, 95% CI=1.17-2.08). Gas or fume exposure was associated with a small, but not significant, increase in COPD prevalence. Significant trends were noted for wheeze and phlegm with increasing duration of dust exposure. Although 36% of exposed subjects reported exposure to both dust and fumes, there was no evidence of a multiplicative interaction between the effects of the individual exposures. Smoking was a significant independent predictor of symptoms, but did not appear to modify the effect of dust or fumes on symptom reporting. These data, obtained in random samples of general populations, demonstrate that chronic respiratory disease can be independently associated with occupational exposures.

Korn, R.J.; Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Ware, J.H.; Ferris, B.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Chronic respiratory effects of indoor formaldehyde exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6-15 years of age) and 613 adults. HCHO measurements were made with passive samplers during two 1-week periods. Data on chronic cough and phlegm, wheeze, attacks of breathlessness, and doctor diagnoses of chronic bronchitis and asthma were collected with self-completed questionnaires. Peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) were obtained during the evenings and mornings for up to 14 consecutive days for each individual. Significantly greater prevalence rates of asthma and chronic bronchitis were found in children from houses with HCHO levels 60-120 ppb than in those less exposed, especially in children also exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. In children, levels of PEFR decreased linearly with HCHO exposure, with the estimated decrease due to 60 ppb of HCHO equivalent to 22% of PEFR level in nonexposed children. The effects in asthmatic children exposed to HCHO below 50 ppb were greater than in healthy ones. The effects in adults were less evident: decrements in PEFR due to HCHO over 40 ppb were seen only in the morning, and mainly in smokers.

Krzyzanowski, M.; Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D. (Univ. of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

acute respiratory allergen: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

syndrome. METHODS As shown in Figure 1 related to lower respiratory illness (e.g., cough, shortness of breath, pneumonia on x-ray, oxygen Boyer, Edmond 11 Evidence of...

67

BE 508: Quantitative Studies of Respiratory and Cardiovascular Systems Spring Semester, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 BE 508: Quantitative Studies of Respiratory and Cardiovascular Systems Spring Semester, 2013 of the respiratory system (1 lecture) (Bates, Ch 1) 2. Measurement of respiratory function (2 lectures) (Bates, Ch 2 mechanics (1 lecture) (Bates, Ch 5) 4. Inverse modeling of respiratory mechanics, part 1 (2 lectures) (Bates

Vajda, Sandor

68

A linear time-varying simulation of the respiratory system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A LINEAR TIME-VARYING SIMULATION OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM A Thesis by OSCAR RENATO HERNANDEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1993 Major Subject: Health Physics A LINEAR TIME-VARYING SIMULATION OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM A Thesis by OSCAR RENATO HERNANDEZ Approved as to style and content by: Wes y E. Bolch (Chair of Committee) Dan Hig tower (Member) ohn...

Hernandez, Oscar Renato

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

A plasma signature of human mitochondrial disease revealed through metabolic profiling of spent media from cultured muscle cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mutations in either the mitochondrial or nuclear genomes can give rise to respiratory chain disease (RCD), a large class of devastating metabolic disorders. Their clinical management is challenging, in part because we lack ...

Shaham, Oded

70

Respiratory Amplitude Guided 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of prospectively guiding 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image acquisition using triggers at preselected respiratory amplitudes to achieve T{sub 2} weighting for abdominal motion tracking. Methods and Materials: A respiratory amplitude-based triggering system was developed and integrated into a commercial turbo spin echo MRI sequence. Initial feasibility tests were performed on healthy human study participants. Four respiratory states, the middle and the end of inhalation and exhalation, were used to trigger 4D MRI image acquisition of the liver. To achieve T{sub 2} weighting, the echo time and repetition time were set to 75 milliseconds and 4108 milliseconds, respectively. Single-shot acquisition, together with parallel imaging and partial k-space imaging techniques, was used to improve image acquisition efficiency. 4D MRI image sets composed of axial or sagittal slices were acquired. Results: Respiratory data measured and logged by the MRI scanner showed that the triggers occurred at the appropriate respiratory levels. Liver motion could be easily observed on both 4D MRI image datasets by sensing either the change of liver in size and shape (axial) or diaphragm motion (sagittal). Both 4D MRI image datasets were T{sub 2}-weighted as expected. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving T{sub 2}-weighted 4D MRI images using amplitude-based respiratory triggers. With the aid of the respiratory amplitude-based triggering system, the proposed method is compatible with most MRI sequences and therefore has the potential to improve tumor-tissue contrast in abdominal tumor motion imaging.

Hu, Yanle, E-mail: yhu@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Caruthers, Shelton D. [Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Human torso phantom for imaging of heart with realistic modes of cardiac and respiratory motion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A human torso phantom and its construction, wherein the phantom mimics respiratory and cardiac cycles in a human allowing acquisition of medical imaging data under conditions simulating patient cardiac and respiratory motion.

Boutchko, Rostyslav; Balakrishnan, Karthikayan; Gullberg, Grant T; O'Neil, James P

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

72

Modelling a Respiratory Central Pattern Generator Neuron in Lymnaea stagnalis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling a Respiratory Central Pattern Generator Neuron in Lymnaea stagnalis Sharene D. Bungay, is characterized in part by its ability to take in oxygen both cutaneously and aerially (via its rudi- mentary lung by a 3-neuron central pattern generator (CPG) as depicted in Figure 1. Syed et al. [1, 2] were able

Campbell, Sue Ann

73

Penn State Respiratory Protection Program Requirements Summary Scope and Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operations, and during some non-routine or emergency operations such as a spill or leak of a hazardous respirators and evaluating hazards. · Select respiratory protection options. · Conduct fit testing. · Evaluate and do not cause discomfort. · Continually check work areas and operations to identify possible

Maroncelli, Mark

74

Department of Environmental Health and Instructional Safety Respiratory Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Seal Check. 5. Respiratory Fit Testing. 6. Inspection Procedures. 7. Cleaning and Storage Instructions example, to retard spoilage in fruit storage areas), or when oxygen is displaced by a heavier gas or vapor, ammonia, propane, etc. Some processes that use high temperatures (like welding) can involve reactions

de Lijser, Peter

75

ORIGINAL PAPER Impacts of ocean acidification on respiratory gas exchange  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Impacts of ocean acidification on respiratory gas exchange and acid­base balance / Revised: 11 April 2012 / Accepted: 14 April 2012 ? Springer-Verlag 2012 Abstract The oceanic carbonate Gill HCO3 - uptake Introduction The earth's oceanic carbonate system (partial pressure of CO2, p

Grosell, Martin

76

INTRODUCTION Insects exchange respiratory gases through a complex network of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3409 INTRODUCTION Insects exchange respiratory gases through a complex network of tracheal tubes through the tracheal system using diffusion alone (Krogh, 1920a; Weis-Fogh, 1964), many species are known to augment gas exchange using convection (Buck, 1962; Miller, 1966a). Two general mechanisms are recognized

Socha, Jake

77

E-Print Network 3.0 - activates non-cftr-dependent respiratory...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source: Wlodawer, Alexander - Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, National Cancer Institute Collection: Chemistry ; Biology and Medicine 5 UCSD Respiratory Protection...

78

Analysis of Cardio-respiratory Dynamics during Mental Stress using (Partial) Time-Frequency Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

important to determine the mechanisms un- derlying stress. In this paper, we aim at studying the cardio-respiratory to conduct a combined analysis of the cardio-respiratory system. In this study, we will perform cross timeAnalysis of Cardio-respiratory Dynamics during Mental Stress using (Partial) Time-Frequency Spectra

79

Accuracy and Consistency of Respiratory Gating in Abdominal Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate respiratory gating accuracy and intrafractional consistency for abdominal cancer patients treated with respiratory gated treatment on a regular linear accelerator system. Methods and Materials: Twelve abdominal patients implanted with fiducials were treated with amplitude-based respiratory-gated radiation therapy. On the basis of daily orthogonal fluoroscopy, the operator readjusted the couch position and gating window such that the fiducial was within a setup margin (fiducial-planning target volume [f-PTV]) when RPM indicated beam-ON. Fifty-five pre- and post-treatment fluoroscopic movie pairs with synchronized respiratory gating signal were recorded. Fiducial motion traces were extracted from the fluoroscopic movies using a template matching algorithm and correlated with f-PTV by registering the digitally reconstructed radiographs with the fluoroscopic movies. Treatment was determined to be accurate if 50% of the fiducial area stayed within f-PTV while beam-ON. For movie pairs that lost gating accuracy, a MATLAB program was used to assess whether the gating window was optimized, the external-internal correlation (EIC) changed, or the patient moved between movies. A series of safety margins from 0.5 mm to 3 mm was added to f-PTV for reassessing gating accuracy. Results: A decrease in gating accuracy was observed in 44% of movie pairs from daily fluoroscopic movies of 12 abdominal patients. Three main causes for inaccurate gating were identified as change of global EIC over time (?43%), suboptimal gating setup (?37%), and imperfect EIC within movie (?13%). Conclusions: Inconsistent respiratory gating accuracy may occur within 1 treatment session even with a daily adjusted gating window. To improve or maintain gating accuracy during treatment, we suggest using at least a 2.5-mm safety margin to account for gating and setup uncertainties.

Ge, Jiajia; Santanam, Lakshmi; Yang, Deshan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Parikh, Parag J., E-mail: pparikh@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Effects of inhalable particles on respiratory health of children  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented from a second cross-sectional assessment of the association of air pollution with chronic respiratory health of children participating in the Six Cities Study of Air Pollution and Health. Air pollution measurements collected at quality-controlled monitoring stations included total suspended particulates (TSP), particulate matter less than 15 microns (PM15) and 2.5 microns (PM2.5) aerodynamic diameter, fine fraction aerosol sulfate (FSO4), SO2, O3, and No2. Reported rates of chronic cough, bronchitis, and chest illness during the 1980-1981 school year were positively associated with all measures of particulate pollution (TSP, PM15, PM2.5, and FSO4) and positively but less strongly associated with concentrations of two of the gases (SO2 and NO2). Frequency of earache also tended to be associated with particulate concentrations, but no associations were found with asthma, persistent wheeze, hay fever, or nonrespiratory illness. No associations were found between pollutant concentrations and any of the pulmonary function measures considered (FVC, FEV1, FEV0.75, and MMEF). Children with a history of wheeze or asthma had a much higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms, and there was some evidence that the association between air pollutant concentrations and symptom rates was stronger among children with these markers for hyperreactive airways. These data provide further evidence that rates of respiratory illnesses and symptoms are elevated among children living in cities with high particulate pollution. They also suggest that children with hyperreactive airways may be particularly susceptible to other respiratory symptoms when exposed to these pollutants.

Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Stram, D.O.; Ware, J.H.; Spengler, J.D.; Ferris, B.G. Jr.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Van de Louw et al. Respiratory Research 2010, 11:38 http://respiratory-research.com/content/11/1/38  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Van de Louw et al. Respiratory Research 2010, 11:38 http://respiratory-research.com/content/11 cardiovascular variability and baroreflex gain in mechanically ventilated patients Andry Van de Louw*1,2, Claire nervous system. During spontaneous breathing, the application of positive end- expiratory pressure (PEEP

Boyer, Edmond

82

Identification and characterization of a virus isolated from bobwhite quail with a respiratory disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

$ Desori t 0 of the Diss ~ The outbreak of quail bronchitis reported by Olson ooeurre4 21 in 1949 at the Best Virgixd. a State Game Farm. Coughing and unseeing was observed in some of the adult bobshite quail, In young bixds spnptons first eccurred... at $ weeks of age. Foe4 con suaptien droype4 and coughing, encasing an4 tales were noto4. Basal disoharge was not seen. Bending cf the neck between tho wings or legs occurred in 2 to ) yoreent of the birds. The course of the dieoase was 1 to $ weeks...

DuBose, Robert Trafton

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Evaluation of Two Methods to Prevent Bovine Respiratory Disease in Growing Cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of 1.2 kg while healthy animals gained 1.4 kg (McNeill, 2000). Although a definitive test does not exist for the diagnosis BRD, DMI and ADG may provide indicators of an animals overall health. Once an animal becomes sick with BRD, the economic... early detection or a more quantitative approach to predicting and diagnosing BRD. Ideally, a chute side test would be available to ascertain the risk of an individual animal developing BRD. Alternatively, quantitative assessment could be developed...

Word, Alyssa Brook

2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

84

Linking Two Seemingly Unrelated Diseases, Cancer and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Through a Dictyostelium Secreted Protein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

glucose uptake from the blood is misregulated (83). The inhibitors allow a longer half-life of the incretins to influence insulin secretion and glucose uptake (83). DPPIV also cleaves stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) the ligand for CXCR4 (84). SDF-1... is a chemoattractant for CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) (85). 9 When cleaved by DPPIV, the affinity of SDF-1 for CXCR4 decreases, allowing HPCs to migrate into the bloodstream (85). DPPIV binds to many binding partners to elucidate...

Herlihy, Sarah E

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

85

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute upper respiratory Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agricultural Research and Cooperative Extension Summary: not only to sneeze and cough but also to develop severe acute respiratory symptoms is more likely... of...

86

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute respiratory symptoms Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agricultural Research and Cooperative Extension Summary: not only to sneeze and cough but also to develop severe acute respiratory symptoms is more likely... in the...

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute respiratory tract Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agricultural Research and Cooperative Extension Summary: not only to sneeze and cough but also to develop severe acute respiratory symptoms is more likely... Name Signs and...

88

E-Print Network 3.0 - aggravates respiratory syncytial Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tetrakis(dimethylamino)hafnium P-6280-B Date: February 2005 Copyright 2002, 2004-2005, Praxair Technology, Inc. Page 1 of 8 Summary: aggravate an existing dermatitis. Respiratory...

89

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative respiratory pathway Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Z. Moussavi and M. Aboofazeli Summary: Respiratory Flow Estimation from Tracheal Sound by Adaptive Filters M. Golabbakhsh, Z. Moussavi... % for inspiration and expiration,...

90

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptable respiratory protection Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

not achieved adequate control you will also need to use respiratory protective... USEFUL HSE PUBLICATIONS Breathe freely: A workers' information card on ... Source: Glasgow,...

91

E-Print Network 3.0 - alters respiratory phenotype Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with the severity of the respiratory phenotype and associated symptoms in both congenital and late onset central... in enteric nervous system deficits. We observe that the...

92

Respiratory effects of diesel exhaust in salt miners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The respiratory health of 259 white males working at 5 salt (NaCl) mines was assessed by questionnaire, chest radiographs, and air and He-O/sup 2/ spirometry. Response variables were symptoms, pneumoconiosis, and spirometry. Predictor variables included age, height, smoking, mine, and tenure in diesel-exposed jobs. The purpose was to assess the association of response measures of respiratory health with exposure to diesel exhaust. There were only 2 cases of Grade 1 pneumoconiosis, so no further analysis was done. Comparisons within the study population showed a statistically significant dose-related association of phlegm and diesel exposure. There was a nonsignificant trend for cough and dyspnea, and no association with spirometry. Age- and smoking-adjusted rates of cough, phlegm, and dyspnea were 145, 159, and 93% of an external comparison population. Percent predicted flow rates showed statistically significant reductions, but the reductions were small and there were no dose-response relations. Percent predicted FEV1 and FVC were about 96% of predicted.

Gamble, J.F.; Jones, W.G.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Effects of air pollution on children's respiratory health in three Chinese cities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the winter of 1988--1989, parents of 2,789 elementary-school students completed standardized questionnaires. The students were 5--14 y of age and were from three urban districts and one suburban district of three large Chinese cities. The 4-y average ambient levels of total suspended particles in the three cities differed greatly during the period 1985--1988: Lanzhou, 1,067 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; urban Wuhan, 406 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; Guangzhou, 296 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; and suburban Wuhan, 191 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. The authors constructed unconditional logistic-regression models to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for prevalences of several respiratory symptoms and illnesses, adjusted for district, use of coal in the home, and parental smoking status. There was a positive and significant association between total suspended particle levels and the adjusted odds ratios for couch, phlegm, hospitalization for diseases, and pneumonia. This association was derived from only the 1,784 urban children and, therefore, the authors were unable to extrapolate it to the suburban children. The results also indicated that parental smoking status was associated with cough and phlegm, and use of coal in the home was associated only with cough prevalence.

Qian, Z.; Chapman, R.S.; Tian, Q.; Chen, Y.; Lioy, P.J.; Zhang, J.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Effects of ozone on the respiratory health, allergic sensitization, and cellular immune system in children  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate the lasting effects of high ozone concentrations under environmental conditions, we examined the respiratory health, pulmonary function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, allergic sensitization, and lymphocyte subpopulations of 10- to 14-yr-old children. A total of 218 children recruited from an area with high ozone concentrations (Group A) were tested against 281 children coming from an area with low ozone concentrations (Group B). As to subjective complaints, categorized as 'usually cough with or without phlegm,' 'breathlessness,' and 'susceptibility to chest colds,' there was no difference between the two groups. The lung function parameters were similar, but in Group A subjects' bronchial hyperresponsiveness occurred more frequently and was found to be more severe than in Group B (29.4 versus 19.9%, p less than 0.02; PD20 2,100 {plus minus} 87 versus 2,350 {plus minus} 58 micrograms, p less than 0.05). In both groups the number of children who had been suffering from allergic diseases and sensitization to aeroallergens, found by means of the skin test, was the same. Comparison of the total IgE levels showed no difference at all between the two groups. As far as the white blood cells are concerned, the total and differential cell count was the same, whereas lymphocyte subpopulations showed readily recognizable changes.

Zwick, H.; Popp, W.; Wagner, C.; Reiser, K.; Schmoeger, J.B.; Boeck, A.H.; Herkner, K.; Radunsky, K. (Pulmonary Department, Krankenhaus Lainz, Vienna (Austria))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Compensation du mouvement respiratoire dans les images TEP Respiratory motion correction in PET images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compensation du mouvement respiratoire dans les images TEP Respiratory motion correction in PET itérative. Abstract The quality of the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is currently limited an integrated system to compensate respiratory motion in PET images. It is based on synchronous acquisition

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

96

Modeling of the oxygen transfer in the respiratory process Sebastien Martin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the acinar periphery. Introduction The respiratory system is designed to achieve two main functions: oxygenModeling of the oxygen transfer in the respiratory process Sebastien Martin Laboratoire de Math, coupled with a lumped mechanical model for the ventilation process. Objectives. We aim at investigating

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

97

The relationships between metabolic rate and the respiratory, circulatory and cellular mechanisms governing oxygen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relationships between metabolic rate and the respiratory, circulatory and cellular mechanisms governing oxygen transport from the respiratory medium to the tissues in air- breathing vertebrates have for albacore (Thunnus alalunga, 82197mlkg-1). Plasma volume within the primary circulatory system (calculated

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

98

ECG-Derived Respiration: Comparison and New Measures for Respiratory Variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECG-Derived Respiration: Comparison and New Measures for Respiratory Variability Devy Widjaja1 During ECG recording, several methods can be applied to derive a respiratory signal from the ECG (EDR signal). In this paper 4 EDR methods, including ECG filtering, R and RS amplitude based techniques

99

acquired respiratory distress: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

distress is very common in cancer patients across diagnoses and across the disease trajectory. Many patients who report high levels of distress are not taking advantage of...

100

acquired respiratory virus: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cause diseases with long incubation periods, insidious onsets, and slowly progressive courses (1). The members of the virus group include visna virus of sheep, caprine...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Assessment of Autonomic Control and Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia Using Point Process Models of Human Heart Beat Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tracking the autonomic control and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) from electrocardiogram and respiratory measurements is an important problem in cardiovascular control. We propose a point process adaptive filter algorithm ...

Chen, Zhe

102

Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in potash workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 94% of the workers in each of four Saskatchewan potash mines participated in a respiratory health surveillance program that included a questionnaire and pulmonary function tests. Compared with a nonexposed control group, potash workers had higher prevalences of cough, dyspnea, and chronic bronchitis but better pulmonary function. Prevalences of symptoms and pulmonary function abnormalities were similar among workers at the four mines tested and at the various job locations. Potash dust, diesel fumes, and other air contaminants may have an irritant effect that leads to the increased prevalences of cough and chronic bronchitis. Although no adverse effects of the potash mine environment on pulmonary function were found, these findings reflect a healthy worker effect or some selection process that makes the potash workers appear healthier in a cross-sectional study.

Graham, B.L.; Dosman, J.A.; Cotton, D.J.; Weisstock, S.R.; Lappi, V.G.; Froh, F.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in potash workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 94% of the workers in each of four Saskatchewan potash mines participated in a respiratory health surveillance program that included a questionnaire and pulmonary function tests. Compared with a nonexposed control group, potash workers had higher prevalences of cough, dyspnea, and chronic bronchitis but better pulmonary function. Prevalences of symptoms and pulmonary function abnormalities were similar among workers at the four mines tested and at the various job locations. Potash dust, diesel fumes, and other air contaminants may have an irritant effect that leads to the increased prevalences of cough and chronic bronchitis. Although we found no adverse effects of the potash mine environment on pulmonary function, these findings reflect a healthy worker effect or some selection process that makes the potash workers appear healthier in a cross-sectional study.

Graham, B.L.; Dosman, J.A.; Cotton, D.J.; Weisstock, S.R.; Lappi, V.G.; Froh, F.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology 173S (2010) S65S73 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and control in the insect respiratory system. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. IntroductionRespiratory Physiology & Neurobiology 173S (2010) S65S73 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/resphysiol Review Issues

Socha, Jake

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illness in children. Part I: Health outcomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have carried out a prospective cohort study to test the hypothesis that exposure to nitrogen dioxide increases the incidence and severity of respiratory infections during the first 18 months of life. Between January 1988 and June 1990, 1,315 infants were enrolled into the study at birth and followed with prospective surveillance for the occurrence of respiratory infections and monitoring of nitrogen dioxide concentrations in their homes. The subjects were healthy infants from homes without smokers; they were selected with stratification by type of cooking stove at a ratio of four to one for gas and electric stoves. Illness experience was monitored by a daily diary of symptoms completed by the mother and a telephone interview conducted every two weeks. Illnesses with wheezing or wet cough were classified as involving the lower respiratory tract; all other respiratory illnesses were designated as involving the upper respiratory tract. Exposure to nitrogen dioxide was estimated by two-week average concentrations measured in the subjects' bedrooms with passive samplers. This analysis is limited to the 1,205 subjects completing at least one month of observation; of these, 823 completed the full protocol, contributing 82.8% of the total number of days during which the subjects were under observation. Incidence rates for all respiratory illnesses, all upper respiratory illness, all lower respiratory illnesses, and lower respiratory illness further divided into those with any wheezing, or wet cough without wheezing, were examined within strata of nitrogen dioxide exposure at the time of the illness, nitrogen dioxide exposure during the prior month, and type of cooking stove. Consistent trends of increasing illness incidence rates with increasing exposure to nitrogen dioxide were not evident for either the lagged or unlagged exposure variables.

Samet, J.M.; Lambert, W.E.; Skipper, B.J.; Cushing, A.H.; Hunt, W.C.; Young, S.A.; McLaren, L.C.; Schwab, M.; Spengler, J.D. (Univ. of New Mexico Medical Center, Albuquerque (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Sorghum Diseases.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of organisms attacking seeds. Environmental conditions 1 encourage seed rot development also W~II increase the amount of damage caused by seedling disease. Vigorous seedlings produc:d from high-quality seed can withstand attack much better than low.... This fungus can cause considerable sorghum damage, although it usually is confined to individual fields or areas within fields that are occasionally flooded. Sorghum downy mildew, Sclerospora sorghi (Kulk) Weston & Uppal, was found first in Texas in 196...

Amador, Jose; Berry, Robert W.; Frederiksen, Richard A.; Horne, C. Wendell; Thames, Walter H.; Toler, Robert W.

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Beryllium disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After two workers at the nuclear weapons plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee were diagnosed earlier this year with chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a rare and sometimes fatal scarring of the lungs, the Department of Energy ordered up a 4-year probe. Now, part of that probe has begun - tests conducted by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities' Center for Epidemiological Research measuring beryllium sensitivity in 3,000 people who've been exposed to the metal's dust since Manhattan Project managers opened the Y-12 plant at Oak Ridge in 1943. Currently, 119 Y-12 employees process beryllium, which has a number of industrial uses, including rocket heat shields and nuclear weapon and electrical components. The disease often takes 20 to 25 years to develop, and the stricken employees haven't worked with beryllium for years. There is no cure for CBD, estimated to strike 2% of people exposed to the metal. Anti-inflammatory steroids alleviate such symptoms as a dry cough, weight loss, and fatigue. Like other lung-fibrosis diseases that are linked to lung cancer, some people suspect CBD might cause some lung cancer. While difficult to diagnose, about 900 cases of CBD have been reported since a Beryllium Case Registry was established in 1952. The Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that about 10,000 DOE employees and 800,000 people in private industry have worked with beryllium.

Not Available

1991-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

108

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative respiratory path Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

than calves. Respiratory catheters (25 mL balloon, 0.17 m2 ) were inserted acutely in sheep (n 2 Source: Federspiel, William J. - Departments of Chemical Engineering, Surgery,...

109

Is breathing in infants chaotic? Dimension estimates for respiratory patterns during quiet sleep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mathematics, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6907; and 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia Small, M., K

Judd, Kevin

110

Linear and nonlinear quantification of respiratory sinus arrhythmia during propofol general anesthesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantitative evaluation of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) may provide important information in clinical practice of anesthesia and postoperative care. In this paper, we apply a point process method to assess dynamic ...

Pierce, Eric T.

111

Passive cigarette smoke, coal heating, and respiratory symptoms of nonsmoking women in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study the authors evaluated data from a sample of 973 never-smoking women, ages 20-40, who worked in three similar textile mills in Anhui Province, China. They compared prevalence rates of respiratory symptoms across homes with and without coal heating and homes with different numbers of smokers. Multiple logistic regression models that controlled for age, job title, and mill of employment were also estimated. Respiratory symptoms were associated with combined exposure to passive cigarette smoke and coal heating. Effects of passive cigarette smoke and coal heating on respiratory symptoms appeared to be nearly additive, suggesting a dose-response relationship between respiratory symptoms and home indoor air pollution from these two sources. The prevalence of chest illness, cough, phlegm, and shortness of breath (but not wheeze) was significantly elevated for women living in homes with both smokers and coal heating.

Pope, C.A. III (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States) Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)); Xu, X. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Building-related risk factors and work-related lower respiratory symptoms in 80 office buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We assessed building-related risk factors for lower respiratory symptoms in office workers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in 1993 collected data during indoor environmental health investigations of workplaces. We used multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess relationships between lower respiratory symptoms in office workers and risk factors plausibly related to microbiologic contamination. Among 2,435 occupants in 80 office buildings, frequent, work-related multiple lower respiratory symptoms were strongly associated, in multivariate models, with two risk factors for microbiologic contamination: poor pan drainage under cooling coils and debris in outside air intake. Associations tended to be stronger among those with a history of physician-diagnosed asthma. These findings suggest that adverse lower respiratory health effects from indoor work environments, although unusual, may occur in relation to poorly designed or maintained ventilation systems, particularly among previously diagnosed asthmatics. These findings require confirmation in more representative buildings.

Mendell, M.J.; Naco, G.M.; Wilcox, T.G.; Sieber, W.K.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

John Widdicombes contribution to respiratory physiology and cough: reminiscences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

But urge-to-cough is perplexing. I await confirmation orM, Widdicombe J: Fog-induced cough with impaired respiratoryJ: Desensitization of the cough reflex by exercise and

Chung, Kian Fan; Nadel, Jay A; Fontana, Giovanni

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Association of residential dampness and mold with respiratory tract infections and bronchitis: a meta-analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dampness and mold have been shown in qualitative reviews to be associated with a variety of adverse respiratory health effects, including respiratory tract infections. Several published meta-analyses have provided quantitative summaries for some of these associations, but not for respiratory infections. Demonstrating a causal relationship between dampness-related agents, which are preventable exposures, and respiratory tract infections would suggest important new public health strategies. We report the results of quantitative meta-analyses of published studies that examined the association of dampness or mold in homes with respiratory infections and bronchitis. For primary studies meeting eligibility criteria, we transformed reported odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) to the log scale. Both fixed and random effects models were applied to the log ORs and their variances. Most studies contained multiple estimated ORs. Models accounted for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed. One set of analyses was performed with all eligible studies, and another set restricted to studies that controlled for age, gender, smoking, and socioeconomic status. Subgroups of studies were assessed to explore heterogeneity. Funnel plots were used to assess publication bias. The resulting summary estimates of ORs from random effects models based on all studies ranged from 1.38 to 1.50, with 95% CIs excluding the null in all cases. Use of different analysis models and restricting analyses based on control of multiple confounding variables changed findings only slightly. ORs (95% CIs) from random effects models using studies adjusting for major confounding variables were, for bronchitis, 1.45 (1.32-1.59); for respiratory infections, 1.44 (1.31-1.59); for respiratory infections excluding nonspecific upper respiratory infections, 1.50 (1.32-1.70), and for respiratory infections in children or infants, 1.48 (1.33-1.65). Little effect of publication bias was evident. Estimated attributable risk proportions ranged from 8% to 20%. Residential dampness and mold are associated with substantial and statistically significant increases in both respiratory infections and bronchitis. If these associations were confirmed as causal, effective control of dampness and mold in buildings would prevent a substantial proportion of respiratory infections.

Fisk, William J.; Eliseeva, Ekaterina A.; Mendell, Mark J.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Respiratory motion management using audio-visual biofeedback for respiratory-gated radiotherapy of synchrotron-based pulsed heavy-ion beam delivery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To efficiently deliver respiratory-gated radiation during synchrotron-based pulsed heavy-ion radiotherapy, a novel respiratory guidance method combining a personalized audio-visual biofeedback (BFB) system, breath hold (BH), and synchrotron-based gating was designed to help patients synchronize their respiratory patterns with synchrotron pulses and to overcome typical limitations such as low efficiency, residual motion, and discomfort. Methods: In-house software was developed to acquire body surface marker positions and display BFB, gating signals, and real-time beam profiles on a LED screen. Patients were prompted to perform short BHs or short deep breath holds (SDBH) with the aid of BFB following a personalized standard BH/SDBH (stBH/stSDBH) guiding curve or their own representative BH/SDBH (reBH/reSDBH) guiding curve. A practical simulation was performed for a group of 15 volunteers to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of this method. Effective dose rates (EDRs), mean absolute errors between the guiding curves and the measured curves, and mean absolute deviations of the measured curves were obtained within 10%50% duty cycles (DCs) that were synchronized with the synchrotrons flat-top phase. Results: All maneuvers for an individual volunteer took approximately half an hour, and no one experienced discomfort during the maneuvers. Using the respiratory guidance methods, the magnitude of residual motion was almost ten times less than during nongated irradiation, and increases in the average effective dose rate by factors of 2.394.65, 2.394.59, 1.733.50, and 1.733.55 for the stBH, reBH, stSDBH, and reSDBH guiding maneuvers, respectively, were observed in contrast with conventional free breathing-based gated irradiation, depending on the respiratory-gated duty cycle settings. Conclusions: The proposed respiratory guidance method with personalized BFB was confirmed to be feasible in a group of volunteers. Increased effective dose rate and improved overall treatment precision were observed compared to conventional free breathing-based, respiratory-gated irradiation. Because breathing guidance curves could be established based on the respective average respiratory period and amplitude for each patient, it may be easier for patients to cooperate using this technique.

