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Sample records for resource supply estimates

  1. 1992 Conversion Resources Supply Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    In recent years conservation of electric power has become an integral part of utility planning. The 1980 Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Northwest Power Act) requires that the region consider conservation potential in planning acquisitions of resources to meet load growth. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) developed its first estimates of conservation potential in 1982. Since that time BPA has updated its conservation supply analyses as a part of its Resource Program and other planning efforts. Major updates were published in 1985 and in January 1990. This 1992 document presents updated supply curves, which are estimates of the savings potential over time (cumulative savings) at different cost levels of energy conservation measures (ECMs). ECMs are devices, pieces of equipment, or actions that increase the efficiency of electricity use and reduce the amount of electricity used by end-use equipment.

  2. Reliability Estimates for Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee C. Cadwallader; Peter I. Petersen

    2005-09-01

    Failure rates for large power supplies at a fusion facility are critical knowledge needed to estimate availability of the facility or to set priorties for repairs and spare components. A study of the "failure to operate on demand" and "failure to continue to operate" failure rates has been performed for the large power supplies at DIII-D, which provide power to the magnet coils, the neutral beam injectors, the electron cyclotron heating systems, and the fast wave systems. When one of the power supplies fails to operate, the research program has to be either temporarily changed or halted. If one of the power supplies for the toroidal or ohmic heating coils fails, the operations have to be suspended or the research is continued at de-rated parameters until a repair is completed. If one of the power supplies used in the auxiliary plasma heating systems fails the research is often temporarily changed until a repair is completed. The power supplies are operated remotely and repairs are only performed when the power supplies are off line, so that failure of a power supply does not cause any risk to personnel. The DIII-D Trouble Report database was used to determine the number of power supply faults (over 1,700 reports), and tokamak annual operations data supplied the number of shots, operating times, and power supply usage for the DIII-D operating campaigns between mid-1987 and 2004. Where possible, these power supply failure rates from DIII-D will be compared to similar work that has been performed for the Joint European Torus equipment. These independent data sets support validation of the fusion-specific failure rate values.

  3. Colorado Division of Water Resources Substitute Water Supply...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Substitute Water Supply Plans Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Division of Water Resources Substitute Water Supply...

  4. Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests...

  5. An Embarrassment Of Riches- Canada'S Energy Supply Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fuel-mix in Canada from 1870 to 1984, and the current provincial breakdown of energy production and use, we provide a source-by-source review of energy supply resources,...

  6. Power, Optimization, Waste Estimating, Resourcing Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-08-13

    Planning, Optimization, Waste Estimating, Resourcing tool (POWERtool) is a comprehensive relational database software tool that can be used to develop and organize a detailed project scope, plan work tasks, develop bottoms-up field cost and waste estimates for facility Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D), equipment, and environmental restoration (ER) projects and produces resource-loaded schedules.

  7. Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping Analysis.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 22, 2002-July 22, 2002 | Department of Energy Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping Analysis. January 22, 2002-July 22, 2002 Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping Analysis. January 22, 2002-July 22, 2002 A report showing a comparative scooping economic analysis of 19 pathways for producing, handling, distributing, and dispensing hydrogen for fuel cell vehicle applications. 32525.pdf (1.48 MB) More Documents & Publications Analysis of a Cluster

  8. Low-Temperature Hydrothermal Resource Potential Estimate

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Katherine Young

    2016-06-30

    Compilation of data (spreadsheet and shapefiles) for several low-temperature resource types, including isolated springs and wells, delineated area convection systems, sedimentary basins and coastal plains sedimentary systems. For each system, we include estimates of the accessible resource base, mean extractable resource and beneficial heat. Data compiled from USGS and other sources. The paper (submitted to GRC 2016) describing the methodology and analysis is also included.

  9. Time and Resource Estimation Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-06-08

    RESTORE is a computer software tool that allows one to model a complex set of steps required to accomplish a goal (e.g., repair a ruptured natural gas pipeline and restore service to customers). However, the time necessary to complete step may be uncertain and may be affected by conditions, such as the weather, the time of day, the day of the week. Therefore, "nature" can influence which steps are taken and the time needed tomore » complete each step. In addition, the tool allows one to model the costs for each step, which also may be uncertain. RESTORE allows the user to estimate the time and cost, both of which may be uncertain, to achieve an intermediate stage of completion, as well as overall completion. The software also makes it possible to model parallel, competing groups of activities (i.e., parallel paths) so that progreSs at a ‘merge point’ can proceed before other competing activities are completed. For example, RESTORE permits one to model a workaround and a simultaneous complete repair to determine a probability distribution for the earliest time service can be restored to a critical customer. The tool identifies the ‘most active path’ through the network of tasks, which is extremely important information for assessing the most effective way to speed-up or slow-down progress. Unlike other project planning and risk analysis tools, RESTORE provides an intuitive, graphical, and object-oriented environment for structuring a model and setting its parameters.« less

  10. A Review of Geothermal Resource Estimation Methodology | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Resource Estimation Methodology Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: A Review of Geothermal Resource Estimation...

  11. Remote Area Power Supply (RAPS) load and resource profiles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giles, Lauren; Skolnik, Edward G.; Marchionini, Brian; Fall, Ndeye K.

    2007-07-01

    In 1997, an international team interested in the development of Remote Area Power Supply (RAPS) systems for rural electrification projects around the world was organized by the International Lead Zinc Research Organization (ILZRO) with the support of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The team focused on defining load and resource profiles for RAPS systems. They identified single family homes, small communities, and villages as candidates for RAPS applications, and defined several different size/power requirements for each. Based on renewable energy and resource data, the team devised a ''strawman'' series of load profiles. A RAPS system typically consists of a renewable and/or conventional generator, power conversion equipment, and a battery. The purpose of this report is to present data and information on insolation levels and load requirements for ''typical'' homes, small communities, and larger villages around the world in order to facilitate the development of robust design practices for RAPS systems, and especially for the storage battery component. These systems could have significant impact on areas of the world that would otherwise not be served by conventional electrical grids.

  12. NREL: Renewable Resource Data Center - Biomass Resource Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data The following biomass resource data collections can be found in the Renewable Resource Data Center (RReDC). Current Biomass Resource Supply An estimate of biomass resources...

  13. Renewable Resources in the U.S. Electricity Supply

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1993-01-01

    Provides an overview of current and long term forecasted uses of renewable resources in the nation's electricity marketplace, the largest domestic application of renewable resources today.

  14. Wind Resource Estimation and Mapping at the National Renewable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resource Estimation and Mapping at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory April 1999 * NRELCP-500-26245 M. Schwartz Presented at the ASES Solar '99 Conference Portland, Maine...

  15. Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Markets - EAC 2011 | Department of Energy Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 The purpose of this report is to assist the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1) establishing a framework for understanding the role electricity storage resources (storage) can play in wholesale and retail electricity markets, 2) assessing the value of electricity storage in a

  16. Benefits of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation on the Supply, Management, and Use of Water Resources in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strzepek, K.; Neumann, Jim; Smith, Joel; Martinich, Jeremy; Boehlert, Brent; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Henderson, Jim; Wobus, Cameron; Jones, Russ; Calvin, Katherine V.; Johnson, D.; Monier, Erwan; Strzepek, J.; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-11-29

    Climate change impacts on water resources in the U.S. are likely to be far-reaching and substantial, because the water sector spans many parts of the economy, from supply and demand for agriculture, industry, energy production, transportation and municipal use to damages from natural hazards. This paper provides impact and damage estimates from five water resource-related models in the CIRA frame work, addressing drought risk, flooding damages, water supply and demand, and global water scarcity. The four models differ in the water system assessed, their spatial scale, and the units of assessment, but together they provide a quantitative and descriptive richness in characterizing water resource sector effects of climate change that no single model can capture. The results also address the sensitivity of these estimates to greenhouse gas emission scenarios, climate sensitivity alternatives, and global climate model selection. While calculating the net impact of climate change on the water sector as a whole may be impractical, because each of the models applied here uses a consistent set of climate scenarios, broad conclusions can be drawn regarding the patterns of change and the benefits of GHG mitigation policies for the water sector. Two key findings emerge: 1) climate mitigation policy substantially reduces the impact of climate change on the water sector across multiple dimensions; and 2) the more managed the water resources system, the more tempered the climate change impacts and the resulting reduction of impacts from climate mitigation policies.

  17. Benefits of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation on the Supply, Management, and Use of Water Resources in the United States

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Strzepek, K.; Neumann, Jim; Smith, Joel; Martinich, Jeremy; Boehlert, Brent; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Henderson, Jim; Wobus, Cameron; Jones, Russ; Calvin, Katherine V.; et al

    2014-11-29

    Climate change impacts on water resources in the U.S. are likely to be far-reaching and substantial, because the water sector spans many parts of the economy, from supply and demand for agriculture, industry, energy production, transportation and municipal use to damages from natural hazards. This paper provides impact and damage estimates from five water resource-related models in the CIRA frame work, addressing drought risk, flooding damages, water supply and demand, and global water scarcity. The four models differ in the water system assessed, their spatial scale, and the units of assessment, but together they provide a quantitative and descriptive richnessmore » in characterizing water resource sector effects of climate change that no single model can capture. The results also address the sensitivity of these estimates to greenhouse gas emission scenarios, climate sensitivity alternatives, and global climate model selection. While calculating the net impact of climate change on the water sector as a whole may be impractical, because each of the models applied here uses a consistent set of climate scenarios, broad conclusions can be drawn regarding the patterns of change and the benefits of GHG mitigation policies for the water sector. Two key findings emerge: 1) climate mitigation policy substantially reduces the impact of climate change on the water sector across multiple dimensions; and 2) the more managed the water resources system, the more tempered the climate change impacts and the resulting reduction of impacts from climate mitigation policies.« less

  18. Project Galaxy - Sustianable Resource Supply and Environmental Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Mark; Wimmer, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Understanding what it takes to move from a corn-based liquid fuels industry to one that is cellulosic-based requires a complex transition over time. This transition implies, among other things, a shift from annual cropping systems considered under United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) policy as commodity crops, to perennial lignocellulosic crops that are herbaceous and wood-based. Because of changes in land use as well as biomass and other crop supplies, land-based environmental amenities such as water quality, soil health and tilth, air quality, and animal and avian species populations and their diversity change also. Environmental effects are measured as magnitudes (how much they are impacted), and direction of the impact (either positive or negative). By developing a series of quantitative and qualitative metrics, the larger issue of defining relative sustainability may be addressed, and this can be done at a finer detail of regional (scale) and environmental amenity-specific impacts. Although much literature exists about research relevant to specific environmental variables, there is no published, documented, nor research literature on direct application of environmental over-compliance with regards a 'biorefinery.' Our three goals were to (1) understand and quantify bioenergy sustainability and some key environmental effects in a generic set of examples; (2) explain the effort and means to define and quantify specific qualitative environmental measures, and to determine a way to understand changes in these measures over time and what their implications might be; and (3) use these outcomes to evaluate potential sites in any geographic area. This would permit assessment of candidate locations, combined with an understanding of co-production of fuels, chemicals, and electric power, to interpret sustainability measures and the relationship between environmental sustainability and economic sustainability. The process of determining environmental

  19. US Low-Temperature EGS Resource Potential Estimate

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Katherine Young

    2016-06-30

    Shapefile of shallow, low-temperature EGS resources for the United States, and accompanying paper (submitted to GRC 2016) describing the methodology and analysis. These data are part of a very rough estimate created for use in the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technology Office's Vision Study. They are not a robust estimate of low-temperature EGS resources in the U.S, and should be used accordingly.

  20. Estimation of economic parameters of U.S. hydropower resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Douglas G.; Hunt, Richard T.; Reeves, Kelly S.; Carroll, Greg R.

    2003-06-01

    Tools for estimating the cost of developing and operating and maintaining hydropower resources in the form of regression curves were developed based on historical plant data. Development costs that were addressed included: licensing, construction, and five types of environmental mitigation. It was found that the data for each type of cost correlated well with plant capacity. A tool for estimating the annual and monthly electric generation of hydropower resources was also developed. Additional tools were developed to estimate the cost of upgrading a turbine or a generator. The development and operation and maintenance cost estimating tools, and the generation estimating tool were applied to 2,155 U.S. hydropower sites representing a total potential capacity of 43,036 MW. The sites included totally undeveloped sites, dams without a hydroelectric plant, and hydroelectric plants that could be expanded to achieve greater capacity. Site characteristics and estimated costs and generation for each site were assembled in a database in Excel format that is also included within the EERE Library under the title, “Estimation of Economic Parameters of U.S. Hydropower Resources - INL Hydropower Resource Economics Database.”

  1. Estimate of Geothermal Energy Resource in Major U.S. Sedimentary...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Estimate of Geothermal Energy Resource in Major U.S. Sedimentary Basins (Presentation) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Estimate of Geothermal Energy Resource in Major ...

  2. Estimating U.S. Methane Emissions from the Natural Gas Supply Chain. Approaches, Uncertainties, Current Estimates, and Future Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, Garvin; Warner, Ethan; Steinberg, Daniel; Brandt, Adam

    2015-08-01

    A growing number of studies have raised questions regarding uncertainties in our understanding of methane (CH4) emissions from fugitives and venting along the natural gas (NG) supply chain. In particular, a number of measurement studies have suggested that actual levels of CH4 emissions may be higher than estimated by EPA" tm s U.S. GHG Emission Inventory. We reviewed the literature to identify the growing number of studies that have raised questions regarding uncertainties in our understanding of methane (CH4) emissions from fugitives and venting along the natural gas (NG) supply chain.