He, Pengbo; Ma, Yuanyuan; Huang, Qiyan; Yan, Yuanlin [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Life Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Qiang, E-mail: liqiang@impcas.ac.cn; Liu, Xinguo; Dai, Zhongying; Zhao, Ting; Fu, Tingyan; Shen, Guosheng [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Daily air pollution effects on children's respiratory symptoms and peak expiratory flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To identify acute respiratory health effects associated with air pollution due to coal combustion, a subgroup of elementary school-aged children was selected from a large cross-sectional study and followed daily for eight months. Children were selected to obtain three equal-sized groups: one without respiratory symptoms, one with symptoms of persistent wheeze, and one with cough or phlegm production but without persistent wheeze. Parents completed a daily diary of symptoms from which illness constellations of upper respiratory illness (URI) and lower respiratory illness (LRI) and the symptom of wheeze were derived. Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) was measured daily for nine consecutive weeks during the eight-month study period. Maximum hourly concentrations of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and coefficient of haze for each 24-hour period, as well as minimum hourly temperature, were correlated with daily URI, LRI, wheeze, and PEFR using multiple regression models adjusting for illness occurrence or level of PEFR on the immediately preceding day. Respiratory illness on the preceding day was the most important predictor of current illness. A drop in temperature was associated with increased URI and LRI but not with increased wheeze or with a decrease in level of PEFR. No air pollutant was strongly associated with respiratory illness or with level of PEFR, either in the group of children as a whole, or in either of the symptomatic subgroups; the pollutant concentrations observed, however, were uniformly lower than current ambient air quality standards.

Vedal, S.; Schenker, M.B.; Munoz, A.; Samet, J.M.; Batterman, S.; Speizer, F.E.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Smoothing of respiratory motion traces for motion-compensated radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The CyberKnife system has been used successfully for several years to radiosurgically treat tumors without the need for stereotactic fixation or sedation of the patient. It has been shown that tumor motion in the lung, liver, and pancreas can be tracked with acceptable accuracy and repeatability. However, highly precise targeting for tumors in the lower abdomen, especially for tumors which exhibit strong motion, remains problematic. Reasons for this are manifold, like the slow tracking system operating at 26.5 Hz, and using the signal from the tracking camera ''as is''. Since the motion recorded with the camera is used to compensate for system latency by prediction and the predicted signal is subsequently used to infer the tumor position from a correlation model based on x-ray imaging of gold fiducials around the tumor, camera noise directly influences the targeting accuracy. The goal of this work is to establish the suitability of a new smoothing method for respiratory motion traces used in motion-compensated radiotherapy. The authors endeavor to show that better prediction--With a lower rms error of the predicted signal--and/or smoother prediction is possible using this method. Methods: The authors evaluated six commercially available tracking systems (NDI Aurora, PolarisClassic, Polaris Vicra, MicronTracker2 H40, FP5000, and accuTrack compact). The authors first tracked markers both stationary and while in motion to establish the systems' noise characteristics. Then the authors applied a smoothing method based on the a trous wavelet decomposition to reduce the devices' noise level. Additionally, the smoothed signal of the moving target and a motion trace from actual human respiratory motion were subjected to prediction using the MULIN and the nLMS{sub 2} algorithms. Results: The authors established that the noise distribution for a static target is Gaussian and that when the probe is moved such as to mimic human respiration, it remains Gaussian with the exception of the FP5000 and the Aurora systems. The authors also showed that the proposed smoothing method can indeed be used to filter noise. The signal's jitter dropped by as much as 95% depending on the tracking system employed. Subsequently, the 3D prediction error (rms) for a prediction horizon of 150 ms on a synthetic signal dropped by up to 37% when using a normalized LMS prediction algorithm (nLMS{sub 2}) and hardly changed when using a MULIN algorithm. When smoothing a real signal obtained in our laboratory, the improvement of prediction was similar: Up to 30% for both the nLMS{sub 2} and the best MULIN algorithm. The authors also found a noticeable increase in smoothness of the predicted signal, the relative jitter dropped by up to 95% on the real signal, and on the simulated signal. Conclusions: In conclusion, the authors can say that preprocessing of marker data is very useful in motion-compensated radiotherapy since the quality of prediction increases. This will result in better performance of the correlation model. As a side effect, since the prediction of a preprocessed signal is also less noisy, the authors expect less robot vibration resulting in better targeting accuracy and less strain on the robot gears.

Ernst, Floris; Schlaefer, Alexander; Schweikard, Achim [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, Luebeck SH 23538 (Germany)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Asbestos-related pulmonary disease in boilermakers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boilermakers are skilled building tradesmen who construct, repair, and dismantle boilers. The present study reports on the evaluation of members of a Michigan boilermaker's union for the presence of signs and symptoms of chronic pulmonary disease. Study variables included standardized evaluations of chest x-ray findings, pulmonary function testing, physical examination, and respiratory symptoms. An overall participation rate of 69% was achieved. A non-participant survey identified no significant differences between participants and non-participants in dyspnea, cough, age, or smoking history. Among participants with greater than 20 years experience in the trade, the mean FVC was 91% of predicted; the FEV1 was 86% of predicted; 25% showed at least a 1/0 profusion of interstitial markings on chest x-ray; 30% had bilateral pleural abnormalities; and 52% had audible inspiratory rales on physical examination. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume at one second both decreased with years in the trade. Chest x-ray findings of interstitial fibrosis and pleural plaques were related to ten or more years in the trade, as were respiratory symptoms of pulmonary rales, wheeze, and dyspnea.

Demers, R.Y.; Neale, A.V.; Robins, T.; Herman, S.C. (Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography: A novel method to reduce imaging dose  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: A novel method called respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is described whereby imaging dose can be reduced without degrading image quality. RT 4D CBCT utilizes a respiratory signal to trigger projections such that only a single projection is assigned to a given respiratory bin for each breathing cycle. In contrast, commercial 4D CBCT does not actively use the respiratory signal to minimize image dose. Methods: To compare RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT, 3600 CBCT projections of a thorax phantom were gathered and reconstructed to generate a ground truth CBCT dataset. Simulation pairs of conventional 4D CBCT acquisitions and RT 4D CBCT acquisitions were developed assuming a sinusoidal respiratory signal which governs the selection of projections from the pool of 3600 original projections. The RT 4D CBCT acquisition triggers a single projection when the respiratory signal enters a desired acquisition bin; the conventional acquisition does not use a respiratory trigger and projections are acquired at a constant frequency. Acquisition parameters studied were breathing period, acquisition time, and imager frequency. The performance of RT 4D CBCT using phase based and displacement based sorting was also studied. Image quality was quantified by calculating difference images of the test dataset from the ground truth dataset. Imaging dose was calculated by counting projections. Results: Using phase based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 47% less imaging dose on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT. Image quality differences were less than 4% at worst. Using displacement based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 57% less imaging dose on average, than conventional 4D CBCT methods; however, image quality was 26% worse with RT 4D CBCT. Conclusions: Simulation studies have shown that RT 4D CBCT reduces imaging dose while maintaining comparable image quality for phase based 4D CBCT; image quality is degraded for displacement based RT 4D CBCT in its current implementation.

Cooper, Benjamin J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Engineering, Canberra Hospital, Canberra, ACT 2605 (Australia); O'Brien, Ricky T.; Keall, Paul J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Balik, Salim; Hugo, Geoffrey D. [Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, 401 College Street, P.O.Box 980058, Richmond, Virginia 23298-0058 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Respiratory-Induced Prostate Motion Using Wavelet Decomposition of the Real-Time Electromagnetic Tracking Signal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The objective of this work is to characterize and quantify the impact of respiratory-induced prostate motion. Methods and Materials: Real-time intrafraction motion is observed with the Calypso 4-dimensional nonradioactive electromagnetic tracking system (Calypso Medical Technologies, Inc. Seattle, Washington). We report the results from a total of 1024 fractions from 31 prostate cancer patients. Wavelet transform was used to decompose the signal to extract and isolate the respiratory-induced prostate motion from the total prostate displacement. Results: Our results show that the average respiratory motion larger than 0.5 mm can be observed in 68% of the fractions. Fewer than 1% of the patients showed average respiratory motion of less than 0.2 mm, whereas 99% of the patients showed average respiratory-induced motion ranging between 0.2 and 2 mm. The maximum respiratory range of motion of 3 mm or greater was seen in only 25% of the fractions. In addition, about 2% patients showed anxiety, indicated by a breathing frequency above 24 times per minute. Conclusions: Prostate motion is influenced by respiration in most fractions. Real-time intrafraction data are sensitive enough to measure the impact of respiration by use of wavelet decomposition methods. Although the average respiratory amplitude observed in this study is small, this technique provides a tool that can be useful if one moves to smaller treatment margins (?5 mm). This also opens ups the possibility of being able to develop patient specific margins, knowing that prostate motion is not unpredictable.

Lin, Yuting [Tu and Yuen Center for Functional Onco-Imaging, Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California (United States); Liu, Tian; Yang, Xiaofeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University Hospital, Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Wang, Yuenan [Center for Devices and Radiological Health, US Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland (United States); Khan, Mohammad K., E-mail: drkhurram2000@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University Hospital, Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Pesticides and human chronic diseases: Evidences, mechanisms, and perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Along with the wide use of pesticides in the world, the concerns over their health impacts are rapidly growing. There is a huge body of evidence on the relation between exposure to pesticides and elevated rate of chronic diseases such as different types of cancers, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson, Alzheimer, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), birth defects, and reproductive disorders. There is also circumstantial evidence on the association of exposure to pesticides with some other chronic diseases like respiratory problems, particularly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular disease such as atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease, chronic nephropathies, autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematous and rheumatoid arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, and aging. The common feature of chronic disorders is a disturbance in cellular homeostasis, which can be induced via pesticides' primary action like perturbation of ion channels, enzymes, receptors, etc., or can as well be mediated via pathways other than the main mechanism. In this review, we present the highlighted evidence on the association of pesticide's exposure with the incidence of chronic diseases and introduce genetic damages, epigenetic modifications, endocrine disruption, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), impairment of ubiquitin proteasome system, and defective autophagy as the effective mechanisms of action. - Highlights: ? There is a link between exposure to pesticides and incidence of chronic diseases. ? Genotoxicity and proteotoxicity are two main involved mechanisms. ? Epigenetic knowledge may help diagnose the relationships. ? Efficient policies on safe use of pesticides should be set up.

Mostafalou, Sara; Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Abdollahi@UToronto.Ca

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Are you protected against Pertussis? Pertussis, or whooping cough, is a highly contagious respiratory infection caused by the bacterium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Are you protected against Pertussis? Pertussis, or whooping cough, is a highly contagious respiratory infection caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis. It causes severe coughing spells, vomiting

123

Hamilton study: distribution of factors confounding the relationship between air quality and respiratory health  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hamilton, Ontario is an industrial city with a population of 300,000 which is situated at the western end of Lake Ontario. Canada's two largest iron and steel mills are located here; the city historically has had relatively poor air quality, which has improved markedly in the last 25 years. Concern about the health effects of current air quality recently led us to carry out an epidemiological study of the effects of air pollution on the respiratory health of over 3500 school children. Respiratory health was measured by pulmonary function testing of each child, and by an assessment of each child's respiratory symptoms via a questionnaire administered to the parents. Previous studies had shown that other environmental factors (e.g. parental smoking, parental cough, socioeconomic level, housing, and gas cooking) might also affect respiratory health, and thus confound any potential relationships between health and air pollution. The questionnaire also collected information on many of these confounding factors. For the purposes of initial analysis, the city was divided into five areas in which differences in air quality were expected. In general, factors which have been associated with poor respiratory health were observed to be more prevalent in areas of poorer air quality.

Pengelly, L.D.; Kerigan, A.T.; Goldsmith, C.H.; Inman, E.M.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Respiratory health effects of the indoor environment in a population of Dutch children  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of indoor exposure to nitrogen dioxide on respiratory health was studied over a period of 2 yr in a population of nonsmoking Dutch children 6 to 12 yr of age. Lung function was measured at the schools, and information on respiratory symptoms was collected from a self-administered questionnaire completed by the parents of the children. Nitrogen dioxide was measured in the homes of all children with Palmes' diffusion tubes. In addition, information on smoking and dampness in the home was collected by questionnaire. There was no relationship between exposure to nitrogen dioxide in the home and respiratory symptoms. Respiratory symptoms were found to be associated with exposure to tobacco smoke and home dampness. There was a weak, negative association between maximal midexpiratory flow (MMEF) and exposure to nitrogen dioxide. FEV1, peak expiratory flow, and MMEF were all negatively associated with exposure to tobacco smoke. Home dampness was not associated with pulmonary function. Lung function growth, measured over a period of 2 yr, was not consistently associated with any of the indoor exposure variables. The development of respiratory symptoms over time was not associated with indoor exposure to nitrogen dioxide. There was a significant association between exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in the home and the development of wheeze. There was also a significant association between home dampness and the development of cough.

Dijkstra, L.; Houthuijs, D.; Brunekreef, B.; Akkerman, I.; Boleij, J.S. (Univ. of Wageningen (Netherlands))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Cumulative exposure to arsenic and its relationship to respiratory cancer among copper-smelter employees  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To explore the role of arsenic as a human carcinogen, the respiratory cancer-mortality experience (1938 to 1977) of 8045 white-male smelter employees in Montana was examined relative to cumulative exposure to arsenic trioxide and was compared with that of the white male population of the same region. Exposure to arsenic was estimated for various work areas from industrial-hygiene reports of average concentrations present in the smelter. Respiratory cancer mortality was analyzed further by time period of first employment and maximum lifetime exposure to arsenic trioxide. When exposure was estimated with arithmetic means of measured concentrations among men first employed prior to 1925, respiratory cancer mortality increased linearly with increasing cumulative exposure group, ranging from two to nine times expected; among those first employed in the period 1925 to 1947 it also increased linearly with increasing cumulative exposure group.

Lee-Feldstein, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Cumulative exposure to arsenic and its relationship to respiratory cancer among copper smelter employees  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To explore the role of arsenic as a human carcinogen, the respiratory cancer mortality experience (1938 to 1977) of 8,045 while male smelter employees in Montana was examined relative to cumulative exposure to arsenic trioxide and was compared with that of the white male population of the same region. Exposure to arsenic was estimated for various work areas from industrial hygiene reports of average concentrations present in the smelter. Respiratory cancer mortality was analyzed further by time period of first employment and maximum lifetime exposure to arsenic trioxide. When exposure was estimated with arithmetic means of measured concentrations among men first employed prior to 1925, respiratory cancer mortality increased linearly with increasing cumulative exposure group, ranging from two to nine times expected; among those first employed in the period 1925 to 1947 it also increased linearly with increasing cumulative exposure group.

Lee-Feldstein, A.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Respiratory Oxygen Uptake Is Not Decreased by an Instantaneous Elevation of [CO2], But Is Increased with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a high-resolution dual channel oxygen analyzer within an open gas exchange system to measure respiratoryRespiratory Oxygen Uptake Is Not Decreased by an Instantaneous Elevation of [CO2], But Is Increased an instantaneous reduction of leaf dark respiration measured as CO2 efflux. No known mechanism accounts

DeLucia, Evan H.

128

CFD simulations of enhanced condensational growth (ECG) applied to respiratory drug delivery with comparisons to in vitro data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CFD simulations of enhanced condensational growth (ECG) applied to respiratory drug delivery t Enhanced condensational growth (ECG) is a newly proposed concept for respiratory drug delivery in which and evaluate a CFD model of ECG in a simple tubular geometry with direct comparisons to in vitro results

Frey, Pascal

129

Smoking cessation among coal miners as predicted by baseline respiratory function and symptoms: a 5-year prospective study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A prospective analysis was used to test whether respiratory impairment or the presence of respiratory symptoms predicts 5-year cigarette smoking cessation in a sample of 1,118 U.S. white, male, underground coal miners. Miners were examined in 1977 and re-examined in 1982 by NIOSH, and all miners with test abnormalities were so informed by letter. Respiratory impairment was measured by an index of airways obstruction combining the spirometric measures of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) and Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 sec (FEV1). Bronchitis symptoms were measured by an index that combined chronic cough (3+ months/year) and chronic phlegm (3 + months/year). Among these coal miners, the presence of chronic respiratory symptoms initially was inversely associated with cigarette smoking cessation. Respiratory impairment, however, was positively associated with cigarette smoking cessation but did not reach statistical significance.

Ames, R.G.; Hall, D.S.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Evaluation of Fiber Bundle Rotation for Enhancing Gas Exchange in a Respiratory Assist Catheter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a rotating densely packed bundle of hollow fiber membranes, water and blood gas exchange levels were the concept of an intravenous respiratory assist device, in which a bundle of hollow fiber membranes (HFMs short blind- ended HFMs along its length in a "bottle-brush" configura- tion.11­14 Our group first

Federspiel, William J.

131

Prevalence of respiratory symptoms and cases suspicious for tuberculosis among public health clinic patients in Afghanistan,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and diagnostic test results were recorded. Correlates of TB-suggestive symptoms (defined as cough >2 weeks children (age 17 or under). The TB-suggestive symptoms of cough >2 weeks and / or haemoptysis were reported workers. keywords Afghanistan, tuberculosis, respiratory symptoms, cough, sputum smear accuracy

Scharfstein, Daniel

132

Personal exposure to nitrogen dioxide and its association with respiratory illness in Hong Kong  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1985, 362 primary schoolchildren and their 319 mothers were surveyed in Hong Kong to study the possible relationship of air pollution to respiratory illnesses. Using nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) measured by personal samplers as a measure of air pollution, the study aimed to identify the major sources of NO{sub 2} in the indoor environment and see whether its increased presence was associated with respiratory symptoms. The levels of NO{sub 2} among the mothers was found to increase by 21% if dust exposure was reported from the workplace, 18% if they used such cooking fuels as liquid petroleum gas or kerosene, 11% when kitchens did not have ventilating fans, and 10% when incense was burned at home. In terms of respiratory symptoms, an increase in NO{sub 2} levels of 19% was reported among those with allergic rhinitis and 18% among those with chronic cough. The levels of NO2 among children were correlated with levels measured in classrooms, all of which had opened windows so that the NO{sub 2} came from outdoors. No association was found between children's NO{sub 2} levels and respiratory symptoms. With the exception of smoking by the father and the children's NO{sub 2} levels, no association was found between smoking at home and NO{sub 2} levels.

Koo, L.C.; Ho, J.H.; Ho, C.Y.; Matsuki, H.; Shimizu, H.; Mori, T.; Tominaga, S. (Nam Long Hospital (Hong Kong))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of school children exposed to ambient air pollution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to evaluate the health effect of air pollution on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of Korean school children between 7 and 10 years of age during November 1995-January 1996. A standard respiratory symptom questionnaire was administered and spirometry was performed to examine pulmonary function of 121 children in an urban polluted area, Seoul, and of 119 children in non-polluted area, Sokcho, respectively. There was significant difference in the level of pulmonary function [forced expiratory volume in second (FEV{sub 1.0}) and forced vital capacity (FVC)] between exposed groups to polluted area and non-polluted area. Parental smoking was significantly related to respiratory symptoms of cough, phlegm, and the level of pulmonary function. The observed changes in FEV{sub 1.0} and FVC seemed to relate to home cooking fuel, not to respiratory symptoms. The additional longitudinal work that carefully monitors ambient and indoor air pollution and health effects data should be conducted to confirm these results.

Kim, Yoon Shin; Ko, Ung Ring [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

A realistic coupled nonlinear artificial ECG, BP and respiratory signal generator for assessing noise performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A realistic coupled nonlinear artificial ECG, BP and respiratory signal generator for assessing differential equations is capable of generating realistic synthetic electrocardiograms (ECGs). Open source code with realistic inter-signal coupling between the respiration, BP and ECG time series. The time-varying surface

McSharry, Patrick E.

135

Functional Analyses of the Molecular mechanisms Underlying Two Equine Respiratory Diseases: Recurrent Airway Obstruction and Rhodococcus equi Pneumonia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

protective immune response through birth up to 8 weeks of age. However there are also processes present that may be counter-productive to the host. Induction of such suppressive mechanisms may be a result of bacterial modulation of the host immune response...

Kachroo, Priyanka

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

136

Respiratory Organ Motion and Dosimetric Impact on Breast and Nodal Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To examine the respiratory motion for target and normal structures during whole breast and nodal irradiation and the resulting dosimetric impact. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional CT data sets of 18 patients with early-stage breast cancer were analyzed retrospectively. A three-dimensional conformal dosimetric plan designed to irradiate the breast was generated on the basis of CT images at 20% respiratory phase (reference phase). The reference plans were copied to other respiratory phases at 0% (end of inspiration) and 50% (end of expiration) to simulate the effects of breathing motion on whole breast irradiation. Dose-volume histograms, equivalent uniform dose, and normal tissue complication probability were evaluated and compared. Results: Organ motion of up to 8.8 mm was observed during free breathing. A large lung centroid movement was typically associated with a large shift of other organs. The variation of planning target volume coverage during a free breathing cycle is generally within 1%-5% (17 of 18 patients) compared with the reference plan. However, up to 28% of V{sub 45} variation for the internal mammary nodes was observed. Interphase mean dose variations of 2.2%, 1.2%, and 1.4% were observed for planning target volume, ipsilateral lung, and heart, respectively. Dose variations for the axillary nodes and brachial plexus were minimal. Conclusions: The doses delivered to the target and normal structures are different from the planned dose based on the reference phase. During normal breathing, the dosimetric impact of respiratory motion is clinically insignificant with the exception of internal mammary nodes. However, noticeable degradation in dosimetric plan quality may be expected for the patients with large respiratory motion.

Qi, X. Sharon, E-mail: xiangrong.qi@ucdenver.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); White, Julia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Merrell, Kenneth; Sood, Amit; Bauer, Anderson; Wilson, J. Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A cross-sectional study of secondhand smoke exposure and respiratory symptoms in non-current smokers in the U.S. trucking industry: SHS exposure and respiratory symptoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with chronic phlegm, chronic cough, and any wheeze, defined= 1.00- 2.13) for chronic cough, 1.55 (95% CI = 1.08-2.21)respiratory symptoms, including cough, phlegm and wheeze, in

Laden, Francine; Chiu, Yueh-Hsiu; Garshick, Eric; Hammond, S; Hart, Jaime E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Respiratory survey of North American Indian children living in proximity to an aluminum smelter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explored the relationship of respiratory symptoms and lung function to exposure to ambient air pollution consisting of particulate and gaseous fluorides. The subjects were 253 North American Indian children 11 to 17 yr of age living on the Akwasasne reserve, which is adjacent to an aluminum smelter. Among boys, closing volume (CV/VC%) was increased in those raised closest to the smelter as opposed to those having lived most of their lives farthest from this source of air pollution. In both sexes, there was a significant linear relationship between increasing CV/VC% and the amount of fluoride contained in a spot urine sample. We conclude that exposure to fluoride air pollution in the community may be associated with abnormalities in small airways. The implication of these abnormalities for future respiratory health is unknown.

Ernst, P.; Thomas, D.; Becklake, M.R.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Effect of nitroimidazoles on the oxygen consumption rate and respiratory control ratio of beef heart mitochondria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neurotoxic effect of the nitroimidazole radiosensitizers misonidazole (MISO) and desmethylmisonidazole (DMM) has seriously compromised their clinical effectiveness. The authors compare here the effect of MISO and DMM on oxygen consumption in purified beef heart mitochondria. MISO has been found to significantly increase the oxygen consumption rate and decrease the respiratory control ratio in isolated mitochondria when incubated in the presence of the NAD+ dependent substrate, ..beta..-hydroxybutyrate. DMM has a similar but less pronounced effect than MISO on these respiratory parameters. When mitochondria were incubated in the presence of these radiosensitizers for 8, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes, the oxygen consumption rate was decreased when succinate, a FAD dependent substrate, was added following the incubation. This decrease, which is both time and dosage dependent, is equivalent for MISO and DMM.

Chao, C.F.; Ting, L.; Subjeck, J.R.; Johnson, R.J.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Respiratory symptoms and lung function in oil mist-exposed workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The prevalence of respiratory symptoms was registered and ventilatory function was determined in 164 men exposed to oil mist. The average exposure time was 16.2 years. One hundred fifty-nine office workers served as controls. The exposed men reported more respiratory symptoms: 14% of the exposed nonsmokers v. 2% of the nonsmoking controls having cough at least three months a year. There were non significant differences between spirometric measurements and chest roentgenograms of the men exposed to oil mist and those of the office workers. The lung function of 25 nonsmoking exposed men was further examined with other lung function tests. The mean values for closing volume, slope of the alveolar plateau, total lung capacity, residual volume, elastic recoil at various lung volumes, and diffusion capacity did not differ significantly.

Jarvholm, B. (Dept.of Occupational Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden); Bake, B.; Lavenius, B.; Thiringer, G.; Vokmann, R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

The Department of Energy Respiratory Acceptance Program for Supplied-Air Suits  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The supplied-air suits that protect DOE contractor and federal employees from exposure to harmful atmospheres and radioactive contaminants are not included in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) certification process for respiratory protective devices. Therefore, with the awareness and acknowledgement of NIOSH and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Department established a system for acceptance testing of supplied-air suits.

2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

142

Interim Chronic Beryllium Disease  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes Departmental expectations for addressing chronic beryllium disease throughout the Department until a Departmental rule on beryllium is promulgated. This Notice was replaced by final rule 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program, published December 8, 1999.

1999-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

143

Reproductive Diseases in Cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication describes prevention measures, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment options for the most common reproductive diseases in cattle: brucellosis (Bang's disease); leptospirosis; infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) and bovine diarrhea...

Sprott, L. R.; Field, Bob

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

144

Development of a novel orthopedic microfastener  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Varadharajan and Mr. Mitul Kothari for making this endeavor a memorable one. vi TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT?????????????????????????... iii DEDICATION????????????????????????.. iv ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...???????????????????..... v TABLE OF CONTENTS????????????????????.. vi LIST OF FIGURES??????????????????????... viii LIST OF TABLES??????????????????????..... xi LIST OF SYMBOLS?????????????????????..... xii CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION...

Agnihotri, Mukul Mukund

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

145

Orthopedic Correction of Growing Retrognathic Hyperdivergent Patients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

appliance. Two maxillary and two mandibular MSIs (immediately loaded with 150gr coil springs) were used for the intrusion mechanics and vertical control. A matched control group was used to evaluate the skeletal changes that occurred during treatment. CBCT...

Carrillo, Roberto

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

146

Correlation of gross tumor volume excursion with potential benefits of respiratory gating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the magnitude of thoracic tumor motion can be used to determine the desirability of respiratory gating. Methods and materials: Twenty patients to be treated for lung tumors had computed tomography image data sets acquired under assisted breath hold at normal inspiration (100% tidal volume), at full expiration (0% tidal volume), and under free breathing. A radiation oncologist outlined gross tumor volumes (GTVs) on the breath-hold computed tomographic images. These data sets were registered to the free-breathing image data set. Two sets of treatment plans were generated: one based on an internal target volume explicitly formed from assessment of the excursion of the clinical target volume (CTV) through the respiratory cycle, representing an ungated treatment, and the other based on the 0% tidal volume CTV, representing a gated treatment with little margin for residual motion. Dose-volume statistics were correlated to the magnitude of the motion of the center of the GTV during respiration. Results: Patients whose GTVs were >100 cm{sup 3} showed little decrease in lung dose under gating. The other patients showed a correlation between the excursion of the center of the GTV and a reduction in potential lung toxicity. As residual motion increased, the benefits of respiratory gating increased. Conclusion: Gating seems to be advantageous for patients whose GTVs are <100 cm{sup 3} and for whom the center of the GTV exhibits significant motion, provided residual motion under gating is kept small.

Starkschall, George [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: gstarksc@mdanderson.org; Forster, Kenneth M. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kitamura, Kei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiology, Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Cardenas, Alex [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Biomathematics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Stevens, Craig W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

In utero and early life arsenic exposure in relation to long-term health and disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: There is a growing body of evidence that prenatal and early childhood exposure to arsenic from drinking water can have serious long-term health implications. Objectives: Our goal was to understand the potential long-term health and disease risks associated with in utero and early life exposure to arsenic, as well as to examine parallels between findings from epidemiological studies with those from experimental animal models. Methods: We examined the current literature and identified relevant studies through PubMed by using combinations of the search terms arsenic, in utero, transplacental, prenatal and fetal. Discussion: Ecological studies have indicated associations between in utero and/or early life exposure to arsenic at high levels and increases in mortality from cancer, cardiovascular disease and respiratory disease. Additional data from epidemiologic studies suggest intermediate effects in early life that are related to risk of these and other outcomes in adulthood. Experimental animal studies largely support studies in humans, with strong evidence of transplacental carcinogenesis, atherosclerosis and respiratory disease, as well as insight into potential underlying mechanisms of arsenic's health effects. Conclusions: As millions worldwide are exposed to arsenic and evidence continues to support a role for in utero arsenic exposure in the development of a range of later life diseases, there is a need for more prospective studies examining arsenic's relation to early indicators of disease and at lower exposure levels. - Highlights: We review in utero and early-life As exposure impacts on lifelong disease risks. Evidence indicates that early-life As increases risks of lung disease, cancer and CVD. Animal work largely parallels human studies and may lead to new research directions. Prospective studies and individual exposure assessments with biomarkers are needed. Assessing intermediary endpoints may aid early intervention and establish causality.

Farzan, Shohreh F.; Karagas, Margaret R. [Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Section of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Community and Family Medicine and Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH 03756 (United States); Chen, Yu, E-mail: yu.chen@nyumc.org [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Coronary heart disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have a greater prevalence in women Osteoporosis Autoimmune disease A. Osteoporosis Osteoporosis disorder of low bone mass, microarchitectural denegra7on% of all women >65 years old have osteoporosis (15% of all Caucasian women

Dever, Jennifer A.

149

Using Wikipedia to forecast diseases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Using Wikipedia to forecast diseases Using Wikipedia to forecast diseases Scientists can now monitor and forecast diseases around the globe more effectively by analyzing views of...

150

Respiratory effort correction strategies to improve the reproducibility of lung expansion measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) can be used to make measurements of pulmonary function longitudinally. The sensitivity of such measurements to identify change depends on measurement uncertainty. Previously, intrasubject reproducibility of Jacobian-based measures of lung tissue expansion was studied in two repeat prior-RT 4DCT human acquisitions. Difference in respiratory effort such as breathing amplitude and frequency may affect longitudinal function assessment. In this study, the authors present normalization schemes that correct ventilation images for variations in respiratory effort and assess the reproducibility improvement after effort correction.Methods: Repeat 4DCT image data acquired within a short time interval from 24 patients prior to radiation therapy (RT) were used for this analysis. Using a tissue volume preserving deformable image registration algorithm, Jacobian ventilation maps in two scanning sessions were computed and compared on the same coordinate for reproducibility analysis. In addition to computing the ventilation maps from end expiration to end inspiration, the authors investigated the effort normalization strategies using other intermediated inspiration phases upon the principles of equivalent tidal volume (ETV) and equivalent lung volume (ELV). Scatter plots and mean square error of the repeat ventilation maps and the Jacobian ratio map were generated for four conditions: no effort correction, global normalization, ETV, and ELV. In addition, gamma pass rate was calculated from a modified gamma index evaluation between two ventilation maps, using acceptance criterions of 2 mm distance-to-agreement and 5% ventilation difference.Results: The pattern of regional pulmonary ventilation changes as lung volume changes. All effort correction strategies improved reproducibility when changes in respiratory effort were greater than 150 cc (p < 0.005 with regard to the gamma pass rate). Improvement of reproducibility was correlated with respiratory effort difference (R = 0.744 for ELV in the cohort with tidal volume difference greater than 100 cc). In general for all subjects, global normalization, ETV and ELV significantly improved reproducibility compared to no effort correction (p = 0.009, 0.002, 0.005 respectively). When tidal volume difference was small (less than 100 cc), none of the three effort correction strategies improved reproducibility significantly (p = 0.52, 0.46, 0.46 respectively). For the cohort (N = 13) with tidal volume difference greater than 100 cc, the average gamma pass rate improves from 57.3% before correction to 66.3% after global normalization, and 76.3% after ELV. ELV was found to be significantly better than global normalization (p = 0.04 for all subjects, and p = 0.003 for the cohort with tidal volume difference greater than 100 cc).Conclusions: All effort correction strategies improve the reproducibility of the authors' pulmonary ventilation measures, and the improvement of reproducibility is highly correlated with the changes in respiratory effort. ELV gives better results as effort difference increase, followed by ETV, then global. However, based on the spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the lung expansion rate, a single scaling factor (e.g., global normalization) appears to be less accurate to correct the ventilation map when changes in respiratory effort are large.

Du, Kaifang; Reinhardt, Joseph M. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Christensen, Gary E. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Ding, Kai [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Bayouth, John E. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)] [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Air pollution and childhood respiratory health: Exposure to sulfate and ozone in 10 Canadian Rural Communities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was designed to examine differences in the respiratory health status of preadolescent school children, aged 7-11 years, who resided in 10 rural Canadian communities in areas of moderate and low exposure to regional sulfate and ozone pollution. Five of the communities were located in central Saskatchewan, a low-exposure region, and five were located in southwestern Ontario, an area with moderately elevated exposures resulting from long-range atmospheric transport of polluted air masses. In this cross-sectional study, the child's respiratory symptoms and illness history were evaluated using a parent-completed questionnaire, administered in September 1985. Respiratory function was assessed once for each child in the schools between October 1985 and March 1986, by the measurement of pulmonary function for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV[sub 1.0]), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), mean forced expiratory flow rate during the middle half of the FVC curve (FEF[sub 25-75]), and maximal expiratory flow at 50% of the expired vital capacity (V[sub 50]max). After controlling for the effects of age, sex, parental smoking, parental education and gas cooking, no significant regional differences were observed in rates of chronic cough or phlegm, persistent wheeze, current asthma, bronchitis in the past year, or any chest illness that kept the child at home for 3 or more consecutive days during the previous year. Children living in southwestern Ontario had statistically significant (P < 0.01) mean decrements of 1.7% in FVC and 1.3% in FEV[sub 1.0] compared with Saskatchewan children, after adjusting for age, sex, weight, standing height, parental smoking, and gas cooking. There were no statistically significant regional differences in the pulmonary flow parameters (P > 0.05). 54 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

Stern, B.R.; Raizenne, M.E.; Burnett, R.T.; Jones, L.; Kearney, J.; Franklin, C.A. (Environmental Health Directorate, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Respiratory response of the sea anemone Bunodosoma cavernata (Bosc) to changes in temperature and salinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Respiratory Rate . 6 2 Analysis of Variance Procedure for 0-2 Hour Average. . . 12 3 Analysis of Variance Procedure for 30 Minutes 13 Duncan's Multiple Range Test for 30 Minutes and 0-2 Hour Average and Acclimation Temperature 5 Duncan's Multiple Range... Test for 30 Minutes and 0-2 Hour Average and Experimental Temperature . 15 16 6 Duncan's Multiple Range Test for 30 Minutes and 0-2 Hour Average and Experimental Salinity 17 7 Duncan's Multiple Range Test for 30 Minutes and 0-2 Hour Average...

Retzer, Kent Arnold

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Discriminant analysis of heart valve sounds during respiratory static volume conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Data collection program 28 28 B. Analysis and extraction of parameters 30 VI. C. Analysis of STAVI-TH D. Statistical procedures RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 30 47 53 A. HVS1 data B. HVS2 data C. HVS3 data 60 62 63 viii Chapter Page D. High... RRZ = . 976 RR3 = . 949 Ave "- . 971 FRON AUTONATIC TRAC INC secs pt1 = 13d secs pt2 = 387 secs pt3 = 637 secs ptd = 888 Figure 7. Respiratory Condition 2. 37 2. 7 1 38 VXDIV. OVED EXIT 1= Gmt 2= FFTB 3=Filter SELECT ta RR1 1. 8 . 5...

Hatzopoulos, Stavros D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Radiology of thoracic diseases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book presents the essential clinical and radiologic findings of a wide variety of thoracic diseases. The authors include conventional, CT and MR images of each disease discussed. In addition, they present practical differential diagnostic considerations for most of the radiographic findings or patterns portrayed.

Swensen, S.J.; Pugatch, R.D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Feasibility of Respiratory Triggering for MR-Guided Microwave Ablation of Liver Tumors Under General Anesthesia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We obtained clear and reproducible MR fluoroscopic images and temperature maps for MR image-guided microwave ablation of liver tumors under general anesthesia without suspending the artificial ventilation. Respiratory information was directly obtained from air-way pressure without a sensor on the chest wall. The trigger signal started scanning of one whole image with a spoiled gradient echo sequence. The delay time before the start of scanning was adjusted to acquire the data corresponding to the k-space center at the maximal expiratory phase. The triggered images were apparently clearer than the nontriggered ones and the location of the liver was consistent, which made targeting of the tumor easy. MR temperature images, which were highly susceptible to the movement of the liver, during microwave ablation using a proton resonance frequency method, could be obtained without suspending the artificial ventilation. Respiratory triggering technique was found to be useful for MR fluoroscopic images and MR temperature monitoring in MR-guided microwave ablation of liver tumors under general anesthesia.

Morikawa, Shigehiro, E-mail: morikawa@belle.shiga-med.ac.jp; Inubushi, Toshiro [Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta Tsukinowa-cho, Ohtsu, Molecular Neuroscience Research Center (Japan); Kurumi, Yoshimasa; Naka, Shigeyuki; Sato, Koichiro; Demura, Koichi; Tani, Tohru [Shiga University of Medical Science, Department of Surgery (Japan); Haque, Hasnine A [GE-Yokogawa Medical Systems (Japan)

2004-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Respiratory responses of vigorously exercising children to 0. 12 ppm ozone exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes in respiratory function have been suggested for children exposed to less than 0.12 ppm ozone (O3) while engaged in normal activities. Because the results of these studies have been confounded by other variables, such as temperature or the presence of other pollutants or have been questioned as to the adequacy of exposure measurements, the authors determined the acute response of children exposed to 0.12 ppm O3 in a controlled chamber environment. Twenty-three white males 8 to 11 yr of age were exposed once to clean air and once to 0.12 ppm O3 in random order. Exposures were for 2.5 h and included 2 h of intermittent heavy exercise. Measures of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and the symptom cough were determined prior to and after each exposure. A significant decline in FEV1 was found after the O3 exposure compared to the air exposure, and it appeared to persist for 16 to 20 h. No significant increase in cough was found due to O3 exposure. Forced vital capacity, specific airways resistance, respiratory frequency, tidal volume, and other symptoms were measured in a secondary exploratory analysis of this study.

McDonnell, W.F. 3d.; Chapman, R.S.; Leigh, M.W.; Strope, G.L.; Collier, A.M.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Association of indoor nitrogen dioxide with respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function in children  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of indoor nitrogen dioxide on the cumulative incidence of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function level was studied in a cohort of 1,567 white children aged 7-11 years examined in six US cities from 1983 through 1988. Week-long measurements of nitrogen dioxide were obtained at three indoor locations over 2 consecutive weeks in both the winter and the summer months. The household annual average nitrogen dioxide concentration was modeled as a continuous variable and as four ordered categories. Multiple logistic regression analysis of symptom reports from a questionnaire administered after indoor monitoring showed that a 15-ppb increase in the household annual nitrogen dioxide mean was associated with an increased cumulative incidence of lower respiratory symptoms (odds ratio (OR) = 1.4, 95% confidence interval (95% Cl) 1.1-1.7). The response variable indicated the report of one or more of the following symptoms: attacks of shortness of breath with wheeze, chronic wheeze, chronic cough, chronic phlegm, or bronchitis. Girls showed a stronger association (OR = 1.7, 95% Cl 1.3-2.2) than did boys (OR = 1.2, 95% Cl 0.9-1.5). An analysis of pulmonary function measurements showed no consistent effect of nitrogen dioxide. These results are consistent with earlier reports based on categorical indicators of household nitrogen dioxide sources and provide a more specific association with nitrogen dioxide as measured in children's homes.

Neas, L.M.; Dockery, D.W.; Ware, J.H.; Spengler, J.D.; Speizer, F.E.; Ferris, B.G. Jr. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (USA))

1991-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Respiratory symptoms among glass bottle makers exposed to stannic chloride solution and other potentially hazardous substances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concern about upper respiratory tract irritation and other symptoms among workers at a glass bottle manufacturing plant led to an epidemiologic and an industrial hygiene survey. Questionnaire responses from 35 hot end and 53 cold end workers indicated that the incidence of wheezing, chest pain, dyspnea on exertion, and cough was significantly elevated among hot end workers. Among both smokers and nonsmokers, hot end workers reported higher, but not significantly higher, rates of wheezing and chest pain. Among smokers, hot end workers reported significantly higher rates of dyspnea on exertion and cough than did cold end workers. Data suggest that reported exposure to stannic chloride solution likely caused these symptoms. The industrial hygiene survey, conducted when stannic chloride use had been reduced, cleaning had been done, and ventilation improved, focused on measuring air contaminants that might possibly cause symptoms. Levels of hydrogen chloride, which apparently was formed by the combination of stannic chloride and water in the presence of heat, were elevated. The finding of increased prevalence of respiratory symptoms among hot end workers was consistent with this exposure. Recommendations were made to reduce hazardous exposures at this plant. Individuals responsible for occupational health should be aware that relatively benign substances, such as stannic chloride and water, can combine spontaneously to form hazardous substances.

Levy, B.S.; Davis, F.; Johnson, B.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Absence of respiratory effects in subjects exposed to low concentrations of TDI and MDI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One hundred seven subjects from a polyurethane plastic manufacturing plant have been followed over a five-year period with measurements of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), and questionnaires on respiratory symptoms and smoking habits. Environmental concentrations of toluene diisocyanate and diphenyl methyl diisocyanate were extensively monitored to provide accurate estimates of the upper-limits of exposure of the subjects. Current mean levels of FEV1 in this population were higher than those predicted for healthy subjects. The five-year change in FEV1 did not exceed that expected from aging. No acute change in FEV1 could be demonstrated over the course of a Monday either before or after a two-week vacation. No improvement in ventilatory function was observed over the vacation period. The presence of cough or sputum was related to smoking but was not related to isocyanate exposure. The results indicate that exposure of workers to extremely low levels of isocyanates (time-weighted average concentrations of the order of 0.001 parts per million (ppm)) is not associated with chronic respiratory symptoms or effects on ventilatory capacity. The results suggest that isocyanates can be controlled to the point of eliminating effects as measured by these techniques.

Musk, A.W.; Peters, J.M.; DiBerardinis, L.; Murphy, R.L.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Health effects of acid aerosols on North American children: Respiratory symptoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examined the respiratory health effects of exposure to acidic air pollution among 13,369 white children 8 to 12 years old from 24 communities in the United States and Canada between 1988 and 1991. Each child`s parent or guardian completed a questionnaire. Air quality and meteorology were measured in each community for a 1-year period. We used a two-stage logistic regression model to analyze the data, adjusting for the period confounding effects of sex, history of allergies, parental asthma, parental education, and current smoking in the home. Children living in the community with the highest levels of particle strong acidity were significantly more likely [odds ratio (OR) = 1.66; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-2.48] to report at least one episode of bronchitis in the past year compared to children living in the least-polluted community. Fine particulate sulfate was also associated with higher reporting of bronchitis (OR = 1.65; 95% CI 1.12-2.42). No other respiratory symptoms were significantly higher in association with any of the air pollutants of interest. No sensitive subgroups were identified. Reported bronchitis, but neither asthma, wheeze, cough, nor phlegm, were associated with levels of particle strong acidity for these children living in a nonurban environment. 26 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Dockery, D.W. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)]|[Channing Lab., Boston, MA (United States); Cunningham, J.; Damokosh, A.I. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Adventures in Infectious Diseases  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Dr. Susan Fisher-Hoch, Virologist and Epidemiologist, will discuss her research and travels associated with viral hemorrhagic fevers. From the Ebola outbreak in Reston, Virginia to outbreaks of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in South Africa, Senegal, and Saudi Arabia, Dr. Fisher-Hoch has studied and tracked the pathophysiology of these viral diseases. These studies have led her from the Center for Disease Control in the United States, to Lyon, France where she was instrumental in designing, constructing, and rendering operational a laboratory capable of containing some of the world's most dangerous diseases.

Fisher-Hoch, Susan [University of Texas School of Public Health

2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

162

Chronic Conditions and Disease Prevention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, diabetes, heart disease and osteoarthritis. One-on-One Nutrition Counseling Help with weight management and supportive program for those who have chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis

163

Effect of xenobiotics on the respiratory activity of rat heart mitochondria and the concomitant formation of superoxide radicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of the xenobiotics atrazine, benzene, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), lindane, toluene, and xylenol on the respiration of isolated rate heart mitochondria were studied. Bioenergetic parameters such as respiratory control (RC) and ATP/oxygen (P/O) values decreased considerably in the presence of these substances, and a concomitant increase of superoxide radical (O[sub 2][sup [minus

Stolze, K.; Nohl, H. (Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Inst. of Pharmacology and Toxicology)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Variations of the Respiration Signals for Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy Using the Video Coached Respiration Guiding System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT) has been used to minimize the dose to normal tissue in lung-cancer radiotherapy. The present research aims to improve the regularity of respiration in RGRT using a video coached respiration guiding system. In the study, 16 patients with lung cancer were evaluated. The respiration signals of the patients were measured by a real-time position management (RPM) Respiratory Gating System (Varian, USA) and the patients were trained using the video coached respiration guiding system. The patients performed free breathing and guided breathing, and the respiratory cycles were acquired for ~5 min. Then, Microsoft Excel 2010 software was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation for each phase. The standard deviation was computed in order to analyze the improvement in the respiratory regularity with respect to the period and displacement. The standard deviation of the guided breathing decreased to 65.14% in the inhale peak and 71.04% in the exhale peak compared with the...

Lee, Hyun Jeong; Oh, Se An

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Four-dimensional image-based treatment planning: Target volume segmentation and dose calculation in the presence of respiratory motion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe approaches to four-dimensional (4D) treatment planning, including acquisition of 4D-CT scans, target delineation of spatio-temporal image data sets, 4D dose calculations, and their analysis. Methods and Materials: The study included patients with thoracic and hepatocellular tumors. Specialized tools were developed to facilitate visualization, segmentation, and analysis of 4D-CT data: maximum intensity volume to define the extent of lung tumor motion, a 4D browser to examine and dynamically assess the 4D data sets, dose calculations, including respiratory motion, and deformable registration to combine the dose distributions at different points. Results: Four-dimensional CT was used to visualize and quantitatively assess respiratory target motion. The gross target volume contours derived from light breathing scans showed significant differences compared with those extracted from 4D-CT. Evaluation of deformable registration using difference images of original and deformed anatomic maps suggested the algorithm is functionally useful. Thus, calculation of effective dose distributions, including respiratory motion, was implemented. Conclusion: Tools and methods to use 4D-CT data for treatment planning in the presence of respiratory motion have been developed and applied to several case studies. The process of 4D-CT-based treatment planning has been implemented, and technical barriers for its routine use have been identified.

Rietzel, Eike [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States) and Abteilung Biophysik, Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: eike@rietzel.net; Chen, George T.Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Choi, Noah C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Willet, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Recent studies have demonstrated that limitations to oxygen transport in lizards occur within both the respiratory and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

both the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. The lateral flexions of the trunk that occur during this constraint by employing an accessory ventilatory mechanism called the gular pump, thus maintaining oxygen of the main veins in the abdominal compartment. Systemic venous return and ventricular preload are major

Bennett, Albert F.

167

Associations of symptoms related to isocyanate, ureaformol, and formophenolic exposures with respiratory symptoms and lung function in coal miners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The respiratory effects of diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI)-based resins and ureaformol- and formophenolic-based resins, used in coal mining, are unknown. This cross-sectional study of 354 miners evaluated respiratory health in miners with MDI-related symptoms (IS) and ureaformol/formophenolic-related symptoms (UFS). The protocol included clinical examination, chest radiograph, questionnaire on respiratory symptoms, smoking habit, job history, resin handling, and spirometry. Resin handling concerned 27.7% of the miners. IS affected 5.6%, and 1.4% also after work. UFS affected 22.6%, and 2.3% also after work. Wheezing affected 35.6%; chronic cough, expectoration, or bronchitis about 10%; dyspnea 5.4%; and asthma 2.8%. The miners with UFS had significantly more frequent chronic cough, expectoration, chronic bronchitis, dyspnea, and wheezing, whereas those with IS at and after work had markedly lower FVC, FEV1, MMEF, FEF50% and FEF25%. These findings raise the possibility of deleterious effects of exposures to MDI and ureaformol/ ormophenolic resins on respiratory health and lung function in coal miners during their working life.

Bertrand, J.P.; Simon, V.; Chau, N. [Houilleres Bassin Lorraine, Freyming Merlebach (France)

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Generating 24-Hour ECG, BP and Respiratory Signals with Realistic Linear and Nonlinear Clinical Characteristics Using a Nonlinear Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generating 24-Hour ECG, BP and Respiratory Signals with Realistic Linear and Nonlinear Clinical, London School of Economics, London, UK Abstract A nonlinear model for generating lifelike human ECG it to three ordinary differential equations, the model generates a 24-hour ECG signal. Using both standard

McSharry, Patrick E.

169

A linear, time-varying simulation of the respiratory tract system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These results show that regional deposition efficiencies of inhaled particles are highly dependent on the level of physical activity in all the spectrum of thermodynamic and aerodynamic aerosol particle sizes; also it was shown that for particles in the aerodynamic size range, the values of regional deposition efficiencies at the inner regions of the lung are highly dependent on age. In addition, the shape of regional deposition efficiency curves as a function of particle size have a similar behavior for all ages; thus, any variation of the airway geometry and respiratory physiological parameters such as tidal volumes and breathing frequencies due to age difference do not cause a change in the fundamental mechanisms of deposition. Thus, for all the cases of physical activity and age dependency, the deposition of ultrafine aerosol particles is highly enhanced by diffusive processes in all regions of the respiratory tract, and for very large aerosol size particles this behavior is repeated again due to impaction and sedimentation mechanisms. Although the results presented at this work, are the result of computer simulations based on different sources of experimental data, the structure of the computer simulation code BIODEP is flexible enough to the acquisition of any kind of new experimental information in terms of biokinetic analysis and regional deposition parameters. In addition, since the design of BIODEP was intended for easy access to the users, then with exception of the subroutine DIVPAG, at this moment, the modular design of BIODEP using FORTRAN 77 allows the implementation of all the subroutines of BIODEP to be used in a interactive mode with any microcomputer.

Hernandez, O.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Effects of ambient ozone on respiratory function and symptoms in Mexico City schoolchildren  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of ambient ozone (O3) on respiratory function and acute respiratory symptoms were evaluated in 143 7- to 9-yr-old schoolchildren followed longitudinally at 1- to 2-wk intervals over a period of 6 months at three schools in Pedregal, Mexico City. The maximum O3 level exceeded the World Health Organization guideline of 80 ppb and the U.S. standard of 120 ppb in every week. For an increase from lowest to highest in the mean O3 level during the 48 hr before spirometry (53 ppb), logistic regression estimated relative odds of 1.7 for a child reporting cough/phlegm on the day of spirometry. For the full population, the mean O3 level during the hour before spirometry, not adjusted for temperature and humidity, predicted a significant decrement in FVC but not in FEV1 or FEF25-75. In contrast, the mean O3 level during the previous 24-, 48-, and 168-h periods predicted significant decrements in FEV1 and FEF25-75 but not in FVC. Ozone was consistently associated with a greater decrement in lung function for the 15 children with chronic phlegm as compared with the children without chronic cough, chronic phlegm, or wheeze. Ozone in the previous 24-, 48-, and 168-h periods predicted decrements in FEV1 for children of mothers who were current or former smokers, but not for children of mothers who were never smokers. Many of these effects were reduced in multiple regression analyses including temperature and humidity, as temperature and O3 were highly correlated.

Castillejos, M.; Gold, D.R.; Dockery, D.; Tosteson, T.; Baum, T.; Speizer, F.E. (Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-X, Mexico City, (Mexico))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Meta-Analyses of the Associations of Respiratory Health Effectswith Dampness and Mold in Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences recently completed a critical review of the scientific literature pertaining to the association of indoor dampness and mold contamination with adverse health effects. In this paper, we report the results of quantitative meta-analysis of the studies reviewed in the IOM report. We developed point estimates and confidence intervals (CIs) to summarize the association of several respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes with the presence of dampness and mold in homes. The odds ratios and confidence intervals from the original studies were transformed to the log scale and random effect models were applied to the log odds ratios and their variance. Models were constructed both accounting for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed and ignoring such potential correlation. Central estimates of ORs for the health outcomes ranged from 1.32 to 2.10, with most central estimates between 1.3 and 1.8. Confidence intervals (95%) excluded unity except in two of 28 instances, and in most cases the lower bound of the CI exceeded 1.2. In general, the two meta-analysis methods produced similar estimates for ORs and CIs. Based on the results of the meta-analyses, building dampness and mold are associated with approximately 30% to 80% increases in a variety of respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes. The results of these meta-analyses reinforce the IOM's recommendation that actions be taken to prevent and reduce building dampness problems.

Fisk, William J.; Lei-Gomez, Quanhong; Mendell, Mark J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Effects of ambient sulfur oxides and suspended particles on respiratory health of preadolescent children  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reported here are the results from an ongoing study of outdoor air pollution and respiratory health of children living in six cities in the eastern and midwestern United States. The study enrolled 10,106 white preadolescent children between 1974 and 1977 in 3 successive annual visits to each city. Each child received a spirometric examination, and a parent completed a standard questionnaire. Of this cohort, 8,380 children were seen for a second examination 1 yr later. An air pollution monitoring program was begun in each community at about the time of the first examination. For this report, measurements of total suspended particulates (TSP), the sulfate fraction of TSP (TSO/sub 4/), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) concentrations at study-affiliated outdoor stations were combined with measurements at other public and private monitoring sites to create a record of TSP, TSO/sub 4/, and SO/sub 2/ concentrations in each of 9 air pollution regions during the 1-yr period preceding each examination and, for TSP, during each child's lifetime up to the time of testing. Across the 6 cities, frequency of cough was significantly associated with the average of 24-h mean concentrations of all 3 air pollutants during the year preceding the health examination (p less than 0.01). Rates of bronchitis and a composite measure of lower respiratory illness were significantly associated with average particulate concentrations (p less than 0.05). In analyses restricted to lifetime residents, these outcomes were significantly associated with measures of lifetime mean TSP concentration. Within the cities, however, temporal and spatial variation in air pollutant concentrations and illness and symptom rates were not positively associated.

Ware, J.H.; Ferris, B.G. Jr.; Dockery, D.W.; Spengler, J.D.; Stram, D.O.; Speizer, F.E.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Periodontal Disease and Heart Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Periodontal Disease and Heart Health Deaf HealthTalks Presenter: Christopher Lehfeldt, DDS Elmwood #12;X-ray showing bone loss rickwilsondmd.typepad.com Thursday, March 15, 12 #12;5. What is heart disease? · The medical name for heart disease is cardiovascular disease (CVD) · An American dies from CVD

Goldman, Steven A.

174

Health & Medicine Heart Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

See Also: Health & Medicine Heart Disease· Medical Imaging· Vioxx· Matter & Energy Electronics· Technology· Medical Technology· Reference Artificial heart· Biosensor· Circuit design· Machine· Science and stretchable electronics can map waves of electrical activity in the heart with better resolution and speed

Rogers, John A.

175

Association between occupational exposure to arsenic and neurological, respiratory and renal effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Occupational exposure by inhalation in copper smelter is associated with several subclinical health phenomena. The respiratory tract is usually involved in the process of detoxication of inhaled noxious agents which, as arsenic, can act as inductors of oxidative stress (Lantz, R.C., Hays, A.M., 2006. Role of oxidative stress in arsenic-induced toxicity. Drug Metab. Rev. 38, 791-804). It is also known that irritating fumes affect distal bronchioles of non-ciliated, epithelial Clara cells, which secrete anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive Clara cell protein (CC16) into the respiratory tract. The study group comprised 39 smelters employed at different workplaces in a copper foundry, matched for age and smoking habits with the control group (n = 16). Subjective neurological symptoms (SNS), visual evoked potentials (VEP), electroneurographic (EneG) and electroencephalographic (EEG) results were examined in the workers and the relationships between As concentration in the air (As-Air) and urine (As-U) were assessed. Effects of exposure were expressed in terms of biomarkers: CC16 as early pulmonary biomarker and {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}M) in urine and serum and retinol binding protein (RBP) as renal markers, measured by sensitive latex immunoassay. The concentrations of arsenic exceeded about two times the Threshold Limit Values (TLV) (0.01 mg/m{sup 3}). The contents of lead did not exceed the TLV (0.05 mg/m{sup 3}). Low CC16 levels in serum (12.1 {mu}g/l) of workers with SNS and VEP symptoms and highest level As-U (x{sub a} 39.0 {mu}g/l) were noted earliest in relation to occupational time. Moreover, those effects were associated with increased levels of urinary and serum {beta}{sub 2}M and urinary RBP. Results of our study suggested the initiative key role of oxidative stress in triggering the processes that eventually lead to the subclinical effects of arsenic on the nervous system.

Halatek, Tadeusz [Department of Toxicology and Carcinogenesis, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland)], E-mail: halatek@imp.lodz.pl; Sinczuk-Walczak, Halina [Outpatient Clinic of Occupational Disease, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland); Rabieh, Sasan [Faculty of Biology, Chemistry, and Geosciences, University of Bayreuth, Bayreuth (Germany); Wasowicz, Wojciech [Department of Toxicology and Carcinogenesis, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Elevated temperature triggers human respiratory syncytial virus F protein six-helix bundle formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants, immunocompromised patients, and the elderly. The RSV fusion (F) protein mediates fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane during virus entry and is a primary target for antiviral drug and vaccine development. The F protein contains two heptad repeat regions, HR1 and HR2. Peptides corresponding to these regions form a six-helix bundle structure that is thought to play a critical role in membrane fusion. However, characterization of six-helix bundle formation in native RSV F protein has been hindered by the fact that a trigger for F protein conformational change has yet to be identified. Here we demonstrate that RSV F protein on the surface of infected cells undergoes a conformational change following exposure to elevated temperature, resulting in the formation of the six-helix bundle structure. We first generated and characterized six-helix bundle-specific antibodies raised against recombinant peptides modeling the RSV F protein six-helix bundle structure. We then used these antibodies as probes to monitor RSV F protein six-helix bundle formation in response to a diverse array of potential triggers of conformational changes. We found that exposure of 'membrane-anchored' RSV F protein to elevated temperature (45-55 deg. C) was sufficient to trigger six-helix bundle formation. Antibody binding to the six-helix bundle conformation was detected by both flow cytometry and cell-surface immunoprecipitation of the RSV F protein. None of the other treatments, including interaction with a number of potential receptors, resulted in significant binding by six-helix bundle-specific antibodies. We conclude that native, untriggered RSV F protein exists in a metastable state that can be converted in vitro to the more stable, fusogenic six-helix bundle conformation by an increase in thermal energy. These findings help to better define the mechanism of RSV F-mediated membrane fusion and have important implications for the identification of therapeutic strategies and vaccines targeting RSV F protein conformational changes.