  3. Community Wind Handbook/Conduct a Wind Resource Estimate | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "Windustry. Wind Resource Assessment" "AWS Scientific for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Wind Resource Assessment Handbook" Retrieved from "http:...

  4. Estimating the Wind Resource in Uttarakhand: Comparison of Dynamic Downscaling with Doppler Lidar Wind Measurements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Previous estimates of the wind resources in Uttarakhand, India, suggest minimal wind resources in this region. To explore whether or not the complex terrain in fact provides localized regions of...

  5. Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses April 2001, Discussion Paper 01-19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedjo, Roger; Sohngen, Brent; Mendelsohn, Robert

    2001-04-05

    This study develops cumulative carbon ''supply curves'' for global forests utilizing a dynamic timber supply model for sequestration of forest carbon. Because the period of concern is the next century, and particular time points within that century, the curves are not traditional Marshallian supply curves or steady-state supply curves. Rather, the focus is on cumulative carbon cost curves (quasi-supply curves) at various points in time over the next 100 years. The research estimates a number of long-term, cumulative, carbon quasi-supply curves under different price scenarios and for different time periods. The curves trace out the relationship between an intertemporal price path for carbon, as given by carbon shadow prices, and the cumulative carbon sequestered from the initiation of the shadow prices, set at 2000, to a selected future year (2010, 2050, 2100). The timber supply model demonstrates that cumulative carbon quasi-supply curves that can be generated through forestry significantly depend on initial carbon prices and expectations regarding the time profile of future carbon prices. Furthermore, long-run quasi-supply curves generated from a constant price will have somewhat different characteristics from quasi-supply curves generated with an expectation of rising carbon prices through time.The ?least-cost? curves vary the time periods under consideration and the time profile of carbon prices. The quasi-supply curves suggest that a policy of gradually increasing carbon prices will generate the least costly supply curves in the shorter periods of a decade or so. Over longer periods of time, however, such as 50 or 100 years, these advantages appear to dissipate.

  6. Estimating the Wind Resource in Uttarakhand: Comparison of Dynamic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications U.S. Virgin Islands Wind Resources Update 2014 The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP): A PublicPrivate Partnership for Improving Short Term ...

  7. Estimating the Wind Resource in Uttarakhand: Comparison of Dynamic Downscaling with Doppler Lidar Wind Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Pukayastha, A.; St. Martin, C.; Newsom, R.

    2014-03-01

    Previous estimates of the wind resources in Uttarakhand, India, suggest minimal wind resources in this region. To explore whether or not the complex terrain in fact provides localized regions of wind resource, the authors of this study employed a dynamic down scaling method with the Weather Research and Forecasting model, providing detailed estimates of winds at approximately 1 km resolution in the finest nested simulation.

  8. Petroleum resources of South America: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietzman, W.D.; Rafidi, N.R.

    1983-01-01

    This report is an analysis of discovered crude oil reserves, undiscovered recoverable crude oil resources, and estimated annual oil field production. The countries analyzed are Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. All of the countries in this report have a history of petroleum exploration and development. Also, they maintain policies which support the search for, and exploitation of, petroleum resources. This systematic assessment provides estimates of the quantities of remaining known petroleum reserves and undiscovered recoverable resources. The future feasible production rates from the respective countries are also discussed. The FESAP assessments are limited to petroleum resources recoverable by conventional primary and secondary extraction technology. It is estimated that over 29.4 billion barrels of recoverable oil (both discovered and undiscovered) originally existed within the sedimentary basins of these countries, as follows: Argentina (9.4 billion barrels); Brazil (6.5 billion barrels); Colombia (5.0 billion barrels); Peru (3.6 billion barrels); Ecuador (over 3.0 billion barrels); Chile (1.1 billion barrels); and Bolivia (over 0.8 billion barrels). Through 1982, about 10.2 billion barrels of the oil had been produced. Thus, some 19.2 billion barrels constitute the remaining recoverable petroleum resource base. It is estimated that the most likely volume of crude oil remaining to be found in the seven countries is 12 billion barrels. 91 refs., 59 figs., 82 tabs.

  9. Estimating U.S. Methane Emissions from the Natural Gas Supply...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is to develop the empirical foundation for activity factor uncertainty estimation. 6. Transparency and credibility of inventory estimates can be improved by bolstering...

  10. Geothermal -- The Energy Under Our Feet: Geothermal Resource Estimates for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, B. D.; Nix, R. G.

    2006-11-01

    On May 16, 2006, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado hosted a geothermal resources workshop with experts from the geothermal community. The purpose of the workshop was to re-examine domestic geothermal resource estimates. The participating experts were organized into five working groups based on their primary area of expertise in the following types of geothermal resource or application: (1) Hydrothermal, (2) Deep Geothermal Systems, (3) Direct Use, (4) Geothermal Heat Pumps (GHPs), and (5) Co-Produced and Geopressured. The workshop found that the domestic geothermal resource is very large, with significant benefits.

  11. GM`s PICOS initiative on resource conservation and pollution prevention: Greening the supply chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pritchett, T.

    1997-12-31

    This paper is comprised of reprints of several related articles from business publications. The first article, on supply-side economics, describes efforts by General Motors to cut costs by encouraging suppliers to reduce the environmental impacts of their products. The PICOS{trademark} program of General Motors helps industrial identify and implement energy efficiency and pollution prevention projects that lower operating costs while reducing emissions linked to global climate change. The second article also describes the program, focusing on aspects of global competition.

  12. Tombs, tunnels, and terraces a cultural resources survey of a former ammunition supply point in Okinawa, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verhaaren, B. T.; Levenson, J. B.; Komine, G.

    2000-02-09

    U.S. forces serving at military bases on foreign soil are obligated to act as good stewards of the cultural and natural resources under their control. However, cultural resources management presents special challenges at U.S. bases in other countries where cultural properties laws differ in emphasis and detail from those in the United States and issues of land ownership and occupancy are not always clear. Where status of forces agreements (SOFAs) exist, environmental governing standards bridge the gap between U.S. and host nation cultural priorities. In Japan, the Department of Defense Japan Environmental Governing Standards (JEGS) fill this function. Under Criteria 12-4.2 and 12-4.3 of the JEGS, U.S. Forces Japan commit themselves to inventory and protect cultural properties found on the lands they control or use. Cultural properties include archaeological sites, tombs, historic buildings, and shrines. Natural monuments, such as landscape features or plant and animal species, may also be designated as cultural properties. As part of this commitment, in February 1999 a cultural resources inventory was conducted in Area 1, part of Kadena Air Base (AB), Okinawa, Japan. Area 1, the former U.S. army Ammunition Supply Point 1, is currently used primarily for training exercises and recreational paint ball.

  13. Estimated winter 1980-1981 electric demand and supply, contiguous United States. Staff report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-12-01

    This report summarizes the most recent data available concerning projected electrical peak demands and available power resouces for the 1980-1981 winter peak period, as reported by electric utilities in the contiguous United States. The data, grouped by Regional Reliability Council areas and by Electrical Regions within the Council areas, was obtained from the Form 12E-2 reports filed by utilities with the Department of Energy on October 15, 1980 (data as of September 30). In some instances the data were revised or verified by telephone. Considerations affecting reliability, arising from Nuclear Regulatory Commission actions based on lessons learned from the forced outage of Three Mile Island Nuclear Unit No. 2, were factored into the report. No widespread large-scale reliability problems are foreseen for electric power supply this winter, on the basis of the supply and demand projections furnished by the electric utilities. Reserve margins could drop in some electric regions to levels considered inadequate for reliable service, if historical forced-outage magnitudes recur.

  14. Geothermal resource base of the world: a revision of the Electric Power Research Institute's estimate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, M.J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Gambill, D.T.

    1981-04-01

    Review of the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) method for calculating the geothermal resource base of a country shows that modifications are needed for several of the assumptions used in the calculation. These modifications include: (1) separating geothermal belts into volcanic types with a geothermal gradient of 50{sup 0}C/km and complex types in which 80% of the area has a temperature gradient of 30{sup 0}C/km and 20% has a gradient of 45{sup 0}C/km, (2) using the actual mean annual temperature of a country rather than an assumed 15{sup 0}C average ambient temperature, and (3) making separate calculations for the resource stored in water/brine and that stored in rock. Comparison of this method (Revised EPRI) for calculating a geothermal resource base with other resource base estimates made from a heat flow map of Europe indicates that the technique yields reasonable values. The calculated geothermal resource bases, stored in water and rock to a depth of 5 km, for each country in the world are given. Approximately five times as much energy is stored in rock as is stored in water.

  15. Comparison of Historical Satellite-Based Estimates of Solar Radiation Resources with Recent Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2009-03-01

    The availability of rotating shadow band radiometer measurement data at several new stations provides an opportunity to compare historical satellite-based estimates of solar resources with measurements. We compare mean monthly daily total (MMDT) solar radiation data from eight years of NSRDB and 22 years of NASA hourly global horizontal and direct beam solar estimates with measured data from three stations, collected after the end of the available resource estimates.

  16. Feedstock Supply & Logistics Feedstock Supply System Integration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... LOGTOF 36.95 60.22 Urban and mill wood wastes MRESUU 4.56 7.79 Potential feedstock supply (Totals) 164.4 267.67 Resource Agricultural Residues Energy Crops Forest Resources ...

  17. Estimate of the Geothermal Energy Resource in the Major Sedimentary Basins in the United States (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esposito, A.; Porro, C.; Augustine, C.; Roberts, B.

    2012-09-01

    Because most sedimentary basins have been explored for oil and gas, well logs, temperatures at depth, and reservoir properties such as depth to basement and formation thickness are well known. The availability of this data reduces exploration risk and allows development of geologic exploration models for each basin. This study estimates the magnitude of recoverable geothermal energy from 15 major known U.S. sedimentary basins and ranks these basins relative to their potential. The total available thermal resource for each basin was estimated using the volumetric heat-in-place method originally proposed by (Muffler, 1979). A qualitative recovery factor was determined for each basin based on data on flow volume, hydrothermal recharge, and vertical and horizontal permeability. Total sedimentary thickness maps, stratigraphic columns, cross sections, and temperature gradient information was gathered for each basin from published articles, USGS reports, and state geological survey reports. When published data were insufficient, thermal gradients and reservoir properties were derived from oil and gas well logs obtained on oil and gas commission databases. Basin stratigraphy, structural history, and groundwater circulation patterns were studied in order to develop a model that estimates resource size, temperature distribution, and a probable quantitative recovery factor.

  18. Estimate of Geothermal Energy Resource in Major U.S. Sedimentary Basins (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porro, C.; Augustine, C.

    2012-04-01

    This study estimates the magnitude of geothermal energy from fifteen major known US sedimentary basins and ranks these basins relative to their potential. Because most sedimentary basins have been explored for oil and gas, well logs, temperatures at depth, and reservoir properties are known. This reduces exploration risk and allows development of geologic exploration models for each basin as well as a relative assessment of geologic risk elements for each play. The total available thermal resource for each basin was estimated using the volumetric heat-in-place method originally proposed by Muffler (USGS). Total sedimentary thickness maps, stratigraphic columns, cross sections, and temperature gradient Information were gathered for each basin from published articles, USGS reports, and state geological survey reports. When published data was insufficient, thermal gradients and reservoir properties were derived from oil and gas well logs obtained on oil and gas commission websites. Basin stratigraphy, structural history, and groundwater circulation patterns were studied in order to develop a model that estimates resource size and temperature distribution, and to qualitatively assess reservoir productivity.

  19. Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Onshore Geopressured Geothermal Energy in Texas and Louisiana (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esposito, A.; Augustine, C.

    2012-04-01

    Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are characterized by high temperatures and high pressures with correspondingly large quantities of dissolved methane. Due to these characteristics, the reservoirs provide two sources of energy: chemical energy from the recovered methane, and thermal energy from the recovered fluid at temperatures high enough to operate a binary power plant for electricity production. Formations with the greatest potential for recoverable energy are located in the gulf coastal region of Texas and Louisiana where significantly overpressured and hot formations are abundant. This study estimates the total recoverable onshore geopressured geothermal resource for identified sites in Texas and Louisiana. In this study a geopressured geothermal resource is defined as a brine reservoir with fluid temperature greater than 212 degrees F and a pressure gradient greater than 0.7 psi/ft.

  20. Using Geothermal Play Types as an Analogue for Estimating Potential Resource Size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry, Rachel; Young, Katherine

    2015-09-02

    Blind geothermal systems are becoming increasingly common as more geothermal fields are developed. Geothermal development is known to have high risk in the early stages of a project development because reservoir characteristics are relatively unknown until wells are drilled. Play types (or occurrence models) categorize potential geothermal fields into groups based on geologic characteristics. To aid in lowering exploration risk, these groups' reservoir characteristics can be used as analogues in new site exploration. The play type schemes used in this paper were Moeck and Beardsmore play types (Moeck et al. 2014) and Brophy occurrence models (Brophy et al. 2011). Operating geothermal fields throughout the world were classified based on their associated play type, and then reservoir characteristics data were catalogued. The distributions of these characteristics were plotted in histograms to develop probability density functions for each individual characteristic. The probability density functions can be used as input analogues in Monte Carlo estimations of resource potential for similar play types in early exploration phases. A spreadsheet model was created to estimate resource potential in undeveloped fields. The user can choose to input their own values for each reservoir characteristic or choose to use the probability distribution functions provided from the selected play type. This paper also addresses the United States Geological Survey's 1978 and 2008 assessment of geothermal resources by comparing their estimated values to reported values from post-site development. Information from the collected data was used in the comparison for thirty developed sites in the United States. No significant trends or suggestions for methodologies could be made by the comparison.

  1. Estimates of U.S. Commercial Building Electricity Intensity Trends: Issues Related to End-Use and Supply Surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belzer, David B.

    2004-09-04

    This report examines measurement issues related to the amount of electricity used by the commercial sector in the U.S. and the implications for historical trends of commercial building electricity intensity (kWh/sq. ft. of floor space). The report compares two (Energy Information Administration) sources of data related to commercial buildings: the Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and the reporting by utilities of sales to commercial customers (survey Form-861). Over past two decades these sources suggest significantly different trend rates of growth of electricity intensity, with the supply (utility)-based estimate growing much faster than that based only upon the CBECS. The report undertakes various data adjustments in an attempt to rationalize the differences between these two sources. These adjustments deal with: 1) periodic reclassifications of industrial vs. commercial electricity usage at the state level and 2) the amount of electricity used by non-enclosed equipment (non-building use) that is classified as commercial electricity sales. In part, after applying these adjustments, there is a good correspondence between the two sources over the the past four CBECS (beginning with 1992). However, as yet, there is no satisfactory explanation of the differences between the two sources for longer periods that include the 1980s.

  2. Updated U.S. Geothermal Supply Curve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, C.; Young, K. R.; Anderson, A.

    2010-02-01

    This paper documents the approach used to update the U.S. geothermal supply curve. The analysis undertaken in this study estimates the supply of electricity generation potential from geothermal resources in the United States and the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE), capital costs, and operating and maintenance costs associated with developing these geothermal resources. Supply curves were developed for four categories of geothermal resources: identified hydrothermal (6.4 GWe), undiscovered hydrothermal (30.0 GWe), near-hydrothermal field enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) (7.0 GWe) and deep EGS (15,900 GWe). Two cases were considered: a base case and a target case. Supply curves were generated for each of the four geothermal resource categories for both cases. For both cases, hydrothermal resources dominate the lower cost range of the combined geothermal supply curve. The supply curves indicate that the reservoir performance improvements assumed in the target case could significantly lower EGS costs and greatly increase EGS deployment over the base case.

  3. Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case studies and additional resources on implementing renewable energy in Federal new construction and major renovations are available.

  4. Geological Carbon Sequestration Storage Resource Estimates for the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone, Illinois and Michigan Basins, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, David; Ellett, Kevin; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    The Cambro-Ordovician strata of the Midwest of the United States is a primary target for potential geological storage of CO2 in deep saline formations. The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive evaluation of the Cambro-Ordovician strata in the Illinois and Michigan Basins above the basal Mount Simon Sandstone since the Mount Simon is the subject of other investigations including a demonstration-scale injection at the Illinois Basin Decatur Project. The primary reservoir targets investigated in this study are the middle Ordovician St Peter Sandstone and the late Cambrian to early Ordovician Knox Group carbonates. The topic of this report is a regional-scale evaluation of the geologic storage resource potential of the St Peter Sandstone in both the Illinois and Michigan Basins. Multiple deterministic-based approaches were used in conjunction with the probabilistic-based storage efficiency factors published in the DOE methodology to estimate the carbon storage resource of the formation. Extensive data sets of core analyses and wireline logs were compiled to develop the necessary inputs for volumetric calculations. Results demonstrate how the range in uncertainty of storage resource estimates varies as a function of data availability and quality, and the underlying assumptions used in the different approaches. In the simplest approach, storage resource estimates were calculated from mapping the gross thickness of the formation and applying a single estimate of the effective mean porosity of the formation. Results from this approach led to storage resource estimates ranging from 3.3 to 35.1 Gt in the Michigan Basin, and 1.0 to 11.0 Gt in the Illinois Basin at the P10 and P90 probability level, respectively. The second approach involved consideration of the diagenetic history of the formation throughout the two basins and used depth-dependent functions of porosity to derive a more realistic spatially variable model of porosity rather than applying a

  5. Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Resources Policies, Manuals & References Map Transportation Publications ⇒ Navigate Section Resources Policies, Manuals & References Map Transportation Publications Getting Help or Information askUS - Operations Unified Services Portal IT Help Desk (or call x4357) Facilities Work Request Center Telephone Services Travel Site Info Laboratory Map Construction Updates Laboratory Shuttle Buses Cafeteria Menu News and Events Today at Berkeley Lab News Center Press Releases Feature

  6. Geopressured Geothermal Resource and Recoverable Energy Estimate for the Wilcox and Frio Formations, Texas (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esposito, A.; Augustine, C.

    2011-10-01

    An estimate of the total and recoverable geopressured geothermal resource of the fairways in the Wilcox and Frio formations is made using the current data available. The flow rate of water and methane for wells located in the geopressured geothermal fairways is simulated over a 20-year period utilizing the TOUGH2 Reservoir Simulator and research data. The model incorporates relative permeability, capillary pressure, rock compressibility, and leakage from the bounding shale layers. The simulations show that permeability, porosity, pressure, sandstone thickness, well spacing, and gas saturation in the sandstone have a significant impact on the percent of energy recovered. The results also predict lower average well production flow rates and a significantly higher production of natural gas relative to water than in previous studies done from 1975 to 1980. Previous studies underestimate the amount of methane produced with hot brine. Based on the work completed in this study, multiphase flow processes and reservoir boundary conditions greatly influence the total quantity of the fluid produced as well as the ratio of gas and water in the produced fluid.

  7. New Wind Energy Resource Potential Estimates for the United States (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; Scott, G.; Brower, M.; Hale, E.; Phelps, B.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the wind energy resource mapping efforts conducted at NREL and by Truepower.

  8. Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lai, Judy; Borgeson, Sam; Coffey, Brian; Azevedo, Ines Lima

    2009-09-01

    In this analysis, the authors projected Japan's energy demand/supply and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions to 2050. Their analysis of various scenarios indicated that Japan's CO{sub 2} emissions in 2050 could be potentially reduced by 26-58% from the current level (FY 2005). These results suggest that Japan could set a CO{sub 2} emission reduction target for 2050 at between 30% and 60%. In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050 from the present level, Japan will have to strongly promote energy conservation at the same pace as an annual rate of 1.9% after the oil crises (to cut primary energy demand per GDP (TPES/GDP) in 2050 by 60% from 2005) and expand the share of non-fossil energy sources in total primary energy supply in 2050 to 50% (to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions per primary energy demand (CO{sub 2}/TPES) in 2050 by 40% from 2005). Concerning power generation mix in 2050, nuclear power will account for 60%, solar and other renewable energy sources for 20%, hydro power for 10% and fossil-fired generation for 10%, indicating substantial shift away from fossil fuel in electric power supply. Among the mitigation measures in the case of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050, energy conservation will make the greatest contribution to the emission reduction, being followed by solar power, nuclear power and other renewable energy sources. In order to realize this massive CO{sub 2} abatement, however, Japan will have to overcome technological and economic challenges including the large-scale deployment of nuclear power and renewable technologies.

  9. Supply Curves for Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

    2008-11-01

    Energy supply curves attempt to estimate the relationship between the cost of an energy resource and the amount of energy available at or below that cost. In general, an energy supply curve is a series of step functions with each step representing a particular group or category of energy resource. The length of the step indicates how much of that resource is deployable or accessible at a given cost. Energy supply curves have been generated for a number of renewable energy sources including biomass fuels and geothermal, as well as conservation technologies. Generating a supply curve for solar photovoltaics (PV) has particular challenges due to the nature of the resource. The United States has a massive solar resource base -- many orders of magnitude greater than the total consumption of energy. In this report, we examine several possible methods for generating PV supply curves based exclusively on rooftop deployment.

  10. Primer on gas integrated resource planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.; Comnes, G.A.; Busch, J.; Wiel, S.

    1993-12-01

    This report discusses the following topics: gas resource planning: need for IRP; gas integrated resource planning: methods and models; supply and capacity planning for gas utilities; methods for estimating gas avoided costs; economic analysis of gas utility DSM programs: benefit-cost tests; gas DSM technologies and programs; end-use fuel substitution; and financial aspects of gas demand-side management programs.

  11. Estimate of Geothermal Energy Resource in Major U.S. Sedimentary Basins (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ESTIMATE OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY RESOURCE IN MAJOR U.S. SEDIMENTARY BASINS Colleen Porro and Chad Augustine April 24, 2012 National Renewable Energy Lab, Golden, CO NREL/PR-6A20-55017 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Sedimentary Basin Geothermal WHAT IS SEDIMENTARY BASIN GEOTHERMAL? 2 Geothermal Energy from Sedimentary Rock - Using hot" geothermal fluids (>100 o C) produced from sedimentary basins to generate electricity - Advantages: * Reservoirs are porous, permeable, and well

  12. Updated U.S. Geothermal Supply Characterization and Representation for Market Penetration Model Input

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, C.

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) tasked the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) with conducting the annual geothermal supply curve update. This report documents the approach taken to identify geothermal resources, determine the electrical producing potential of these resources, and estimate the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE), capital costs, and operating and maintenance costs from these geothermal resources at present and future timeframes under various GTP funding levels. Finally, this report discusses the resulting supply curve representation and how improvements can be made to future supply curve updates.

  13. Oil- and gas-supply modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gass, S.I.

    1982-05-01

    The symposium on Oil and Gas Supply Modeling, held at the Department of Commerce, Washington, DC (June 18-20, 1980), was funded by the Energy Information Administration of the Department of Energy and co-sponsored by the National Bureau of Standards' Operations Research Division. The symposium was organized to be a forum in which the theoretical and applied state-of-the-art of oil and gas supply models could be presented and discussed. Speakers addressed the following areas: the realities of oil and gas supply, prediction of oil and gas production, problems in oil and gas modeling, resource appraisal procedures, forecasting field size and production, investment and production strategies, estimating cost and production schedules for undiscovered fields, production regulations, resource data, sensitivity analysis of forecasts, econometric analysis of resource depletion, oil and gas finding rates, and various models of oil and gas supply. This volume documents the proceedings (papers and discussion) of the symposium. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  14. Estimating the supply and demand for deep geologic CO2 storage capacity over the course of the 21st Century: A meta-analysis of the literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.

    2013-08-05

    Whether there is sufficient geologic CO2 storage capacity to allow CCS to play a significant role in mitigating climate change has been the subject of debate since the 1990s. This paper presents a meta- analysis of a large body of recently published literature to derive updated estimates of the global deep geologic storage resource as well as the potential demand for this geologic CO2 storage resource over the course of this century. This analysis reveals that, for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation scenarios that have end-of-century atmospheric CO2 concentrations of between 350 ppmv and 725 ppmv, the average demand for deep geologic CO2 storage over the course of this century is between 410 GtCO2 and 1,670 GtCO2. The literature summarized here suggests that -- depending on the stringency of criteria applied to calculate storage capacity global geologic CO2 storage capacity could be: 35,300 GtCO2 of theoretical capacity; 13,500 GtCO2 of effective capacity; 3,900 GtCO2, of practical capacity; and 290 GtCO2 of matched capacity for the few regions where this narrow definition of capacity has been calculated. The cumulative demand for geologic CO2 storage is likely quite small compared to global estimates of the deep geologic CO2 storage capacity, and therefore, a lack of deep geologic CO2 storage capacity is unlikely to be an impediment for the commercial adoption of CCS technologies in this century.

  15. Oil and Gas Resources of the Fergana Basin (Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan, and Kyrgysztan)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01

    Provides the most comprehensive assessment publicly available for oil and gas resources in the Fergana Basin. Includes projections of potential oil supply and U.S. Geological Survey estimates of undiscovered recoverable oil and gas.

  16. Estimating Methods

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Based on the project's scope, the purpose of the estimate, and the availability of estimating resources, the estimator can choose one or a combination of techniques when estimating an activity or project. Estimating methods, estimating indirect and direct costs, and other estimating considerations are discussed in this chapter.

  17. Planning, electric systems and security of supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saullo, A.

    1998-07-01

    The move towards liberalization of electricity markets has raised different views on the answer to be given to the following question: will the new environment allow for enough resources to be conveyed to the power sector so as to preserve security of supply? There are two facets under which the ``security of supply'' issue can be considered. The first one relates to the availability of generating capacity, and of network infrastructures, adequate to meet the demand. The second aspect to be considered in dealing with security of supply is more a matter of energy policy. Electricity, as such, is basically an energy carrier able to convey to consumers virtually any kind of energy source; the ``switching'' capability from a source to a different one may offer a solution when reliability of energy supply is felt at risk. This flexibility is a premium, particularly for those countries/regions that have to rely strongly on energy imports. Preserving the contribution that the power sector offers to the ``external'' security of supply may represent a major objective of investment policies and energy sector regulation, depending on the level of risk as perceived by national/regional authorities. On the other hand, the volume of investments at stake is considerable. Enel, on the base of projections of electricity demand worldwide made by the EU Commission and of studies on investments developed by EURELECTRIC, estimates that the volume of investments conveyed to the power sector each year in the period 2000--2010 will be in the range of 300 billion of 1995 US$. Will this huge amount of resources provide for an adequate level of security of supply? This paper aims to introduce for discussion some views on the subject, considering separately the industrialized countries and those still undergoing industrialization.