Yunus, Abdul S.; Jackson, Trent P.; Crisafi, Katherine; Burimski, Irina; Kilgore, Nicole R.; Zoumplis, Dorian; Allaway, Graham P.; Wild, Carl T. [Panacos Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 209 Perry Parkway, Suite 7, Gaithersburg, MD 20877 (United States); Salzwedel, Karl, E-mail: salzwedelkd@niaid.nih.go [Panacos Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 209 Perry Parkway, Suite 7, Gaithersburg, MD 20877 (United States)

2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

177

Effect of diaphragmatic fatigue on control of the respiratory muscles during CO sub 2 rebreathing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors measured respiratory muscle recruitment and ventilation ({dot V}{sub E}) during CO{sub 2} rebreathing before and after diaphragmatic fatigue in normal subjects. Muscle activity was assessed by measuring pleural, abdominal, and transdiaphragmatic pressures (Ppl, Pab, and Pdi, resp). The results showed that (1) there was a progressive increase in Pdi with increasing end-tidal PCO{sub 2} (P{sub ET}CO{sub 2}); the rate of increase was usually greater before than after fatigue, however, in some it was less because of longer operating length and/or passive stretching of the diaphragm due to strong rib cage muscle (RCM) activity induced by fatigue; (2) Pdi increased mainly due to greater fall in Ppl; {Delta}Pab increased little during CO{sub 2} rebreathing or even decreased with P{sub ET}CO{sub 2} over 50-55 mmHg; this pattern was exaggerated by fatigue; (3) at the end of each trial, the ratio {minus}{Delta}Ppl/{Delta}Pab increased by {approximately}140% before and {approximately}850% after fatigue; (4) CO{sub 2} induced expiratory abdominal muscle activity; and (5) as a group, {dot V}{sub E} and its pattern did not change appreciably with fatigue. The authors conclude that RCM are recruited proportionately more than the diaphragm by CO{sub 2} and that diaphragmatic fatigue shifts the central drive from the fatigued diaphragm to TCM to preserve ventilation.

Yan, S.; Lichros, I.; Macklem, P.T. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada) Montreal Chest Hospital, Quebec (Canada))

1991-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

178

Relationship of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide yield of cigarettes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The data from consecutive surveys of the Tucson Epidemiologic Study (1981-1988) were used to evaluate the relationship in cigarette smokers of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide (CO) yields of the cigarette. There were 690 subjects who reported smoking regularly in at least one survey, over age 15. After adjustment for intensity and duration of smoking and for depth of inhalation, the risk of chronic phlegm, cough, and dyspnea were not related to the tar and nicotine yields. In 414 subjects with pulmonary function tested in at least one of the three surveys the spirometric indices used were significantly related to the daily dose of tar, nicotine, and CO (product of the cigarette yield and daily number of cigarettes smoked). The effects were more pronounced for past than for current doses. However, the differentiation of pulmonary function due to various yields of cigarettes was small in comparison to the difference in pulmonary function between smokers and nonsmokers.

Krzyzanowski, M.; Sherrill, D.L.; Paoletti, P.; Lebowitz, M.D. (National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw (Poland))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Daily diaries of respiratory symptoms and air pollution: Methodological issues and results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Daily diaries of respiratory symptoms are a powerful technique for detecting acute effects of air pollution exposure. While conceptually simple, these diary studies can be difficult to analyze. The daily symptom rates are highly correlated, even after adjustment for covariates, and this lack of independence must be considered in the analysis. Possible approaches include the use of incidence instead of prevalence rates and autoregressive models. Heterogeneity among subjects also induces dependencies in the data. These can be addressed by stratification and by two-stage models such as those developed by Korn and Whittemore. These approaches have been applied to two data sets: a cohort of school children participating in the Harvard Six Cities Study and a cohort of student nurses in Los Angeles. Both data sets provide evidence of autocorrelation and heterogeneity. Controlling for autocorrelation corrects the precision estimates, and because diary data are usually positively autocorrelated, this leads to larger variance estimates. Controlling for heterogeneity among subjects appears to increase the effect sizes for air pollution exposure. Preliminary results indicate associations between sulfur dioxide and cough incidence in children and between nitrogen dioxide and phlegm incidence in student nurses.

Schwartz, J. (Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)); Wypij, D.; Dockery D.; Ware, J.; Spengler, J.; Ferris, B. Jr. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)); Zeger, S. (Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Spirometry variability criteria--association with respiratory morbidity and mortality in a cohort of coal miners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To clarify the association between spirometry variability and respiratory morbidity and mortality, the authors analyzed data for miners examined in the first round of the National Coal Study, 1969-1971, and they compared groups of miners who failed with those who met each of two spirometry variability criteria: a 5% criterion recommended by the American Thoracic Society, and a 200 ml criterion used in prior research studies. Compared with miners who met the 5% criterion (the best two forced vital capacities must be within 5% or 100 ml of one another), the group that failed had a lower mean for forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and odds ratios for cough, phlegm, wheeze, shortness of breath, and death of 1.75, 1.67, 1.76, 2.71, and 1.30, respectively. The findings for the 200 ml criterion (the best two FEV1s must be within 200 ml of one another) were somewhat different. The group that failed versus the group that met this criterion had a higher mean for FEV1, and odds ratios for cough, phlegm, wheeze, shortness of breath, and death of 1.13, 1.07, 1.15, 1.43, and 0.94, respectively. Although the findings differ for the two criteria, the findings demonstrate that increased spirometry variability is associated with poorer health.

Kellie, S.E.; Attfield, M.D.; Hankinson, J.L.; Castellan, R.M.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The respiratory health and lung function of Anglo-American children in a smelter town  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooper smelters are large, usually isolated, sources of air pollution. Arizona has several such plants on the periphery of small communities. The smelters emit predominantly sulfur oxides and particulates, and the residents of these communities intermittently are exposed to high concentrations (24-h sulfur dioxide (SO2) . 250 to 500 micrograms/m3) of smelter smoke but little other pollution. This study compared the respiratory health of Anglo-American school children who lived in one smelter community with children living in another small community in Arizona that was free of smelter air pollution. The prevalence of cough, as determined by questionnaire, was 25.6% in the smelter town children and 14.3% in the nonsmelter town children (p less than 0.05). Pulmonary function at the study onset was equal in the two groups. Over the course of the 4 yr of study, lung function growth (measured as actual forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) after 4 yr of study minus predicted FEV1) was also equal in the smelter town and nonsmelter town children. These results suggest that children in smelter communities have slightly more cough when compared with children living in other communities, but no differences in initial lung function or lung function at yearly testing over the period of the study.

Dodge, R.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Coal home heating and environmental tobacco smoke in relation to lower respiratory illness in Czech children, from birth to 3 years of age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Young SA, et al. 1993. Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory ill-as nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide would occur only inLRI from exposures to nitrogen dioxide (Samet et al. 1993).

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Patient-specific quantification of respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty for step-and-shoot IMRT of lung cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The objective of this study was to quantify respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty at the planning stage for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using an analytical technique.Methods: Ten patients with stage II/III lung cancer who had undergone a planning four-dimensional (4D) computed tomographic scan and step-and-shoot IMRT planning were selected with a mix of motion and tumor size for this retrospective study. A step-and-shoot IMRT plan was generated for each patient. The maximum and minimum doses with respiratory motion were calculated for each plan, and the mean deviation from the 4D dose was calculated, taking delivery time, fractionation, and patient breathing cycle into consideration.Results: For all patients evaluated in this study, the mean deviation from the 4D dose in the planning target volume (PTV) was <2.5%, with a standard deviation <1.2%, and maximum point dose variation from the 4D dose was <6.2% in the PTV assuming delivery dose rate of 200 MU/min and patient breathing cycle of 8 s. The motion-induced dose uncertainty is a function of motion, fractionation, MU (plan modulation), dose rate, and patient breathing cycle.Conclusions: Respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty varies from patient to patient. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the dose uncertainty on a patient-specific basis, which could be useful for plan evaluation and treatment strategy determination for selected patients.

Li, Heng; Park, Peter; Liu, Wei; Matney, Jason; Balter, Peter; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Li, Yupeng [Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)] [Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

A multiplexed reverse transcriptase PCR assay for identification of viral respiratory pathogens at point-of-care  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a nucleic acid-based assay that is rapid, sensitive, specific, and can be used for the simultaneous detection of 5 common human respiratory pathogens including influenza A, influenza B, parainfluenza type 1 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus group B, C, and E. Typically, diagnosis on an un-extracted clinical sample can be provided in less than 3 hours, including sample collection, preparation, and processing, as well as data analysis. Such a multiplexed panel would enable rapid broad-spectrum pathogen testing on nasal swabs, and therefore allow implementation of infection control measures, and timely administration of antiviral therapies. This article presents a summary of the assay performance in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Limits of detection are provided for each targeted respiratory pathogen, and result comparisons are performed on clinical samples, our goal being to compare the sensitivity and specificity of the multiplexed assay to the combination of immunofluorescence and shell vial culture currently implemented at the UCDMC hospital. Overall, the use of the multiplexed RT-PCR assay reduced the rate of false negatives by 4% and reduced the rate of false positives by up to 10%. The assay correctly identified 99.3% of the clinical negatives, 97% of adenovirus, 95% of RSV, 92% of influenza B, and 77% of influenza A without any extraction performed on the clinical samples. The data also showed that extraction will be needed for parainfluenza virus, which was only identified correctly 24% of the time on un-extracted samples.

Letant, S E; .Ortiz, J I; Tammero, L; Birch, J M; Derlet, R W; Cohen, S; Manning, D; McBride, M T

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

185

Maximum-Intensity Volumes for Fast Contouring of Lung Tumors Including Respiratory Motion in 4DCT Planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum-intensity volumes (MIV) for fast contouring of lung tumors including respiratory motion. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) data of 10 patients were acquired. Maximum-intensity volumes were constructed by assigning the maximum Hounsfield unit in all CT volumes per geometric voxel to a new, synthetic volume. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on all CT volumes, and their union was constructed. The GTV with all its respiratory motion was contoured on the MIV as well. Union GTVs and GTVs including motion were compared visually. Furthermore, planning target volumes (PTVs) were constructed for the union of GTVs and the GTV on MIV. These PTVs were compared by centroid position, volume, geometric extent, and surface distance. Results: Visual comparison of GTVs demonstrated failure of the MIV technique for 5 of 10 patients. For adequate GTV{sub MIV}s, differences between PTVs were <1.0 mm in centroid position, 5% in volume, {+-}5 mm in geometric extent, and {+-}0.5 {+-} 2.0 mm in surface distance. These values represent the uncertainties for successful MIV contouring. Conclusion: Maximum-intensity volumes are a good first estimate for target volume definition including respiratory motion. However, it seems mandatory to validate each individual MIV by overlaying it on a movie loop displaying the 4DCT data and editing it for possible inadequate coverage of GTVs on additional 4DCT motion states.

Rietzel, Eike [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Abteilung Biophysik, Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)], E-mail: eike@rietzel.net; Liu, Arthur K.; Chen, George T.Y.; Choi, Noah C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Epidemiological-environmental study of diesel bus garage workers: chronic effects of diesel exhaust on the respiratory system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two hundred and eighty-three (283) male diesel bus garage workers from four garages in two cities were examined to determine if there was excess chronic respiratory morbidity related to diesel exposure. The dependent variables were respiratory symptoms, radiographic interpretation for pneumoconiosis, and pulmonary function (FVC, FEV1, and flow rates). Independent variables included race, age, smoking, drinking, height, and tenure (as surrogate measure of exposure). Exposure-effect relationships within the study population showed no detectable associations of symptoms with tenure. There was an apparent association of pulmonary function and tenure. Seven workers (2.5%) had category 1 pneumoconiosis (three rounded opacities, two irregular opacities, and one with both rounded and irregular). The study population was also compared to a nonexposed blue-collar population. After indirect adjustment for age, race, and smoking, the study population had elevated prevalences of cough, phlegm, and wheezing, but there was no association with tenure. Dyspnea showed a dose-response trend but no apparent increase in prevalence. Mean percent predicted pulmonary function of the study population was greater than 100%, i.e., elevated above the comparison population. These data show there is an apparent effect of diesel exhaust on pulmonary function but not chest radiographs. Respiratory symptoms are high compared to blue-collar workers, but there is no relationship with tenure.

Gamble, J.; Jones, W.; Minshall, S.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Management of Respiratory Motion in Extracorporeal High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment in Upper Abdominal Organs: Current Status and Perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extracorporeal high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a minimally invasive therapy considered with increased interest for the ablation of small tumors in deeply located organs while sparing surrounding critical tissues. A multitude of preclinical and clinical studies have showed the feasibility of the method; however, concurrently they showed several obstacles, among which the management of respiratory motion of abdominal organs is at the forefront. The aim of this review is to describe the different methods that have been proposed for managing respiratory motion and to identify their advantages and weaknesses. First, we specify the characteristics of respiratory motion for the liver, kidneys, and pancreas and the problems it causes during HIFU planning, treatment, and monitoring. Second, we make an inventory of the preclinical and clinical approaches used to overcome the problem of organ motion. Third, we analyze their respective benefits and drawbacks to identify the remaining physical, technological, and clinical challenges. We thereby consider the outlook of motion compensation techniques and those that would be the most suitable for clinical use, particularly under magnetic resonance thermometry monitoring.

Muller, A., E-mail: arnaud.muller@chu-lyon.fr [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France); Petrusca, L.; Auboiroux, V. [University of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Switzerland)] [University of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Switzerland); Valette, P. J. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France)] [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France); Salomir, R. [University of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Switzerland)] [University of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Switzerland); Cotton, F. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France)] [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Inherited risk for common disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Linkage disequilibrium studies have discovered few gene-disease associations for common diseases. The explanation has been offered that complex modes of inheritance govern risk for cancers, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ...

Banava, Helen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Respiratory Motion of The Heart and Positional Reproducibility Under Active Breathing Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To reduce cardiotoxicity from breast radiotherapy (RT), innovative techniques are under investigation. Information about cardiac motion with respiration and positional reproducibility under active breathing control (ABC) is necessary to evaluate these techniques. Methods and Materials: Patients requiring loco-regional RT for breast cancer were scanned by computed tomography using an ABC device at various breath-hold states, before and during treatment. Ten patients were studied. For each patient, 12 datasets were analyzed. Mutual information-based regional rigid alignment was used to determine the magnitude and reproducibility of cardiac motion as a function of breathing state. For each scan session, motion was quantified by evaluating the displacement of a point along the left anterior descending artery (LAD) with respect to its position at end expiration. Long-term positional reproducibility was also assessed. Results: Displacement of the LAD was greatest in the inferior direction, moderate in the anterior direction, and lowest in the left-right direction. At shallow breathing states, the average displacement of LAD position was up to 6 mm in the inferior direction. The maximum displacement in any patient was 2.8 cm in the inferior direction, between expiration and deep-inspiration breath hold. At end expiration, the long-term reproducibility (SD) of the LAD position was 3 mm in the A-P, 6 mm in the S-I, and 4 mm in the L-R directions. At deep-inspiration breath hold, long-term reproducibility was 3 mm in the A-P, 7 mm in the S-I, and 3 mm in the L-R directions. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the extent of LAD displacement that occurs with shallow breathing and with deep-inspiration breath hold. This information may guide optimization studies considering the effects of respiratory motion and reproducibility of cardiac position on cardiac dose, both with and without ABC.

Jagsi, Reshma [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Moran, Jean M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kessler, Marc L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Marsh, Robin B. C [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Balter, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pierce, Lori J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)]. E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illness in children. Part II: Assessment of exposure to nitrogen dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeated measurements of nitrogen dioxide were obtained from 1988 to 1991 in the homes of 1,205 infants living in Albuquerque, NM. Passive diffusion samplers were used to obtain a series of two-week integrated measurements from the home of each infant for use in a cohort study of the relation of residential exposure to nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illnesses. Information on stove use and time spent inside the residence was collected at two-week and two-month intervals, respectively. During the winter, in the bedrooms of homes with gas cooking stoves, mean nitrogen dioxide concentrations were 21 parts per billion (ppb); mean concentrations in the living room and kitchen were 29 ppb and 34 ppb, respectively. In homes with electric cooking stoves, the mean bedroom concentration was 7 ppb during the winter. Lower indoor concentrations were observed during the summer in homes with both gas and electric stoves. On average, infants spent approximately 12.3 hours per day in their bedrooms, 7.3 hours in the living rooms, 35 minutes in the kitchens, and 3.8 hours out of their homes. (As a condition of participation, none of the infants spent more than 20 hours per week in day care outside of their homes). The mean time infants spent in the kitchen during cooking was approximately nine minutes per day. We tested whether exposures of infants living in homes with gas stoves could be reasonably estimated by measurements in the bedroom in comparison with time-weighted average concentrations based on time-activity data and simultaneous nitrogen dioxide measurements in the kitchen, living room, and bedroom. In 1,937 two-week intervals from 587 infants, 90% of time-weighted exposure (on the three-level classification used in this study) estimates were in agreement with estimates based on bedroom concentrations alone.

Lambert, W.E.; Samet, J.M.; Hunt, W.C.; Skipper, B.J.; Schwab, M.; Spengler, J.D. (Univ. of New Mexico Medical Center, Albuquerque (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Similarities of host defense mechanisms against pulmonary infectious disease in animals and man  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evidence linking exposure to air pollutants with increased susceptibility to infectious diseases in humans comes from epidemiological, clinical, and experimental laboratory studies. The data suggest that the most common, and perhaps the most sensitive, index of the pulmonary effect of air pollutant exposure is on post upper respiratory infection, prolonged cough, phlegm, and purulent sputum. Experimental models of these relationships for extrapolation to humans should be able to measure such minor changes in symptomatology and physiology rather than require major lethal events. The bacterial aerosol model for quantifying nonspecific defense mechanisms of the bronchopulmonary tree utilizing nonpathogenic organisms fulfills this criterion. The function of the six major components of pulmonary antimicrobial defense mechanisms - including aerodynamic filtration, secretory respiratory tract fluid, fluid transport at the alveolar and bronchial levels, the phagocytic function of alveolar macrophages, the augmenting mechanisms of blood-derived inflammatory cells, and the secretory and cellular-specific immune mechanisms and their mediator products - can all be quantified by this experimental animal model system. The defensive functions are remarkably similar across animal species, and available human data suggest that findings obtained using the model may be extrapolatred to humans.

Green, G.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A Manual of Poultry Diseases.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" of ocular leucosis is specific. Hatchery and Breeder Flock Health Management Sanitation is a much used, but poorly defined word. The usual implication is that sanitation is a universally understood practice that may be applied to prevent all diseases... must be based on the nature of specific diseases. The ;kmbiguity surrounding the term "sanitation" can be avoided by using a term "management and sanitation for disease prevention." This phrase then would be defined as all practices, specific...

Bell, R. R.; Flowers, A. I.; Grumbles, L. C.; Meinecke, C. F.; Patterson, C. M.; Wormell, B. C.; Hall, C. F.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Interfractional Reproducibility of Lung Tumor Location Using Various Methods of Respiratory Motion Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine interfractional reproducibility of the location of lung tumors using respiratory motion mitigation. Methods and Materials: Free-breathing four-dimensional computed tomography (CT) data sets and CT data sets during breath hold were acquired weekly for 17 patients undergoing treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer. Distances between the center of the gross tumor volume (GTV) and a reproducible bony reference point under conditions of breath hold on end inspiration (EI) and end expiration (EE) and during free breathing on the 0% phase (corresponding to EI) and 50% phase (corresponding to EE) were analyzed for interfractional reproducibility. Systematic uncertainties in tumor location were determined as the difference in distance between the GTV center on the first CT data set and the mean location of GTV centers on the subsequent data sets. Random uncertainties in tumor location were determined as the standard deviation of the distances between the GTV centers and the bony reference points. Margins to account for systematic and random interfractional variations were estimated based on these uncertainties. Results: Mean values of interfractional setup uncertainties were as follows: systematic uncertainties-EI, 0.3 cm; EE, 0.2 cm; 0% phase, 0.3 cm; and 50% phase, 0.3 cm; and random uncertainties-EI, 0.3 cm; EE, 0.3 cm; 0% phase, 0.3 cm; and 50% phase, 0.3 cm. There does not appear to be any correlation between uncertainties and GTV size, but there appears to be a weak positive correlation between uncertainties and the magnitude of GTV excursion. Conclusions: Voluntary breath hold and gating on either EI or EE appear to be equally reliable methods of ensuring the reproducibility of lung tumor position. We recommend setup margins of 0.3 cm if using cone-beam CT or kilovoltage X-ray with fiducials and aligning directly to the tumor and 0.8 cm when aligning to a nearby bony surrogate using cone-beam CT or kilovoltage X-ray.

Starkschall, George, E-mail: gstarksc@mdanderson.or [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Britton, Keith [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); McAleer, Mary F.; Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

A cell based high-throughput screening approach for the discovery of new inhibitors of respiratory syncytial virus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based higsyncytial virus Dong-Hoon Chung1,2, Blake P Moore3,5, Daljit S Matharu4, Jennifer E Golden4, Clinton Maddox3, Lynn Rasmussen3, Melinda I Sosa3, Subramaniam Ananthan3, E Lucile White3, Fuli Jia3,6, Colleen B Jonsson1,2 and William E Severson1* Abstract... syncytial virus. Handbooks in Health Care Co. In Edited by Weisman LE, Groothuis JR. Newtown: PA; 2000:723. 18. Hall CB, et al: Aerosolized ribavirin treatment of infants with respiratory syncytial viral infection. a randomized double-blind study. N Engl J...

Chung, Dong-Hoon; Moore, Blake P.; Matharu, Daljit S.; Golden, Jennifer E.; Maddox, Clinton; Rasmussen, Lynn; Sosa, Melinda I.; Ananthan, Subramaniam; White, E. Lucile; Jia, Fuli; Jonsson, Colleen B.; Severson, William E.

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

195

Air pollutant monitoring for the East Bay Children's Respiratory Health Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology and presents the summary results of the air pollutant monitoring program conducted by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in support of the East Bay Children's Respiratory Health Study. The full study is examining the effects of chronic exposure to traffic-related pollutants on respiratory health among 3rd and 4th grade children attending ten neighborhood elementary schools in the San Francisco East Bay Area (Hayward, San Leandro and Oakland, CA). The demographically similar schools are located at varying distances from the I-880 and CA-92 freeways. Several schools were selected because they are located within 300 m in the predominant downwind direction (east) from either of the freeways. Measurements of multiple pollutants were made outdoors at the schools over 1-2 week intervals for 14 weeks in spring and eight weeks in fall 2001 using a custom-designed and validated package of commercially available monitoring equipment. Particulate matter was sampled over all hours (24 h per day) or during schools hours only with battery-operated programmable pumps and inlet devices for PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5}. These pumps were modified to allow for up to 10 days of continuous operation. Fine particle mass and black carbon (BC) were determined from the collected filters. Nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} and NO{sub 2}) were measured with passive samplers. Carbon monoxide (CO) was measured continuously with an electrochemical sensor. Gasoline-related volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured with passive samplers during three 4-week intervals in spring 2001 and two 4-week periods in early 2002. All samplers were deployed in a metal cabinet located outside at each school. Ranges of study average pollutant concentrations (all-hours) at the ten individual schools were: NO{sub x}, 33-68 ppb; NO{sub 2}, 19-31 ppb; PM{sub 10} mass, 27-32 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; PM{sub 2.5} mass, 12-15 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; and BC associated with PM{sub 2.5}, 0.6-1.0 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. Although statistical analysis of the data is yet to be performed, some general observations can be made. Absolute pollutant levels varied by season and week, but the simultaneous sampling design allowed for comparisons of concentrations among schools during each interval. Pollutant concentrations at each school were normalized to the sampling period averages among all schools. The normalized concentrations were generally consistent at each school throughout the entire study, suggesting that measured differences represent ongoing conditions and chronic exposures in the vicinities of the schools. Substantially elevated concentrations of NO{sub x}, NO{sub 2}, and BC, and somewhat elevated concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} were observed at one school located less than 100 meters to the east of I-880. Normalized concentrations of NO{sub x}, NO{sub 2}, and BC were also higher at the three other ''nearby and downwind'' schools relative to those located far from any freeway or other major traffic source. An ancillary monitoring program was implemented to examine the correlation between school-based pollutant measurements and measurements throughout the neighborhoods adjacent to three of the schools. Volunteer households were obtained from among the families of participating schoolchildren. Concentrations of NO{sub x} and NO{sub 2} were measured with passive samplers outside the homes of these volunteers during one of two 1-week periods in spring 2002. Simultaneous measurements were conducted at all ten of the schools and a central monitoring station during each week. The neighborhoods surrounding two schools were predominantly upwind of the I-880 freeway, while the neighborhood surrounding the other school was downwind from I-880. The overall distribution of concentrations observed for the residences near the downwind school appeared to be substantially higher than the regional background concentrations. The variability observed within the neighborhoods appeared to be, at least in part, explained by the proximity of individual residences to the freeway or

Singer, Brett C.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Hodgson, Alfred T.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

MFR PAPER 1300 Shellfish Diseases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

promise for the efficient recycling of organic waste materials, such as agricultural wastes, and metazoan parasitic and infectious agents. In addition, predators, toxic agents, and fouling organisms studied. DISEASES OF SHELLFISH A list of organisms that cause com- mon diseases in oysters is shown

197

Lessons from a rare disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Progeria is a genetic aging disease of childhood affecting an estimated one in four to eight million births. Children with progeria experience a range of developmental disorders and aging-like symptoms, including wrinkled ...

Dutchen, Stephanie Lynn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

A Manual of Poultry Diseases.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surrounding the term "sanitation" can be avoided by using the expression "management and sanitation for disease preven- , tion." This phrase then would be defined as all practices, specific and nonspecific, that the poultry- man applies to ptevent.... Change litter and thoroughly clean and disinfect the house and equipment between each group of birds. While litter selection and management is a large subject, applying this recommendation as a general practice will prevent many disease and parasite...

Hall, C. F.; Bell, R. R.; Clifford, R. L., Jr.; Glass, S. E.; Grimes, J. E.; Grumbles, L. C.; Keahey, E. E.; Wormell, B. C.

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Diarrheal Disease in Show Swine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cause disease in humans. Contaminated water is the main source of Giardia spp. Bacterial Causes Swine dysentery or ?bloody dysentery? from infec- tion with Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae is a major cause of diarrheal disease in show pigs... (the same area as whipworms) and prevents reabsorption of fluids. Affected pigs severe- ly dehydrate and up to 30 percent can die. Most affected pigs will drink but will not eat. Pigs that recover are intermittent shedders of B. hyodysenteriae and are a...

Lawhorn, D. Bruce

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disease, the number one killer of all Americans. Cardiovascular disease, or heart disease is the primary cause Summary: Kidney disease is both a cause and a consequence...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

SAGE-Hindawi Access to Research Advances in Orthopedics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on titanium were grown by hydrothermal processing in one case and by anodization in the presence of dilute" titanium (cp Ti) coupons and implants. The methods included hydrothermal processing under different

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

202

Heart Disease and Early Heart Attack Care  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heart Disease and Early Heart Attack Care Pamela Kostic, RN, CCCC, Chest Pain Coordinator, Stony Risk Factors · EHAC & Prevention #12;Heart disease includes a number of problems affecting the heart and the blood vessels in the heart. #12;Types of heart disease include: · Coronary artery disease (CAD) · Angina

Ohta, Shigemi

203

Radiologic atlas of rheumatic diseases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book is an ''atlas of rheumatic joint disease'' selected from 20 years of personal experience by the author. The author sets a goal of demonstrating the value of soft-tissue imaging in the diagnosis of early joint disease. This goal is achieved with high quality reproductions, many of which are presented in duplicate to illustrate bone and soft-tissue changes. The contents include an introductory overview of the ''Mosaic of Arthritis'' followed by sections on adult rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative spondyloarthropathies, classic collagen disease, enthesiopathies, and lastly a section on gout and psuedogout. The subject index is specific and indexes figures with boldface type. Each section is introduced by a brief outline or overview of the radiographic spectrum of the joint disorder to be illustrated.

Dihlmann, W.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Effects of Respiratory Motion on Passively Scattered Proton Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Photon Therapy for Stage III Lung Cancer: Are Proton Plans More Sensitive to Breathing Motion?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To quantify and compare the effects of respiratory motion on paired passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and intensity modulated photon therapy (IMRT) plans; and to establish the relationship between the magnitude of tumor motion and the respiratory-induced dose difference for both modalities. Methods and Materials: In a randomized clinical trial comparing PSPT and IMRT, radiation therapy plans have been designed according to common planning protocols. Four-dimensional (4D) dose was computed for PSPT and IMRT plans for a patient cohort with respiratory motion ranging from 3 to 17 mm. Image registration and dose accumulation were performed using grayscale-based deformable image registration algorithms. The dosevolume histogram (DVH) differences (4D-3D [3D = 3-dimensional]) were compared for PSPT and IMRT. Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to the magnitude of tumor respiratory motion. Results: The average 4D-3D dose to 95% of the internal target volume was close to zero, with 19 of 20 patients within 1% of prescribed dose for both modalities. The mean 4D-3D between the 2 modalities was not statistically significant (P<.05) for all dosevolume histogram indices (mean SD) except the lung V5 (PSPT: +1.1% 0.9%; IMRT: +0.4% 1.2%) and maximum cord dose (PSPT: +1.5 2.9 Gy; IMRT: 0.0 0.2 Gy). Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to tumor motion for only 2 indices: dose to 95% planning target volume, and heterogeneity index. Conclusions: With our current margin formalisms, target coverage was maintained in the presence of respiratory motion up to 17 mm for both PSPT and IMRT. Only 2 of 11 4D-3D indices (lung V5 and spinal cord maximum) were statistically distinguishable between PSPT and IMRT, contrary to the notion that proton therapy will be more susceptible to respiratory motion. Because of the lack of strong correlations with 4D-3D dose differences in PSPT and IMRT, the extent of tumor motion was not an adequate predictor of potential dosimetric error caused by breathing motion.

Matney, Jason; Park, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Bluett, Jaques [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chen, Yi Pei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Wei; Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Heng [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe, E-mail: rmohan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Environmental Contributions to Allergic Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with increased exposure to air pollution and indoor contaminants such as house dust mites, cockroaches linked to the severity of allergic disease. The contribution of house dust mites, cockroaches, animal some of the strongest evidence sug- gests a compelling link between exposure to passive smoking

Levetin, Estelle

206

Polar lipid fatty acids, LPS-hydroxy fatty acids, and respiratory quinones of three Geobacter strains, and variation with electron acceptor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The polar lipid fatty acids, lipopolysaccharide hydroxy-fatty acids, and respiratory quinones of Geobacter metallireducens str. GS-15, Geobacter sulfurreducens str. PCA, and Geobacter bemidjiensis str. Bem are reported. Also, the lipids of G. metallireducens were compared when grown with Fe3+ or nitrate as electron acceptors and G. sulfurreducens with Fe3+ or fumarate. In all experiments, the most abundant polar lipid fatty acids were 14:0, i15:0, 16:1*7c, 16:1*5c, and 16:0; lipopolysaccharide hydroxyfatty acids were dominated by 3oh16:0, 3oh14:0, 9oh16:0, and 10oh16:0; and menaquinone-8 was the most abundant respiratory quinone. Some variation in lipid proWles with strain were observed, but not with electron acceptor.