  18. Protection of the Groundwater Resource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection of the Groundwater Resource Protection of the Groundwater Resource Monitoring wells act as sentinels between suspected LANL contamination and the water supply. August 1,...

  19. Coal supply/demand, 1980 to 2000. Task 3. Resource applications industrialization system data base. Final review draft. [USA; forecasting 1980 to 2000; sector and regional analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, W.M.; Hasson, V.

    1980-10-10

    This report is a compilation of data and forecasts resulting from an analysis of the coal market and the factors influencing supply and demand. The analyses performed for the forecasts were made on an end-use-sector basis. The sectors analyzed are electric utility, industry demand for steam coal, industry demand for metallurgical coal, residential/commercial, coal demand for synfuel production, and exports. The purpose is to provide coal production and consumption forecasts that can be used to perform detailed, railroad company-specific coal transportation analyses. To make the data applicable for the subsequent transportation analyses, the forecasts have been made for each end-use sector on a regional basis. The supply regions are: Appalachia, East Interior, West Interior and Gulf, Northern Great Plains, and Mountain. The demand regions are the same as the nine Census Bureau regions. Coal production and consumption in the United States are projected to increase dramatically in the next 20 years due to increasing requirements for energy and the unavailability of other sources of energy to supply a substantial portion of this increase. Coal comprises 85 percent of the US recoverable fossil energy reserves and could be mined to supply the increasing energy demands of the US. The NTPSC study found that the additional traffic demands by 1985 may be met by the railways by the way of improved signalization, shorter block sections, centralized traffic control, and other modernization methods without providing for heavy line capacity works. But by 2000 the incremental traffic on some of the major corridors was projected to increase very significantly and is likely to call for special line capacity works involving heavy investment.

  20. Resources for global risk assessment: The International Toxicity Estimates for Risk (ITER) and Risk Information Exchange (RiskIE) databases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wullenweber, Andrea Kroner, Oliver; Kohrman, Melissa; Maier, Andrew; Dourson, Michael; Rak, Andrew; Wexler, Philip; Tomljanovic, Chuck

    2008-11-15

    The rate of chemical synthesis and use has outpaced the development of risk values and the resolution of risk assessment methodology questions. In addition, available risk values derived by different organizations may vary due to scientific judgments, mission of the organization, or use of more recently published data. Further, each organization derives values for a unique chemical list so it can be challenging to locate data on a given chemical. Two Internet resources are available to address these issues. First, the International Toxicity Estimates for Risk (ITER) database ( (www.tera.org/iter)) provides chronic human health risk assessment data from a variety of organizations worldwide in a side-by-side format, explains differences in risk values derived by different organizations, and links directly to each organization's website for more detailed information. It is also the only database that includes risk information from independent parties whose risk values have undergone independent peer review. Second, the Risk Information Exchange (RiskIE) is a database of in progress chemical risk assessment work, and includes non-chemical information related to human health risk assessment, such as training modules, white papers and risk documents. RiskIE is available at (http://www.allianceforrisk.org/RiskIE.htm), and will join ITER on National Library of Medicine's TOXNET ( (http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/)). Together, ITER and RiskIE provide risk assessors essential tools for easily identifying and comparing available risk data, for sharing in progress assessments, and for enhancing interaction among risk assessment groups to decrease duplication of effort and to harmonize risk assessment procedures across organizations.

  1. Investigation of thermochemical biorefinery sizing and environmental sustainability impacts for conventional supply system and distributed preprocessing supply system designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muth, jr., David J.; Langholtz, Matthew H.; Tan, Eric; Jacobson, Jacob; Schwab, Amy; Wu, May; Argo, Andrew; Brandt, Craig C.; Cafferty, Kara; Chiu, Yi-Wen; Dutta, Abhijit; Eaton, Laurence M.; Searcy, Erin

    2014-03-31

    The 2011 US Billion-Ton Update estimates that by 2030 there will be enough agricultural and forest resources to sustainably provide at least one billion dry tons of biomass annually, enough to displace approximately 30% of the country's current petroleum consumption. A portion of these resources are inaccessible at current cost targets with conventional feedstock supply systems because of their remoteness or low yields. Reliable analyses and projections of US biofuels production depend on assumptions about the supply system and biorefinery capacity, which, in turn, depend upon economic value, feedstock logistics, and sustainability. A cross-functional team has examined combinations of advances in feedstock supply systems and biorefinery capacities with rigorous design information, improved crop yield and agronomic practices, and improved estimates of sustainable biomass availability. A previous report on biochemical refinery capacity noted that under advanced feedstock logistic supply systems that include depots and pre-processing operations there are cost advantages that support larger biorefineries up to 10 000 DMT/day facilities compared to the smaller 2000 DMT/day facilities. This report focuses on analyzing conventional versus advanced depot biomass supply systems for a thermochemical conversion and refinery sizing based on woody biomass. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the economies of scale enabled by advanced logistics offsets much of the added logistics costs from additional depot processing and transportation, resulting in a small overall increase to the minimum ethanol selling price compared to the conventional logistic supply system. While the overall costs do increase slightly for the advanced logistic supply systems, the ability to mitigate moisture and ash in the system will improve the storage and conversion processes. In addition, being able to draw on feedstocks from further distances will decrease the risk of biomass supply to the

  2. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melody, Moya; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Richard

    2010-09-30

    As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

  3. Supply Forecast and Analysis (SFA)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Matthew Langholtz Science Team Leader Oak Ridge National Laboratory DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Supply Forecast and Analysis (SFA) 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office Goal Statement * Provide timely and credible estimates of feedstock supplies and prices to support - the development of a bioeconomy; feedstock demand analysis of EISA, RFS2, and RPS mandates - the data and analysis of other projects in Analysis and Sustainability, Feedstock Supply and Logistics,

  4. Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Geothermal energy comes from the internal heat of the Earth, and has been continuously exploited for the production of electricity in the United States since 1960. Currently, geothermal power is one of the ready-to-use baseload electricity generating technologies that is competing in the western United States with fossil fuel, nuclear and hydroelectric generation technologies to provide utilities and their customers with a reliable and economic source of electric power. Furthermore, the development of domestic geothermal resources, as an alternative to fossil fuel combustion technologies, has a number of associated environmental benefits. This report serves two functions. First, it provides a description of geothermal technology and a progress report on the commercial status of geothermal electric power generation. Second, it addresses the question of how much electricity might be competitively produced from the geothermal resource base. 19 figs., 15 tabs.

  5. supply chain | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    supply chain

  6. Power supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Hamilton, Pamela Jane; Brubaker, Michael Allen

    2007-12-04

    A modular, low weight impedance dropping power supply with battery backup is disclosed that can be connected to a high voltage AC source and provide electrical power at a lower voltage. The design can be scaled over a wide range of input voltages and over a wide range of output voltages and delivered power.

  7. Power supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, Edward J.; Leeman, James E.; MacDougall, Hugh R.; Marron, John J.; Smith, Calvin C.

    1976-01-01

    An electric power supply employs a striking means to initiate ferroelectric elements which provide electrical energy output which subsequently initiates an explosive charge which initiates a second ferroelectric current generator to deliver current to the coil of a magnetic field current generator, creating a magnetic field around the coil. Continued detonation effects compression of the magnetic field and subsequent generation and delivery of a large output current to appropriate output loads.

  8. Investigation of thermochemical biorefinery sizing and environmental sustainability impacts for conventional supply system and distributed pre-processing supply system designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David J. Muth, Jr.; Matthew H. Langholtz; Eric C. D. Tan; Jacob J. Jacobson; Amy Schwab; May M. Wu; Andrew Argo; Craig C. Brandt; Kara G. Cafferty; Yi-Wen Chiu; Abhijit Dutta; Laurence M. Eaton; Erin M. Searcy

    2014-08-01

    The 2011 US Billion-Ton Update estimates that by 2030 there will be enough agricultural and forest resources to sustainably provide at least one billion dry tons of biomass annually, enough to displace approximately 30% of the country's current petroleum consumption. A portion of these resources are inaccessible at current cost targets with conventional feedstock supply systems because of their remoteness or low yields. Reliable analyses and projections of US biofuels production depend on assumptions about the supply system and biorefinery capacity, which, in turn, depend upon economic value, feedstock logistics, and sustainability. A cross-functional team has examined combinations of advances in feedstock supply systems and biorefinery capacities with rigorous design information, improved crop yield and agronomic practices, and improved estimates of sustainable biomass availability. A previous report on biochemical refinery capacity noted that under advanced feedstock logistic supply systems that include depots and pre-processing operations there are cost advantages that support larger biorefineries up to 10 000 DMT/day facilities compared to the smaller 2000 DMT/day facilities. This report focuses on analyzing conventional versus advanced depot biomass supply systems for a thermochemical conversion and refinery sizing based on woody biomass. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the economies of scale enabled by advanced logistics offsets much of the added logistics costs from additional depot processing and transportation, resulting in a small overall increase to the minimum ethanol selling price compared to the conventional logistic supply system. While the overall costs do increase slightly for the advanced logistic supply systems, the ability to mitigate moisture and ash in the system will improve the storage and conversion processes. In addition, being able to draw on feedstocks from further distances will decrease the risk of biomass supply to the

  9. The Growth of U.S. Natural Gas: An Uncertain Outlook for U.S. and World Supply

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    The Growth of U.S. Natural Gas: An Uncertain Outlook for U.S. and World Supply For 2015 EIA Energy Conference June 15, 2015 | Washington, D.C. By John Staub, Team Lead, Exploration and Production Analysis Outline * Changes in U.S. natural gas - Why resource estimates change * Why resource estimates produced with different methods should be different and are valuable * What we need to know about a play to get a fairly accurate estimate - Intersection of geology, technology & above-ground

  10. Automating Natural Disaster Impact Analysis: An Open Resource to Visually Estimate a Hurricane s Impact on the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, Alan M; Freer, Eva B; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Fernandez, Steven J; Chinthavali, Supriya; Kodysh, Jeffrey B

    2013-01-01

    An ORNL team working on the Energy Awareness and Resiliency Standardized Services (EARSS) project developed a fully automated procedure to take wind speed and location estimates provided by hurricane forecasters and provide a geospatial estimate on the impact to the electric grid in terms of outage areas and projected duration of outages. Hurricane Sandy was one of the worst US storms ever, with reported injuries and deaths, millions of people without power for several days, and billions of dollars in economic impact. Hurricane advisories were released for Sandy from October 22 through 31, 2012. The fact that the geoprocessing was automated was significant there were 64 advisories for Sandy. Manual analysis typically takes about one hour for each advisory. During a storm event, advisories are released every two to three hours around the clock, and an analyst capable of performing the manual analysis has other tasks they would like to focus on. Initial predictions of a big impact and landfall usually occur three days in advance, so time is of the essence to prepare for utility repair. Automated processing developed at ORNL allowed this analysis to be completed and made publicly available within minutes of each new advisory being released.

  11. Resource Program (pbl/main)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is abbreviated and primarily provides updates to key inputs and analysis. The potential power supply obligation needs for the 2013 Resource Program are based on the Needs...

  12. Supply Chain Risk Management (SCRM) Awareness Toolkit | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Supply Chain Risk Management (SCRM) Awareness Toolkit Supply Chain Risk Management (SCRM) Awareness Toolkit The Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) Supply Chain Risk Management (SCRM) Resource Center developed the SCRM Awareness Toolkit to introduce DOE employees to the basic terms and concepts of the technology supply chain and associated threats. For additional information on the DOE Enterprise SCRM Resource Center and program initiatives, please contact Sue Farrand at

  13. Protection of the Groundwater Resource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection of the Groundwater Resource Protection of the Groundwater Resource Monitoring wells act as sentinels between suspected LANL contamination and the water supply. August 1, 2013 Where to place a sentinel well Where

  14. Model for Energy Supply System Alternatives and their General...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    long term strategies by analysing cost optimal energy mixes, investment needs and other costs for new infrastructure, energy supply security, energy resource utilization, rate of...

  15. Natural gas resource data base for the United States (1987). Final report, June-December 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent, H.C.; Finney, J.J.

    1988-02-01

    This data base gives a detailed summary of the estimated potential resources of natural gas in the United States, including postulated depth distributions, field sizes, well recoveries and success rates. The study (an expansion on the 1986 resource estimates of the Potential Gas Committee) analyzed the distribution and characteristics of the resource potential estimated to occur in the onshore geologic provinces of the lower 48 states, as well as the resources beneath the continental shelf and slope offshore from Louisiana and Texas. The areas that hold the greatest potential for future natural gas exploration and development include the Atlantic, Gulf Coast, Mid-Continent and Rocky Mountain areas, which contain approximately 92% of the estimated undiscovered resources. The results of the study are intended to be used to assist in making cost determinations which can be utilized in the development of supply models and in planning.

  16. ,"U.S. Weekly Supply Estimates"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...99374,863325,293913,,569412,203808,157209,38839,,,118370,,,,,46599,,,...42060,97259,,60520,36739,34773,21558,,,92817 36623,1474511,905099,866209,296797,,569412,203566,157070,4083...

  17. U.S. Weekly Supply Estimates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Area: U.S. Lower 48 (Crude Oil Production) PADD 1 New England Central Atlantic Lower Atlantic PADD 2 Cushing, Oklahoma (Crude Oil Stocks) PADD 3 PADD 4 PADD 5 Alaska (Crude Oil Production) PADD's 4 & 5 Period: Weekly 4-Week Average Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 07/29/16 08/05/16 08/12/16 08/19/16 08/26/16 09/02/16 View History Crude Oil Production Domestic Production 8,460 8,445

  18. ENERGY SUPPLY SECURITY 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Sustainable Together ENERGY SUPPLY SECURITY 2014 Emergency Response of IEA Countries Secure Sustainable Together ENERGY SUPPLY SECURITY 2014 Emergency Response of IEA Countries ...

  19. School Supply Drive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    backpacks filled with school supplies. September 16, 2013 Del Norte Credit Union's Baxter Bear takes a moment to pose with some of the backpacks filled with school supplies...

  20. Improved Offshore Wind Resource Assessment in Global Climate Stabilization Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arent, D.; Sullivan, P.; Heimiller, D.; Lopez, A.; Eurek, K.; Badger, J.; Jorgensen, H. E.; Kelly, M.; Clarke, L.; Luckow, P.

    2012-10-01

    This paper introduces a technique for digesting geospatial wind-speed data into areally defined -- country-level, in this case -- wind resource supply curves. We combined gridded wind-vector data for ocean areas with bathymetry maps, country exclusive economic zones, wind turbine power curves, and other datasets and relevant parameters to build supply curves that estimate a country's offshore wind resource defined by resource quality, depth, and distance-from-shore. We include a single set of supply curves -- for a particular assumption set -- and study some implications of including it in a global energy model. We also discuss the importance of downscaling gridded wind vector data to capturing the full resource potential, especially over land areas with complex terrain. This paper includes motivation and background for a statistical downscaling methodology to account for terrain effects with a low computational burden. Finally, we use this forum to sketch a framework for building synthetic electric networks to estimate transmission accessibility of renewable resource sites in remote areas.

  1. Examination of the Regional Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity in the United States through 2015: Projecting from 2009 through 2015 (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Hurlbut, D.; Donohoo, P.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.

    2010-06-01

    This report examines the balance between the demand and supply of new renewable electricity in the United States on a regional basis through 2015. It expands on a 2007 NREL study that assessed the supply and demand balance on a national basis. As with the earlier study, this analysis relies on estimates of renewable energy supplies compared to demand for renewable energy generation needed to meet existing state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies in 28 states, as well as demand by consumers who voluntarily purchase renewable energy. However, it does not address demand by utilities that may procure cost-effective renewables through an integrated resource planning process or otherwise.

  2. Center For Resource Solutions CRS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Solutions (CRS) is a national nonprofit working to build a robust renewable energy market by increasing demand and supply of renewable resources. References: Center For...

  3. Integrating water supply and efficient use options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melendy, C.A.

    1995-06-01

    This paper addresses a new planning process that includes water use efficiency measures, new technologies, and traditional supply options. As water agencies gain experience in influencing customer water use amounts and patterns, the agencies need to incorporate these changes into their planning process. Here is a description of process used successfully by electric and natural gas utilities to compare and select among both supply-side and demand-side resource options.

  4. Feedstock Supply System Logistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-06-01

    Feedstock supply is a significant cost component in the production of biobased fuels, products, and power. The uncertainty of the biomass feedstock supply chain and associated risks are major barriers to procuring capital funding for start-up biorefineries.

  5. Proceedings: fuel-supply seminars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prast, W.G.

    1983-03-01

    The objectives of the seminars were to provide an up-to-date assessment of critical issues affecting fuel-supply and utility-fuel planning. The chief topics were coal, oil and gas, uranium, and utility coal conversion. Presentations were made by EPRI research contractors on the results of ongoing research within the Energy Resources Program and by speakers from the utility and coal industries, government, academia, and the consulting and legal professions. A supplementary paper compiling recent oil and gas supply-and-demand forecast is included in these proceedings. The message emerging from the seminars, and illustrated in numerous ways, is of continuing uncertainty in fuel markets and the necessity for utilities to pursue flexible fuel strategies. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 19 presentations.

  6. Optics Supply Planning System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaylord, J

    2009-04-30

    The purpose of this study is to specify the design for an initial optics supply planning system for NIF, and to present quality assurance and test plans for the construction of the system as specified. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large laser facility that is just starting operations. Thousands of specialized optics are required to operate the laser, and must be exchanged over time based on the laser shot plan and predictions of damage. Careful planning and tracking of optic exchanges is necessary because of the tight inventory of spare optics, and the long lead times for optics procurements and production changes. Automated inventory forecasting and production planning tools are required to replace existing manual processes. The optics groups members who are expected to use the supply planning system are the stakeholders for this project, and are divided into three groups. Each of these groups participated in a requirements specification that was used to develop this design. (1) Optics Management--These are the top level stakeholdersk, and the final decision makers. This group is the interface to shot operations, is ultimately responsible for optics supply, and decides which exchanges will be made. (2) Work Center Managers--This group manages the on site optics processing work centers. They schedule the daily work center operations, and are responsible for developing long term processing, equipment, and staffing plans. (3) Component Engineers--This group manages the vendor contracts for the manufacture of new optics and the off site rework of existing optics. They are responsible for sourcing vendors, negotiating contracts, and managing vendor processes. The scope of this analysis is to describe the structure and design details of a system that will meet all requirements that were described by stakeholders and documented in the analysis model for this project. The design specifies the architecture, components, interfaces, and data stores of the system

  7. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 248,959 - - - - 235,269 8,443 10,330 474,643 7,698 0

  8. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.PDF Table 10. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 573 - - - - 309

  9. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1.PDF Table 11. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 35,538 -

  10. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2.PDF Table 12. PAD District 5 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,146 - - - -

  11. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .PDF Table 2. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 8,031 - - - - 7,589 272 333 15,311 248 0 Natural Gas Plant

  12. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .PDF Table 3. PAD District 1 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,408 - -

  13. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    TABLE4.PDF Table 4. PAD District 1 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 45 - - - -

  14. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    TABLE5.PDF Table 5. PAD District 2 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil .............................................................

  15. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    TABLE6.PDF Table 6. PAD District 2 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,529 - - -

  16. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    TABLE7.PDF Table 7. PAD District 3 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................

  17. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    TABLE8.PDF Table 8. PAD District 3 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 4,737 - - -

  18. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    TABLE9.PDF Table 9. PAD District 4 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil .............................................................

  19. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2016 Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 261,028 - - - - 228,320 3,220 -11,881 492,960

  20. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 June 2016 Table 10. PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil

  1. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 June 2016 Table 11. PAD District 2 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,673 - - - -

  2. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 June 2016 Table 12. PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil

  3. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 June 2016 Table 13. PAD District 3 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................

  4. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 June 2016 Table 14. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6

  5. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 June 2016 Table 15. PAD District 3 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................ 5,357 - - -

  6. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 June 2016 Table 16. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6

  7. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 June 2016 Table 17. PAD District 4 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6 ............................................................

  8. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 June 2016 Table 18. PAD District 4 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil 6

  9. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 June 2016 Table 19. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 643 - - - -

  10. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2016 Table 2. U.S. Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 1,639,778 - - - - 1,420,355

  11. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 June 2016 Table 20. PAD District 4 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil

  12. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 June 2016 Table 21. PAD District 5 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil .............................................................

  13. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 June 2016 Table 22. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil

  14. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 June 2016 Table 23. PAD District 5 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 983 - - - -

  15. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 June 2016 Table 24. PAD District 5 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil

  16. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2016 Table 3. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 8,701 - - - - 7,611 107 -396 16,432 383 0 Natural Gas Plant

  17. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2016 Table 4. U.S. Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports Adjust- ments 1 Stock Change 2 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 3 Crude Oil 4 ............................................................ 9,010 - - - - 7,804 34 259 16,107 481

  18. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2016 Table 5. PAD District 1 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,348 -

  19. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2016 Table 6. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil

  20. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 2016 Table 7. PAD District 1 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 45 - - - - 900

  1. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 June 2016 Table 8. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-June 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil

  2. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 June 2016 Table 9. PAD District 2 - Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity Supply Disposition Ending Stocks Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 50,177

  3. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Table 1. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, September 2005 (Thousand Barrels) Field Production Refinery and Blender Net Production...

  4. Supervisory Supply Systems Analyst

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This position is located in Materials Management Group, which is part of the Logistics Management operations of Supply Chain Services. The Logistics Management organization manages the warehousing...

  5. Self Supplied Balancing Reserves

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Self-Supplied-Balancing-Reserves Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects &...

  6. Supply Management Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Logistics Management organization (NSL), Supply Chain Services (NS), Chief Administrative Office (N). NSL manages the warehousing of materials; the investment...

  7. Advanced Feedstock Supply System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Feedstock Logistics Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 2 * Technologies exist to supply biomass for energy production, but they have limits * Cost, quantity, ...

  8. Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    Accuracy of published data in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, the Petroleum Supply Monthly, and the Petroleum Supply Annual.

  9. Petroleum supply monthly, March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-30

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures in the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. Most time series include preliminary estimates for one month based on the Weekly Petroleum Supply Reporting System; statistics based on the most recent data from the Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (MPSRS); and statistics published in prior issues of the PSM and PSA. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas -- the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the US and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. The statistics are developed from monthly survey forms submitted by respondents to the EIA and from data provided from other sources.

  10. Petroleum supply monthly, June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-28

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures ih the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. Most time series include preliminary estimates for one month based on the Weekly Petroleum Supply Reporting System; statistics based on the most recent data from the Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (MPSRS); and statistics published in prior issues of the PSM and PSA. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas - - the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the US and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. The statistics are developed from monthly survey forms submitted by respondents to the EIA and from data provided firom other sources.

  11. Better Plants Supply Chain Pilot – Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is working with Better Plants Partners to improve energy efficiency throughout their supply chains. Around 40 to 60 percent of a manufacturing company’s energy and carbon footprint can reside upstream in its supply chain—from raw materials, transport, and packaging to the energy consumed in manufacturing processes—but this number can be as high as 80 percent. Coordinating energy management practices between companies and their supply chains has the potential to significantly improve industrial energy productivity and reduce the amount of energy embedded in manufactured products. Through this Supply Chain Pilot, DOE will work with a select group of Better Plants Partners to extend the benefits of energy efficiency to their suppliers. Partners will leverage existing Better Plants Program resources and encourage suppliers to collectively set, track, and meet energy savings goals.

  12. Assessment of electric-utility supply plans, 1978-2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    An assessment of the utilities' forecasts of future electricity supply is presented. An analysis of the demand forecast is contained in a separate document. California Energy Demand 1978 to 2000: A preliminary Assessment (August 1979). An evaluation of the feasibility and implications of supply plans, formulated by the State's electric utilities, to meet their forecasted demand is presented. The report is a critique of the supply plans; therefore, it establishes the foundation for the examining alternatives. Utility resource plans and underlying supply planning assumptions were submitted between March and June 1978 for evaluation, but updated resource plans of July 1979 were used as the basis for the assessment. Supply plans were evaluated from utilities (PG and E, SCE, SDG and E, LADWP, Sacramento Municipal Utility District); cities (Burbank, Anaheim, Glendale, Pasadena, Riverside); Northern California Power Agency; Modesto Irrigation District; Turlock Irrigation District; Imperial Irrigation District; and Department of Water Resources.

  13. Gas Hydrate: A Realistic Future Source of Gas Supply?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A Department of Energy scientist writes in this week's Science magazine that a search is underway for a potentially immense untapped energy resource that, given its global distribution, has the potential to alter existing energy production and supply paradigms.

  14. Global Carbon Fiber Composites Supply Chain Competitiveness Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This analysis identifies key opportunities in the carbon fiber supply chain where resources and investments can help advance the clean energy economy. The report focuses on four application areas...

  15. Automating power supply checkout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laster, J.; Bruno, D.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drozd, J.; Marr, G.; Mi, C.

    2011-03-28

    Power Supply checkout is a necessary, pre-beam, time-critical function. At odds are the desire to decrease the amount of time to perform the checkout while at the same time maximizing the number and types of checks that can be performed and analyzing the results quickly (in case any problems exist that must be addressed). Controls and Power Supply Group personnel have worked together to develop tools to accomplish these goals. Power Supply checkouts are now accomplished in a time-frame of hours rather than days, reducing the number of person-hours needed to accomplish the checkout and making the system available more quickly for beam development. The goal of the Collider-Accelerator Department (CAD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is to provide experimenters with collisions of heavy-ions and polarized protons. The Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) magnets are controlled by 100's of varying types of power supplies. There is a concentrated effort to perform routine maintenance on the supplies during shutdown periods. There is an effort at RHIC to streamline the time needed for system checkout in order to quickly arrive at a period of beam operations for RHIC. This time-critical period is when the checkout of the power supplies is performed as the RHIC ring becomes cold and the supplies are connected to their physical magnets. The checkout process is used to identify problems in voltage and current regulation by examining data signals related to each for problems in settling and regulation (ripple).