Hedrick, David B.; Peacock, Aaron; Lovley, Derek; Woodard, Trevor L.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Long, Philip E.; White, David C.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Why Do We Get Alzheimer's Disease?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neurodegenerative diseases and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in particular, are among the major health concerns of the elderly in industrialized societies. The cause of AD is unknown and no disease-modifying treatments are available. The disease is characterized clinically by a progressive dementia and pathologically by the accumulation of protein aggregates in the brain and a profound loss of nerve cells. It has also become clear recently that local immune responses are activated in the AD brain and may have a role in the disease. Our laboratory uses genetic mouse models to understand the disease process and to identify potential therapeutic targets.

Wyss-Coray, Tony (Stanford University) [Stanford University

2006-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

208

Crystallization of Mitochondrial Respiratory Complex II fromChicken Heart: A Membrane-Protein Complex Diffracting to 2.0Angstrom  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Procedure is presented for preparation of diffraction-quality crystals of a vertebrate mitochondrial respiratory Complex II. The crystals have the potential to diffract to at least 2.0 Angstrom with optimization of post-crystal-growth treatment and cryoprotection. This should allow determination of the structure of this important and medically relevant membrane protein complex at near-atomic resolution and provide great detail of the mode of binding of substrates and inhibitors at the two substrate-binding sites.

Huang, Li-shar; Borders, Toni M.; Shen, John T.; Wang, Chung-Jen; Berry, Edward A.

2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

209

Daily targeting of liver tumors: Screening patients with a mock treatment and using a combination of internal and external fiducials for image-guided respiratory-gated radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility and accuracy of using a mock treatment to screen suitable patients for respiratory-gated image-guided radiotherapy was investigated. Radio-opaque fiducials implanted adjacent to the liver tumor were used for online positioning to minimize the systematic error in patient positioning. The consistency in the degree of correlation between the external and internal fiducials was analyzed during a mock treatment. This technique could screen patients for gated therapy, reduce setup inaccuracy, and possibly individualize treatment margins.

Krishnan, Sunil; Briere, Tina Marie; Dong Lei; Murthy, Ravi; Ng, Chaan; Balter, Peter; Mohan, Radhe; Gillin, Michael T.; Beddar, A. Sam [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Variation in rectal temperature, respiratory rate, and pulse rate of cattle as related to variations in solar radiation, air temperature, wind velocity, and vapor pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VARIATION IN RECTAL TEMPERATURE, RESPIRATORY RATE, AND PULSE RATE GF CATTLE AS RELATED TO VARIATIONS IN SOLAR RADIATION, AIR TEMPERATURE, WIND VELOCITY, AND VAPOR PRESSURE A Dissertation By Mohammad Fazlur Rahim Quazi Approved as to style... Dissertation By Mohammad Fazlur Rahim tyiazi Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 1955 Major Subject: Genetics ? ?4...

Quazi, Mohammad Fazlur Rahim

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

New Clues in Predicting Alzheimer's Disease  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Theres a new clue in the search to identify the harbingers of Alzheimers disease. More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2008/12/16/predict-alzheimers-disease/

Jagust, William

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

212

MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, coughing and having close social contact (living in the same household) are examples of how this disease

Missouri-Rolla, University of

213

Heart Valve Disease James S. Gammie, MD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heart Valve Disease James S. Gammie, MD Professor and Chief Division of Cardiac Surgery University USA Source: CDC #12;#12;CARDIOTHORACIC SURGEON: A SURGEON THAT TREATS HEART AND LUNG DISEASE #12;Valvular Heart Disease: Common and Under-diagnosed 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 18 - 44 45 - 54 55 - 64 65 - 74 > 75

Weber, David J.

214

Coronary Heart Disease, Hypertension, Stroke, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coronary Heart Disease, Hypertension, Stroke, and Diabetes #12;Coronary Heart Disease: Overview by atherosclerosis ­ Narrowing of coronary arteries, the vessels that supply the heart · Disease process: coronary and arms Myocardial infarction - heart attack, ischemia - local blood supply decreased resulting in cell

Meagher, Mary

215

Induction of T helper 3 regulatory cells by dendritic cells infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Delayed development of virus-specific immune response has been observed in pigs infected with the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Several studies support the hypothesis that the PRRSV is capable of modulating porcine immune system, but the mechanisms involved are yet to be defined. In this study, we evaluated the induction of T regulatory cells by PRRSV-infected dendritic cells (DCs). Our results showed that PRRSV-infected DCs significantly increased Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells, an effect that was reversible by IFN-alpha treatment, and this outcome was reproducible using two distinct PRRSV strains. Analysis of the expressed cytokines suggested that the induction of Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells is dependent on TGF-beta but not IL-10. In addition, a significant up-regulation of Foxp3 mRNA, but not TBX21 or GATA3, was detected. Importantly, our results showed that the induced Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells were able to suppress the proliferation of PHA-stimulated PBMCs. The T cells induced by the PRRSV-infected DCs fit the Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T helper 3 (Th3) regulatory cell phenotype described in the literature. The induction of this cell phenotype depended, at least in part, on PRRSV viability because IFN-alpha treatment or virus inactivation reversed these effects. In conclusion, this data supports the hypothesis that the PRRSV succeeds to establish and replicate in porcine cells early post-infection, in part, by inducing Th3 regulatory cells as a mechanism of modulating the porcine immune system.

Silva-Campa, Erika; Flores-Mendoza, Lilian; Resendiz, Monica; Pinelli-Saavedra, Araceli; Mata-Haro, Veronica [Centro de Investigacion en Alimentacion y Desarrollo, A.C. Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Mwangi, Waithaka [Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Hernandez, Jesus, E-mail: jhdez@ciad.m [Centro de Investigacion en Alimentacion y Desarrollo, A.C. Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

216

The South Karelia Air Pollution Study. The effects of malodorous sulfur compounds from pulp mills on respiratory and other symptoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper mills in South Karelia, the southeast part of Finland, are responsible for releasing a substantial amount of malodorous sulfur compounds such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methyl mercaptan (CH3SH), and methyl sulfides ((CH3)2S and (CH3)2S2), into ambient air. In the most polluted residential area the annual mean concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan are estimated to be 8 and 2 to 5 micrograms/m3 and the highest daily average concentration 100 and 50 micrograms/m3. The annual mean and highest daily concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) are very low. We studied the effects of malodorous sulfur compounds on eye, nasal and respiratory symptoms, and headache in adults. A cross-sectional self-administered questionnaire was distributed in February 1987 and responded to by 488 adults living in a severely (n = 198), a moderately (n = 204), and a nonpolluted community (n = 86). This included questions about occurrence of the symptoms of interest during the previous 4 wk and 12 months and individual, behavioral, and other environmental determinants of the symptoms. The response rate was 83%. The odds ratios (OR) for symptoms experienced often or constantly in severely versus nonpolluted and moderately versus nonpolluted communities were estimated in logistic regression analysis controlling potential confounders. The odds ratios for eye (moderate exposure OR 11.70, Cl95% 2.33 to 58.65; severe exposure OR 11.78, Cl95% 2.35 to 59.09) and nasal symptoms (OR 2.01, Cl95% 0.97 to 4.15; OR 2.19, Cl95% 1.06 to 4.55) and cough (OR 1.89, Cl95% 0.61 to 5.86; OR 3.06, Cl95% 1.02 to 9.29) during the previous 12 months were increased, with a dose-response pattern.

Jaakkola, J.J.; Vilkka, V.; Marttila, O.; Jaeppinen, P.H.; Haahtela, T. (South Karelia Allergy and Environment Institute, Espoo (Finland))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

E-Print Network 3.0 - asbestos-related diseases incidence Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fibrosis of the lung Asbestos-related lung cancer: lung cancer, risk of contracting... mining and product manufacturing) can lead to a variety of respiratory ... Source: Flanagan,...

218

E-Print Network 3.0 - asbestos-related pleuropulmonary diseases...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fibrosis of the lung Asbestos-related lung cancer: lung cancer, risk of contracting... mining and product manufacturing) can lead to a variety of respiratory ... Source: Flanagan,...

219

Controlling Diseases on Ornamental Plants.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

powder is used as a spray to control powdery mildew and foliage diseases. It is available as Daconil 2787?, Bravo? and Ferti-Iome Broad Spectrum Liquid Fungicide?. Formaldehyde: This is a 37 percent solution in water and methanol which is used... and move it over the loosened soil. Drain tile or iron pipe buried in the soil helps to distribute the ste~m. Heat the soil until a medium-sized potato buried several inches deep is cooked thoroughly. Use formaldehyde as manufacturer directs. Water...

Horne, C. Wendell; Johnson, Jerral D.; Walla, Walter J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

airway stenoses involving: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

equine respiratory diseases. RAO is an allergic asthma like disease of the middle-aged horses while the R. equi pneumonia affects only young foals. Respiratory... Kachroo,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A "blind" study of the power spectra analysis of respiratory sounds at the trachea of a sample of pulmonary insufficiency patients and normal subjects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the condition of the lungs. The slow progress is due to: (1) a variety of human factor problems, (2) the limitations of the instrumentation, (3) the lack of total understanding of the mechanism of production of respiratory sounds, and (4) the lack... was a "blind s'tudy The equipment used in the analysis of the magnetic tapes consisted of the following components: 1. Ampex 2200 PM analog tape recorder 2, Datum Time Code Generator/Reader Model 9300 3. 20 Hz, 1800 Hz low pass filters 4. 100 Hz...

Wolf, Brenda Ann

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Therapeutic target for protozoal diseases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel Fasciclin Related Adhesive Protein (FRAP) from Plasmodium and related parasites is provided as a target for therapeutic intervention in diseases caused by the parasites. FRAP has been shown to play a critical role in adhesion to, or invasion into, host cells by the parasite. Furthermore, FRAP catalyzes the neutralization of heme by the parasite, by promoting its polymerization into hemozoin. This invention provides methods and compositions for therapies based on the administration of protein, DNA or cell-based vaccines and/or antibodies based on FRAP, or antigenic epitopes of FRAP, either alone or in combination with other parasite antigens. Methods for the development of compounds that inhibit the catalytic activity of FRAP, and diagnostic and laboratory methods utilizing FRAP are also provided.

Rathore, Dharmendar (Blacksburg, VA); Jani, Dewal (Blacksburg, VA); Nagarkatti, Rana (Blacksburg, VA)

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

223

Fracture, aging and disease in bone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Rheumatic DiseaseGlucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Endocrinol Metab. Clin.of cortico-steroid osteoporosis. A meta-analysis. Osteoporos

Ager, J.W.; Balooch, G.; Ritchie, R.O.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

"Artificial" brains, electrical grids, and disease modeling:...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science discoveries unveiled "Artificial" brains, electrical grids, and disease modeling: Los Alamos science discoveries unveiled September 15 The event is an opportunity for...

225

Functional cardiovascular assessment in congenital heart disease.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??abstractAdequate and serial functional cardiovascular assessment is important in patients with congenital heart disease because many show disruption of normal myocardial geometry, which may or (more)

W.J.B.W. van den Berg

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Enzyme replacement therapy for Pompe disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Enzyme Replacement Therapy for Pompe3 1.3 Enzyme Replacement Therapy for Pompe Disease 5Receptor ERT Enzyme Replacement Therapy LSD Lysosomal

Burris, Ryan Jonathan William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Epidemiological-environmental study of diesel bus garage workers: acute effects of NO/sub 2/ and respirable particulate on the respiratory system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Personal samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) and respirable particulate (RP) were collected over the shift on 232 workers in four diesel bus garages. Response was assessed by an acute respiratory questionnaire and before and after shift spirometry. Measures of exposure to NO/sub 2/ and RP were associated with work-related symptoms of cough; itching, burning, or watering eyes; difficult or labored breathing; chest tightness; and wheeze. The prevalence of burning eyes, headaches, difficult or labored breathing, nausea, and wheeze experienced at work were higher in the diesel bus garage workers than in a comparison population of battery workers, while the prevalence of headaches was reduced. Mean reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), peak flow, and flows at 50 and 75% of FVC were not obviously different from zero. There was no detectable association of exposure to NO/sub 2/ or respirable particulate and acute reductions in pulmonary function. Workers who often had respiratory work-related symptoms generally had a slightly greater mean acute reduction in FEV1 and FEF50 than did those who did not have these symptoms, but these differences were not statistically significant.

Gamble, J.; Jones, W.; Minshall, S.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Are You at Risk for Heart Disease?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vessels going to the heart get narrow and clogged. A heart attack can happen when these blood vesselsAre You at Risk for Heart Disease? Healthy Heart, Healthy Family Nangangamba Ka Bang Magkaroon ng Are You at Risk for Heart Disease? Healthy Heart, Healthy Family Nangangamba Ka Bang Magkaroon ng Sakit sa

Bandettini, Peter A.

229

PROTEIN INTERACTIONS AND DISEASE MARICEL KANN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and illnesses, including AIDS, cancer, and Alzheimer's disease. The goal of this session is to discuss interaction data to identify active pathways re- lated to HIV pathogenesis. A functional analysis for successful inference of protein interactions. Chen et al. developed a framework to mine disease

Radivojac, Predrag

230

Coronary Heart Disease, Hypertension, Stroke, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coronary Heart Disease, Hypertension, Stroke, and Diabetes #12;Coronary Heart Disease: Overview to illnesses caused by atherosclerosis ­ Narrowing of coronary arteries, the vessels that supply the heart that radiates across the chest and arms ? Myocardial infarction - heart attack, ischemia - local blood supply

Meagher, Mary

231

HANFORD THYROID DISEASE STUDY FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HANFORD THYROID DISEASE STUDY FINAL REPORT Study Management Team Scott Davis, Ph.D., Principal;Acknowledgments Many individuals have contributed to the success of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. We wish: Dr. Floyd Frost and Mr. Eugene Sobota; 3) history of Hanford: Dr. Michelle Stenejhem; 4) statistical

232

X-ray atlas of rheumatic diseases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This atlas comprises instructive X-rays of the various inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases in all stages at the extremities and the spinal column. In addition, the complex pattern of the wide range of arthroses, also known as degenerative rheumatic disease is included. Besides the instructive pointers to X-ray diagnosis, the book is also a guide to differential diagnosis. Hence, this book is actually an X-ray atlas of joint diseases in general. Selected Contents: Introduction: What Does ''Rheumatism'' Actually Mean./Radiographic Methodology in Rheumatic Diseases of the Locomotor System/The Mosaic of Arthritis/Adult Rheumatoid Arthritis/Seronegative Spondylarthritis/Classic Collagen Diseases/Enthesiopathies/Gout-Pseudogout

Dihlmann, W.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Behavioral impulsivity and hallucinations : insights from Parkinson's disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related degenerative disease of the brain, characterized by motor, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms. Neurologists and neuroscientists now understand that several symptoms of the disease, ...

Ashourian, Paymon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

HLB in Argentina: a New Disease Outbreak  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vol. 1 (2014) HLB in Argentina: a New Disease Outbreak Outi,E. 6 SENASA, Bs. As. Argentina MAGyP Bs. As INTA Montecarlo,Paran, 300 km away from Argentinas Northeastern border. In

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR DIARRHOEAL DISEASE RESEARCH, BANGLADESH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

©INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR DIARRHOEAL DISEASE RESEARCH, BANGLADESH J HEALTH POPUL NUTR 2009 00 managers can target resources to identify if such clusters exist. If so, they can then ensure supervi

Scharfstein, Daniel

236

Comparison of Rigid and Adaptive Methods of Propagating Gross Tumor Volume Through Respiratory Phases of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Image Data Set  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare three different methods of propagating the gross tumor volume (GTV) through the respiratory phases that constitute a four-dimensional computed tomography image data set. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography data sets of 20 patients who had undergone definitive hypofractionated radiotherapy to the lung were acquired. The GTV regions of interest (ROIs) were manually delineated on each phase of the four-dimensional computed tomography data set. The ROI from the end-expiration phase was propagated to the remaining nine phases of respiration using the following three techniques: (1) rigid-image registration using in-house software, (2) rigid image registration using research software from a commercial radiotherapy planning system vendor, and (3) rigid-image registration followed by deformable adaptation originally intended for organ-at-risk delineation using the same software. The internal GTVs generated from the various propagation methods were compared with the manual internal GTV using the normalized Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) index. Results: The normalized DSC index of 1.01 {+-} 0.06 (SD) for rigid propagation using the in-house software program was identical to the normalized DSC index of 1.01 {+-} 0.06 for rigid propagation achieved with the vendor's research software. Adaptive propagation yielded poorer results, with a normalized DSC index of 0.89 {+-} 0.10 (paired t test, p <0.001). Conclusion: Propagation of the GTV ROIs through the respiratory phases using rigid- body registration is an acceptable method within a 1-mm margin of uncertainty. The adaptive organ-at-risk propagation method was not applicable to propagating GTV ROIs, resulting in an unacceptable reduction of the volume and distortion of the ROIs.

Ezhil, Muthuveni [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: veniezhil@hotmail.com; Choi, Bum; Starkschall, George [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bucci, M. Kara [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Vedam, Sastry; Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

What You Should Know About Plant Diseases.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

when applied before the attack, thus serving as a preventive measure. With many crops, the occurrence of these attacks is predictable on the basis of past experience. Dusting Plants One may use dusts when controlling diseases with chemicals..., but they are not as effective as spraying. Usually, dusts shoultl be used to supple- ment sprays. Dust preparations are ready-mixed in the proper concentration, ready for application. Crop Rotation and Sanitation During the winter many plant disease organisms may live...

Horne, C. Wendell; Smith, Harlan E.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Major Oak Diseases and Their Control.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

)OC ?A245 Q7 173 . \\00 ILl78 , LIBRARY -?'?AUG 3 1?1S84 r ex.J$ MM University MAJOR OAK DISEASES AND THEIR CONTROL 8-1478 J ~ Texas Agricultural Extension Service. The Texas A&M University System ? Zerle L. Carpenter, Director. College... Station, Texas (Blaok Page bl-?OriglulBidletial? / . , ,;..,' ,- ; ~ ~ " OAK DISEASES AND THEIR CONTROL Jerral D. Johnson and David N. Appel* Oaks represent the major shade trees of Texas and are also...

Johnson, Jerral D.; Appel, David N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Integrated Molecular Signature of Disease: Analysis of Influenza...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Disease: Analysis of Influenza Virus-Infected Macaques through Functional Genomics and Integrated Molecular Signature of Disease: Analysis of Influenza Virus-Infected...

240

The Seattle Structure Genomics Center for Infectious Disease...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Seattle Structure Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID). The Seattle Structure Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID). Abstract: The NIAID-funded Seattle...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Structural genomics of infectious disease drug targets: the SSGCID...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of infectious disease drug targets: the SSGCID. Structural genomics of infectious disease drug targets: the SSGCID. Abstract: The NIAID-funded SSGCID is a consortium established to...

242

alzheimers disease amyloid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alzheimer???s Disease Medications. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??The brain of Alzheimer???s disease (AD) is characterized by accumulations of ??-amyloid peptide...

243

alzheimer disease amyloid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alzheimer???s Disease Medications. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??The brain of Alzheimer???s disease (AD) is characterized by accumulations of ??-amyloid peptide...

244

Commercial Pecans: Controlling Rosette, Diseases and Zinc Deficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pecan losses from diseases and insufficient zinc nutrition can be prevented by following effective grove management practices. Descriptions of diseases and recommendations for controls are included....

Lee, Thomas A.; Krausz, Joseph P.

2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

245

alzheimer's disease: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and memory deterioration, a clinical hallmark of Alzheimer's disease that the primary factor in the pathogenesis of cognitive de ciencies in Alzheimer's disease is the...

246

anthracnose disease caused: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disease of papaya Babak Madani a,*, Mahmud Tengku Muda Mohamed a,**, Alan R. Biggs c , Jugah Kadir October 2013 Keywords: Papaya Anthracnose Calcium Disease incidence...

247

adult celiac disease: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Websites Summary: with a dietitian or physician who specializes in celiac disease. People with celiac disease should always read food for Celiac Awareness; Cynthia Kupper,...

248

ASSISTANT/ASSOCIATE/FULL PROFESSOR Diabetes, Obesity, Metabolic Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASSISTANT/ASSOCIATE/FULL PROFESSOR Diabetes, Obesity, Metabolic Disease Department strengths in diabetes, obesity and metabolic disease. Outstanding candidates with expertise

Cinabro, David

249

A Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating the Pathogen-Host Research Paradigm. A Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating the...

250

Restoration of Endangered White Abalone, Haliotis sorenseni: Resource Assessment, Genetics, Disease and Culture of Captive Abalone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Haliotis sorenseni: Resource Assessment, Genetics, Disease,Haliotis sorenseni: Resource Assessment, Genetics, Disease,Haliotis sorenseni: Resource Assessment, Genetics, Disease,

Burton, Ronald S.; McCormick, Thomas B.; Moore, James D.; Friedman, Carolyn S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

E-Print Network 3.0 - adults cardiovascular disease Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disease, the number one killer of all Americans. Cardiovascular disease, or heart disease is the primary cause Summary: Kidney disease is both a cause and a consequence...

252

E-Print Network 3.0 - affect cardiovascular disease Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disease, the number one killer of all Americans. Cardiovascular disease, or heart disease is the primary cause Summary: Kidney disease is both a cause and a consequence...

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - addressing cardiovascular disease Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disease, the number one killer of all Americans. Cardiovascular disease, or heart disease is the primary cause Summary: Kidney disease is both a cause and a consequence...

254

Chronic beryllium disease: Diagnosis and management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chronic beryllium disease is predominantly a pulmonary granulomatosis that was originally described in 1946. Symptoms usually include dyspnea and cough. Fever, anorexia, and weight loss are common. Skin lesions are the most common extrathoracic manifestation. Granulomatous hepatitis, hypercalcemia, and kidney stones can also occur. Radiographic and physiologic abnormalities are similar to those in sarcoidosis. While traditionally the pathologic changes included granulomas and cellular interstitial changes, the hallmark of the disease today is the well-formed granuloma. Immunologic studies have demonstrated a cell-mediated response to beryllium that is due to an accumulation of CD4{sup +} T cells at the site of disease activity. Diagnosis depends on the demonstration of pathologic changes (i.e., granuloma) and evidence that the granuloma was caused by a hypersensitivity to beryllium (i.e., positive lung proliferative response to beryllium). Using these criteria, the diagnosis of chronic beryllium disease can now be made before the onset of clinical symptoms. Whether, with early diagnosis, the natural course of this condition will be the same as when it was traditionally diagnosed is not known. Currently, corticosteroids are used to treat patients with significant symptoms or evidence of progressive disease. 21 refs.

Rossman, M.D. [Hospital of the Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Questions and Answers What is meningococcal disease? How do you get it?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through droplets of respiratory or throat secretions, by kissing, sneezing or coughing on someone. Basic steps like covering your nose or mouth when you sneeze or cough, washing and drying your hands can help

Hickman, Mark

256

HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2014 Nursery Crops: Diseases 4-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemicals available. Only chemicals registered by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are recommended.1 - Common Diseases and Chemical Control Options Plant Disease Fungicide Rate/100 Gal Remarks Ajuga;HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2014 4-2 Nursery Crops: Diseases Table 4.1 - Common Diseases and Chemical Control

Liskiewicz, Maciej

257

A Comparison of Amplitude-Based and Phase-Based Positron Emission Tomography Gating Algorithms for Segmentation of Internal Target Volumes of Tumors Subject to Respiratory Motion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To quantitatively compare the accuracy of tumor volume segmentation in amplitude-based and phase-based respiratory gating algorithms in respiratory-correlated positron emission tomography (PET). Methods and Materials: List-mode fluorodeoxyglucose-PET data was acquired for 10 patients with a total of 12 fluorodeoxyglucose-avid tumors and 9 lymph nodes. Additionally, a phantom experiment was performed in which 4 plastic butyrate spheres with inner diameters ranging from 1 to 4 cm were imaged as they underwent 1-dimensional motion based on 2 measured patient breathing trajectories. PET list-mode data were gated into 8 bins using 2 amplitude-based (equal amplitude bins [A1] and equal counts per bin [A2]) and 2 temporal phase-based gating algorithms. Gated images were segmented using a commercially available gradient-based technique and a fixed 40% threshold of maximum uptake. Internal target volumes (ITVs) were generated by taking the union of all 8 contours per gated image. Segmented phantom ITVs were compared with their respective ground-truth ITVs, defined as the volume subtended by the tumor model positions covering 99% of breathing amplitude. Superior-inferior distances between sphere centroids in the end-inhale and end-exhale phases were also calculated. Results: Tumor ITVs from amplitude-based methods were significantly larger than those from temporal-based techniques (P=.002). For lymph nodes, A2 resulted in ITVs that were significantly larger than either of the temporal-based techniques (P<.0323). A1 produced the largest and most accurate ITVs for spheres with diameters of ?2 cm (P=.002). No significant difference was shown between algorithms in the 1-cm sphere data set. For phantom spheres, amplitude-based methods recovered an average of 9.5% more motion displacement than temporal-based methods under regular breathing conditions and an average of 45.7% more in the presence of baseline drift (P<.001). Conclusions: Target volumes in images generated from amplitude-based gating are larger and more accurate, at levels that are potentially clinically significant, compared with those from temporal phase-based gating.

Jani, Shyam S., E-mail: sjani@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Dahlbom, Magnus [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); White, Benjamin M.; Thomas, David H.; Gaudio, Sergio; Low, Daniel A.; Lamb, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Mouse and human embryonic stem cells: can they improve human health by preventing disease?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diseases, they also have equally great potential to prevent disease by identifying dangerous environmental chemicals

Talbot, Prue

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Purdue Extension Muskmelon and Watermelon Diseases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to muskmelons than watermelons. The disease is caused by a fungus (Alternaria cucumerina) that can rapidly Conditions · A brief introduction to the Melcast concept. III. Using Melcast · Acquiring Environmental Data - A description of data requirements for running Melcast. · Translating Environmental Data into EFI Values

260

Vaccine approaches with Edinburgh Infectious Diseases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vaccine approaches with Edinburgh Infectious Diseases Alexander Corbishley #12;The technology approaches to knowledge exchange · October 2013: three technology scouts seconded for 12 months, to identify Congress 2014 (Washington DC) · Local partnering meetings with SMEs · Discussions with Open Innovation

Maizels, Rick

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a disease character-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SS-167-R05 Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a disease character- ized by structural deterioration of bone tissue, leading to fragile bones and low bone mass. Osteoporosis can weaken bones and cause them" because bone loss occurs with- out symptoms. Many people may not know that they have osteoporosis until

262

DISEASES OF AQUATIC ORGANISMS Dis Aquat Org  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), and hybrid striped bass (Evans et al. 2000). Clinical symptoms of S. iniae infection in fish include loss from the freshwater dolphin Inia geoffrensis (Pier & Madin 1976), S. iniae infects a wide range of fish infection in humans who have handled diseased fish (Weinstein et al. 1997). Despite the need for novel

Nizet, Victor

263

Northern Kentucky University Communicable Disease Protocol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Northern Kentucky University Communicable Disease Protocol Approved 12/6/2011 1.0 Scope To develop procedures and policies for Northern Kentucky University students who reside on or off- campus who have been those required as outlined in 902 KAR 2:020 to be reported to the Northern Kentucky Health Department

Boyce, Richard L.

264

Disease Prediction Models and Operational Readiness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION: The objective of this manuscript is to present a systematic review of biosurveillance models that operate on select agents and can forecast the occurrence of a disease event. One of the primary goals of this research was to characterize the viability of biosurveillance models to provide operationally relevant information for decision makers to identify areas for future research. Two critical characteristics differentiate this work from other infectious disease modeling reviews. First, we reviewed models that attempted to predict the disease event, not merely its transmission dynamics. Second, we considered models involving pathogens of concern as determined by the US National Select Agent Registry (as of June 2011). Methods: We searched dozens of commercial and government databases and harvested Google search results for eligible models utilizing terms and phrases provided by public health analysts relating to biosurveillance, remote sensing, risk assessments, spatial epidemiology, and ecological niche-modeling, The publication date of search results returned are bound by the dates of coverage of each database and the date in which the search was performed, however all searching was completed by December 31, 2010. This returned 13,767 webpages and 12,152 citations. After de-duplication and removal of extraneous material, a core collection of 6,503 items was established and these publications along with their abstracts are presented in a semantic wiki at http://BioCat.pnnl.gov. Next, PNNLs IN-SPIRE visual analytics software was used to cross-correlate these publications with the definition for a biosurveillance model resulting in the selection of 54 documents that matched the criteria resulting Ten of these documents, However, dealt purely with disease spread models, inactivation of bacteria, or the modeling of human immune system responses to pathogens rather than predicting disease events. As a result, we systematically reviewed 44 papers and the results are presented in this analysis.

Corley, Courtney D.; Pullum, Laura L.; Hartley, David M.; Benedum, Corey M.; Noonan, Christine F.; Rabinowitz, Peter M.; Lancaster, Mary J.

2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

265

Binding of the Respiratory Chain Inhibitor Antimycin to theMitochondrial bc1 Complex: A New Crystal Structure Reveals an AlteredIntramolecular Hydrogen-Bonding Pattern  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex.Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28Angstrom resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alpha-A helix.

Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

266

Associations of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations and environmental susceptibilities with mucous membrane and lower respiratory building related symptoms in the BASE study: Analyses of the 100 building dataset  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the US EPA 100 office-building BASE Study dataset, they conducted multivariate logistic regression analyses to quantify the relationship between indoor CO{sub 2} concentrations (dCO{sub 2}) and mucous membrane (MM) and lower respiratory system (LResp) building related symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. In addition, they tested the hypothesis that certain environmentally-mediated health conditions (e.g., allergies and asthma) confer increased susceptibility to building related symptoms within office buildings. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for statistically significant, dose-dependent associations (p < 0.05) for dry eyes, sore throat, nose/sinus congestion, and wheeze symptoms with 100 ppm increases in dCO{sub 2} ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. These results suggest that increases in the ventilation rates per person among typical office buildings will, on average, reduce the prevalence of several building related symptoms by up to 70%, even when these buildings meet the existing ASHRAE ventilation standards for office buildings. Building occupants with certain environmentally-mediated health conditions are more likely to experience building related symptoms than those without these conditions (statistically significant ORs ranged from 2 to 11).