  16. Sources for Office Supplies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Consistent with the Office of Management and Budget's savings mandates and the Acting Director of the Office of Procurement and Assistance Management's memorandum entitled "Sources for Office Supplies," dated September 9, 2011, the Department of Energy (DOE) supports utilization of: (1) the General Service Administration's (GSA) Blanket Purchase Agreements (BPA) under the Federal Strategic Sourcing Initiative for Office Supplies Second Generation (FSSI OS2); and/or (2) the DOE's AbilityOne Supply Stores, Paperclips, Etc., (Forrestal Building and Germantown). More information on the FSSI can be found at http://www.gsa.gov/fssi.

  17. Lifting BLS Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarychev, Michael

    2007-08-01

    This note describes BLS power supplies lifting techniques and provides stress calculations for lifting plate and handles bolts. BLS power supply weight is about 120 Lbs, with the center of gravity shifted toward the right front side. A lifting plate is used to attach a power supply to a crane or a hoist. Stress calculations show that safety factors for lifting plate are 12.9 (vs. 5 required) for ultimate stress and 5.7 (vs. 3 required) for yield stress. Safety factor for shackle bolt thread shear load is 37, and safety factor for bolts that attach handles is 12.8.

  18. Updated U.S. Geothermal Supply Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petty, S.; Porro, G.

    2007-03-01

    This paper documents the approach taken to characterize and represent an updated assessment of U.S. geothermal supply for use in forecasting the penetration of geothermal electrical generation in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). This work is motivated by several factors: The supply characterization used as the basis of several recent U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) forecasts of geothermal capacity is outdated; additional geothermal resource assessments have been published; and a new costing tool that incorporates current technology, engineering practices, and associated costs has been released.

  19. Preliminary assessment of the availability of U.S. natural gas resources to meet U.S. transportation energy demand.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M. K.; Moore, J. S.

    2002-03-04

    Recent studies have indicated that substitutes for conventional petroleum resources will be needed to meet U.S. transportation energy demand in the first half of this century. One possible substitute is natural gas which can be used as a transportation fuel directly in compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas vehicles or as resource fuel for the production of hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles. This paper contains a preliminary assessment of the availability of U.S. natural gas resources to meet future U.S. transportation fuel demand. Several scenarios of natural gas demand, including transportation demand, in the U.S. to 2050 are developed. Natural gas resource estimates for the U. S. are discussed. Potential Canadian and Mexican exports to the U.S. are estimated. Two scenarios of potential imports from outside North America are also developed. Considering all these potential imports, U.S. natural gas production requirements to 2050 to meet the demand scenarios are developed and compared with the estimates of U.S. natural gas resources. The comparison results in a conclusion that (1) given the assumptions made, there are likely to be supply constraints on the availability of U.S. natural gas supply post-2020 and (2) if natural gas use in transportation grows substantially, it will have to compete with other sectors of the economy for that supply-constrained natural gas.

  20. Supply Chain | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACSupply Chain content top National Transportation Fuels Model Posted by tmanzan on Oct 3, 2012 in | Comments 0 comments National Transportation Fuels Model This model informs analyses of the availability of transportation fuel in the event the fuel supply chain is disrupted. The portion of the fuel supply system represented by the network model (see figure) spans from oil fields to fuel distribution terminals. Different components of this system (e.g., crude oil import terminals, refineries,

  1. Petroleum Supply Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.PDF Table 13. Crude Oil Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks by PAD District, January 2014 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Process PAD Districts U.S. Total 1 2 3 4 5 Total Daily Average Supply Field Production .................................................... 1,408 47,406 146,833 17,773 35,538 248,959 8,031 Alaskan ............................................................. - - - - - - - - - 16,799 542 Lower 48 States ................................................ - - - - -

  2. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 June 2016 Appendix D Northeast Reserves Reserves inventories are not considered to be in the commercial sector and are excluded from EIA's commercial motor gasoline and distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics, such as those reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and This Week In Petroleum. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve classifed as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) Terminal Operator Location Thousand Barrels Buckeye

  3. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 June 2016 Table 25. Crude Oil Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks by PAD District, June 2016 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Process PAD Districts U.S. Total 1 2 3 4 5 Total Daily Average Supply Field Production .................................................... 1,348 50,177 160,724 19,300 29,479 261,028 8,701 Alaskan ............................................................. - - - - - - - - - 14,103 470 Lower 48 States ................................................ - - - - -

  4. Evaluating New Hydropower Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Energy Potential from New Stream-reach Development in the United States ... The estimated technical resource capac- ity for new stream-reach development is 84.7 GW, ...

  5. Using Integrated Resource Planning to Encourage Investment in Cost-Effective Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shenot, John

    2011-09-01

    Describes how utility planning processes that allow demand-side resources to compete with supply-side resources can promote cost-effective energy efficiency.

  6. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  7. Petroleum supply monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blends, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  8. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Supply Monthly with data for June 2016 August 2016 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Monthly, ii June 2016 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report

  9. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Mark; Eaton, Laurence M; Graham, Robin Lambert; Langholtz, Matthew H; Perlack, Robert D; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Stokes, Bryce; Brandt, Craig C

    2011-08-01

    The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were

  10. 1999 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1999-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book) is published annually by BPA and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to its regional power sales contracts. Specifically, BPA uses the information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. The White Book will not be used in calculations for the 2002 regional power sales contract subscription process. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions, including expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a medium forecast of electricity consumption. The forecasted future electricity demands--firm loads--are subtracted from the projected capability of existing and ''contracted for'' resources to determine whether BPA and the region will be surplus or deficit. If Federal system resources are greater than loads in any particular year or month, there is a surplus of energy

  11. Supply Chain Management Center | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Supply Chain Management Center

  12. STEO November 2012 - natural gas supply

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    natural gas supplies plentiful to help meet higher demand this winter As Americans move deeper into the winter heating season, the amount of U.S. natural gas in underground storage reached an estimated 3.9 trillion cubic feet at the end of October. That's up 3 percent from the same time last year and a record high says the U.S. Energy Information Administration in its new monthly short-term energy outlook. The bigger supply will help meet U.S. residential natural gas demand this winter, which is

  13. Petroleum supply monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    Information on the supply and distribution of petroleum and petroleum products in the US as of March 1983 is presented. Data include statistics on crude oil, motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gases, imports, exports, stocks, and transport. This issue also features 2 articles entitled: Summer Gasoline Overview and Principal Factors Influencing Motor Gasoline Demand. (DMC)

  14. Supply Stores | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supply Stores Supply Stores DOE Self Service Supply Stores at Headquarters Operated by: Base Supply Center and the Winston-Salem Industries for the Blind DOE Self-Service Supply Stores Hours of Operation: 9:00 a.m. through 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday DOE Supply Stores Locations Location Phone Fax Forrestal Room GA-171 (202) 554-1451 (202) 554-1452 (202) 554-7074 Germantown Room R-008 (301) 515-9109 (301) 515-9206 (301) 515-8751 The stores provide an Office Supply Product inventory that is

  15. 2006 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book), which is published annually by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), establishes one of the planning bases for supplying electricity to customers. The White Book contains projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. The White Book also contains information obtained from formalized resource planning reports and data submittals including those from individual utilities, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council), and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues, although the database that generates the data for the White Book analysis contributes to the development of BPA's inventory and ratemaking processes. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions that include expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The load resource balance of both the Federal system and the region is determined by comparing resource availability to an expected level of total retail electricity consumption. Resources include projected energy capability plus contract purchases. Loads include a forecast of retail obligations plus contract obligations. Surplus energy is available when resources are greater than loads. This surplus energy could be marketed to increase revenues. Energy deficits occur when resources are less than loads. These energy deficits will be met by any combination of the following: better-than-critical water conditions, demand-side management and conservation programs

  16. Proton driver power supply system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Jach and D. Wolff

    2002-06-03

    This paper describes magnet power supply system for a proposed Proton Driver at Fermilab. The magnet power supply system consists of resonant dipole/quadrupole power supply system, quadrupole tracking, dipole correction (horizontal and vertical) and sextupole power supply systems. This paper also describes preliminary design of the power distribution system supplying 13.8 kV power to all proton Driver electrical systems.

  17. Middle East fuel supply & gas exports for power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, G.K.; Newendorp, T.

    1995-12-31

    The Middle East countries that border on, or are near, the Persian Gulf hold over 65% of the world`s estimated proven crude oil reserves and 32% of the world`s estimated proven natural gas reserves. In fact, approximately 5% of the world`s total proven gas reserves are located in Qatar`s offshore North Field. This large natural gas/condensate field is currently under development to supply three LNG export projects, as well as a sub-sea pipeline proposal to export gas to Pakistan. The Middle East will continue to be a major source of crude oil and oil products to world petroleum markets, including fuel for existing and future base load, intermediate cycling and peaking electric generation plants. In addition, as the Persian Gulf countries turn their attention to exploiting their natural gas resources, the fast-growing need for electricity in the Asia-Pacific and east Africa areas offers a potential market for both pipeline and LNG export opportunities to fuel high efficiency, gas-fired combustion turbine power plants. Mr. Mitchell`s portion of this paper will discuss the background, status and timing of several Middle Eastern gas export projects that have been proposed. These large gas export projects are difficult and costly to develop and finance. Consequently, any IPP developers that are considering gas-fired projects which require Mid-East LNG as a fuel source, should understand the numerous sources and timing to securing project debt, loan terms and conditions, and, restrictions/credit rating issues associated with securing financing for these gas export projects. Mr. Newendorp`s section of the paper will cover the financing aspects of these projects, providing IPP developers with additional considerations in selecting the primary fuel supply for an Asian-Pacific or east African electric generation project.

  18. Petroleum supply annual 1994, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  19. Petroleum supply annual 1992. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-27

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1992 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. This second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1992, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  20. Petroleum supply annual 1992. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-27

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1992 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. This second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1992, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  1. Petroleum supply annual, 1997. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1997 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1997, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  2. Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and selected Refinery Statistics each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1995, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  3. Petroleum supply annual 1996: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1996 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Capacity; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1996, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  4. Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. This second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  5. Marketing Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expand Utility Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Marketing Resources Marketing Portal Reports, Publications, and Research Utility Toolkit...

  6. Human Resources | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Resources

  7. Transportation Fuel Supply | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Equipment (2010 MECS) Transportation Equipment (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Transportation Equipment Sector (NAICS 336) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Transportation Equipment (125.57 KB) More Documents & Publications MECS 2006 - Transportation Equipment

    SheetsTransportation Fuel Supply content top

  8. The EURATOM Supply Agency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lightner, J.

    1989-11-01

    With the coming liberalization of trade and industry within the European Community (EC) and a more centrally-coordinated EC external trade policy, it is timely to ask if in the 1990s there will be any significant changes in the commercial relations between the EC and non-EC companies trading in nuclear fuel. The key vehicle for implementing any change of policy would probably be the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM) Supply Agency in Brussels, which is charged under the EURATOM Treaty with overseeing the equitable supply of nuclear fuel to and among EC companies. The EURATOM Supply Agency (the Agency) is a signatory to almost all EC-company contracts for transactions that occur on the territory of the Community, which includes Belgium, Denmark, France, the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), Great Britain, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain. During the 1980s, the Supply Agency has rarely tried to influence the commercial decisions of EC member companies. The nuclear fuel industry has largely perceived the Agency as an administrative office that registers contracts and maintains relations with some outside governments, particularly Australia, Canada, and the USA. However, in 1988 the Agency began to have a more direct commercial impact when it reviewed the practice-previously conducted routinely by the EURATOM Safeguards Directorate in Luxembourg at the request of EC-member companies-of swapping safeguards obligations on equivalent quantities of uranium at different locations (flag swapping). The Agency`s actions inhibiting flag swaps, as well as a related de facto policy restricting material swaps of Southern African uranium, caused it to be viewed as obstructive by some EC companies. During 1989 the discussion about flag swaps and swaps involving South African and Namibian uranium has subsided, and a far-reaching discussion has arisen about EC trade policy in general.

  9. Energy Supply Transformation Needed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supply Transformation Needed - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  10. Unconventional Energy Resources: 2011 Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collaboration: American Association of Petroleum Geologists

    2011-12-15

    This report contains nine unconventional energy resource commodity summaries prepared by committees of the Energy Minerals Division (EMD) of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. Unconventional energy resources, as used in this report, are those energy resources that do not occur in discrete oil or gas reservoirs held in structural or stratigraphic traps in sedimentary basins. These resources include coal, coalbed methane, gas hydrates, tight gas sands, gas shale and shale oil, geothermal resources, oil sands, oil shale, and uranium resources. Current U.S. and global research and development activities are summarized for each unconventional energy commodity in the topical sections of this report. Coal and uranium are expected to supply a significant portion of the world's energy mix in coming years. Coalbed methane continues to supply about 9% of the U.S. gas production and exploration is expanding in other countries. Recently, natural gas produced from shale and low-permeability (tight) sandstone has made a significant contribution to the energy supply of the United States and is an increasing target for exploration around the world. In addition, oil from shale and heavy oil from sandstone are a new exploration focus in many areas (including the Green River area of Wyoming and northern Alberta). In recent years, research in the areas of geothermal energy sources and gas hydrates has continued to advance. Reviews of the current research and the stages of development of these unconventional energy resources are described in the various sections of this report.