Erdmann, Christine A.; Apte, Michael G.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Epidemiological-environemental study of lead acid battery workers. III. Chronic effects of sulfuric acid on the respiratory system and teeth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of long-term exposure to sulfuric acid mist on the teeth and respiratory system were studied in 248 workers in five plants manufacturing lead acid batteries. The prevalence of cough, phlegm, dyspnea, and wheezing as determined by questionnaire were not associated with estimates of cumulative acid exposure. There was only one case of irregular opacities seen on the chest radiographs. There was no statistically significant association of reduced FEV/sub 1/ peak flow, FEF/sub 50/, and FEF/sub 75/ with acid exposure although the higher exposed group had lower mean values. FVC in the high exposure group showed a statistically significant reductioon compared to the low exposure group but there was no significant association when exposure was analyzed as a continuous variable. The ratio of observed to expected prevalence of teeth etching and erosion was about four times greater in the high acid-exposure group. The earliest case of etching occured after 4 months exposure to an estimated average exposure of 0.23 mg/m/sup 3/ sulfuric acid.

Gamble, J.; Jones, W.; Hancock, J.; Meckstroth, R.L.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Poultry Diseases Expert System using Dempster-Shafer Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on World Health Organization (WHO) fact sheet in the 2011, outbreaks of poultry diseases especially Avian Influenza in poultry may raise global public health concerns due to their effect on poultry populations, their potential to cause serious disease in people, and their pandemic potential. In this research, we built a Poultry Diseases Expert System using Dempster-Shafer Theory. In this Poultry Diseases Expert System We describe five symptoms which include depression, combs, wattle, bluish face region, swollen face region, narrowness of eyes, and balance disorders. The result of the research is that Poultry Diseases Expert System has been successfully identifying poultry diseases.

Maseleno, Andino

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Texas Plant Disease Diagnostic Lab Information Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXAS PLANT DISEASE DIAGNOSTIC LABORATORY 1500 Research Parkway, Suite A130 Texas A&M University Research Park College Station, Texas 77845 e-mail: plantclinic@ag.tamu.edu phone: 979.845.8032 fax: 979.845.6499 http..., disability, religion, age, or national origin. The Texas A&M System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissioners Courts of Texas cooperating. Please complete form for diagnostic services. Please PRINT and mark ? all that apply. PLANT...

Barnes, Larry W.

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

270

Women and Heart Disease: Neglected Directions for Future Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

009-9110-0 Women and Heart Disease: Neglected Directions forage 65, women have less heart disease than men. For many1980s showed a lower risk of heart attacks in postmenopausal

Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

alberta kidney disease: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for nearly 44 percent of new cases.1 Even when diabetes is controlled, the disease can lead to CKD Baker, Chris I. 2 Kidney Dysplasia National Kidney and Urologic Diseases...

272

animal virus diseases: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics Websites Summary: Modelling the spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus F Moutou B Durand CNEVA, Laboratoire Central-and-mouth disease is an economically important viral...

273

animal disease models: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics Websites Summary: Modelling the spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus F Moutou B Durand CNEVA, Laboratoire Central-and-mouth disease is an economically important viral...

274

Characterization of a Drosophila model of Huntington's disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurological disorder caused by a polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat expansion in the huntingtin (Htt) protein. The disease is characterized by neurodegeneration and formation ...

Lee, Wyan-Ching Mimi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Annular lichen planus in association with Crohn disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Crohn disease and a sickle cell trait. Therapy withparasites were excluded. Sickle cell trait was diagnosed (

Serro, Vasco Vieira; Organ, Vasili; Pereira, Lus; Vale, Esmeralda; Correia, Suzete

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A Century of Progress: Milestones in Sickle Cell Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Century of Progress: Milestones in Sickle Cell Disease Research and Care Introduction In 1910 to be known as sickle cell disease. One hundred years later we know that the sickle-shaped cells are due take the characteristic "C"-shape that is the hallmark of sickle cell disease. What is Sickle Cell

Bandettini, Peter A.

277

Harvesting can increase severity of wildlife disease epidemics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harvesting can increase severity of wildlife disease epidemics Marc Choisy1,* and Pejman Rohani1 extinction. Surprisingly, infectious diseases have not been accounted for in harvest models, which is a major and harvesting can substantially increase both disease prevalence and the absolute number of infectious

278

PRINCIPAL DISEASES OF COMMERCIALLY IMPORTANT MARINE BIVALVE MOLLUSCA AND CRUSTACEA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of disease-resistant strains of shellfish, environmental manipulation (dredging of grow. ing areas, chemical has ex- panded, it has become evident that disease, among other environmental variables, can drasPRINCIPAL DISEASES OF COMMERCIALLY IMPORTANT MARINE BIVALVE MOLLUSCA AND CRUSTACEA By Carl J

279

Disparities in Emergency Department Quality of Care among Patients with and without Coronary Heart Disease Diagnoses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coronary heart disease and heart attack, and perceive theyheart disease and heart attack, and tend to perceive thatfor heart disease and heart attack, and do not recognize

Sammartinova, Jitka

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Impact of Palivizumab on RSV Hospitalizations for Children with Hemodynamically Significant Congenital Heart Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in infants with congenital heart disease. Pediatrics 114:children with congenital heart disease. The Cardiac StudySigni?cant Congenital Heart Disease Ruey-Kang R. Chang

Chang, Ruey-Kang R.; Chen, Alex Y.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Smoking and Ischemic Heart Disease Disparities Between Studies, Genders, Times, and Socioeconomic Strata  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

predictors of coronary heart disease among women. Americanon the risk for coronary heart disease even stronger thanx Smoking and Ischemic Heart Disease Disparities Between

Leistikow, Bruce N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute diarrhoeal disease Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(collectively) the diarrhoeal diseases. Each... .4. Diarrhoeal diseases 4.4.1. Deprive resources needed to fight disease The most common fatal complication... arising from...

283

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced eye disease Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Safety PRogRam Summary: . Leptospirosis Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease that causes abortion, eye problems and kidney disease... Horse Transmitted DiseasesSaddle Up SAFELY...

284

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute kawasaki disease Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nile Virus and Encephalitis; Kawasaki disease that may be transmitted by an unknown... problems. Vector borne diseases and Kawasaki Disease are two areas CAPCCCC are currently...

285

Analysis of Dose Response for Circulatory Disease After Radiotherapy for Benign Disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the shape of the dose-response for various circulatory disease endpoints, and modifiers by age and time since exposure. Methods and Materials: This was an analysis of the US peptic ulcer data testing for heterogeneity of radiogenic risk by circulatory disease endpoint (ischemic heart, cerebrovascular, other circulatory disease). Results: There were significant excess risks for all circulatory disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.082 (95% CI 0.031-0.140), and ischemic heart disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.102 (95% CI 0.039-0.174) (both p = 0.01), and indications of excess risk for stroke. There were no statistically significant (p > 0.2) differences between risks by endpoint, and few indications of curvature in the dose-response. There were significant (p < 0.001) modifications of relative risk by time since exposure, the magnitude of which did not vary between endpoints (p > 0.2). Risk modifications were similar if analysis was restricted to patients receiving radiation, although the relative risks were slightly larger and the risk of stroke failed to be significant. The slopes of the dose-response were generally consistent with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in occupationally and medically exposed groups. Conclusions: There were excess risks for a variety of circulatory diseases in this dataset, with significant modification of risk by time since exposure. The consistency of the dose-response slopes with those observed in radiotherapeutically treated groups at much higher dose, as well as in lower dose-exposed cohorts such as the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and nuclear workers, implies that there may be little sparing effect of fractionation of dose or low-dose-rate exposure.

Little, Mark P., E-mail: mark.little@nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Kleinerman, Ruth A. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mabuchi, Kiyohiko [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A study of the pecan shuck disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

29 Micro. 28 + Macro. 27 10 11 Cyprex 12 33 Mi cro . 34 + Zinc 35 36 37 Zinc 38 26 25 24 23 22 21 Micro. Cyprex + Macro. 13 Cyprex 14 + Micro. 15 16 Cyprex 17 + Zinc 18 0 I a 'o tU 4J m w 4J o 39 20 19... in the study of the effect of various treatments on the incidence of pecan shuck disease. 12 Fig. 3-3. John Bean sprayer used to make the foliar applications of zinc, Cyprex fungicide and microelements. A) Front view, B) Side view. 13 Table 3...

Williams, James Mclaren

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Chemicals for Plant Disease Control at Home  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

name/type Product name Brand T/O V F 1. biological Serenade Garden Disease Control Agraquest y y y 2. botanical Lawn & Turf Fungicide Garlic GP y n n E-rase RTU Monterey y y y Organic Rose & Flower Spray Greenlight y n n Paradigm Parkway Research y n n... product Oil and Lime Sulfur Bonide y n y 8. mancozeb Mancozeb Flowable Bonide y y n Dithane M-45 Southern Ag y y n 9. maneb Maneb Garden Fungicide Hi-Yield y y n 10. myclobutanil F-Stop Fertilome y n n Fung-Away Systemic Lawn Fungicide Granules Greenlight...

Ong, Kevin

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

diseases based upon common toxicogenomic profiles at CTD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) is a free resource that describes chemical-gene-disease networks to help understand the effects of environmental exposures on human health. The database contains more than 13,500 chemical-disease and 14,200 gene-disease interactions. In CTD, chemicals and genes are associated with a disease via two types of relationships: as a biomarker or molecular mechanism for the disease (M-type) or as a real or putative therapy for the disease (T-type). We leveraged these curated datasets to compute similarity indices that can be used to produce lists of comparable diseases (DiseaseComps) based upon shared toxicogenomic profiles. This new metric now classifies diseases with common molecular characteristics, instead of the traditional approach of using histology or tissue of origin to define the disorder. In the dawning era of personalized medicine, this feature provides a new way to view and describe diseases and will help develop testable hypotheses about chemical-gene-disease networks. Availability: CTD is freely available at

Allan Peter Davis; Michael C. Rosenstein; Thomas Conrad Wiegers; Carolyn J. Mattingly

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult kawasakis disease Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Starvation nutritional deficiencies Concurrent diseasesConcurrent diseases Poor immunoglobulin levelsPoor immunoglobulin... facilities RenderedRendered--product...

290

FISH CONSUMPTION, METHYLMERCURY, AND HUMAN HEART DISEASE.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental mercury continues to be of concern to public health advocates, both in the U.S. and abroad, and new research continues to be published. A recent analysis of potential health benefits of reduced mercury emissions has opened a new area of public health concern: adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, which could account for the bulk of the potential economic benefits. The authors were careful to include caveats about the uncertainties of such impacts, but they cited only a fraction of the applicable health effects literature. That literature includes studies of the potentially harmful ingredient (methylmercury, MeHg) in fish, as well as of a beneficial ingredient, omega-3 fatty acids or ''fish oils''. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently certified that some of these fat compounds that are primarily found in fish ''may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease''. This paper briefly summarizes and categorizes the extensive literature on both adverse and beneficial links between fish consumption and cardiovascular health, which are typically based on studies of selected groups of individuals (cohorts). Such studies tend to comprise the ''gold standard'' of epidemiology, but cohorts tend to exhibit a great deal of variability, in part because of the limited numbers of individuals involved and in part because of interactions with other dietary and lifestyle considerations. Note that eating fish will involve exposure to both the beneficial effects of fatty acids and the potentially harmful effects of contaminants like Hg or PCBs, all of which depend on the type of fish but tend to be correlated within a population. As a group, the cohort studies show that eating fish tends to reduce mortality, especially due to heart disease, for consumption rates up to about twice weekly, above which the benefits tend to level off. A Finnish cohort study showed increased mortality risks in the highest fish-consuming group ({approx}3 times/wk), which had mercury exposures (mean hair content of 3.9 ppm) much higher than those seen in the United States. As an adjunct to this cursory review, we also present some new ''ecological'' analyses based on international statistics on hair Hg, fish consumption, other dietary and lifestyle factors, and selected cardiovascular health endpoints. We searched for consistent differences between primarily fish-consuming nations, like Japan or the Seychelles, and others who traditionally eat much less fish , such as in central Europe, for example. We use data on cigarette sales, smoking prevalence surveys, and national lung cancer mortality rates to control for the effects of smoking on heart disease. These ecological analyses do not find significant adverse associations of either fish consumption or hair Hg with cardiovascular health; instead, there is a consistent trend towards beneficial effects, some of which are statistically significant. However, such ecological studies cannot distinguish differences due to variations in individual rates of fish consumption. We conclude that the extant epidemiological evidence does not support the existence of significant heart disease risks associated with mercury in fish, for the United States. The most prudent advice would continue to be that of maintaining a well-balanced diet, including fish or shellfish at least once per week. There may be additional benefits from fatty fish.

LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

291

Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) meets the requirements and management practices of federal regulation 10 CFR 850, 'Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP).' This revision of the LLNL CBDPP incorporates clarification and editorial changes based on lessons learned from employee discussions, observations and reviews of Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and commercial industry beryllium (Be) safety programs. The information is used to strengthen beryllium safety practices at LLNL, particularly in the areas of: (1) Management of small parts and components; and (2) Communication of program status to employees. Future changes to LLNL beryllium activities and on-going operating experience will be incorporated into the program as described in Section S, 'Performance Feedback.'

Lee, S

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

292

Infectious Disease Proteome Biomarkers: Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research for the DOE Infectious Disease Proteome Biomarkers focused on Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus (VEEV). RVFV and VEEV are Category A and B pathogens respectively. Among the priority threats, RVFV and VEEV rank high in their potential for being weaponized and introduced to the United States, spreading quickly, and having a large health and economic impact. In addition, they both have live attenuated vaccine, which allows work to be performed at BSL-2. While the molecular biology of RVFV and VEEV are increasingly well-characterized, little is known about its host-pathogen interactions. Our research is aimed at determining critical alterations in host signaling pathways to identify therapeutics targeted against the host.

Bailey, Charles L.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

Automated diagnostic kiosk for diagnosing diseases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An automated and autonomous diagnostic apparatus that is capable of dispensing collection vials and collections kits to users interesting in collecting a biological sample and submitting their collected sample contained within a collection vial into the apparatus for automated diagnostic services. The user communicates with the apparatus through a touch-screen monitor. A user is able to enter personnel information into the apparatus including medical history, insurance information, co-payment, and answer a series of questions regarding their illness, which is used to determine the assay most likely to yield a positive result. Remotely-located physicians can communicate with users of the apparatus using video tele-medicine and request specific assays to be performed. The apparatus archives submitted samples for additional testing. Users may receive their assay results electronically. Users may allow the uploading of their diagnoses into a central databank for disease surveillance purposes.

Regan, John Frederick; Birch, James Michael

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

294

Optical detection dental disease using polarized light  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polarization sensitive optical imaging system is used to detect changes in polarization in dental tissues to aid the diagnosis of dental disease such as caries. The degree of depolarization is measured by illuminating the dental tissue with polarized light and measuring the polarization state of the backscattered light. The polarization state of this reflected light is analyzed using optical polarimetric imaging techniques. A hand-held fiber optic dental probe is used in vivo to direct the incident beam to the dental tissue and collect the reflected light. To provide depth-resolved characterization of the dental tissue, the polarization diagnostics may be incorporated into optical coherence domain reflectometry and optical coherence tomography (OCDR/OCT) systems, which enables identification of subsurface depolarization sites associated with demineralization of enamel or bone.

Everett, Matthew J. (Livermore, CA); Colston, Jr., Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Sathyam, Ujwal S. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Fried, Daniel (San Francisco, CA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute encephalitis syndrome Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20 Environmental Health & Health & Disease Summary: Human Transport of Disease SARS The Cough Heard Round the World Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome 2003 1... disease related...

296

Does aluminum smelting cause lung disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evidence concerning a relationship between work in the aluminum industry and lung disease has been reviewed using epidemiologic criteria. Adequate data on environmental exposure are rarely presented. Case series on aluminum potroom workers over the past 50 years have identified an asthmalike syndrome that appears to be due to an irritant rather than an allergic mechanism. These studies have been supported by evidence of within shift variability of measures of lung function. However, to date, there is inadequate evidence to resolve the question of whether potroom exposure initiates asthma or merely precipitates asthmalike symptoms in a predisposed individual. Cross-sectional studies have demonstrated evidence of reduced lung function, consistent with chronic airflow limitation. In exposed aluminum smelter workers compared to unexposed control subjects. Cigarette smoking, the major potential confounding variable, has been measured and accounted for in multivariate analyses. To date, evidence is lacking from longitudinal studies about the development of disabling chronic obstructive lung disease. Exposure to coal tar pitch volatiles in the production and consumption of anodes has biologic plausibility for an association of lung cancer with work in an aluminum smelter. Although retrospective mortality studies have failed to account for the probable high prevalence of smoking in blue collar workers, the relative risk of lung cancer is very low if present at all. Pulmonary fibrosis has not been shown to be a significant problem in aluminum smelter workers. Future research in the aluminum industry needs to concentrate on longitudinal studies, preferably with an inception cohort for the investigation of potroom asthma. 92 references.

Abramson, M.J.; Wlodarczyk, J.H.; Saunders, N.A.; Hensley, M.J.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Genomics of emerging infectious disease: A PLoS collection.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Origins and evolutionary genomics of the 2009 swine-originan Infectious Diseases Genomics Project predict and preventRavel J (2009) The role of genomics in the identification,

Eisen, Jonathan A; MacCallum, Catriona J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

ORNL, UTGSM study compares structures of Huntington's disease...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ORNL, UTGSM study compares structures of Huntington's disease protein Researchers used neutron scattering experiments to clarify structural differences between the normal (left)...

299

Strategies of survival; lectures on population, disease, war, famine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lectures on the theories of Malthus, and on disease, war and famine, including theories of McKeown, Adam Smith and Amartya Sen...

Macfarlane, Alan

2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

300

aleutian disease virus: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cause diseases with long incubation periods, insidious onsets, and slowly progressive courses (1). The members of the virus group include visna virus of sheep, caprine...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

adnexal diseases: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

diseases Ulcer treatment has been revolutionized by recently discovered knowledge about Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium commonly found in the human gastrointestinal tract. These...

302

avium complex disease: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Characterizing SNP-Disease Associations Using Bayesian Networks University of Kansas - KU ScholarWorks Summary: of computational methods in epistatic interaction...

303

E-Print Network 3.0 - atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the molecular Summary: .Riou@ujf-grenoble.fr > LMR and AB equally contributed to this work Abstract Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading... ; vulnerable coronary...

304

Mitochondrial DNA variants observed in Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD) were sought by restriction endonuclease analysis in a cohort of 71 late-onset Caucasian patients. A tRNA[sup Gln] gene variant at nucleotide pair (np) 4336 that altered a moderately conserved nucleotide was present in 9/173 (5.2%) of the patients surveyed but in only 0.7% of the general Caucasian controls. One of these patients harbored an additional novel 12S rRNA 5-nucleotide insertion at np 956-965, while a second had a missense variant at np 3397 that converted a highly conserved methionine to a valine. This latter mutation was also found in an independent AD + PD patient, as was a heteroplasmic 16S rRNA variant at np 3196. Additional studies will be required to determine the significance, if any, of these mutations. 122 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Shoffner, J.M.; Brown, M.D.; Torroni, A.; Lott, M.T.; Cabell, M.F.; Mirra, S.S.; Yang, C.C.; Gearing, M.; Salvo, R. (Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)); Beal, M.F. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)) (and others)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

An extensive analysis of modified nanotube surfaces for next-generation orthopedic implants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of cemented versus cementless press-fit condylar total kneecemented implants or press-fit implants. For cemented boneThe second approach is to use press-fit implants, which are

Frandsen, Christine Jeanette

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

An extensive analysis of modified nanotube surfaces for next-generation orthopedic implants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nanotubes for improved dye-sensitized solar cells. Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy.energy of the Ti-O bond (323 kJ/mol) to the fact that TiO 2 nanotubes

Frandsen, Christine Jeanette

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Evaluation of Biomimetic and Alloy-based Materials for Orthopedic Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

then polished to a 0.3 ?m finish using silicon carbide paper followed by alumina colloidal powder on all sides. 2.3.2. Polyelectrolyte coating fabrication Two sets of homogenized NiMnSn samples were coated using layer-by-layer assembly via dip... in the presence of alloy specimens or metal controls (Ni, Mn, Sn) for a period of 14 days, as described in the following sections. 2.3.3.1. Polymer synthesis PEGDA was prepared by combining 0.1 mmol/mL dry PEG (6 kDa; Sigma), 0.4 mmol/mL acryloyl...

Guiza-Arguello, Viviana R.

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

308

Low temperature solution deposition of calcium phosphate coatings for orthopedic implants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calcium phosphate coatings were grown from aqueous solution onto a derivatized self-assmebled monolayer (SAM) which was covalently bound to a titanium metal substrate. The SAM molecules provided an idea connection between the metal surface and the calcium phosphate coating. The trichlorosilane terminus of the SAM molecule insured covalent attachment to the surface, while the functionalized ``tail`` induced heterogeneous nucleation of the calcium phosphate coating from supersaturated solutions. This low temperature process allowed for uniform coatings to be produced onto complex-shaped and/or microporous surfaces and provided better control of phase purity.

Campbell, A.A.; Graff, G.L.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

SmartCast - Novel Textile Sensors for Embedded Pressure Sensing of Orthopedic Casts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

>. [4] Buechley, Leah. "LilyPad Arduino: How an Open SourceSD Card by calling the Arduino * SD Card library functionson return code from Arduino library * Inputs: * Outputs:

Danilovic, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

An extensive analysis of modified nanotube surfaces for next-generation orthopedic implants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nanotube arrays in dye-sensitized solar cells. Nano Letters,for improved dye-sensitized solar cells. Journal ofJin. Enhancement of dye sensitized solar cell efficiency by

Frandsen, Christine Jeanette

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

ArthroNav:Computer Assisted Navigation System for Orthopedic Surgery using Endoscopic Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Coimbra Coimbra, Portugal jpbar@{deec.uc.pt, isr of the endoscopic lens. We intend to adapt/design new computer vision techniques invariant to the numerous the procedure, the injured ligament is removed, and drill holes are open on the tibia Jo~ao. P. Barreto

Barreto, Joao

312

Development of an orthopedic load cell for stress analysis of a canine tibia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Ontario, Canada, pp. 91-97. 54 APPENDIX I NOTATION The following symbols are used in this thesis: ai = counterclockwise angle from the Z axis on the cross section of the shaft of the load cell to the location of gage i. A = area of the cross.... The anticipated loads are difficult to predict, yet they are critical when designing the cell. It must be small enough to have sufficient strain induced that can be accurately measured by the strain gages. The cell, however, must also be large enough...

Green, Bryan Wade

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Using yeast to study neurodegenerative diseases : amyloid formation as a protective mechanism and a new Alzheimer's disease model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerous neurodegenerative diseases are pathologically characterized by idiosyncratic protein amyloid inclusions. Not surprisingly amyloid fibrils have long been proposed to be the toxic protein species in these neurodegenerative ...

Treusch, Sebastian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Do changes in traditional coronary heart disease risk factors over time explain the association between socio-economic status and coronary heart disease?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

case-control study. Heart 2009, Franks P, Tancredi DJ,status in coronary heart disease risk estimation. Ann Famstatus and coronary heart disease risk prediction. JAMA

Franks, Peter; Winters, Paul C; Tancredi, Daniel J; Fiscella, Kevin A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Inherited Neuronal Ion Channelopathies: New Windows on Complex Neurological Diseases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cause of these diseases. Key words: sodium channels; calcium channels; epilepsy; migraine; pain; genetic diseases Introduction Voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels are closely related members of the ion­IV), which each consists of six -helical trans- membrane segments (S1­S6) and a pore loop connecting S5 and S

Meisler, Miriam

316

Harnessing plasticity to understand learning and treat disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harnessing plasticity to understand learning and treat disease Michael P. Kilgard The University, USA A large body of evidence suggests that neural plasticity contributes to learning and disease. Recent studies sug- gest that cortical map plasticity is typically a transient phase that improves

Kilgard, Michael P.

317

Diseases of plantation forestry trees in eastern and southern Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diseases of plantation forestry trees in eastern and southern Africa J. Roux a*, G. Meke b , B are being allocated to the training of forestry staff andtreeimprovement.Theseefforts,aimedatstrengtheningthe forestry business, also embrace research on pests and diseases that might significantly reduce the value

318

Arsenic in drinking water Increases mortality from cardiovascular disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arsenic in drinking water Increases mortality from cardiovascular disease Allan H Smith professor of inorganic arsenic in drinking water causes cancer of the skin, bladder, lung, liver, and kidney.1 2 Mounting of a link between cardiovascular disease and arsenic in drinking water came in 1980 from Antofagasta, Chile

California at Berkeley, University of

319

Development and Characterization of A Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed candidate multiplexed assays that may potentially be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the ability to improve our nation's capability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect food and agricultural resources with a diagnostic test which could enhance the nation's capabilities for early detection of a foreign animal disease. In FY2005 with funding from the DHS, LLNL developed the first version (Version 1.0) of a multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based RT-PCR assay that included signatures for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases (FADs) of swine, Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease Virus (SVDV), and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus [BPSV], Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). In FY06, LLNL has developed Bovine and Porcine species-specific panel which included existing signatures from Version 1.0 panel as well as new signatures. The MUX RT-PCR porcine assay for detection of FMDV includes the FADs, VESV and SVD in addition to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). LLNL has also developed a MUX RT-PCR bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine FADs malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitus virus (BHV-1), bluetongue virus (BTV), and the Parapox viruses (which are of two bovine types) bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) and psuedocowpox (PCP). A timeline for this development is presented in Table 1. The development of the Version 1.0 panel for FMDV rule-out and the most current efforts aimed to designed species specific panels has spanned over 2 1/2 years with multiple collaborative partnerships. This document provides a summary of the development, testing and performance data at OIE Stage 1 Feasibility into Stage 2 Assay Development and Standardization1 (see Table 2), gathered as of June 30th, 2007 for the porcine and bovine MUX assay panels. We present an overview of the identification and selection of candidate genetic signatures, the assay development process, and preliminary performance data for each of the individual signatures as characterized in the multiplexed format for the porcine and bovine panels. The Stage 1 Feasibility data of the multiplexed panels is presented in this report also includes relevant data acquired from the Version 1.0 panel as supporting information where appropriate. In contrast to last years effort, the development of the bovine and porcine panels is pending additional work to complete analytical characterization of FMDV, VESV, SVD, RPV and MCF. The signature screening process and final panel composition impacts this effort. The unique challenge presented this year was having strict predecessor limitations in completing characterization, where efforts at LLNL must precede efforts at PIADC, such challenges were alleviated in the 2006 reporting by having characterization data from the interlaboratory comparison and at Plum Island under AgDDAP project. We will present an addendum at a later date with additional data on the characterization of the porcine and bovine multiplex assays when that data is available. As a summary report, this document does not provide the details of signature generation, evaluation, and testing, nor does it provide spec

Smith, S M; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Vitalis, B; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

320

Foundation for the Support of Research on Alzheimer's Disease and other Neurodegenerative Diseases Synapsis Foundation, Fabrikstrasse 50, CH-8031 Zrich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Foundation for the Support of Research on Alzheimer's Disease and other Neurodegenerative Diseases Synapsis Foundation, Fabrikstrasse 50, CH-8031 Zürich Tel. +41 (0)44 271 35 11, Fax +41 (0)44 271 35 12 Submission Deadline 31st August, 2011 SYNAPSIS FOUNDATION with its research programme "Alzheimer Research

Richner, Heinz

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Development and Characterization of a Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out Supplemental Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed advanced rapid diagnostics that may be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the potential to improve our nation's ability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect animal populations of high economic importance in the United States. Under 2005 DHS funding we have developed multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based PCR assays that combine foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease (SVD) and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1 or Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitus IBR), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus BPSV, Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). Under 2006 funding we have developed a Multiplexed PCR [MUX] porcine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for VESV and SVD foreign animal diseases in addition to one other domestic vesicular animal disease vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and one domestic animal disease of swine porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). We have also developed a MUX bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine foreign animal diseases malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitus virus (BHV-1), bluetongue virus (BTV), and the Parapox viruses which are of two bovine types bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) and psuedocowpox (PCP). This document provides details of signature generation, evaluation, and testing, as well as the specific methods and materials used. A condensed summary of the development, testing and performance of the multiplexed assay panel was presented in a 126 page separate document, entitled 'Development and Characterization of A Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out'. This supplemental document provides additional details of large amount of data collected for signature generation, evaluation, and testing, as well as the specific methods and materials used for all steps in the assay development and utilization processes. In contrast to last years effort, the development of the bovine and porcine panels is pending additional work to complete analytical characterization of FMDV, VESV, VSV, SVD, RPV and MCF. The signature screening process and final panel composition impacts this effort. The unique challenge presented this year was having strict predecessor limitations in completing characterization, where efforts at LLNL must preceed efforts at PIADC, such challenges were alleviated in the 2006 reporting by having characterization data from the interlaboratory comparison and at Plum Island under AgDDAP project. We will present an addendum at a later date with additional data on the characterization of the porcine and bovine multiplex assays when that data is available.

Smith, S; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

322

O R E G O N of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASHINGTON O R E G O N IDAHO HANFORD Summary of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study Summary of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study Final Report F I N A L R E P O R T AbouttheHanfordThyroidDiseaseStudy(HTDS) The Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS) is a study of thyroid disease among people who were exposed

323

Particulate matter and heart disease: Evidence from epidemiological studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The association between particulate matter and heart disease was noted in the mid-nineties of last century when the epidemiological evidence for an association between air pollution and hospital admissions due to cardiovascular disease accumulated and first hypotheses regarding the pathomechanism were formulated. Nowadays, epidemiological studies have demonstrated coherent associations between daily changes in concentrations of ambient particles and cardiovascular disease mortality, hospital admission, disease exacerbation in patients with cardiovascular disease and early physiological responses in healthy individuals consistent with a risk factor profile deterioration. In addition, evidence was found that annual average PM{sub 2.5} exposures are associated with increased risks for mortality caused by ischemic heart disease and dysrhythmia. Thereby, evidence is suggesting not only a short-term exacerbation of cardiovascular disease by ambient particle concentrations but also a potential role of particles in defining patients' vulnerability to acute coronary events. While this concept is consistent with the current understanding of the factors defining patients' vulnerability, the mechanisms and the time-scales on which the particle-induced vulnerability might operate are unknown.

Peters, Annette [GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Epidemiology, Ingolstaedter Landstr. 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)]. E-mail: peters@gsf.de

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Associations of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations, VOCS, environmental susceptibilities with mucous membrane and lower respiratory sick building syndrome symptoms in the BASE study: Analyses of the 100 building dataset  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the 100 office-building Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study dataset, we performed multivariate logistic regression analyses to quantify the associations between indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} (dCO{sub 2}) concentrations and mucous membrane (MM) and lower respiratory system (Lresp) Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. Using principal components analysis we identified a number of possible sources of 73 measured volatile organic compounds in the office buildings, and assessed the impact of these VOCs on the probability of presenting the SBS symptoms. Additionally we included analysis adjusting for the risks for predisposition of having SBS symptoms associated with the allergic, asthmatic, and environmentally sensitive subpopulations within the office buildings. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for statistically significant, dose-dependant associations (p<0.05) for dry eyes, sore throat, nose/sinus congestion, and wheeze symptoms with 100-ppm increases in dCO{sub 2} ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. These results suggest that increases in the ventilation rates per person among typical office buildings will, on average significantly reduce the prevalence of several SBS symptoms, up to 80%, even when these buildings meet the existing ASHRAE ventilation standards for office buildings. VOC sources were observed to play an role in direct association with mucous membrane and lower respiratory irritation, and possibly to be indirectly involved in indoor chemical reactions with ozone that produce irritating compounds associated with SBS symptoms. O-xylene, possibly emitted from furniture coatings was associated with shortness of breath (OR at the maximum concentration = 8, p < 0.05). The environmental sensitivities of a large subset of the office building population add to the overall risk of SBS symptoms (ORs ranging from 2 to above 11) within the buildings.

Apte, M.G.; Erdmann, C.A.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Red Blood cell Alloimmunization in Sickle Cell Disease: Pathophysiology, Risk Factors, and Transfusion Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Red Blood cell Alloimmunization in Sickle Cell Disease: Pathophysiology, Risk Factors; email: france.noizat-pirenne@efs.sante.fr Keywords: sickle cell disease, alloimmunization, DHTR with sickle cell disease (SCD). Transfusions can lead to erythrocyte alloimmunization, however, with serious

Boyer, Edmond

326

Medicating race : heart disease and durable preoccupations with difference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation is an examination of intersections of race, pharmaceuticals, and heart disease over the course of the 20th century and today. Each of these parts has had a dynamic history, and when they are invoked ...

Pollock, Anne, 1975-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Correlates of Hippocampal Neuron Number in Alzheimer's Disease and Ischemic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

White, MD,6 and Helena C. Chui, MD7 The cornu ammonis 1 region of the hippocampus (CA1) sector-vessel disease, and leukoariosis.1 The cornu ammonis 1 region of the hippocampus (CA1) sector of hippocampus

California at Davis, University of

328

Real-time Raman system for in vivo disease diagnosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Raman spectroscopy has been well established as a powerful in vitro method for studying biological tissue and diagnosing disease. The recent development of efficient, high-throughput, low-background optical fiber Raman ...

Motz, Jason T.

329

Quantitative Neuroimaging : : Applications to Normal Aging and Neurodegenerative Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and metabolism of lipoproteins. Ann Endocrinol 44(1), 59-65.Disease by Elizabeth Ann Murphy Doctor of Philosophy ina tale of two proteins. Ann Neurol. 2006;59(3);449-458.

Murphy, Elizabeth Ann

330

alzheimers disease neuroimaging: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Learning Brain Connectivity of Alzheimer's Disease from Neuroimaging Data Mathematics Websites...

331

Striatal origin of the pathologic beta oscillations in Parkinson's disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhanced oscillations at beta frequencies (830 Hz) are a signature neural dynamic pathology in the basal ganglia and cortex of Parkinson's disease patients. The mechanisms underlying these pathological beta oscillations ...

Boyden, Edward Stuart

332

Modelling power-law spread of infectious diseases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short-time human travel behaviour can be well described by a power law with respect to distance. We incorporate this information in space-time models for infectious disease surveillance data to better capture the dynamics of disease spread. Two previously established model classes are extended, which both decompose disease risk additively into endemic and epidemic components: a space-time point process model for individual point-referenced data, and a multivariate time series model for aggregated count data. In both frameworks, the power-law spread is embedded into the epidemic component and its decay parameter is estimated simultaneously with all other unknown parameters using (penalised) likelihood inference. The performance of the new approach is investigated by a re-analysis of individual cases of invasive meningococcal disease in Germany (2002-2008), and count data on influenza in 140 administrative districts of Southern Germany (2001-2008). In both applications, the power-law formulations substantially ...

Meyer, Sebastian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Collaborative Help in Chronic Disease Management: Supporting Individualized Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collaborative Help in Chronic Disease Management: Supporting Individualized Problems ABSTRACT for how diabetes patient support groups help one another find individualized strategies for managing diabetes community, and interviews, we found several help interactions that are critical in helping

Anderson, Richard

334

A biophysical marker of severity in sickle cell disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The search for predictive indicators of disease has largely focused on molecular markers. However, biophysical markers, which can integrate multiple pathways, may provide a more global picture of pathophysiology. Sickle ...

Mahadevan, L.

335

452 Plant Disease / Vol. 82 No. 5 A. R. Biggs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

452 Plant Disease / Vol. 82 No. 5 A. R. Biggs West Virginia University, Kearneysville G. G. Grove-illustrated "fact sheets" Dr. Biggs' address is: West Virginia University, University Experiment Farm, P. O. Box 609

Biggs, Alan R.

336

Status Report, Department of Energy's Chronic Beryllium Disease...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of 10 C.F.R. Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program, at the Department of Energy (DOE). The report is based on the results of evaluations of the effectiveness of...

337

CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL ,,~V'CIl'1I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXECUTIVESECRETARY Houk, Vernon N., M.D. Director Center for Environmental Health Centers for Disease Conlrol Atlanla Hahnemann UniversilY Broad and Vine Streets Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19102 Cole, Jerome F., S

338

artery disease involving: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

E. Lundquist; James P. Ward 72 Association of Common Polymorphisms in GLUT9 Gene with Gout but Not with Coronary Artery Disease in a Large Case-Control Study CiteSeer Summary:...

339

autoimmune disease triggered: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disease (PD), to date there is still no definite cause or accepted treatment Hlava, Debbie Joy 2012-01-01 44 One (1) Postdoctoral position available at IMBB-FORTH, Heraklion,...

340

artery disease evaluation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GIUSEPPE, RACHELE 2012-01-01 53 Association of Common Polymorphisms in GLUT9 Gene with Gout but Not with Coronary Artery Disease in a Large Case-Control Study CiteSeer Summary:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

artery disease studied: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pressure Hielscher, Andreas 8 Association of Common Polymorphisms in GLUT9 Gene with Gout but Not with Coronary Artery Disease in a Large Case-Control Study CiteSeer Summary:...

342

artery disease selection: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Andrew J. Lees 1991-01-01 56 Association of Common Polymorphisms in GLUT9 Gene with Gout but Not with Coronary Artery Disease in a Large Case-Control Study CiteSeer Summary:...

343

arterial occlusive disease: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have Chen, Yiling 65 Association of Common Polymorphisms in GLUT9 Gene with Gout but Not with Coronary Artery Disease in a Large Case-Control Study CiteSeer Summary:...

344

artery disease potential: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fo... Yi, Li Ting 2013-01-01 56 Association of Common Polymorphisms in GLUT9 Gene with Gout but Not with Coronary Artery Disease in a Large Case-Control Study CiteSeer Summary:...

345

artery disease comparison: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have Chen, Yiling 45 Association of Common Polymorphisms in GLUT9 Gene with Gout but Not with Coronary Artery Disease in a Large Case-Control Study CiteSeer Summary:...

346

artery disease assessed: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have Chen, Yiling 60 Association of Common Polymorphisms in GLUT9 Gene with Gout but Not with Coronary Artery Disease in a Large Case-Control Study CiteSeer Summary:...

347

arterial occlusive diseases: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have Chen, Yiling 65 Association of Common Polymorphisms in GLUT9 Gene with Gout but Not with Coronary Artery Disease in a Large Case-Control Study CiteSeer Summary:...

348

artery disease outcomes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have Chen, Yiling 53 Association of Common Polymorphisms in GLUT9 Gene with Gout but Not with Coronary Artery Disease in a Large Case-Control Study CiteSeer Summary:...

349

artery disease assessment: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have Chen, Yiling 60 Association of Common Polymorphisms in GLUT9 Gene with Gout but Not with Coronary Artery Disease in a Large Case-Control Study CiteSeer Summary:...

350

artery disease increased: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mervyn J. Monteiro 1997-01-01 52 Association of Common Polymorphisms in GLUT9 Gene with Gout but Not with Coronary Artery Disease in a Large Case-Control Study CiteSeer Summary:...

351

artery occlusive disease: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have Chen, Yiling 65 Association of Common Polymorphisms in GLUT9 Gene with Gout but Not with Coronary Artery Disease in a Large Case-Control Study CiteSeer Summary:...

352

artery disease evaluated: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GIUSEPPE, RACHELE 2012-01-01 53 Association of Common Polymorphisms in GLUT9 Gene with Gout but Not with Coronary Artery Disease in a Large Case-Control Study CiteSeer Summary:...

353

arterial disease study: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pressure Hielscher, Andreas 8 Association of Common Polymorphisms in GLUT9 Gene with Gout but Not with Coronary Artery Disease in a Large Case-Control Study CiteSeer Summary:...

354

arterial disease lack: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have Chen, Yiling 42 Association of Common Polymorphisms in GLUT9 Gene with Gout but Not with Coronary Artery Disease in a Large Case-Control Study CiteSeer Summary:...

355

RESEARCH OF ANIMAL DISEASE INFORMATION SYSTEM BASED ON GIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH OF ANIMAL DISEASE INFORMATION SYSTEM BASED ON GIS TECHNOLOGY Hongbin Wang *, Lin Li, Jing.1007/978-3-642-12220-0_9 #12;2 Hongbin Wang, Lin Li, Jing Dong, Danning Xu, Jing Li distribution. It is evident

Boyer, Edmond

356

Disease Ecology: Community Structure and Pathogen Dynamics [Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BOOKS & MEDIA Disease Ecology: Community Structure and Pathogen Dynamics Sharon K. Collinge and Chris Ray, editors Oxford University Press, Cary, North Carolina, 2006 ISBN: 0198567073 Pages: 227; Price: US $124.50 The disciplines of community...

Peterson, A. Townsend

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Engineering disease resistance with pectate lyase-like genes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mutant gene coding for pectate lyase and homologs thereof is provided, which when incorporated in transgenic plants effect an increased level disease resistance in such plants. Also is provided the polypeptide sequence for the pectate lyase of the present invention. Methods of obtaining the mutant gene, producing transgenic plants which include the nucleotide sequence for the mutant gene and producing improved disease resistance in a crop of such transgenic plants are also provided.

Vogel, John; Somerville, Shauna

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

358

Effect of Insulators on the Expression of betaAS3 in Lentiviral Gene Therapy for Sickle Cell Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

al. (2001). Correction of sickle cell disease in transgenicto human bone marrow for sickle cell disease. Journal ofal. (2011). Correction of sickle cell disease in adult mice

Wherley, Jennifer Patricia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute diarrheal disease Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fever Diarrheal disease caused by a parasite... Human Transport of Disease SARS The Cough Heard Round the World Severe ... Source: Otter, Ryan R. - Department of Biology,...

360

E-Print Network 3.0 - alzheimers disease brain Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September... disease other than incipient Alzheimer's disease, any history of significant brain lesions or head trauma... ... Source: Thompson, Paul - Laboratory of Neuro Imaging,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Rheumatic Heart Disease and Beta-hemolytic Streptococci in Salvador, Brazil: A Study of Slum Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Africa. S Afrthe chain that links the heart to the throat? Lancet Infectchildren with rheumatic heart disease. J Thorac Cardiovasc

Tartof, Sara Yee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

E-Print Network 3.0 - acromegaly cushing disease Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). PPNAD, a rare cause of Cushing's syndrome, is due... is the most common treatment for Cushing's syndrome due to PPNAD. Disease...

363

E-Print Network 3.0 - atypical vogt-koyanagi-harada disease Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

differences in size, form, flower, fruit, foliage, and disease resistant... in the trade; these vary greatly in their aesthetic, size and shape, and disease resistance...

364

E-Print Network 3.0 - atypical kawasaki disease Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

differences in size, form, flower, fruit, foliage, and disease resistant... in the trade; these vary greatly in their aesthetic, size and shape, and disease resistance...

365

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing disease activity Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

> >> 1 MAR 554 -DISEASES OF AQUATIC ORGANISMS (3 credits) Summary: and public health 21. Impact of natural environmental factors on diseases 22. Impact of human activities......

366

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal disease outbreaks Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: animal disease outbreaks Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Economic Consideration of Mitigation of Foreign Animal Disease Introduction * Summary:...

367

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced liver disease Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

useful for advancing therapeutic interventions for individuals with liver disease... diseases (e.g. hepatitis B and hepatitis C infection, toxin-induced liver failure, tyrosinemia...

368

E-Print Network 3.0 - addison disease Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and the Transmission of Infectious Diseases Summary: Tropical Environments, Human Activities, and the Transmission of Infectious Diseases LISA... host-pathogen interactions;...

369

E-Print Network 3.0 - atherosclerotic heart disease Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

heart disease Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atherosclerotic heart disease Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Stent's unique nature may...

370

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne infectious diseases Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics Investigation of airborne foot-and-mouth disease virus transmission during low-wind conditions... ) provides a more de- tailed analysis of the airborne disease...

371

Utilization of Fibroblast Steroidogeic Capacity as a Predictive Marker for Alzheimer's Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the cause of AD must be related to aging Figure 1. Sex Hormone Dyscrasia Following Menopause Post, including coronary heart disease, stroke, Alzheimer's disease and osteoporosis. Since circulating

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

372

Disease-Specific Symptoms and Health-Related Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents with Inflammatory Bowel Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, & Tennen, 2006). Therefore, HRQOL provides valuable information about patient outcomes in terms of successful adaptation to chronic illness (Livneh, 2001; Varni, Burwinkle, & Lane, 2005). Although HRQOL is a broad concept that may encompass a number...; Cortina, McGraw, deAlarcon, Rothenberg, & Drotar, 2010; Varni et al., 2006; Varni et al., 2007). Within the category of gastrointestinal disorders, Crohn?s disease and ulcerative colitis, two conditions subsumed under the overarching disease category...

Vaughan-Dark, Chelsea Ann

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

373

MRI Study on Maple Syrup Urine Disease via the LONI Pipeline With the creation of large image datasets for quantitative disease classification and diagnosis, like the Alzheimer's Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MRI Study on Maple Syrup Urine Disease via the LONI Pipeline Overview: With the creation of large pipeline implementation. Given this need, software tools like STAMPS (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19346025) and the LONI Pipeline (http://pipeline.loni.ucla.edu/) were developed. These tools integrate

Bjørnstad, Ottar Nordal

374

Journal of Alzheimer's Disease xx (20xx) xxx DOI 10.3233/JAD-132483  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Alzheimer's Disease as isoprostanes, neuroprostanes, acrolein, and hydrox- ynonenal (HNE), have also been

Mandal, Pravat K.

375

Seamless Correction of the Sickle Cell Disease Mutation of the HBB Gene in Human Induced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seamless Correction of the Sickle Cell Disease Mutation of the HBB Gene in Human Induced ABSTRACT: Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common human genetic disease which is caused by a single effector nucleases; induced pluripotent stem cells; piggyBac transposon; sickle cell disease; gene therapy

Zhao, Huimin

376

Association Between Celiac Disease and Iron Deficiency in Caucasians, but not Non-Caucasians  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

autoimmune gastritis, Helicobacter pylori and celiac diseaserole of celiac disease, helicobacter pylori, and autoimmune

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Genetic variation in soluble epoxide hydrolase (EPHX2) and risk of coronary heart disease: The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genetic variation in soluble epoxide hydrolase (EPHX2) and risk of coronary heart disease contributes to the development of coronary heart disease (CHD). Soluble epoxide hydrolase metabolizes as a potential cardiovascular disease- susceptibility gene. INTRODUCTION Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major

Hammock, Bruce D.

378

Curr Pharm Des . Author manuscript Bisphosphonates and bone diseases: past, present and future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

involving excessive bone resorption which include post-menopausal osteoporosis, Paget s disease of bone

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

379

Detection of bone disease in dogs by radioisotope scanning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DETECTION OZ BONE DISEASE IN DOGS BY RADIOISOTOPE SCANNING A Thesis EARL LOUIS MORRIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8cM University in partial fulfillment of' the requirement for the degree of MASTER OP SCIENCE May 1971 Major...' Bone Disease in Dogs by Radioisotope Scanning. (May 1971) Earl Louis Morris, B. S. , Texas Ad:I University; B. S. , Texas MM University; D. V. M. , Texas A8cM University; Directed by: Dan Eightower, D. V. M. The use of radioisotope scintiscanning...

Morris, Earl Louis

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Fruit and Nut Disease Control Products for Use in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and/or distributors Contents 3 Fruit and Nut Disease Control PRODUCTS FOR USE IN TEXAS By George L.Philley* his listing of chemicals to control fruit diseases is a reference for county Extension agents and fruit producers in Texas... interval in days DF ?dry flowable F ?flowable L?liquid WDG ?wettable dispersable granule WG ?wettable granule WP?wettable powder days. Example: 7* indicates a 7-day interval from last application to har- vest. At the end of the publication is a listing...

Philley, George L.

2004-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Fish oil can help reduce deaths from heart disease,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the risk of irregu- lar heart beats -- particularly in individuals with a recent heart attack. Paul CoatesFish oil can help reduce deaths from heart disease, according to new evidence reports announced evi- dence that long-chain omega- 3 fatty acids reduce heart at- tack and other problems, re- lated

Bandettini, Peter A.

382

PEBC Breast Cancer Disease Site Group page at:  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evidence-based Series 8-3 was reviewed in 2011 and ARCHIVED by the Melanoma Disease Site Group (DSG) on May 20, 2011. Evidence-based Series (EBS) 8-3 ARCHIVED 2011, the resulting review report, consists of the following 5 parts:

Program In Evidence-based Care (pebc; Cancer Care Ontario (cco

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A Predator-Prey Model with Disease Dynamics Chris Flake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a diseased fish population and their predators. Analysis of the system is performed to determine among the Tilapia fish of the Salton Sea and their predator, the pelican. This model is of interest deaths not only among the fish themselves, but also in the pelican population. Studies have indicated

Logan, David

384

alzheimer disease brain: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alzheimer disease brain First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Brain MRI segmentation for the...

385

GUANYLATE CYCLASE-ACTIVATING PROTEINS AND RETINA DISEASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in visual trans- duction that transcends to other neuronal Ca2+ homeostasis processes Keywords: Calcium, rod hyperpolarize. Open CNG 71 E. Carafoli and M. Brini (eds.), Calcium Signalling and Disease, 71­91. © 2007*, and PDE*). Deactivation of Figure 1. Negative cGMP/Ca2+ feedback loop. Light activates PDE which rapidly

Palczewski, Krzysztof

386

A Unified Framework for MR Based Disease Classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Unified Framework for MR Based Disease Classification Kilian M. Pohl1,2 and Mert R. Sabuncu2 1-hippocampal gyrus. On this small size data set, our approach, which performs classification based on the MR images with the accuracy achieved by state-of-the-art techniques in schizophrenia MRI research. 1 Introduction Thanks to in

Pohl, Kilian M.

387

Rapid communication Identification of a Crohn's disease specific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be due to a combination of factors involving diet, genetic background, immunological responses presented antigen, in individuals with a particular genetic back- ground may be involved in the lack that of their respective proteins appear to be useful as specific markers for unequivocally distinguishing Crohn's disease

Perreault, Jean-Pierre

388

Introduction The number of catalogued emerging infectious diseases (EIDs), and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Perhaps even more immediate than these other factors are the implications of large- scale deforestation on disease emergence. The global rate of tropical deforestation appears to be increasing readily; between of deforestation in parts of Africa are near 1% per year (FAO, 2009). Deforestation is also increasing in temperate

Sehgal, Ravinder

389

Prediction and Informative Risk Factor Selection of Bone Diseases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data and use these integrated features to effectively predict osteoporosis and bone fractures. We; disease memory; osteoporosis; bone fracture. ! 1 INTRODUCTION Risk factor (RF) analysis based on patients on the study of osteoporosis and bone fracture prediction. Over the past few decades, osteoporosis has been

Zhang, Aidong

390

Atlas-Based Hippocampus Segmentation In Alzheimer's Disease and Mild  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atlas-Based Hippocampus Segmentation In Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment Owen T of Chen to align the images to the Harvard atlas, MNI atlas, and randomly-selected, manually state, registration method, choice of atlas, and man- ual tracing protocol on the agreement between

391

An approach for mining care trajectories for chronic diseases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An approach for mining care trajectories for chronic diseases Elias Egho1 ,Nicolas Jay1 , Chedy Ra of chronic patients. In this context, temporal data mining methods are promising tools, though lacking. We show the interest of our approach with the analysis of trajectories of care for colorectal cancer

Boyer, Edmond

392

Real-Time Event Extraction Infectious Disease Outbreaks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; potentially relevant stories are fed to an information extraction engine, whose output is used to update Yangarber roman@cs.nyu.edu ABSTRACT We describe a system for creating and automatically updating a data base of information on infectious disease outbreaks. A web crawler is used to retrieve current news stories

393

Structural Location of Disease-associated Single-nucleotide Polymorphisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural Location of Disease-associated Single-nucleotide Polymorphisms Nathan O. Stitziel1 , Yan-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism (nsSNP) of genes introduces amino acid changes to proteins, and plays reserved Keywords: single-nucleotide polymorphism; alpha shape; hidden Markov model; surface pockets

Pervouchine, Dmitri D.

394

Comparing Online Community Structure of Patients of Chronic Diseases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we compare the social network structure of people talking about Crohn's disease, Cystic Fibrosis, and Type 1 diabetes on Facebook and Twitter. We find that the Crohn's community's contributors are most emotional on Facebook and Twitter and most negative on Twitter, while the T1D community's communication network structure is most cohesive.

Maddali, Hanuma Teja; Margolis, Peter

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

REVIEW ARTICLE Potato soil-borne diseases. A review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW ARTICLE Potato soil-borne diseases. A review Marie Fiers & Véronique Edel /Published online: 24 June 2011 # INRA and Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Potato crop potato and cause severe damages especially on tubers, the economically most impor- tant part of the plant

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

396

Learning Brain Connectivity of Alzheimer's Disease from Neuroimaging Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning Brain Connectivity of Alzheimer's Disease from Neuroimaging Data Shui Huang2 , Jing Li2 to alternation in the functional brain network, i.e., the functional connectivity among different brain regions. In this paper, we consider the problem of learning functional brain connectivity from neuroimaging, which holds

Li, Jing

397

K. A. Garrett and C. M. Cox. Applied biodiversity science: Managing emerging diseases in agriculture and linked natural systems using 1 ecological principles. Pages 368-386 in Infectious disease ecology: The effects of ecosystems on disease and of disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in agriculture and linked natural systems using 1 ecological principles. Pages 368-386 in Infectious disease in Agriculture and Linked Natural Systems Using Ecological Principles K. A. Garrett and C. M. Cox Summary particular crop species or genotypes are very common. Nonetheless, production agriculture is dominated

Garrett, Karen A.

398

Cross-Species Pathogen Transmission and Disease Emergence in Primates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to their rapidly growing human populations, close proximity to apes, and population centers with high density and Ebola, are zoonotic, having shifted from wildlife populations. Critical questions for predicting disease is greatest. We find that central Africa and Amazonia are hotspots for cross-species transmission events

Pedersen, Amy B.

399

Cancer is a genetic disease1 . Although environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cancer is a genetic disease1 . Although environmental and other non-genetic factors have roles in many stages of tumorigenesis,it is widely accepted that cancer arises because of mutations in cancer,however,does not suffice to give rise to full-blown cancer.For progression towards malignancyandinvasion

Nowak, Martin A.

400

PUBLICATION 600-080 Fish Health and Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PUBLICATION 600-080 Fish Health and Disease Striped bass (Morone saxitilis) and hybrid striped bass these fish are commonly raised in high densities under intensive aquaculture situations (e.g., cages, ponds of the viral, bacterial, fungal, and parasitic pathogens, but the fish become increasingly susceptible

Liskiewicz, Maciej

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Invest in Your Bones Osteoporosis--The Silent Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invest in Your Bones Osteoporosis--The Silent Disease Leaflet 2 Osteoporosis, a painful of State Health Services, 2008). Osteoporosis is preventable and/or treatable. Accordingly, osteoporosis of height, and chronic back pain. Hip fracture, the most serious consequence of osteoporosis, threatens one

402

Selection of a multiple disease resistant runner-type peanut  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Four F2:4 populations of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) resulting from the complex cross Tamrun 96 X Tx901639-3 X Sun Oleic 95R were grown in three disease nurseries over a 2 year period. Three separate selection techniques were applied to determine...

Baring, Michael Robert

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

403

Plant pathology Firestop: a chemical against bacterial diseases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant pathology Firestop: a chemical against bacterial diseases of fruit trees recently available Erwinia amylovora (fire blight) in pear and apple, and Pseudomonas syringae pv persicae (bacterial dieback) was as efficient as Bordeaux mixture and less efficient than the conventional antibiotics, streptomycin

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

404

Tropical Environments, Human Activities, and the Transmission of Infectious Diseases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of water sources. The transmission of cholera, a water-borne disease, is related to sanitation practices decades as a consequence of large-scale agricultural development projects that have shifted the nature and quantity of water sources and potential mosquito breeding sites. Dracunculiasis is transmitted by a small

Gottgens, Hans

405

Prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in rural women of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for refining disease burden assessments attributable to household biomass combustion Priscilla Johnson1 January and May 2007. COPD assessments were done using a combination of clinical examination spend !2 hours/day in the kitchen involved in cooking. Use of solid fuel was associated with higher risk

Silver, Whendee

406

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Vessel Sanitation Program is proud to bring to you the following  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:1189-1197 #12;Mechanisms of Legionella Transmission Showers Humidifiers Cooling towers Respiratory therapy pneumophila · Bacteria growing in cooling tower were introduced in the hotel HVAC system NEJM, 297 equipment Whirlpools Faucets #12;Key Points Regarding Transmission · No person-to-person transmission

407

IntroductionIntroduction Mercury: Monitoring Patients with ParkinsonMercury: Monitoring Patients with Parkinson''s Diseases Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IntroductionIntroduction Mercury: Monitoring Patients with ParkinsonMercury: Monitoring Patients's Disease EvaluationEvaluation Mercury ArchitectureMercury Architecture Mercury is a wireless sensor network and disconnections Node Behavior Hardware PlatformHardware Platform Usage Scenario InternetInternet http://fiji.eecs.harvard.edu/Mercury

Chen, Yiling

408

BONE LOSS IN RELATION TO HYPOTHALAMIC ATROPHY IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

considerable burden on the health system, patients, and caregivers. 1.2 Alzheimers Disease and Bone Loss Bone health is an important issue in aging and AD. Osteoporosisrelated fractures are among the major health and socioeconomic concerns in aging... of bone fractures, and a determining factor in clinical diagnosis of osteoporosis (Ammann and Rizzoli 2003). Several studies in women suggest that low BMD is associated with poorer cognitive function and subsequent cognitive decline (Yaffe, Browner et al...

Loskutova, Natalia Y.

2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

409

Design of a numerical model for simulation of blood microcirculation and study of sickle cell disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sickle cell disease is nowadays one of the most challenging blood diseases, where patients suffer from both chronic and acute episodes of painful medical conditions. In particular, unpredictable crises due to blood vessel ...

Le Floch-Yin, Franois T. (Franois Thomas)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Integrated training in Cardiovascular Diseases Sponsored by the Division of Cardiology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and interventional procedures such as percutaneous interventions such as angioplasty and stent placement Knowlton, Division Head I. Major Diseases 1. Coronary artery disease 2. Congestive Heart Failure 3. Cardiac

Gleeson, Joseph G.

411

Fluid and structural modeling of the disease-free and atherosclerotic human carotid bifurcation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. It claims more lives each year than the next 7 leading causes of death combined. Atherosclerosis is a major cause of cardiovascular disease and is ...

Younis, Hesham F. (Hesham Farouk)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

I N T H I S I S S U E Lyme disease communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I N T H I S I S S U E · Lyme disease communication to countryside users · Providing public benefits in private woodlands, causes of wildfires in South Wales and communicating animal disease (Lyme) risks

413

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute vogt-koyanagi-harada disease Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

vogt-koyanagi-harada disease Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acute vogt-koyanagi-harada disease Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 sistent...

414

E-Print Network 3.0 - arthritis disease activity Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: arthritis disease activity Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 CURRICULUM VITAE DANIEL J. McCARTY, M.D. Summary: of Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases, Department...

415

E-Print Network 3.0 - alzheimers disease ad Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: alzheimers disease ad Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 4.2.5 NANOTECHNOLOGY TOWARDS CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE D. Georganopoulu, L. Chang,...

416

E-Print Network 3.0 - amyloid heart disease Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

heart disease Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: amyloid heart disease Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Imaging and In Vivo Quantitation of...

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - arrhythmia-related heart disease Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

arrhythmia-related heart disease Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arrhythmia-related heart disease Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1...

418

assess foot-and-mouth disease: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics Websites Summary: Modelling the spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus F Moutou B Durand CNEVA, Laboratoire Central-and-mouth disease is an economically important viral...

419

Three surveillance systems for describing the spatial distribution of Johne's disease seropositivity in Texas cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution of Johnes disease seropositvity, based on the three surveillance systems, confirmed our hypothesis that estimation of disease distribution is dependant upon the source of surveillance samples....

Pearce, Brielle H.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Mapping local hippocampal changes in Alzheimer's disease and normal ageing with MRI at 3 Tesla  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping local hippocampal changes in Alzheimer's disease and normal ageing with MRI at 3 Tesla and Alzheimer's disease based on high resolution MRI at 3 Tesla. T1-weighted images were acquired from 19

Thompson, Paul

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A common allele on chromosome 9 associated with coronary heart disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. Appleyard, European Heart Journal 3, Suppl H. , H1 (associated with Coronary Heart Disease in whites. Minor9 associated with coronary heart disease Ruth McPherson 1* ,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

E-Print Network 3.0 - ankylosing spondylitis disease Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 5 > >> 1 HLA and Disease Jean Dausset Summary: al (18) 2) As recommended by Macrae & Wright (19) 12;74 of the disease. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS... : the "illness susceptible"...

423

Innovative Alzheimer's disease clinical trial design in the coming age of biomarkers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a field with huge unmet need and only a few symptomatic treatments with limited efficacy have been made available to patients. With the testing of disease-modifying drugs in recent years, the ...