  11. 2009 Geothermal, Co-Production, and GSHP Supply Curves | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 2009 Geothermal, Co-Production, and GSHP Supply Curves 2009 Geothermal, Co-Production, and GSHP Supply Curves Project objective: Generate supply/deployment curve input for geothermal technologies for use in market penetration models. analysis_augustine_supply_curves.pdf (861.72 KB) More Documents & Publications SMU Geothermal Conference 2011 - Geothermal Technologies Program track 1: systems analysis | geothermal 2015 peer review National Geothermal Resource Assessment and

  12. Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 - Oil and Gas Supply...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    explicitly modeled to determine the direct impacts on supply, reserves, and various economic parameters. The success of the technology program is measured by estimating the...

  13. Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in New Department of Energy Study | Department of Energy Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental Profile for Natural Gas Revealed in New Department of Energy Study August 23, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The nation's large resource base of natural gas can be used for cost-effective power generation, with environmental burdens coming primarily from fuel combustion, not

  14. Water resources and the urban environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loucks, E.D.

    1998-07-01

    140 abstracts from the conference cover topics such as urban stormwater management; geographic information systems, hydrologic and hydraulic computer modeling; groundwater analysis and management; drinking water supply and quality; and international water resources issues.

  15. Diversifying Supply | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diversifying Supply diagram for focus area 1 diversifying supply (A click on the org chart image will lead to a pdf version that includes hotlinks for the e-mail addresses of the leaders.)

  16. Feedstock Supply | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supply Feedstock Supply The development of efficient, sustainable biomass feedstock supply systems supports a diversified energy portfolio and increased U.S. competitiveness in the global quest for clean energy technologies. This page provides information directly related to feedstock supply: Feedstock Types Feedstock Production Sustainability. Feedstock Types A variety of biomass feedstocks can be used to produce energy (including transportation fuels) and bio-based products. The Bioenergy

  17. Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Brian

    2015-06-30

    Full realization of the potential of what might be considered “low-grade” geothermal resources will require that we examine many more uses for the heat than traditional electricity generation. To demonstrate that geothermal energy truly has the potential to be a national energy source we will be designing, assessing, and evaluating innovative uses for geothermal-produced water such as hybrid biomass-geothermal cogeneration of electricity and district heating and efficiency improvements to the use of cellulosic biomass in addition to utilization of geothermal in district heating for community redevelopment projects. The objectives of this project were: 1) to perform a techno-economic analysis of the integration and utilization potential of low-temperature geothermal sources. Innovative uses of low-enthalpy geothermal water were designed and examined for their ability to offset fossil fuels and decrease CO2 emissions. 2) To perform process optimizations and economic analyses of processes that can utilize low-temperature geothermal fluids. These processes included electricity generation using biomass and district heating systems. 3) To scale up and generalize the results of three case study locations to develop a regionalized model of the utilization of low-temperature geothermal resources. A national-level, GIS-based, low-temperature geothermal resource supply model was developed and used to develop a series of national supply curves. We performed an in-depth analysis of the low-temperature geothermal resources that dominate the eastern half of the United States. The final products of this study include 17 publications, an updated version of the cost estimation software GEOPHIRES, and direct-use supply curves for low-temperature utilization of geothermal resources. The supply curves for direct use geothermal include utilization from known hydrothermal, undiscovered hydrothermal, and near-hydrothermal EGS resources and presented these results at the Stanford

  18. Contacts & Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contacts & Resources Contacts & Resources Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 envoutreach@lanl.gov Public...

  19. Teacher Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Teacher Resources Teacher Resources The Bradbury Science Museum offers teacher resources for your visit. Scavenger Hunts Scavenger Hunt (pdf) Scavenger Hunt Key (pdf) Bradbury Science Museum newsletter The current issue can be found at the Newsletter page. Los Alamos Teachers' Resource Book Informal educators throughout the Los Alamos School District gather periodically to share ideas and collaborate. We have assembled a collection of flyers about our programs that serve classroom teachers into

  20. Resources - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Resources Hero.jpg Resources Research Introduction Thrusts Library Resources Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database JCAP offers a number of databases and simulation tools for solar-fuel generator researchers and developers. User Facilities Expert Team solarfuels1.jpg

  1. Switching power supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihalka, A.M.

    1984-06-05

    The invention is a repratable capacitor charging, switching power supply. A ferrite transformer steps up a dc input. The transformer primary is in a full bridge configuration utilizing power MOSFETs as the bridge switches. The transformer secondary is fed into a high voltage, full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The transformer is designed to provide adequate leakage inductance to limit capacitor current. The MOSFETs are switched to the variable frequency from 20 to 50 kHz to charge a capacitor from 0.6 kV. The peak current in a transformer primary and secondary is controlled by increasing the pulse width as the capacitor charges. A digital ripple counter counts pulses and after a preselected desired number is reached an up-counter is clocked.

  2. Sustainable Biomass Supply Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erin Searcy; Dave Muth; Erin Wilkerson; Shahab Sokansanj; Bryan Jenkins; Peter Titman; Nathan Parker; Quinn Hart; Richard Nelson

    2009-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) aims to displace 30% of the 2004 gasoline use (60 billion gal/yr) with biofuels by 2030 as outlined in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which will require 700 million tons of biomass to be sustainably delivered to biorefineries annually. Lignocellulosic biomass will make an important contribution towards meeting DOEs ethanol production goals. For the biofuels industry to be an economically viable enterprise, the feedstock supply system (i.e., moving the biomass from the field to the refinery) cannot contribute more that 30% of the total cost of the biofuel production. The Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Davis and Kansas State University are developing a set of tools for identifying economical, sustainable feedstocks on a regional basis based on biorefinery siting.

  3. NNSA TRITIUM SUPPLY CHAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyrick, Steven; Cordaro, Joseph; Founds, Nanette; Chambellan, Curtis

    2013-08-21

    Savannah River Site plays a critical role in the Tritium Production Supply Chain for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The entire process includes: • Production of Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods (TPBARs) at the Westinghouse WesDyne Nuclear Fuels Plant in Columbia, South Carolina • Production of unobligated Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) at the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) in Portsmouth, Ohio • Irradiation of TPBARs with the LEU at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Watts Bar Reactor • Extraction of tritium from the irradiated TPBARs at the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) at Savannah River Site • Processing the tritium at the Savannah River Site, which includes removal of nonhydrogen species and separation of the hydrogen isotopes of protium, deuterium and tritium.

  4. Solar Resources by Class and Country - Datasets - OpenEI Datasets

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Resources by Class and Country These estimates are derived from the best available solar resource data available to NREL. Resources are organized by class and country....

  5. Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Onshore Geopressured...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AAPG 2012 Annual Convention and Exhibition Ariel Esposito and Chad Augustine April 24, 2012 NRELPR-6A20-54999 2 * Geopressured Geothermal o Reservoirs characterized by pore...

  6. Advanced Supply System Design Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    weather conditions; if drought, floods, wind, hail etc. damage the crops in a resource rich region, then there is even greater importance placed on stranded resource areas. ...

  7. Modeling renewable energy resources in integrated resource planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, D.; Neil, C.; Taylor, A.

    1994-06-01

    Including renewable energy resources in integrated resource planning (IRP) requires that utility planning models properly consider the relevant attributes of the different renewable resources in addition to conventional supply-side and demand-side options. Otherwise, a utility`s resource plan is unlikely to have an appropriate balance of the various resource options. The current trend toward regulatory set-asides for renewable resources is motivated in part by the perception that the capabilities of current utility planning models are inadequate with regard to renewable resources. Adequate modeling capabilities and utility planning practices are a necessary prerequisite to the long-term penetration of renewable resources into the electric utility industry`s resource mix. This report presents a review of utility planning models conducted for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The review examines the capabilities of utility planning models to address key issues in the choice between renewable resources and other options. The purpose of this review is to provide a basis for identifying high priority areas for advancing the state of the art.

  8. Tax revenue and innovations in natural gas supply: New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulibarri, C.A.; Marsh, T.L.

    1994-10-01

    This paper develops an econometric model of natural gas supply at the state-level using New Mexico as a case study. The supply model is estimated using annual time series observations on production levels, delivered prices, proved reserves, existing wells, and extraction costs. The authors validate the model against historical data and then use it to consider the fiscal impacts on state tax revenue from innovations in extraction technologies.

  9. Part II: Section B - Supplies, Services, and Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICE/COSTS DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M938 Section B - ii PART I SECTION B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICE/COSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS B.1 Service Being Acquired ......................................................................................... 1 B.2 Obligation of Funds and Financial Limitations ...................................................... 1 B.3 Transition Cost, Estimated Costs and Maximum Available Fee ............................ 1 B.4 Allowability

  10. Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum & Other Liquids Reports Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 1 With Data for 2014 | Release Date: September 25, 2015 | Next Release Date: September 2016 Previous Issues Year: 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Volume 1 - Final annual data for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. Volume 1 Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National Statistics 1 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and

  11. Lab Supplies | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Supplies The Ames Laboratory Storeroom has many lab supplies available for purchase. Please see commodity numbers 01-08, 12, 15-16 in the storeroom catalog for all available products. For a more general listing of products, reference the Storeroom Services website here. Common Lab Supplies purchased from the Storeroom: Various sizes of batteries Various sizes of bottles Various sizes of beakers Various sizes of vials Various sizes of flasks Various sizes of cylinders Various sizes of jars

  12. Uncertainties in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Advanced Biomass Feedstock Logistics Supply Chains in Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cafferty, Kara G.; Searcy, Erin M.; Nguyen, Long; Spatari, Sabrina

    2014-11-01

    To meet Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) cellulosic biofuel mandates, the United States will require an annual domestic supply of about 242 million Mg of biomass by 2022. To improve the feedstock logistics of lignocellulosic biofuels and access available biomass resources from areas with varying yields, commodity systems have been proposed and designed to deliver on-spec biomass feedstocks at preprocessing “depots”, which densify and stabilize the biomass prior to long-distance transport and delivery to centralized biorefineries. The harvesting, preprocessing, and logistics (HPL) of biomass commodity supply chains thus could introduce spatially variable environmental impacts into the biofuel life cycle due to needing to harvest, move, and preprocess biomass from multiple distances that have variable spatial density. This study examines the uncertainty in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of corn stover logisticsHPL within a bio-ethanol supply chain in the state of Kansas, where sustainable biomass supply varies spatially. Two scenarios were evaluated each having a different number of depots of varying capacity and location within Kansas relative to a central commodity-receiving biorefinery to test GHG emissions uncertainty. Monte Carlo simulation was used to estimate the spatial uncertainty in the HPL gate-to-gate sequence. The results show that the transport of densified biomass introduces the highest variability and contribution to the carbon footprint of the logistics HPL supply chain (0.2-13 g CO2e/MJ). Moreover, depending upon the biomass availability and its spatial density and surrounding transportation infrastructure (road and rail), logistics HPL processes can increase the variability in life cycle environmental impacts for lignocellulosic biofuels. Within Kansas, life cycle GHG emissions could range from 24 to 41 g CO2e/MJ depending upon the location, size and number of preprocessing depots constructed. However, this

  13. Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon 32525.pdf More Documents & Publications Analysis of a Cluster Strategy for Near Term Hydrogen Infrastructure Rollout in Southern California Hydrogen Delivery ...

  14. Fort Carson Wind Resource Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2012-10-01

    This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and economic potential of a wind turbine project on a ridge in the southeastern portion of the Fort Carson Army base.

  15. Online Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    online resources Online Resources Fusion and Plasma Physics Fusion Energy Education FuseEdWeb: Fusion Energy Education A Webby-award-winning site sponsored by LLNL and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory with information and links to the world of fusion and plasma physics. General Atomics Fusion Education General Atomics Fusion Education Fusion education resources for teachers and students from General Atomics. Lasers and Photon Science Optics for Kids Optics 4 Kids Learn about optics-the

  16. Subcontractor Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community, Environment » Environmental Stewardship » Subcontactor Resources Subcontractor Resources We make it easy for you to work for Environmental Programs. Contact Environmental Programs Directorate Office (505) 606-2337 Points of Contact Subcontracts Manager Robin Reynolds Badging LANL TRU Program (LTP) - Mary Thronas Corrective Actions Program (CAP) - Tammie Fredenburg Records Debi Guffee Training Lisarae Lattin Resources Badge request form (docx) Injury illness card (pdf) Laboratory

  17. Business resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Business resources Business resources Setting new standards and small business initiatives within NNSA that will contribute to developing and strengthening our strategic partners for national security challenges. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email Broaden your market-find more resources with other labs, organizations LANL encourages business owners to fully research the Laboratory and to also market their services and products to other businesses, small business programs of other

  18. Additional Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following resources are focused on Federal new construction and major renovation projects, sustainable construction, and the role of renewable energy technologies in such facilities. These...

  19. Subcontractor Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robin Reynolds Badging LANL TRU Program (LTP) - Mary Thronas Corrective Actions Program (CAP) - Tammie Fredenburg Records Debi Guffee Training Lisarae Lattin Resources Badge...

  20. Hydrothermal Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    These geothermal systems can occur in widely diverse geologic settings, sometimes without clear surface manifestations of the underlying resource. In 2008, the U.S. Geological ...

  1. NREL: Wind Research - Offshore Wind Resource Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Resource Characterization Map of the United States, showing the wind potential of offshore areas across the country. Enlarge image US offshore wind speed estimates at 90-m ...

  2. Repetitive resonant railgun power supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, Emanuel M. (Los Alamos, NM); Nunnally, William C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. The supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles.

  3. Repetitive resonant railgun power supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, E.M.; Nunnally, W.C.

    1985-06-19

    A repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. The supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles.

  4. Petroleum supply monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This publication the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Data presented are divided into Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  5. NATURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.F. Fenster

    2000-12-11

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the scientific work that was performed to evaluate and assess the occurrence and economic potential of natural resources within the geologic setting of the Yucca Mountain area. The extent of the regional areas of investigation for each commodity differs and those areas are described in more detail in the major subsections of this report. Natural resource assessments have focused on an area defined as the ''conceptual controlled area'' because of the requirements contained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulation, 10 CFR Part 60, to define long-term boundaries for potential radionuclide releases. New requirements (proposed 10 CFR Part 63 [Dyer 1999]) have obviated the need for defining such an area. However, for the purposes of this report, the area being discussed, in most cases, is the previously defined ''conceptual controlled area'', now renamed the ''natural resources site study area'' for this report (shown on Figure 1). Resource potential can be difficult to assess because it is dependent upon many factors, including economics (demand, supply, cost), the potential discovery of new uses for resources, or the potential discovery of synthetics to replace natural resource use. The evaluations summarized are based on present-day use and economic potential of the resources. The objective of this report is to summarize the existing reports and information for the Yucca Mountain area on: (1) Metallic mineral and mined energy resources (such as gold, silver, etc., including uranium); (2) Industrial rocks and minerals (such as sand, gravel, building stone, etc.); (3) Hydrocarbons (including oil, natural gas, tar sands, oil shales, and coal); and (4) Geothermal resources. Groundwater is present at the Yucca Mountain site at depths ranging from 500 to 750 m (about 1,600 to 2,500 ft) below the ground surface. Groundwater resources are not discussed in this report, but are planned to be included in the hydrology

  6. Billion-Ton Update and Ongoing Resource Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2011 Update Combined into Composite * Agricultural resources - Crop residues - Grains to ... * Secondary processing residues and wastes are estimated using technical ...

  7. National Geothermal Resource Assessment and Classification | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Resource Assessment and Classification National Geothermal Resource Assessment and Classification This work will enable lower risk/cost deployment of conventional and EGS geothermal power. USGS is also supporting GTP input to DOE National Energy Modeling by providing resource assessment data by geothermal region as input to GTP supply curves. analysis_williams_resource_assessment.pdf (661.92 KB) More Documents & Publications National Geothermal Resource Assessment and

  8. Issues and Methods for Estimating the Percentage Share of Ethanol...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Energy Information Administration 1 Issues and Methods for Estimating the Share of Ethanol in the Motor Gasoline Supply U.S. Energy Information Administration October 6, 2011...

  9. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagerman, G.; Scott, G.

    2011-12-01

    This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources.

  10. Uninterruptible power supply cogeneration system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gottfried, C.F.

    1987-08-11

    A power system is described for providing an uninterruptible power supply comprising: a first generator means for supplying energy to a primary load; a second generator means connected to an electrical utility, the first and second generator means being connected by a common shaft, the first generator means being electrically isolated from the electrical utility; prime mover means connected to the common shaft, the prime mover means for supplying mechanical energy to the shaft; and controller means interposed electrically between the second generator means and the secondary external load, the controller means causing the second generator means to become disconnected from the secondary load upon interruptions in the secondary load.

  11. Petroleum supply monthly, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographical regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US.

  12. Petroleum supply monthly, February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly presents data describing the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US. The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders; operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. Data are divided into two sections: Summary statistics and Detailed statistics.

  13. Multiple resonant railgun power supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, E.M.; Nunnally, W.C.

    1985-06-19

    A multiple repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. A plurality of serially connected paired parallel rails are powered by similar power supplies. Each supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles. The multiple serial operation permits relatively small energy components to deliver overall relatively large amounts of energy to the projectiles being propelled.

  14. Multiple resonant railgun power supply

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, Emanuel M. (Los Alamos, NM); Nunnally, William C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A multiple repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. A plurality of serially connected paired parallel rails are powered by similar power supplies. Each supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles. The multiple serial operation permits relatively small energy components to deliver overall relatively large amounts of energy to the projectiles being propelled.

  15. Petroleum Supply Monthly September 2004

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Ranges in Inventory Graphs XLS HTML Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 1.2MB . . Front Matter . Petroleum Supply Monthly Cover Page, Preface, and Table of...

  16. Advanced Supply System Validation Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is hosting the Advanced Supply System Validation Workshop on February 3-4, 2015, in Golden, Colorado. The purpose of the workshop is to bring together a...

  17. Archaeological Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Archaeological Resources Archaeological Resources Our environmental stewardship commitment: we will cleanup the past, minimize impacts for current environmental operations, and create a sustainable future. April 12, 2012 Nake'muu Standing and previously collapsed walls at Nake'muu - note the window opening in the wall in the forefront of the photograph. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email The results of the

  18. School supply drive winding down

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    School Supply Drive Winding Down Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit School supply drive winding down The drive is collecting materials for schools throughout Northern New Mexico and will be distributed by the Lab and Self Help, Inc. August 1, 2012 dummy image Read our archives Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Notebooks,

  19. TRANSISTOR HIGH VOLTAGE POWER SUPPLY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Driver, G.E.

    1958-07-15

    High voltage, direct current power supplies are described for use with battery powered nuclear detection equipment. The particular advantages of the power supply described, are increased efficiency and reduced size and welght brought about by the use of transistors in the circuit. An important feature resides tn the employment of a pair of transistors in an alternatefiring oscillator circuit having a coupling transformer and other circuit components which are used for interconnecting the various electrodes of the transistors.

  20. Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual, Volume 2 With Data for 2014 | Release Date: September 25, 2015 | Next Release Date: September 2016 Previous Issues Year: 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Volume 2 - Final monthly statistics for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. Volume 2 Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National Statistics 1 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum

  1. Chemical Supply Chain Analysis | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACCapabilitiesChemical Supply Chain Analysis content top Chemical Supply Chain Analysis NISAC has developed a range of capabilities for analyzing the consequences of disruptions to the chemical manufacturing industry. Each capability provides a different but complementary perspective on the questions of interest-questions like Given an event, will the entire chemical sector be impacted or just parts? Which chemicals, plants, and complexes could be impacted? In which regions of the country?

  2. Petroleum supply monthly, April 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-06-26

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly describe (PSM) the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply.'' Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

  3. Valuation of ecological resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Bilyard, G.R.; Link, S.O.; Ricci, P.F.; Seely, H.E.; Ulibarri, C.A.; Westerdahl, H.E.

    1995-04-01

    Ecological resources are resources that have functional value to ecosystems. Frequently, these functions are overlooked in terms of the value they provide to humans. Environmental economics is in search of an appropriate analysis framework for such resources. In such a framework, it is essential to distinguish between two related subsets of information: (1) ecological processes that have intrinsic value to natural ecosystems; and (2) ecological functions that are values by humans. The present study addresses these concerns by identifying a habitat that is being displaced by development, and by measuring the human and ecological values associated with the ecological resources in that habitat. It is also essential to determine which functions are mutually exclusive and which are, in effect, complementary or products of joint production. The authors apply several resource valuation tools, including contingent valuation methodology (CVM), travel cost methodology (TCM), and hedonic damage-pricing (HDP). One way to derive upper-limit values for more difficult-to-value functions is through the use of human analogs, because human-engineered systems are relatively inefficient at supplying the desired services when compared with natural systems. Where data on the relative efficiencies of natural systems and human analogs exist, it is possible to adjust the costs of providing the human analog by the relative efficiency of the natural system to obtain a more realistic value of the function under consideration. The authors demonstrate this approach in an environmental economic case study of the environmental services rendered by shrub-steppe habitats of Benton County, Washington State.

  4. LNG links remote supplies and markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avidan, A.A.; Gardner, R.E.; Nelson, D.; Borrelli, E.N.; Rethore, T.J.

    1997-06-02

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) has established a niche for itself by matching remote gas supplies to markets that both lacked indigenous gas reserves and felt threatened in the aftermath of the energy crises of the 1970s and 1980s. It has provided a cost-effective energy source for these markets, while also offering an environmentally friendly fuel long before that was fashionable. The introduction of natural-gas use via LNG in the early years (mostly into France and Japan) has also allowed LNG to play a major role in developing gas infrastructure. Today, natural gas, often supplied as LNG, is particularly well-suited for use in the combined cycle technology used in independent power generation projects (IPPs). Today, LNG players cannot simply focus on monetizing gas resources. Instead, they must adapt their projects to meet the needs of changing markets. The impact of these changes on the LNG industry has been felt throughout the value chain from finding and producing gas, gas treatment, liquefaction, transport as a liquid, receiving terminals and regasification, and finally, to consumption by power producers, industrial users, and households. These factors have influenced the evolution of the LNG industry and have implications for the future of LNG, particularly in the context of worldwide natural gas.

  5. Geo Hydro Supply | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydro Supply Jump to: navigation, search Name: Geo Hydro Supply Address: 997 State Route 93 NW Place: Sugarcreek, Ohio Zip: 44681 Sector: Geothermal energy Phone Number:...

  6. ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS: PROCUREMENT, SUPPLY, AND GRANT RECORDS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS: PROCUREMENT, SUPPLY, AND GRANT RECORDS Procurement and supply records document the acquisition of goods and non-personal services, controlling the volume of ...

  7. Airtricity Energy Supply Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Airtricity Energy Supply Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Airtricity Energy Supply Ltd Place: Belfast, United Kingdom Zip: BT2 7AF Product: Energy supplier owned by Airtricity...

  8. Alternate Water Supply System, Riverton, WY, Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Alternate Water Supply System Flushing Report Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site January ... left blank DOE-LM1570-2008 Alternate Water Supply System Flushing Report Riverton, ...

  9. Training Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Learning and Workforce Development » Training Resources Training Resources Training Resources Type Training Resources

  10. GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide: Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process, from the first step of defining the estimate's purpose to the last step of updating the estimate to reflect actual costs and changes. Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process (75.75 KB) Key Resources PMCDP EVMS PARS IIe FPD Resource Center PM Newsletter Forms and Templates More Documents & Publications

  11. Petroleum Supply Monthly, August 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-30

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) district movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

  12. Petroleum supply monthly, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-30

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administrations for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics. 65 tabs.

  13. Petroleum Supply Monthly, September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timelines and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: Petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  14. Petroleum supply monthly, January 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 states and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in ''Primary Supply.'' Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics. 12 figs., 46 tabs.

  15. Petroleum supply monthly, October 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-27

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately, represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

  16. Petroleum supply monthly, April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-04

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  17. Petroleum supply monthly, May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-27

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum supply annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  18. Petroleum supply monthly, February 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-02

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

  19. Petroleum supply monthly, December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-29

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

  20. Petroleum supply monthly, June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-28

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  1. Petroleum monthly supply, November 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-30

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

  2. Petroleum supply monthly, October 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-26

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  3. Petroleum supply monthly, July 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-26

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  4. Petroleum supply monthly, January 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-15

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  5. Petroleum supply monthly, January 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-27

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

  6. Petroleum supply monthly, November 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-29

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  7. Petroleum supply monthly, October 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-27

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: Petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  8. Analyses of mixed-hydrocarbon binary thermodynamic cycles for moderate-temperature geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demuth, O.J.

    1981-02-01

    A number of binary geothermal cycles utilizing mixed hydrocarbon working fluids were analyzed with the overall objective of finding a working fluid which can produce low-cost electrical energy using a moderately-low temperature geothermal resource. Both boiling and supercritical shell-and-tube cycles were considered. The performance of a dual-boiling isobutane cycle supplied by a 280/sup 0/F hydrothermal resource (corresponding to the 5 MW pilot plant at the Raft River site in Idaho) was selected as a reference. To investigate the effect of resource temperature on the choice of working fluid, several analyses were conducted for a 360/sup 0/F hydrothermal resource, which is representative of the Heber resource in California. The hydrocarbon working fluids analyzed included methane, ethane, propane, isobutane, isopentane, hexane, heptane, and mixtures of those pure hydrocarbons. For comparison, two fluorocarbon refrigerants were also analyzed. These fluorocarbons, R-115 and R-22, were suggested as resulting in high values of net plant geofluid effectiveness (watt-hr/lbm geofluid) at the two resource temperatures chosen for the study. Preliminary estimates of relative heat exchanger size (product of overall heat transfer coefficient times heater surface area) were made for a number of the better performing cycles.

  9. Petroleum supply monthly, August 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-26

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  10. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.