Hillerstrom, Hampus

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane association of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus GP4 glycoprotein and its co-localization with CD163 in lipid rafts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) glycoprotein 4 (GP4) resembles a typical type I membrane protein in its structure but lacks a hydrophilic tail at the C-terminus, suggesting that GP4 may be a lipid-anchored membrane protein. Using the human decay-accelerating factor (DAF; CD55), a known glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) lipid-anchored protein, chimeric constructs were made to substitute the GPI-anchor domain of DAF with the putative lipid-anchor domain of GP4, and their membrane association and lipase cleavage were determined in cells. The DAF-GP4 fusion protein was transported to the plasma membrane and was cleaved by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), indicating that the C-terminal domain of GP4 functions as a GPI anchor. Mutational studies for residues adjacent to the GPI modification site and characterization of respective mutant viruses generated from infectious cDNA clones show that the ability of GP4 for membrane association corresponded to virus viability and growth characteristics. The residues T158 ({omega} - 2, where {omega} is the GPI moiety at E160), P159 ({omega} - 1), and M162 ({omega} + 2) of GP4 were determined to be important for virus replication, with M162 being of particular importance for virus infectivity. The complete removal of the peptide-anchor domain in GP4 resulted in a complete loss of virus infectivity. The depletion of cholesterol from the plasma membrane of cells reduced the virus production, suggesting a role of lipid rafts in PRRSV infection. Remarkably, GP4 was found to co-localize with CD163 in the lipid rafts on the plasma membrane. Since CD163 has been reported as a cellular receptor for PRRSV and GP4 has been shown to interact with this receptor, our data implicates an important role of lipid rafts during entry of the virus.

Du, Yijun [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States) [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Shandong Key Laboratory of Animal Disease Control and Breeding, Institute of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Shandong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Jinan (China); Pattnaik, Asit K. [School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and the Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0900 (United States)] [School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and the Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0900 (United States); Song, Cheng [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States)] [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Yoo, Dongwan, E-mail: dyoo@illinois.edu [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States)] [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Li, Gang, E-mail: dyoo@illinois.edu [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States) [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Institute of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing (China)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

E-Print Network 3.0 - atheromatous cerebrovascular diseases Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information Sciences 3 Cerebrovascular Management & Emerging Therapies Summary: 2010 Stroke & Cerebrovascular Disease Management & Emerging Therapies OCTOBER 30, 2010 ARNOLD... ,...

426

E-Print Network 3.0 - aortic valve disease Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disease, fibrotic... aortic ... Source: Simmons, Craig A. - Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto Collection: Engineering ; Biology and...

427

English walnut rootstocks help avoid blackline disease, but produce less than Paradox hybrid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rootstock selection can help to prevent blackline infection.English walnut rootstocks help avoid blackline disease, but

Grant, Joseph A.; McGranahan, Gale H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced periodontal disease Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

devastating form of periodontal disease. Genetic analysis has revealed a cluster of tad genes responsible... of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Periodontology 20,...

429

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid peptic disease Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

), asthma, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, epilepsy, gastricpeptic ulcer dis- ease, gout, ocular... and systemic hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, and stroke (ischemic...

430

E-Print Network 3.0 - allergic ocular diseases Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

), asthma, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, epilepsy, gastricpeptic ulcer dis- ease, gout, ocular... and systemic hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, and stroke (ischemic...

431

E-Print Network 3.0 - aleutian mink disease virus Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mink lung cells... family (Borna disease ... Source: Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences) Collection: Multidisciplinary Databases and...

432

Proposed measures for the control of three diseases of veterinary public health significance in Bolivia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designed to suppress or eradicate disease has been presented. Plans for the development of effective programs for control of foot-and-mouth disease, brucellosis, and rabies have been presented along with recom- mendations for utilizing a task force... manuscripts of my thesis. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page INTRODUCTION. REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE. Geography Topography. Demography. Livestock Production. 10 Foot-and-Mouth Disease. Veterinary Public Health Aspects of Foot-and-Mouth Disease. 12 Control...

Justiniano, Mario Miguel

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Eur Heart J. Author manuscript History of coronary heart disease and cognitive performance in midlife: the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eur Heart J. Author manuscript Page /1 9 History of coronary heart disease and cognitive: Archana Singh-Manoux Abstract Aims Some studies show coronary heart for this association. Coronary heart disease is a global problem, with the risk of disease shown to increase as12

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

434

Towards an Objective Assessment of Alzheimer's Disease: The Application of a Novel Evolutionary Algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the way out of a large building. It also affects the drawing of simple three- dimensional geometric shapes countries [4]. The disease occurs when the amyloid -protein forms miliary bodies (plaques) and dense bundles conclusions are drawn in Section 5. 2. ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form

Fernandez, Thomas

435

Machine Learning Algorithms for Predicting Severe Crises of Sickle Cell Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Machine Learning Algorithms for Predicting Severe Crises of Sickle Cell Disease Clara Allayous of an acute splenic sequestration crisis (ASSC), a serious symptom of sickle cell disease (SCD). Precisely, in contrast to the logistic regression approach. Keywords and phrases: sickle cell disease, ranking, ROC curve

Emilion, Richard

436

Cost-Sensitive Risk Stratification in the Diagnosis of Heart Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost-Sensitive Risk Stratification in the Diagnosis of Heart Disease Selen Uguroglu and Jaime Pittsburgh, PA 15212 Abstract We investigate machine learning methods for diagnos- tic screening of heart disease. Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in the US, causing more deaths than all

Carbonell, Jaime

437

THe heartTruTH Heart disease is the #1 killer of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THe heartTruTH® #12;Heart disease is the #1 killer of women, but many women do not know they are at risk. The Heart Truth® campaign aims to give women a personal and urgent wake-up call about their risk of heart disease. The red Dress® is the national symbol for women and heart disease awareness introduced

Baker, Chris I.

438

Heart . Author manuscript Effects of depressive symptoms and coronary heart disease and their  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heart . Author manuscript Page /1 11 Effects of depressive symptoms and coronary heart disease separately in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and in populations healthy at study inception and CHD status. OBJECTIVE To examine effects of depressive symptoms and coronary heart disease

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

439

Cardiovascular Disease and Functional Foods: The Effect of Milk Derived Peptides on Hypertension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Cardiovascular Disease and Functional Foods: The Effect of Milk Derived Peptides on Hypertension and Hypertension Cardiovascular disease (CVD) encompasses many conditions including coronary heart disease, heart attack (myocardial infarction), stroke and hypertension. In 2003, CVD accounted for 16.7 million

Nottingham, University of

440

Congestive heart failure: treat the disease, not the symptom: return to normalcy/Part II--the experimental approach.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Congestive heart failure: treat the disease not theTITLE: Congestive heart failure: treat the disease not theGD. Congestive heart failure: treat the disease, not the

Buckberg, Gerald D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The Diet-Heart Hypothesis: a critical appraisal of the relationship between diet and coronary artery disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease. JAMA. 2002;288:M. Fish consumption and coronary heart disease mortality: aacid and risk of ischemic heart disease among women. Am J

Jurewitz, Daniel L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

New England Foot and Mouth Disease Tabletop Exercise  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multiscale Epidemiologic/Economic Simulation and Analysis (MESA) Decision Support System (DSS) is the product of investments that began in FY05 by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate and continue today with joint funding by both DHS and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). The DSS consists of a coupled epidemiologic/economic model, a standalone graphical user interface (GUI) that supports both model setup and post-analysis, and a Scenario Bank archive to store all content related to foreign animal disease (FAD) studies (Figure 1). The MESA epi model is an object-oriented, agent-based, stochastic, spatio-temporal simulator that parametrically models FAD outbreaks and response strategies from initial disease introduction to conclusion over local, regional, and national scales. Through its output database, the epi model couples to an economic model that calculates farm-level impacts from animal infections, responsive control strategies and loss of trade. The MESA architecture contains a variety of internal models that implement the major components of the epi simulation, including disease introduction, intra-herd spread, inter-herd spread (direct and indirect), detection, and various control strategies (movement restrictions, culling, vaccination) in a highly configurable and extensible fashion. MESA will produce both overall and daily summary statistics for the outbreak, epidemic curves, and costs associated with the outbreak. This information can be used to reconstruct and analyze the course of the outbreak. Geographical information produced by MESA can be used to produce maps and movies as visual aids to understand the distribution characteristics of a simulated outbreak.

Hullinger, P

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

Loss of Hsp70 Exacerbates Pathogenesis But Not Levels of Fibrillar Aggregates in a Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Endogenous protein quality control machinery has long been suspected of influencing the onset and progression of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of misfolded proteins. Huntington's disease (HD) ...

Lindquist, Susan

444

Development of Biomarkers for Chronic Beryllium Disease in Mice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beryllium is a strategic metal, indispensable for national defense programs in aerospace, telecommunications, electronics, and weaponry. Exposure to beryllium is an extensively documented occupational hazard that causes irreversible, debilitating granulomatous lung disease in as much as 3 - 5% of exposed workers. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships has been severely limited by a general lack of a sufficient CBD animal model. We have now developed and tested an animal model which can be used for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new diagnostic and treatment paradigms. We have created 3 strains of transgenic mice in which the human antigen-presenting moiety, HLA-DP, was inserted into the mouse genome. Each mouse strain contains HLA-DPB1 alleles that confer different magnitude of risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD): HLA-DPB1*0401 (odds ratio = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (odds ratio = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (odds ratio = 240). Our preliminary work has demonstrated that the *1701 allele, as predicted by human studies, results in the greatest degree of sensitization in a mouse ear swelling test. We have also completed dose-response experiments examining beryllium-induced lung granulomas and identified susceptible and resistant inbred strains of mice (without the human transgenes) as well as quantitative trait loci that may contain gene(s) that modify the immune response to beryllium. In this grant application, we propose to use the transgenic and ?normal inbred strains of mice to identify biomarkers for the progression of beryllium sensitization and CBD. To achieve this goal, we propose to compare the sensitivity and accuracy of the lymphocyte proliferation test (blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) with the ELISPOT test in the three HLA-DP transgenic mice strains throughout a 6 month treatment with beryllium particles. Because of the availability of high-throughput proteomics, we will also identify changes in potential protein biomarkers in beryllium-treated mice. We will correlate these findings with the ability of the transgenic mice to develop a beryllium-specific adaptive immune response in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. We will also determine whether beryllium-responsive CD4+ T cells in blood and BAL correlate with the onset of granuloma formation. Thus, we will provide the scientific community with biomarkers of sensitization and disease progression for CBD. These biomarkers will serve as critical tools for development of improved industrial hygiene and therapeutic interventions.

Gordon, Terry

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

445

Storage and Diseases of the Sweet Potato in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

readily apparent upon casual examination of the lot, and that any damage from the caum mentionecl can be removed by the ordinary process of paring witnout appreciable increase in waste over that which would oc-cur if the sweet potatoes were perfect. d...TEXAS A~~RICUL~~R~L EXPERIMENT STATION AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS W. B. BIZZELL, President BULLETIN TuO. 250 OCTOBER, 1919 EXPERIMENT STATION AND EXTENSION SERVICE COOPERATING STORAGE AND DISEASES OF THE SWEET POTATO...

Youngblood, B. (Bonney)

1919-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Mechanical Assessment of Veterinary Orthopedic Implant Technologies: Comparative Studies of Canine Fracture Fixation and Equine Arthrodesis Devices and Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Clamp-Rod Internal Fixator (CRIF) is a fracture fixation implant with growing popularity among veterinarians for its versatility and ease of use. Although the CRIF is currently in clinical use, relatively few reports exist describing...

Baker, Sean Travis

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

447

Sedation-assisted Orthopedic Reduction in Emergency Medicine: The Safety and Success of a One Physician/One Nurse Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tracking after outpatient anesthesia: a comparison with theGuidelines for the Anesthesia Services Condition of 38.and Revised Hospital Anesthesia Services Interpretive M,

Vinson, David R; Hoehn, Casey

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Respiratory distress with acitretin, reversal by corticosteroid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developed high fever, dry cough and dyspnea while undergoingfor high fever (39.5C), dry cough and dyspnoea. He had beentherapy, fever and dry cough were not improving and his

Cuhadaroglu, Caglar; Korular, Didem; Erelel, Mustafa; Kiyan, Esen; Kiliaslan, Zeki

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Ghosting of Pulmonary Nodules with Respiratory Motion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Usingan InVitro Pediatric Model Gary D. ~ u k e r ' Kyongtae T. Bae Marilyn J. Siegel Steven Don James A: Mallinckrodt lnst~tuteof Radiology, Wash- ington University School of Medicine, 510 S. Kingshigh- way Blvd., St

Virginia Tech

450

Winter Infections: Influenza, Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spread? Sick person can spread influenza by: ­ Touching ­ Sneezing ­ Coughing Picture: newbedfordguide Fever Cough Fatigue (feel "worn out") Headaches Body aches Runny nose #12;Influenza ("Flu") Treatments paralysis) #12;"MythBusters" Reported That: Sneezes can travel ~35 mph Cough/sneeze droplets can travel

Goldman, Steven A.

451

Respiratory Protection Program | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromComments onReplyof Energy Residential NetworkResources

452

Hanford Site Respiratory Protection Program (HSRPP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200cell 9 Hanford Traffic Safety

453

Bead-based microfluidic immunoassay for diagnosis of Johne's disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microfluidics technology offers a platform for development of point-of-care diagnostic devices for various infectious diseases. In this study, we examined whether serodiagnosis of Johne s disease (JD) can be conducted in a bead-based microfluidic assay system. Magnetic micro-beads were coated with antigens of the causative agent of JD, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The antigen-coated beads were incubated with serum samples of JD-positive or negative serum samples and then with a fluorescently-labeled secondary antibody (SAB). To confirm binding of serum antibodies to the antigen, the beads were subjected to flow cytometric analysis. Different conditions (dilutions of serum and SAB, types of SAB, and types of magnetic beads) were optimized for a great degree of differentiation between the JD-negative and JD-positive samples. Using the optimized conditions, we tested a well-classified set of 155 serum samples from JD negative and JD-positive cattle by using the bead-based flow cytometric assay. Of 105 JD-positive samples, 63 samples (60%) showed higher antibody binding levels than a cut-off value determined by using antibody binding levels of JD-negative samples. In contrast, only 43-49 JD-positive samples showed higher antibody binding levels than the cut-off value when the samples were tested by commercially-available immunoassays. Microfluidic assays were performed by magnetically immobilizing a number of beads within a microchannel of a glass microchip and detecting antibody on the collected beads by laser-induced fluorescence. Antigen-coated magnetic beads treated with bovine serum sample and fluorescently-labeled SAB were loaded into a microchannel to measure the fluorescence (reflecting level of antibody binding) on the beads in the microfluidic system. When the results of five bovine serum samples obtained with the system were compared to those obtained with the flow cytometer, a high level of correlation (linear regression, r2 = 0.994) was observed. In a further experiment, we magnetically immobilized antigen-coated beads in a microchannel, reacted the beads with serum and SAB in the channel, and detected antibody binding to the beads in the microfluidic system. A strong antibody binding in JD-positive serum was detected, whereas there was only negligible binding in negative control experiments. Our data suggest that the bead-based microfluidic system may form a basis for development of an on-site serodiagnosis of JD. Key Words: Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis, Johne s disease, microfluidics, lab-on-a-chip.

Wadhwa, Ashutosh [University of Tennessee, Center for Wildlife Health, Department of Forestry; Foote, Robert [ORNL; Shaw, Robert W [ORNL; Eda, Shigetoshi [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

When you hear the term "heart disease," what's your first reaction? Like many women, you may think, "That's a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When you hear the term "heart disease," what's your first reaction? Like many women, you may think, "That's a man's disease." But here's The Heart Truth: Heart disease is the #1 killer of Latinas in the United States. Together with stroke, heart disease accounts for a third of all deaths among Latinas

Bandettini, Peter A.

455

Bisphosphonates and Bone diseases: past, present and future Bisphosphonates are stable analogues of the naturally-occuring inorganic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

involving excessive bone resorption which include post-menopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease of bone

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

456

Ulcerative colitis and steroid-responsive, diffuse interstitial lung disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors describe a patient with ulcerative colitis and extracolonic manifestations in whom diffuse interstitial pulmonary disease developed that was responsive to glucocorticoid therapy one year after total proctocolectomy. The patient presented in December 1983 with a subacute course marked by cough and progressive exertional dyspnea, abnormal chest examination results, and a chest roentgenogram that revealed diffuse interstitital and alveolar infiltrates. A transbronchial biopsy specimen revealed a polymorphic interstitial infiltrate, mild interstitial fibrosis without apparent intraluminal fibrosis, and no vasculitis, granulomas, or significant eosinophilic infiltration. Within one week of the initiation of daily high-dose steroid therapy, the patient's symptoms dramatically improved; chest roentgenogram and forced vital capacity (60%) improved at a slower rate. All three measures deteriorated when alternate-day prednisone therapy was started but once again improved until the patient was totally asymptomatic, chest roentgenograms were normal, and forced vital capacity was 80% of the predicted value 2 1/2 years later.

Balestra, D.J.; Balestra, S.T.; Wasson, J.H.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis.

Morales, J. P.; Taylor, P. R.; Bell, R. E.; Chan, Y. C. [Guy's and St. Thomas' Foundation Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom); Sabharwal, T. [Guy's and St. Thomas' Foundation Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom); Carrell, T. W. G. [Guy's and St. Thomas' Foundation Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom); Reidy, J. F. [Guy's and St. Thomas' Foundation Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom)], E-mail: John.Reidy@gstt.nhs.uk

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Dual-Energy CT Angiography in Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We sought to study the accuracy of dual-energy computed tomographic angiography (DE-CTA) for the assessment of symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease of the lower extremity by using the dual-energy bone removal technique compared with a commercially available conventional bone removal tool. Twenty patients underwent selective digital subtraction angiography and DE-CTA of the pelvis and lower extremities. CTA data were postprocessed with two different applications: conventional bone removal and dual-energy bone removal. All data were reconstructed and evaluated as 3D maximum-intensity projections. Time requirements for reconstruction were documented. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and concordance of DE-CTA regarding degree of stenosis and vessel wall calcification were calculated. A total of 359 vascular segments were analyzed. Compared with digital subtraction angiography, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, respectively, of CTA was 97.2%, 94.1%, and 94.7% by the dual-energy bone removal technique. The conventional bone removal tool delivered a sensitivity of 77.1%, a specificity of 70.7%, and an accuracy of 72.0%. Best results for both postprocessing methods were achieved in the vascular segments of the upper leg. In severely calcified segments, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy stayed above 90% by the dual-energy bone removal technique, whereas the conventional bone removal technique showed a substantial decrease of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. DE-CTA is a feasible and accurate diagnostic method in the assessment of symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Results obtained by DE-CTA are superior to the conventional bone removal technique and less dependent on vessel wall calcifications.

Brockmann, Carolin, E-mail: carolin.brockmann@rad.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Jochum, Susanne; Sadick, Maliha [University of Heidelberg, Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty Mannheim (Germany); Huck, Kurt [University of Heidelberg, I. Medical Clinic, Medical Faculty Mannheim (Germany); Ziegler, Peter [University of Heidelberg, Department of Surgery, Medical Faculty Mannheim (Germany); Fink, Christian; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Diehl, Steffen J. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty Mannheim (Germany)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Characterization of the Meq oncoproteins of Marek's disease virus vaccine strain CVI988/Rispens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the condition in four adult male chickens in 1907 (Biggs, 1961; Marek, 1907). He described the disease as a "polyneuritis" or a ?neuritis interstitialis?, characterized by paralysis of the legs and wings. Grossly, the sacral plexuses and spinal cords were... leukosis virus (Biggs, 1961; Campbel, 1961; Elermann, 1922). Based on susceptibility, organs afected, and histopathogenesis, the disease can be distinguished from lymphoid leucosis and a new name, Marek?s disease, was proposed (Biggs, 1961). Later...

Ajithdoss, Dharani K.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

460

Isolation of the Left Innominate Artery in an Elderly Patient Without Congenital Heart Disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a rare anomaly consisting of a right aortic arch with an isolated left innominate artery in an elderly man without congenital heart disease.

Boren, Edwin L. Jr.; Matchett, W. Jean [Department of Radiology, Slot 556, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72210 (United States); Gagne, Paul J. [Department of Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72210 (United States); McFarland, David R. [Department of Radiology, Slot 556, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72210 (United States)

2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Protein folding stress in neurodegenerative diseases: a glimpse into the ER .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Several neurodegenerative diseases share common neuropathology, primarily featuring the presence in the brain of abnormal protein inclusions containing specific misfolded proteins. Recent evidence indicates that (more)

Matus, Soledad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

E-Print Network 3.0 - aujeszky disease Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: animals, the signs of disease are moderated and may just consist of a mild cough or mucopurulent nasal... studied in equine influenza. Notable exceptions outside the...

463

E-Print Network 3.0 - allergic eye diseases Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measles, mumps, and rubella are serious diseases. Measles Measles virus causes rash, cough, runny nose... , eye irritation, and fever. It can lead to ear infection,...

464

E-Print Network 3.0 - artery disease results Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

? Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is a serious condition that is associated with heart attack and stroke. PAD... results in a narrowing of the arteries that carry blood to...

465

E-Print Network 3.0 - artery disease risk Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as well as powers of 10 to illustrate the magnitude of the research. Summary: factors for heart attack and coronary artery disease include: Bad genes (hereditary factors) ...

466

E-Print Network 3.0 - artery disease caused Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

? Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is a serious condition that is associated with heart attack and stroke. PAD... results in a narrowing of the arteries that carry blood to...

467

E-Print Network 3.0 - addressing chronic disease Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human Development Faculty Research Themes Summary: Cardiovascular and Circulatory Disease W. Larry Kenney Professor Kinesiology Email Address: W7K@PSU.EDU Research... ; the...

468

E-Print Network 3.0 - autosomal dominant diseases Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alexander disease patients ... Source: Kalil, Ronald E. - Neuroscience Training Program & W.M. Keck Laboratory for Biological Imaging, University of Wisconsin at Madison...

469

Edge effects, not connectivity, determine the incidence and development of a foliar fungal plant disease.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a model plant-pathogen system in a large-scale habitat corridor experiment, we found that corridors do not facilitate the movement of wind-dispersed plant pathogens, that connectivity of patches does not enhance levels of foliar fungal plant disease, and that edge effects are the key drivers of plant disease dynamics. Increased spread of infectious disease is often cited as a potential negative effect of habitat corridors used in conservation, but the impacts of corridors on pathogen movement have never been tested empirically. Using sweet corn (Zea mays) and southern corn leaf blight (Cochliobolus heterostrophus) as a model plant-pathogen system, we tested the impacts of connectivity and habitat fragmentation on pathogen movement and disease development at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, USA. Over time, less edgy patches had higher proportions of diseased plants, and distance of host plants to habitat edges was the greatest determinant of disease development. Variation in average daytime temperatures provided a possible mechanism for these disease patterns. Our results show that worries over the potentially harmful effects of conservation corridors on disease dynamics are misplaced, and that, in a conservation context, many diseases can be better managed by mitigating edge effects.

Johnson, Brenda, L.; Haddad, Nick, M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Pediatric Intestinal Failure Associated Liver Disease is Revered with Six Months of Intravenous Fish Oil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Pediatric intestinal failure associated liver disease (IFALD) is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Studies have suggested that when intravenous (IV) soybean oil (SO) (more)

Calkins, Kara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

E-Print Network 3.0 - ameliorate coral disease Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: ameliorate coral disease Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Climate change impedes scleractinian corals as primary reef ecosystem engineers Summary:...

472

E-Print Network 3.0 - alzheimer disease molecular Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wesleyan University Collection: Geosciences 2 COGNITIVE NEUROLOGY AND ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE CENTER Summary: CNADC COGNITIVE NEUROLOGY AND...

473

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal diseases host-pathogen Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization University of Saskatchewan Summary: .vido.org. Candidates are expected to have a strong background in...

474

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymptomatic gallstone disease Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Collection: Biology and Medicine 13 AND THERAPY OF SICKLE CELL DISEASE Summary: S HPFH are asymptomatic and not anemic. Patients with SS or...

475

A Prioritized Research Agenda for Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

haemoglobin disorders (sickle cell disease and thalassae-quality of care for sickle cell anaemia and thalassaemia * *carriers, such as sickle cell anaemia or thalassaemia); (ii)

WHO

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult coeliac disease Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FOR NEW PATIENTS Summary: , Colon, Prostate and Melanoma (Skin) Cancer; Thalassaemia or Sickle Cell, Coeliac Disease, Osteoporosis... YesNo Date(s) Details Diabetes Asthma Heart...

477

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced hiv disease Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry ; Biology and Medicine 44 PRESS RELEA Oct. 28, 2009 Summary: Therapies for Sickle Cell Disease, HIVAIDS and Brain, Ovarian and Colorectal Cancers Three...

478

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute gallbladder disease Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Technologies and Information Sciences ; Biology and Medicine 34 AND THERAPY OF SICKLE CELL DISEASE Summary: experiencing acute or severe exac- erbations of sickle cell...

479

Peripheral arterial disease and osteoporosis in older adults: the Rancho Bernardo Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

calcification and the risk of osteoporosis and fractures. Jarterial disease and osteoporosis in older adults: theassociation between PAD and osteoporosis and bone loss only

von Mhlen, D.; Allison, M.; Jassal, S. K.; Barrett-Connor, E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

E-Print Network 3.0 - atherosclerotic vascular disease Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

provide objective quantitative data characterising Summary: . References: 1. Fact report: Heart, stroke and vascular diseases: AIHW Cat. No. CVD 27. Canberra: AIHW......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "respiratory disease orthopedic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Brain Imaging with Positron Emission Tomography: Quantification and Biomedical Applications in Alzheimer's Disease and Brain Tumors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diseases of the brain can result from errors introduced into its chemical systems by viruses, bacteria, genetic abnormalities, drugs, trauma, environmental

Wardak, Mirwais

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

E-Print Network 3.0 - asbestos related disease Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Asbestos contamination in buildings is a significant environmental problem. Several diseases have... to the performance of emergency asbestos-related jobs. Licensed asbestos...

483

E-Print Network 3.0 - address diet-related diseases Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pigments called... and fertilizers, that resist pests and diseases without the use of chemicals, and have improved nutritional... in India and Bangladesh alone. The global...

484

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic-induced proliferative diseases...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: arsenic-induced proliferative diseases Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Environmental Health Perspectives VOLUME 108 | NUMBER 7 | July 2000 617 Arsenic-Induced Skin...

485

E-Print Network 3.0 - allergic lung disease Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disease and promote... , teaches people with lung ... Source: National Center for Environmental Health- Publications and Products Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 3...

486

E-Print Network 3.0 - artery disease drugs Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Drug Plan Benefit Guide Revised 101510 Summary: artery disease or congestive heart failure) are eligible for the Value-Based Prescription Drug Plan... (Coronary Artery...

487

Gist Memory in Alzheimer's Disease: Evidence From Categorized Pictures Andrew E. Budson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gist Memory in Alzheimer's Disease: Evidence From Categorized Pictures Andrew E. Budson Edith of items (gist memory; Reyna & Brainerd, 1995; Schacter, Norman, & Koutstaal, 1998). We have argued

Schacter, Daniel

488

E-Print Network 3.0 - aggravated creutzfeldt-jacob disease Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proteins are the workhorses of the body, and the enigmatic process... secrets of protein folding that could lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of diseases Source: Daggett,...

489

A fuzzy logic controller for intestinal levodopa infusion in Parkinsons disease.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The aim of this work is to evaluate the fuzzy system for different types of patients for levodopa infusion in Parkinson Disease based on (more)

Jiang, Xiaowen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal disease management Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

certain measures for managing disease and improving livestock performance. Solution... farming in the UK was 3.5 billion. However, ... Source: Reading, University of - School...

491

E-Print Network 3.0 - affected vector-borne diseases Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disease systems... between species diversity and ... Source: Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York; Holt, Robert D. - Department of Biology, University of...

492

Right Ventricular Assessment by Real-time Three-dimensional Echocardiography in Congenital Heart Disease.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??abstractThe remarkable improvement in survival of patients with congenital heart disease has led to a growing number of adult patients. In particular, patients with more (more)

H.B. van der Zwaan (Heleen)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Soil fungicides in relation to cotton seedling disease at various temperature levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to obtain controlled spacing an4 4epth of seed ?hon ylanting, ~, , ~ 18 Xllnotration of seedling disease grades. Xi No evidence of diseases' energed 2 Sprouted' no e?L'donee of disease; no ssLergenoe. 5 Lesion less than three nao in length? 4i Lesion... of disease. 2, Emerged; lesion lees than three nn. long. ~Eaepgedj le&oh learn Qlall I%a ss, 10$$, gl aineb io the non proprietary nano ef sino ?thglene bi sdithiooarhanate. 4. Knerged~ sevorelF lesiono4, but not girdle4. 5? Energed~ dea4 or girdling...

Ranney, Carleton David

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute gastrointestinal disease Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

erythematosus (SLE) 3. Scleroderma (Systemic sclerosis) 4. Crystal induced disease (Gout... : acute and chronic 3. Connective tissue 4. Joints (focus on synovium) 5....

495

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute bacterial diseases Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

erythematosus (SLE) 3. Scleroderma (Systemic sclerosis) 4. Crystal induced disease (Gout... : acute and chronic 3. Connective tissue 4. Joints (focus on synovium) 5....

496

E-Print Network 3.0 - alzheimers disease caregivers Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

group for family caregivers and health... professionals The Alzheimer List is a free public service of the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (ADRC... -mail based support...

497

E-Print Network 3.0 - active disease caused Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Princeton University Press. of foliar diseases caused by polycyclic, specialized, wind... K. A. Garrett and C. M. Cox. Applied biodiversity science: Managing emerging...

498

Development and application of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics methods for disease biomarker identification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human societies face diverse health challenges including a rapidly aging population, rising incidence of metabolic disease, and increasing antibiotic resistance. These problems involve complex interactions between genes ...

Tong, Lily Victoria

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult moyamoya disease Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-intestinal, splenogonadal, and genital abnormalities. Neoplasms, nerve paralysis, Moya-Moya disease, and stroke are seen Source: Ober, Carole - Committee on Genetics &...

500

Holdover inoculum of Pseudomonas syringae pv. alisalensis from broccoli raab causes disease in subsequent plantings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

about P. syringae pv. Plant Disease / August 2006 ABSTRACTsyringae pv. lachrymans in soil, plant debris, and thesyringae pv. tomato populations on field tomato plants.

Cintas, N A; Koike, S T; Bunch, R A; Bull, C T

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z